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Sample records for non-operatively managed patients

  1. Recurrence of biliary disease following non-operative management in elderly patients.

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    Bergman, Simon; Al-Bader, Mohammed; Sourial, Nadia; Vedel, Isabelle; Hanna, Wael C; Bilek, Aaron J; Galatas, Christos; Marek, Jonah E; Fraser, Shannon A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the proportion of symptomatic recurrence following initial non-operative management of gallstone disease in the elderly and to test possible predictors. This is a single institution retrospective chart review of patients 65 years and older with an initial hospital visit (V1) for symptomatic gallstone disease, over a 4-year period. Patients with initial "non-operative" management were defined as those without surgery at V1 and without elective surgery at visit 2 (V2). Baseline characteristics included age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), diagnosis, and interventions (ERCP or cholecystostomy) at V1. Outcomes assessed over 1 year were as follows: recurrence (any ER/admission visit following V1), surgery, complications, and mortality. A survival analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model was performed to assess predictors of recurrence. There were 195 patients initially treated non-operatively at V1. Mean age was 78.3 ± 7.8 years, 45.6% were male, and the mean CCI was 2.1 ± 1.9. At V1, 54.4% had a diagnosis of biliary colic or cholecystitis, while 45.6% had a diagnosis of cholangitis, pancreatitis, or choledocholithiasis. 39.5% underwent ERCP or cholecystostomy. Excluding 10 patients who died at V1, 31.3% of patients had a recurrence over the study period. Among these, 43.5% had emergency surgery, 34.8% had complications, and 4.3% died. Median time to first recurrence was 2 months (range 6 days-4.8 months). Intervention at V1 was associated with a lower probability of recurrence (HR 0.3, CI [0.14-0.65]). One-third of elderly patients will develop a recurrence following non-operative management of symptomatic biliary disease. These recurrences are associated with significant rates of emergency surgery and morbidity. Percutaneous or endoscopic therapies may decrease the risk of recurrence.

  2. Case Report: Successful non-operative management of spontaneous splenic rupture in a patient with babesiosis

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    Tobler William D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Babesiosis is a zoonotic disease transmitted by the Ixodes tick species. Infection often results in sub-clinical manifestations; however, patients with this disease can become critically ill. Splenic rupture has been a previously reported complication of babesiosis, but treatment has always led to splenectomy. Asplenia places a patient at greater risk for overwhelming post-splenectomy infection from encapsulated bacteria, Lyme disease, Ehrlichia as well as Babesia microti. Therefore, avoiding splenectomy in these patients must be considered by the physician; particularly, if the patient is at risk for re-infection by living in an endemic area. Case Presentation A 54 year-old male from the northeast United States presented with left upper quadrant abdominal pain associated with fever, chills, night sweats and nausea. A full evaluation revealed active infection with Babesia microti and multiple splenic lacerations. This patient was successfully treated with appropriate pharmacological therapy and non-operative observation for the splenic injury. Conclusion Patients diagnosed with Babesia microti infection are becoming more common, especially in endemic areas. Although clinical manifestations are usually minimal, this infection can present with significant injuries leading to critical illness. We present the successful non-operative treatment of a patient with splenic rupture due to babesiosis infection.

  3. Case Report: Successful non-operative management of spontaneous splenic rupture in a patient with babesiosis.

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    Tobler, William D; Cotton, Deborah; Lepore, Timothy; Agarwal, Suresh; Mahoney, Eric J

    2011-01-20

    Babesiosis is a zoonotic disease transmitted by the Ixodes tick species. Infection often results in sub-clinical manifestations; however, patients with this disease can become critically ill. Splenic rupture has been a previously reported complication of babesiosis, but treatment has always led to splenectomy. Asplenia places a patient at greater risk for overwhelming post-splenectomy infection from encapsulated bacteria, Lyme disease, Ehrlichia as well as Babesia microti. Therefore, avoiding splenectomy in these patients must be considered by the physician; particularly, if the patient is at risk for re-infection by living in an endemic area. A 54 year-old male from the northeast United States presented with left upper quadrant abdominal pain associated with fever, chills, night sweats and nausea. A full evaluation revealed active infection with Babesia microti and multiple splenic lacerations. This patient was successfully treated with appropriate pharmacological therapy and non-operative observation for the splenic injury. Patients diagnosed with Babesia microti infection are becoming more common, especially in endemic areas. Although clinical manifestations are usually minimal, this infection can present with significant injuries leading to critical illness. We present the successful non-operative treatment of a patient with splenic rupture due to babesiosis infection.

  4. Clinical Factors Associated with the Non-Operative Airway Management of Patients with Robin Sequence

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    Frank P. Albino

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe indications for surgical airway management in patients with Robin sequence (RS and severe airway obstruction have not been well defined. While certain patients with RS clearly require surgical airway intervention and other patients just as clearly can be managed with conservative measures alone, a significant proportion of patients with RS present with a more confusing and ambiguous clinical course. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical features and objective findings of patients with RS whose airways were successfully managed without surgical intervention.MethodsThe authors retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of infants with RS evaluated for potential surgical airway management between 1994 and 2014. Patients who were successfully managed without surgical intervention were included. Patient demographics, nutritional and respiratory status, laboratory values, and polysomnography (PSG findings were recorded.ResultsThirty-two infants met the inclusion criteria. The average hospital stay was 16.8 days (range, 5–70 days. Oxygen desaturation (<70% by pulse oximetry occurred in the majority of patients and was managed with temporary oxygen supplementation by nasal cannula (59% or endotracheal intubation (31%. Seventy-five percent of patients required a temporary nasogastric tube for nutritional support, and a gastrostomy tube placed was placed in 9%. All patients continued to gain weight following the implementation of these conservative measures. PSG data (n=26 demonstrated mild to moderate obstruction, a mean apneahypopnea index (AHI of 19.2±5.3 events/hour, and an oxygen saturation level <90% during only 4% of the total sleep time.ConclusionsNonsurgical airway management was successful in patients who demonstrated consistent weight gain and mild to moderate obstruction on PSG, with a mean AHI of <20 events/hour.

  5. Non-operative management of adult blunt splenic injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; GAO Jin-mou; Jean-Claude Baste

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indication of nonoperative management of adult blunt splenic injuries.Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all adult patients (age > 15 years ) with blunt splenic injuries admitted to the department of vascular surgery of Pellegrin hospital in France from 1999 to 2003. We managed splenic injuries non-operatively in all appropriate patients without regard to age.Results: During the 4 years, 54 consecutive adult patients with blunt splenic injuries were treated in the hospital. A total of 27 patients with stable hemodynamic status were treated non-operatively at first, of which 2 patients were failed to non-operative treatment. The successful percentage of non-operative management was 92.6 %. In the 54 patients, 7 of 8 patients older than 55 years were treated with non-operative management. Two cases developing postoperatively subphrenic infection were healed by proper treatment. In the series, there was no death.Conclusions: Non-operative management of low-grade splenic injuries can be accomplished with an acceptable low-failure rate. If the clinical and laboratory parameters difficult for surgeons to make decisions, they can depend on Resciniti' s CT (computed tomography)scoring system to select a subset of adults with splenic trauma who are excellent candidates for a trial of nonoperative management. The patients older than 55 years are not absolutely inhibited to receive non-operative management.

  6. Patient profiling can identify patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) at risk for conversion from non-operative to surgical treatment: initial steps to reduce ineffective ASD management.

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    Passias, Peter G; Jalai, Cyrus M; Line, Breton G; Poorman, Gregory W; Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Burton, Douglas C; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Klineberg, Eric O; Hart, Robert A; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay

    2017-07-05

    Non-operative management is a common initial treatment for patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) despite reported superiority of surgery with regard to outcomes. Ineffective medical care is a large source of resource drain on the health system. Characterization of patients with ASD likely to elect for operative treatment from non-operative management may allow for more efficient patient counseling and cost savings. This study aimed to identify deformity and disability characteristics of patients with ASD who ultimately convert to operative treatment compared with those who remain non-operative and those who initially choose surgery. A retrospective review was carried out. A total of 510 patients with ASD (189 non-operative, 321 operative) with minimum 2-year follow-up comprised the patient sample. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short-Form 36 Health Assessment (SF-36), Scoliosis Research Society questionnaire (SRS-22r), and spinopelvic radiographic alignment were the outcome measures. Demographic, radiographic, and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) from a cohort of patients with ASD prospectively enrolled into a multicenter database were evaluated. Patients were divided into three treatment cohorts: Non-operative (NON=initial non-operative treatment and remained non-operative), Operative (OP=initial operative treatment), and Crossover (CROSS=initial non-operative treatment with subsequent conversion to operative treatment). NON and OP groups were propensity score-matched (PSM) to CROSS for baseline demographics (age, body mass index, Charlson Comorbidity Index). Time to crossover was divided into early (1 year). Outcome measures were compared across and within treatment groups at four time points (baseline, 6 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years). Following PSM, 118 patients were included (NON=39, OP=38, CROSS=41). Crossover rate was 21.7% (41/189). Mean time to crossover was 394 days. All groups had similar baseline sagittal alignment, but CROSS had larger

  7. Role of non-operative management in pediatric appendicitis.

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    Gonzalez, Dani O; Deans, Katherine J; Minneci, Peter C

    2016-08-01

    Appendectomy is currently considered the standard of care for children with acute appendicitis. Although commonly performed and considered a safe procedure, appendectomy is not without complications. Non-operative management has a role in the treatment of both uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. In uncomplicated appendicitis, initial non-operative management appears to be safe, with an approximate 1-year success rate of 75%. Compared to surgery, non-operative management is associated with less disability and lower costs, with no increase in the rate of complicated appendicitis. In patients with complicated appendicitis, initial non-operative management with interval appendectomy has been shown to be safe with reported success rates between 66% and 95%. Several studies suggest that initial non-operative management with interval appendectomy may be beneficial in patients with perforated appendicitis with a well-formed abscess or inflammatory mass. Recent data suggest that interval appendectomy may not be necessary after initial non-operative management of complicated appendicitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Liver Trauma: Operative and Non-operative Management

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    Moosa Zargar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The liver is the second most commonly injured organ in abdominal trauma, but liver damage is the most common cause of death after abdominal injury. Although urgent surgery continues to be the standard for hemodynamically compromised patients with hepatic trauma, there has been a paradigm shift in the management of patients who have stable hemodynamic. A marked change toward a more conservative approach in the treatment of abdominal trauma has been noted during the last decades. Modern treatment of liver trauma is increasingly non-operative.Purpose: To find the epidemiology, etiologies and managements of liver trauma in a population based study in Iran.Material and Method: A study including 16,287 trauma patients referred to the main hospitals of seven cities with different geographic patterns was done in Iran. Eighty-four patients with hepatic trauma during the 1-year period ending March 2000 included in this Cross-Sectional study. We determined the incidence, etiology and management of the patients suffering liver injury. Analysis was done using SPSS 18. Statistical significance was set at PResults: Out of 16287 trauma patients 84 (0.5% had hepatic trauma with male predominance 68(81%. The most type of trauma was blunt and the main cause was motor vehicle crashes. Thirty patients (35.7% managed non-operatively. There was no significant difference in hospital stay between patients operated and managed non-operatively. There was no mortality in the patients managed non-surgically.Conclusion: In this study hepatic trauma was in 3.7% of abdominal trauma patients. This study concluded non-operative management of hepatic injuries is associated with a low overall morbidity and does not result in increases in length of stay. Non-operative management is a safe approach for the patients of liver trauma with stable hemodynamic.

  9. [Non-operative management of splenic trauma].

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    Moog, R; Mefat, L; Kauffmann, I; Becmeur, F

    2005-02-01

    Non-operative management of splenic trauma is one of the most notable advances in paediatric surgery. It should be systematically proposed except for cases of hemodynamic instability. Abdominal CT scan without and with contrast injection is essential with initial optimal management. Stay in paediatric surgical intensive care unit with monitoring can prevent rare but serious complications. The time of hospitalisation stay lies between two and three weeks and will be followed by three months without contact activity. The advantages of this treatment are obvious safeguarding of splenic function and absence of postoperative complications. Consequently only one of the 88 children admitted these ten last past years for splenic trauma in our unity was operated.

  10. Non-operative outcomes in Chiari I malformation patients.

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    Killeen, Amy; Roguski, Marie; Chavez, Alexis; Heilman, Carl; Hwang, Steven

    2015-01-01

    While postoperative outcomes of Chiari I malformation patients have been well-reported, there is a paucity of literature concerning non-operative management in these patients. We retrospectively identified patients with Chiari I malformation who were not recommended for surgery based on lack of clinical objective findings or inconsistent cough headaches and conducted patient follow-up with a prospective telephone survey. Of the 68 patients (mean age at diagnosis 30.1 ± 17.4 years), 72% were female and 31% were pediatric patients (age at diagnosis ⩽ 18 years). Average follow up was 4.9 ± 2.9 years. Typical presenting symptoms included cough headache, non-specific headache, nausea, ataxia, dysphagia and paresthesias. Overall, 40% of patients who had cough headaches and 61.5% of patients with non-specific headaches reported improvement. The presence of subjective sensory symptoms was significantly associated with less likelihood of cough headache improvement while the presence of a cough headache was also associated with a lower likelihood of improvement in all non-cough symptoms. The pediatric subgroup had a greater rate of improvement with all cases of nausea/emesis and paresthesias improved or resolved at follow-up. Overall 67% of pediatric patients had improved cough headache and 71% had improvement of migraines/diffuse headaches. We found that many symptoms of Chiari I patients from our conservatively managed cohort either improved or remained unchanged over time. However, the presence of cough headaches was a significant negative predictor of concomitant symptom improvement. This further validates the view that patients with cough headaches should be considered for surgical intervention and provides useful information to counsel patients.

  11. Evolution of the treatment of splenic injuries: from surgery to non-operative management.

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    Petrone, Patrizio; Anduaga Peña, María Fernanda; Servide Staffolani, María José; Brathwaite, Collin; Axelrad, Alexander; Ceballos Esparragón, José

    2017-08-02

    The spleen is one of the most frequently injured organs in blunt abdominal trauma. In the past decades, the treatment of patients with blunt splenic injury has shifted from operative to non-operative management. The knowledge of physiology and immunology of the spleen have been the main reasons to develop techniques for splenic salvage. The advances in high-resolution imaging techniques, as well as less invasive procedures, including angiography and angioembolization, have allowed a higher rate of success in the non-operative management. Non-operative management has showed a decrease in overall mortality and morbidity. The aim of this article is to analyze the current management of splenic injury based on a literature review of the last 30 years, from we have identified 63,205 patients. This would enable the surgeons to provide the best care possible in every case. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Splenic injuries in children: The challenges of non operative management in a developing country

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    Osifo O

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This is to report the challenges and experience gained with non operative management of splenic injuries in a developing country where sophisticated imaging facilities are either not available or exorbitantly expensive. Materials and Methods: All patients who presented with splenic injury at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital between January, 2000 and December, 2006 were assessed and those who met the criteria were recruited for non operative management. Diagnosis of splenic injury was made by combining clinical assessment and ultrasound findings. Results: A total of 24 children with a mean age 12 ± 0.04 years and male/female ratio 1.7:1 were treated during the period. Road traffic accident, accounting for 50% of the cases was the major cause of trauma followed by falls from heights. Delay in presentation was a major concern as 62.5% of them were not referred until shock supervened. None of the patients could afford CT scan but ultrasound scan was able to confirm diagnosis in all. Basing decision on clinical parameters, non operative management was successfully done in 75% while 25% were operated as they could not meet the criteria. No mortality was recorded in the non operated group while one was recorded in those operated. The average length of hospitalization was two weeks. Conclusion: Non operative management of splenic injuries can be successfully done in a developing country using clinical parameters as a guide. The 75% of patients with splenic injury treated can be improved upon by health awareness campaign/improvement in government policy that will result in early presentation.

  13. Non-operative management of isolated liver trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Wen-Kui Yu; Xin-Bo Wang; Wu Ji; Jie-Shou Li; Ning Li

    2014-01-01

    Liver trauma is the most common abdominal emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Now, nonoperative management (NOM) is a selective method for liver trauma. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate, mortality and morbidity of NOM for isolated liver trauma. Medical records of 81 patients with isolated liver trauma in our unit were analyzed retrospectively. The success rate, mortality and morbidity of NOM were evaluated. In this series, 9 patients with grade IV-V liver injuries underwent emergent operation due to hemodynamic instability; 72 patients, 6 with grade V, 18 grade IV, 29 grade III, 15 grade II and 4 grade I, with hemodynamic stability received NOM. The overall success rate of NOM was 97.2% (70/72). The success rates of NOM in the patients with grade I-III, IV and V liver trauma were 100%, 94.4% and 83.3%. The complication rates were 10.0% and 45.5% in the patients who underwent NOM and surgical treatment, respectively. No patient with grade I-II liver trauma had complications. All patients who underwent NOM survived. NOM is the first option for the treatment of liver trauma if the patient is hemodynamically stable. The grade of liver injury and the volume of hemoperitoneum are not suitable criteria for selecting NOM. Hepatic angioembolization associated with the correction of hypothermia, coagulopathy and acidosis is important in the conservative treatment for liver trauma.

  14. The song remains the same although the instruments are changing: complications following selective non-operative management of blunt spleen trauma: a retrospective review of patients at a level I trauma centre from 1996 to 2007

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    Clancy Aisling A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a widespread shift to selective non-operative management (SNOM for blunt splenic trauma, there remains uncertainty regarding the role of adjuncts such as interventional radiological techniques, the need for follow-up imaging, and the incidence of long-term complications. We evaluated the success of SNOM (including splenic artery embolization, SAE for the management of blunt splenic injuries in severely injured patients. Methods Retrospective review (1996-2007 of the Alberta Trauma Registry and health records for blunt splenic trauma patients, aged 18 and older, with injury severity scores of 12 or greater, admitted to the Foothills Medical Centre. Results Among 538 eligible patients, 150 (26% underwent early operative intervention. The proportion of patients managed by SNOM rose from 50 to 78% over the study period, with an overall success rate of SNOM of 87%, while injury acuity remained unchanged over time. Among SNOM failures, 65% underwent surgery within 24 hours of admission. Splenic arterial embolization (SAE was used in only 7% of patients managed non-operatively, although at least 21% of failed SNOM had contrast extravasation potentially amenable to SAE. Among Calgary residents undergoing SNOM, hospital readmission within six months was required in three (2%, all of whom who required emergent intervention (splenectomy 2, SAE 1 and in whom none had post-discharge follow-up imaging. Overall, the use of post-discharge follow-up CT imaging was low following SNOM (10%, and thus no CT images identified occult hemorrhage or pseudoaneurysm. We observed seven cases of delayed splenic rupture in our population which occurred from five days to two months following initial injury. Three of these occurred in the post-discharge period requiring readmission and intervention. Conclusions SNOM was the initial treatment strategy for most patients with blunt splenic trauma with 13% requiring subsequent operative intervention

  15. The long-term functional outcome of type II odontoid fractures managed non-operatively.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Butler, J S

    2010-10-01

    Odontoid fractures currently account for 9-15% of all adult cervical spine fractures, with type II fractures accounting for the majority of these injuries. Despite recent advances in internal fixation techniques, the management of type II fractures still remains controversial with advocates still supporting non-rigid immobilization as the definitive treatment of these injuries. At the NSIU, over an 11-year period between 1 July 1996 and 30 June 2006, 66 patients (n = 66) were treated by external immobilization for type II odontoid fractures. The medical records, radiographs and CT scans of all patients identified were reviewed. Clinical follow-up evaluation was performed using the Cervical Spine Outcomes Questionnaire (CSOQ). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the long-term functional outcome of patients suffering isolated type II odontoid fractures managed non-operatively and to correlate patient age and device type with clinical and functional outcome. Of the 66 patients, there were 42 males and 24 females (M:F = 1.75:1) managed non-operatively for type II odontoid fractures. The mean follow-up time was 66 months. Advancing age was highly correlated with poorer long-term functional outcomes when assessing neck pain (r = 0.19, P = 0.1219), shoulder and arm pain (r = 0.41, P = 0.0007), physical symptoms (r = 0.25, P = 0.472), functional disability (r = 0.24, P = 0.0476) and psychological distress (r = 0.41, P = 0.0007). Patients >65 years displayed a higher rate of pseudoarthrosis (21.43 vs. 1.92%) and established non-union (7.14 vs. 0%) than patients <65 years. The non-operative management of type II odontoid fractures is an effective and satisfactory method of treating type II odontoid fractures, particularly those of a stable nature. However, patients of advancing age have been demonstrated to have significantly poorer functional outcomes in the long term. This may be linked to higher rates of non-union.

  16. Non-operative management of arterial liver hemorrhages

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    Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Vogel, J.; Sokiranski, R.; Brambs, H.J. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulm (Germany); Brado, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Huppert, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Siech, M.; Ganzauge, F.; Beger, H.G. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. of Ulm (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    A retrospective evaluation of embolotherapy in patients with arterial liver hemorrhages was carried out. Twenty-six patients, ranging in age from 10 days to 77 years with active arterial liver hemorrhages, underwent non-surgical embolotherapy. Bleeding was attributed to trauma (n = 21), tumor (n = 3), pancreatitis (n = 1), or unknown cause (n = 1). Twenty-nine embolizations were performed via a transfemoral (n = 26) or biliary (n = 2) approach. One bare Wallstent was placed into the common hepatic artery via to an axillary route to cover a false aneurysm due to pancreatitis. Treatment was controlled in 4 patients by cholangioscopy (n = 2) or by intravascular ultrasound (n = 2). Prior surgery had failed in 3 patients. Intervention controlled the hemorrhage in 24 of 26 (92 %) patients within 24 h. Embolotherapy failed in 1 patient with pancreatic carcinoma and occlusion of the portal vein. In 1 patient with an aneurysm of the hepatic artery treated by Wallstent insertion, total occlusion was not achieved in the following days, as demonstrated by CT and angiography. However, colour Doppler flow examination showed no flow in the aneurysm 6 months later. Complications were one liver abscess, treated successfully by percutaneous drainage for 10 days, and one gallbladder necrosis after superselective embolization of the cystic artery. Embolization is a effective tool with a low complication rate in the treatment of liver artery hemorrhage, even in patients in whom surgery has failed. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 26 refs.

  17. Factors predicting the outcome of non-operative management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.M. Maarouf

    c Department of Urology, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City, Cairo 11884, Egypt ... Subjects and methods: The data review included the patients' demographics, the mechanism of trauma ... Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. ... III–V) with the exception of cases with renal vascular pedicle injury.

  18. Splenic artery embolisation in the non-operative management of blunt splenic trauma in adults

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    Richard J. Cormack

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the splenic salvage rate with angioembolisation in the non-operative management (NOM of blunt splenic injury.Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients presenting to our Level I trauma centre with computed tomography (CT-confirmed splenic injury following blunt trauma and in whom angioembolisation was utilised in the algorithm of NOM. Data review included CT and angiography findings, embolisation technique and patient outcomes.Results: Between January 2005 and April 2010, 60 patients with splenic injury following blunt trauma underwent NOM, which included splenic artery embolisation (SAE. All patients included in the study required a preadmission. CT scan was used to document the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST grade of splenic injury. The average injury grade was 3.0. The non-operative splenic salvage rate following SAE was 96.7% with statistically similar salvage rates achieved for grades II to IV injuries. The quantity of haemoperitoneum and the presence of a splenic vascular injury did not significantly affect the splenic salvage rate. The overall complication rate was 27%, of which 15% were minor and 13% were major.Conclusion: SAE is a safe and effective treatment strategy in the NOM of blunt splenic injury. The quantity of haemoperitoneum, the presence of vascular injury and embolisation technique did not significantly affect the splenic salvage rate.

  19. Non-operative management of tube thoracostomy induced pulmonary artery injury.

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    Sundaramurthy, Senthilkumar R; Moshinsky, Randall A; Smith, Julian A

    2009-10-01

    Tube thoracostomy insertion is a common procedure in the management of air and fluid collections in the pleural space. Pulmonary artery injury is a rare but serious complication following intercostal catheterisation. This complication is usually managed surgically. We report a case of successful non-operative management of a pulmonary artery injury after tube thoracostomy.

  20. Predictors of successful non-operative management of grade III & IV blunt pancreatic trauma

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    Suman B Koganti

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Non-operative measures should be attempted in a select group of grade III&IV blunt pancreatic trauma. In hemodynamically stable patients with a controlled leak walled off as a pseudocyst without associated organ injuries and pancreatic necrosis, NOM has a higher success rate.

  1. Recommendations for research studies on treatment of idiopathic scoliosis: Consensus 2014 between SOSORT and SRS non-operative management committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Stefano; Hresko, Timothy M; O'Brien, Joseph P; Price, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The two main societies clinically dealing with idiopathic scoliosis are the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), founded in 1966, and the international Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT), started in 2004. Inside the SRS, the Non-Operative Management Committee (SRS-NOC) has the same clinical interest of SOSORT, that is the Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation (or Non-Operative, or conservative) Management of idiopathic scoliosis patients. The aim of this paper is to present the results of a Consensus among the best experts of non-operative treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis, as represented by SOSORT and SRS, on the recommendation for research studies on treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis. The goal of the consensus statement is to establish a framework for research with clearly delineated inclusion criteria, methodologies, and outcome measures so that future meta- analysis or comparative studies could occur. A Delphi method was used to generate a consensus to develop a set of recommendations for clinical studies on treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis. It included the development of a reference scheme, which was judged during two Delphi Rounds; after this first phase, it was decided to develop the recommendations and 4 other Delphi Rounds followed. The process finished with a Consensus Meeting, that was held during the SOSORT Meeting in Wiesbaden, 8-10 May 2014, moderated by the Presidents of SOSORT (JP O'Brien) and SRS (SD Glassman) and by the Chairs of the involved Committees (SOSORT Consensus Committee: S Negrini; SRS Non-Operative Committee: MT Hresko). The Boards of the SRS and SOSORT formally accepted the final recommendations. The 18 Recommendations focused: Research needs (3), Clinically significant outcomes (4), Radiographic outcomes (3), Other key outcomes (Quality of Life, adherence to treatment) (2), Standardization of methods of non-operative research (6).

  2. Outcome of non-operative management of femoral shaft fractures in children

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    Akinyoola A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femoral shaft fractures are common injuries in childhood. There is paucity of information on their presentation and outcome of the available treatment methods in the African population. This study evaluated the outcome of non-operative methods of treatment of femoral shaft fractures in our centre. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of the database of children aged 14 years and below with femoral shaft fractures treated non-operatively over a 10-year period. Results: A total of 134 patients with 138 fractures met the study criteria. This consisted of 71 boys (mean age = 6.1 years ± SD and 63 girls (mean age = 6.5 years ± SD. Pedestrian vehicular accident was the most common cause of femoral shaft fractures in the study population. The midshaft was the most common site of fractures. There were associated injuries to other parts of the body (especially head injury in 34.3% of the patients. The commonest mode of treatment was skin traction only (87.7%. The mean time to fracture union was 4.9 weeks ± SD (range = 3-15 weeks. The mean length of hospitalisation was 6.7 weeks ± SD (range = 5 days-11 weeks. There was a fairly strong positive correlation between the length of hospitalisation and the presence of associated injuries, especially head injury, upper limb fractures and bilaterality of the fractures. The mean total cost of treatment was #7685 (Naira or $51.2 (range = $14.2-$190. At the last follow up, 97.8% of the fractures united without significant angulation or shortening. Conclusion: The outcome of non-operative treatment of femoral shaft fractures in our setting is comparable to the results of other workers. Methods of treatment that shorten the length of hospitalisation without unduly increasing cost should be encouraged.

  3. A NON-OPERATIVE APPROACH TO THE MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC EXERTIONAL COMPARTMENT SYNDROME IN A TRIATHLETE: A CASE REPORT

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    Gilden, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Background & Purpose Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS) causes significant exercise related pain secondary to increased intra-compartmental pressure (ICP) in the lower extremities. CECS is most often treated with surgery with minimal information available on non-operative approaches to care. This case report presents a case of CECS successfully managed with physical therapy. Study Design Case report Case Description A 34-year-old competitive triathlete experienced bilateral anterior and posterior lower leg pain measured with a numerical pain rating scale of 7/10 at two miles of running. Pain decreased to resting levels of 4/10 two hours post exercise. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral CECS with left lower extremity ICP at rest measured at 36 mmHg (deep posterior), 36-38 mmHg (superficial posterior), and 25 mmHg (anterior). Surgery was recommended. Interventions The patient chose non-operative care and was treated with physical therapy using the Functional Manual Therapy approach aimed at addressing myofascial restrictions, neuromuscular function and motor control deficits throughout the lower quadrant for 23 visits over 3.5 months. Outcomes At discharge the patient had returned to running pain free and training for an Olympic distance triathlon. The Lower Extremity Functional Scale improved from 62 to 80. The patient reported minimal post exercise tightness in bilateral lower extremities. Left lower extremity compartment pressure measurements at rest were in normal ranges measuring at 11 mmHg (deep posterior), 8 mmHg (superficial posterior), 19 mmHg (anterior), and 10 mmHg (lateral). Three-years post intervention the patient remained pain free with a Global Rating of Change of 6. Discussion This case report describes the successful treatment of a triathlete with Functional Manual Therapy resulting in a return to competitive sports without pain. Level of Evidence Level 4 PMID:27999729

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative management for osteoarthritis of the knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Birmingham, Trevor B; Giffin, J Robert; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Feagan, Brian G; Litchfield, Robert; Willits, Kevin; Fowler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery in addition to non-operative treatments compared with non-operative treatments alone in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design, setting and participants We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a single-centre, randomised trial among patients with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (KL grade ≥2). Interventions Patients received arthroscopic debridement and partial resection of degenerative knee tissues in addition to optimised non-operative therapy, or optimised non-operative therapy only. Main outcome measures Direct and indirect costs were collected prospectively over the 2-year study period. The effectiveness outcomes were the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-effectiveness was estimated using the net benefit regression framework considering a range of willingness-to-pay values from the Canadian public payer and societal perspectives. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and conducted sensitivity analyses using the extremes of the 95% CIs surrounding mean differences in effect between groups. Results 168 patients were included. Patients allocated to arthroscopy received partial resection and debridement of degenerative meniscal tears (81%) and/or articular cartilage (97%). There were no significant differences between groups in use of non-operative treatments. The incremental net benefit was negative for all willingness-to-pay values. Uncertainty estimates suggest that even if willing to pay $400 000 to achieve a clinically important improvement in WOMAC score, or ≥$50 000 for an additional QALY, there is therapies only. Our sensitivity analysis suggests that even when assuming the largest treatment effect, the addition of arthroscopic surgery is not economically attractive compared with non-operative treatments only. Conclusions Arthroscopic debridement of degenerative articular cartilage and

  5. Knee Osteoarthritis: Use of investigations and non-operative management in the Australian primary care setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bopf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOsteoarthritis affects 15% of Australians or around 3.2 millionpeople. This figure will rise owing to the ageing of theAustralian population. Over 38000 knee arthroplasties areperformed each year in Australia. There are limited resourcesfor arthroplasty and ever increasing numbers of patients withosteoarthritis of the knee that will ultimately require one. It istherefore important to promptly diagnose the condition andutilise simple, efficacious management options to alleviatesuffering for patients and the overburdened health system.Evaluation of current investigations and management incomparison with published guidelines is the first step.MethodNinety-five patients with 100 symptomatic knees referredfrom their GP with a provisional diagnosis of osteoarthritis,were surveyed on the investigations and management theyhad received prior to presentation. The results were thencompared with accepted clinical guidelines.ResultsThere is a disparity between the clinical guidelines and theresults of the survey from clinical practice. 27.5% of patientshad not undertaken the gold standard weight bearingradiograph prior to presentation. 6% of patients did not havea plain radiograph at all. Simple efficacious treatmentswith high levels of evidence such as physiotherapy andweight loss had only been utilised in 41% and 58%respectively. 55% had used glucosamine which is notrecommended in the guidelines.ConclusionA better awareness of the rationale for investigations byGPs and improved communication between specialistsand GPs can prevent duplication of resources andminimise the costs of investigations. Increased awarenessof the efficacy of simple treatment modalities canincrease their utilisation. Streamlining of investigation andmanagement requires a multidisciplinary approach andboth patient and service provider education.

  6. Humeral shaft fractures: Retrospective results of non-operative and operative treatment of 186 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C. Mahabier (Kiran); L.M.M. Vogels (Lucas); B.J. Punt (Bas); G.R. Roukema (Gert); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Humeral shaft fractures account for 1-3% of all fractures and 20% of the fractures involving the humerus. The aim of the current study was to compare the outcome after operative and non-operative treatment of humeral shaft fractures, by comparing the time to radiological unio

  7. Current management options for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures: Non-operative, ORIF, minimally invasive reduction and fixation or primary ORIF and subtalar arthrodesis. A contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharr, P J; Mangupli, M M; Winson, I G; Buckley, R E

    2016-03-01

    Management of Displaced Intra-articular Calcaneal Fractures (DIACFs) continues to be technically demanding. The literature has not been definitive in its guidance for surgeons dealing with these injuries. Recent publications have further added to the lack of clarity. This review is intended to summarise the present state of knowledge, and provide some genuine guidance for clinicians. To review previous research, focussing on articles published within the last fifteen years, and summarise the findings to aid surgeons in managing DIACFs with choosing best management for patients. We reviewed the best evidence and literature, focussing on articles published within the last fifteen years, and summarised findings into workable recommendations. Variables of (1) patient, (2) the associated soft tissue injury and (3) the fracture characteristics were used to aid surgeons in choosing the best of the available options for each patient that presents with a DIACF. Management of DIACFs can best be divided into four broad categories: (i) non-operative management, (ii) open reduction and internal fixation, (iii) minimally invasive reduction and fixation, and (iv) primary subtalar arthrodesis. The evolution of the literature would suggest orthopaedic surgeons managing calcaneus fractures should have an expert's knowledge, surgical expertise and the latest techniques to cover these four options, to tailor the treatment of DIACFs to the individual patient. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Successful non-operative management of left atrioesophageal fistula following catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Morita, Hideki; Muramatsu, Kenichi; Sato, Akira; Nitta, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Atrioesophageal fistula (AEF) is a potentially lethal complication of catheter radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation. A 49-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who underwent catheter ablation around the pulmonary vein was admitted 31 days after the procedure, suffering seizures and fever. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed ischemia and multiple lesions of acute infarction in the right occipital lobe of the cerebrum. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed a small accumulation of air between the posterior left atrium and the esophagus, suggesting an AEF. Endoscopic snaring of the esophageal mucosa, repeated a few times, supported by nil by mouth and antibiotic therapy, resulted in improvement of his condition with no recurrence of symptoms. Subsequent chest CT scans confirmed disappearance of the leaked air and the patient was discharged home 45 days after admission with no neurological compromise.

  9. The long-term outcome of patients treated operatively and non-operatively for scoliosis deformity secondary to spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshbin, A; Vivas, L; Law, P W; Stephens, D; Davis, A M; Howard, A; Jarvis, J G; Wright, J G

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of adults with spina bifida cystica (SBC) who had been treated either operatively or non-operatively for scoliosis during childhood. We reviewed 45 patients with a SBC scoliosis (Cobb angle ≥ 50º) who had been treated at one of two children's hospitals between 1991 and 2007. Of these, 34 (75.6%) had been treated operatively and 11 (24.4%) non-operatively. After a mean follow-up of 14.1 years (standard deviation (sd) 4.3) clinical, radiological and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes were evaluated using the Spina Bifida Spine Questionnaire (SBSQ) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Although patients in the two groups were demographically similar, those who had undergone surgery had a larger mean Cobb angle (88.0º (sd 20.5; 50.0 to 122.0) ; : versus 65.7º (sd 22.0; 51.0 to 115.0); p < 0.01) and a larger mean clavicle-rib intersection difference (12.3 mm; (sd 8.5; 1 to 37); versus 4.1 mm, (sd 5.9; 0 to 16); p = 0.01) than those treated non-operatively. Both groups were statistically similar at follow-up with respect to walking capacity, neurological motor level, sitting balance and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes. Spinal fusion in SBC scoliosis corrects coronal deformity and stops progression of the curve but has no clear effect on HRQOL. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. A review of the anatomical, biomechanical and kinematic findings of posterior cruciate ligament injury with respect to non-operative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Ma, David; Scarvell, Jennifer M; Woods, Kevin R; Smith, Paul N

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the kinematics of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) deficiency is important for the diagnosis and management of patients with isolated PCL injury. The kinematics of PCL injury has been analysed through cadaveric and in vivo imaging studies. Cadaveric studies have detailed the anatomy of the PCL. It consists of two functional bundles, anterolateral and posteromedial, which exhibit different tensioning patterns through the arc of knee flexion. Isolated sectioning of the PCL and its related structures in cadaveric specimens has defined its primary and secondary restraining functions. The PCL is the primary restraint to posterior tibia translation above 30° and is a secondary restraint below 30° of knee flexion. Furthermore, sectioning of the PCL produces increased chondral deformation forces in the medial compartment as the knee flexes. However, the drawback of cadaveric studies is that they can not replicate the contribution of surrounding neuromuscular structures to joint stability that occurs in the clinical setting. To address this, there have been in vivo studies that have examined the kinematics of the PCL deficient knee using imaging modalities whilst subjects perform dynamic manoeuvres. These studies demonstrate significant posterior subluxation of the medial tibia as the knee flexes. The results of these experimental studies are in line with clinical consequences of PCL deficiency. In particular, arthroscopic evaluation of subjects with isolated PCL injuries demonstrate an increased incidence of chondral lesions in the medial compartment. Yet despite the altered kinematics with PCL injury only a minority of patients require surgery for persistent instability and the majority of athletes are able to return to sport following a period of non-operative rehabilitation. Specifically, non-operative management centres on a programme of quadriceps strengthening and hamstring inhibition to minimise posterior tibial load. The mechanism behind the

  11. 消化性溃疡穿孔非手术治疗指征的探讨%Indications of Non-Operative Management for Perforated Peptic Ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方育; 李非; 曹锋; 李昂; 张钰鹏; 刘东斌; 孙家邦; 王亚军

    2011-01-01

    Objective To discuss the indications of the non-operative management for perforated peptic ulcer.Methods Clinical data of 145 patients with perforated peptic ulcer, aged below 70 years old, with first attack and onset time<12 h , admitted to our hospital between January 2002 and December 2009, were analyzed respectively.Patients who were negative for fluid of abdominopelvic cavity in ultrasound examination and leakage in water-soluble contrast examination received non-operative management, otherwise underwent operation directly (If the patients were being on medication for the ulcer, they should also go directly to surgery).Non-operative patients were converted to operation if the symptom had not relieved during the first 12 h.When admitted , the APACHE Ⅱ score was calculated for all patients.Results Seventy-four and 71 patients underwent non-operative management and operation directly respectively.Sex, age, onset time, perforation site and so on were comparable between the two groups (P>0.05), while APACHE Ⅱ score over 8 was 25.7% and 76.1% respectively with significant difference (P=0.000).In non-operative group, 11 (14.9%) patients were converted to operation.The mortality (4.1% vs 9.8%, P=0.203), mobility (16.2% vs 25.3%, P=0.175), hospital stay [(11.4±2.5) d vs (11.3±1.3) d,P=0.447], and cost [(11 657.3±2 826.4) yuan vs (10 013.0± 1 877.4) yuan, P=0.212]between two groups had also no significant difference.The mean APACHE Ⅱ score was significant different between the survivors and the dead (9.3 vs 20.2, P=0.000).APACHE Ⅱ score was positively related to mortality and morbility (r=0.98,P=0.000; r= 0.52, P= 0.000).Conclusions Non-operative management is a safe and effective way in selected patients with perforated peptic ulcer, such as APACHE Ⅱ score ≤8, negative for fluid of abdominopelvic cavity in ultrasound examination, and leakage in water-soluble contrast examination.APACHE Ⅱ score is an important factor in prognosis of

  12. The role of induction chemotherapy before radiation therapy in non-operative management of stage III NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M R

    1994-11-01

    Radiation therapy alone has been 'standard' management of patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer for several decades. Palliative benefits are routinely achieved but significant survival benefits have not been documented. Patterns of failure in Stage III patients emphasize the need to pursue better treatment for both local macroscopic disease and distant micrometastatic sites. Improved control in both areas will be necessary to meaningfully enhance outcome for the universe of Stage III NSCLC patients. Several randomized trials show a significant survival benefit when cisplatin-containing induction chemotherapy is administered prior to locoregional treatment. In the favorable subset of Stage III patients selected for study by CALGB, the surviving fraction at 2-5 years post-therapy was > or = 2-fold larger in the chemoradiation group than in the cohort treated with radiation alone. The French trial documented a significant decrease in distant metastases rate among the chemotherapy treated patients. In all the trials where patterns of failure are discussed, local disease persistence is the overwhelming rule. Future trials must evaluate improved induction chemotherapy approaches. Stage III patients are an ethical population in which to test induction therapy with new drug combinations randomized against already 'active' regimens for comparative efficacy. End points would be initial response rates, patterns of failure, and overall survival. The feasibility of high-dose chemotherapy regimens with growth factor and hematopoietic support followed by aggressive radiation must be tested. If feasible, trials randomizing high dose versus conventional dose induction programs within the context of sequential multimodality therapy should follow. Intensified radiation approaches such as hyperfractionation or CHART should be paired with active concurrent chemotherapy following induction chemotherapy alone. Pursuit of these approaches over the next several years will

  13. Non-operative management of a complete anterior cruciate ligament injury in an English Premier League football player with return to play in less than 8 weeks: applying common sense in the absence of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Richard; Monte-Colombo, Mathew; Mitchell, Adam; Haddad, Fares

    2015-04-26

    This case report illustrates and discusses the non-operative management of a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in an English Premier League football player, his return to play within 8 weeks and problem-free follow-up at 18 months post injury. When non-operative verses surgical ACL reconstruction is considered there are many fundamental gaps in our knowledge and currently, at elite level, there are no cases in cutting sports within the literature to guide these decisions. When the norm is for all professional footballers to be recommended surgery, it will be very challenging when circumstances and patient autonomy dictate a conservative approach, where prognosis, end points and risk are unclear and assumed to be high. This case challenges current dogma and provides a starting point for much needed debate about best practice, treatment options, research direction and not just at the elite level of sport.

  14. Pan-regional (cervico-thoraco-lumbo-sacral spinal epidural abscess with multi-level discitis, vertebral body osteomyelitis and facet joint septic arthritis: complete resolution with non-operative management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appukutty Manickam, MRCS

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Even pan-regional CTLS SEA with multi-level discitis, vertebral body osteomyelitis and facet joint septic arthritis can be managed non-operatively. A complete clinical and radiological resolution can be achieved with antibiotics alone.

  15. Outcome Study of Non-operative Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis in Middle-aged Patients With Reference to the Body Mass Index—A Randomised Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheong Peng Meng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available From the year 2006 to 2008, 69 patients of symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knees were divided randomly and entered into three non-operative treatment protocols. It included 4 weeks of pharmacological treatment followed by 4 weeks of specific treatments (physiotherapy, acupuncture, and combined. The pretreatment and post-treatment physical and functional statuses were evaluated. Their body mass index (BMI was measured. The patients with below-normal BMI did not benefit from all the three treatment protocols. However, all other groups of increased BMI did benefit from all three treatment protocols in terms of pain score, analgesic sparing, and knee scores.

  16. Assessment of splanchnic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis after splenectomy in comparison with non-operated patients at the decompensated stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алий Саитович Тугушев

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Splenectomy in patients with cirrhosis presupposes an increase of blood inflow into portal system to decrease the portal pressure. At the same time there are different opinions about splenectomy. So it is actual to study the character of changes of blood flow in vessels of abdominal cavity in pre- and postsurgical periods and assessment of an influence of these changes on the clinical course of cirrhosis.Aim of research: To assess an influence of splenectomy on the character of changes of splanchnic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis comparing to non-operated patients with compensated and decompensated clinical course.Materials and methods: There were examined 190 patients with cirrhosis: gastrointestinal bleeding from oesophagus varicose veins took place in 133 patients, diuretic resistant ascites – in 57 ones. 19 patients underwent splenectomy: 7 – in association with sewing of the left gastric vein and artery, 6 – with “skeletonization” of the lesser curvature of stomach with Nessen’s operation, 2 – with Patsiora’s operation, 2 – with application of selective porto-caval shunt between the low mesenteric vein and the left vein of an ovary. 84 patients died during observation. The duration of observation was from 0.5 to 3.5 years. All patients underwent fibrogastroscopy every 3–4 month. Hemodynamics was assessed on the base of repeated ultrasound of abdominal cavity. There were assessed diameter of hepatic and splenic vessels; qualitative and quantitative characteristics of blood flow in hepatic and splenic arteries, portal and splenic veins.Results of research: Changes of hemodynamics in patients after splenectomy as opposed to non-operative patients are characterized with the decrease of diameter of portal vein at almost stable speed of the linear blood flow in it. The result is some decrease of the volume of portal blood and index of portal blood congestion that indirectly indicates the decrease of portal pressure

  17. Clinical outcome of percutaneous RF-ablation of non-operable patients with liver metastasis from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Parner, Vibeke Kirk; Tuxen, Malgorzata K.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite improved anti-neoplastic treatment the prognosis for patients with liver metastases from metastatic breast cancer remains poor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-two consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) at the Department of Onc...

  18. High prevalence of severe coronary artery disease in elderly patients with non-operable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension referred for balloon pulmonary angioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Roik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA is a new emerging catheter-based alternative treatment option for patients with inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH. Aim : To show that all elderly CTEPH patients referred for BPA are at higher risk of obstructive coronary artery disease and that, in daily practice, they should undergo invasive coronary angiography. Material and methods : Eleven patients at the age of at least 65 years (6 males, 5 females, 77.2 ±5.9 years with confirmed non-operable type II or type III CTEPH, considered for BPA, underwent elective coronary angiography. Severe obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD was diagnosed when stenosis of left main coronary artery ≥ 50% or stenosis of ≥ 70% of epicardial arteries was angiographically confirmed. We also screened for CAD consecutive age- and sex-matched 114 PE survivors (52 males, 62 females, 74.8 ±7.2 years with excluded CTEPH. Results : Severe CAD was more frequent in elderly patients with non-operable type II or type III CTEPH candidates for BPA than in elderly acute PE survivors with excluded CTEPH (54.5% vs. 16.7%, p < 0.01, and therefore elderly CTEPH patients referred for BPA were at higher risk of CAD (OR = 5.9, 95% CI: 1.64–21.46, p = 0.007 when compared to elderly survivors after acute PE with excluded CTEPH. Conclusions : All elderly CTEPH patients referred for BPA are at higher risk of severe CAD and should routinely undergo invasive coronary angiography before BPA.

  19. Acute uncomplicated appendicitis study: rationale and protocol for a multicentre, prospective randomised controlled non-inferiority study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of non-operative management in children with acute uncomplicated appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jane; Liu, Yingrui Cyril; Adams, Susan; Karpelowsky, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This article presents an overview of a prospective randomised controlled non-inferiority study designed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of non-operative management (NOM) with operative management in children with acute uncomplicated appendicitis (AUA). Here, we present the study protocol for this APRES study, a multicentre Australian study. The rationale and details of future analysis, in particular, non-inferiority calculations, cost-effectiveness, feasibility and acceptability of each intervention. Design A multicentre, prospective randomised controlled clinical trial, conducted in 2 Australian tertiary paediatric hospitals. Participants Children who meet the inclusion criteria of an age between 5 and 15 years and a clinical diagnosis of AUA will be invited to participate, and after consent will be randomised via a computer-based program into treatment groups. The study started in June 2016, and the target recruitment is 220 patients. Interventions Children in the control group will be treated with prophylactic antibiotics and appendicectomy, and those in the intervention group will be treated with antibiotic therapy alone. Primary outcome measures include unplanned or unnecessary operation and complications at 30 days. Secondary outcomes include longer term complications within 1 year, length of stay, time off work and school analgesic requirements and cost. Analysis Data analyses will be on the intention-to-treat principle using non-inferiority analysis. Analysis will include the Pearson χ2 test for categorical variables and independent sample t-test or Mann-Whitney test for continuous variables. Non-inferiority for NOM will be tested using 1-sided Wald tests with an α level of 0.05. Ethics and dissemination The research has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Sydney Children's Hospital Network. In addition, results will be reported through academic journals, seminars and conference presentations. Trial

  20. Benefits of Either Operative or Non-Operative Treatment for Perilunate Dislocation and Fracture Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rivlin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor We read the article by Bagheri et al with great interest (1. We found the study interesting and comprehensive as four groups of patients, including operative and nonoperative in either pure dislocation or fracture dislocation, were compared in terms of Mayo wrist score, Grip strength, range of motion and radiographic parameters. It seems that the results were comparable to studies by Capo, Chou, Laporte, Malovic, Kremer, Forli and Lutz (Table 1 (2-8. In the studies listed above, all the patients were treated by operative fixation and none of them reported any experience with non-operative treatment (2-8. Their operative results are almost similar to Bagheri’s operative results in which they demonstrated better outcomes in terms of motion and Mayo score than the non-operative counterpart. In the current study by Bagheri et al, non-operative treatment is also discussed, which has little literature support so far (1. We wonder what the indications were leading the patient and the surgeon electing nonoperative treatment versus operative intervention. Since the outcomes of non-operative care were comparable to the operative outcomes, weighing the benefits of non surgical management may be an area of further investigation.The authors didn’t describe the operative intervention in detail making comparisons with outer studies difficult. Therefore, we note the need to compare different operative techniques in the literature to figure out which provide the most optimal outcomes and expedite patients’ rehabilitation.

  1. The NOTA study: non-operative treatment for acute appendicitis: prospective study on the efficacy and safety of antibiotic treatment (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid) in patients with right sided lower abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Eleonora; Biscardi, Andrea; Villani, Silvia; Clemente, Nicola; Senatore, Gianluca; Filicori, Filippo; Antonacci, Nicola; Baldoni, Franco; De Werra, Carlo; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2011-01-01

    Background Case control studies that randomly assign patients with diagnosis of acute appendicitis to either surgical or non-surgical treatment yield a relapse rate of approximately 14% at one year. It would be useful to know the relapse rate of patients who have, instead, been selected for a given treatment based on a thorough clinical evaluation, including physical examination and laboratory results (Alvarado Score) as well as radiological exams if needed or deemed helpful. If this clinical evaluation is useful, the investigators would expect patient selection to be better than chance, and relapse rate to be lower than 14%. Once the investigators have established the utility of this evaluation, the investigators can begin to identify those components that have predictive value (such as blood analysis, or US/CT findings). This is the first step toward developing an accurate diagnostic-therapeutic algorithm which will avoid risks and costs of needless surgery. Methods/design This will be a single-cohort prospective observational study. It will not interfere with the usual pathway, consisting of clinical examination in the Emergency Department (ED) and execution of the following exams at the physician's discretion: full blood count with differential, C reactive protein, abdominal ultrasound, abdominal CT. Patients admitted to an ED with lower abdominal pain and suspicion of acute appendicitis and not needing immediate surgery, are requested by informed consent to undergo observation and non operative treatment with antibiotic therapy (Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid). The patients by protocol should not have received any previous antibiotic treatment during the same clinical episode. Patients not undergoing surgery will be physically examined 5 days later. Further follow-up will be conducted at 7, 15 days, 6 months and 12 months. The study will conform to clinical practice guidelines and will follow the recommendations of the Declaration of Helsinki. The protocol

  2. Traumatic First Time Shoulder Dislocation: Surgery vs Non-Operative Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Polyzois

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Management of first shoulder dislocation following reduction remains controversial. The two main options are immobilisation and arthroscopic stabilisation. The aim of this article is to highlight some of the issues that influence decision making when discussing management options with these patients, including natural history of the first time dislocation, outcomes of surgery and non-operative management particularly on the risk of future osteoarthritis (OA, the effects of delaying surgery and the optimal method of immobilisation. Extensive literature review was performed looking for previous publication addressing 4 points. i Natural history of primary shoulder dislocation ii Effect of surgical intervention on natural history iii Risk of long term osteoarthritis with and without surgical intervention iv Immobilisation techniques post reduction. Individuals younger than 25 years old are likely to re-dislocate with non-operative management. Surgery reduces risk of recurrent instability. Patients with recurrent instability appear to be at a higher risk of OA. Those who have surgical stabilisation do not appear to be at a higher risk than those who dislocate just once, but are less likely to develop OA than those with recurrent instability. Delaying surgery makes the stabilisation more demanding due to elongation of capsule, progressive labro-ligamentous injury, prevalence and severity of glenoid bone loss. Recent studies have failed to match the preliminary outcomes associated with external rotation braces. Defining the best timing and type of treatment remains a challenge and should be tailored to each individual’s age, occupation and degree of physical activity.

  3. Patient management in dermoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl Kılınç Karaarslan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering the work load in daily practice, it’s necessary to establish a cost-effective approach in the dermoscopic evaluation for early diagnose of melanoma, which is the primary goal of dermoscopy. In this article, the basic characteristics of “patient management strategy in dermoscopy”, which are necessary for such an approach, are discussed.

  4. A rare case of splenic pseudoaneurysm in pediatric splenic blunt trauma patient: Review of diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Chen Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Discussion & conclusion: Questions still remain regarding the timing of repeat imaging for diagnosis of SPA following non-operative blunt splenic trauma, which patients should be imaged, and how to manage SPA upon diagnosis. More clinical study and basic science research is warranted to study the disease process of SPA in pediatric patient. We believe that our proposed management algorithm timely detect formation of delayed SPA formation and addresses the possible fatal disease course of pediatric SPA.

  5. [Management of splenectomized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, J P; Vallet, B; Caiazzo, R; Zerbib, P

    2003-09-06

    PARTIAL SPLENECTOMY: Partial resection is possible in certain indications for splenectomy. Partial splenectomy is the best way to prevent postsplenectomy infections, even though vaccination and antibiotic prophylaxis must be prescribed. This association is also necessary when the patient undergoes an autograft to reimplant splenic tissue or develops splenosis, i.e. fortuitous autotransplantation of splenic parenchyma. GUIDELINES FOR PLANNED SPLENECTOMY: Prophylactic vaccination should be performed 15 days, or 6 weeks, before surgery. Antibiotic prophylaxis includes a preoperative injection of cefazolin followed by intravenous amoxicillin, then Oracilline (Penicilline V) with resumption of oral intake. SURGICAL ASPECTS: Indications for laparoscopic surgery have broadened, laparotomy being reserved for the most difficult cases. Special care is recommended concerning complications, particularly respiratory disorders (pleural effusion, atelectasia) and acute pancreatitis.

  6. Non-operative Management of Gallbladder Perforation After Blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-07

    REPORt. cASE. [Downloaded free from http://www.jstcr.org on Monday, October 07, 2013, IP: 41.135.175.93] || Click here to download free Android application for this journal .... Click on. View as eBook. [Downloaded free from ...

  7. Patient blood management equals patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharowski, Kai; Spahn, Donat R

    2016-06-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) can be defined in many ways and may consist of hundreds of single measures to improve patient safety. Traditionally, PBM is based on three pillars and defined as (i) optimization of the endogenous red blood cell (RBC) mass through the targeted stimulation of erythropoiesis and the treatment of modifiable underlying disorders; (ii) minimization of diagnostic, interventional, and surgical blood loss to preserve the patient's RBC mass; and (iii) optimization of the patient-specific tolerance to anemia through strict adherence to physiological transfusion thresholds [1-4]. However, for this review, we have chosen the following three peri-interventional parts: (1) diagnosis and therapy of anemia, (2) optimal hemotherapy, and (3) minimization of hospital-acquired anemia. PBM is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary preventive, and therapeutic approach focusing each patient. The PBM concept involves the use of safe and effective medical and surgical methods and techniques designed to prevent peri-interventional anemia, rationalize use of blood products, and set good blood management measures in an effort to improve patient safety and outcome.

  8. Management of colonic volvulus: Experience in 75 patients Manejo del vólvulo de colon: Experiencia en 75 pacientes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background: the diagnostic and therapeutic management of colonic volvulus remains nowadays controversial. The election of the type of surgery, its timing, or the use of non-operative decompression must be based on the experience of a multidisciplinary team, the clinical condition of the patient, and the type of volvulus. Objectives: the purpose of this study is to review our experience and results in the treatment of patients with colonic volvulus. Material and methods: we performed a retrosp...

  9. Patient Blood Management in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, M T; Pendry, K; Georgsen, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patient Blood Management (PBM) in Europe is a working group of the European Blood Alliance with the initial objective to identify the starting position of the participating hospitals regarding PBM for benchmarking purposes, and to derive good practices in PBM from...

  10. [Perioperative Management of PD Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Both patients and caregivers but also treating physicians are concerned about complications along with surgical interventions. A major problem is abrupt cessation of anti-Parkinson medication, which leads to manifold disturbances, sometimes even to an akinetic crisis. There are several means to guarantee continuous dopaminergic stimulation even in patients that are not allowed to take medication orally before they undergo surgery. Amongst others rectally applied levodopa, amantadine infusions, and especially the use of a rotigotine patch are good means to overcome oral intake. Perioperative management is important due to the fact that in Germany alone each year more than 10 000 PD patients undergo surgery. Main reasons for this are fractures, but also elective interventions. Further emergency situations that cause treatment as an inpatient are psychosis, motoric disability, but also pneumonia and cardiovascular disturbances. In contrast PD patients suffer less often from cancer. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. The role of non-operating income in community benefit provision by not-for-profit hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Reiter, Kristin L

    2013-01-01

    Not-for-profit hospitals are under increased public scrutiny for providing what some view as insufficient levels of community benefit compared to their tax-exempt benefits. One potential driver of community benefit is financial surplus, which arises from both patient care (operating) activities and non-patient care (non-operating) activities. This study addresses the effect of hospitals' non-operating income on not-for-profit hospitals' provision of community benefit. The study sample includes 217 unique not-for-profit, non-governmental, general, acute care hospitals in California between 1997 and 2010 that filed annual reports with the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD). We model the effect of hospitals' operating and non-operating incomes on hospitals' community benefit, controlling for observable hospital characteristics such as scale and system membership, local competition, time trends, and hospital fixed effects. Our results indicate that non-operating income has no effect on levels of community benefit provided by not-for-profit hospitals. This finding suggests that not-for-profit hospitals budget for uncompensated care at levels that are prioritized over other potential investments if non-operating income falls, but remain fixed if non-operating income rises.

  12. 术中非手术区迟发性颅内血肿致急性脑膨出的高危因素及抢救体会40例%The high risk factors and emergency treatments to the patients with in-traoperative acute encephalocele caused by delayed intracranial hematomas at non operating region:An investigate of 40 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵刚; 刘帅; 李俊; 王宇; 孙继程; 张义; 王铂

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨术中非手术区迟发性颅内血肿致急性脑膨出患者的临床高危因素及抢救经验。方法对2000年1月~2013年12月40例术中非手术区迟发性颅内血肿致急性脑膨出患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析,总结其高危因素及抢救经验。结果对冲伤22例。术前合并广泛脑挫裂伤14例,合并颅骨骨折16例,合并颅内小血肿(<15 mL)10例。致急性脑膨出的颅内血肿中对侧32例,其中硬膜外血肿24例。再手术32例,存活16例,总死亡率60%。结论术中非手术区迟发性颅内血肿致急性脑膨出高危因素为广泛脑挫裂伤、对侧颅骨骨折、非手术区的颅内小血肿。掌握其临床高危因素,有足够的预见性,充分的术前准备,正确的术中处理,术后科学系统的综合治疗才能最大限度地挽救患者生命。%Objective To investigate the high risk factors and emergency treatments to the patients with intraoperative acute encephalocele caused by delayed intracranial hematomas at non operating region. Methods The clinical data of 40 patients with intraoperative acute encephalocele caused by delayed intracranial hematomas at non operating region from January 2000 to December 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Summarized the high risk factors and emergency treatments in this case. Results The 22 cases with contrecoup injury. 14 cases with extensive contusion of brain,16 cases with skull fracture and 10 cases with small intracranial hematoma (Volume <15mL).The delayed intracranial hematomas to the acute encephalocele include,32 cases at the offside. And 24 cases with epidural hematoma. 32 cases had to undergo reoperation, survived 16 cases. The total death rate was 60%. Conclusion The high risk factors are ex-tensive contusion of brain, offside skull fracture and the delayed intracranial hematomas at non operating region. Under-standing Its high risk factors in clinical, with much more foreseeability, and

  13. Non-operative treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wever Jan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical characteristics and complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration are well known. Gastro-intestinal involvement has also been recognised in these patients. However an acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer has not been documented up to now. Case presentation A 26-year-old male with Duchenne muscular dystrophy with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer is treated non-operatively with naso-gastric suction and intravenous medication. Gastrointestinal involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and therapeutic considerations in a high risk patient are discussed. Conclusion Non-surgical treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer should be considered in high risk patients, as is the case in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Patients must be carefully observed and operated on if non-operative treatment is unsuccessful.

  14. A System-Wide Approach to Physician Efficiency and Utilization Rates for Non-Operating Room Anesthesia Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Mitchell H; Huynh, Tinh T; Breidenstein, Max W; O'Donnell, Stephen E; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Urman, Richard D

    2017-07-01

    There has been little in the development or application of operating room (OR) management metrics to non-operating room anesthesia (NORA) sites. This is in contrast to the well-developed management framework for the OR management. We hypothesized that by adopting the concept of physician efficiency, we could determine the applicability of this clinical productivity benchmark for physicians providing services for NORA cases at a tertiary care center. We conducted a retrospective data analysis of NORA sites at an academic, rural hospital, including both adult and pediatric patients. Using the time stamps from WiseOR® (Palo Alto, CA), we calculated site utilization and physician efficiency for each day. We defined scheduling efficiency (SE) as the number of staffed anesthesiologists divided by the number of staffed sites and stratified the data into three categories (SE 1). The mean physician efficiency was 0.293 (95% CI, [0.281, 0.305]), and the mean site utilization was 0.328 (95% CI, [0.314, 0.343]). When days were stratified by scheduling efficiency (SE 1), we found differences between physician efficiency and site utilization. On days where scheduling efficiency was less than 1, that is, there are more sites than physicians, mean physician efficiency (95% CI, [0.326, 0.402]) was higher than mean site utilization (95% CI, [0.250, 0.296]). We demonstrate that scheduling efficiency vis-à-vis physician efficiency as an OR management metric diverge when anesthesiologists travel between NORA sites. When the opportunity to scale operational efficiencies is limited, increasing scheduling efficiency by incorporating different NORA sites into a "block" allocation on any given day may be the only suitable tactical alternative.

  15. Operative versus non-operative treatment in complex proximal humeral fractures: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lin; Ding, Fan; Zhao, Zhigang; Chen, Yan; Xing, Danmou

    2015-01-01

    Whether operative treatment for complex proximal humeral fractures (CPHFs) has a greater benefit over non-operative treatment remains controversial. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment in elderly patients with CPHFs. This updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) aims to investigate whether operative treatment is superior to non-operative treatment in CPHFs. The authors searched RCTs in the electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Embase, Springer Link, Web of Knowledge, OVID and Google Scholar) from their establishment to July 2015. Researches on operative and non-operative treatment for CPHFs were selected in this meta-analysis. The quality of all studies was assessed and effective data was pooled for this meta-analysis. Outcome measurements were functional status include constant scores (CS scores) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand scores (DASH scores), total complication rates and healthy-related quality of life. The meta-analysis was performed with software revman 5.3. Nine articles with a total 518 patients (average age 70.93) met inclusion criteria. Patients were followed up for at least 1 year in all the studies. No statistical differences were found between operative and non-operative treatment in CS scores at 12 mo (months) [MD 1.06 95 % CI (-3.51, 5.62)] and 24 mo [MD -0.61 95 % CI (-5.87, 4.65)]. There are also no statistical differences between operative and non-operative treatment in DASH scores at 12 mo [MD -4.51 95 % CI (-13.49, 4.47)] and 24 mo [MD -7.43 95 % CI (-16.14, 1.27)]. Statistical differences were found between operative and non-operative treatment in total complication rates [RR 1.55, 95 % CI (1.24, 1.94)]. Statistical differences in EQ-5D at 24 mo [MD 0.15, 95 % CI (0.05, 0.24)] were found between operative and non-operative treatment but no statistical differences were found in ED-5D at 12 mo [MD 0.08, 95 % CI (-0.01, 0.17)], 15D at

  16. PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Amirdzhanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the joint management of rheumatoid arthritis patients needing endoprosthetic replacement of the large joints of the lower extremities by rheumatologists and orthopedic traumatologists.Due to the fact that there are no conventional standards or guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with rheumatic diseases, adopted by international rheumatology associations, the authors generalize their experience in managing the patients in terms of international approaches and guidelines from different countries. The medical assessment and reduction of cardiovascular risks, the prevention of infectious complications, hemorrhages, and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis, and the specific features of management of patients with osteoporosis are under consideration. The authors' experience in managing the patients receiving antirheumatic therapy with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, sulfasalazine, and hydroxychloroquine, is detailed. Recommendations for managing patients taking glucocorticoids and biologic agents (tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, anti-B-cell therapy, and interleukin-6 receptor inhibitors in the preoperative andpostoperative periods are given.

  17. Self-management in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak SN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Swetha Narahari Pathak,1 Pauline L Scott,1 Cameron West,1 Steven R Feldman,1–3 1Center for Dermatology Research, Departments of Dermatology, 2Center for Dermatology Research, Departments of Pathology, 3Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder effecting the skin and joints. Additionally, multiple comorbidities exist, including cardiovascular, metabolic, and psychiatric. The chronic nature of psoriasis is often frustrating for both patients and physicians alike. Many options for treatment exist, though successful disease management rests largely on patients through the application of topical corticosteroids, Vitamin D analogs, and calcineurin inhibitors, amongst others and the administration of systemic medications such as biologics and methotrexate. Phototherapy is another option that also requires active participation from the patient. Many barriers to effective self-management of psoriasis exist. Successful treatment requires the establishment of a strong doctor-patient relationship and patient empowerment in order to maximize adherence to a treatment regimen and improve outcomes. Improving patient adherence to treatment is necessary in effective self-management. Many tools exist to educate and empower patients, including online sources such as the National Psoriasis Foundation and online support group, Talk Psoriasis, amongst others. Effective self management is critical in decreasing the physical burden of psoriasis and mitigating its multiple physical, psychological, and social comorbidities, which include obesity, cardiovascular disease, alcohol dependence, depression, anxiety, and social anxiety. Keywords: psoriasis, adherence, self management, compliance

  18. 对非手术食管癌患者同步放化疗期间体重指数干预效果的研究%Investigation of the effect on weight index intervention for non-operative esophageal carcinoma patients with synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜平; 马艳会

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨对非手术食管癌同步放化疗患者体重指数干预的方法及效果。方法选取100例给予体重指数干预的非手术食管癌同步放化疗患者为观察组,选取100例给予常规饮食护理的非手术食管癌同步放化疗患者为对照组。比较两组患者放疗前后的相关营养学指标以及不良反应。结果观察组放疗前的体重指数、血红蛋白、血清白蛋白、白细胞变化差异无统计学意义( P>0.05)。观察组放疗后的体重指数、上臂肌围大于对照组,血清白蛋白、血红蛋白、高于对照组,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。观察组的血液系统、胃肠道反应以及放射性食管炎不良反应轻于对照组,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论体重指数干预能够提高非手术食管癌同步放化疗患者的营养水平,减轻毒副反应,值得推广。%Objective To investigate the method and effect on weight index intervention for non-operative e-sophageal carcinoma patients with synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy.Methods A total of 100 cases of esoph-ageal carcinoma patients with synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy by weight index intervention were selected as the observation group, another 100 cases by routine nursing were selected as the control group.The nutritional indicators and adverse reactions of the two groups before and after radiotherapy were compared.Results The changes of body mass index, hemoglobin, serum albumin, and white blood cell in observation group had no statistical significance in pre-treat-ment period ( P>0.05) .The body mass index and the circumference of the upper arm in observation group were higher than those of the control group, and serum albumin and hemoglobin were higher than those of the control group ( P>0.05) .The blood system, gastrointestinal reaction and adverse reactions in observation group were less than those of the control group ( P>0.05 ) .Conclusion

  19. MANAGEMENT OF SPLENIC INJURY AFTER BLUNT INJURY TO ABDOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bharath Prakash Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The spleen is an important organ in the body’s immune system. It is the most frequently injured organ in blunt abdominal trauma. 1 Over the past several decades, diagnosis and management of splenic trauma has been evolved. The conservative, operative approach has been challenged by several reports of successful non-operative management aided by the power of modern diagnostic imaging. The aim of our prospective study was to compare non-operative management with surgery for cases of splenic injury. METHODS We conducted a prospective study of patients admitted with blunt splenic injury to our regional hospital over a three-year period (2012-2015. Haemodynamic status upon admission, FAST examination, computed tomography 2 grade of splenic tear, presence and severity of associated injuries have been taken into account to determine the treatment of choice. Therapeutic options were classified into non-operative and splenectomy. RESULTS Over a 3-year period, 24 patients were admitted with blunt splenic injury. Sixteen patients were managed operatively and eight patients non-operatively. 3,4 Non-operative management failed in one patient due to continued bleeding. The majority of grades I, II, and III splenic injuries were managed non-operatively and grades IV and V were managed operatively. Blood transfusion requirement was significantly higher among the operative group, but the operative group had a significantly longer hospital stay. Among those managed non-operatively (median age 24.5 years, a number of patients were followed up with CT scans with significant radiation exposure and unknown longterm consequences. CONCLUSION In our experience, NOM is the treatment of choice for grade I, II and III blunt splenic injuries. Splenectomy was the chosen technique in patients who met exclusion criteria for NOM, as well as for patients with grade IV and V injury.

  20. Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon: Operative or non-operative procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukelj, Fabijan; Bandalovic, Ante; Knezevic, Josip; Pavic, Arsen; Pivalica, Bozen; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of non-operative and surgical procedures in the treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon in athletes (professional and amateur). Ninety professional or amateur athletes with rupture of the Achilles tendon were included in the study between 1998 and 2013. The athletes were aged between 25 and 40 years (mean 34.83±4.65). A total of 30 athletes underwent an open procedure, 30 were treated with a percutaneous method and 30 were treated non-operatively. All operated patients were tested one year after the surgical procedure. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to compare the open and percutaneous methods. The results for the patients who were treated using the percutaneous method were 15% better than those for the patients who underwent the open procedure; the results for the group treated conservatively were 20% better than those for the group treated percutaneously. The percutaneous method was easier technically than the open method. Time spent in hospital was 14.5 times shorter with the percutaneous procedure compared with the open procedure (percutaneous procedure: range 0.5-2 days, mean 0.79±0.36; open procedure: range 10-24 days, mean 11.46±2.70; pAchilles tendon in the group treated with the percutaneous procedure. One patient in the group treated with the open procedure had postoperative infection (4.2%). In the non-surgical (conservatively treated) group, there were three reruptures of the Achilles tendon within one year, and one patient developed adhesions that resulted in loss of function and had to undergo an operation. The percutaneous method is the best method of surgical treatment for Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Dental management of hemorrhage-prone patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalma, József; Joób-Fancsaly, Árpád

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a proposal of dental treatment and management of anticoagulated patients and of patients on antiplatelet therapy, with the approval by the Hungarian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and by the Dental Implantology Association of Hungarian Dentists. This current guide was based on recent Hungarian and on several foreign national guidelines and considers significant publications from international literature.

  2. Allergic contact dermatitis: Patient management and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowad, Christen M; Anderson, Bryan; Scheinman, Pamela; Pootongkam, Suwimon; Nedorost, Susan; Brod, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common diagnosis resulting from exposure to a chemical or chemicals in a patient's personal care products, home, or work environment. Once patch testing has been performed, the education and management process begins. After the causative allergens have been identified, patient education is critical to the proper treatment and management of the patient. This must occur if the dermatitis is to resolve. Detailed education is imperative, and several resources are highlighted. Photoallergic contact dermatitis and occupational contact dermatitis are other considerations a clinician must keep in mind. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The scientific basis for patient blood management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M F; Goodnough, L T

    2015-08-01

    Patient blood management is an increasingly used term to describe an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach to optimising the care of patients who might need transfusion. It encompasses measures to avoid transfusion such as anaemia management without transfusion, cell salvage and the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce bleeding as well as restrictive transfusion. It ensures that patients receive the optimal treatment, and that avoidable, inappropriate use of blood and blood components is reduced. This paper provides an overview of the scientific basis for patient blood management with a focus on the increasing evidence for restrictive rather than liberal transfusion practice and the use of electronic blood ordering and decision support to facilitate its implementation.

  4. Acute pain management in burn patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst-Jensen, Hejdi; Vedel, Pernille Nygaard; Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria Oline

    2014-01-01

    management addresses and alleviates these complications. The aim of our study was to compare clinical guidelines for pain management in burn patients in selected European and non-European countries. We included pediatric guidelines due to the high rate of children in burn units. METHOD: The study had...... patients. The most highly recommended guidelines provided clear and accurate recommendations for the nursing and medical staff on pain management in burn patients. We recommend the use of a validated appraisal tool such as the AGREE instrument to provide more consistent and evidence-based care to burn......OBJECTIVE: Burn patients suffer excruciating pain due to their injuries and procedures related to surgery, wound care, and mobilization. Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent among survivors of severe burns. Evidence-based pain...

  5. Medication Management in Homecare Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sino, C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the general practitioner and pharmacist, homecare workers who visit their patients in their homes on a regular basis might be able to facilitate early recognition of potential Drug Related Problems. First, the beliefs about medicines and factors influencing these beliefs in community

  6. Jordanian patients' satisfaction with pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darawad, Muhammad W; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Saleh, Ali M; Al-Sutari, Manal

    2014-03-01

    Pain is still undertreated among hospitalized patients. Recently, patient satisfaction with pain management has received significant attention. This field has not yet been explored among Jordanian patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge regarding pain characteristics, beliefs, and satisfaction that can be included in planning pain management strategies and protocols within Jordanian hospitals. Using descriptive cross-sectional methodology, the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ) was used to survey 375 inpatients from Jordanian hospitals. Participants reported relatively severe pain and pain interferences while being hospitalized and seemed to be well informed regarding pain and pain management. Participants reported high levels of pain management satisfaction. Also, the Arabic version of the APS-POQ was found to be reliable among the Jordanian population. Findings of this study are similar to those reported by earlier studies in other countries and support the need for applying the caring attitude in managing patients' reports of having pain. This study is the first in Jordan, opening the door for future studies to be conducted in this important field.

  7. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-08

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI.

  8. Coagulation management in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robba, Chiara; Bertuetti, Rita; Rasulo, Frank; Bertuccio, Alessando; Matta, Basil

    2017-10-01

    Management of coagulation in neurosurgical procedures is challenging. In this contest, it is imperative to avoid further intracranial bleeding. Perioperative bleeding can be associated with a number of factors, including anticoagulant drugs and coagulation status but is also linked to the characteristic and the site of the intracranial disorder. The aim of this review will be to focus primarily on the new evidence regarding the management of coagulation in patients undergoing craniotomy for neurosurgical procedures. Antihemostatic and anticoagulant drugs have shown to be associated with perioperative bleeding. On the other hand, an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and hypercoagulative state after elective and emergency neurosurgery, in particular after brain tumor surgery, has been described in several patients. To balance the risk between thrombosis and bleeding, it is important to be familiar with the perioperative changes in coagulation and with the recent management guidelines for anticoagulated patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures, in particular for those taking new direct anticoagulants. We have considered the current clinical trials and literature regarding both safety and efficacy of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in the neurosurgical population. These were mainly trials concerning both elective surgical and intensive care patients with a poor grade intracranial bleed or multiple traumas with an associated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Coagulation management remains a major issue in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures. However, in this field of research, literature quality is poor and further studies are necessary to identify the best strategies to minimize risks in this group of patients.

  9. Management of pregnant patient in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Sophia; Kattimani, Vivekanand S; Sriram, Roopa Rani; Sriram, Sanjay Krishna; Rao V K, Prabhakara; Bhupathi, Anitha; Bodduru, Rupa Rani; N Patil, Namrata

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to update general dentists and maxillofacial surgeons in the perioperative management of the pregnant patient. Pregnancy results in physiologic changes in almost all organ systems in the body mediated mainly by hormones; which influences the treatment schedule. Understanding these normal changes is essential for providing quality care for pregnant women. The general principles that apply in this situation are discussed, followed by the relevant physiologic changes and their treatment implications, the risks of various medications to the mother and fetus, the management of concomitant medical problems in the pregnant patient, appropriate timing of oral and maxillofacial surgery during pregnancy, and management of emergencies during pregnancy. Information about the compatibility, complications, and excretion of the common drugs during pregnancy is provided. Guidelines for the management of a pregnant patient in the dental office are summarized. How to cite this article: Kurien S, Kattimani V S, Sriram R, Sriram S K, Prabhakar Rao V K, Bhupathi A, Bodduru R, Patil N N. Management of Pregnant Patient in Dentistry. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):88-97.

  10. Patient debt management and student academic progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C A; Olswang, S G

    1989-10-01

    A survey of the patient debt management policies of all U.S.-accredited dental and dental hygiene educational programs was taken to assess institutional patient debt management procedures and their relationship to student academic progress. The policies were evaluated to determine the level of compliance with existing standards and to analyze them in light of their legal implications relative to student rights. The results illustrated a vast breadth of policies for both dental and dental hygiene programs, ranging from no relationship between debt management and student progress, to an unspecified relationship, to a formal relationship whereby academic progress is conditional on collection of patient fees. The question of the legal validity of conditioning academic progress on third party payments for services was then examined. It is the opinion of the authors that the translation of a student's successful performance in a clinic setting to an academic failure or incomplete based on a patient's failure to pay for services is likely not legally defendable. Thus, it is essential that policies on fee collection and patient debt management not be tied to issues of student academic progress.

  11. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV. Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better management of bronchial secretion in patient undergone to the use of in-ex suflator machine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV expect the use of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST and in-ex suflator machine (cough machine to decrease pulmonary infection thank to a reduction of permanence of bronchial secretions in the lungs .

  12. Clinical Management of Patients With Thalassemia Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marie; Haines, Drucilla

    2016-06-01

    Thalassemia is a chronic inherited blood disorder that reduces hemoglobin production, causing chronic hemolytic anemia. Patients often are diagnosed via newborn screening programs. Patients diagnosed with the most severe form of thalassemia often require chronic red blood cell transfusions to control their anemia. The side effect of chronic transfusions is cumulative iron overload for which chelation therapy is required. The incidence of thalassemia is low; therefore, care is best delivered at specialized treatment centers that offer multidisciplinary coordination. This article reviews the diagnosis, management, and curative options for thalassemia. This review follows a hypothetical patient with thalassemia and his family through the major stages of the disease. Increasing knowledge about thalassemia and its management among healthcare providers can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

  13. Up-to-date management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last few years new approaches to the diagnosis and management of abdominal trauma were introduced, and in addition, monitoring of individual organ function in the intensive care units has become an almost daily practice. In our article we review the principles of assessment and management of injured individual abdominal organs from surgical and intensive care medicine’s point of view. Conclusions: Appropriate diagnostics and, precise and timely decision for surgery are the most important factors in the management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma. The mechanism of injury, presence of concomitant injuries, lifethreatening condition and competence of medical staff have to be taken into consideration. The most often injured organs, spleen and liver, are nowadays managed mostly non-operatively. Such an approach has resulted in an increased admission of patients to the intensive care unit, with an attempt to prevent secondary organ dysfunction and multiple-organ failure. These new treatment options have contributed to lower morbidity and mortality and improved quality of life.

  14. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Provenzano G.; Petrozzino S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV). Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine) associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO).Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better managemen...

  15. Hip Osteoarthritis : symptomatic presentation and non-operative treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M.J. Dorleijn (Desirée)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractHip osteoarthritis is a common, chronic disease characterized by pain and disability. It can have a considerable impact on a person’s activities of daily living. Because there is no treatment available that can cure osteoarthritis, the treatment consists of symptom management. This

  16. Patient safety and managing risk in nursing

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    This book aims to provide nursing students and new nurses with a greater understanding of how to manage patient safety and risk in their own practice. The book focuses on the essentials that students and nurses need to know, and therefore provides a clear pathway through what can sometimes seem an overwhelmingly complex mass of rules, procedures and possible options.

  17. Management of Pregnant Patient in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Kurien, Sophia; Kattimani, Vivekanand S.; Sriram, Roopa Rani; Sriram, Sanjay Krishna; Rao V K, Prabhakara; Bhupathi, Anitha; Bodduru, Rupa Rani; N Patil, Namrata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to update general dentists and maxillofacial surgeons in the perioperative management of the pregnant patient. Pregnancy results in physiologic changes in almost all organ systems in the body mediated mainly by hormones; which influences the treatment schedule. Understanding these normal changes is essential for providing quality care for pregnant women.

  18. Acute Stroke Management in Patients Taking Dabigatran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Raf; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; Moens, Maarten; De Raedt, Sylvie; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Jochmans, Kristin; De Keyser, Jacques

    Dabigatran etexilate is emerging as an alternative for vitamin K antagonists, but evidence-based guidelines for management of intracerebral hemorrhage and acute ischemic stroke in patients taking this drug are nonexistent. This review summarizes current knowledge on key pharmacological features and

  19. Total quality management and the silent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ann E; Rorty, Mary V

    2002-10-01

    This essay examines the impact of the imposition of businesses techniques, in particular, those associated with Total Quality Management, on the relationships of important components of the health care delivery system, including payers, managed care organizations, institutional and individual providers, enrollees, and patients. It examines structural anomalies within the delivery system and concludes that the use of Total Quality Management techniques within the health care system cannot prevent the shift of attention of other components away from the enrollee and the patient, and may even contribute to it. It speculates that the organization ethics process may serve as a quality control mechanism to prevent this shift and so help eliminate some of the ethically problematic processes and outcomes within the health care delivery system.

  20. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  1. Perioperative management of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katus, Linn; Shtilbans, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, leading to a wide range of disability and medical complications. Managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting can be particularly challenging. Suboptimal management can lead to medical complications, prolonged hospital stays, and delayed recovery. This review aims to address the most important issues related to caring for patients with Parkinson's disease perioperatively who are undergoing emergent or planned general surgery. It also intends to help hospitalists, internists, and other health care providers mitigate potential in-hospital morbidity and prevent prolonged recovery. Challenges in managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting include disruption of medication schedules, "nothing by mouth" status, reduced mobility, and medication interactions and their side effects. Patients with Parkinson's disease are more prone to immobility and developing dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, urinary retention, and psychiatric symptoms. These issues lead to higher rates of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, deconditioning, and falls compared with patients without Parkinson's disease, as well as prolonged hospital stays and a greater need for post-hospitalization rehabilitation. Steps can be taken to decrease these complications, including minimizing nothing by mouth status duration, using alternative routes of drugs administration when unable to give medications orally, avoiding drug interactions and medications that can worsen parkinsonism, assessing swallowing ability frequently, encouraging incentive spirometry, performing bladder scans, avoiding Foley catheters, and providing aggressive physical therapy. Knowing and anticipating these potential complications allow hospital physicians to mitigate nosocomial morbidity and shorten recovery times and hospital stays.

  2. Hip Osteoarthritis : symptomatic presentation and non-operative treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Dorleijn, Desirée

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractHip osteoarthritis is a common, chronic disease characterized by pain and disability. It can have a considerable impact on a person’s activities of daily living. Because there is no treatment available that can cure osteoarthritis, the treatment consists of symptom management. This thesis describes a systematic review on the usefulness of anesthetic hip joint injection in diagnosing hip osteoarthritis. Also it reports on associations between biochemical cartilage markers and c...

  3. Dental management of the anticoagulated patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, C A

    1997-09-01

    Most anticoagulated patients can be safely managed for routine dental treatment in the outpatient setting by following appropriate guidelines. Management should be based on the present level of anticoagulation as assessed by tests, in particular the international normalised ratio (INR), which should be carried out as close to the intervention as possible. A philosophy of minimal, if any, alteration to the level of anticoagulation should be adopted. This is particularly true for procedures producing minimal bleeding such as scaling and cleaning which, in the past, have resulted in patients having their INR lowered, with its attendant risks. The patient's anticoagulation is potentially life-saving and, where at all possible, should be maintained at therapeutic levels when therapy for non-threatening conditions is planned.

  4. Management of dental patients with seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Robert B; Sullivan, Steven M

    2006-10-01

    Dental practitioners from time to time must treat patients with epilepsy or similar seizure disorders. This article describes the various classification for epilepsy, explains how such disorders are evaluated and diagnosed, discusses management methods, and addresses related issues for special populations, such as pregnant women and elderly. In addition, the article offers information about what special steps dentists should take in treating such epileptic patients and others vulnerable to seizures and in preparing offices and staff for the possibility that a patient will have a seizure in the office. In general, a patient with severe, poorly controlled epilepsy should be treated in a hospital. Otherwise, a well-controlled patient should easily be treated in the office.

  5. [Management of patients with conversion disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Marinus; Hoekstra, Jan; Kuipers-van Kooten, Mariëtte J; van der Linden, Els A M

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of conversion disorder are not due to conscious simulation. There should be no doubt that the symptoms of conversion disorder are genuine, even if scans do not reveal any abnormalities. The management of patients with conversion disorder starts with an explanation of the diagnosis. The essence of this explanation is that patients first hear about what the diagnosis actually means and only after this about what they do not have. When explaining the diagnosis it is a good idea to use metaphors. The treatment of patients with conversion disorder is carried out together with a physical therapist. The collaboration of healthcare professionals who are involved in the treatment of a patient with conversion disorder should preferably be coordinated by the patient's general practitioner.

  6. Diabetes in patients with HIV: patient characteristics, management and screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerink, M.E.; Meijering, R.; Bosch, M.; Galan, B.E. de; Crevel, R. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As HIV management has become more successful during the past years, non-communicable diseases have become more prevalent among HIV-infected individuals. As a result, more HIV-infected patients die of cardiovascular diseases, with diabetes being one of the main risk factors. This study ev

  7. Chiropractic management of a hypertensive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaugher, G; Bachman, T R

    1993-10-01

    Although many chiropractors may treat patients who have concomitant hypertensive disease, there is a paucity of literature on the nuances of case management for these patients. We report a patient who underwent a course of chiropractic care with a previous diagnosis of chronic essential hypertension. A 38-yr-old male presented for chiropractic care with complaints of hypertension, drug-related side effects and lower back pain. He was also receiving concurrent medical care for his hypertension. The patient received specific contact, short lever arm spinal adjustments as the primary mode of chiropractic care. During the course of chiropractic treatment, the patient's need for hypertensive medication was reduced. The patient's medical physician gradually withdrew the medication over 2 months. Specific contact short lever arm spinal adjustments may cause a hypotensive effect in a medicated hypertensive patient that may lead to complications (e.g., hypotension). Since a medicated hypertensive patient's blood pressure may fall below normal while he or she is undergoing chiropractic care, it is advised that the blood pressure be closely monitored and medications adjusted, if necessary, by the patient's medical physician.

  8. The complicated management of a patient following transarterial chemoembolization for metastatic carcinoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Manisha H

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transarterial Chemoembolization (TACE has been recognized as a successful way of managing symptomatic and/or progressive hepatic carcinoid metastases not amenable to surgical resection. Although it is a fairly safe procedure, it is not without its complications. Case presentation This is a case of a 53 year-old woman with a patent foramen ovale (PFO and mild pulmonary hypertension who underwent TACE for progressive carcinoid liver metastases. She developed acute heart failure, due to a severe inflammatory response; this resulted in pneumatosis intestinalis due to non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia. We describe the successful non-operative management of her pneumatosis intestinalis and the role of a PFO in this patient's heart failure. Conclusion TACE remains an effective and safe treatment for metastatic carcinoid not amenable to resection, this case illustrates the complexity of complications that can arise. A multi-disciplinary approach including ready access to advanced critical care facilities is recommended in managing such complex patients.

  9. Management of patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain (cervicalgia occupies one of the leading places among the reasons for outpatient visits, 75% of people have experienced neck pain at least once in their lives. In most cases, neck pain regresses; however, it recurs in almost one half of patients. The paper gives data on the risk factors, mechanisms, course, and prognosis of cervicalgia. It discusses the issues of differential diagnosis, examination, and approaches to treating this condition in these patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are most effective in treating patients with acute cervicalgia. Therapeutic exercises and manual therapy are indicated in patients with chronic cervicalgia. There is evidence on the efficacy and safety of meloxicam for the management of acute and chronic cervicalgia.

  10. Management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Calvo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons. We report a case of a 45-years-old patient with ALS to underline difficulties and challenges in ALS management. Even though ALS remains fatal, several advances have been made in improving the consequences of this disease: symptomatic treatments have an important role in controlling sialorrhea, bronchial secretions, pseudobulbar emotional lability, cramps, spasticity, depression and anxiety, insomnia and pain. An adequate management of ALS should be multidisciplinar, involving not only the neurologist, but also family physicians and many other specialists, such as pulmonologist, rehabilitation medicine physician, speech therapist, dietitian and psychologist. The multidisciplinary approach should be aimed at relieving specific problems associated with the disability of single patients and improving their quality of life.

  11. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  12. Management of Patients with Oral Candidiasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidal infections are medically treated with antifungal agents. In the fungal cell membrane, steroid ergosterol is the target of the antifungals on the market, but similarity with the human cell membrane may cause host toxicity and unintended reactions. Management of oral candidiasis depends...... in particular in patients with recurrent oral candidiasis. This risk can be reduced if different types of antifungal drugs are used over time or are combined. This chapter focuses on antifungal treatment of the medically compromised patient with oral candidiasis by highlighting the advantages and disadvantages...

  13. Perioperative management of the chronically anticoagulated patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, J A

    2001-09-01

    Common indications for chronic anticoagulation include mechanical prosthetic heart valve, non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation, and venous thromboembolism. Perioperative management of the chronically anticoagulated patient is a complex medical problem, and includes the following issues: urgency of surgery, risk of thromboembolism in the absence of anticoagulation, bleeding risk, consequences of bleeding, ability to control bleeding physically, and duration of bleeding risk after the procedure. Most patients can be managed safely by stopping oral anticoagulants 4-5 days before surgery and restarting anticoagulation after the procedure at the patient's usual daily dose. In general, dental procedures and cataract extraction can be performed without interrupting anticoagulation. Most other procedures can be safely performed with an INR patients with double-wing prosthetic valves (e.g., St. Jude, Carbomedics) in the aortic position, uncomplicated atrial fibrillation, or a remote (>3 months) history of venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulants can be stopped 4-5 days before surgery and restarted at the usual daily dose immediately after surgery. For other patients at higher risk of thrombosis, "bridging therapy" with outpatient low molecular weight heparin is safe and effective. For urgent procedures, a small dose of oral vitamin K usually will reduce the INR within 24-36 hours to a level sufficient for surgery and avoids exposure to transfused blood products.

  14. Managing patients taking edoxaban in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Daniel; Sanchez, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. A new group of oral anticoagulants with clear advantages over classic dicoumarin oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocoumarol) has been developed in recent years. The Food and Drug Administration has approved edoxaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. Their advantages include: predictable pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and limited food, rapid onset of action and short half-life. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. Material and Methods This paper examines the available evidence regarding rivaroxaban and sets out proposals for clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care. A literature search was conducted through July 2016 for publications in PubMed and Cochrane Library using the keywords “edoxaban”, “dabigatran”, “rivaroxaban”, “apixaban”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “novel oral anticoagulants”, “bleeding” and “dental treatment” with the “and” boolean operator in the last 10 years. Results The number of patients taking edoxaban is increasing. There is no need for regular coagulation monitoring of patients on edoxaban therapy. For patients requiring minor oral surgery procedures, interruption of edoxaban is not generally necessary. Management of patients on anticoagulation therapy requires that dentists can accurately assess the patient prior to dental treatments. Conclusions Their increased use means that oral care clinicians should have a sound understanding of the mechanism of action, pharmacology, reversal strategies and management of bleeding in patients taking edoxaban. There is a need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for dental patients requiring edoxaban. Key words:Edoxaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, novel oral anticoagulants, bleeding. PMID:28210454

  15. Pharmacological pain management in the elderly patient

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Gary McCleaneRampark Pain Centre, Lurgan, Northern Ireland, United KingdomAbstract: With the increasing number of elderly patients the issue of pain management for older people is of increasing relevance. The alterations with aging of the neurobiology of pain have impacts of pain threshold, tolerance and treatment. In this review the available evidence from animal and human experimentation is discussed to highlight the differences between young and older subjects along with consideration of h...

  16. Anaesthetic management of patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Ramachandran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a disease affecting the parturient during late pregnancy or immediately after delivery. This unique disorder not just endangers the life of mother and progeny but is also a financial burden to the health system due to its potential to cause prolonged and persistent cardiac function insufficiency in the mother. The hallmark of the disease is onset of decreased cardiac ejection fraction either in the late pregnancy or early puerperium. Over the last few decades, the disease has been extensively researched and investigated to formulate diagnostic guidelines and therapeutic approaches. Many theories regarding its pathophysiology have also been proposed. The clinical presentation and the basic and intensive interventional strategies of the disease are more or less similar to that of dilated cardiomyopathy due to any other cause; however, at all points of time the pregnant or lactating state of mother and the subsequent effect of the medication and therapeutic interventions on the fetus or neonate needs to be considered. Apart from intensive care management, these patients may also require anaesthetic intervention for management of painless labor and/or either vaginal or operative delivery. Favorable maternal and fetal outcome require that the basic hemodynamic goals be always kept in mind while choosing the techniques and drugs to provide anaesthesia to the patients with PPCM. Literature search of the anaesthetic management of patients with diagnosis of PPCM undergoing operative delivery reveals both general and regional anaesthesia being used with comparable outcomes.

  17. Perioperative Management Center (PERIO) for Neurosurgical Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    YASUHARA, Takao; HISHIKAWA, Tomohito; AGARI, Takashi; KUROZUMI, Kazuhiko; ICHIKAWA, Tomotsugu; KAMEDA, Masahiro; SHINKO, Aiko; ISHIDA, Joji; HIRAMATSU, Masafumi; KOBAYASHI, Motomu; MATSUOKA, Yoshikazu; SASAKI, Toshihiro; SOGA, Yoshihiko; YAMANAKA, Reiko; ASHIWA, Takako; ARIOKA, Akemi; HASHIMOTO, Yasuko; MISAKI, Ayasa; ISHIHARA, Yuriko; SATO, Machiko; MORIMATSU, Hiroshi; DATE, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative management is critical for positive neurosurgical outcomes. In order to maintain safe and authentic perioperative management, a perioperative management center (PERIO) was introduced to patients of our Neurosurgery Department beginning in June 2014. PERIO involves a multidisciplinary team consisting of anesthesiologists, dentists/dental hygienists/technicians, nurses, physical therapists, pharmacists, and nutritionists. After neurosurgeons decide on the course of surgery, a preoperative evaluation consisting of blood sampling, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and lung function test was performed. The patients then visited the PERIO clinic 7–14 days before surgery. One or two days before surgery, the patients without particular issues enter the hospital and receive a mouth cleaning one day before surgery. After surgery, postoperative support involving eating/swallowing evaluation, rehabilitation, and pain control is provided. The differences in duration from admission to surgery, cancellation of surgery, and postoperative complications between PERIO and non-PERIO groups were examined. Eighty-five patients were enrolled in the PERIO group and 131 patients in the non-PERIO group. The duration from admission to surgery was significantly decreased in the PERIO group (3.6 ± 0.3 days), compared to that in the non-PERIO group (4.7 ± 0.2 days). There was one cancelled surgery in the PERIO group and six in the non-PERIO group. Postoperative complications and the overall hospital stay did not differ between the two groups. The PERIO system decreased the duration from admission to surgery, and it is useful in providing high-quality medical service, although the system should be improved so as not to increase the burden on medical staff. PMID:27396396

  18. Nutrition management of patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, K

    1995-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a heterogeneous group of rare, inherited disorders, is manifested by recurrent blistering of the skin induced by the slightest trauma. Little information exists regarding the nutrition management of patients with EB. This study presents information on growth, identifies potential nutrition problems, and provides guidelines for nutrition management of persons with EB. Eighty patients attending a dermatology clinic for EB patients are described. Severity of disease ranged from mild blistering of the knees, elbows, and feet to extensive blistering and scarring of the skin and entire gastrointestinal tract. Of the 18 children with EB simplex, which is a mild form of the disease, 4 (22%) were at nutritional risk. None of the 13 adults with EB simplex were underweight and 8 (62%) were overweight. Of the patients with the more severe forms of EB, 27 of the 35 (77%) children with dystrophic EB and 4 of the 7 (57%) children with junctional EB were at risk for malnutrition. Of the 7 adults with dystrophic EB, 6 (86%) were underweight. Common nutrition problems included protein-energy malnutrition, chewing and swallowing problems, constipation, anemia, and vitamin/mineral deficiencies. When nutrition care protocols address these problems, growth, development, and nutritional status can improve. For those with severe nutrition problems, gastrostomy feeding or similar nutrition therapies should be considered.

  19. Current management of patients with hepatocellularcarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The current management therapies for hepatocellularcarcinoma (HCC) patients are discussed in this review.Despite the development of new therapies, HCCremains a "difficult to treat" cancer because HCCtypically occurs in advanced liver disease or hepaticcirrhosis. The progression of multistep and multicentricHCC hampers the prevention of the recurrence of HCC.Many HCC patients are treated with surgical resectionand radiofrequencyablation (RFA), although thesemodalities should be considered in only selected caseswith a certain HCC number and size. Although there is ashortage of grafts, liver transplantation has the highestsurvival rates for HCC. Several modalities are salvagetreatments; however, intensive care in combinationwith other modalities or in combination with surgicalresection or RFA might offer a better prognosis. Sorafenibis useful for patients with advanced HCC. In the nearfuture, HCC treatment will include stronger moleculartargeted drugs, which will have greater potency andfewer adverse events. Further studies will be ongoing.

  20. Management of periprosthetic acetabular fractures in elderly patients--a minimally invasive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Ralph; Eschbach, Daphne; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2015-09-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fractures are rare and in the current literature largely underreported. The management is reported to be difficult. Treatment varies from non-operative to open reduction and internal fixation up to revision of the acetabular components. A prospective consecutive case series in acetabular fractures was performed in a level 1 trauma centre. All patients with pre-existing total hip replacement were followed up for one year. Perioperative data, complications, radiological results, functional outcome and quality of life were measured. Eight (15%) of 53 patients who were included in the study underwent total hip arthroplasty before and had stable implants at time of fracture. Mean age of the patients was 83 years. All of them were female. Mean operative time was 85 minutes. There were no soft tissue complications like infection or nerve damage in the post-operative course. No revision was needed. Two patients died in between the follow up. The Harris hip score was a mean of 77, with quality of life comparable to persons in the same age. Minimally invasive reconstruction of the anterior column is a viable method to conserve stable acetabular components in this type of fracture. Short operation time and limited incisions are the most conclusive advantages.

  1. Functional outcome 5 years after non-operative treatment of type A spinal fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, RB; Keizer, HJE; Leferink, VJM; van der Sluis, CK

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to study the functional outcome after non-operative treatment of type A thoracolumbar spinal fractures without neurological deficit. Functional outcome was determined following the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, measuring restrictions in

  2. Managing anxiety in the elective surgical patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Michael John

    Patients coming into hospital can suffer a great deal of anxiety--Mathews et al (1981) suggested patients who undergo surgery experience acute psychological distress in the pre-operative period. These fears manifest themselves as uncertainty, loss of control and decreased self-esteem, anticipation of postoperative pain, and fear of separation from family (Egan et al, 1992; Asilioglu and Celik, 2004). As technical advances and improved anaesthetic techniques become available to the NHS, the ability to offer day surgery to a wider patient population is increasing. In fact Bernier et al (2003) and Elliott et al (2003) have suggested that 60% of future operations will be day procedures. This means as health-care professionals, nurses will have shorter time available not only to identify patients who may be experiencing anxiety, but also to offer them the support they need to cope with the surgery. Anxiety can have a profound effect on patients--it affects them in a variety of ways, from ignoring the illness, which could have a serious impact on the patient's life, to the constant demand for attention which can take the nurse away from the care of other patients on the ward (Thomas et al, 1995). Recently, there has been increasing interest in the possible influences of properative anxiety on the course and outcome of surgical procedures and the potential benefits of anxiety-reducing interventions (Markland et al, 1993). Caumo et al (2001) suggested that pre-operative management of a patients anxiety would be improved if health-care professionals had more knowledge about the potential predictors of pre-operative anxiety.

  3. Perioperative management of patients with hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathatos, Nikolaos; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2003-06-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common disorder affecting the cardiovascular, respiratory, hematopoietic, and renal organ systems--each of which is particularly germane in the management of the surgical patient. In general, treatment of recognized hypothyroidism is recommended before any surgical procedure whenever possible and euthyroidism should be documented by measurement of serum TSH as part of the preoperative evaluation. Such a strategy is likely to result in better surgical outcomes with improved morbidity and mortality. One exception to treating first with thyroid hormone is the patient with angina or coronary artery disease requiring bypass grafting, angioplasty or stenting. In this setting, preoperative thyroid hormone therapy could tax the ischemic myocardium. The coronary blood flow should be addressed first, and thyroid hormone therapy initiated afterwards. The authors have emphasized the need for caution in the interpretation of low serum thyroid hormones in sick or surgical patients because of the importance of distinguishing between hypothyroidism and the "euthyroid sick syndrome." There is no clear evidence at this point to support thyroid hormone replacement in the latter patients, and it may be potentially harmful. Rather, we hold that T3 treatment of various surgical and other patients with nonthyroidal illness should be deferred until proof of its therapeutic efficacy is demonstrated.

  4. Management of a post-stroke patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of a post-stroke patient represents is a challenge to modern neurology. Complete recovery of all functions requires only recurrent stroke prevention. If the patient continues to have motor, speech, and/or other disorders that are promising to recover function, there is a need for rehabilitation. Patient care and prevention of recurrent stroke and akinesia-associated complications are required if there are no promises for functional recovery. The paper describes the current methods for the prevention of recurrent stroke, which include lifestyle modification, blood pressure normalization, and the use of surgical procedures (in some patients, antithrombotic agents, and statins (after ischemic stroke. It analyzes the possibilities and methods of treatment in lost motor and speech functions, neuropsychic (cognitive and depressive disorders, and urination disorders. It is noted that the application of current treatment options makes it possible to substantially reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and to improve recovery of lost functions and quality of life in the patient.

  5. Clinical practice guidelines in patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts have always been made to evolve certain prin-ciples to reduce the variability in the management of patients and make medical care more appropriate. These efforts have become almost a movement since 1980s as evidenced in the development of clinical practice guide-lines in all medical disciplines. This article describes the need for clinical practice guidelines and their de-velopment methods and qualities. Advantages and limi-tations of clinical practice guidelines are enumerated. The salient features of various available clinical prac-tice guidelines in urology are also described.

  6. [Conservative management option in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guienne, Véronique; Parahy, Sophie; Testa, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    "Conservative management" is as an alternative care pathway offered to patients who elect not to start dialysis often because of a heavy burden of comorbid illness and advanced ages. Our research, characterized by a transdisciplinary medical and social investigation and based on a case by case analysis, intends to understand the reasons and the context in which this choice has to be made. On the first hand, the results show that all the studied cases can be explained by two variables, the latter can be combined: when the patient is suffering from important clinical pathologies; when the patient lives with this renal failure as a trouble linked to the age. On the second hand, two important questions are raised: the first one is about the medical practices and stems from the influence of criteria always present in the decisions to take (the paramedical exams and the clinical information from the interview, the patient's examination and the discussion with his/her close family member). The second one is about the patient's autonomy and can be analyzed regarding to his/her capacity to express his/her choices and share it with his close family. But also, to live in according to his age, that is to say the relation he/she has with his/her edged body and to the limits of his/her existence. The key notion of shared decision-making renewed is to refer in the consultation and the choices to take to the question of the advantages/drawbacks for the patient's life and not only to the question of the connection between the results and the medical risks, in order to exchange view with the patient on his/her future life and not only on the condition of his failed organ. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacological pain management in the elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary McCleane

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gary McCleaneRampark Pain Centre, Lurgan, Northern Ireland, United KingdomAbstract: With the increasing number of elderly patients the issue of pain management for older people is of increasing relevance. The alterations with aging of the neurobiology of pain have impacts of pain threshold, tolerance and treatment. In this review the available evidence from animal and human experimentation is discussed to highlight the differences between young and older subjects along with consideration of how these changes have practical effect on drug treatment of pain. Cognitive impairment, physical disability and social isolation can also impact on the accessibility of treatment and have to be considered along with the biological changes with ageing. Conventional pain therapies, while verified in younger adults cannot be automatically applied to the elderly without consideration of all these factors and in no other group of patients is a holistic approach to treatment more important.Keywords: pain, analgesia, pain threshold, pain tolerance

  8. Angiosarcoma arising in the non-operated, sclerosing breast after primary irradiation, surviving 6 years post-resection: A case report and review of the Japanese literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Ito

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Angiosarcoma may occur in the non-operated breast, post irradiation. The potential difficulties of diagnosing angiosarcoma against background fibrosis should be kept in mind. Initial radical surgery currently represents the only effective treatment for improving survival in these patients.

  9. Management of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Jurado, J; Richart Aznar, P; García Mata, J; Fernández Martínez, R; Peláez Fernández, I; Sampedro Gimeno, T; Galve Calvo, E; Murillo Jaso, L; Polo Marqués, E; García Palomo, A

    2011-09-01

    Hormone treatment is one of the key strategies in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Hormone treatment is one of the key strategies in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors (AI) have been extensively studied in this setting. This section summarizes the key data regarding the use of AI in advanced breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, AI are the first line of treatment for untreated patients, or those who had prior AI treatment and progress after 12 months of adjuvant therapy. A longer disease-free interval and absence of visceral disease is associated with a better response. If tumors recur in less than 12 months, it is recommended that tamoxifen (TAM) or the estrogen-receptor antagonist fulvestrant (FUL) treatment be initiated. In the second-line setting, the best option after progression is the administration of either FUL or TAM. In the third-line setting, reintroduction of AI is considered an acceptable option. In premenopausal women who have not received prior treatment or who have progressed after 12 months following adjuvant treatment, it is recommended to initiate therapy with a combination of TAM and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog. If there is treatment failure with the use of this combination, megestrol acetate or an LHRH agonist plus an AI may be reasonable alternatives. Intensive research is ongoing to understand the mechanisms of resistance to hormone therapy. In human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive-patients, combinations with HER2 antagonists are associated with significant clinical activity.

  10. [Cost analysis of patient blood management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinerüschkamp, A G; Zacharowski, K; Ettwein, C; Müller, M M; Geisen, C; Weber, C F; Meybohm, P

    2016-06-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) is a multidisciplinary approach focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of preoperative anaemia, the minimisation of blood loss, and the optimisation of the patient-specific anaemia reserve to improve clinical outcomes. Economic aspects of PBM have not yet been sufficiently analysed. The aim of this study is to analyse the costs associated with the clinical principles of PBM and the project costs associated with the implementation of a PBM program from an institutional perspective. Patient-related costs of materials and services were analysed at the University Hospital Frankfurt for 2013. Personnel costs of all major processes were quantified based on the time required to perform each step. Furthermore, general project costs of the implementation phase were determined. Direct costs of transfusing a single unit of red blood cells can be calculated to a minimum of €147.43. PBM-associated costs varied depending on individual patient requirements. The following costs per patient were calculated: diagnosis of preoperative anaemia €48.69-123.88; treatment of preoperative anaemia (including iron-deficiency anaemia and megaloblastic anaemia) €12.61-127.99; minimising perioperative blood loss (including point-of-care diagnostics, coagulation management and cell salvage) €3.39-1,901.81; and costs associated with the optimisation of the tolerance to anaemia (including patient monitoring and volume therapy) €28.62. General project costs associated with the implementation of PBM were €24,998.24. PBM combines various alternatives to the transfusion of red blood cells and improves clinical outcome. Costs of PBM vary from institution to institution and depend on the extent to which different aspects of PBM have been implemented. The quantification of costs associated with PBM is essential in order to assess the economic impact of PBM, and thereby, to efficiently re-allocate health care resources. Costs were determined at a single

  11. Managing myelodysplastic symptoms in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ria

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available R Ria, M Moschetta, A Reale, G Mangialardi, A Castrovilli, A Vacca, F DammaccoDepartment of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, ItalyAbstract: Most patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are elderly (median age range 65 to 70 years; as a consequence, the incidence and prevalence of these diseases are rising as the population ages. Physicians are often uncertain about how to identify patients who may benefit from specific treatment strategies. The International Prognostic Scoring System is a widely used tool to assess the risk of transformation to leukemia and to guide treatment decisions, but it fails to take into account many aspects of treating elderly patients, including comorbid illnesses, secondary causes of MDS, prior therapy for MDS, and other age-related health, functional, cognitive, and social problems that affect the outcome and managing of myelodysplastic symptoms. Patients with low-risk disease traditionally have been given only best supportive care, but evidence is increasing that treatment with novel non-conventional drugs such as lenalidomide or methyltransferase inhibitors may influence the natural history of the disease and should be used in conjunction with supportive-care measures. Supportive care of these patients could also be improved in order to enhance their quality of life and functional performance. Elderly patients commonly have multiple medical problems and use medications to deal with these. In addition, they are more likely to have more than one health care provider. These factors all increase the risk of drug interactions and the consequent treatment of toxicities. Manifestations of common toxicities or illnesses may be more subtle in the elderly, owing to age-associated functional deficits in multiple organ systems. Particularly important to the elderly MDS patient is the age-related decline in normal bone

  12. Postoperative management of the exotic animal patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Christal

    2002-01-01

    Careful postoperative management is crucial for the success of any orthopedic surgical repair. The special needs of the exotic animal must be met during the immediate postoperative period and during hospitalization. Many exotic animals require a quiet, stress-free environment and careful attention to housing parameters, such as perching, temperature, and visual security. To provide adequate pain relief in these patients, analgesia should be given before, during, and after surgery. The drugs most often used for pain relief are NSAIDs and opioid analgesics. After surgery, monitor the healing process carefully with regular examinations and radiographs while remaining vigilant for potential problems such as osteomyelitis or nonunion. Physical therapy prevents the development of fracture disease, which includes joint or ligament contracture and bone or muscle mass loss. Because physical therapy affords the patient full use of the affected limb, it is considered a helpful practice in all patients. Physical therapy, however, is critical for free-ranging exotic animals that will be released back into the wild, such as birds of prey.

  13. Unique patient issues: early interventions and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combelles, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Patient cases that present with recurring fertilization failure or complete abnormality in either the oocytes or sperm before fertilization are uncommon, yet they are devastating. This review presents several such instances, including oocyte maturation blocks, empty follicle syndrome, oocyte activation failures, defects in sperm phospholipase C isoform ζ, sperm structural anomalies, spontaneous oocyte activation, and unexplained cases. Diagnostic efforts have not only provided insight into possible etiologies but also have helped manage such challenging cases. Interventions may comprise cellular, molecular, or genetic analyses of gametes, as well as functional assays and/or modified treatment strategies. Consequently, infertility professionals can increasingly rely on evidence-based counseling with respect to prognosis and treatment options.

  14. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  15. Zika Virus and Patient Blood Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Lawrence T; Marques, Marisa B

    2017-01-01

    -Barre syndrome in adults. Furthermore, we urge hospital-based clinicians and transfusion medicine specialists to implement perisurgical patient blood management strategies to avoid blood component transfusions with their potential risks of emerging pathogens, illustrated here by the Zika virus. Ultimately, this current global threat, as described by the World Health Organization, will inevitably be followed by future outbreaks of other bloodborne pathogens; the principles and practices of perioperative patient blood management will reduce the risks from not only known, but also unknown risks of blood transfusion for our patients.

  16. Orthodontic management of the short face patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, P K

    1996-06-01

    A short lower face may accompany various types of malocclusions depending on the structural etiology. Because most cephalometric analyses focus on the anteroposterior plane of space, they are often insufficient in diagnosing a significant vertical dysplasia. This article describes a cephalometric analysis that examines not only the vertical proportions of the face, but the various anatomical features that contribute to the dysplasia. Diagnosis is further enhanced by evaluating the facial profile with the mandible postured at various amounts of opening, suggesting the degree of vertical discrepancy. Traditional orthodontic therapy corrects the associated malocclusion but is usually ineffective in changing inherent facial proportions. However, several orthopedic methods have shown the ability to increase lower facial height when used in combination with nonextraction orthodontic mechanotherapy. Adults with short faces require a combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery. The Class II malocclusion can usually be managed by surgically advancing the mandible with the curve of Spee maintained. In cases of vertical maxillary deficiency, the LeFort I osteotomy with inferior repositioning provides the spatial correction that is needed. Two cases are presented to illustrate the cephalometric and facial analyses used in diagnosis, as well as the common surgical procedures to manage the short face patient.

  17. Advanced airway management is necessary in prehospital trauma patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lockey, D J; Healey, B; Crewdson, K; Chalk, G; Weaver, A E; Davies, G E

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of airway compromise in trauma patients is a priority. Basic airway management is provided by all emergency personnel, but the requirement for on-scene advanced airway management is controversial...

  18. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment.

  19. [A WHO concept- patient blood management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theusinger, Oliver M

    2014-10-15

    Blood transfusions are in general considered as lifesaving. Current data and evidence show, that blood transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and this apparently dose-dependent. Basic research and results from randomized controlled trials show a causal relationship between blood transfusion and adverse outcome. Based on the current state of knowledge it has to be questioned that blood transfusions are "life-saving" as patients are exposed to an increased risk of disease or death. Furthermore, blood transfusions are more costly than previously assumed. For these reasons novel approaches in the treatment of anemia and bleeding are needed. Patient Blood Management (PBM) allows reduction of transfusion rates by correcting anemia by stimulating erythropoiesis, minimizing perioperative blood loss and optimizing the physiological tolerance of anemia. In 2010 the World Health Organization has claimed PBM to be considered as golden standard. PBM reduces morbidity and mortality by lowering the excessive use of blood transfusions. This concept has partially and successfully been implemented in the University Hospital Balgrist in Zurich.

  20. A Novel Technique for Improving Bodily Experience in a Non-operable Super–Super Obesity Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serino, Silvia; Scarpina, Federica; Keizer, Anouk; Pedroli, Elisa; Dakanalis, Antonios; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Chirico, Alice; Novelli, Margherita; Gaudio, Santino; Riva, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The available clinical guidelines for super-super obese patients (i.e., with body mass index (BMI) > 60 kg/m2) that are not suitable for bariatric surgery mandate a palliative multidisciplinary treatment (i.e., production and maintenance of weight loss) provided in a center of excellence. However, the modality and the impact of this approach are still controversial. Moreover, it is not able to address the high level of body dissatisfaction and body distortions that are common among these patients. Clinical Presentation: We report the case of a non-operable super–super obesity – a 37 year old woman with a BMI of 62 kg/m2 – receiving a specialized treatment for her obstructive sleep apnea. She entered a multidisciplinary program that promoted healthy behaviors, including physical activities and psychological intervention. To improve body dissatisfaction, which was linked to a significant multisensory impairment of body perception, she also entered a virtual reality (VR) body-swapping illusion protocol. At the end of the current investigation, the patient continued her multidisciplinary program, reporting an increase in the motivation for undertaking healthy behavior and a decrease in the anxiety feelings associated with her clinical condition. Conclusion: This case provides preliminary evidence that both body dissatisfaction and body-size distortions of non-operable super-super obesity patients could be addressed by a VR body-swapping protocol, which is important because the palliative multidisciplinary treatment recommended for these patients is not able to address them. Interestingly, the use of a VR body-swapping illusion protocol seems to be able to improve not only the experience of the body in these patients but their motivation for change, too. PMID:27378965

  1. Managing patient complaints in China: a qualitative study in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yishi; Ying, Xiaohua; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Sirui Rae; Kane, Sumit; Mukhopadhyay, Maitrayee; Qian, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the handling system for patient complaints and to identify existing barriers that are associated with effective management of patient complaints in China. Setting Key stakeholders of the handling system for patient complaints at the national, Shanghai municipal and hospital levels in China. Participants 35 key informants including policymakers, hospital managers, healthcare providers, users and other stakeholders in Shanghai. Primary and secondary outcome measures Semistructured interviews were conducted to understand the process of handling patient complaints and factors affecting the process and outcomes of patient complaint management. Results The Chinese handling system for patient complaints was established in the past decade. Hospitals shoulder the most responsibility of patient complaint handling. Barriers to effective management of patient complaints included service users’ low awareness of the systems in the initial stage of the process; poor capacity and skills of healthcare providers, incompetence and powerlessness of complaint handlers and non-transparent exchange of information during the process of complaint handling; conflicts between relevant actors and regulations and unjustifiable complaints by patients during solution settlements; and weak enforcement of regulations, deficient information for managing patient complaints and unwillingness of the hospitals to effectively handle complaints in the postcomplaint stage. Conclusions Barriers to the effective management of patient complaints vary at the different stages of complaint handling and perspectives on these barriers differ between the service users and providers. Information, procedure design, human resources, system arrangement, unified legal system and regulations and factors shaping the social context all play important roles in effective patient complaint management. PMID:25146715

  2. Analysis of Bacterial Liver Abscess in Nursing Care of Non Operation Treatment of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus%细菌性肝脓肿合并糖尿病患者非手术治疗的护理要点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王菊敏

    2015-01-01

    目的:总结采用非手术方式治疗细菌性肝脓肿的糖尿病患者的护理对策。方法择取2014年1~12月我院收治的50例采用非手术方式治疗细菌性肝脓肿的糖尿病患者,为患者进行穿刺抽脓和控制血糖治疗,并从饮食、心理等方面行以精心护理。结果50例患者中有48例恢复情况良好,1例恢复较差,1例死亡,总有效率为96%。结论非手术治疗糖尿病及细菌性肝脓肿患者,要针对血糖进行有效控制,并及时补充营养,以加快患者恢复速度。%Objective To summarize the non-surgical treatment of bacterial liver abscess the nursing strategy of diabetic patients.MethodsTo pick in January 2014~December 2014, our hospital of 50 patients with non-surgical treatment of bacterial liver abscess, patients with diabetes in the treatment of patients with puncture pumping pus and control blood sugar, and from the perspectives of diet, psychological line with elaborate care.Results 50 cases of 48 cases of recovering well, 1 case of poor recovery, 1 case of death, the total effective rate was 96%. Conclusion Non-surgical treatment of diabetes and patients with bacterial liver abscess, to effectively control blood sugar, and timely supplement nutrition, to speed up the patients recover.

  3. [Anesthesiological management of the high-risk surgical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, G; Avalle, M

    1980-03-01

    Evaluation of the anaesthesiological risk in surgical patients is described and an account is given of results obtained with an association of ketamin and NLA II in 57 high-risk patients subjected to general surgical management.

  4. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Klazinga, Niek S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes...... are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect......-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management...

  5. Patient empowerment in cancer pain management: an integrative literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boveldt, N.D. te; Vernooij-Dassen, M.; Leppink, I.; Samwel, H.; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: More than 50% of patients with cancer experience pain. Patient empowerment has been highlighted as central to success in pain management. Up to now, no clear model for this patient group exists, yet several strategies to empower patients have been used in clinical practice. This review ex

  6. Patient care management as a global nursing concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Kathleen A

    2004-01-01

    Effective and efficient patient management is important in all health care environments because it influences clinical and financial outcomes as well as capacity. Design of care management processes is guided by specific principles. Roles (e.g., case management) and tools (e.g., clinical paths) provide essential foundations while attention to outcomes anchors the process.

  7. Stress management training for breast cancer surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garssen, B.; Boomsma, M.F.; Ede, J. van; Porsild, T.; Berkhof, J.; Berbee, M.; Visser, A.; Meijer, S.; Beelen, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the psychological effects of a pre-surgical stress management training (SMT) in cancer patients. METHODS: Stress management training comprised four sessions in total: on 5 days and 1 day pre-surgery and on 2 days and 1 month post-surgery. Patients also received audio

  8. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in non-operative management of pancreatic injury in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentino, Massimo; Sartoni Galloni, Stefania; Rimondi, Maria Rita; Barozzi, Libero [University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Emergency Department, Bologna (Italy); Gentili, Andrea [University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Bologna (Italy); Lima, Mario [University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Department of Paediatrics, Bologna (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    We report a 5-year-old child with pancreatic trauma from a blunt abdominal injury that was monitored with contrast-enhanced sonography. Unenhanced US failed to demonstrate the abnormality that was recognized by CT and MRI. The injury was well demonstrated by contrast-enhanced US which was therefore used for follow-up until its healing. (orig.)

  9. Patient accounts managers: the reality behind the myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, K L

    1988-10-01

    Rising receivables and slowed cash flow have put a greater emphasis on the position of patient accounts manager. As the patient accounts manager becomes increasingly important to the long-term viability of hospitals, the person filling that role is placed in the spotlight. In the first survey of its kind, HFMA and the American Guild of Patient Accounts Management profile today's patient accounts manager. The average patient accounts manager is a male in large institutions and female in smaller facilities, has a college degree, is between 31 and 50 years of age, and has been in the healthcare field for almost 10 years. In addition, they earn $33,600 a year and aspire to higher positions including consultant and chief financial officer.

  10. 'PROSTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF AN IEPILEPTIC PATIENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case report illustrates the problems of tooth loss in an epileptic patient. The patient presented with .... Fig. lb fully dentate lower arch with no clinically obvious gingival ... For this patient who is partially edentulous: the ideal treatment option.

  11. Quality management, a directive approach to patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso-Murillo, Diego; de Andrés-Gimeno, Begoña; Noriega-Matanza, Concha; López-Suárez, Rafael Jesús; Herrera-Peco, Ivan

    Nowadays the implementation of effective quality management systems and external evaluation in healthcare is a necessity to ensure not only transparency in activities related to health but also access to health and patient safety. The key to correctly implementing a quality management system is support from the managers of health facilities, since it is managers who design and communicate to health professionals the strategies of action involved in quality management systems. This article focuses on nursing managers' approach to quality management through the implementation of cycles of continuous improvement, participation of improvement groups, monitoring systems and external evaluation quality models (EFQM, ISO). The implementation of a quality management system will enable preventable adverse effects to be minimized or eliminated, and promote patient safety and safe practice by health professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-management support for peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarian, Mari; Brault, Diane; Perreault, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses and kidney disease, in particular, makes it necessary to adopt new approaches towards their management (Wagner, 1998). Evidence suggests that promoting self-management improves the health status of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, as they manage upwards of 90% of their own care. Patients who are unable to self-manage suffer from various complications. This project proposes an intervention aimed at improving self-management skills among PD patients. To promote self-management in peritoneal dialysis patients. This is achieved through the following objectives: (a) develop an algorithm that can improve patients' ability to solve the specific problem of fluid balance maintenance, (b) develop an educational session for patients on how to use the algorithm, and (c) develop an implementation strategy in collaboration with the PD nurse. Three measures evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. First, a telephone call log shows that participating patients call the clinic less to inquire about fluid balance maintenance. Next, a pre- and post-intervention knowledge test measures definite knowledge increase. Finally, a Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire reveals overall satisfaction with the intervention. This project, which proved beneficial to our patient population, could be duplicated in other clinics. The algorithm "How do I choose a dialysis bag" and the slides of the educational sessions can be shared with PD nurses across the country for the benefit of PD patients.

  13. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  14. 慢性牙周炎合并2型糖尿病患者牙周非手术治疗的疗效%Effect of periodontal non operative treatment in patients with chronic periodontitis with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓雪; 陈嵩; 周艳; 宦泓; 曹盈; 张巍炜; 孙敬伟

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究牙周非手术治疗对慢性牙周炎伴发2型糖尿病患者的疗效。方法选择伴发2型糖尿病的慢性牙周炎患者40例,将其随机分为实验组和对照组。两组经X线片检查、Florida电子探针牙周指数检测和血糖水平检查后,实验组接受口腔卫生宣教及牙周非手术治疗,对照组仅进行口腔卫生宣教。3个月后,观察两组治疗前后牙周探诊深度(PD)、附着丧失(AL)、牙周探诊出血百分比(BOP)、空腹血糖(FBG)及糖化血红蛋白(HbA1c)的变化。结果实验组在牙周非手术治疗后,PD、AL、BOP和FBG均明显改善,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),而对照组没有明显变化,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论牙周非手术治疗对改善慢性牙周炎合并2型糖尿病患者的牙周健康状况有一定的疗效。%Objective To evaluate the effect of non-surgical treatment on periodontal disease patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods40 periodontal disease patients with type 2 diabetes were chosen in the study, who randomized into two groups: experimental group and control group. Both groups were accepted X-ray examination, examination of periodontal index with Florida Probe and blood glucose. The experimental group was accepted oral health education and non-surgical treatment, while the control group was accepted oral health education only. Assessments of probing pocket depths(PD)、attachment levels(AL)、bleeding on probing(BOP)、fasting blood-glucose(FBG) and HbA1c were observed at baseline examination and 3 months following treatment.ResultsThere were signifi cant improvements in PD, AL,BOP%,FBG and HbA1c on experimental group (P0.05). ConclusionNon-surgical treatment has certain treatment responses on periodontal disease patients with type 2 diabetes.

  15. Management of patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debarle, Michel; Aigron, Rémi; Depernet, Laure

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the level of consensus within the French chiropractic profession regarding management of clinical issues. A previous Swedish study showed that chiropractors agreed relatively well on the management strategy for nine low back pain scenarios. We wished to investigate...... whether those findings could be reproduced among French chiropractors.Objectives: 1. To assess the level of consensus among French chiropractors regarding management strategies for nine different scenarios of low back pain. 2. To assess whether the management choices of the French chiropractors appeared...... reasonable for the low back pain scenarios. 3. To compare French management patterns with those described in the previous survey of Swedish chiropractors. METHOD: A postal questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected sample of 167 French chiropractors in 2009. The questionnaire described a 40-year old man...

  16. Perspectives and experiences of elective surgery patients regarding pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeh, Nahid; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives and experiences of elective surgery patients regarding pain management. A qualitative design, based on the content analysis approach, was used to collect and analyze the experience of 20 elective surgery patients who all had abdominal surgery in surgical wards in two teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. After employing purposeful sampling for the selection of the participants, semistructured interviews were held for data collection. During the data analysis, three main themes emerged: "perceptions of pain management goals", "patients' views of nurses' role in pain management", and "interaction in pain management". It was concluded that understanding the factors that influence pain management after surgery from the patients' viewpoint will contribute to the body of knowledge of nurses in order to promote the quality of nursing care.

  17. [The Experience of Fluid Management in Hemodialysis Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonsoo; Kim, Miyoung

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of fluid management in hemodialysis patients by describing how they manage fluid intake and what affects fluid management. Purposive sampling yielded 11 patients who have received hemodialysis for one year or longer in one general hospital. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and analysed using Giorgi's phenomenological method. Data collection and analysis were performed concurrently. The findings regarding how hemodialysis patients manage fluid intake were classified into four constituents: 'recognizing the need for fluid control', 'observing the status of fluid accumulation', 'controlling fluid intake and output', 'getting used to fluid management'. The factors that affect fluid management of hemodialysis patients were revealed as 'willpower', 'change in the mindset', 'support system', and 'emotional state'. The study results show that hemodialysis patients manage fluid intake through food and exercise as well as interpersonal relationships. These findings suggest that strategies in the development of nursing interventions for hemodialysis patients should be directed at assisting them in familiarization with fluid management based on an understanding of their sociocultural contexts.

  18. Problems with Cash and Other Non-Operating Assets Value in the Process of Valuing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Szczepankowski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In economic practice the process of valuing enterprises is based on potential earnings from companies operating assets ñ operating fixed assets and operating working capital. Cash and other non-operating assets (mainly financial are treated as unproductive, non-income assets. Eventually, in process of pricing their current, accounting value is added to income value of enterprise or cash is treated as source for quick covering the debts of firm, what of course indirectly improve for better value of equity (the lower financial risk. Not taking into account the profitable influence of cash value and other non-operating assets can negatively affect on result of final value of enterprise, reducing it. In the article two alternative approaches (separate and inclusive of cash value is presented. Also main determinants of estimating value of cash are described as well as potential threats of its valuation.

  19. Managing the lipid profile of coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakopoulou, Maria; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Stathogiannis, Konstantinos; Synetos, Andreas; Trantalis, George; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-11-01

    Lipid profile management is even more critical in patients treated for secondary prevention, since patients with established coronary heart disease are at higher risk of developing events. Current guidelines encourage lifestyle modification and patient engagement in disease prevention. However, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines seem to differ considerably from their predecessors, having an impact on clinical practice of lipid management. Area covered: This review article discusses and provides a summary of the current recommendations for lipid profile management in patients with coronary heart disease, with a view to present lifestyle modification and novel treatment strategies, and to indicate areas of dispute among recent guidelines. Expert commentary: Existing controversies between current guidelines concerning treatment goals and therapeutic decisions may have potential implications on the clinical management of patients. In the meantime, we eagerly wait for the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating promising, potent, safe and prolonged drugs that are in progress.

  20. Management of tinnitus in patients with presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagólski, Olaf

    2006-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss in elderly patients (presbycusis) relatively often coexists with annoying tinnitus (termed presbytinnitus [PT] by Claussen). The purpose of this study was to verify the conditions of improvement in patients treated for PT. We fitted with hearing aids 33 PT patients (ages 60-89 years) and questioned them about subjective hearing results. Assessment tools included comprehensive audiology and a subjective self-assessment survey of tinnitus characteristics. All patients had very good tolerance of the hearing aids; 28 reported that they had considerable reduction in PT intensity. Fitting PT patients with hearing aids is usually effective. In patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus, fitting the impaired ear is sufficient. Individuals with bilateral complaints require bilateral fitting. Effectiveness of fitting in the affected group of patients depended on speech discrimination scores before fitting. The improvement scores were higher in patients with more aggravated symptoms and did not depend on history of prolonged exposure to excessive noise.

  1. Anesthetic Management of Pregnant Patients with Appendectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Feyzi; Oguz, Abdullah; Yildirim, Zeynep Baysal; Guzel, Abdulmenap; Dogan, Erdal; Ciftci, Taner; Aycan, Ilker Onguc

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to present our anesthesia procedure of pre-diagnosis and laparotomy on pregnant patients with acute appendicitis. After approval Ethics Committee, 77 pregnant patients with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis were evaluated. Patients were separated into two groups: group G (general anesthesia) and Group S (spinal anesthesia), according to the method of anesthesia applied. The patients' age, gestational age, method of anesthesia applied, duration of hospital stay, duration of a...

  2. Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandourh, Wsam A

    2016-12-01

    Advanced cancer patients commonly have misunderstandings about the intentions of treatment and their overall prognosis. Several studies have shown that large numbers of patients receiving palliative radiation or chemotherapy hold unrealistic hopes of their cancer being cured by such therapies, which can affect their ability to make well-informed decisions about treatment options. This review aimed to explore this discrepancy between patients' and physicians' expectations by investigating three primary issues: (1) the factors associated with patients developing unrealistic expectations; (2) the implications of having unrealistic hopes and the effects of raising patients' awareness about prognosis; and (3) patients' and caregivers' perspective on disclosure and their preferences for communication styles. Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic databases including Pubmed, EMBASE and ScienceDirect using multiple combinations of keywords, which yielded a total of 65 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The discrepancy between patients' and doctors' expectations was associated with many factors including doctors' reluctance to disclose terminal prognoses and patients' ability to understand or accept such information. The majority of patients and caregivers expressed a desire for detailed prognostic information; however, varied responses have been reported on the preferred style of conveying such information. Communication styles have profound effects on patients' experience and treatment choices. Patients' views on disclosure are influenced by many cultural, psychological and illness-related factors, therefore individuals' needs must be considered when conveying prognostic information. More research is needed to identify communication barriers and the interventions that could be used to increase patients' satisfaction with palliative care.

  3. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Groene

    Full Text Available Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures.We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ, a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level.Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute myocardial infarction n = 1

  4. Management of penetrating injuries of the upper extremities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.J.F. van Waes (Oscar); P.H. Navsaria; R.C. Verschuren (Renske Cm); L.C. Vroon (Laurens); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); J.A. Halm (Jens); A.J. Nicol; J. Vermeulen (Jefrey)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Routine surgical exploration after penetrating upper extremity trauma (PUET) to exclude arterial injury leads to a large number of negative explorations and iatrogenic injuries. Selective non-operative management (SNOM) is gaining in favor for patients with PUET. The present

  5. Using patient management as a surrogate for patient health outcomes in diagnostic test evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staub Lukas P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Before a new test is introduced in clinical practice, evidence is needed to demonstrate that its use will lead to improvements in patient health outcomes. Studies reporting test accuracy may not be sufficient, and clinical trials of tests that measure patient health outcomes are rarely feasible. Therefore, the consequences of testing on patient management are often investigated as an intermediate step in the pathway. There is a lack of guidance on the interpretation of this evidence, and patient management studies often neglect a discussion of the limitations of measuring patient management as a surrogate for health outcomes. Methods We discuss the rationale for measuring patient management, describe the common study designs and provide guidance about how this evidence should be reported. Results Interpretation of patient management studies relies on the condition that patient management is a valid surrogate for downstream patient benefits. This condition presupposes two critical assumptions: the test improves diagnostic accuracy; and the measured changes in patient management improve patient health outcomes. The validity of this evidence depends on the certainty around these critical assumptions and the ability of the study design to minimise bias. Three common designs are test RCTs that measure patient management as a primary endpoint, diagnostic before-after studies that compare planned patient management before and after testing, and accuracy studies that are extended to report on the actual treatment or further tests received following a positive and negative test result. Conclusions Patient management can be measured as a surrogate outcome for test evaluation if its limitations are recognised. The potential consequences of a positive and negative test result on patient management should be pre-specified and the potential patient benefits of these management changes clearly stated. Randomised comparisons will provide

  6. Factors associated with management of cervical cancer patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors associated with management of cervical cancer patients at KCMC Hospital, Tanzania: a retrospective cross-sectional ... Abstract: Cervical cancer is an important public health problem among adult women worldwide. ... Article Metrics.

  7. Assessment and management of patients with varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Louise

    Varicose veins are enlarged superficial veins found in the legs. This article explores the anatomy and physiology of the venous system to assist nurses to assess, manage and treat patients with varicose veins.

  8. Intraoperative management of the patient with severe lung disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intraoperative management strategies in patients with COPD need to consider the potential presence of CO2 ... bullae provided the airway pressures are kept low and that adequate .... relate to the more advanced methodology of the more.

  9. Managing treatment for the orthodontic patient with periodontal problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, D P; Kokich, V G

    1997-03-01

    Some adult patients have mild to moderate periodontal disease before orthodontic treatment. These patients may be at risk of developing further periodontal breakdown during orthodontic therapy. However, careful diagnosis and judicious management of these potentially volatile patients can alleviate the risk. In this article, the diagnosis and management of several periodontal problems is discussed. The need for and timing of preorthodontic periodontal surgery for these situations is elucidated. In addition, the types of tooth movement that will ameliorate these problematic situations is described. This information is valuable for the orthodontist who treats patients with underlying periodontal problems.

  10. The hemodynamic management of elderly patients with sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis is among the most common reason for admission to intensive care units throughout the world. In the US and most Western nations sepsis is largely a disease of the elderly. Management of elderly patients with severe sepsis is challenging. Early recognition of this syndrome, together with the early administration of appropriate antibiotics and cautious fluid resuscitation is the cornerstone of therapy. Echocardiography together with non-invasive or invasive hemodynamic monitoring is recommended in patients who have responded poorly to fluids or have significant underlying cardiac disease. This paper reviews the hemodynamic changes that characterize sepsis, particularly as they apply to elderly patients and provides recommendations for the management of these patients.

  11. Management of patients with headache and cervicalgia in outpatient practice

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Chechet; A. I. Isaikin

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with headache (cephalgia) concurrent with neck pain (cervicalgia) remains an urgent problem of modern medicine. Concurrent cervicalgia in cephalgia substantially lowers quality of life in these patients and is encountered in more than half the patients. Cervicalgia is considered as a risk factor of migraine and tension headache attacks. Cervicogenic headache is assigned to one of the most common forms of secondary cephalgias. It is shown that patients with daily hea...

  12. Pregnancy in patients with rheumatic diseases: obstetric management and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, D W

    2004-01-01

    The obstetric management of the pregnant rheumatic patient is largely dictated by the specific disease and the degree to which it is associated with recognizable and treatable adverse obstetric outcomes, maternal or fetal. This review will cover the obstetric management of women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). Most experts agree that a co-ordinated management effort on the part of obstetricians and rheumatologists will likely yield the optimal achievable results.

  13. Ambulatory anesthesia: optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polderman JAW

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jorinde AW Polderman, Robert van Wilpe, Jan H Eshuis, Benedikt Preckel, Jeroen Hermanides Department of Anaesthesiology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Given the growing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and the growing number of surgical procedures performed in an ambulatory setting, DM is one of the most encountered comorbidities in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. Perioperative management of ambulatory patients with DM requires a different approach than patients undergoing major surgery, as procedures are shorter and the stress response caused by surgery is minimal. However, DM is a risk factor for postoperative complications in ambulatory surgery, so should be managed carefully. Given the limited time ambulatory patients spend in the hospital, improvement in management has to be gained from the preanesthetic assessment. The purpose of this review is to summarize current literature regarding the anesthesiologic management of patients with DM in the ambulatory setting. We will discuss the risks of perioperative hyperglycemia together with the pre-, intra-, and postoperative considerations for these patients when encountered in an ambulatory setting. Furthermore, we provide recommendations for the optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient undergoing ambulatory surgery. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, perioperative period, ambulatory surgery, insulin, complications, GLP-1 agonist, DPP-4 inhibitor

  14. Anesthetic management of a patient with Edwards syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifsud, Stephanie; Bezzina, Maureen; Paris, Simon

    2016-08-01

    The use of suxamethonium in our case was uneventful and despite craniofacial anomalies, airway management was straightforward. This case illustrates that pediatric patients with trisomy 18, presenting with potentially acute life-threatening conditions and requiring emergency major surgery can be managed successfully with a multidisciplinary approach.

  15. Motivational Interviewing to Engage Patients in Chronic Kidney Disease Management

    OpenAIRE

    Martino, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) must manage numerous medical treatments and lifestyle changes that strain their treatment adherence. An important strategy to improve adherence is to activate the patients’ motivation to manage their CKD. This article describes an approach for enhancing patients’ motivation for change, called motivational interviewing (MI), a treatment that is increasingly being used in health care settings to counsel patients with chronic diseases. Its basic princip...

  16. Management of osteoporosis in patients hospitalized for hip fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Ip, T. P.; Leung, J.; Kung, A. W. C.

    2010-01-01

    Hip fracture is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and economic burden worldwide. It is also a major risk factor for a subsequent fracture. A literature search on the management of osteoporosis in patients with hip fracture was performed on the Medline database. Only one clinical drug trial was conducted in patients with a recent hip fracture. Further studies that specifically address post-fracture management of hip fracture are needed. The efficacy of anti-osteoporosis medication in ...

  17. perioperative management of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Clinical Medicine and Therapeutics, School of Medicine, College ... Perioperative assessment enables the discussion of the proposed treatment ... patients with severely damaged hip or knee joints. This improves the patient's functional ability and quality of ... operative history and physical examination should.

  18. [Management of pacemaker patients by bathtub ECG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, H; Togawa, T; Toyoshima, T; Ishijima, M

    1989-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a new method for recording electrocardiogram (ECG) of pacemaker patients in bathtub (bathtub ECG). ECG from the pacemaker implanted patients in the bathtub with tap water was recorded through three silver/silver chloride electrodes (4 x 4 cm) fitted on the inside wall of bathtub. Electric signal was connected to the isolated amplifier and recorded on the strip chart recorder. Contrast to the conventional method for recording standard ECG, bathtub ECG does not require body surface electrodes and is recorded at patients home. Although the amplitude of bathtub ECG was reduced approximately to a quarter of standard ECG, cardiac arrhythmia can be easily interpreted by bathtub ECG. In patients with pacemaker system, the amplitude of the pacing pulse recorded by bathtub ECG was much larger than that of QRS complex recorded by standard ECG. Therefore, we conclude that bathtub ECG would be a suitable method to follow up patients with pacemaker system.

  19. Prosthetic management of an epileptic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeredolu, P A; Temisanren, O T; Danesi, M A

    2005-12-01

    This case report illustrates the problems of tooth loss in an epileptic patient. The patient presented with a broken denture following a seizure. She gave a history of breaking and swallowing her dentures during seizures. Before presentation she had worn five upper removable partial dentures. An upper removable partial denture with increased thickness of the acrylic palatal was fabricated and fitted satisfactorily. The patient was taught how to insert and remove the prosthesis as quickly as possible. Epileptic patients can use dentures but run the risk of frequently breaking and swallowing them during seizures. The risk can be reduced if patients and relatives are taught how to remove the dentures prior to or during seizures.

  20. Advanced airway management is necessary in prehospital trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockey, D J; Healey, B; Crewdson, K; Chalk, G; Weaver, A E; Davies, G E

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of airway compromise in trauma patients is a priority. Basic airway management is provided by all emergency personnel, but the requirement for on-scene advanced airway management is controversial. We attempted to establish the demand for on-scene advanced airway interventions. Trauma patients managed with standard UK paramedic airway interventions were assessed to determine whether airway compromise had been effectively treated or whether more advanced airway management was required. A prospective observational study was conducted to identify trauma patients requiring prehospital advanced airway management attended by a doctor-paramedic team. The team assessed and documented airway compromise on arrival, interventions performed before and after their arrival, and their impact on airway compromise. Four hundred and seventy-two patients required advanced airway intervention and received 925 airway interventions by ground-based paramedics. Two hundred and sixty-nine patients (57%) still had airway compromise on arrival of the enhanced care team; no oxygen had been administered to 52 patients (11%). There were 45 attempted intubations by ground paramedics with a 64% success rate and 11% unrecognized oesophageal intubation rate. Doctor-paramedic teams delivering prehospital anaesthesia achieved definitive airway management for all patients. A significant proportion of severely injured trauma patients required advanced airway interventions to effectively treat airway compromise. Standard ambulance service interventions were only effective for a proportion of patients, but might not have always been applied appropriately. Complications of advanced airway management occurred in both provider groups, but failed intubation and unrecognized oesophageal intubation were a particular problem in the paramedic intubation group. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  1. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  2. Supporting cancer patients' unanchored health information management with mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hartzler, Andrea; Powell, Christopher; Pratt, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from home, when they are experiencing pain or treatment side effects, or when their abilities to deal with information effectively are otherwise impaired. In this paper, we describe the results from a four-week evaluation of HealthWeaver Mobile, a mobile phone application that we developed to support such "unanchored" patient information activities. Based on experiences from nine cancer patients, our results indicate that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture information whenever a need arises, and to share information with clinicians during clinic visits. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more confident in their ability to stay in control of their information and their health.

  3. Weight management in general practice: what do patients want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Daisy; Zwar, Nicholas A; Dennis, Sarah M; Vagholkar, Sanjyot

    2006-07-17

    To explore patients' views of the role of general practitioners in weight management. Waiting-room questionnaire survey, including measurement of height, weight and waist circumference, May-August 2005. 227 patients from five general practices located in metropolitan and rural New South Wales. Patients' views on: the role of GPs in weight management; the usefulness of weight-loss strategies; and the likelihood of following the GP's advice about weight loss. Most patients (78%) felt that GPs had a role in weight management, but only 46% thought that GPs would be able to spend enough time to provide effective weight loss advice. Over 80% of patients perceived advice on healthy eating and physical activity to be useful or very useful, and were likely to follow weight-loss recommendations; 78% were in favour of regular review. Patients indicated they would be less likely to see a dietitian or to attend information sessions, and unlikely to take weight-loss medication. Views of overweight and obese patients were generally similar to those of normal weight patients, but there were significant differences in perceptions of the usefulness of information on weight and weight-related medical conditions, as well as willingness to change lifestyle, possibly reflecting resistance to change among obese or overweight patients. These findings have implications for the design of primary care interventions for managing obesity.

  4. Management of the patient with refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauts, Nada M

    2005-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a metabolic complication that can occur when nutrition is reintroduced for patients who are severely malnourished. This syndrome can occur with any form of nutrition (oral, enteral, or parenteral), and it is fatal if not recognized and treated properly. This article discusses the body's adaptation to starvation, the pathophysiology and risk factors of refeeding syndrome, and the pharmacologic treatment of complications that threaten the lives of patients who experience this disorder. Additionally, this article discusses standards of care to ensure the early recognition of patients at risk for refeeding syndrome and the nursing considerations that can be implemented to prevent it.

  5. Lipid management in the geriatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ajith P; Darrow, Bruce

    2009-03-01

    Elderly individuals are at higher risk for cardiovascular events, and thus this population stands to gain a greater reduction in events from lipid therapy than younger individuals. Multiple primary and secondary prevention trials have demonstrated that the benefits of statins in geriatric patients are equivalent to, or greater than, those seen in younger patients. Combination therapy with non-statin agents should be considered in patients who do not meet cholesterol goals or who have concomitant hypertriglyceridemia or low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although increased side effects may occur with high-dose statin therapy, careful vigilance of drug interactions and limiting polypharmacy can reduce these effects.

  6. Patients optimizing epilepsy management via an online community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Deborah; Parko, Karen; Durgin, Tracy; Van Bebber, Stephanie; Graham, Arianne; Wicks, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study objective was to test whether engaging in an online patient community improves self-management and self-efficacy in veterans with epilepsy. Methods: The study primary outcomes were validated questionnaires for self-management (Epilepsy Self-Management Scale [ESMS]) and self-efficacy (Epilepsy Self-Efficacy Scale [ESES]). Results were based on within-subject comparisons of pre- and postintervention survey responses of veterans with epilepsy engaging with the PatientsLikeMe platform for a period of at least 6 weeks. Analyses were based on both completer and intention-to-treat scenarios. Results: Of 249 eligible participants enrolled, 92 individuals completed both surveys. Over 6 weeks, completers improved their epilepsy self-management (ESMS total score from 139.7 to 142.7, p = 0.02) and epilepsy self-efficacy (ESES total score from 244.2 to 254.4, p = 0.02) scores, with greatest impact on an information management subscale (ESMS–information management total score from 20.3 to 22.4, p < 0.001). Results were similar in intention-to-treat analyses. Median number of logins, postings to forums, leaving profile comments, and sending private messages were more common in completers than noncompleters. Conclusions: An internet-based psychosocial intervention was feasible to implement in the US veteran population and increased epilepsy self-management and self-efficacy scores. The greatest improvement was noted for information management behaviors. Patients with chronic conditions are increasingly encouraged to self-manage their condition, and digital communities have potential advantages, such as convenience, scalability to large populations, and building a community support network. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with epilepsy, engaging in an online patient community improves self-management and self-efficacy. PMID:26085605

  7. Reflective practice: providing safe quality patient-centered pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Gwen; McNeill, Jeanette

    2017-02-02

    Effective pain management continues to baffle clinicians in spite of numerous evidence-based guidelines and standards, focused clinical interventions and standardized assessments. Reflective practice is a mindful approach to practice that grounds clinicians in the moment with the individual patient to ask questions and then to listen to the patient's message about their pain experience. Reflective practice helps meld theoretical knowledge with lessons from experience to rethink mechanistic responses to patient pain. The subjective nature of pain means no two patients have the same experience, and, evidence based best practices are to be applied within the patient's preferences and context. The paper uses a case study to illustrate how to apply reflective practice to integrate the interprofessional quality and safety competencies to provide patient-centered pain management. Applying reflective questions throughout the care experience by all members of the healthcare team provides a mindful approach that focuses care on the individual patient.

  8. Training doctors to manage patients with multimorbidity: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliona Lewis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with multimorbidity (two or more chronic conditions are now the norm in clinical practice, and place an increasing burden on the healthcare system. Management of these patients is challenging, and requires doctors who are skilled in the complexity of multiple chronic diseases. Objective: To perform a systematic review of the literature to ascertain whether there are education and training formats which have been used to train postgraduate medical doctors in the management of patients with multimorbidity in primary and/or secondary care, and which have been shown to improve knowledge, skills, attitudes, and/or patient outcomes. Methods: Overall, 75,110 citations were screened, of which 65 full-text articles were then independently assessed for eligibility by two reviewers, and two studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. Results: The two included studies implemented and evaluated multimorbidity workshops, and highlight the need for further research addressing the learning needs of doctors tasked with managing patients with multimorbidity in their daily practice. Conclusion: While much has been published about the challenges presented to medical staff by patients with multimorbidity, published research regarding education of doctors to manage these problems is lacking. Further research is required to determine whether there is a need for, or benefit from, specific training for doctors to manage patients with multimorbidity. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013004010. Journal of Comorbidity 2016;6(2:85–94

  9. Management of the anticoagulated dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J H

    1996-11-01

    An understanding of the primary mechanisms of hemostasis, including the coagulation pathways and the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common systems, is the basis for treating the anticoagulated patient. Two major anticoagulants are used for treating those who may be at risk for thromboembolic crisis. These drugs include Coumadin, which is an oral anticoagulant, and heparin, a parenteral anticoagulant, which is often used for acute thromboembolic episodes or for hospitalization protocols that include significant surgical procedures. The practitioner should be familiar with common dental drugs that can interact with anticoagulants and should consult with the patient's physician before administering any such drugs. By placing the patient into one of three dental treatment categories, appropriate anticoagulation therapy can be rendered to each patient according to his or her needs. Low-risk procedures require no change in anticoagulation medication. For moderate-risk procedures, withdrawal of anticoagulation medication 2 days before the procedure and verified with the PT the day of the procedure is indicated. For high-risk dental procedures, using a heparin protocol should be strongly considered. In all instances of dental treatment, the oral tissues should be treated atraumatically using local hemostatic measures for control of hemorrhage. Treating medically compromised patients who are on a variety of medications is becoming more common in dentistry today. Understanding the underlying disease and the appropriate protocol for treatment of anticoagulated patients reduces the risk of thromboembolism and hemorrhagic complications.

  10. FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA: THE MANAGEMENT OF ELDERLY PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Castellino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma (FL is the most common indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma, typically affected mature adults and elderly, with a median age at diagnosis of 65 years. The natural history of FL appears to have been favorably impacted by the introduction of Rituximab. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that the addition of rituximab to standard chemotherapy induction has improved the overall survival and new strategies of chemo-immunotherapy, such as Bendamustine combined with Rituximab, showed optimal results on response and lower hematological toxicity, becoming one of the standard treatments, particularly in elderly. Moreover maintenance therapy with Rituximab demonstrated improvement of progression-free survival. Despite these exciting results, FL is still an incurable disease. It remains a critical unmet clinical need finding new prognostic factors to better identify poor outcome patients, to reduce the risk of transformation and to explore new treatment strategies, especially for patients not candidate to intensive chemotherapy regimens, such as elderly patients. Some progresses were already done with novel agents, but larger and more validated studies are needed. Elderly patients are the larger portion of patients with FL and represent a subgroup with higher treatment difficulties, because of comorbidities and smaller spectrum for treatment choice. Further studies, focused on elderly follicular lymphoma patients, with their peculiar characteristics, are needed in order to define the best tailored treatment at diagnosis and at the time of relapse in this setting.

  11. Natural history of lumbar disc herniation. MRI findings of improved case treated non-operatively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Hideyo; Hachiya, Masafumi; Ohnari, Katsuhiro [Minami Kyosai Hospital, Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    This study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can predict the changes in morphology of herniation. MRI examinations were done in 42 patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniation, who were managed conservatively. Of these patients, 15 underwent Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI. Morphology of herniation was classified as protrusion (n=15) and prolapse (n=27). The patients in the group of protrusion were significantly younger than those in the group of prolapse. Symptoms tended to improve earlier in the group of prolapse. Reduction of herniation was observed in one in the group of protrusion and 21 in the group of prolapse. Herniation was shown as hyperintensity on T2-weighted images in 16 patients and as isointensity in 26 patients. Enhancement of the nerve root, which was observed on the first contrast-enhanced MRI, disappeared in 8 patients whose symptoms improved. Herniation was reduced more readily in the group of prolapse than in the group of protrusion, revealing the potential of MRI to predict morphological changes of herniation. Furthermore, Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI was useful in determining the prognosis of herniation. (N.K.).

  12. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Mirjam P; Beune, Erik J A J; Baim-Lance, Abigail M; Bruessing, Raynold C; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study serves as a problem analysis for systematic intervention development to improve diabetes self-management among patients with LHL. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews with general practitioners (n = 4), nurse practitioners (n = 5), and patients with LHL (n = 31). The results of the interviews with health care providers guided the patient interviews. In addition, we observed 10 general practice consultations. Providers described patients with LHL as uninvolved and less motivated patients who do not understand self-management. Their main strategy to improve self-management was to provide standard information on a repeated basis. Patients with LHL seemed to have a different view of diabetes self-management than their providers. Most demonstrated a low awareness of what self-management involves, but did not express needing more information. They reported several practical barriers to self-management, although they seemed reluctant to use the information provided to overcome them. Providing and repeating information does not fit the needs of patients with LHL regarding diabetes self-management support. Health care providers do not seem to have the insight or the tools to systematically support diabetes self-management in this group. Systematic intervention development with a focus on skills-based approaches rather than cognition development may improve diabetes self-management support of patients with LHL. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Monitors Enable Medication Management in Patients' Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded SBIR funding to ZIN Technologies to develop a platform that could incorporate sensors quantifying an astronaut’s health status and then communicate with the ground. ZIN created a device, developed the system further, and then formed Cleveland-based FlexLife Health to commercialize the technology. Today it is part of an anti-coagulation management system for people with cardiovascular disease.

  14. Management of asthma in the elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani AS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrea S Melani Fisiopatologia e Riabilitazione Respiratoria, Dipartimento Vasi, Cuore e Torace, Policlinico Le Scotte, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy Abstract: A significant number of older asthmatics, more often than in previous ages, have poorly controlled asthma, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, current guidelines suggest that most asthmatics can obtain achievement and maintenance of disease control and do not include sections specific to the management of asthma in the elderly so that it is more evident the contrast between poor control of asthma in the elderly and the lack of specific guidance from guidelines on asthma management in older asthmatics. Inhaled corticosteroids are the cornerstone for older asthmatics, eventually with add-on inhaled long-acting beta-agonists; inhaled short acting beta-agonists can be used as rescue medications. Triggers exacerbating asthma are similar for all ages, but inhaled viruses and drug interactions have greater clinical significance in the elderly. Older asthmatics have an increased likelihood of comorbidities and polypharmacy, with possible worsening of asthma control and reduced treatment adherence. Physicians and older asthmatics probably either do not perceive or accept a poor asthma control. We conclude that specific instruments addressed to evaluate asthma control in the elderly with concomitant comorbidities and measurements for improving self-management and adherence could assure better disease control in older asthmatics. Keywords: asthma, beta2-agonists, inhaled corticosteroids, asthma control, elderly

  15. How nurse managers in Japanese hospital wards manage patient violence toward their staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kana; Yumoto, Yoshie; Fukahori, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    This study explores nurse managers' experiences in dealing with patient/family violence toward their staff. Studies and guidelines have emphasised the responsibility of nurse managers to manage violence directed at their staff. Although studies on nursing staff have highlighted the ineffectiveness of strategies used by nurse managers, few have explored their perspectives on dealing with violence. This qualitative study adopted a grounded theory approach to explore the experiences of 26 Japanese nurse managers. The nurse managers made decisions using internalised ethical values, which included maintaining organisational functioning, keeping staff safe, advocating for the patient/family and avoiding moral transgressions. They resolved internal conflicts among their ethical values by repeating a holistic assessment and simultaneous approach consisting of damage control and dialogue. They facilitated the involved persons' understanding, acceptance and sensemaking of the incident, which contributed to a resolution of the internal conflicts among their ethical values. Nurse managers adhere to their ethical values when dealing with patient violence toward nurses. Their ethical decision-making process should be acknowledged as an effective strategy to manage violence. Organisational strategies that support and incorporate managers' ethical decision-making are needed to prevent and manage violence toward nurses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  17. Management of Hypertension: Adapting New Guidelines for Active Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.; Batt, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses recent guidelines on hypertension from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and details the latest management protocols for patients with high blood pressure. The article helps physicians interpret the guidelines for treating active patients, highlighting diagnosis, step care revision, pharmacology, and sports participation…

  18. Self management for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerink, M.; Brusse-Keizer, M.; Valk, P.D.L.P.M. van der; Zielhuis, G.A.; Monninkhof, E.M.; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Frith, P.A.; Effing, T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self management interventions help patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acquire and practise the skills they need to carry out disease-specific medical regimens, guide changes in health behaviour and provide emotional support to enable patients to control their

  19. Gun Safety Management with Patients at Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Robert I.

    2007-01-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person…

  20. Gun Safety Management with Patients at Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Robert I.

    2007-01-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person…

  1. Burn patients' experience of pain management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuxiang, Li; Lingjun, Zhou; Lu, Tang; Mengjie, Liu; Xing, Ming; Fengping, Shen; Jing, Cui; Xianli, Meng; Jijun, Zhao

    2012-03-01

    Pain is a major problem after burns and researchers continue to report that pain from burns remains undertreated. The inadequate pain control results in adverse sequalae physically and psychologically in the burn victims. A better understanding of a burn patient's experience is important in identifying the factors responsible for undertreated pain and establishing effective pain management guidelines or recommendation in the practice of pain relief for burn injuries. This study sought to explore and describe the experience that patients have about pain related to burn-injury during hospitalization. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on eight patients with moderate to severe pain from burn injuries recruited from a Burn Centre in Northwest China. Data was collected by in-depth interviews and qualitative description after full transcription of each interview. Analysis involved the identification of themes and the development of a taxonomy of patients' experience of burn pain and its management. Three themes were indentified: (1) patients' experience of pain control, (2) patients' perception on burn pain management, and (3) patients' expectation of burn pain management. Findings from this study suggested that patients experience uncontrolled pain both physically and psychologically which may serve as an alert for awareness of health professionals to recognize and establish a multidisciplinary pain management team for burn victims, including surgeons, critical care specialists, anesthesiologists, nurses, psychologists, and social workers to accomplish safe and effective strategies for pain control to reach an optimal level of pain management in burn patients. It also provides insights and suggestions for future research directions to address this significant clinical problem.

  2. Optimal management of hypertension in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Czarina Acelajado

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Czarina AcelajadoVascular Biology and Hypertension Program, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hypertension is a common and important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney diseases. The prevalence of hypertension, particularly isolated systolic hypertension, increases with advancing age, and this is partly due to the age-related changes in the arterial tree, leading to an increase in arterial stiffness. Therapeutic lifestyle changes, such as reduced dietary sodium intake, weight loss, regular aerobic activity, and moderation of alcohol consumption, have been shown to benefit elderly patients with hypertension. Lowering blood pressure (BP using pharmacological agents reduces the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with no difference in risk reduction in elderly patients compared to younger hypertensives. Guidelines recommend a BP goal of <140/90 in hypertensive patients regardless of age and <130/80 in patients with concomitant diabetes or kidney disease, and lowering the BP further has not been shown to confer any additional benefit. Moreover, the choice of antihypertensive does not seem to be as important as the degree of BP lowering. Special considerations in the treatment of elderly hypertensive patients include cognitive impairment, dementia, orthostatic ­hypotension, and polypharmacy.Keywords: hypertension, elderly, treatment, blood pressure

  3. Management of patients with a short bowel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeremy M D Nightingale

    2001-01-01

    There are two common types of adult patient with a short bowel, those with jejunum in continuity with a functioning colon and those with a jejunostomy. Both groups have potential problems of undemutrition, but this is a greater problem in those without a colon, as they do not derive energy from anaerobic bacterial fermentation of carbohydrate to short chain fatty acids in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have major problems of dehydration,sodium and magnesium depletion all due to a large volume of stomal output. Both types of patient have lost at least 60cm of terminal ileum and so will become deficient of vitamin B12. Both groups have a high prevalence of gallstones (45%) resulting from periods of biliary stasis. Patients with a retained colon have a 25% chance of developing calcium oxalats renal atones and they may have problems with D (-)lactic acidosis. The survival of patients with a short bowel,even if they need long-term parenteral nutrition, is good.

  4. Management of patients with a short bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, J M

    2001-12-01

    There are two common types of adult patient with a short bowel, those with jejunum in continuity with a functioning colon and those with a jejunostomy. Both groups have potential problems of undernutrition, but this is a greater problem in those without a colon, as they do not derive energy from anaerobic bacterial fermentation of carbohydrate to short chain fatty acids in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have major problems of dehydration, sodium and magnesium depletion all due to a large volume of stomal output. Both types of patient have lost at least 60 cm of terminal ileum and so will become deficient of vitamin B(12). Both groups have a high prevalence of gallstones (45%) resulting from periods of biliary stasis. Patients with a retained colon have a 25% chance of developing calcium oxalate renal stones and they may have problems with D(-) lactic acidosis. The survival of patients with a short bowel, even if they need long-term parenteral nutrition, is good.

  5. Nutritional management of the patient with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologides, A

    1977-02-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition, vitamin and other deficiencies, and weight loss frequently develop in cancer patients. Although there is no evidence that aggressive nutritional management prolongs survival, it may improve the quality of life. Efforts should be made to maintain adequate daily caloric intake with appropriate food selection and with control of complications interfering with nutrition. In selected patients, intravenous hyperalimentation can provide adequate nutrition during potentially effective chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Elemental diets also may be a source of complete or supplemental nutrition. Further experience with both approaches will help to clarify their role in the nutritional management of the patient with advanced cancer.

  6. Management of pregnancy in a patient with beta thalassaemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butwick, A; Findley, I; Wonke, B

    2005-10-01

    beta thalassaemia is one of the world's most wide-spread monogenetic disorders. Advances in the management of beta thalassaemia major by extensive blood transfusions and chelation therapy have improved survival of patients into adult life. Due to the prolonged life expectancy and improvements in quality of life, pregnancy has now become an important issue for patients and clinicians. We report a case of a pregnant patient with beta thalassaemia major who underwent a successful caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia. The multidisciplinary approach to management of beta thalassaemia major and pregnancy is discussed.

  7. Anticoagulated patient management in primary care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Out-patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment are attended by nursing staff, working with doctors.To be able to provide adequate medical care, nurses must have the minimum knowledge and skills needed to work with the programme described in this article. These include basic and specific knowledge of anticoagulation. The correct functioning of the service will help provide an optimum control of the INR (International Normalized Ratio and reduce the complications of bleeding, both of which are the main objectives of the nursing care of these patients.

  8. Management of patients with neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Chechet; V. A. Parfenov

    2016-01-01

    Neck pain (cervicalgia) occupies one of the leading places among the reasons for outpatient visits, 75% of people have experienced neck pain at least once in their lives. In most cases, neck pain regresses; however, it recurs in almost one half of patients. The paper gives data on the risk factors, mechanisms, course, and prognosis of cervicalgia. It discusses the issues of differential diagnosis, examination, and approaches to treating this condition in these patients. Nonsteroidal anti-infl...

  9. Communication accommodation and managing musculoskeletal disorders: doctors' and patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Susan C; Gallois, Cindy; Driedger, S Michelle; Santesso, Nancy

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the ways in which health care providers (general practitioners and specialists) and patients communicate with each other about managing musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders, a major cause of long-term pain and physical disability. In managing their illness, patients must interact closely with health care providers, who play a large role in transferring knowledge to them. In-depth interviews with patients, general practitioners, and specialist rheumatologists in Australia and Canada were analyzed using Leximancer (a text-mining tool). Results indicated that, in their communication, doctors subtly emphasized accepting and adjusting to the illness ("new normal"), whereas patients emphasized pain relief and getting "back to normal." These results suggest that doctors and patients should accommodate in their communication across subtle and often unexpressed differences in the priorities of provider and patient, or they are likely to be at cross purposes and thus less effective.

  10. Management of oral anticoagulation in patients undergoing minor dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaali, Yathreb; Barnes, Geoffrey D; Froehlich, James B; Kaatz, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Approximately 4.2 million patients in the United States are taking warfarin, making it the 11th most prescribed drug. Warfarin is primarily used for treatment of venous thromboembolic disease and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves. Dentists frequently encounter anticoagulated patients and are faced with management decisions in these patients who require dental procedures. Observational studies suggest the risk of thrombosis if anticoagulation is suspended during dental procedures is higher than the risk of bleeding if anticoagulation is not suspended. Several groups now offer guidelines that recommend most minor dental procedures should be performed while on therapeutic warfarin. The recent approval of several new oral anticoagulants has introduced greater complexity to the management of the anticoagulated patient, and this narrative review will discuss current guidelines, the scientific underpinnings of the guidelines, and offer some practical suggestions for patients that are receiving the new agents.

  11. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management.

  12. Airway management in unconscious non-trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Klaus; Hansen, Christian Muff; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2012-01-01

    , however, there are no such firm recommendations regarding airway management and the GCS score may be less useful. The aim of this study was to describe the authors' experience with airway management in unconscious non-trauma patients in the prehospital setting with a physician-manned Mobile Emergency Care......BackgroundTracheal intubation is recommended in unconscious trauma patients to protect the airway from pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents and also to ensure ventilation and oxygenation. Unconsciousness is often defined as a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score below 9. In non-trauma patients......-trauma patients registered in the database during 2006 were included. The ambulance patient charts and medical records were scrutinised to assess outcome and the need for tracheal intubation during the first 24 h after admittance into hospital.ResultsA total of 557 unconscious non-trauma patients were examined...

  13. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......, and not based on a critical review of the available evidence, are presented. The various recommendations carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of the article text and in the detailed voting results recorded in supplementary Material, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed...

  14. Pain management in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, Barbara; Janse, Ineke C.; Sibbald, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and painful inflammatory disease. HS patients' quality of life is severely impaired, and this impairment correlates strongly with their pain. Pain in HS can be acute or chronic and has both inflammatory and noninflammatory origins. The purpose o

  15. Managing patients with complications of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, D T; Shipp, K M; Lyles, K W

    1998-06-01

    This article reviews the impact of osteoporosis on quality of life. It defines specific impairments and suggests how best to minimize the impact of osteoporosis on patients' daily lives. Specific issues such as a spinal deformity, limitations on activities of daily living, pain, functionality, social impairment, self esteem, and depression also are addressed. Finally, a multidisciplinary team approach to osteoporosis is advocated.

  16. Nutritional management of a critically injured patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arm circumference was 31.8 cm (50th percentile) and his weight was ... Key considerations in the nutritional therapy of ICU patients include ... 4. This provided enteral glutamine at 0.38 g/kg, in addition to the intravenous glutamine of 0.5 g/kg.

  17. Pain management in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, Barbara; Janse, Ineke C.; Sibbald, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and painful inflammatory disease. HS patients' quality of life is severely impaired, and this impairment correlates strongly with their pain. Pain in HS can be acute or chronic and has both inflammatory and noninflammatory origins. The purpose

  18. [Physical activity and management of obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, J M; Balarac, N

    2001-09-01

    Physical activity is recognized as an integral part of obesity treatment, in association with other therapeutic means. A major benefit of physical activity is the association with better long-term maintenance of weight loss. Physical activity has also positive psychological effects and increases quality of life. An evaluation of the usual level of physical activity and inactivity is needed for each patient. Physical activity counselling should be individualized and graded, in a perspective of individual progression. In subjects with massive obesity, remobilization based on physiotherapy techniques is the first step. All patients should be given simple advice to decrease sedentary behavior: use the stairs instead of the escalators, limit the time spent seated, etc. In general, current physical activity recommendations for the general population fit well with a majority of obese patients, i.e. a minimum of 30 minutes/day of moderate intensity physical activity (brisk walking or equivalent) on most, and preferably all, days of the week. Physical activities of higher intensities (endurance training programme) can be proposed on an individual basis. The type of physical activity required for long-term weight maintenance, and the question of adherence to physical activity recommendations in obese patients should be further investigated.

  19. Psychotherapeutic strategies in the management of depressed and suicidal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiev, A

    1975-07-01

    This paper examines the Crisis Intervention Therapy developed by Dr. Kiev's Cornell Program, for the management of depressed and suicidal patients. Combining chemotherapy with supportive psychotherapy, he emphasizes the acquisition of Life Strategy Skills, using motivational audiotaped material. The therapeutic rationale is also explored and related to the explosive and unpredictable interpersonal world of suicidal patients and attiudes of patients and significant others toward the sick role.

  20. Ambulatory anesthesia: optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient

    OpenAIRE

    Polderman JAW; van Wilpe R; Eshuis JH; Preckel B; Hermanides J

    2016-01-01

    Jorinde AW Polderman, Robert van Wilpe, Jan H Eshuis, Benedikt Preckel, Jeroen Hermanides Department of Anaesthesiology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Given the growing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and the growing number of surgical procedures performed in an ambulatory setting, DM is one of the most encountered comorbidities in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. Perioperative management of ambulatory patients wi...

  1. [The physician-patient relationship in chronic disease management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginies, P

    2008-07-01

    The relationship between patients and clinicians is a key element in the management of chronic diseases. With the objective of a more efficient communication, the clinician should know his own personality but also the patient personality. The organisation of the consultation, of the waiting room and of the secretary has to facilitate this relationship. The amelioration of this relationship is usefulness only for the clinician in particularly complicated cases but also for the patients suffering from chronic diseases.

  2. Team management of the elderly patient with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, G A; Myles, J W; Williams, D R; Anand, J K

    1988-02-20

    The management of 200 consecutive patients with hip fracture by a joint hospital and community team in Peterborough has shown that over half the patients could be discharged considerably earlier than is usual. The patients are cared for at home by the hospital-at-home nursing service and generally need much less nursing care than patients treated conventionally. In the first 10 months of the scheme 733 inpatient bed-days were saved and the average hospital stay of patients discharged home was reduced from 22.0 to 14.6 days.

  3. Alzheimer's disease care management plan: maximizing patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinkman, Anna

    2005-03-01

    Nurse practitioners have the potential to significantly impact the care of patients with dementia. Healthcare providers can now offer patients medications that will control symptoms and prolong functioning. As a result of ongoing contact with patients, NPs play an important role in assessing and screening patients for AD and educating the patients, families, and caregivers about the disease. Alzheimer's disease is a chronic, progressive illness that requires long-term management. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with available medications and appreciate the need to individualize therapy to maximize efficacy and minimize potential adverse drug reactions.

  4. Personalised Hip Therapy: development of a non-operative protocol to treat femoroacetabular impingement syndrome in the FASHIoN randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Peter Dh; Dickenson, Edward J; Robinson, David; Hughes, Ivor; Realpe, Alba; Hobson, Rachel; Griffin, Damian R; Foster, Nadine E

    2016-10-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is increasingly recognised as a cause of hip pain. As part of the design of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of arthroscopic surgery for FAI syndrome, we developed a protocol for non-operative care and evaluated its feasibility. In phase one, we developed a protocol for non-operative care for FAI in the UK National Health Service (NHS), through a process of systematic review and consensus gathering. In phase two, the protocol was tested in an internal pilot RCT for protocol adherence and adverse events. The final protocol, called Personalised Hip Therapy (PHT), consists of four core components led by physiotherapists: detailed patient assessment, education and advice, help with pain relief and an exercise-based programme that is individualised, supervised and progressed over time. PHT is delivered over 12-26 weeks in 6-10 physiotherapist-patient contacts, supplemented by a home exercise programme. In the pilot RCT, 42 patients were recruited and 21 randomised to PHT. Review of treatment case report forms, completed by physiotherapists, showed that 13 patients (62%) received treatment that had closely followed the PHT protocol. 13 patients reported some muscle soreness at 6 weeks, but there were no serious adverse events. PHT provides a structure for the non-operative care of FAI and offers guidance to clinicians and researchers in an evolving area with limited evidence. PHT was deliverable within the National Health Service, is safe, and now forms the comparator to arthroscopic surgery in the UK FASHIoN trial (ISRCTN64081839). ISRCTN 09754699. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Personalised Hip Therapy: development of a non-operative protocol to treat femoroacetabular impingement syndrome in the FASHIoN randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Peter DH; Dickenson, Edward J; Robinson, David; Hughes, Ivor; Realpe, Alba; Hobson, Rachel; Griffin, Damian R; Foster, Nadine E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is increasingly recognised as a cause of hip pain. As part of the design of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of arthroscopic surgery for FAI syndrome, we developed a protocol for non-operative care and evaluated its feasibility. Methods In phase one, we developed a protocol for non-operative care for FAI in the UK National Health Service (NHS), through a process of systematic review and consensus gathering. In phase two, the protocol was tested in an internal pilot RCT for protocol adherence and adverse events. Results The final protocol, called Personalised Hip Therapy (PHT), consists of four core components led by physiotherapists: detailed patient assessment, education and advice, help with pain relief and an exercise-based programme that is individualised, supervised and progressed over time. PHT is delivered over 12–26 weeks in 6–10 physiotherapist-patient contacts, supplemented by a home exercise programme. In the pilot RCT, 42 patients were recruited and 21 randomised to PHT. Review of treatment case report forms, completed by physiotherapists, showed that 13 patients (62%) received treatment that had closely followed the PHT protocol. 13 patients reported some muscle soreness at 6 weeks, but there were no serious adverse events. Conclusion PHT provides a structure for the non-operative care of FAI and offers guidance to clinicians and researchers in an evolving area with limited evidence. PHT was deliverable within the National Health Service, is safe, and now forms the comparator to arthroscopic surgery in the UK FASHIoN trial (ISRCTN64081839). Trial registration number ISRCTN 09754699. PMID:27629405

  6. Management of lipid disorders in patients living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Merle; Malvestutto, Carlos; Aberg, Judith A

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery and development of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV has become a chronic disease with patients living longer lives and to ages where co-morbidities, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) are prevalent. Diagnosis and management of risk factors for CVD, in particular dyslipidemia, have become an important part of the overall care for patients living with HIV infection. Existing guidelines and recommendations for the management of dyslipidemia for persons with HIV infection are largely based on guidelines for the general population. Clinical and epidemiologic research efforts are ongoing to provide information specific to patients living with HIV. This review offers a detailed guide for clinicians who manage dyslipidemia in patients infected with HIV. The first sections provide background information on dyslipidemia, risk stratification, and targets for lipid therapy. This is followed by a step-by-step approach for diagnosis and treatment with specific information on lipid drug use for patients with HIV. The recommendations presented here are based on existing guidelines for the general population, evidence from research in patients infected with HIV, and the clinical experience of the authors. Management issues for which little or no information is available specific to this patient population are noted and serve to highlight the many gaps in our knowledge that will need to be addressed.

  7. Perioperative management of patients with lung carcinoma and cerebral metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghita, Eva; Pruna, Viorel Mihai; Neagoe, Luminita; Bucur, Cristina; Cristescu, Catioara; Gorgan, Mircea Radu

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The present study proposes to present the importance of perioperative therapeutic management in survival prolongation and the quality of life for patients that have undergone surgery for cerebral metastases secondary to pulmonary tumors. Method: During 2001-2009, 40 patients with ages between 43-74 years have been diagnosed in our clinic with pulmonary tumor and cerebral metastases. The patients presented single cerebral lesion (excepting one patient with 2 cerebral metastases) and pulmonary tumor. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was high in all cases. All patients have undergone operation with general anesthesia. Results:For all patients the reduction of ICP and keeping an optimal CPP (cerebral perfusion pressure) was pursued. In 38 cases, general anesthesia was performed with Sevoflurane and opioids (fentanyl, remifentanyl, sufentanyl) and in 2 cases the TIVA (total intravenous anesthesia) technique was used with propofol and remifentanyl. 14 of the patients required intraoperative depletive treatment through administering mannitol 20%. 37 patients (92%) have been discharged with improved neurological condition without showing signs of intracranial hypertension, convulsive seizures and with partially or totally remitted hemiparesis and one patient had worse postoperative neurological status. Conclusion:Pulmonary tumor with cerebral metastases represent an important cause for death rate. To solve secondary cerebral lesions, the perioperative management must include assesment and choosing an anesthesia technique with a proper intraoperative management. PMID:21977115

  8. Dental management in patients with hemostasis alteration

    OpenAIRE

    Claramunt Lozano, Ariadna; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia; Gavaldá Esteve, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Haemostasis is a mechanism that, through different interdependent biologic processes, has the purpose of ensuring the integrity and permeability of the circulatory system. Hemostasis term means prevention the loss of blood. Interventions or treatments in the oral cavity, in particular those with a possibility of bleeding, represent a risk for patients with disorders of hemostasis. Prevention is the key to avoid bleeding complications after oral surgical procedures and therefore it...

  9. Management of fatigue in patients with cancer -- a practical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koornstra, Rutger H T; Peters, Marlies; Donofrio, Stacey; van den Borne, Ben; de Jong, Floris A

    2014-07-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a serious clinical problem and is one of the most common symptoms experienced by cancer patients. CRF has deleterious effects on many aspects of patient quality of life including their physical, psychological and social well-being. It can also limit their ability to function, socialise and participate in previously enjoyable activities. The aetiology of CRF is complex and multidimensional, involving many potentially contributing elements. These include tumour-related factors and comorbid medical/psychological conditions and also side effects associated with anti-cancer therapies or other medications. Barriers to the effective management of CRF exist both on the side of physicians and patients, and as a result CRF often remains unrecognised and undiscussed in clinical practice. A change of approach is required, where fatigue is treated as central to patient management during and after systemic anti-cancer treatment. In this review we summarise factors involved in the aetiology of CRF and the barriers to its effective management, as well as factors involved in the screening, diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients experiencing fatigue. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches to its management are also reviewed. We suggest an algorithm for the process of managing CRF, guided by our experiences in The Netherlands, which we hope may provide a useful tool to healthcare professionals dealing with cancer patients in their daily practice. Although CRF is a serious and complex clinical problem, if it is worked through in a structured and comprehensive way, effective management has the potential to much improve patient quality of life.

  10. Perioperative Management of Interscalene Block in Patients with Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Schwenk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interscalene nerve block impairs ipsilateral lung function and is relatively contraindicated for patients with lung impairment. We present a case of an 89-year-old female smoker with prior left lung lower lobectomy and mild to moderate lung disease who presented for right shoulder arthroplasty and insisted on regional anesthesia. The patient received a multimodal perioperative regimen that consisted of a continuous interscalene block, acetaminophen, ketorolac, and opioids. Surgery proceeded uneventfully and postoperative analgesia was excellent. Pulmonary physiology and management of these patients will be discussed. A risk/benefit discussion should occur with patients having impaired lung function before performance of interscalene blocks. In this particular patient with mild to moderate disease, analgesia was well managed through a multimodal approach including a continuous interscalene block, and close monitoring of respiratory status took place throughout the perioperative period, leading to a successful outcome.

  11. Utilizing patient satisfaction surveys to prepare for Medicaid managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, T T; Gomez, P S

    2001-02-01

    To prepare for Medicaid managed care, a community health center incorporated the business principle of continuous quality improvement, often used in the private sector to improve customer service, into its planning process. The initial endeavor was to create a patient satisfaction survey that was appropriate for the uniqueness of the community. The survey, taken monthly, resulted in both staff and patients making active improvements in the clinic environment. Staff showed more enthusiasm, and patients were more assertive in their attitudes toward the clinic. The empowerment of the patient to take ownership in the clinic will be coupled with the next step of the formalized plan, that of educating patients on the steps necessary to ensure that their Medicaid managed care facility will be the local community health center.

  12. Constipation and flatulence management for stoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jennie

    2007-10-01

    The ostomate (person with a stoma) has many issues to overcome when coming to terms with their new stoma. Some of the problems that can be associated with a colostomy are constipation and flatus. The ileostomate may also be troubled with flatulence. Causal factors for flatus may be ingested air or gut bacteria. Constipation may be a result of many factors, including diet and medication. The community nurse is in an ideal position to assist this patient group and this article offers a number of potential treatments or advice that the community nurse can provide for the ostomate. Many of the tips provided in this article are simple but may be potentially effective.

  13. Management of Hyperglycemia and Enteral Nutrition in the Hospitalized Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia Ann; Wien, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    There has been increased attention on the importance of identifying and distinguishing the differences between stress-induced hyperglycemia (SH), newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH), and hyperglycemia in persons with established diabetes mellitus (DM). Inpatient blood glucose control is now being recognized as not only a cost issue for hospitals but also a concern for patient safety and care. The reasons for the increased incidence of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients include preexisting DM, undiagnosed DM or prediabetes, SH, and medication-induced hyperglycemia with resulting transient blood glucose variability. It is clear that identifying and documenting hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with and without a previous diagnosis of DM and initiating prompt insulin treatment are important. Agreement on the optimum treatment goals for hyperglycemia remains quite controversial, and the benefits of intensive glucose management may be lost at the cost of hypoglycemia in intensive care unit patients. Nutrition support in the form of enteral nutrition (EN) increases the risk of hyperglycemia in both critical and non-critically ill hospitalized patients. Reasons for beginning a tube feeding are the same whether a person has NDH or DM. What differs is how to incorporate EN into the established insulin management protocols. The risk for hyperglycemia with the addition of EN is even higher in those without a previous diagnosis of DM. This review discusses the incidence of hyperglycemia, the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, factors contributing to hyperglycemia in the hospitalized patient, glycemic management goals, current glycemic management recommendations, and considerations for EN formula selection, administration, and treatment.

  14. Ethical issues in patient safety: Implications for nursing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the ethical issues impacting the phenomenon of patient safety and to present implications for nursing management. Previous knowledge of this perspective is fragmented. In this discussion, the main drivers are identified and formulated in 'the ethical imperative' of patient safety. Underlying values and principles are considered, with the aim of increasing their visibility for nurse managers' decision-making. The contradictory nature of individual and utilitarian safety is identified as a challenge in nurse management practice, together with the context of shared responsibility and identification of future challenges. As a conclusion, nurse managers play a strategic role in patient safety. Their role is to incorporate ethical values of patient safety into decision-making at all levels in an organization, and also to encourage clinical nurses to consider values in the provision of care to patients. Patient safety that is sensitive to ethics provides sustainable practice where the humanity and dignity of all stakeholders are respected.

  15. Therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient: safety planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Bridget B; Homaifar, Beeta Y; Wortzel, Hal S

    2014-05-01

    This column is the fourth in a series describing a model for therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient. Previous columns presented an overview of the therapeutic risk management model, provided recommendations for how to augment risk assessment using structured assessments, and discussed the importance of risk stratification in terms of both severity and temporality. This final column in the series discusses the safety planning intervention as a critical component of therapeutic risk management of suicide risk. We first present concerns related to the relatively common practice of using no-suicide contracts to manage risk. We then present the safety planning intervention as an alternative approach and provide recommendations for how to use this innovative strategy to therapeutically mitigate risk in the suicidal patient.

  16. Cancer Carepartners: Improving patients' symptom management by engaging informal caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Maria J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have found that cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy can effectively manage their own symptoms when given tailored advice. This approach, however, may challenge patients with poor performance status and/or emotional distress. Our goal is to test an automated intervention that engages a friend or family member to support a patient through chemotherapy. Methods/Design We describe the design and rationale of a randomized, controlled trial to assess the efficacy of 10 weeks of web-based caregiver alerts and tailored advice for helping a patient manage symptoms related to chemotherapy. The study aims to test the primary hypothesis that patients whose caregivers receive alerts and tailored advice will report less frequent and less severe symptoms at 10 and 14 weeks when compared to patients in the control arm; similarly, they will report better physical function, fewer outpatient visits and hospitalizations related to symptoms, and greater adherence to chemotherapy. 300 patients with solid tumors undergoing chemotherapy at two Veteran Administration oncology clinics reporting any symptom at a severity of ≥4 and a willing informal caregiver will be assigned to either 10 weeks of automated telephonic symptom assessment (ATSA alone, or 10 weeks of ATSA plus web-based notification of symptom severity and problem solving advice to their chosen caregiver. Patients and caregivers will be surveyed at intake, 10 weeks and 14 weeks. Both groups will receive standard oncology, hospice, and palliative care. Discussion Patients undergoing chemotherapy experience many symptoms that they may be able to manage with the support of an activated caregiver. This intervention uses readily available technology to improve patient caregiver communication about symptoms and caregiver knowledge of symptom management. If successful, it could substantially improve the quality of life of veterans and their families during the stresses of

  17. Management of Demented Patients in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Valeriani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The hospitalization of the elderly with acute illness is one of the most discussed in the organization of health services, it is not yet clear whether the hospital is really the best response to the needs of the elderly, especially those with cognitive impairment. Despite evidence of possible adverse effects of hospitalization (immobilization, acute confusional state resulting in sedation, risk of falls, intestinal sub-ileus, there has been an increasing use of the hospital, particularly to specialist services. Regardless of the benefits from the shelter (instrumental diagnosis and prompt treatment of acute somatic disease, in people with dementia it needs to identify the characteristics of the person (cognitive impairment, functional status, somatic comorbidity, social and familial status, the personal needs and, therefore, diagnostic and therapeutic targets which must be assumed for that sick person during hospitalization. To this end, it is fundamental the role of assessment and diagnostic orientation that takes place in the Department of Emergency and Acceptance (DEA, which mainly receives patients at the hospital. Even before the hospital recovery it is therefore essential to check how many elderly patients with cognitive impairment that belong to the DEA, and what are their needs.

  18. Knowledge management for chronic patient control and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Nieves; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Dorado, Julián; Pazos, Alejandro; Pereira, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) can be seen as the process of capturing, developing, sharing, and effectively using organizational knowledge. In this context, the work presented here proposes a KM System to be used in the scope of chronic patient control and monitoring for distributed research projects. It was designed in order to enable communication between patient and doctors, as well as to be usedbythe researchers involved in the project for its management. The proposed model integrates all the information concerning every patient and project management tasks in the Institutional Memory of a KMSystem and uses an ontology to maintain the information and its categorization independently. Furthermore, taking the philosophy of intelligent agents, the system will interact with the user to show him the information according to his preferences and access rights. Finally, three different scenarios of application are described.

  19. Orchestrating the management of patients with high-output stomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Alison

    Working in isolation, managing high-output stomas can be stressful and difficult, with patient outcomes varying significantly. For the stoma care clinical nurse specialist, managing the choice of stoma appliance is only a small part of the care provided. To standardise and improve outcomes for patients with high-output stomas, team working is required. After contacting other stoma care services and using guidance from the High Impact Actions for Stoma Care document ( Coloplast, 2010 ), it was evident that the team should put together an algorithm/flow chart to guide both specialists and ward nursing staff in the evidence-based and standardised management of patients with high-output stomas. This article presents the flowchart that was produced and uses case studies to demonstrate improvements.

  20. [Management of patients with pulmonary fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestaev, D V; Karateev, D E; Nasonov, E L

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune systemic disease. Its systemic manifestations include interstitial lung lesions (ILL). According to morphological studies and X-ray computed tomography, the incidence of RA-associated ILL is 60-70% which gives reason to consider pulmonary fibrosis (PF) to be the main form of lung pathology in this disease. PF is a pathological process in the lungs characterized by high mortality rate and refractoriness to therapy. It is a heterogeneous group of disorders with progressive and irreversible destruction of lung architectonics due to scarification that in the end results in organ dysfunction, disturbed gaseous exchange and respiratory distress. Changes in the interstitial lung tissue resulting from local autoimmune rheumatoid inflammation develop by the same mechanisms that underlie idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis used as a model for classification, pathogenesis and treatment of RA-associated ILL. This review is focused on the therapeutic strategy for the management of PF in the context of consensus of the American Thoracic Society (ATS), European Respiratory Society (ERS), Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) and Latin American Thoracic Association (ALAT, 2010/2011).

  1. Management of patients with hepatitis C infection and renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2015-02-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with more rapid liver disease progression and reduced renal graft and patients' survival following kidney transplantation. Evaluations and management of HCV in patients with renal disease are challenging. The pharmacokinetics of interferons (IFN), ribavirin (RBV) and some direct acting antiviral (DAA), such as sofosbuvir, are altered in patients with ESRD. With dose adjustment and careful monitoring, treatment of HCV in patients with ESRD can be associated with sustained virological response (SVR) rates nearly comparable to that of patients with normal renal function. DAA-based regimens, especially the IFN-free and RBV-free regimens, are theoretically preferred for patients with ESRD and KT in order to increase SVR rates and to reduce treatment side effects. However, based on the data for pharmacokinetics, dosing safety and efficacy of DAA for patients with severe renal impairment are lacking. This review will be focused on the evaluations, available pharmacologic data, and management of HCV in patients with severe renal impairment, patients who underwent KT, and those who suffered from HCV-related renal disease, according to the available treatment options, including DAA.

  2. Patient web portals, disease management, and primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Prochaska, Judith J; Williams, Lovoria B; Besenyi, Gina M; Heboyan, Vahé; Goggans, D Stephen; Yoo, Wonsuk; De Leo, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Efforts aimed at health care reform and continued advances in information technologies have prompted interest among providers and researchers in patient web portals. Patient web portals are password-protected online websites that offer the patients 24-hour access to personal health information from anywhere with an Internet connection. This article, which is based upon bibliographic searches in PubMed, reviews important developments in web portals for primary and secondary disease prevention, including patient web portals tethered to electronic medical records, disease-specific portals, health disparities, and health-related community web portals. Although findings have not been uniformly positive, several studies of the effectiveness of health care system patient portals in chronic disease management have shown promising results with regard to patient outcomes. Patient web portals have also shown promising results in increasing adherence with screening recommendations. Racial and ethnic minorities, younger persons, and patients who are less educated or have lower health literacy have been found to be less likely to use patient portals. Additional studies are needed of the utility and effectiveness of different elements of web portals for different patient populations. This should include additional diseases and health topics such as smoking cessation and weight management.

  3. Older Patients' Perspectives on Managing Complexity in CKD Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, C Barrett; Vandenberg, Ann E; Phillips, Lawrence S; McClellan, William M; Johnson, Theodore M; Echt, Katharina V

    2017-04-03

    Patients with CKD are asked to perform self-management tasks including dietary changes, adhering to medications, avoiding nephrotoxic drugs, and self-monitoring hypertension and diabetes. Given the effect of aging on functional capacity, self-management may be especially challenging for older patients. However, little is known about the specific challenges older adults face maintaining CKD self-management regimens. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study designed to understand the relationship among factors facilitating or impeding CKD self-management in older adults. Six focus groups (n=30) were held in August and September of 2014 with veterans≥70 years old with moderate-to-severe CKD receiving nephrology care at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Grounded theory with a constant comparative method was used to collect, code, and analyze data. Participants had a mean age (range) of 75.1 (70.1-90.7) years, 60% were black, and 96.7% were men. The central organizing concept that emerged from these data were managing complexity. Participants typically did not have just one chronic condition, CKD, but a number of commonly co-occurring conditions. Recommendations for CKD self-management therefore occurred within a complex regimen of recommendations for managing other diseases. Participants identified overtly discordant treatment recommendations across chronic conditions (e.g., arthritis and CKD). Prioritization emerged as one effective strategy for managing complexity (e.g., focusing on BP control). Some patients arrived at the conclusion that they could group concordant recommendations to simplify their regimens (e.g., protein restriction for both gout and CKD). Among older veterans with moderate-to-severe CKD, multimorbidity presents a major challenge for CKD self-management. Because virtually all older adults with CKD have multimorbidity, an integrated treatment approach that supports self-management across commonly occurring conditions may be

  4. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Diagnosis and management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minako Katayama; Hari P Chaliki

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis(AS) is a disease that progresses slowly for years without symptoms, so patients need to be carefully managed with appropriate follow up and referred for aortic valve replacement in a timely manner. Development of symptoms is a clear indication for aortic valve intervention in patients with severe AS. The decision for early surgery in patients with asymptomatic severe AS is more complex. In this review, we discuss how to identify high-risk patients with asymptomatic severe AS who may benefit from early surgery.

  6. Management of the hospitalized diabetes patient with an insulin pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    More than 375,000 Americans manage their diabetes with an insulin pump, and this number continues to increase. Many of these patients will want to remain on their insulin pump while hospitalized, so the nurse needs to know about how to care for the hospitalized patient wearing an insulin pump. This article discusses the benefits of intensive insulin therapy, how the insulin pump works, initial insulin-pump dosing, candidate selection, advantages and disadvantages of using an insulin pump, troubleshooting the pump, nursing care of the hospitalized patient wearing an insulin pump, and development of hospital protocols for the care of such patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment and Management of Hypertension in Patients on Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Joseph; Pogue, Velvie; Rahman, Mahboob; Reisin, Efrain; Weir, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is common, difficult to diagnose, and poorly controlled among patients with ESRD. However, controversy surrounds the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. Here, we describe the diagnosis, epidemiology, and management of hypertension in dialysis patients, and examine the data sparking debate over appropriate methods for diagnosing and treating hypertension. Furthermore, we consider the issues uniquely related to hypertension in pediatric dialysis patients. Future clinical trials designed to clarify the controversial results discussed here should lead to the implementation of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that improve long-term cardiovascular outcomes in patients with ESRD. PMID:24700870

  8. [Customer and patient satisfaction. An appropriate management tool in hospitals?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawils, S; Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Bleich, C

    2012-09-01

    Recently, the concept of patient satisfaction has been established as an essential part of the quality management of hospitals. Despite the concept's lack of theoretical and methodological foundations, patient surveys on subjective hospital experiences contribute immensely to the improvement of hospitals. What needs to be considered critically in this context is the concept of customer satisfaction for patients, the theoretical integration of empirical results, the reduction of false satisfaction indications and the application of risk-adjusted versus naïve benchmarking of data. This paper aims to contribute to the theoretical discussion of the topic and to build a basis for planning methodologically sound patient surveys.

  9. Airway management in patients with deep neck infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soo Young; Woo, Jae Hee; Kim, Yoon Jin; Chun, Eun Hee; Han, Jong In; Kim, Dong Yeon; Baik, Hee Jung; Chung, Rack Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Securing the airway in patients undergoing surgical intervention to control a deep neck infection (DNI) is challenging for anesthesiologists due to the distorted airway anatomy, limited mouth opening, tissue edema, and immobility. It is critical to assess the risk of a potential difficult airway and prepare the most appropriate airway management method. We reviewed our anesthetic experiences managing patients with DNIs, focusing on the need for video-laryngoscope or awake fiberoptic intubation beyond a standard intubation from the anesthesiologist's perspective. When patients had infections in the masticatory space, mouth of floor, oropharyngeal mucosal space, or laryngopharynx, their airways tended to be managed using methods requiring more effort by the anesthesiologists, and more extensive equipment preparation, compared with use of a standard laryngoscope. The degree to which the main lesion influenced the airway anatomy, especially at the level of epiglottis and aryepiglottic fold was related to the airway management method selected. When managing the airways of patients undergoing surgery for DNIs under general anesthesia, anesthesiologists should use imaging with computed tomography to evaluate the preoperative airway status and a comprehensive understanding of radiological findings, comorbidities, and patients’ symptoms is needed. PMID:27399122

  10. Cytomegalovirus quantification: where to next in optimising patient management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Claire; Emery, Vincent C

    2011-08-01

    Over the years quantification of cytomegalovirus (HCMV) load in blood has become a mainstay of clinical management helping direct deployment of antiviral therapy, assess response to therapy and highlight cases of drug resistance. The review focuses on a brief historical perspective of HCMV quantification and the ways in which viral load is being used to improve patient management. A review of the published literature and also personal experience at the Royal Free Hospital. Quantification of HCMV is essential for efficient patient management. The ability to use real time quantitative PCR to drive pre-emptive therapy has improved patient management after transplantation although the threshold viral loads for deployment differ between laboratories. The field would benefit from access to a universal standard for quantification. We see that HCMV quantification will continue to be central to delivering individualised patient management and facilitating multicentre trials of new antiviral agents and vaccines in a variety of clinical settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Guidelines for managing the orthodontic-restorative patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokich, V G; Spear, F M

    1997-03-01

    Occasionally, patients require restorative treatment during or after orthodontic therapy. Patients with worn or abraded teeth, peg-shaped lateral incisors, fractured teeth, multiple edentulous spaces, or other restorative needs may require tooth positioning that is slightly different from a nonrestored, nonabraded, completely dentulous adolescent. Generally, orthodontists are not accustomed to dealing with patients who require restorative intervention. Should the objectives of orthodontic treatment differ for the restorative patient compared with the nonrestorative patient? How should the teeth be positioned during orthodontic therapy to facilitate specific restorations? Should teeth be restored before, during, or perhaps after orthodontics? The answers to these and other important questions are vital to the successful treatment of some orthodontic patients. This article will provide a series of eight guidelines to help the interdisciplinary team manage treatment for the orthodontic-restorative patient.

  12. Airway Management in a Patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Andrea G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 3-month-old female with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement with a focus on airway management. WHS is a rare 4p microdeletion syndrome resulting in multiple congenital abnormalities, including craniofacial deformities. Microcephaly, micrognathia, and glossoptosis are common features in WHS patients and risk factors for a pediatric airway that is potentially difficult to intubate. We discuss anesthesia strategies for airway preparation and management in a WHS patient requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. PMID:27752382

  13. Airway Management in a Patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Gamble

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 3-month-old female with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement with a focus on airway management. WHS is a rare 4p microdeletion syndrome resulting in multiple congenital abnormalities, including craniofacial deformities. Microcephaly, micrognathia, and glossoptosis are common features in WHS patients and risk factors for a pediatric airway that is potentially difficult to intubate. We discuss anesthesia strategies for airway preparation and management in a WHS patient requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation.

  14. Airway management in patients with burn contractures of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Smita; Mullick, Parul

    2015-12-01

    Airway management of patients with burn contracture of the neck (PBC neck) is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Patient evaluation includes history, physical and airway examination. A safe approach in the airway management of a patient with moderate to severe PBC neck is to secure the airway with the patient awake. The anesthesiologist should have a pre-planned strategy for intubation of the difficult airway. The choices advocated for airway management of such patients include awake fiberoptic-guided intubation, use of intubating laryngeal mask airway, intubation without neuromuscular blocking agents, intubation with neuromuscular blocking agents after testing the ability to ventilate by mask, pre-induction neck scar release under local anesthesia and ketamine or sedation followed by direct laryngoscopy and intubation and video-laryngoscope guided intubation, amongst others. Preparation of the patient includes an explanation of the proposed procedure, sedation, administration of antisialogogues and regional anesthesia of the airway. The various options for intubation of patients with PBC neck, intraoperative concerns and safe extubation are described. Back-up plans, airway rescue strategies and a review of literature on this subject are presented.

  15. SELF MANAGEMENT INTERVENTION INCREASING COMPLIANCE IN PATIENT WITH DM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nur Kholifah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM was a degenerative disease which often found in the community. Diabetes was caused by unhealthy habits, such as overeating, lack of exercise, and stress. The purpose of this study was to identify selfmanagement as one of the interventions that can improve treatment compliance in patients with diabetes. Method: This study was used quasy experiments non randomized pretest-posttest design. Samples were 20 families who lived with type 2 diabetes patient. Variable independent was self management intervention and variable dependent was patient complience. Data were collected by using interview, food recall, and observation on behavioral change. Data then analyzed by using paired t-test with α≤0.05. Results: The results had showed that before intervention only 3 (15 % respondents who obey diabetes diet, then increase to 19 (95 % respondents after intervention with p value=0.000. Patient’s medication compliance also increased, from 6 (30 % respondents before intervention to 20 (100% respondents after intervention, with p value= 0.000. Patient compliance on exercise also increase from 2 (10% respondents before intervention, become 19 (95% respondents after intervention, with p value=0.000. Discussion: Self management intervention could improve patient’s knowledge, problem-solving skills, and self-effi cacy. Self management should be done after the patient had understand their disease and realized the importance of self-care. Community health nurses were expected to implement self management as one of nursing intervention, so that patient compliance on their treatment can be increased. Key words: Self management intervention, compliance, patient DM type 2

  16. Allied health team management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J R; Brandt, K D

    1984-09-01

    The use of a coordinated team of allied health professionals (AHPs) to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis assigned to experimental groups (EG) and comparison groups (CG) was assessed. The EG patients were evaluated regularly by each AHP team member, whereas CG patients were seen by AHPs only upon referral. Of the 10 EG and 13 CG patients who remained in the study for 2 years, the EG patients initially exhibited somewhat greater disease activity than CG (as reflected by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and duration of morning stiffness). After 2 years, EG patients demonstrated less disease activity than at the outset, whereas CG patients either showed little change in these parameters or deteriorated during the study. Grip strength, which was initially similar in the two groups, improved in EG patients but decreased in CG patients, so that after 2 years a significant difference was noted between the two groups (p less than .05). Tendency to lose hand range of motion was also greater in CG than in EG patients. Some EG patients showed improvement in finger flexion deformities during the study. Furthermore, EG patients showed a greater tendency to acquire positive attitudes regarding themselves and family relationships. These results suggest that ongoing "team care" may be more efficacious than episodic use of AHPs in management of patients with mild rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Defining chronic cancer: patient experiences and self-management needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Clare; Pini, Simon; Bartlett, Yvonne Kiera; Velikova, Galina

    2015-12-01

    Chronic cancer is poorly defined and strategies for supporting patients during this disease phase are lacking. This research defines chronic cancer, explores patient experiences and reviews patients' support needs against those described in the 2007 Department of Health Generic Choice Model for Long-term Conditions (DoH-GCM). Semistructured interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and data explored for emergent themes. The a priori themes from DoH-GCM were applied: clinical support; self-care and self-management; supporting independence; psychological support; and social and economic factors. 56 patients >12 months postdiagnosis of advanced cancer were recruited from five clinics at a Yorkshire cancer centre: breast (n=11); renal (n=11); colorectal/gastrointestinal (n=12); gynaecological (n=12); and prostate (n=10). Most patients aspired to living normal lives. Challenges included frequent and lengthy hospital appointments, long-term symptom control and uncertainty. Only renal and prostate patients reported routine access to specialist nursing. Uptake of support services was varied and there was generally poor understanding of support pathways for non-medical problems and issues occurring when patients were not receiving active treatment. There was variation in coping strategies and ability of patients to attain a positive outlook on life. For patients to do well in this cancer phase requires good self-management of symptoms plus taking an active role in accessing appropriate services as needed. Care planning at the point of transition to the chronic phase of cancer should focus on evaluating patients' needs, clarifying support pathways, increasing the profile and involvement of community services and organisations, and supporting patients and families develop effective self-management skills. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Symptom Management in Patients with Stage 5 CKD Opting for Conservative Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sheila

    2016-09-22

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3-5 now affects 8.5% of adults in the United Kingdom; with 4% of patients expected to reach stage 5 CKD. Increasing numbers of older patients are contributing to the growth of demand of kidney services. With the exception of transplantation, dialysis has been the main form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for advanced CKD. This elderly population is usually too frail and has many other co-existing medical complaints or co morbidities to undergo transplantation. Dialysis is an invasive treatment, and some frail elderly patients can experience many dialysis related symptoms. An alternative option for these patients is to choose conservative management (CM) of their stage 5 CKD. These patients often have complex supportive and palliative care needs. The frequency, severity and distress caused by symptoms related to stage 5 CKD are often under recognized and under treated. There is a need for early identification and management of symptoms as they present in patients with stage 5 CKD being managed conservatively. Symptom assessment should be focused on anticipating, identifying and alleviating any symptoms. This needs to be incorporated into the regular practice of those managing CM patients.

  19. Optimising the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients: emergency treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Naeije

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a rare and potentially fatal disease whose management is usually restricted to a few specialised centres. As patients do not necessarily live in the neighbourhood of these centres, daily care and emergencies have to be delegated to first and second lines. Treatment guidelines do not usually provide recommendations for acute emergency situations as evidence is scarce. This short review provides a description of our therapeutic protocols based on available data. A model of transmural organisation of care for PAH patients, currently applied in Belgium, is described. Thereafter, based on an analysis of the reasons of death in the PAH population, a review of the main emergencies is provided. Cardiac arrest and resuscitation, decompensated right heart failure, respiratory failure, arrhythmia, pericardial effusion, haemoptysis, surgery and drug-related adverse events will be discussed successively. Case reports showing the precariousness of PAH patients will enforce our thesis of the need for optimal patient management organisation.

  20. Psychological aspects in the management of patients with essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Genesia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The hypertensive patient is the most stable phenotype in psychosomatic medicine. Hypertensive patients represent a vulnerable population that deserves special attention from health care providers and systems, and psychosomatic medicine may be an important tool in the management of high blood pressure. Depression, anxiety disorders and personality features are often associated with elevated blood pressure (BP and they may have a role in the development of mild high-renin essential hypertension. Besides, “white coat” hypertension and “masked” hypertension demonstrate how clinic blood pressure could be strongly related to trait anxiety. Hypertension is largely asymptomatic, and patients often have little understanding of the importance of achieving BP control. Medication adverse effects may become an important factor in poor adherence to the treatment and the antidepressant use increases the risk of hypertension. So, the challenge in the management of hypertensive patients is the adherence to non-pharmacological and behavioural treatments for hypertension.

  1. Can ultrasound help to manage patients with scrotal trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlan, T; Freeman, S J

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic injuries to the scrotum are uncommon but, when they do occur, frequently lead to serious complications. Early complications include testicular infarction, necrosis and abscess formation; in the longer-term trauma may result in testicular atrophy and subfertility. Early surgical intervention in patients with testicular rupture can significantly improve the clinical outcome and reduce the need for delayed orchidectomy. However, clinical examination of the scrotum following trauma is difficult and frequently inaccurate; this may result in incorrect triage of patients for surgical exploration. Scrotal ultrasound can reliably assess scrotal injuries and diagnose testicular rupture with a high level of accuracy. Additionally, ultrasound can provide important information regarding testicular perfusion, which can further inform decisions on surgical management. This article reviews the sonographic findings that may be encountered in patients with scrotal trauma, with an emphasis on blunt trauma. It describes the pivotal role that ultrasound can play in the accurate triage of these patients to surgical or conservative management.

  2. Management of Patients with Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, E; Russell, A; Kearney, P M

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as a raised serum thyroid stimulating hormone level with normal thyroxine. Despite a prevalence of up to 9% of the adult population there is widespread uncertainty on how to manage it. The aim of this study was to assess how older adults with SCH are managed in primary care. A retrospective case-note review was carried out on patients attending Mallow Primary Healthcare Centre. This study identified patients 65 years and over meeting the criteria for SCH in one year. The prevalence of SCH in this study was calculated as 2.9%. 22.2% of patients were treated with thyroxine. 6.1% of untreated patients progressed to clinical hypothyroidism within the study period while 18.2% spontaneously reverted to normal TSH levels.

  3. Assessment and management of patients with ankle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie

    2014-08-19

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and can have a significant effect on an individual's daily activities. Nurses have an important role in the assessment, management, ongoing care and support of patients with ankle injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the ankle enables nurses to identify significant injuries, which may result in serious complications, and communicate effectively with the multidisciplinary team to improve patient care and outcomes.

  4. Myasthenic crisis patients who require intensive care unit management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kimura, En; Maeda, Yasushi; Uchino, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this report was to investigate predictive factors that necessitate intensive care in myasthenic crisis (MC). We retrospectively reviewed MC patients at our institution and compared ICU and ward management groups. Higher MG-ADL scale scores, non-ocular initial symptoms, infection-triggered findings, and higher MGFA classification were observed more frequently in the ICU group. In patients with these prognostic factors, better outcomes may be obtained with early institution of intensive care.

  5. Perioperative corticosteroid management for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Wick, Elizabeth C; Salvatori, Roberto; Ha, Christina Y

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines on the appropriate use of perioperative steroids in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are lacking. As a result, corticosteroid supplementation during and after colorectal surgery procedures has been shown to be highly variable. A clearer understanding of the indications for perioperative corticosteroid administration relative to preoperative corticosteroid dosing and duration of therapy is essential. In this review, we outline the basic tenets of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and its normal response to stress, describe how corticosteroid use is thought to affect this system, and provide an overview of the currently available data on perioperative corticosteroid supplementation including the limited evidence pertaining to patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Based on currently existing data, we define "adrenal suppression," and propose a patient-based approach to perioperative corticosteroid management in the inflammatory bowel disease population based on an individual's historical use of corticosteroids, the type of surgery they are undergoing, and HPA axis testing when applicable. Patients without adrenal suppression (corticosteroid supplementation in the perioperative period; patients with adrenal suppression (>20 mg prednisone per day) should be treated with additional perioperative corticosteroid coverage above their baseline home regimen; and patients with unclear HPA axis function (>5 and <20 mg prednisone per day) should undergo preoperative HPA axis testing to determine the best management practices. The proposed management algorithm attempts to balance the risks of adrenal insufficiency and immunosuppression.

  6. Data security and patient confidentiality: the manager's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, F; Madge, B

    1996-10-01

    The maintenance of patient confidentiality is of utmost importance in the doctor patient relationship. With the advent of networks such as the National Health Service Wide Area Network in the UK, the potential to transmit identifiable clinical data will become greater. Links between general practitioners (GPs) and hospitals will allow the rapid transmission of data which if intercepted could be potentially embarrassing to the patient concerned. In 1994 the British Medical Association launched a draft bill on privacy and confidentiality and in association with this bill it is pushing for encryption of all clinical data across electronic networks. The manager's role within an acute hospital, community units and general practice, is to ensure that all employees are aware of the principles of data protection, security of hospital computer systems and that no obvious breaches of security can occur at publicly accessible terminals. Managers must be kept up to date with the latest developments in computer security such as digital signatures and be prepared to instigate these developments where practically possible. Managers must also take responsibility for the monitoring of access to terminals and be prepared to deal severely with staff who breach the code of confidentiality. Each manager must be kept informed of employees status with regard to their 'need to know' clearance level and also to promote confidentiality of patient details throughout the hospital. All of the management team must be prepared to train new staff in the principles of data security as they join the organisation and recognise their accountability if the programme fails. Data security and patient confidentiality is a broad responsibility in any healthcare organisation, with the Chief Executive accountable. In family practice, the partners are responsible and accountable. The British Medical Association believes as a matter of policy, that allowing access to personal health data without the patients

  7. Improving patient satisfaction with pain management using Six Sigma tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPree, Erin; Martin, Lisa; Anderson, Rebecca; Kathuria, Navneet; Reich, David; Porter, Carol; Chassin, Mark R

    2009-07-01

    Patient satisfaction as a direct and public measure of quality of care is changing the way hospitals address quality improvement. The feasibility of using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) methodology to improve patient satisfaction as it relates to pain management was evaluated. This project used the DMAIC methodology to improve patients' overall satisfaction with pain management on two inpatient units in an urban academic medical center. Pre- and postintervention patient surveys were conducted. The DMAIC methodology provided a data-driven structure to determine the optimal improvement strategies, as well as a long-term plan for maintaining any improvements. In addition, the Change Acceleration Process (CAP) was used throughout the project's various DMAIC stages to further the work of the team by creating a shared need to meet the objectives of the project. Overall satisfaction with pain management "excellent" ratings increased from 37% to 54%. Both units surpassed the goal of at least 50% of responses in the "excellent" category. Several key drivers of satisfaction with pain management were uncovered in the Analyze phase of the project, and each saw rating increases from the pre-intervention to postintervention surveys. Ongoing monitoring by the hospital inpatient satisfaction survey showed that the pain satisfaction score improved in subsequent quarters as compared with the pre-intervention period. The Six Sigma DMAIC methodology can be used successfully to improve patient satisfaction. The project led to measurable improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management, which have endured past the duration of the Six Sigma project. The Control phase of DMAIC allows the improvements to be incorporated into daily operations.

  8. Web-Based Distress Management for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habibović, Mirela; Denollet, Johan; Cuijpers, Pim

    2017-01-01

    distress post-ICD implantation. The WEB-based distress management program for ICD patients (WEBCARE) was developed to mitigate anxiety and depression and enhance health-related quality of life in ICD patients. This study investigates the 6- and 12-months outcomes. METHOD: A total of 289 consecutive ICD...... patients from 6 referral hospitals in the Netherlands were randomized to either the WEBCARE (n = 146) or usual care (n = 143) group. Patients in the WEBCARE group received an online, 12-weeks fixed, 6 lesson behavioral treatment based on problem solving therapy. Patients in the usual care group receive...... care as usual. RESULTS: Current findings show no significant difference on anxiety, depression or quality of life between the WEBCARE and Usual Care group at 6- and 12-months postimplantation. CONCLUSIONS: In this clinical trial of a Web-based behavioral intervention for ICD patients, the Web...

  9. Managing dysphagia. Special problems in patients with neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, J; Massey, E W

    1991-04-01

    Swallowing is a brief but intricate process. When this process is interrupted, as in patients with neurologic disorders, problems such as aspiration and risk of malnutrition can occur. The authors of this article discuss an individualized approach to evaluation and management of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia. Three cases illustrate the diversity of causes, signs and symptoms, and clinical course.

  10. A balanced approach to the management of patients with stable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-23

    Feb 23, 2009 ... The issue of the optimal management of patients with chronic stable coronary disease ... that have a higher mortality or risk of myocardial infarction will be very unlikely to .... the risk of stent thrombosis and myocardial infarction ...

  11. Collaborative management of a young patient with generalized aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Arunachalam; Raju, M A K V; Sunny, James; Cyriac, Rajesh; Bhat, Subraya; Mohandas, Ashil A; Divya, Beemavarapu

    2014-01-01

    What are the orthodontic treatment possibilities, limitations and risks inherent in patients with periodontal disorders, particularly active periodontal disease? This case report describes the interface between orthodontics, periodontics and restorative dentistry in the management of a 25-year-old young man with generalized aggressive periodontitis.

  12. Strategies to improve self-management in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toback, Mehnosh; Clark, Nancy

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of hospitalization, hospital readmission and death. Patients with heart failure have many complications, with multiple co-existing diagnoses which result in polypharmacy. Following instructions provided by many physicians, medication adjustments based on changes in their symptoms are required. Behavioral adjustments concerning diet and exercise regime are recommended. Therefore, the patient plays a crucial role in the management of heart failure. To review the available studies on heart failure self-management, and investigate educational, behavioral and psychosocial strategies that plays an important role to improve patient self-management. A literature review was conducted based upon the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidance. The articles identified through an extensive search using PubMed and UpToDate from 1999 to 2016. Improved self-management will increase compliance, promote patient quality-of-life, advance clinical outcomes, reduce hospital re-admission and will decrease hospitalization costs.

  13. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  14. Surgical Management of the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth M.; Haynes, David S.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the surgical management of children receiving cochlear implants. It identifies preoperative considerations to select patients likely to benefit, contraindications, some new surgical techniques, complications, special considerations (otitis media, meningitis, head growth, inner ear malformations, and cochlear obstruction).…

  15. Managing the patient with episodic sinus tachycardia and orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narichania, Aalap D; Schleifer, J William; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Patients with episodic sinus tachycardia and associated orthostatic intolerance present a diagnostic and management dilemma to the clinician. We define this group of disorders to include sinus node reentrant tachycardia (SNRT), inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IAST), and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). After a brief review of the current understanding of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of this group of disorders, we focus on the diagnosis and management of IAST and POTS. Our approach attempts to recognize the considerable overlap in pathophysiology and clinical presentation between these two heterogeneous conditions. Thus, we focus on a mechanism-based workup and therapeutic approach. Sinus tachycardia related to identifiable causes should first be ruled out in these patients. Next, a basic cardiovascular and autonomic workup is suggested to exclude structural heart disease, identify a putative diagnosis, and guide therapy. We review both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy, with a focus on recent advances. Larger randomized control trials and further mechanistic studies will help refine management in the future.

  16. Management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation in the diabetic patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is considerable, and prevalence rates are increasing. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation; however, diabetes also influences the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation. I...... and outcomes of heart failure and the success rates of both ablation and cardioversion in atrial fibrillation patients with diabetes. Finally, this article describes the association of HbA1c levels with the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation patients.......The global burden of atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is considerable, and prevalence rates are increasing. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation; however, diabetes also influences the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation...

  17. Categorizing patients in a forced-choice triad task: the integration of context in patient management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Devantier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies of experts' problem-solving abilities have shown that experts can attend to the deep structure of a problem whereas novices attend to the surface structure. Although this effect has been replicated in many domains, there has been little investigation into such effects in medicine in general or patient management in particular. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a 10-item forced-choice triad task in which subjects chose which one of two hypothetical patients best matched a target patient. The target and its potential matches were related in terms of surface features (e.g., two patients of a similar age and gender and deep features (e.g., two diabetic patients with similar management strategies: a patient with arthritis and a blind patient would both have difficulty with self-injected insulin. We hypothesized that experts would have greater knowledge of management categories and would be more likely to choose deep matches. We contacted 130 novices (medical students, 11 intermediates (medical residents, and 159 experts (practicing endocrinologists and 15, 11, and 8 subjects (respectively completed the task. A linear mixed effects model indicated that novices were less likely to make deep matches than experts (t(68 = -3.63, p = .0006, while intermediates did not differ from experts (t(68 = -0.24, p = .81. We also found that the number of years in practice correlated with performance on diagnostic (r = .39, p = .02, but not management triads (r = .17, p = .34. CONCLUSIONS: We found that experts were more likely than novices to match patients based on deep features, and that this pattern held for both diagnostic and management triads. Further, management and diagnostic triads were equally salient for expert physicians suggesting that physicians recognize and may create management-oriented categories of patients.

  18. Nonoperative management for patients with grade IV blunt hepatic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago Thiago

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The treatment of complex liver injuries remains a challenge. Nonoperative treatment for such injuries is increasingly being adopted as the initial management strategy. We reviewed our experience, at a University teaching hospital, in the nonoperative management of grade IV liver injuries with the intent to evaluate failure rates; need for angioembolization and blood transfusions; and in-hospital mortality and complications. Methods This is a retrospective analysis conducted at a single large trauma centre in Brazil. All consecutive, hemodynamically stable, blunt trauma patients with grade IV hepatic injury, between 1996 and 2011, were analyzed. Demographics and baseline characteristics were recorded. Failure of nonoperative management was defined by the need for surgical intervention. Need for angioembolization and transfusions, in-hospital death, and complications were also assessed Results Eighteen patients with grade IV hepatic injury treated nonoperatively during the study period were included. The nonoperative treatment failed in only one patient (5.5% who had refractory abdominal pain. However, no missed injuries and/or worsening of bleeding were observed during the operation. None of the patients died nor need angioembolization. No complications directly related to the liver were observed. Unrelated complications to the liver occurred in three patients (16.7%; one patient developed a tracheal stenosis (secondary to tracheal intubation; one had pleural effusion; and one developed an abscess in the pleural cavity. The hospital length of stay was on average 11.56 days. Conclusions In our experience, nonoperative management of grade IV liver injury for stable blunt trauma patients is associated with high success rates without significant complications.

  19. The management of Fournier's gangrene: A review of 60 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Onur Basat

    2016-09-01

    Results: 60 male patients with the mean age of 55 (ranged between 48-62 were included to the study. 50 patients survived, mortality rate was 16.6%. Septic shock (n: 4, cardiogenic shock (n:4 and pneumonia (n:2 were causes of death. As a risk factor, 45 (75% patients had DM, 40 (66.6% patients had HT, and 35 (58.3% patients had both DM and HT. There were no other co-morbid situation for 10 (16.6% patients. All the survived 50 patients were suitable for surgical reconstruction. STSG procedure was performed for 46 (76.6% patients and flap reconstruction was performed for 4 (6.6% patients. None of the patients had hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO. Length of hospitalization was 16 days (5-58 for all patients. A mean FGSI score at admission was of 5.02 +/- 2.45 for survivors compared with 13.8 +/- 4.53 for non-survivors. A mean FGSI score was of 4.56 +/- 2.28 for survivors and 11.50 +/- 2.63 in non-survivors during hospitalization. Conclusion: Although FG has high mortality rates, appropriate management of the disease can reduce rates. Early diagnosis, surgical debridement, VAC application and antibiotherapy are the essentials for FG. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(3.000: 154-159

  20. Did Not Wait Patient Management Strategy (DNW PMS) Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives This study was undertaken to assess the usefulness of senior emergency medicine specialists\\' review of all \\'did not wait\\' (DNW) patients\\' triage notes and the recall of at-risk patients. Methods A prospective study of all DNW patients was performed from 1 January to 31 December 2008. Following a daily review of charts of those who failed to wait to be seen, those patients considered to be at risk of adverse outcome were contacted by the liaison team and advised to return. Data were gathered on all DNW patients on the Oracle database and interrogated using the Diver solution. Results 2872 (6.3%) of 45 959 patients did not wait to be seen. 107 (3.7%) were recalled on the basis of senior emergency medicine doctor review of the patients\\' triage notes. Variables found to be associated with increased likelihood of being recalled included triage category (p<0.001), male sex (p<0.004) and certain clinical presentations. The presenting complaints associated with being recalled were chest pain (p<0.001) and alcohol\\/drug overdose (p=0.001). 9.4% of DNW patients required admission following recall. Conclusion The systematic senior doctor review of triage notes led to 3.7% of patients who failed to wait being recalled. 9.4% of those recalled required acute admission. The daily review of DNW patients\\' triage notes and the recalling of at-risk patients is a valuable addition to our risk management strategy.

  1. Did Not Wait Patient Management Strategy (DNW PMS) Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Keeffe, Fran

    2011-06-14

    Objectives This study was undertaken to assess the usefulness of senior emergency medicine specialists\\' review of all \\'did not wait\\' (DNW) patients\\' triage notes and the recall of at-risk patients. Methods A prospective study of all DNW patients was performed from 1 January to 31 December 2008. Following a daily review of charts of those who failed to wait to be seen, those patients considered to be at risk of adverse outcome were contacted by the liaison team and advised to return. Data were gathered on all DNW patients on the Oracle database and interrogated using the Diver solution. Results 2872 (6.3%) of 45 959 patients did not wait to be seen. 107 (3.7%) were recalled on the basis of senior emergency medicine doctor review of the patients\\' triage notes. Variables found to be associated with increased likelihood of being recalled included triage category (p<0.001), male sex (p<0.004) and certain clinical presentations. The presenting complaints associated with being recalled were chest pain (p<0.001) and alcohol\\/drug overdose (p=0.001). 9.4% of DNW patients required admission following recall. Conclusion The systematic senior doctor review of triage notes led to 3.7% of patients who failed to wait being recalled. 9.4% of those recalled required acute admission. The daily review of DNW patients\\' triage notes and the recalling of at-risk patients is a valuable addition to our risk management strategy.

  2. Understanding older patients' self-management abilities: functional loss, self-management, and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, J M; Hartgerink, J M; Steyerberg, E W; Bakker, T J; Mackenbach, J P; Nieboer, A P

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to increase our understanding of self-management abilities and identify better self-managers among older individuals. Our cross-sectional research was based on a pilot study of older people who had recently been admitted to a hospital. In the pilot study, all patients (>65 years of age) who were admitted to the Vlietland hospital between June and October 2010 were asked to participate, which led to the inclusion of 456 older patients at baseline. A total of 296 patients (65% response rate) were interviewed in their homes 3 months after admission. Measures included social, cognitive, and physical functioning, self-management abilities, and well-being. We used descriptive, correlations, and multiple regression analyses. In addition, we evaluated the mediation effect of self-management abilities on well-being. Social, cognitive, and physical functioning significantly correlated with self-management abilities and well-being (all p ≤ 0.001). After controlling for background characteristics, multiple regression analysis indicated that social, cognitive, and physical functioning still related to self-management abilities (β = 0.17-0.25; all p ≤ 0.001). Older people with low levels of social, cognitive, and physical functioning were worse self-managers than were those with higher levels of functioning. Self-management abilities mediate the relationship between social, cognitive, and physical functioning and well-being. Interventions to improve self-management abilities may help older people better deal with function losses as they age further.

  3. Assessing and Managing Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatle, Martin D; Foster, Simmie; Pinkett, Aaron; Lesneski, Matthew; Qu, David; Dhingra, Lara

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is associated with symptoms that may impair a patient's quality of life, including emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. There is a high prevalence of concomitant pain and sleep disturbance. Studies support the hypothesis that sleep and pain have a bidirectional and reciprocal relationship. Clinicians who manage patients with chronic pain often focus on interventions that relieve pain, and assessing and treating sleep disturbance are secondary or not addressed. This article reviews the literature on pain and co-occurring sleep disturbance, describes the assessment of sleep disturbance, and outlines nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies to improve sleep in patients with chronic pain.

  4. The management of dental patients taking new generation oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alun; Gibson, John; Crighton, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin. While national guidelines for treatment of dental patients taking warfarin as an anticoagulant are well-established, no such information is available for these novel therapeutic agents. At present, the local guidance available is contradictory between different health boards/health planning units, and liaison with the medical practitioner managing the individual patient's anticoagulation is imperative if any invasive procedure is proposed. This paper examines the available evidence regarding these drugs and sets out proposals for clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care.

  5. [Patient with a Fontan circulation undergoing caesarean section: Anesthesiological management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, E; Mann, V; Körner, C; Jost, A; Thul, J; Engel, J B; Müller, M F

    2015-07-01

    Adults suffering from congenital heart diseases (CHD) represent a challenge to anesthesiologists because of the diverse pathologies, complex pathophysiology and special treatment strategies. Due to improved therapeutic options for CHD, patient quality of life and life expectancy is increasing, leaving them as a growing population including pregnant patients with CHD. This article presents the main principles of the pathophysiology and anesthesiological management of pregnant patients living with a Fontan circulation based on a case report, which was complicated by an aortic coarctation and atonic uterine hemorrhage.

  6. Outpatient management of intensively treated acute leukemia patients-the patients' perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Lene Østergaard; Høybye, Mette Terp; Hansen, Dorte Gilså

    2016-01-01

    , responsibility and the home were performed. Twenty-two patients were interviewed the first time, and 15 of these were interviewed the second time. The data were analyzed in an everyday life relational perspective. RESULTS: Outpatient management facilitates time to be administrated by the patients and thereby...... the possibility of maintaining everyday life, which was essential to the patients. The privacy ensured by the home was important to patients, and they accepted the necessary responsibility that came with it. However, time spent together with fellow patients and their relatives was an important and highly valued...... part of their social life. CONCLUSIONS: Approached from the patient perspective, outpatient management provided a motivation for patients as it ensured their presence at home and provided the possibility of taking part in everyday life of the family, despite severe illness and intensive treatment...

  7. Successful surgical management of ruptured umbilical hernias in cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Bradley, J Andrew; Harper, Simon; Butler, Andrew; Jah, Asif; Huguet, Emmanuel; Praseedom, Raaj K; Allison, Michael; Gibbs, Paul

    2015-03-14

    Acute umbilical hernia rupture in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and ascites is an unusual, but potentially life-threatening complication, with postoperative morbidity about 70% and mortality between 60%-80% after supportive care and 6%-20% after urgent surgical repair. Management options include primary surgical repair with or without concomitant portal venous system decompression for the control of the ascites. We present a retrospective analysis of our centre's experience over the last 6 years. Our cohort consisted of 11 consecutive patients (median age: 53 years, range: 36-63 years) with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Appropriate patient resuscitation and optimisation with intravenous fluids, prophylactic antibiotics and local measures was instituted. One failed attempt for conservative management was followed by a successful primary repair. In all cases, with one exception, a primary repair with non-absorbable Nylon, interrupted sutures, without mesh, was performed. The perioperative complication rate was 25% and the recurrence rate 8.3%. No mortality was recorded. Median length of hospital stay was 14 d (range: 4-31 d). Based on our experience, the management of ruptured umbilical hernias in patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites is feasible without the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt routinely in the preoperative period, provided that meticulous patient optimisation is performed.

  8. Advanced Hemodynamic Management in Patients with Septic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Wolfgang; Nierhaus, Axel; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A.; Wagner, Julia Y.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, the hemodynamic management in both early and later phases of these “organ dysfunction syndromes” is a key therapeutic component. It needs, however, to be differentiated between “early goal-directed therapy” (EGDT) as proposed for the first 6 hours of emergency department treatment by Rivers et al. in 2001 and “hemodynamic management” using advanced hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent large trials demonstrated that nowadays protocolized EGDT does not seem to be superior to “usual care” in terms of a reduction in mortality in emergency department patients with early identified septic shock who promptly receive antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation. “Hemodynamic management” comprises (a) making the diagnosis of septic shock as one differential diagnosis of circulatory shock, (b) assessing the hemodynamic status including the identification of therapeutic conflicts, and (c) guiding therapeutic interventions. We propose two algorithms for hemodynamic management using transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables aiming to optimize the cardiocirculatory and pulmonary status in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The complexity and heterogeneity of patients with septic shock implies that individualized approaches for hemodynamic management are mandatory. Defining individual hemodynamic target values for patients with septic shock in different phases of the disease must be the focus of future studies. PMID:27703980

  9. Management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Scoliosis occurs in nearly all non-ambulatory children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Non-operative treatments have not been shown to be effective at preventing progression of scoliosis. Progressive scoliosis can impact the ability of patients to sit comfortably, be cosmetically unappealing, and in severe cases exacerbate pulmonary disease. The main goal of operative treatment is to improve sitting balance and prevent progression of scoliosis. Complication rates are high and there is little data on effect of operative treatment on quality of life in children with SMA and DMD. Comprehensive multi-disciplinary pre-operative evaluations are vital to reduce the risks of operative treatment.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heck T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taryn Heck,1 Monica Zolezzi21Pharmacy Department, University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 2Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, QatarAbstract: Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, psychiatric disorders, comorbidity, psychotropic medications

  11. Surgical management of lagophthalmos in patients with facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, H M

    1999-01-01

    A prospective before-and-after trial was designed to evaluate the role of upper-lid gold weight implantation and lower lid lateral canthoplasty in the management of patients with paralytic lagophthalmos. The study included 40 patients (age range 19 to 72, mean age 46.8), and gold weights varying from 0.6 to 1.6 g were implanted in all 40 patients. Lateral canthoplasty was performed in 14 of the patients who suffered from variable degrees of lower lid laxity. Mean follow-up period was 15.7 months (range 9 to 38). Complete correction of lagophthalmos and/or ectropion with resolution of preoperative symptoms was achieved in 37 of 40 patients (92.5%), and spontaneous extrusion of the gold weight occurred in only one patient (2.5%). Excellent results were achieved in the management of paralytic lagophthalmos with upper-lid gold weight insertion, and simultaneous lateral canthoplasty proved to be very helpful in patients with significant hypotonia of lower lid.

  12. Hospital‑based case management for migrant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølholm, Anne Mette; Christensen, Janne B; Kamionka, Stine Lundstrøm

    2016-01-01

    to patients with a refugee or immigrant background. Provision of specialized services for migrant patients, including case management with multidisciplinary physical, cognitive and social interventions, has been suggested as a way to tackle inequalities in response to a growing recognition of the complexity...... of both their health needs and the skills needed to meet these. However, categorical care is generally considered to be stigmatizing and to decrease care quality. The evidence base for both arguments is unclear. The aim of this review was therefore to investigate the effectiveness of specialized hospital...... - b ased case management for ethnic minority patients. Methods: This review used a health technology assessment model, including a systematic search of literature in the PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Sociological Abstracts, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases...

  13. Time trends in axilla management among early breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondos, Adam; Jansen, Lina; Heil, Jörg;

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined time trends in axilla management among patients with early breast cancer in European clinical settings. Material and methods EUROCANPlatform partners, including population-based and cancer center-specific registries, provided routinely available clinical cancer registry data...... for a comparative study of axillary management trends among patients with first non-metastatic breast cancer who were not selected for neoadjuvant therapy during the last decade. We used an additional short questionnaire to compare clinical care patterns in 2014. Results Patients treated in cancer centers were...... younger than population-based registry populations. Tumor size and lymph node status distributions varied little between settings or over time. In 2003, sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) use varied between 26% and 81% for pT1 tumors, and between 2% and 68% for pT2 tumors. By 2010, SLNB use increased to 79...

  14. Patient care and management: reduced skin integrity of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Sharon

    The development and deterioration of pressure ulcers are a frequent occurrence across all healthcare settings and specialties, posing daily challenges to the healthcare worker and unnecessary suffering to the patient. Reduced skin integrity occurs within those patients deemed high risk, particularly to the vulnerable areas such as the heel and ankle (American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), 1996). The incidence of pressure ulcers, alongside diabetes, vascular insufficiency and obesity, is on the increase, posing additional demands on current clinical resources; specialist clinics, debridement therapies and appropriate dressing management regimes. This article will focus on the heel and ankle in regards to reduced skin integrity and the positive introduction of an innovative dressing product as an adjunct to the overall care and management of this patient group.

  15. Management Strategy for Patients With Chronic Subclavian Vein Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Graham; Marshall, M Blair

    2017-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to determine best practice for the management of patients with chronic or subacute subclavian vein thrombosis. This condition is best managed with surgical excision of the first rib followed by long-term anticoagulation. Interventional techniques aimed at restoring patency are ineffective beyond 2 weeks postthrombosis. Additional therapeutic options should be made based on the severity of symptoms as well as vein status. Patients with milder symptoms are given decompression surgery followed by anticoagulation whereas patients with more severe symptoms are considered for either a jugular vein transposition or saphenous patch based on the vein characteristics. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of antithrombotic agents in patients undergoing flexible bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Abuqayyas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding is one of the most feared complications of flexible bronchoscopy. Although infrequent, it can be catastrophic and result in fatal outcomes. Compared to other endoscopic procedures, the risk of morbidity and mortality from the bleeding is increased, as even a small amount of blood can fill the tracheobronchial tree and lead to respiratory failure. Patients using antithrombotic agents (ATAs have higher bleeding risk. A thorough understanding of the different ATAs is critical to manage patients during the peri-procedural period. A decision to stop an ATA before bronchoscopy should take into account a variety of factors, including indication for its use and the type of procedure. This article serves as a detailed review on the different ATAs, their pharmacokinetics and the pre- and post-bronchoscopy management of patients receiving these medications.

  17. Patient-controlled modalities for acute postoperative pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaskowski, Christine

    2005-08-01

    Although numerous clinical practice guidelines for pain management have been published throughout the last 12 years, inadequate pain relief remains a significant health care issue. Several patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) modalities are currently available for the treatment of acute postoperative pain, including intravenous (IV) PCA, epidural (PCEA), and oral PCA. Although PCEA and IV PCA are both commonly used modalities, IV PCA is considered the standard of care for postoperative pain management. Limitations of this modality do exist, however. Consequently, noninvasive PCA systems are under development to circumvent many of these limitations, including the fentanyl hydrochloride patient-controlled transdermal system (PCTS); (IONSYS Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ) and a number of patient-controlled intranasal analgesia (PCINA) delivery systems. The objective of this article is to review the PCA modalities currently in use and to discuss those in development for the treatment of acute postoperative pain.

  18. Understanding older patients' self-management abilities: functional loss, self-management, and well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Cramm, Jane; Hartgerink, Jacqueline; Steyerberg, Ewout; Bakker, Ton; Mackenbach, Johan; Nieboer, Anna

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: This study aimed to increase our understanding of self-management abilities and identify better self-managers among older individuals. Methods: Our cross-sectional research was based on a pilot study of older people who had recently been admitted to a hospital. In the pilot study, all patients (>65 years of age) who were admitted to the Vlietland hospital between June and October 2010 were asked to participate, which led to the inclusion of 456 older patients at baseline....

  19. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-02-04

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel "myths" about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of "near zero" PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting "near zero" catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of "near zero" PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition.

  20. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel “myths” about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of “near zero” PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting “near zero” catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of “near zero” PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition. PMID

  1. Management of patients with headache and cervicalgia in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with headache (cephalgia concurrent with neck pain (cervicalgia remains an urgent problem of modern medicine. Concurrent cervicalgia in cephalgia substantially lowers quality of life in these patients and is encountered in more than half the patients. Cervicalgia is considered as a risk factor of migraine and tension headache attacks. Cervicogenic headache is assigned to one of the most common forms of secondary cephalgias. It is shown that patients with daily headache have functional insufficiency of the antinociceptive system that plays an important role in the maintenance and chronization of neck pain. The diagnosis of different cephalgic syndromes and the identification of causes of cervicalgia commonly raise problems in a physician; the rate of misdiagnoses and hence inadequate treatment has been high so far. The detection of various comorbid conditions, including cervicalgia, in a patient with cephalgia makes it possible to use effective treatment and to achieve good results.

  2. New antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs. Considerations for dental patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Harold V; Quek, Samuel Y P; Subramanian, Gayathri; Abbas, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A recent occurrence in dental practice is the noting of new "blood thinners" when the clinician is reviewing a patient's medical history and medications. "Doc, I take Pradaxa or Effient or Xarelto" etc. After many years of the widespread use of aspirin and Coumadin there has appeared a new generation of medications focused on reducing thromboembolic events in patients at risk. This trend has been driven by a need for drugs providing better drug efficacy based on patient biologic processing of the medications and the frequency and cost factors associated with the monitoring the degree of anticoagulation. Guidelines for assessing bleeding risk and managing patients on these new medications in dental practice are not yet defined and are empirically based on medical practitioner experience. This paper will review these new medications and will discuss current considerations for dental patient care. (Note that not all new antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications will be reviewed in this paper.)

  3. Airway Management of Patients Undergoing Oral Cancer Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis of 156 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhar, Sapna Annaji; Sharma, Ashima; Ramdaspally, Mahesh; Gopinath, Ramachandran

    2017-04-01

    Oral cancer patients have a potentially difficult airway, but if managed properly during the perioperative period, morbidity and mortality can be reduced or avoided. The medical records of 156 patients who were operated for oral cancers were reviewed for airway management during the perioperative period. The surgical procedures ranged from excisions, wide local excisions with split skin graftings, hemiglossectomies and radical neck nodes dissections to pectoralis major myocutaneous or free fibular flaps. Intubation was assessed as difficult in 14.7% of patients because of tumour- or radiation fibrosis-related trismus, restricted neck mobility and prior similar surgeries. Twenty patients had undergone surgery for oral cancer previously and were scheduled for flap reconstruction. Nasotracheal intubation was a preferred route, and 62.8% of patients could be intubated nasotracheally after neuromuscular blockade. Tracheostomy (elective or existing) was utilised for airway control in 19.2% cases. Patients who had undergone prior radiotherapy were more likely to be tracheostomised. McCoy laryngoscopes (13.4%), gum elastic bougies (23.6%), Airtraq devices (0.006%) and fibreoptic bronchoscopes (FOBs) (0.03%) were the additional airway techniques employed. In total, 64 patients (50.7%) could be extubated immediately after surgery. Proper preoperative evaluation and planning help manage difficult airways effectively with minimal need of advanced airway gadgets. Gum elastic bougies and Magill forceps are very useful in airway management and decrease the need of elective tracheostomy in oral cancer patients.

  4. Cardiovascular risk factor management in patients with RA compared to matched non-RA patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Alemao (Evo); H. Cawston (Helene); F. Bourhis (Francois); M.J. Al (Maiwenn); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); K. Liao (Katherine); D.H. Solomon (Daniel)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractObjective. RA is associated with a 50-60% increase in risk of cardiovascular (CV) death. This study aimed to compare management of CV risk factors in RA and matched non-RA patients. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using UK clinical practice data. Patients presen

  5. [Modern airway management--current concepts for more patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Arnd

    2009-04-01

    Effective and safe airway management is one of the core skills among anaesthesiologists and all physicians involved in acute care medicine. However, failure in airway management is still the most frequent single incidence with the highest impact on patient's morbidity and mortality known from closed claims analyses. The anaesthesiologist has to manage the airway in elective patients providing a high level of safety with as little airway injury and interference with the cardio-vascular system as possible. Clinical competence also includes the management of the expected and unexpected difficult airway in different clinical environments. Therefore, it is the anaesthesiologist's responsibility not only to educate and train younger residents, but also all kinds of medical personnel involved in airway management, e.g. emergency physicians, intensive care therapists or paramedics. Modern airway devices, strategies and educational considerations must fulfill these sometimes diverse and large range requirements. Supraglottic airway devices will be used more often in the daily clinical routine. This is not only due the multiple advantages of these devices compared to the tracheal tube, but also because of the new features of some supraglottic airways, which separate the airway from the gastric track and give information of the pharyngeal position. For the event of a difficult airway, new airway devices and concepts should be trained and applied in daily practice.

  6. A randomized trial of patient self-managed versus physician-managed oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderji, Rubina; Gin, Kenneth; Shalansky, Karen; Carter, Cedric; Chambers, Keith; Davies, Cheryl; Schwartz, Linda; Fung, Anthony

    2004-09-01

    Self-management (SM) of warfarin by patients is an attractive strategy, particularly if it improves anticoagulation control and can be done safely under minimal physician supervision. To compare the effect of SM with physician-management (PM) on the maintenance of therapeutic anticoagulation. A randomized, open-label eight-month trial was performed. Patients 18 years of age and older were eligible if they were receiving warfarin for at least one month before enrolment and required anticoagulation for at least one year to a target international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.0 to 3.0 or 2.5 to 3.5. Exclusion criteria were a known hypercoaguable disorder, mental incompetence, a language barrier or an inability to attend training sessions. Patients randomly assigned to SM tested their INR using a point-of-care device (Pro Time Microcogulation System, International Technidyne Corporation, USA) and adjusted their warfarin doses using a nomogram. Patients randomly assigned to PM received usual care from their general practitioner. The primary outcome was to demonstrate 20% improvement in anticoagulation control by SM. One hundred forty patients were randomly assigned (70 per group). Thirteen patients dropped out of SM early due to an inability to self-manage. Based on intention-to-treat analysis, there was no difference in the proportion of INR in range (SM 64.8% versus PM 58.7%, P=0.23) or time in target range (SM 71.8% versus PM 63.2%, P=0.14). Patients managing their own therapy spent less time below the therapeutic range (15.0% versus 27.3%, P=0.04). There were three major complications of thrombosis or bleeding, all occurring in the PM arm. All patients who completed SM preferred to continue with that strategy. SM was not significantly better than PM in maintaining therapeutic anticoagulation. SM was feasible and appeared safe in the present study population.

  7. Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-06-01

    This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific

  8. Managing mood disorders in patients attending pulmonary rehabilitation clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvarajah S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Colleen Doyle,1–3 David Dunt,2 David Ames,1 Suganya Selvarajah11National Ageing Research Institute, Royal Melbourne Hospital Royal Park Campus, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 2Centre for Health Policy, Programs and Economics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 3Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: There is good evidence for the positive benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR in the prevention of hospital admissions, lower mortality, and improved health-related quality of life. There is also increasing evidence about the impact of PR on mental health and, in particular, mood disorders. We aimed to identify how depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients in Victoria, Australia, is being managed in PR, to identify the prevalence of depressive symptoms among COPD patients who attend PR, and to determine whether patients with depressive symptoms or anxiety symptoms dropped out of PR early.Method: Of 61 PR clinics, 44 were invited and 22 agreed to participate. Telephone interviews were conducted to see how depression and anxiety in COPD patients were being recognized and managed in these clinics. A total of 294 questionnaires were distributed to patients by clinic coordinators to determine the prevalence of anxiety/depression, as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Coordinators were contacted to provide information on whether respondents dropped out of rehabilitation early or continued with their treatment at 2–4 months post program.Results: Seven clinics were not aware of local guidelines on assessment/treatment/management of mood. Four clinics did not use any screening tools or other aids in the recognition and management of depression and/or anxiety. Overall, eight clinics participating in this study requested advice on suitable screening tools. The patient survey indicated that the mean depression score on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression

  9. Clinical management methods for out-patients with alcohol dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulze Isabelle

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In France outpatient centres for the care of alcoholics are healthcare establishments providing medical, psychological and social support. Although they meet the practical needs of these patients, their degree of use in each of these domains and the respective mobilisation of different skills by the care team are not well understood. Our aim was therefore to determine in detail the management involved as a function of the severity of alcohol dependence. For this purpose, all the procedures involved were compiled in a thesaurus describing its type (psychological, medical, social, reception, its scheduled or unscheduled nature, its method (face-to-face, telephone, letter and its duration. The severity of dependence was evaluated using the Addiction Severity Index (ASI. Results 45 patients were included and followed-up during 291 ± 114 days. The mean initial ASI scores (± SD were: medical (M = 0.39 ± 0.3, working-income (ER = 0.5 ± 0.3, alcohol (A = 0.51 ± 0.2, illicit drugs (D = 0.07 ± 0.08, legal (L = 0.06 ± 0.13, familial and social environment (FS = 0.34 ± 0.26, psychological (P = 0.39 ± 0.22. The total number of procedures was 1341 (29.8 per patient corresponding to 754.4 hours (16.7 per patient. The intensity of management peaked during the first month of treatment, and then declined rapidly; the maximum incidence of abstinence was observed during the 3rd month of management. Interviews with patients, group therapy and staff meetings represented 68.7%, 9.9% and 13.9% of all procedures, respectively. In patients with severe dependence, as compared to moderate, management was twice as intense in the psychological and social domains, but not in the medical domain. The ASI questionnaire was completed a second time by 24 patients, after an average of 3.2 months. The improvement was significant in the M, A, D and P domains only. Conclusion This study provided an overview of the methods employed in managing a sample of

  10. Evaluating the management of septic shock using patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottestad, Einar; Boulet, John R; Lighthall, Geoffrey K

    2007-03-01

    Develop a scoring system that can assess the management of septic shock by individuals and teams. Retrospective review of videotapes of critical care house staff managing a standardized simulation of septic shock. Academic medical center; videotapes were made in a recreated intensive care unit environment using a high-fidelity patient simulator. Residents in medicine, surgery, and anesthesiology who had participated in the intensive care unit rotation. The septic patient was managed by the intensive care unit team in a graded manner with interns present for the first 10 mins and more senior-level help arriving after 10 mins. The intern was graded separately for the first 10 mins, and the team was graded for the entire 35-min performance. Both technical and nontechnical scoring systems were developed to rate the management of septic shock. Technical scores are based on guidelines and principles of managing septic shock. Team leadership, communication, contingency planning, and resource utilization were addressed by the nontechnical rating. Technical scores were calculated for both interns and teams; nontechnical scores applied only to the team. Of 16 technical checklist items, interns completed a mean of 7 with a range of 1.5-11. Team technical ratings had a mean of 9.3 with a range of 3.3-13. Nontechnical scores showed similar intergroup variability with a mean of 26 and a range of 10-35. Technical and nontechnical scores showed a modest correlation (r = .40, p = .05). Interrater reliabilities for intern and team technical scores were both r = .96 and for nontechnical scores r = .88. Objective measures of both knowledge-based and behavioral skills pertinent to the management of septic shock were made. Scores identified both adequate and poor levels of performance. Such assessments can be used to benchmark clinical skills of individuals and groups over time and may allow the identification of interventions that improve clinical effectiveness in sepsis management.

  11. Management of dyslipidemia in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalit, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are more common in the patient population with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically reduced HIV-associated morbidity and mortality and has transformed HIV disease into a chronic, manageable condition. As a result, non-AIDS-related illnesses, including cardiovascular diseases, are now the leading causes of death in the HIV-infected population. Optimizing fasting lipid parameters plays an important role in reducing cardiovascular risk in this population. This review focuses on the management of dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals treated with combination ART.

  12. Diagnosis and management of allergic conjunctivitis in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, William E; Granet, David B; Kabat, Alan G

    2017-01-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC), although one of the most common ocular disorders in pediatric patients, is frequently overlooked, misdiagnosed, and undertreated in children. To guide pediatric health care professionals in the optimal diagnosis and management of AC in pediatric patients. To identify any existing best practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AC in pediatric patients, a review of the literature published between 2004 and January 2015 was conducted. Diagnosis and treatment algorithms and guidelines for pediatric patient referrals were then developed. A literature search to identify best practice guidelines for the treatment of AC in pediatric patients failed to return any relevant articles, which highlighted the need for best practice recommendations. Based on publications on adult AC and clinical experience, this review provides step-by-step guidance for pediatric health care professionals, including recognizing clinical features of AC, establishing a comprehensive medical history, and performing a thorough physical examination to ensure a correct diagnosis and the optimal treatment or referral to an eye care specialist or allergist when required. In addition to established drug treatments, the role of subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy is discussed to inform pediatric health care professionals about alternative treatment options for patients who do not tolerate pharmacotherapy or who do not respond sufficiently. The diagnostic and treatment algorithms and guidelines provided in this review help address the current literature and educational gap and may lead to improvements in diagnosis and management of pediatric AC.

  13. Oral hygiene management in patients with visual sensory disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Barbato

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Oral hygiene maintenance is one of the most difficult tasks for visually impaired people. The aim of study was to investigate about knowledge on oral hygiene practices among patients with visual sensory disabilities by proposing an effective management in order to achieve and maintain oral health status of these patients. Methods:It was administered a questionnaire about oral health management to the patients with visual disabilities accessing to dental unit of “Mons. Di Liegro” Hospital of Gaeta. Results: The survey covered a sample of 49 patients, aged between 14 and 95 years. More than half (66% was blind ( 65% of cases with primary blindness and the remaining 35% with secondary blindness. Only 32.65% brushed their teeth 3 times a day; 68% of the surveyed patients limited home oral hygiene procedures to toothbrush and toothpaste; 79% used manual toothbrush; 49% of respondents reported odontophobia (it was basically generated by pain often due to bad experience during childhood. More than half declared a dental office attendance as needed. Conclusions: This study showed as, although starting from a compromised oral health and inadequate knowledge of oral hygiene practices, visual impaired/ blind patients were able to achieve and maintain a good level of oral hygiene, using the most appropriate techniques and instruments.

  14. Challenges in managing hepatitis C virus infection in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Roy A; Torres, Harrys A

    2014-03-21

    Cancer patients have unique problems associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and treatment not seen in the general population. HCV infection poses additional challenges and considerations for the management of cancer, and vice versa. HCV infection also can lead to the development of cancer, particularly hepatocellular carcinoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In severely immunocompromised cancer patients, diagnosis of HCV infection requires increased reliance on RNA detection techniques. HCV infection can affect chemotherapy, and delay of HCV infection treatment until completion of chemotherapy and achievement of cancer remission may be required to decrease the potential for drug-drug interactions between antineoplastic agents and HCV therapeutics and potentiation of side effects of these agents. In addition, hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients have an increased risk of early development of cirrhosis and fibrosis. Whether this increased risk applies to all patients regardless of cancer treatment is unknown. Furthermore, patients with cancer may have poorer sustained virological responses to HCV infection treatment than do those without cancer. Unfortunately, not all cancer patients are candidates for HCV infection therapy. In this article, we review the challenges in managing HCV infection in cancer patients and HSCT recipients.

  15. Nurse case managers: patient care implications at a Pakistani university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walani, Laila

    The role of the nurse in hospital is varied and some are choosing to incorporate more managerial and administrative skills into their clinical role. One such role is that of the nurse case manager (NCM). This particular role concentrates on involving the family and the patient in his or her own care, facilitation of the care plan, and open discussions between the patient, medics and nursing staff. NCMs in the author's hospital have made a remarkable contribution to patient care. It is a challenging and exceedingly demanding role in both developing and developed countries, but one that is increasingly important. The NCMs are involved in coordination, facilitation of core process and mobilization of resources, not only in hospital but at the patient's home. In this short introductory article the role of NCM is highlighted and the author discusses how this diverse role is concerned with patient care. NCMs work with multidisciplinary teams to enhance the patient's care process. Their attention is also given to cost reduction and clinical pathway management.

  16. Noninvasive Respiratory Management of Patients With Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R

    2017-08-01

    This review article describes definitive noninvasive respiratory management of respiratory muscle dysfunction to eliminate need to resort to tracheotomy. In 2010 clinicians from 22 centers in 18 countries reported 1,623 spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis users of noninvasive ventilatory support (NVS) of whom 760 required it continuously (CNVS). The CNVS sustained their lives by over 3,000 patient-years without resort to indwelling tracheostomy tubes. These centers have now extubated at least 74 consecutive ventilator unweanable patients with DMD, over 95% of CNVS-dependent patients with SMA1, and hundreds of others with advanced neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) without resort to tracheotomy. Two centers reported a 99% success rate at extubating 258 ventilator unweanable patients without resort to tracheotomy. Patients with myopathic or lower motor neuron disorders can be managed noninvasively by up to CNVS, indefinitely, despite having little or no measurable vital capacity, with the use of physical medicine respiratory muscle aids. Ventilator-dependent patients can be decannulated of their tracheostomy tubes.

  17. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  18. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  19. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearancegouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD.

  20. Management of patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meko, J B; Norton, J A

    1995-01-01

    Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is caused by gastrin-secreting tumors called gastrinomas. Patients commonly present with peptic ulcer disease and may have recurrent, multiple, and atypically located ulcers, e.g. in the jejunum. Alternatively, severe diarrhea may be the only presenting symptom. Patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia Type I (MEN-I) and ZES become symptomatic at an earlier age than patients with sporadic ZES. Patients with ZES have elevated fasting serum gastrin concentrations (> 100 pg/ml) and basal gastric acid hypersecretion (> 15 mEq/h). The secretin stimulation test is the best test to distinguish ZES from other conditions resulting in elevated gastrin levels. Gastric acid hypersecretion can be controlled in virtually all patients with H2-receptor antagonists or omeprazole, thus rendering total gastrectomy unnecessary. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radionuclide octreotide scanning, endoscopic ultrasound, and the selective arterial secretin injection test are the recommended imaging studies for localization of gastrinoma; nevertheless, 50% of gastrinomas are not evident on preoperative imaging studies. All patients with sporadic gastrinoma who do not have unresectable metastatic disease should undergo exploratory laparotomy for potential curative resection. With increased awareness of duodenal tumors, gastrinoma can be found in 80-90% of patients. Surgery may be the most effective treatment for metastatic gastrinoma if most or all of the tumor can be resected. The management of patients with MEN-I and ZES remains controversial. Some clinicians advocate an aggressive surgical approach, whereas others have had little success in rendering patients eugastrinemic.

  1. Management of hydrocephalus in patients with tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshekhar Vedantam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus is one of the commonest complications of tuberculous meningitis (TBM occurring in up to 85% of children with the disease. It is more severe in children than in adults. It could be either of the communicating type or the obstructive type with the former being more frequently seen. The Vellore grading system for clinical grading of patients with TBM and hydrocephalus with grade I being the best grade and grade IV being the worst grade has been validated by several authors. The management of hydrocephalus can include medical therapy with dehydrating agents and steroids for patients in good grades and those with communicating hydrocephalus. However, surgery is required for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus and those in poor grades. Surgery can involve either a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt or endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV. Complications of shunt surgery in patients with TBM and hydrocephalus are high with frequent shunt obstructions and shunt infections requiring repeated revisions. ETV has variable success in these patients and is generally not advisable in patients in the acute stages of the disease. Mortality on long-term follow up has been reported to vary from 10.5% to 57.1% in those with altered sensorium prior to surgery and 0 to 12.5% in patients with normal sensorium. Surgery for patients in Vellore grade IV is usually associated with a poor outcome and high mortality and therefore, its utility in these patients is debatable

  2. Patient considerations in the management of mental stress in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid-Ott G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Gerhard Schmid-Ott,1,2 Dana Böhm,1,3 Scott Stock Gissendanner1,21Hospital Management and Stress Medicine, IREHA Institute for Innovative Rehabilitation, Loehne, Germany; 2Berolina Klinik, Loehne, Germany; 3Saale Reha-Klinikum, Bad Koesen, GermanyAbstract: Psoriasis is an incurable, inflammatory disease of the skin with a complex etiology. The disease has serious negative repercussions for patients' quality of life, but quality of life does not depend on physical symptoms alone. The impact of somatic symptoms on life quality is mitigated by various forms of mental stress. Through a discussion of the physical and mental burdens of psoriasis, the psychosocial determinants of life quality, common treatment options, and issues of adherence and resilience, this paper seeks to identify common sources of mental stress and appropriate strategies for stress management for psoriasis patients. The paper argues that a sustained and successful management of psoriasis depends on patients playing an active role in the prevention and reduction of their own personal sources of mental stress. Health-care professionals can and should assist patients in doing so.Keywords: psoriasis, shared decision-making, treatment, adherence, resilience

  3. Recommendations for the management of patients after heart valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchart, Eric G; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Antunes, Manuel J; Tornos, Pilar; De Caterina, Raffaele; Cormier, Bertrand; Prendergast, Bernard; Iung, Bernard; Bjornstad, Hans; Leport, Catherine; Hall, Roger J C; Vahanian, Alec

    2005-11-01

    Approximately 50,000 valve replacement operations take place in Europe annually and almost as many valve repair procedures. Previous European guidelines on management of patients after valve surgery were last published in 1995 and were limited to recommendations about antithrombotic prophylaxis. American guidelines covering the broader topic of the investigation and treatment of patients with valve disease were published in 1998 but devoted relatively little space to post-surgical management. This document represents the consensus view of a committee drawn from three European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Working Groups (WG): the WG on Valvular Heart Disease, the WG on Thrombosis, and the WG on Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology. In almost all areas of patient management after valve surgery, randomized trials and meta-analyses do not exist. Such randomized trials as do exist are very few in number, are narrowly focused with small numbers, have limited general applicability, and do not lend themselves to meta-analysis because of widely divergent methodologies and different patient characteristics. Recommendations are therefore almost entirely based on non-randomized studies and relevant basic science.

  4. Catatonia in patients with autism: prevalence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Luigi; Postorino, Valentina; Valeri, Giovanni; Vicari, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Although recent studies have shown that catatonia can occur in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the overlap of the behavioral features between these disorders raises many diagnostic challenges. In fact, in clinical practice it is common to misinterpret catatonic symptoms, including mutism, stereotypic speech, repetitive behaviors, echolalia, posturing, mannerisms, purposeless agitation and rigidity, as features of ASDs. The current medical treatment algorithm for catatonia in ASDs recommends the use of benzodiazepines. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is indicated when patients are unresponsive, or insufficiently responsive, to benzodiazepines. Other pharmacological options are also described for the treatment of catatonic patients resistant to benzodiazepines and ECT, and there is evidence for the effectiveness of a psychological treatment, co-occurring with medical treatments, in order to support the management of these patients. In this article we provide a summary of studies exploring catatonia in ASDs and our clinical experience in the management and treatment of this syndrome through the presentation of three brief case studies. Moreover, we review the mechanisms underlying symptoms of catatonia in ASDs, as well as the diagnostic challenges, providing an outline for the management and treatment of this syndrome in this clinical population.

  5. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  6. [Economic rehabilitation management among patients with chronic low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, R; Schweikert, B; Jacobi, E; Tschirdewahn, B; Leidl, R

    2001-12-01

    Back pain causes high costs to society. In Germany, these amount to an estimated total of 5 billion euro of direct costs per year and 13 billion euro of indirect costs, the latter being caused by incapacity to work. The purpose of this study is to develop a concept for economic rehabilitation management. This concept is based on the managed care approach and aims at improving efficiency of care. The concept development consists of a theoretical and an empirical part. The method of the theoretical part is based on a systematic literature review on managed care (not included in this article), health systems research and the analysis of economic incentives. For the empirical investigation, long term effects and costs were calculated. For the evaluation of effects, we psychometrically tested and used the EuroQol (EQ-5D) as a measure of health-related quality of life (HRQL). The calculation of costs (both direct and indirect) is based on routine data of payers, a cost diary and the internal cost accounting systems of rehabilitation clinics. We statistically analysed the cost distribution and identified predictors of the management targets (e.g., costs of care) by means of regression analyses. The market-driven managed care approach is based on three tools: (1) a primary care system with case management and gatekeeping, (2) direct influence on providers by utilisation review and setting guidelines, and (3) indirect influence by setting supply-side economic incentives via the remuneration mode. The third managed care tool is most important when managing the rehabilitation of working age patients with chronic low back pain from an economic point of view. This concept consists of three components: (1) a case-based budget for direct costs; this is a prospective remuneration mode for an integrated primary care network including a rehabilitation facility, (2) retrospective bonus payments which are related to savings of indirect costs, and (3) retrospective bonus payments which

  7. Management of cyanide toxicity in patients with burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Louise; Moiemen, Naiem

    2015-02-01

    The importance of cyanide toxicity as a component of inhalational injury in patients with burns is increasingly being recognised, and its prompt recognition and management is vital for optimising burns survival. The evidence base for the use of cyanide antidotes is limited by a lack of randomised controlled trials in humans, and in addition consideration must be given to the concomitant pathophysiological processes in patients with burns when interpreting the literature. We present a literature review of the evidence base for cyanide antidotes with interpretation in the context of patients with burns. We conclude that hydroxycobalamin should be utilised as the first-line antidote of choice in patients with burns with inhalational injury where features consistent with cyanide toxicity are present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Dental management of patients irradiated for oral cancer. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regezi, J.A.; Courtney, R.M.; Kerr, D.A.

    1976-08-01

    Management of patients irradiated for oral cancer should include consideration of their oral health prior to, and after, radiation therapy. Data from 130 patients, followed for a period of 1 to 10 years, are presented and evaluated. The philosophy of retention and maintenance of as many teeth as possible is supported by this data. Extraction of teeth with severe periodontal disease after irradiation also proves to be a relatively safe operation. Osteoradionecrosis tends to be limited in extent and is generally well tolerated by the patient when treated conservatively. A treatment regimen is presented that significantly reduces the morbidity from therapeutic irradiation of the jaws. A comprehensive dental evaluation and follow-up plan coupled with patient cooperation are instrumental to the success of this program.

  9. [Anesthetic Management of Three Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Naoko; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Inamori, Noriko; Nishimura, Shinya; Mori, Takahiko

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronically progressing or relapsing disease caused by immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy. We report the anesthetic management of three CIDP patients who underwent elective orthopedic surgeries. Owing to the risk of neuraxial anesthetics triggering demyelination, general anesthesia was selected to avoid epidural or spinal anesthesia or other neuraxial blockade. It was also judged prudent to avoid prolonged perioperative immobilization, which might compress vulnerable peripheral nerves. For Patient 1, general anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil, and sevoflurane, and was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. For Patients 2 and 3, general anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. For tracheal intubation, under careful monitoring with peripheral nerve stimulators, minimal doses of rocuronium (0.6-0.7 mg x kg(-1)) were administered. When sugammadex was administered to reverse the effect of rocuronium, all patients rapidly regained muscular strength. Postoperative courses were satisfactory without sequelae.

  10. Management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouillon, Lieven; Bossuyt, Peter; Vanderstukken, Joke; Moulin, David; Netter, Patrick; Danese, Silvio; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Loeuille, Damien; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2017-09-07

    More than half of the patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experience at least one extra-intestinal manifestation (EIM). The most common EIM in patients with IBD is spondyloarthritis (SpA). Microscopic intestinal inflammation is documented in almost 50% of the patients with SpA. Areas covered: We give an overview of the classification, the epidemiology and the diagnosis of IBD and SpA. The treatment goals, the pharmacologic management options and the available treatment guidelines in IBD patients with SpA are discussed. Expert Commentary: The coexistence of IBD and SpA generates challenges and opportunities for both the gastroenterologist and the rheumatologist. The potential of drugs with a gut-specific mode of action in the treatment of IBD-related arthritis warrants further exploration.

  11. Management of orbital complications of sinusitis in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinis, Vefa; Ozbay, Musa; Bakir, Salih; Yorgancilar, Ediz; Gun, Ramazan; Akdag, Mehmet; Sahin, Muhammed; Topcu, Ismail

    2013-09-01

    The most common reason of orbital infections is sinusitis. Orbital complications of sinusitis are mostly seen in children. Loss of vision and intracranial infections are among the complications of sinusitis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is very important in the management of orbital complications. The orbital complication can be in the form of cellulitis or abscess. A retrospective review of 26 pediatric patients with orbital complications due to sinusitis was presented in this study. Of 26 patients, there were 13 cases of preseptal cellulitis, 2 cases of orbital cellulitis, and 11 cases of subperiosteal abscess. We grouped the preseptal and orbital cellulites in one category and the subperiosteal abscess in the other. All patients in the cellulitis group recovered by medical treatment. All the patients were treated by surgical drainage. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment method are vital for the treatment of orbital complications secondary to sinusitis.

  12. The management of patients with the short bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cameron F. E. Platell; Jane Coster; Rosalie D. McCauley; John C. Hall

    2002-01-01

    The surgeon is invariably the primary specialist involvedin managing patients with short bowel syndrome. Becauseof this they will play an important role in co-ordinating themanagement of these patients. The principal aims at theinitial surgery are to preserve life, then to preserve gutlength, and maintain its continuity. In the immediatepostoperative period, there needs to be a balancebetween keeping the patient alive through the use of TPNand antisecretory agents and promoting gut adaptationwith the use of oral nutrition. lf the gut fails to adaptduring this period, then the patient may require therapywith more specific agents to promote gut adaptation suchas growth factors and glutamine. lf following this, thepatient still has a short gut syndrome, then the principaloptions remain either long term TPN, or intestinaltransplantation which remains a difficult and challengingprocedure with a high mortality and morbidity due torejection.

  13. [Operational units for health risk management (patient safety)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo Hernández, A; Claveria Fontán, A; García Urbaneja, M; López Barba, J

    2008-12-01

    In 1995 INSALUD began to develop performance measures in the field of risk management, and following transfer of powers to the regions, these led to the development of operational units in individual healthcare centres. These units, which consist of a group of health professionals, including managers, aim to identify, evaluate, analyse and deal with health risks, to enhance patient safety. Their organisational structure can vary in accordance with the needs, resources and philosophy of each individual organisation. This paper presents the experience of the risk management units developed in four Spanish regions: Madrid, the Basque Country, Galicia and INGESA (Ceuta and Melilla). It also includes reflections on assessment of their impact and on their future role in improving safety in healthcare services.

  14. Challenges in the management of oral ulceration in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanan Nur'aeny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral ulceration can be experienced by anyone, including those who are elderly. Various trigger factors can occur in elderly patient, but the main thing to consider is the degenerative factors that affect the occurrence of some medical problems. Handling oral ulceration in elderly patients should be done carefully and holistically otherwise the improvement is only temporary and can reappear or even be worse. Purpose: In this paper we will discuss two different case reports of elderly female patients and both having some oral ulceration. Cases: First case of recurrent oral ulceration experienced by 58 years old patient, and second case is concerning a 77 years old patient with chronic oral ulceration and also having some medical problems. Aphthous like ulcers (ALU is a diagnosis for recurrent oral ulceration associated with systemic condition, and usually started after adolescent age. Elderly or geriatric condition itself is a special condition that contribute to the degree of a disease. Cases management: Both patients given non pharmacology and pharmacology therapies. The non pharmacology therapy includes communication, information, and education, also oral hygiene instruction. Steroid as anti-inflammatory drugs had an important role in healing process, beside other medication. Conclusion: Oral ulceration in elderly patients with or without a medical problems becomes a challenging thing to handle due to the complexity of their condition. As a dentist we have more careful to arrange the treatment plans for elderly patients when combine with some therapy related systemic disease.

  15. Management of patients with hepatitis C infection and renaldisease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chalermrat Bunchorntavakul; Monthira Maneerattanaporn; Disaya Chavalitdhamrong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with endstagerenal disease (ESRD) is associated with morerapid liver disease progression and reduced renal graftand patients' survival following kidney transplantation.Evaluations and management of HCV in patients withrenal disease are challenging. The pharmacokineticsof interferons (IFN), ribavirin (RBV) and some directacting antiviral (DAA), such as sofosbuvir, are altered inpatients with ESRD. With dose adjustment and carefulmonitoring, treatment of HCV in patients with ESRD canbe associated with sustained virological response (SVR)rates nearly comparable to that of patients with normalrenal function. DAA-based regimens, especially the IFNfreeand RBV-free regimens, are theoretically preferredfor patients with ESRD and KT in order to increase SVRrates and to reduce treatment side effects. However,based on the data for pharmacokinetics, dosing safetyand efficacy of DAA for patients with severe renalimpairment are lacking. This review will be focusedon the evaluations, available pharmacologic data, andmanagement of HCV in patients with severe renalimpairment, patients who underwent KT, and thosewho suffered from HCV-related renal disease, accordingto the available treatment options, including DAA.

  16. Current investigation and management of patients with syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagres, Nikolaos; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dobreanu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    for neurally mediated syncope. Physical manoeuvres were the most widely (93%) applied standard treatment for this syncope form. The results of this survey suggest that there are significant differences in the management of patients with syncope across Europe, specifically with respect to hospitalization rates......The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to provide an insight into the current practice of work-up and management of patients with syncope among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. Responses were received from 43 centres. The majority of respondents...... (74%) had no specific syncope unit and only 42% used a standardized assessment protocol or algorithm. Hospitalization rates varied from 10% to 25% (56% of the centres) to >50% (21% of the centres). The leading reasons for hospitalization were features suggesting arrhythmogenic syncope (85...

  17. Perioperative Considerations and Management of Patients Receiving Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Safiya Imtiaz; Kumari, R. Vasantha; Hegade, Ganapati; Marutheesh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulants remain the primary strategy for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. Unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux, and warfarin have been studied and employed extensively with direct thrombin inhibitors typically reserved for patients with complications or those requiring interventions. Novel oral anticoagulants have emerged from clinical development and are expected to replace older agents with their ease to use and more favorable pharmacodynamic profiles. Increasingly, anesthesiologists are being requested to anesthetize patients who are on some form of anticoagulants and hence it is important to have sound understanding of pharmacology, dosing, monitoring, and toxicity of anticoagulants. We searched the online databases including PubMed Central, Cochrane, and Google Scholar using anticoagulants, perioperative management, anesthetic considerations, and LMWH as keywords for the articles published between 1994 and 2015 while writing this review. In this article, we will review the different classes of anticoagulants and how to manage them in the perioperative settings.

  18. Anaphylaxis avoidance and management: educating patients and their caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Järvinen KM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kirsi M Järvinen, Jocelyn CelestinDivision of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USAAbstract: Anaphylaxis is an increasingly prevalent problem in westernized countries. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the increasing numbers of patients at risk for anaphylaxis receive proper education on the etiology and risk factors as well as appropriate treatment of anaphylaxis with epinephrine. The physician's role is crucial in order to educate the patients and care takers on effective measures to prevent anaphylaxis and empower them to take charge of early recognition and proper management of an anaphylactic reaction to prevent poor outcomes. This review summarizes the clinical presentation, triggers, avoidance, and management of anaphylaxis.Keywords: food allergy, drug allergy, Hymenoptera, latex

  19. STABLE: an acronym for managing the observation-status patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Dawn; Hollabaugh, Sue; Duffy, Terry

    2003-01-01

    Ever rising patient acuity, new nursing staff practitioners, and cumbersome documentation processes potentially impact quality of care. Nurse managers are challenged to utilize creative strategies to minimize risk potential and improve patient outcomes. One 36-bed medical/ surgical/telemetry unit focused on improving competence in clinical assessment and documentation associated with the determinants of STABLE. Education centered on a simple approach based on the use of an acronym to memorize concepts and trigger the recall of 6 key points of care. Evaluation of documentation after pain implementation indicated significant improvement in nursing practice.

  20. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werder, Gabriel M. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology, 3600 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States); St Christopher Iba Mar Diop College of Medicine, Luton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gabriel_werder@yahoo.com; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B. [St Vincent' s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2008-02-15

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze.

  1. Management strategies for problem behaviors in the patient with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, F W; Ravindran, V L; Stewart, J T

    1998-04-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral problems are present in most patients with dementia and are usually the clinician's main focus of management. Differential diagnosis of these problems can be challenging, but the effort is essential for planning appropriate therapy. Pharmacologic interventions are available for treatment of depression, agitation, aggression, psychotic symptoms, wandering, and sleep disorders. Given the less than favorable risk-benefit ratio of most psychotropic drugs in the population of older patients with dementia, the importance of nonpharmacologic strategies and limiting treatment goals should not be overlooked.

  2. Management of Hypertensive patient in the Dental Office - Current Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Maheswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental patients with a significant medical condition like hypertension are more likely to be encountered in the dental office. Those with very high blood pressure are at great risk for acute medical problems while receiving dental treatment. Adverse oral effects and drug interactions of antihypertensive medications further indicates special considerations for the hypertensive patient. This article highlights the recent advances in the dental management of hypertension. It is important for the dentist to be aware of hypertension in relation to the practice of dentistry.

  3. The anesthetic management in the patient with Kabuki makeup syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Aydın Erden

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kabuki makeup syndrome is characterized by mentalretardation, characteristic facial appearance (ektropion,skeletal abnormalities, joint laxity, short stature. The syndromeis thought to be a consequence of otosomal dominantmutation. Important factors in anesthetical managementof these patients include; difficult airway, cardiologicproblems, obstructive sleeps apne, hypotoni and malignshyperthermia risks. In this case report we aimed to discussanesthesic management of a patient with Kabukisyndrome -a rare clinical entity in our country- . J Clin ExpInvest 2013; 4 (1: 116-118Key words: kabuki makeup, tympanoplasty, general anesthesia

  4. [Anesthetic management of a patient with suspected pseudothrombocytopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Kouchi, Akira; Inaba, Shin; Motomura, Yuji; Takahashi, Minoru

    2003-10-01

    A 74-year-old male was operated for sigmoid colon cancer. Because of an agglutination of the patient's platelet, it was difficult to measure his platelet count under ethylene diamine tetra acetate (EDTA), heparin or citrate as anticoagulants with an automated cell counter. Even though there was a strong possibility of pseudothrombocytopenia, anesthetic management for the patient was safely conducted. His condition was stable throughout the perioperative course and no bleeding tendency was observed. Nitrous oxide, oxygen, sevoflurane, propofol and pancuronium were useful in this case.

  5. Cryosurgery: Painless and Fearless Management of Mucocele in Young Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Abhaymani; Chowdhry, Swati; Sharma, Ashish; Biswas, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    A mucocele is a common benign lesion of the minor salivary gland mucosa that most frequently affects children and young adults. A 6-year-old male patient reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, with the chief complaint of a painless swelling on floor of the mouth on his left side. The purpose of this case report is to present the treatment of mucocele present in floor of the mouth in a child patient using liquid nitrogen cryosurgery. Also, discussed are the mechanism of action, current protocol of cryosurgery recommended in the management of mucoceles, clinical advantages and disadvantages together with the clinical outcomes. PMID:25302270

  6. Management of patient with necrotizing fasciitis: a challenge for anaesthesiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Mahajan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Necrotising fasciitis, a highly lethal infection of deep seated subcutaneous tissue and fascia, is associated with high mortality and long term morbidity. A five year old child of necrotizing fasciitis with poor general condition, deranged investigations and unstable vitals was posted for debridement. After initial resuscitation, TIVA was given, intraoperative period was uneventful and post operatively patient was shifted to recovery room as fully conscious with O2 by face mask. After 1 and frac12; hours, patient became drowsy, hypotensive with bradycardia and urine output was nil. Immediate resuscitation started and vasopressors added. Despite all aggressive interventions, the patient died due to sepsis induced multiorgan failure. Blood samples and wound aspirate culture showed group A beta hemolytic Streptococcous. In this case report we discuss the best possible management of such patients and tried to minimize several barriers like lack of early recognition of severe sepsis and septic shock, treatment delay, lack of several investigations and drugs, shortage of health care providers, absence of locally written protocol, remote area and tried to give the massage that adherence to published guidelines for the management of severe sepsis patients lowers mortality. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 763-766

  7. Avoiding Errors in the Management of Pediatric Polytrauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kenneth; Abzug, Joshua; Bae, Donald S; Horn, Bernard D; Herman, Martin; Eberson, Craig P

    2016-01-01

    Management of pediatric polytrauma patients is one of the most difficult challenges for orthopaedic surgeons. Multisystem injuries frequently include complex orthopaedic surgical problems that require intervention. The physiology and anatomy of children and adolescent trauma patients differ from the physiology and anatomy of an adult trauma patient, which alters the types of injuries sustained and the ideal methods for management. Errors of pediatric polytrauma care are included in two broad categories: missed injuries and inadequate fracture treatment. Diagnoses may be missed most frequently because of a surgeon's inability to reliably assess patients who have traumatic brain injuries and painful distracting injuries. Cervical spine injuries are particularly difficult to identify in a child with polytrauma and may have devastating consequences. In children who have multiple injuries, the stabilization of long bone fractures with pediatric fixation techniques, such as elastic nails and other implants, allows for easier care and more rapid mobilization compared with cast treatments. Adolescent polytrauma patients who are approaching skeletal maturity, however, are ideally treated as adults to avoid complications, such as loss of fixation, and to speed rehabilitation.

  8. Anesthesia Management in a Patient with Niemann Pick Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Akoğul

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease (NPD is an autosomal recessive, lipid storage disorder caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme sphingomyelinase or defective cholesterol transport from lysosome to cytosol. The clinical symptoms and signs include dysphagia, loss of motor function, hepatosplenomegaly, recurred respiratory infections, seizure, mental retardation, spasticity, myoclonic jerks and ataxia, but vary depending on the type of this disease. According to the observed pathology, patients require specialized therapy. Due to the high prevalence of the pathology in this group of patients, surgical interventions requiring general anaesthesia are common. Anesthetists have some difficulties with this group of patients. One of them is difficult ventilation because of hepatosplenomegaly and the other is difficult intubation. The metabolism of some of the anesthetic agents may be affected due to chronic use of anticonvulsant agents. Liver enzymes are elevated and platelet counts are reduced. Here we report an anesthesia management, difficulties and post-op follow up in a female child having NPD. Anesthetists have some difficulties in ventilation and intubation with NPD patients. In this situation ventilation should be with low tidal volume and high frequency. Because anesthetic agents might cause liver damage, they should be used cautiously. As a result, with keeping mind all these pathologies, anesthesia management to these patients should be used cautiously. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2013; 11: 42-4

  9. Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and patients in retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, J A

    2005-05-01

    Retreatment of tuberculosis involves the management of entities as diverse as relapse, failure, treatment after default, and poor patient adherence to the previous treatment. The emergence of conditions for selection of resistance (failure and partial abandonment) is a matter of great concern. The development of a retreatment regimen for tuberculosis requires consideration of certain basic premises. The importance of a comprehensive and directed history of drugs taken in the past, and the limited reliability of susceptibility tests to many of these drugs, should be kept in mind. Taking this into account, and possessing a thorough knowledge of all anti-tuberculosis medications, it is possible to cure almost all patients with an appropriate retreatment regimen including a minimum of three or four drugs not previously used. Nonetheless, the treatment of these patients is so complex that it should only be carried out by experienced staff. Concern about treating tuberculosis patients with drug resistance varies greatly depending on the available resources. High-income countries should provide individual treatment regimens adapted to each patient; however, in other settings, restricted resources could justify the implementation of standardised therapeutic guidelines with second-line drugs in order to facilitate management and reduce costs.

  10. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  11. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction.

  12. Incidence and Management of Rash in Telaprevir-Treated Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Johnson, Heather J; Chopra, Kapil B; Dunn, Michael A; Ulrich, Ashley M; Mohammad, Rima A

    2014-09-01

    Telaprevir-induced rash is a common, therapy-limiting adverse drug event (ADE) for patients with hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection. Given the similarity between telaprevir and simeprevir, real-world management of rash during treatment with an NS3/4A protease inhibitor and its implications are important. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of rash in telaprevir-treated patients, its management, and the impact on sustained virological response and to identify any risk factors for rash development. This was a retrospective study of adult patients who were treated with telaprevir in a hepatology clinic from July 1, 2011, to August 31, 2012. Pertinent information on demographics, past medical history, medications, laboratory data, outcomes of rash, other ADEs related to treatment, and physician grading of rash were collected. Of 159 patients included, 44% (70/159) developed rash, and 4% (7/159) discontinued therapy because of rash. Median number of days until rash did not differ between patients who continued and discontinued therapy (25 vs 45, respectively; P = 0.88). Patients who developed rash were more likely to have lower actual body weight (ABW) or body mass index (BMI; P ≤ 0.01). No significant difference in rash development when drug-allergy history was considered was found. Most patients who continued telaprevir were prescribed topical corticosteroids (93.7%) and cetirizine (41.3%). Patients who discontinued therapy were more likely to be evaluated by dermatology (P = 0.002), prescribed oral corticosteroids (P = 0.02), hydroxyzine (P = 0.001), and topical triamcinolone (P = 0.01). ABW and BMI appear to be related to rash development. This finding may have implications in the treatment of HCV with simeprevir, given its similarity to telaprevir. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Patient privacy, consent, and identity management in health information exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Hosek, Susan D

    2013-01-01

    As a step toward improving its health information technology (IT) interoperability, the Military Health System is seeking to develop a research roadmap to better coordinate health IT research efforts, address IT capability gaps, and reduce programmatic risk for its enterprise projects. This report identifies gaps in research, policy, and practice involving patient privacy, consent, and identity management that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of care through health information exchange.

  14. Initial evaluation and management of the critical burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivó, C; Galeiras, R; del Caz, Ma D P

    2016-01-01

    The major improvement in burn therapy is likely to focus on the early management of hemodynamic and respiratory failures in combination with an aggressive and early surgical excision and skin grafting for full-thickness burns. Immediate burn care by first care providers is important and can vastly alter outcomes, and it can significantly limit burn progression and depth. The goal of prehospital care should be to cease the burning process as well as prevent future complications and secondary injuries for burn shock. Identifying burn patients appropriate for immediate or subacute transfer is an important step in reducing morbidity and mortality. Delays in transport to Burn Unit should be minimized. The emergency management follows the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support Guidelines for assessment and stabilization of airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure and environment control. All patients with suspected inhalation injury must be removed from the enclosure as soon as possible, and immediately administer high-flow oxygen. Any patient with stridor, shortness of breath, facial burns, singed nasal hairs, cough, soot in the oral cavity, and history of being in a fire in an enclosed space should be strongly considered for early intubation. Fibroscopy may also be useful if airway damage is suspected and to assess known lung damage. Secondary evaluation following admission to the Burn Unit of a burned patient suffering a severe thermal injury includes continuation of respiratory support and management and treatment of inhalation injury, fluid resuscitation and cardiovascular stabilization, pain control and management of burn wound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in the pregnant patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flavio M Habal; Nikila C Ravindran

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disorder affecting young adults in their reproductive years.Many young women with IBD express concern about the effect their disease will have on fertility,pregnancy course and fetal development This article presents an approach to management of IBD in the pregnant patient,including counseling and investigation,and summarizes existing data on the safety of medications used to treat IBD in pregnancy and breastfeeding.

  16. ["SOS SEIN 84" accelerated breast disease management: Patients satisfaction survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Antoine; Dumuids, Magali; Mège, Alice; de Rauglaudre, Gaëtan; Regis Arnaud, Anne; Martin, Nicole; Dupuy Meurat, Françoise; Dolle, Sabine; Gallon, Elise; Serin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In case of a new breast symptom or an abnormal result of breast imaging, some women have a problem finding a quick answer to allay their anxiety. The Institut Sainte-Catherine in Avignon has set up a new form of accelerated disease management through the opening of a new dedicated consultation called SOS SEIN 84. We present the result of a prospective quality study of our first new patients.

  17. Perioperative Management of Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzia A Khan

    2008-01-01

    The anaesthetic implications include the presence of comorbidities like cardiovascular, respiratory and cerebrovascular sequelae. Obesity is a commonly associated condition. Effects of sedatives, hypnotics and other anaesthetic drugs are of major concern and there are potential complications associated with the postoperative period. The purpose of this review is to update the readers on the recent literature available on the topic. The American Society of Anesthesiologists has recently suggested guidelines on the perioperative management of these patients.

  18. Weight Management in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottalib, Adham; Kasetty, Megan; Mar, Jessica Y; Elseaidy, Taha; Ashrafzadeh, Sahar; Hamdy, Osama

    2017-08-23

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are typically viewed as lean individuals. However, recent reports showed that their obesity rate surpassed that of the general population. Patients with T1D who show clinical signs of type 2 diabetes such as obesity and insulin resistance are considered to have "double diabetes." This review explains the mechanisms of weight gain in patients with T1D and how to manage it. Weight management in T1D can be successfully achieved in real-world clinical practice. Nutrition therapy includes reducing energy intake and providing a structured nutrition plan that is lower in carbohydrates and glycemic index and higher in fiber and lean protein. The exercise plan should include combination stretching as well as aerobic and resistance exercises to maintain muscle mass. Dynamic adjustment of insulin doses is necessary during weight management. Addition of anti-obesity medications may be considered. If medical weight reduction is not achieved, bariatric surgery may also be considered.

  19. Management of nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Purpose To review evidence-based management of nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data sources A literature search (MEDLINE 1966 to 2000) was performed using the key word “diabetic nephropathy". Relevant book chapters were also reviewed. Study selection Well-controlled, prospective landmark studies and expert review articles on diabetic nephropathy were selected. Data extraction Data and conclusions from the selected articles that provide solid evidence to the optimal management of diabetic nephropathy were extracted and interpreted in light of our clinical research experience with many thousands of Hong Kong Chinese patients. Results Hypertension, long diabetes duration, poor glycaemic control and central obesity are the most important risk factors. Microalbuminuria is a practical marker to predict overt nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Risk factor modification, renal function monitoring and combined therapies are the current integrated approaches to manage patients with diabetic kidney disease. Optimal glycaemic control is the mainstay of treatment but effective antihypertensive therapy is also key to delaying the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonists have important renoprotective actions independent of their blood pressure lowering actions. Conclusions Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Monitoring renal function and screening for microalbuminuria will allow the identification of patients with nephropathy at a very early stage for intervention. Tight glycaemic control and aggressive antihypertensive treatment as well as the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors should substantially delay the progression of nephropathy.

  20. The Management of Patients after Surgical Treatment of Maxillofacial Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolski, D.; Zawadzki, P.; Życińska, K.; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and functional disturbances induced by postsurgical defects and loss of tissues in the stomatognathic system due to the treatment of tumors in the maxillofacial region determine the therapeutic needs of patients. The study aimed at clinical and epidemiological evaluation of patients under prosthetic treatment in order to establish the algorithm for rehabilitation. The study group was composed of the patients after midface surgery (45.74%); surgery in a lower part of the face (47.38%); mixed postoperative losses (3.44%); loss of face tissues and surgery in other locations in the head and neck region (3.44%). The supplementary treatment was applied in 69.63% of patients. Clinical and additional examinations were performed to obtain the picture of postoperative loss, its magnitude, and location to plan the strategy of prosthetic rehabilitation. The management algorithm for prosthetic rehabilitation in patients after surgical treatment of maxillofacial neoplasms was based on its division in stages. The location and magnitude of postoperative losses, as well as the implementation of supplementary treatment of the patients after treatment of maxillofacial tumors, influence the planning of prosthetic rehabilitation that plays a key role and facilitates the patients' return to their prior living situation, occupational and family lives.

  1. Oral surgery for patients on anticoagulant therapy: current thoughts on patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doonquah, Ladi; Mitchell, Anika D

    2012-01-01

    Minor oral surgical procedures make up a significant part of the daily practice of dentistry. With the increased sophistication of medical technology and medications there is increased likelihood of performing surgery on patients who are being treated for conditions that require some type of anticoagulant therapy. These patients are at an increased risk for perioperative bleeding or thrombotic complications if anticoagulation is discontinued or the dosage is adjusted. Therefore, a fine balance needs to be obtained and adequate preparation of these patients is the key to establishing this balance. This article reviews suggested approaches to the management of such patients.

  2. Anesthetic management of minimally invasive intervention in children's oncohematology: preoperative patient management protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shchukin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Preoperative patient management protocol in the complex anesthetic support of minimally invasive interventions in pediatric oncology is described. Choice of general anesthesia method was determined by the specific clinical situation by analyzing all of the following factors: airway management, necessity and anticipated duration of unconsciousness, the need for analgesia, necessity and duration of immobilization, prevention of hypothermia, the presence and severity of disturbances in the hemostatic system, comfort for the child and his representatives (parents. Basic techniques of child preoperative examination, as well as the methodology for predicting the risk of perioperative adverse events are described.

  3. Anesthetic management of minimally invasive intervention in children's oncohematology: preoperative patient management protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shchukin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Preoperative patient management protocol in the complex anesthetic support of minimally invasive interventions in pediatric oncology is described. Choice of general anesthesia method was determined by the specific clinical situation by analyzing all of the following factors: airway management, necessity and anticipated duration of unconsciousness, the need for analgesia, necessity and duration of immobilization, prevention of hypothermia, the presence and severity of disturbances in the hemostatic system, comfort for the child and his representatives (parents. Basic techniques of child preoperative examination, as well as the methodology for predicting the risk of perioperative adverse events are described.

  4. Measuring and managing patient expectations for breast reconstruction: impact on quality of life and patient satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Andrea L; Klassen, Anne F; Snell, Laura; Cano, Stefan J; McCarthy, Colleen; Scott, Amie; Cemal, Yeliz; Rubin, Lisa R; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    The goal of postmastectomy breast reconstruction is to restore a woman’s body image and to satisfy her personal expectations regarding the results of surgery. Studies in other surgical areas have shown that unrecognized or unfulfilled expectations may predict dissatisfaction more strongly than even the technical success of the surgery. Patient expectations play an especially critical role in elective procedures, such as cancer reconstruction, where the patient’s primary motivation is improved health-related quality of life. In breast reconstruction, assessment of patient expectations is therefore vital to optimal patient care. This report summarizes the existing literature on patient expectations regarding breast reconstruction, and provides a viewpoint on how this field can evolve. Specifically, we consider how systematic measurement and management of patient expectations may improve patient education, shared medical decision-making and patient perception of outcomes. PMID:22458616

  5. Evaluation of management of desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis in Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, M. H.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M.; Baeten, C. G.; Nagengast, F. M.; van der Bijl, J.; van Dalsen, A. D.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Dekker, E.; Langers, A. M.; Vecht, J.; Peters, F. T.; van Dam, R.; van Gemert, W. G.; Stuifbergen, W. N.; Schouten, W. R.; Gelderblom, H.; Vasen, H. F. A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment of desmoid tumours is controversial. We evaluated desmoid management in Dutch familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. METHODS: Seventy-eight FAP patients with desmoids were identified from the Dutch Polyposis Registry. Data on desmoid morphology, management,

  6. [Management of hemodialysis patients using simple informatics program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devcić, Bosiljka; Jelić, Ita; Racki, Sanjin

    2014-03-01

    Providing health care and good hospital organization are always based on a well-educated and competent nurse. Nurses can significantly affect the result of overall treatment, which has a professional and financial effect. Nursing Informatics is a specialty that integrates nursing, computer and information science applied to nursing management as well as transfer of data, information and knowledge in nursing practice. This facilitates nurses' integration in supporting decision-making and implementation of health care. Informatics emphasizes overall nursing practice and nurses should have basic computer skills. In this article, we show how the use of simple tables, designed by using Microsoft Office programs (Word and Excel), has been employed for over a decade in facilitating the organization of daily work, monitoring of patients and their prescribed therapy. A trained nurse-manager will be able to evaluate patient care and to organize health care administration using all human and technical resources. The vision of the national health care system is still not achievable due to the lack of infrastructure. Nurses and computer documentation of patients with chronic kidney disease can significantly improve the quality of patient care and treatment.

  7. Managing hepatitis C in liver transplant patients with recurrent infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Zimmermann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Tim Zimmermann1, Gerd Otto2, Marcus Schuchmann11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Transplantation Surgery, University of Mainz, GermanyAbstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV reinfection after liver transplantation (LT and recurrent hepatitis C often lead to recurrent cirrhosis (RC. RC is one of the most frequent complications resulting in organ failure and early death after LT in HCV-positive patients with reported 5-year rates from 20% to 40%. As HCV-cirrhosis is one of the leading indications for LT, the therapeutic management is a central issue. To date, the best available therapy is a combination of pegylated interferon + ribavirin in patients with established recurrent hepatitis C proven by liver biopsy. Although increasing experience in using interferon therapy after LT has suggested better response rates, treatment is limited by a poor tolerability and high rates of severe side effects, necessitating lower doses or withdrawal of therapy. The extent to which dose reductions and the concomitant administration of growth factors affect virological response or prevent complications is still to be determined. Prospective clinical trials are mandatory to identify the best time point and schedule of antiviral treatment in transplant patients. Currently, therapeutic options need to be discussed for each individual patient. Therefore therapy should be carried out only in transplant centers with experience in managing hepatitis C after LT.Keywords: hepatitis C, liver transplantation, recurrent infection, treatment

  8. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 and those with BMI > 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review. PMID:25429323

  9. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abd; Elrazek; Mohammad; Ali; Abd; Elrazek; Abduh; Elsayed; Mohamed; Elbanna; Shymaa; E; Bilasy

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index(BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients(BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 and those with BMI > 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review.

  10. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-11-27

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) and those with BMI > 35 kg/m(2) with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review.

  11. Cardiovascular risk factor management in patients with RA compared to matched non-RA patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawston, Helene; Bourhis, Francois; Al, Maiwenn; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P. M. H.; Liao, Katherine P.; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. RA is associated with a 50–60% increase in risk of cardiovascular (CV) death. This study aimed to compare management of CV risk factors in RA and matched non-RA patients. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using UK clinical practice data. Patients presenting with an incident RA diagnosis were matched 1:4 to non-RA patients based on a propensity score for RA, entry year, CV risk category and treatment received at index date (date of RA diagnosis). Patients tested and treated for CV risk factors as well as those attaining CV risk factor management goals were evaluated in both groups. Results. Between 1987 and 2010, 24 859 RA patients were identified and matched to 87 304 non-RA patients. At index date, groups had similar baseline characteristics. Annual blood pressure, lipids and diabetes-related testing were similar in both groups, although CRP and ESR were higher in RA patients at diagnosis and decreased over time. RA patients prescribed antihypertensives increased from 38.2% at diagnosis to 45.7% at 5 years, from 14.0 to 20.6% for lipid-lowering treatments and from 5.1 to 6.4% for antidiabetics. Similar treatment percentages were observed in non-RA patients, although slightly lower for antihypertensives. Modest (2%) but significantly lower attainment of lipid and diabetes goals at 1 year was observed in RA patients. Conclusion. There were no differences between groups in the frequency of testing and treatment of CV risk factors. Higher CV risk in RA patients seems unlikely to be driven by differences in traditional CV risk factor management. PMID:26705329

  12. [Integrated management of patients with schizophrenia: beyond psychotropic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda Zapata, Eliana; Montoya Gonzalez, Laura Elisa; Gómez Sierra, Natalia María; Arteaga Morales, Laura María; Correa Rico, Oscar Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disease with severe functional repercussions; therefore it merits treatment which goes beyond drugs. It requires an approach that considers a diathesis-stress process that includes rehabilitation, psychotherapeutic strategies for persistent cognitive, negative and psychotic symptoms, psychoeducation of patient and communities, community adaptation strategies, such as the introduction to the work force, and the community model, such as a change in the asylum paradigm. It is necessary to establish private and public initiatives for the integrated care of schizophrenia in the country, advocating the well-being of those with the disease. The integrated management of schizophrenic patients requires a global view of the patient and his/her disease, and its development is essential. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Palliative management of malignant bowel obstruction in terminally Ill patient

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    Darshit A Thaker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mr. P was a 57-year-old man who presented with symptoms of bowel obstruction in the setting of a known metastatic pancreatic cancer. Diagnosis of malignant bowel obstruction was made clinically and radiologically and he was treated conservatively (non-operativelywith octreotide, metoclopromide and dexamethasone, which provided good control over symptoms and allowed him to have quality time with family until he died few weeks later with liver failure. Bowel obstruction in patients with abdominal malignancy requires careful assessment. The patient and family should always be involved in decision making. The ultimate goals of palliative care (symptom management, quality of life and dignity of death should never be forgotten during decision making for any patient.

  14. Hemophilia A. Considerations for dental management of pediatric patients.

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    Sonia López-Villareal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It comes to consulting the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Nuevo León pediatric male patient of 9 years 10 months, who was admitted with a presumptive diagnosis of hemophilia due to a subsequent persistent bleeding to treatment with steel crowns made in an earlier appointment. Interconsultation is performed with the hematologist who by laboratory examinations notice decreased coagulation factor VIII confirming the diagnosis of hemophilia A. It plans and conducts comprehensive treatment dental team with the hematologist who said that patients in hospitals with the replacement of missing clotting factor is prepared by cryo precipitates or with concentrated factor VIII intravenously before and after his dental intervention. The aim of the article is to highlight that hemophilia can be a disease detected during dental surgery in some patients and for it to be successfully treated with multidisciplinary management protocol is required between hematologists and dentists.

  15. Favorable results after conservative management of 316 valproate intoxicated patients

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    Shahin Shadnia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Valproic acid (VPA is an effective antiepileptic drug widely used worldwide. Despite several studies indicating the usefulness of intravenous L-carnitine in the treatment of VPA poisoning, this drug is not readily available in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine whether supportive care without antidote would result in acceptable outcomes in VPA poisoned patients. Materials and Methods: In an observational, retrospective, single-center case series, all patients >12-year-old with VPA overdose who had referred to a tertiary center between 2009 and 2013 were consecutively enrolled. Patients′ demographic and presenting features, physical examinations, clinical management, laboratory data, and outcomes were recorded. Results: A total of 316 patients were enrolled with pure VPA toxicity. The most common presenting signs/symptoms were drowsiness, nausea and vomiting, vertigo, and headache. In the course of the disease, 14 patients (4.4% were intubated and three (0.9% required hemodialysis with mean dialysis sessions of two. Fourteen patients were admitted to Intensive Care Unit, and seizures occurred in five. The initial level of consciousness was lower in patients with poor outcome. The median ingested dose of VPA in patients who required dialysis was significantly higher (20 vs. 6 g; P = 0.006. Multivariate analyses revealed that coma on presentation was associated with a worse outcome (P = 0.001; odds ratio = 61.5, 95% CI = 5.8-646.7. Conclusion: Prognosis of VPA poisoned patients appears to be good even with supportive care. According to our study, older age, ingestion of higher amounts of VPA and lower PCO 2 , HCO 3 , base excess, and CPK levels prone the patients to more severe toxicities in univariate analysis, but the main poor prognostic factor is coma on presentation in multivariate analysis.

  16. Endoscopic management of acute cholangitis in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naresh Agarwal; Barjesh Chander Sharma; Shiv K Sarin

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate clinical presentation, etiology, complications and response to treatment in elderly patients with acute cholangitis.METHODS: Demographics, etiology of biliary obstruction, clinical features, complications and associated systemic diseases of 175 patients with acute cholangitis were recorded. Endoscopic biliary drainage was performed using nasobiliary drain or stent. The complications related to ERCP, success of biliary drainage, morbidity, mortality and length of hospital stay were evaluated.RESULTS: Of 175 patients, 52 aged≥60 years (groupⅠ,age<60 years; groupⅡ,age≥60 years) and 105 were men. Fever was present in 38 of 52 patients of group Ⅱ compared to 120 of 123 in group Ⅰ. High fever (fever≥38.0℃) was more common in group Ⅰ (118/120 vs 18/38). Hypotension (5/123 vs 13/52),altered sensorium (3/123 vs 19/52), peritonism (22/123 vs 14/52), renal failure (5/123 vs 14/52) and associated comorbid diseases (4/123 vs 21/52) were more common in group Ⅱ. Biliopancreatic malignancy was a common cause of biliary obstruction in group Ⅱ (n = 34) and benign diseases in group Ⅰ (n = 120). Indications for biliary drainage were any one of the following either singly or in combination: a fever of≥38.0℃ (n=136),hypotension (n=18), peritonism (n=36), altered sensorium (n=22), and failure to improve within 72h of conservative management (n=22). High grade fever was more common indication of biliary drainage in group Ⅰ and hypotension, altered sensorium, peritonism and failure to improve within 72 h of conservative management were more common indications in group Ⅱ. Endoscopic biliary drainage was achieved in 172 patients (nasobiliary drain: 56 group Ⅰ, 24 group Ⅱ,stent: 64 group Ⅰ, 28 group Ⅱ) without any significant age related difference in the success rate. Abdominal pain, fever, jaundice, hypotension, altered sensorium,peritonism and renal failure improved after median time of 5 d in 120 patients in group Ⅰ (2-15 d

  17. The Management of Patients after Surgical Treatment of Maxillofacial Tumors

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    D. Rolski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and functional disturbances induced by postsurgical defects and loss of tissues in the stomatognathic system due to the treatment of tumors in the maxillofacial region determine the therapeutic needs of patients. The study aimed at clinical and epidemiological evaluation of patients under prosthetic treatment in order to establish the algorithm for rehabilitation. The study group was composed of the patients after midface surgery (45.74%; surgery in a lower part of the face (47.38%; mixed postoperative losses (3.44%; loss of face tissues and surgery in other locations in the head and neck region (3.44%. The supplementary treatment was applied in 69.63% of patients. Clinical and additional examinations were performed to obtain the picture of postoperative loss, its magnitude, and location to plan the strategy of prosthetic rehabilitation. The management algorithm for prosthetic rehabilitation in patients after surgical treatment of maxillofacial neoplasms was based on its division in stages. The location and magnitude of postoperative losses, as well as the implementation of supplementary treatment of the patients after treatment of maxillofacial tumors, influence the planning of prosthetic rehabilitation that plays a key role and facilitates the patients’ return to their prior living situation, occupational and family lives.

  18. Management of radiation therapy patients with cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Francesca; Gomellini, Sara; Caruso, Cristina; Barbara, Raffaele; Musio, Daniela; Coppi, Tamara; Cardinale, Mario; Tombolini, Vincenzo; de Paula, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The increasing growth of population with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as Pacemaker (PM) and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD), requires particular attention in management of patients needing radiation treatment. This paper updates and summarizes some recommendations from different international guidelines. Ionizing radiation and/or electromagnetic interferences could cause device failure. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centres. We refer to the German Society of Radiation Oncology and Cardiology guidelines (ed. 2015); to the Society of Cardiology Australia and New Zealand Statement (ed. 2015); to the guidelines in force in the Netherlands (ed. 2012) and to the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology recommendations (ed. 2013) as reported in the guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with CIED. Although there is not a clear cut-off point, risk of device failure increases with increasing doses. Cumulative dose and pacing dependency have been combined to categorize patients into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Measures to secure patient safety are described for each category. The use of energy ≤6MV is preferable and it's strongly recommended not to exceed a total dose of 2 Gy to the PM and 1 Gy for ICD. Given the dangers of device malfunction, radiation oncology departments should adopt all the measures designed to minimize the risk to patients. For this reason, a close collaboration between cardiologist, radiotherapist and physicist is necessary.

  19. Current migraine managementpatient acceptability and future approaches

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    Jean Schoenen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Arnaud Fumal, Jean SchoenenDepartments of Neurology and Functional Neuroanatomy, Headache Research Unit, University of Liège, BelgiumAbstract: Despite its high prevalence and individual as well as societal burden, migraine remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. In recent years, the options for the management of migraine patients have greatly expanded. A number of drugs belonging to various pharmacological classes and deliverable by several routes are now available both for the acute and the preventive treatments of migraine. Nevertheless, disability and satisfaction remain low in many subjects because treatments are not accessible, not optimized, not effective, or simply not tolerated. There is thus still considerable room for better education, for more efficient therapies and for greater support from national health systems. In spite of useful internationally accepted guidelines, anti-migraine treatment has to be individually tailored to each patient taking into account the migraine subtype, the ensuing disability, the patient’s previous history and present expectations, and the co-morbid disorders. In this article we will summarize the phenotypic presentations of migraine and review recommendations for acute and preventive treatment, highlighting recent advances which are relevant for clinical practice in terms of both diagnosis and management.Keywords: migraine, disability, acute treatment, preventive treatment, management

  20. Airway Management of the Cardiac Surgical Patients: Current Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Arindam; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Magoon, Rohan; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2017-01-01

    The difficult airway (DA) is a common problem encountered in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, the challenge is not only just establishment of airway but also maintaining a definitive airway for the safe conduct of cardiopulmonary bypass from initiation to weaning after surgical correction or palliation, de-airing of cardiac chambers. This review describes the management of the DA in a cardiac theater environment. The primary aims are recognition of DA both anatomical and physiological, necessary preparations for (and management of) difficult intubation and extubation. All patients undergoing cardiac surgery should initially be considered as having potentially DA as many of them have poor physiologic reserve. Making the cardiac surgical theater environment conducive to DA management is as essential as it is to deal with low cardiac output syndrome or acute heart failure. Tube obstruction and/or displacement should be suspected in case of a new onset ventilation problem, especially in the recovery unit. Cardiac anesthesiologists are often challenged with DA while inducing general endotracheal anesthesia. They ought to be familiar with the DA algorithms and possess skill for using the latest airway adjuncts. PMID:28074820

  1. Improving access for patients – a practice manager questionnaire

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    Brown James S

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The administrative and professional consequences of access targets for general practices, as detailed in the new GMS contract, are unknown. This study researched the effect of implementing the access targets of the new GP contract on general practice appointment systems, and practice manager satisfaction in a UK primary health care setting. Methods A four-part postal questionnaire was administered. The questionnaire was modified from previously validated questionnaires and the findings compared with data obtained from the Western Health and Social Services Board (WHSSB in N Ireland. Practice managers from the 59 general practices in the WHSSB responded to the questionnaire. Results There was a 94.9% response rate. Practice managers were generally satisfied with the introduction of access targets for patients. Some 57.1% of responding practices, most in deprived areas (Odds ratio 3.13 -95% CI 1.01 – 9.80, p = 0.0256 had modified their appointment systems. Less booking flexibility was reported among group practices (p = 0.006, urban practices (p Conclusion The findings demonstrated the ability of general practices within the WHSSB to adjust to a demanding component of the new GP contract. Issues relating to the flexibility of patient appointment booking systems, receptionists' training and the development of the primary care nursing role were highlighted by the study.

  2. Osteoporosis management in older patients who experienced a fracture

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    Oertel MJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Oertel,1 Leland Graves,1 Eyad Al-Hihi,2 Vincent Leonardo,3 Christina Hopkins,2 Kristin DeSouza,2 Rajib K Bhattacharya1 1Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Genetics, Department of Medicine, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Enterprise Analytics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA Background: Fractures in older patients are common, morbid, and associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures. Inpatient and outpatient management and treatment of fractures can be costly. With more emphasis placed on quality care for Medicare beneficiaries, we studied if patients were receiving proper screening for osteoporosis and treatment after diagnosis of fracture. This study aims to determine if adequate screening and treatment for osteoporosis occurs in the postfracture period.Methods: A retrospective analysis of Medicare beneficiaries aged 67 years or older was gathered from a single institution in both inpatient and outpatient visits. Based on International Classification of Diseases ninth revision codes, primary diagnosis of fractures of neck and trunk, upper limb, and lower limb were obtained in addition to current procedural terminology codes for fracture procedures. We studied patients who had been screened for osteoporosis with a bone mineral study or received osteoporosis treatment after their fracture.Results: Medicare beneficiaries totaling 1,375 patients were determined to have an inclusion fracture between June 1, 2013 and November 30, 2014. At the time of our analysis on December 1, 2014, 1,219 patients were living and included in the analysis. Of these patients, 256 (21.0% either received osteoporosis testing with bone mineral density or received treatment for osteoporosis. On sex breakdown, 208/820 (25.4% females received proper evaluation or treatment of osteoporosis in comparison to 48/399 (12.0% males. This is in comparison to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ national

  3. Prognostic comparison of operative and non-operative therapies for intracerebral hemorrhage in a local hospital: Case retrospection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deming Zhao; Zenghong Jiang; Bin Wang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present, it is satisfactory for micro-trauma craniopuncture therapy for cerebral hemor rhage to treat spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Surgical treatment can decrease fatality rate of ICH patients; however, some reports suggest that there are no obvious differences of therapeutic effects between surgical treatment and medical therapy because of various states, operative indications, contraindi cations and operative styles.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of surgical treatment on ICH prognosis, especially on fatality rate. DESIGN: Retrospective-case study.SETTING: Huaibei People's Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: ① A total of 241 ICH patients selected from Huaibei People's Hospital from January 1988 to May 1989 were regarded as group A. They were all coincidence with Diagnostic Criteria of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in the National Cerebrovascular Disease Academic Meeting. There were 154 males and 87 females aged 34-94 years, and among them, 230 patients were older than 50 years (95.4%). Hemorrhage sites: Among 142 patients, 85 cases had internal capsule hemorrhage, 18 external capsule hemorrhage, 15 thalamic hemorrhage, 9 cerebellar hemorrhage, 7 brain stem hemorrhage, 7 cerebral lobe hemorrhage, and 1 corpus callosum hemorrhage. Hemorrhage volume: Among 89 clear records, 44 cases had of 1-10 mL, 35 of 11-30 mL, 5 of 31-40 mL, and 5 of 41-80 mL. Except 2 patients, other ones were treated with medical operation. ② A total of 203 ICH patients selected from the same hospital from January 2003 to December 2005 were regarded as group B. Among them, 72 cases were treated with operation, but other 131 ones were treated with non-operation. They were all diagnosed with CT. There were 113 males and 90 females aged 30-88 years, and among them, 183 patients were older than 50 years (90.1%). Hemorrhage sites: Among 203 patients, 104 cases had internal capsule hemorrhage, 17 external capsule hemorrhage, 19 thalamic hemorrhage, 9 cerebellar hemorrhage, 12 brain

  4. Integrating digital image management software for improved patient care and optimal practice management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Jon C

    2006-06-01

    Photographic images provide vital documentation of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative results in the clinical dermatologic surgery practice and can document histologic findings from skin biopsies, thereby enhancing patient care. Images may be printed as part of text documents, transmitted via electronic mail, or included in electronic medical records. To describe existing computer software that integrates digital photography and the medical record to improve patient care and practice management. A variety of computer applications are available to optimize the use of digital images in the dermatologic practice.

  5. Management of patients with Graves' orbitopathy: initial assessment, management outside specialised centres and referral pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Petros; Dayan, Colin M; Dickinson, A Jane; Ezra, Daniel; Estcourt, Stephanie; Foley, Peter; Hickey, Janis; Lazarus, John H; MacEwen, Caroline J; McLaren, Julie; Rose, Geoffrey E; Uddin, Jimmy; Vaidya, Bijay

    2015-04-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is uncommon, but responsible for considerable morbidity. A coordinated approach between healthcare professionals is required in order to meet the needs of patients. Early diagnosis can be achieved by a simple clinical assessment. Low-cost effective interventions can be initiated by generalists, which may improve outcomes. Moderate-to-severe GO should be referred to specialised centres. Recommendations for clinical diagnosis, initial management and referral pathways are highlighted.

  6. Rethinking blood components and patients: Patient blood management. Possible ways for development in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folléa, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. A better awareness of the risks of blood transfusion, the availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all have led to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. In this context, patient blood management (PBM) appears as an evidence-based, patient centred, multidisciplinary approach, aiming to optimise the care of patients who might need transfusion and consequently the use of blood products. This paper presents updated scientific bases of PBM and the three pillars founding it. As PBM is developing fast in other European countries, this review proposes ways to explore for its development in France. It finally proposes to integrate PBM in a wider and coordinated approach of the blood supply management, with tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, starting with the needs of the patients and ending with an optimum treatment of the patient, including the appropriate number of blood components of the required quality. A better understanding, implementation and assessment of this coordinated global approach, allowing to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, in a coordinated way, will certainly be a major challenge for transfusion medicine in the near future, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain.

  7. Perioperative Anesthesiological Management of Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

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    Jochen Gille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is a major reason for elevated perioperative morbidity and mortality, even in noncardiac surgical procedures. Patients should be thoroughly prepared for the intervention and allowed plenty of time for consideration. All specialty units involved in treatment should play a role in these preparations. After selecting each of the suitable individual anesthetic and surgical procedures, intraoperative management should focus on avoiding all circumstances that could contribute to exacerbating pulmonary hypertension (hypoxemia, hypercapnia, acidosis, hypothermia, hypervolemia, and insufficient anesthesia and analgesia. Due to possible induction of hypotonic blood circulation, intravenous vasodilators (milrinone, dobutamine, prostacyclin, Na-nitroprusside, and nitroglycerine should be administered with the greatest care. A method of treating elevations in pulmonary pressure with selective pulmonary vasodilation by inhalation should be available intraoperatively (iloprost, nitrogen monoxide, prostacyclin, and milrinone in addition to invasive hemodynamic monitoring. During the postoperative phase, patients must be monitored continuously and receive sufficient analgesic therapy over an adequate period of time. All in all, perioperative management of patients with pulmonary hypertension presents an interdisciplinary challenge that requires the adequate involvement of anesthetists, surgeons, pulmonologists, and cardiologists alike.

  8. Dental management of patients receiving anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototski, Mariele; Amenábar, José M

    2007-12-01

    Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents have been extensively researched and developed as potential therapies in the prevention and management of arterial and venous thrombosis. On the other hand, antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs have also been associated with an increase in the bleeding time and risk of postoperative hemorrhage. Because of this, some dentists still recommend the patient to stop the therapy for at least 3 days before any oral surgical procedure. However, stopping the use of these drugs exposes the patient to vascular problems, with the potential for significant morbidity. This article reviews the main antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs in use today and explains the dental management of patients on these drugs, when subjected to minor oral surgery procedures. It can be concluded that the optimal INR value for dental surgical procedures is 2.5 because it minimizes the risk of either hemorrhage or thromboembolism. Nevertheless, minor oral surgical procedures, such as biopsies, tooth extraction and periodontal surgery, can safely be done with an INR lower than 4.0.

  9. Management of acid-related disorders in patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Colin W

    2004-09-06

    Dysphagia affects a large and growing number of individuals in the United States, particularly the elderly and those who are neurologically impaired. Swallowing difficulties may be due to age-related changes in oropharyngeal and esophageal functioning as well as central nervous system diseases such as stroke, Parkinson disease, and dementia. Among institutionalized individuals, dysphagia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. An appreciation of the physiology of swallowing and the pathophysiology of dysphagia is necessary for proper patient management. Careful history, physical examination, and evaluation of radiologic and endoscopic studies should differentiate oropharyngeal and esophageal etiologies of dysphagia and distinguish mechanical (anatomic) disorders from functional (motor) disorders. A significant percentage of patients with dysphagia have concomitant acid-related disorders that are managed best with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Three of the currently available PPIs are manufactured as capsules containing enteric-coated granules that may be mixed with soft foods or fruit juices before oral administration to those with swallowing difficulties. In addition, omeprazole and lansoprazole may be administered via gastrostomy or nasogastric feeding tubes as suspensions in sodium bicarbonate. Novel dosage formulations of lansoprazole that may be appropriate for patients with dysphagia include the commercially manufactured lansoprazole strawberry-flavored enteric-coated granules for suspension and lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablets.

  10. Anesthetic Management of a Pediatric Patient with Arginase Deficiency

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    Abdulkadir Atım

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arginase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle in which a defect in conversion of arginine to urea and ornithine leads to hyperammonemia. Patients with urea cycle disorders may show increased protein catabolism due to inadequate intake of energy, protein and essential amino acids; infections, fever and surgery. A 12-year-old girl with arginase deficiency, ASA II who weighed 40 kg was scheduled for bilateral adductor, quadriceps and gastrocnemius tenotomies. She had mental retardation, spasticity and flexion posture of thelower limbs. Metabolic homeostasis was restored with appropriate diet. Successful anesthetic management allowed the patient to be discharged 48 hours after surgery. Increased levels of arginine and ammonia during or after surgery may lead to serious complications such as hypotension, cerebral edema, convulsions, hypothermia and spasticity. Thus special attention must be given to metabolic homeostasis and nutrition of the patients with arginase deficiency in the perioperative period. Primary goals should be to minimize stress levels by effective anxiolysis, provide an adequate amount of protein-free energy with proper fluid management and to obtain an effective preemptive and postoperative analgesia. In addition to a high level of knowledge, successful anesthesia requires professional communication among nursing staff, dietitians, pediatric metabolism specialist, surgeon and anesthesiologist.

  11. Current Chemotherapeutic Management of Patients with Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia

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    Taymaa May

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN describes a heterogeneous group of interrelated lesions that arise from abnormal proliferation of placental trophoblasts. GTN lesions are histologically distinct, malignant lesions that include invasive hydatidiform mole, choriocarcinoma, placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT and epithelioid trophoblastic tumor (ETT. GTN tumors are generally highly responsive to chemotherapy. Early stage GTN disease is often cured with single-agent chemotherapy. In contrast, advanced stage disease requires multiagent combination chemotherapeutic regimens to achieve a cure. Various adjuvant surgical procedures can be helpful to treat women with GTN. Patients require careful followup after completing treatment and recurrent disease should be aggressively managed. Women with a history of GTN are at increased risk of subsequent GTN, hence future pregnancies require careful monitoring to ensure normal gestational development. This article will review the workup, management and followup of women with all stages of GTN as well as with recurrent disease.

  12. MANAGEMENT OF THE PATIENTS WITH EBOLA VIRUS DESEASE

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    Bondarenko A.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest in the history of the Ebola virus disease (EVD outbreak was recorded in 2014. There are 9976 lethal cases from 24282 infected people (data up to 8 March 2015 within a year from the time of its announcement in West African countries. The outbreak started in Guinea then spread to neighbouring Sierra Leone and Liberia across land borders, to Senegal and Mali by ground transportation, and to Nigeria, Spain, United States of America and the United Kingdom by air transport. If in the previous years disease was the problem of endemic countries in Central Africa nowadays it became a major medical and social problem all over the world. The effective licensed drugs for the treatment and prevention of the disease does not currently exist, experimental drugs (ZMapp, TKM-100802, AVI 7537 Sarepta, Favipiravir T705, BCX4430 Biocryst, Brincidofovir, Nano Silver et al. are extremely limited, and they are still under investigation. Evidence their effectiveness is suggestive, but not based on solid scientific data from clinical trials. Safety is also unknown. There is consensus that the hyperimmune globulin or convalescent plasma containing high titres of specific neutralizing antibodies to Ebola virus, which leads to decrease the viral load in the blood, is considering to use in an epidemic area as a matter of priority. Experience has shown that the risk of EVD importation into Ukraine remains high despite all preventive measures. Thereby health care providers should be prepared to confront this problem and know how to manage the symptoms of the disease. The management of the patients with EVD mainly should be aimed to early recognition of severe disease and its complications, in combination with appropriate symptomatic therapy. Health care workers should pay careful attention to standard precautions and wear special protective clothing, including goggles, masks and gloves while providing clinical care. Management of intoxication, dehydration

  13. Peri-operative management of ophthalmic patients taking antithrombotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, G Y H; Durrani, O M; Roldan, V; Lip, P L; Marin, F; Reuser, T Q

    2011-03-01

    Increasing number of patients presenting for ophthalmic surgery are using oral anti-coagulant and anti-platelet therapy. The current practice of discontinuing these drugs preoperatively because of a presumed increased risk of bleeding may not be evidence-based and could pose a significant risk to the patient's health. To provide an evidence-based review on the peri-operative management of ophthalmic patients who are taking anti-thrombotic therapy. In addition, we briefly discuss the underlying conditions that necessitate the use of these drugs as well as management of the operative field in anti-coagulated patients. A semi-systematic review of literature was performed. The databases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, database of abstracts of reviews of effects (DARE), Cochrane controlled trial register and Cochrane systematic reviews. In addition, the bibliographies of the included papers were also scanned for evidence. The published data suggests that aspirin did not appear to increase the risk of serious postoperative bleeding in any type of ophthalmic surgery. Topical, sub-tenon, peri-bulbar and retrobulbar anaesthesia appear to be safe in patients on anti-thrombotic (warfarin and aspirin) therapy. Warfarin does not increase the risk of significant bleeding in most types of ophthalmic surgery when the INR was within the therapeutic range. Current evidence supports the continued use of aspirin and with some exceptions, warfarin in the peri-operative period. The risk of thrombosis-related complications on disruption of anticoagulation may be higher than the risk of significant bleeding by continuing its use for most types of ophthalmic surgery.

  14. 颈椎间盘突出症合并腰椎间盘突出症的非手术治疗效果分析%Effect of non-operative treatments on herniation of cervical disc complicated by prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Background: There are many reports about the operative or non- operative treatments of herniation of cervical disc or prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc, but few about the non- operative treatments curative effect and attentive affairs of their combination. Objective: To study the non- operative treatments' curative effect of herniation of cervical disc combined with prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc. Design: To make retrospective survey and study of non- operative treatments' curative effect of herniation of cervical disc combined with prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc. Unit: First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University. Subject: From February 1990 to February 1998, 55 patients were with the complication, occupied 15. 41% of the simple cervical disc, and 9. 34% of the simple lumbar intervertebral disc.

  15. Assessment and Management of Hypertension in Transplant Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ellen D.; Cooper, James E.; Fenves, Andrew Z.; Goldsmith, David; McKay, Dianne; Mehrotra, Anita; Mitsnefes, Mark M.; Sica, Domenic A.; Taler, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension in renal transplant recipients is common and ranges from 50% to 80% in adult recipients and from 47% to 82% in pediatric recipients. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and shortened allograft survival are important consequences of inadequate control of hypertension. In this review, we examine the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management considerations of post-transplant hypertension. Donor and recipient factors, acute and chronic allograft injury, and immunosuppressive medications may each explain some of the pathophysiology of post-transplant hypertension. As observed in other patient cohorts, renal artery stenosis and adrenal causes of hypertension may be important contributing factors. Notably, BP treatment goals for renal transplant recipients remain an enigma because there are no adequate randomized controlled trials to support a benefit from targeting lower BP levels on graft and patient survival. The potential for drug-drug interactions and altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the different antihypertensive medications need to be carefully considered. To date, no specific antihypertensive medications have been shown to be more effective than others at improving either patient or graft survival. Identifying the underlying pathophysiology and subsequent individualization of treatment goals are important for improving long-term patient and graft outcomes in these patients. PMID:25653099

  16. Management of candidemia in patients with Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Venditti, Mario; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella

    2016-07-01

    Patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) experience intestinal microflora changes that can promote the overgrowth and subsequent translocation of gut resident pathogens into the blood. Consistently, CDI due to PCR-ribotype 027 strain, severe or relapsing CDI, and treatment with high-dosage vancomycin are independent risk factors for candidemia. We review the role played by the gut microbiota during CDI and its treatment, as well as the clinical profile of CDI patients who are at risk of developing candidemia. Also, we discuss the management of these patients by focusing on pre-emptive strategies aimed at reducing the risk of candidemia, and on innovative anti-C. difficile therapies that may mitigate CDI-related effects such as the altered gut microbiota composition and prolonged intestinal mucosa damage. Expert commentary: A closer clinical and diagnostic monitoring of patients with CDI should help to limit the CDI-associated long-term consequences, including Candida infections, which worsen the outcome of hospitalized patients.

  17. Approach to diabetes management in patients with CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathief, Sanam; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have established a clear association between diabetes and macrovascular disease. Vascular dysfunction caused by metabolic abnormalities in patients with diabetes is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Patients with diabetes are at two to four fold higher CV risk as compared to non-diabetic individuals, and CVD remains the leading cause of mortality in patients with this condition. One strategy to reduce CVD burden in patients with diabetes has been to focus on controlling the major metabolic abnormality in this condition, namely hyperglycemia. However, this has not been unequivocally demonstrated to reduced CV events, in contrast to controlling other CVD risk factors linked to hyperglycemia, such as blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and platelet dysfunction. However, In contradistinction, accrued data from a number of large, randomized clinical trials in both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) over the past 3 decades have proven that more intensive glycemic control retards the onset and progression of microvascular disease. In this review, we will summarize the key glucose-lowering CV outcomes trials in diabetes, provide an overview of the different drugs and their impact on the CV system, and describe our approach to management of the frequently encountered patient with T2DM and coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or heart failure (HF).

  18. Questionnaire Survey on Asthma Management of Japanese Allergists I. Diagnosis patient education and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuharu Tsukioka

    1996-01-01

    Responses to the questionnaire on the diagnosis, patient education and management of asthma indicated that a reduced number of patients with severe asthma were seen in 1993 in both Pediatric and Internal Medicine Departments compared with 5 years before, despite the increase in total number of asthma patients in Japan. Specifiic IgE radioallergosorbent test (RAST measurements were frequently performed instead of skin testing for diagnosis, and eosinophil count and bronchodilator response served as an adjunct to the diagnosis. Patients were frequently asked detailed questions about aspirin-induced asthma, which accounted for 8.8, 2.2 and 1.5% of patients with asthma in the adult, schoolchildren (6–16 years and infant (≤ 5 years groups, respectively. In achieving ‘control of asthma’, first priority was given to coping with the symptoms in children aged 5 years or less and to enabling routine daily life activities in patients 6 years of age or older. Usefulness of peak flow measurements was widely recognized and a detailed plan for allergen avoidance (house dust was often given to patients.

  19. Emergency management of patients being treated with oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Manzato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists (VKA are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the industrialized world. In fact, for decades, VKA have been the only orally available anticoagulant for the primary and secondary prevention of venous and arterial thrombotic events. Their efficacy has been widely demonstrated in a series of studies carried out in the 1990s. Since the incidences of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism increase exponentially with age, the number of anticoagulated patients is destined to increase. This paper examines anticoagulation therapy management with particular attention to the use of VKA.

  20. Perioperative management of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda-Jaramillo, R; Castro-Arias, H D; Vallejo-Zarate, C; Ramos-Hurtado, L F

    2017-05-01

    The use of implantable cardiac devices in people of all ages is increasing, especially in the elderly population: patients with pacemakers, cardioverter-defibrillators or cardiac resynchronization therapy devices regularly present for surgery for non-cardiac causes. This review was made in order to collect and analyze the latest evidence for the proper management of implantable cardiac devices in the perioperative period. Through a detailed exploration of PubMed, Academic Search Complete (EBSCO), ClinicalKey, Cochrane (Ovid), the search software UpToDate, textbooks and patents freely available to the public on Google, we selected 33 monographs, which matched the objectives of this publication.

  1. Stabilizing and Managing Patients with Altered Mental Status and Delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odiari, Ebelechukwu A; Sekhon, Navdeep; Han, Jin Y; David, Elizabeth H

    2015-11-01

    Present in all patient populations, altered mental status (AMS) is a common, but nonspecific emergency department (ED) presentation that can signify serious underlying pathology. Delirium is a more defined mental status change caused by another medical condition that carries a high morbidity and mortality if missed. However, ED physicians miss the condition in more than 50% of cases. The ED physician should maintain a high index of suspicion for delirium, because if missed in the ED, delirium is more likely to be missed on the floors as well. Management of delirium is directed toward treating the underlying course.

  2. Patient self-management and pharmacist-led patient self-management in Hong Kong: A focus group study from different healthcare professionals' perspectives

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    Wong Eliza LY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient self-management is a key approach to manage non-communicable diseases. A pharmacist-led approach in patient self-management means collaborative care between pharmacists and patients. However, the development of both patient self-management and role of pharmacists is limited in Hong Kong. The objectives of this study are to understand the perspectives of physicians, pharmacists, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM practitioners, and dispensers on self-management of patients with chronic conditions, in addition to exploring the possibilities of developing pharmacist-led patient self-management in Hong Kong. Methods Participants were invited through the University as well as professional networks. Fifty-one participants comprised of physicians, pharmacists, TCM practitioners and dispensers participated in homogenous focus group discussions. Perspectives in patient self-management and pharmacist-led patient self-management were discussed. The discussions were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed accordingly. Results The majority of the participants were in support of patients with stable chronic diseases engaging in self-management. Medication compliance, monitoring of disease parameters and complications, lifestyle modification and identifying situations to seek help from health professionals were generally agreed to be covered in patient self-management. All pharmacists believed that they had extended roles in addition to drug management but the other three professionals believed that pharmacists were drug experts only and could only play an assisting role. Physicians, TCM practitioners, and dispensers were concerned that pharmacist-led patient self-management could be hindered, due to unfamiliarity with the pharmacy profession, the perception of insufficient training in disease management, and lack of trust of patients. Conclusions An effective chronic disease management model should involve patients in stable

  3. Dyslipidemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: etiology and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Žutelija, Marta; Mavrinac, Vojko; Orlic, Lidija

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including those with end-stage renal disease, treated with dialysis, or renal transplant recipients have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. Dyslipidemia, often present in this patient population, is an important risk factor for CVD development. Specific quantitative and qualitative changes are seen at different stages of renal impairment and are associated with the degree of glomerular filtration rate declining. Patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD have low high-density lipoproteins (HDL), normal or low total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, increased triglycerides as well as increased apolipoprotein B (apoB), lipoprotein(a) (Lp (a)), intermediate- and very-low-density lipoprotein (IDL, VLDL; “remnant particles”), and small dense LDL particles. In patients with nephrotic syndrome lipid profile is more atherogenic with increased TC, LDL, and triglycerides. Lipid profile in hemodialysis (HD) patients is usually similar to that in non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients. Patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) have more altered dyslipidemia compared to HD patients, which is more atherogenic in nature. These differences may be attributed to PD per se but may also be associated with the selection of dialytic modality. In renal transplant recipients, TC, LDL, VLDL, and triglycerides are elevated, whereas HDL is significantly reduced. Many factors can influence post-transplant dyslipidemia including immunosuppressive agents. This patient population is obviously at high risk; hence, prompt diagnosis and management are required to improve their clinical outcomes. Various studies have shown statins to be effective in the cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with mild-to-moderate CKD as well as in renal transplant recipients. However, according to recent clinical randomized controlled trials (4D, A Study to Evaluate the Use of Rosuvastatin in Subjects on

  4. Prehospital management of gunshot patients at major trauma care centers: exploring the gaps in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-09-01

    Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  5. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantar-Zadeh K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Kalantar-ZadehHarold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine’s School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USAObjectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia.Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed.Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels.Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, renal diet, phosphorus binders, educational programs, food fatigue, concordance

  6. Patient management in the recovery period of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kosivtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke heads the list of all causes of disability in middle-aged and elderly people. In recent years, there have been about 30% of morbid events among able-bodied persons (less than 65 years of age. The major post-stroke incapacitating disorders are motor and speech defects, cognitive and psychoemotional disorders, and pelvic organ dysfunctions. The patients’ quality of life largely depends on the degree of recovery of lost functions. In turn, the degree of their recovery depends on the start, proportioning, and continuity of initiated rehabilitation measures and on whether the patient has cognitive, speech, and psychoemotional problems and pelvic organ dysfunctions. Unfortunately, after discharge from a specialized unit, only a small number of post-stroke patients are admitted to specialized rehabilitation centers. The responsibility of caring forthese patients rests with their relatives and outpatient physicians.The main tasks in the early and late recovery periods following stroke are, in addition to the prevention of recurrent stroke, the implementation of rehabilitation programs to correct motor and speech disorders and cognitive impairments, the stabilization of emotions, and the provision of proper and qualitative general care for patients with severe motor defects and pelvic organ dysfunctions. The paper considers the main principles of patient management in the early and late post-stroke recovery periods. The authors give rehabilitation recommendations and main errors in routine practice (their relatives and junior medical staff have no speech contact with patients having speech disorders; psychoemotional disorders are underestimated and uncorrected; proper general care for patients with pelvic organ dysfunctions is absent.

  7. Leadership style and patient safety: implications for nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Katreena Collette

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between nurse manager (NM) leadership style and safety climate. Nursing leaders are needed who will change the environment and increase patient safety. Hospital NMs are positioned to impact day-to-day operations. Therefore, it is essential to inform nurse executives regarding the impact of leadership style on patient safety. A descriptive correlational study was conducted in 41 nursing departments across 9 hospitals. The hospital unit safety climate survey and multifactorial leadership questionnaire were completed by 466 staff nurses. Bivariate and regression analyses were conducted to determine how well leadership style predicted safety climate. Transformational leadership style was demonstrated as a positive contributor to safety climate, whereas laissez-faire leadership style was shown to negatively contribute to unit socialization and a culture of blame. Nursing leaders must concentrate on developing transformational leadership skills while also diminishing negative leadership styles.

  8. Perioperative management of patient with alkaptonuria and associated multiple comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Pandey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaptonuria is a rare inherited genetic disorder of tyrosine metabolism characterized by a triad of homogentisic aciduria, ochronosis, and arthritis. The most common clinical manifestations of ochronosis involve the musculoskeletal, respiratory, airway, cardiovascular, genitourinary, cutaneous, and ocular systems. We report the perioperative anesthetic management of a 56-year-old alkaptonuric patient, with multiple comorbidities scheduled, for revision total hip replacement. A review of her medical history revealed alkaptonuria, hypothyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and Pott′s spine with disc prolapse. We want to highlight the need of thorough preoperative evaluation in patients of alkaptonuria, as it is associated with multiple comorbidities. The systemic involvement should determine the anesthetic plan. Caution should be exercised during positioning to prevent injury to the joints and the spine.

  9. [Nursing assessment and management of patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jyuan; Liao, Chieh-Yin; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2012-02-01

    Cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) is a clinical health problem that induces impaired gas exchange, dyspnea and hypoxia. This serious condition results in acute respiratory failure and high mortality rate. This article suggests an effective approach to CPE patient clinical symptom assessment and management. In accordance with evidence-based methods, we searched Cochrane, CINAHL and ScienceDirect and identified four Oxford Ia or Ib reports that employed a randomized controlled trial, systematic review and meta-analysis. Results suggest that prompt application of a non-invasive positive ventilator, especially continuous positive or bi-level positive airway pressure, can help patients reduce intubation risks, ICU stay days, and mortality rates. The authors hope to see more clinical trials on this topic to support evidence-based clinical nursing care.

  10. Evaluation and Management of Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain

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    C. Shekhar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to a third of patients undergoing coronary angiography for angina-like chest pain are found to have normal coronary arteries and a substantial proportion of these individuals continue to consult and even attend emergency departments. Initially, these patients are usually seen by cardiologists but with accumulating evidence that the pain might have a gastrointestinal origin, it may be more appropriate for them to be cared for by the gastroenterologist once a cardiological cause has been excluded. This review covers the assessment and management of this challenging condition, which includes a combination of education, reassurance, and pharmacotherapy. For the more refractory cases, behavioral treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or hypnotherapy, may have to be considered.

  11. Anaesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema

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    Nergis Ataol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by reduced activity of the C1 esterase inhibitor. Patients with hereditary angioedema are clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, airways and abdominal organs. Attacks may occur either spontaneously or following trauma, stress, surgery, infections and hormonal fluctuations. The most common cause of death is asphyxia related to laryngeal edema. Giving C1 esterase inhibitor is the most effective method of treatment. Also fresh frozen plasma, androgen steroids, quinine pathway inhibitors, antifibrinolytics and bradykinin receptor antagonists can be used as treatment. In this paper, the anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema undergoing inguinal hernia repair surgery is reported.

  12. Management of a patient with advanced BRAF-mutant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Michelle T; Daud, Adil

    2014-03-01

    A 49-year-old man initially diagnosed in 1995 with cutaneous melanoma presented to the authors' institution in 2009 with metastatic, BRAF V600E-mutant melanoma. His treatment course to date has included surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy, and interferon, metastasectomies, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors, a clinical trial with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib (PLX-4032), clinical trial with combination BRAF plus MEK inhibition with vemurafenib plus GDC-0973, and combination targeted and immune therapy with vemurafenib plus the anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab. This case report illustrates the long-term management of a patient with metastatic melanoma using targeted and immune therapy, evolution in treatment guidelines, next directions in research, and the critical role of clinical trials in advancement of patient care.

  13. Oral health management of a patient with 47,XYY syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Manjunatha, B S; Bindayel, Naif A; Khounganian, Rita

    2013-12-05

    The 47,XYY syndrome is an aneuploidy (abnormal number) of sex chromosomes, where a human male receives an extra Y chromosome, making 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. Individuals with 47,XYY are usually physically normal and tend to be tall and thin. They are not at increased risk of mental retardation and cardiovascular diseases. They may have speech delay, hyperactivity and normal/decreased IQ level. Behavioural problems are not common in 47,XYY individuals. There have been reports that suggest the tooth-size increase in 47,XYY males is due to a direct genetic effect. The patient presented with multiple over-retained deciduous, unerupted permanent teeth and increased incidence of carious lesions may be attributed to decreased oral hygiene maintenance. The present article describes the medical and dental history along with the clinical management of oral health issues in an 18-year-old male patient with 47,XYY syndrome having normal physical structure and development.

  14. Oral health management of a patient with 47,XYY syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Manjunatha, B S; Bindayel, Naif A; Khounganian, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The 47,XYY syndrome is an aneuploidy (abnormal number) of sex chromosomes, where a human male receives an extra Y chromosome, making 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. Individuals with 47,XYY are usually physically normal and tend to be tall and thin. They are not at increased risk of mental retardation and cardiovascular diseases. They may have speech delay, hyperactivity and normal/decreased IQ level. Behavioural problems are not common in 47,XYY individuals. There have been reports that suggest the tooth-size increase in 47,XYY males is due to a direct genetic effect. The patient presented with multiple over-retained deciduous, unerupted permanent teeth and increased incidence of carious lesions may be attributed to decreased oral hygiene maintenance. The present article describes the medical and dental history along with the clinical management of oral health issues in an 18-year-old male patient with 47,XYY syndrome having normal physical structure and development. PMID:24311410

  15. Managing the hair and skin of African American pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W; Burns, C

    1999-01-01

    In Africa, the ancestral home of most African Americans, hair is viewed as the epitome of beauty. However, when Africans were brought to America as slaves, they were unable to care for their hair and skin adequately and were exposed to the predominant white culture, which valued straight hair and light skin. As a result, many African Americans lost self-esteem because of the characteristics of their hair and skin. In this article we examine the anatomic and physiologic features of African American hair and skin and typical African American hair and skin care practices. Common African American hair and skin disorders and their management are discussed. The goal of this article is to help primary care providers understand the special hair and skin care required for African American children (as well as other dark-skinned patients). With good patient education, understanding one's own hair and skin characteristics can also support positive self-esteem.

  16. [Continuous clinical management of patients with neurofibromatosis type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kousaku

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1(NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression. The complications are age specific. Serious complication during early childhood is rare but optic glioma, brain tumors or leukemia may appear. Learning difficulties and attention deficit hyperactive disorders occur in as many as 60% of patients during school age. Overall, intelligence in neurofibromatosis is normal and mental retardation occurs in 6-7%. Managements for learning difficulties and attention deficit hyperactive disorders are especially important for quality of life in these patients. Skin neurofibromas or subcutaneous plexiform neurofibromas appear during childhood and may cause pain or spinal cord involvement. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors that arise from plexiform neurifibromas are a particularly devastating complication during middle age.

  17. Biophysical approach to chronic kidney disease management in older patients

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    Alberto Foletti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and its clinical progression are a critical issue in an aging population. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing and managing the decline of renal function are warranted. Recent evidence has provided encouraging results for the improvement of renal function achieved through an integrated biophysical approach, but prospective studies on the clinical efficacy of this strategy are still lacking. This was an open-label prospective pilot study to investigate the effect of electromagnetic information transfer through the aqueous system on kidney function of older patients affected by stage 1 or 2 CKD. Patients received biophysical therapy every 3 months over a 1-year period. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values were calculated using the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and were recorded at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 58 patients (mean age 74.8 ± 3.7 years were included in the study. At baseline, mean eGFR was 64.6 ± 15.5 mL/min, and it significantly increased to 69.9 ± 15.8 mL/min after 1 year (+5.2 ± 10 mL/min, p<0.0002. The same trend was observed among men (+5.7 ± 10.2 mL/min, p<0.0064 and women (+4.7 ± 9.9 mL/min, p<0.014. When results were analyzed by sex, no difference was found between the 2 groups. Although further and larger prospective studies are needed, our findings suggest that an integrated biophysical approach may be feasible in the management of older patients with early-stage CKD, to reduce and prevent the decline of renal function due to aging or comorbidities.

  18. [Patient education in rheumatology: a way to better disease management using patients' empowerment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind-Albrecht, Gudrun

    2006-11-01

    Patients' empowerment has become a main issue in modern treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases. Within this concept patient education is an important instrument. Specific standardized programs, developed by multicenter groups under the leadership of the DGRh (German Society for Rheumatology) have become widely used all over Germany. The DGRh takes care of the program quality and of the trainers and heads of courses. Based on modern educational theories for adults and using a modular concept, which must be adapted to the individual situation of the patients, the curricula are put into practice by trainees of the different professions concerned. Controlled studies have not only shown the progress of patients' knowledge, compliance and coping, but also showed striking socioeconomic advantages in long-term follow-up. Patient education leads to a better and cost-effective management of rheumatic diseases.

  19. Management of liver trauma in RIPAS Hospital

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    Kenneth Yuh Yen KOK

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The management of blunt and penetrating liver trauma continues to pose a tremendouschallenge to surgeons. This study reviews the pattern of liver trauma and its management, bothoperative and non-operative, in RIPAS Hospital, the only tertiary referral center in Brunei Darussalam.Material and Methods: A retrospective study of patients admitted with liver trauma, with and withoutother associated injuries between January 2002 and December 2006 to RIPAS Hospital was undertaken.The patients’ case records were retrieved. Details on age, sex, mode of injury, pre-operativeimaging, severity of liver injury based on the Liver Injury Scale (LIS, grades I to VI, presence of otherassociated injuries, overall management, complications and outcome were collected and analysed. Results:Twenty patients (male, n = 12 with a mean age of 36 years old (range 20 to 75 were treatedfor liver trauma (median LIS grade of III, range I to V during the study period. Road traffic accidentsaccounted for 75% of the injuries. Thirteen (65% had high grade injuries (6 LIS grade III. Seventeen(85% patients underwent surgical procedures for liver and other associated injuries. Four patients(20% had non-operative management with one failure (5%. This patient subsequently requiredsurgery. There were six post-operative deaths (mortality 30%. There were three major morbidities(15%: right hepatic artery aneurysm, a right hepatic duct bile leak and left hemiplegia secondaryto cerebrovascular accident. Conclusions: In our local setting, blunt liver trauma is often due toroad traffic accidents and is associated with a high mortality rate. A majority was of high grades andrequired urgent surgical interventions. Non-operative management is an option for those with lowgrade injuries and who are stable.

  20. Surgical Management of Patients with Chiari I Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Siasios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiari malformations (CMs constitute a variety of four mainly syndromes (I, II, III, and IV, which describe the protrusion of brain tissue into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum. These malformations frequently occur in combination with other pathological entities such as myelomeningocele, hydrocephalus, and/or hydrosyringomyelia. The recent improvement of imaging techniques has increased not only the rate of CM diagnosis but also the necessity for its early treatment. Several different surgical techniques have been employed in the treatment of patients with symptomatic CM-I. In our current study, a systematic and critical review of the pertinent literature was made for identifying the most commonly employed surgical procedures in the management of these patients. Emphasis was given in outlining the advantages and disadvantages of each surgical approach. Moreover, an attempt was made for defining those parameters that may be prognostic factors for their surgical outcome. There is a consensus that surgical treatment is reserved only for symptomatic patients with CM-I. It has also been postulated that early surgically intervention is usually associated with better outcome. Despite the large number of previously published clinical series, further clinical research with large-scale studies is necessary for defining surgical treatment guidelines in these patients.

  1. Transesophageal echocardiography in the management of burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybauer, Marc O; Asmussen, Sven; Platts, David G; Fraser, John F; Sanfilippo, Filippo; Maybauer, Dirk M

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review was conducted to assess the level of evidence for the use of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in the management of burn patients. We searched any article published before and including June 30, 2013. Our search yielded 118 total publications, 11 met the inclusion criteria of burn injury and TEE. Available studies published in any language were rated and included. At the present time, there are no available systematic reviews/meta-analyses published that met our search criteria. Only a small number of clinical trials, all with a limited number of patients were available. Therefore, a meta-analysis on outcome parameters was not performed. However, the major pathologic findings in burn patients were reduced left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function, mitral valve vegetation, pulmonary hypertension, pericardial effusion, fluid overload, and right heart failure. The advantages of TEE include offering direct assessment of cardiac valve competency, myocardial contractility, and most importantly real time assessment of adequacy of hemodynamic resuscitation and preload in the acute phase of resuscitation, with minimal additional risk. TEE serves multiple diagnostic purposes and is being used to better understand the fluid status and cardiac physiology of the critically ill burn patient. Randomized controlled trials especially on fluid resuscitation and cardiac performance in acute burns are warranted to potentially further improve outcome.

  2. Management of Coagulopathy in Patients with Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis

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    Pooja D. Amarapurkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis have significantly impaired synthetic function. Many proteins involved in the coagulation process are synthesized in the liver. Routinely performed tests of the coagulation are abnormal in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. This has led to the widespread belief that decompensated liver cirrhosis is prototype of acquired hemorrhagic coagulopathy. If prothrombin time is prolonged more than 3 seconds over control, invasive procedures like liver biopsy, splenoportogram, percutaneous cholangiography, or surgery were associated with increased risk of bleeding, and coagulopathy should be corrected with infusion of fresh frozen plasma. These practices were without any scientific evidence and were associated with significant hazards of fresh frozen plasma transfusion. Now, it is realized that coagulation is a complex process involving the interaction of procoagulation and anticoagulation factors and the fibrinolytic system. As there is reduction in both anti and procoagulant factors, global tests of coagulation are normal in patients with acute and chronic liver disease indicating that coagulopathy in liver disease is more of a myth than a reality. In the last few years, surgical techniques have substantially improved, and complex procedures like liver transplantation can be done without the use of blood or blood products. Patients with liver cirrhosis may also be at increased risk of thrombosis. In this paper, we will discuss coagulopathy, increased risk of thrombosis, and their management in decompensated liver cirrhosis.

  3. Management of coagulopathy in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarapurkar, Pooja D; Amarapurkar, Deepak N

    2011-01-01

    Patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis have significantly impaired synthetic function. Many proteins involved in the coagulation process are synthesized in the liver. Routinely performed tests of the coagulation are abnormal in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. This has led to the widespread belief that decompensated liver cirrhosis is prototype of acquired hemorrhagic coagulopathy. If prothrombin time is prolonged more than 3 seconds over control, invasive procedures like liver biopsy, splenoportogram, percutaneous cholangiography, or surgery were associated with increased risk of bleeding, and coagulopathy should be corrected with infusion of fresh frozen plasma. These practices were without any scientific evidence and were associated with significant hazards of fresh frozen plasma transfusion. Now, it is realized that coagulation is a complex process involving the interaction of procoagulation and anticoagulation factors and the fibrinolytic system. As there is reduction in both anti and procoagulant factors, global tests of coagulation are normal in patients with acute and chronic liver disease indicating that coagulopathy in liver disease is more of a myth than a reality. In the last few years, surgical techniques have substantially improved, and complex procedures like liver transplantation can be done without the use of blood or blood products. Patients with liver cirrhosis may also be at increased risk of thrombosis. In this paper, we will discuss coagulopathy, increased risk of thrombosis, and their management in decompensated liver cirrhosis.

  4. Multisciplinary management of patients with liver metastasis from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Greef, Kathleen; Rolfo, Christian; Russo, Antonio; Chapelle, Thiery; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Coelho, Andreia; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Peeters, Marc

    2016-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have been till now the main therapeutic strategies for disease control and improvement of the overall survival. Twenty-five per cent (25%) of CRC patients have clinically detectable liver metastases at the initial diagnosis and approximately 50% develop liver metastases during their disease course. Twenty-thirty per cent (20%-30%) are CRC patients with metastases confined to the liver. Some years ago various studies showed a curative potential for liver metastases resection. For this reason some authors proposed the conversion of unresectable liver metastases to resectable to achieve cure. Since those results were published, a lot of regimens have been studied for resectability potential. Better results could be obtained by the combination of chemotherapy with targeted drugs, such as anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However an accurate selection for patients to treat with these regimens and to operate for liver metastases is mandatory to reduce the risk of complications. A multidisciplinary team approach represents the best way for a proper patient management. The team needs to include surgeons, oncologists, diagnostic and interventional radiologists with expertise in hepatobiliary disease, molecular pathologists, and clinical nurse specialists. This review summarizes the most important findings on surgery and systemic treatment of CRC-related liver metastases.

  5. Special management needs of the elderly hypertensive patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry L Elliott

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV disease will progressively assume greater importance as the number of elderly individuals in the population of the world increases with a parallel increase in the incidence of hypertension. Elderly patients with hypertension are often difficult to manage. Pathophysiological changes associated with ageing are also associated with long-standing, uncontrolled hypertension. Diagnosis may not be straightforward and the incidence of concomitant disease will be higher than in younger patients. The preventative benefits of antihypertensive therapy in the elderly is well established and treatment of hypertension is of greatest value in older patients who, because of additional risk factors or prevalent CV disease, are at a higher risk of developing a CV event. However, established benefits are based upon the evidence from randomised, controlled trials in selected patient groups, which may not be universally applicable to many elderly hypertensives. Thus, the treatment of hypertension in the elderly should be based upon an individualised approach which inevitably cannot be strictly evidence-based. However, there is a compelling case for an approach based upon a recognition that high blood pressure (BP in the elderly should be treated early and vigorously whilst at the same time exercising some caution to avoid the development of hypotensive BP levels.

  6. MANAGEMENT OF PORTAL VEIN THROMBOSIS IN CIRRHOTIC PATIENTS

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    Lucio Amitrano

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Portal vein thrombosis (PVT not associated with hepatocellular carcinoma is considered a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis but, unlike PVT occurring in non-cirrhotic patients, very few data are available on its natural history and management.  The reduced portal blood flow velocity is the main determinant of PVT but, as in other venous thromboses, multiple factors local and systemic, inherited or acquired often can concur with. PVT has a variety of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening diseases like gastroesophageal bleeding or acute intestinal ischemia. It is usually diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound but computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful to study the extent of thrombosis and the involvement of the abdominal organs. The risk of bleeding mainly determined by the presence of gastroesophageal varices and clotting alterations causes concern for the treatment of PVT in cirrhotic patients. To date, anticoagulant therapy seems to be indicated only in patients awaiting liver transplantation. This review focuses on the definition of the subgroups of patients with cirrhosis that might benefit from treatment of PVT and examines the pros and cons of the available treatments in terms of efficacy, monitoring and safety, providing also perspectives for future studies.

  7. MANAGEMENT OF PORTAL VEIN THROMBOSIS IN CIRRHOTIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Anna Guardascione

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT not associated with hepatocellular carcinoma is considered a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis but, unlike PVT occurring in non-cirrhotic patients, very few data are available on its natural history and management.  The reduced portal blood flow velocity is the main determinant of PVT but, as in other venous thromboses, multiple factors local and systemic, inherited or acquired often can concur with. PVT has a variety of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening diseases like gastroesophageal bleeding or acute intestinal ischemia. It is usually diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound but computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful to study the extent of thrombosis and the involvement of the abdominal organs. The risk of bleeding mainly determined by the presence of gastroesophageal varices and clotting alterations causes concern for the treatment of PVT in cirrhotic patients. To date, anticoagulant therapy seems to be indicated only in patients awaiting liver transplantation. This review focuses on the definition of the subgroups of patients with cirrhosis that might benefit from treatment of PVT and examines the pros and cons of the available treatments in terms of efficacy, monitoring and safety, providing also perspectives for future studies.

  8. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care.

  9. Protocol guided bleeding management improves cardiac surgery patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, B L; Smith, I; Faulke, D; Wall, D; Fraser, J F; Ryan, E G; Drake, L; Rapchuk, I L; Tesar, P; Ziegenfuss, M; Fung, Y L

    2015-10-01

    Excessive bleeding is a risk associated with cardiac surgery. Treatment invariably requires transfusion of blood products; however, the transfusion itself may contribute to postoperative sequelae. Our objective was to analyse a quality initiative designed to provide an evidenced-based approach to bleeding management. A retrospective analysis compared blood product transfusion and patient outcomes 15 months before and after implementation of a bleeding management protocol. The protocol incorporated point-of-care coagulation testing (POCCT) with ROTEM and Multiplate to diagnose the cause of bleeding and monitor treatment. Use of the protocol led to decreases in the incidence of transfusion of PRBCs (47·3% vs. 32·4%; P bleeding (5·6% vs. 3·4; P = 0·01), superficial chest wound (3·3% vs. 1·4%; P = 0·002), leg wound infection (4·6% vs. 2·0%; P bleeding management protocol supported by POCCT in a cardiac surgery programme was associated with significant reductions in the transfusion of allogeneic blood products, improved outcomes and reduced cost. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  10. Controversies in the temperature management of critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yasufumi

    2016-10-01

    Although body temperature is a classic primary vital sign, its value has received little attention compared with the others (blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate). This may result from the fact that unlike the other primary vital signs, aging and diseases rarely affect the thermoregulatory system. Despite this, when humans are exposed to various anesthetics and analgesics and acute etiologies of non-infectious and infectious diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings, abnormalities may occur that shift body temperature up and down. A recent upsurge in clinical evidence in the perioperative and critical care field resulted in many clinical trials in temperature management. The results of these clinical trials suggest that aggressive body temperature modifications in comatose survivors after resuscitation from shockable rhythm, and permissive fever in critically ill patients, are carried out in critical care settings to improve patient outcomes; however, its efficacy remains to be elucidated. A recent, large multicenter randomized controlled trial demonstrated contradictory results, which may disrupt the trends in clinical practice. Thus, updated information concerning thermoregulatory interventions is essential for anesthesiologists and intensivists. Here, recent controversies in therapeutic hypothermia and fever management are summarized, and their relevance to the physiology of human thermoregulation is discussed.

  11. The Patient with Turner Syndrome: Puberty and Medical Management Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Luisa; Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2013-01-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) affects approximately 1 in 2500 liveborn females and is characterized by loss or structural anomalies of an X chromosome. Clinical features vary among patients; multiple organ systems can be affected. Endocrinologists are involved in the management of short stature, delayed puberty, and infertility. Endocrine therapies can include growth hormone, estrogen, and progestagen to promote linear growth and pubertal development. The duration of estrogen and progestagen treatment (HRT) is generally more than 40 years. There is not one standard HRT protocol that is suitable for all women. Thus, general guidelines are provided for HRT to induce pubertal development. Additional considerations regarding choice of HRT include thrombotic risk and disorders associated with thrombophila. Involvement of cardiologists is important because approximately 50% of patients with TS have congenital structural cardiac anomalies linked to an increased risk for aortic dissection and rupture. Although oocyte donation offers the chance to carry a pregnancy, accumulating information has highlighted the potential dangers associated with pregnancy. Advances in the care of infants, girls, and women with TS have been achieved. Management of infants, girls, and women with TS involves coordinated care from a multi-disciplinary team including endocrinologists, cardiologists, geneticists, otolaryngologists, behavioral health experts, nurse educators, and social workers. PMID:22884020

  12. Impact of sarcopenia in the management of urological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Koga, Fumitaka

    2017-05-01

    Sarcopenia, the degenerative and systemic loss of skeletal muscle mass, develops as a consequence of the progression of cancer cachexia. Recent studies suggest that sarcopenia may be used as a biomarker in the management of patients with several cancers. Areas covered: In this article, the authors review 1) the methods to simply and optimally evaluate and define sarcopenia using computed tomography images in daily clinical practice and 2) the impact of sarcopenia in the management of urological cancers, specifically focusing on the usefulness in predicting treatment-related complications and prognosis. The authors also discuss the prognostic importance of changes in skeletal muscle mass in the course of treatment and the potential roles of nutritional support and exercise to prevent progression of sarcopenia. Expert commentary: Sarcopenia is associated with treatment-related complications and unfavorable prognosis in urological cancer patients. Nutritional support and exercise might be helpful in improving sarcopenia. The impact of these interventions on clinical outcomes would be elucidated by ongoing or future clinical studies.

  13. Computerized database management system for breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kok Swee; Chong, Sze Siang; Tso, Chih Ping; Nia, Mohsen Esmaeili; Chong, Aun Kee; Abbas, Siti Fathimah

    2014-01-01

    Data analysis based on breast cancer risk factors such as age, race, breastfeeding, hormone replacement therapy, family history, and obesity was conducted on breast cancer patients using a new enhanced computerized database management system. My Structural Query Language (MySQL) is selected as the application for database management system to store the patient data collected from hospitals in Malaysia. An automatic calculation tool is embedded in this system to assist the data analysis. The results are plotted automatically and a user-friendly graphical user interface is developed that can control the MySQL database. Case studies show breast cancer incidence rate is highest among Malay women, followed by Chinese and Indian. The peak age for breast cancer incidence is from 50 to 59 years old. Results suggest that the chance of developing breast cancer is increased in older women, and reduced with breastfeeding practice. The weight status might affect the breast cancer risk differently. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD.

  15. Enhancing the utility of prostascint SPECT scans for patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noz, Marilyn E; Chung, Grace; Lee, Benjamin Y; Maguire, Gerald Q; DeWyngaert, J Keith; Doshi, Jay V; Kramer, Elissa L; Murphy-Walcott, Antoinette D; Zeleznik, Michael P; Kwak, Noeun G

    2006-04-01

    This project investigated reducing the artifact content of In-ill ProstaScint SPECT scans for use in treatment planning and management. Forty-one patients who had undergone CT or MRI scans and simultaneous Tc-99m RBC/In-111 ProstaScint SPECT scans were included. SPECT volume sets, reconstructed using Ordered Set-Expectation Maximum (OS-EM) were compared against those reconstructed with standard Filtered Back projection (FBP). Bladder activity in Tc-99m scans was suppressed within an ellipsoidal volume. Tc-99m voxel values were subtracted from the corresponding In-111 after scaling based on peak activity within the descending aorta. The SPECT volume data sets were merged with the CT or MRI scans before and after processing. Volume merging, based both on visual assessment and statistical evaluation, was not affected. Thus iterative reconstruction together with bladder suppression and blood pool subtraction may improve the interpretation and utility of ProstaScint SPECT scans for patient management.

  16. A Nurse's Guide to the Acute Management of Suicidal Patients in the Student Health Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Howard S.

    1978-01-01

    The acute management of suicidal patients requires that the helper (1) be aware of feelings of anger and fear toward these patients and (2) try to understand the nature of the patients' depression and helpless feelings. (MM)

  17. Mobile phone-based remote patient monitoring system for management of hypertension in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Alexander G; McIsaac, Warren J; Tisler, Andras; Irvine, M Jane; Saunders, Allison; Dunai, Andrea; Rizo, Carlos A; Feig, Denice S; Hamill, Melinda; Trudel, Mathieu; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2007-09-01

    Rising concern over the poor level of blood-pressure (BP) control among hypertensive patients has prompted searches for novel ways of managing hypertension. The objectives of this study were to develop and pilot-test a home BP tele-management system that actively engages patients in the process of care. Phase 1 involved a series of focus-group meetings with patients and primary care providers to guide the system's development. In Phase 2, 33 diabetic patients with uncontrolled ambulatory hypertension were enrolled in a 4-month pilot study, using a before-and-after design to assess its effectiveness in lowering BP, its acceptability to users, and the reliability of home BP measurements. The system, developed using commodity hardware, comprised a Bluetooth-enabled home BP monitor, a mobile phone to receive and transmit data, a central server for data processing, a fax-back system to send physicians' reports, and a BP alerting system. In the pilot study, 24-h ambulatory BP fell by 11/5 (+/-13/7 SD) mm Hg (both P < .001), and BP control improved significantly. Substantially more home readings were received by the server than expected, based on the preset monitoring schedule. Of 42 BP alerts sent to patients, almost half (n = 20) were due to low BP. Physicians received no critical BP alerts. Patients perceived the system as acceptable and effective. The encouraging results of this study provide a strong rationale for a long-term, randomized, clinical trial to determine whether this home BP tele-management system improves BP control in the community among patients with uncontrolled hypertension.

  18. Educating Patients about CKD: The Path to Self-Management and Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narva, Andrew S; Norton, Jenna M; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-04-07

    Patient education is associated with better patient outcomes and supported by international guidelines and organizations, but a range of barriers prevent widespread implementation of comprehensive education for people with progressive kidney disease, especially in the United States. Among United States patients, obstacles to education include the complex nature of kidney disease information, low baseline awareness, limited health literacy and numeracy, limited availability of CKD information, and lack of readiness to learn. For providers, lack of time and clinical confidence combine with competing education priorities and confusion about diagnosing CKD to limit educational efforts. At the system level, lack of provider incentives, limited availability of practical decision support tools, and lack of established interdisciplinary care models inhibit patient education. Despite these barriers, innovative education approaches for people with CKD exist, including self-management support, shared decision making, use of digital media, and engaging families and communities. Education efficiency may be increased by focusing on people with progressive disease, establishing interdisciplinary care management including community health workers, and providing education in group settings. New educational approaches are being developed through research and quality improvement efforts, but challenges to evaluating public awareness and patient education programs inhibit identification of successful strategies for broader implementation. However, growing interest in improving patient-centered outcomes may provide new approaches to effective education of people with CKD. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Management and outcome of mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Peñuelas, Oscar; Muriel, Alfonso; Vargas, Maria; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Brunetti, Iole; Raymondos, Konstantinos; D'Antini, Davide; Nielsen, Niklas; Ferguson, Niall D; Böttiger, Bernd W; Thille, Arnaud W; Davies, Andrew R; Hurtado, Javier; Rios, Fernando; Apezteguía, Carlos; Violi, Damian A; Cakar, Nahit; González, Marco; Du, Bin; Kuiper, Michael A; Soares, Marco Antonio; Koh, Younsuck; Moreno, Rui P; Amin, Pravin; Tomicic, Vinko; Soto, Luis; Bülow, Hans-Henrik; Anzueto, Antonio; Esteban, Andrés; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-05-08

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the changes in ventilator management and complications over time, as well as variables associated with 28-day hospital mortality in patients receiving mechanical ventilation (MV) after cardiac arrest. We performed a secondary analysis of three prospective, observational multicenter studies conducted in 1998, 2004 and 2010 in 927 ICUs from 40 countries. We screened 18,302 patients receiving MV for more than 12 hours during a one-month-period. We included 812 patients receiving MV after cardiac arrest. We collected data on demographics, daily ventilator settings, complications during ventilation and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios, determining which variables within 24 hours of hospital admission were associated with 28-day hospital mortality and occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pneumonia acquired during ICU stay at 48 hours after admission. Among 812 patients, 100 were included from 1998, 239 from 2004 and 473 from 2010. Ventilatory management changed over time, with decreased tidal volumes (VT) (1998: mean 8.9 (standard deviation (SD) 2) ml/kg actual body weight (ABW), 2010: 6.7 (SD 2) ml/kg ABW; 2004: 9 (SD 2.3) ml/kg predicted body weight (PBW), 2010: 7.95 (SD 1.7) ml/kg PBW) and increased positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (1998: mean 3.5 (SD 3), 2010: 6.5 (SD 3); P <0.001). Patients included from 2010 had more sepsis, cardiovascular dysfunction and neurological failure, but 28-day hospital mortality was similar over time (52% in 1998, 57% in 2004 and 52% in 2010). Variables independently associated with 28-day hospital mortality were: older age, PaO2 <60 mmHg, cardiovascular dysfunction and less use of sedative agents. Higher VT, and plateau pressure with lower PEEP were associated with occurrence of ARDS and pneumonia acquired during ICU stay. Protective mechanical ventilation with lower VT and higher PEEP is more

  20. Pain management in patients with Parkinson's disease: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skogar O

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Orjan Skogar,1,2 Johan Lokk2 1Academy for Health and Care (FUTURUM, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, 2Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract: This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of Parkinson-related pain which is one of the more frequently reported nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD, which is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease. Pain is ranked high by patients as a troublesome symptom in all stages of the disease. In early-stage PD, pain is rated as the most bothersome symptom. Knowledge of the correct diagnosis of pain origin and possible methods of treatments for pain relief in PD is of great importance. The symptoms have a great negative impact on health-related quality of life. Separating PD-related pain from pain of other origins is an important challenge and can be characterized as “many syndromes under the same umbrella”. Among the different forms of PD-related pain, musculoskeletal pain is the most common form, accounting for 40%–90% of reported pain in PD patients. Augmentation by pathophysiological pathways other than those secondary to rigidity, tremor, or any of the other motor manifestations of the disease seems most probable. In PD, the basal ganglia process somatosensory information differently, and increased subjective pain sensitivity with lower electrical and heat-pain thresholds has been reported in PD patients. The mechanism is assumed to be diminished activity of the descending inhibitory control system of the basal ganglia. PD pain, like many of the nonmotor symptoms, remains underdiagnosed and, thus, poorly managed. A systematic collection of patient descriptions of type, quality, and duration of pain is, therefore, of utmost importance. Recent studies have validated new and more specific and dedicated pain scales for PD-related symptoms. Symptomatic treatments based

  1. Non-operative treatment of a fracture to the coracoid process with acromioclavicular dislocation in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Pedersen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Coracoid process fractures are rare and often associated with dislocations of the acromioclavicular (AC joint. There is little evidence about the treatment of these injuries in adolescents, but the few case reports published recommend surgery. We report a case of a dislocated epiphyseal fracture to the base of the coracoid process with AC joint dislocation in a 14-year-old ice-hockey player following direct impact to his left shoulder. Since magnetic resonance tomography revealed intact AC and coracoclavicular ligaments, we initiated non-operative treatment with immobilization and unloading of the shoulder by an abduction brace allowing limited rotation for 6 weeks. This treatment resulted in complete recovery after 8 weeks and return to full sports on first league level after 3 month. In conclusion, non-operative treatment of coracoid base fractures with concomitant AC-joint injury in the adolescent can result in excellent functional results and early recovery.

  2. Optimal management of bone metastases in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong MH

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available MH Wong, N PavlakisDepartment of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Bone metastasis in breast cancer is a significant clinical problem. It not only indicates incurable disease with a guarded prognosis, but is also associated with skeletal-related morbidities including bone pain, pathological fractures, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia. In recent years, the mechanism of bone metastasis has been further elucidated. Bone metastasis involves a vicious cycle of close interaction between the tumor and the bone microenvironment. In patients with bone metastases, the goal of management is to prevent further skeletal-related events, manage complications, reduce bone pain, and improve quality of life. Bisphosphonates are a proven therapy for the above indications. Recently, a drug of a different class, the RANK ligand antibody, denosumab, has been shown to reduce skeletal-related events more than the bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid. Other strategies of clinical value may include surgery, radiotherapy, radiopharmaceuticals, and, of course, effective systemic therapy. In early breast cancer, bisphosphonates may have an antitumor effect and prevent both bone and non-bone metastases. Whilst two important Phase III trials with conflicting results have led to controversy in this topic, final results from these and other key Phase III trials must still be awaited before a firm conclusion can be drawn about the use of bisphosphonates in this setting. Advances in bone markers, predictive biomarkers, multi-imaging modalities, and the introduction of novel agents have ushered in a new era of proactive management for bone metastases in breast cancer.Keywords: breast cancer, bone metastases, bisphosphonates, denosumab, biomarkers, optimal management

  3. Nursing pain management--a qualitative interview study of patients with pain, hospitalized for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustøen, Tone; Gaardsrud, Torill; Leegaard, Marit; Wahl, Astrid K

    2009-03-01

    Pain is a significant symptom in cancer patients. Understanding of patients' experiences in relation to pain management is important in evidence-based nursing in the field of pain. The aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' experiences of nursing pain management during hospitalization for cancer treatment. Eighteen cancer patients participated in the study, all with advanced cancer, including skeleton metastases. The female participants all had breast cancer, and the male participants all had prostate cancer. Data were collected by in-depth interviews, and qualitative description was used to entail low-inference interpretation to reach an understanding of the essence of pain and nursing pain management. Patients found it somewhat difficult to express their expectations of nursing pain management and competencies. However, 1) being present and supportive; 2) giving information and sharing knowledge; 3) taking care of medication; and 4) recognizing the pain emerged as themes in nursing pain management. Although patients believed that nurses were caring persons, they perceived differences between nurses in the ways they handled pain management. Furthermore, some patients experienced a lack of information from nurses in relation to pain management. Although cancer patients' experiences showed the importance of nurses in pain management, it seems that nurses should have a clearer role in cancer pain management in relation to counseling and patient education. The results from this study can increase nurses' awareness of their role in pain management as a first step in improving pain management for patients.

  4. Patients' and partners' perspectives of chronic illness and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checton, Maria G; Greene, Kathryn; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Venetis, Maria K

    2012-06-01

    are significant differences in (a) how patients and partners experience illness uncertainty and illness interference and (b) how appraisals of illness uncertainty and illness interference influence communication efficacy and health condition management. We discuss the findings and implications of the study.

  5. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc., to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc., and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.. These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person′s job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information.

  6. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information.

  7. Physician-Patient Concordance in Pharmacological Management of Patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Mark; Higgins, Victoria; Lees, Adam; Johns, Nicola; Mastrangelo, Anthony; Nazareth, Tara; Turner, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a cross-sectional, multicenter survey was conducted in United States (US) medical practices to evaluate the concordance between patients with COPD and their physicians on disease-specific characteristics. Associations between patient and disease-related characteristics with monotherapy, dual therapy, or triple therapy prescribed as COPD maintenance regimens were also examined. Eligible physicians completed patient record forms (PRFs) for up to 6 consecutive patients with COPD. Patients for whom a PRF was completed were invited to complete a patient self-completion (PSC) survey consisting of questions similar to those on the PRF, as well as several validated measures to assess the impact of COPD on patients' lives. A total of 469 patients completed a PSC that was matched with the PRF completed by their physician, forming the sample for the concordance analysis. Moderate agreement (kappa (κ) = 0.41-0.60) was observed for 79% of measures, with the lowest concordance rating corresponding to hemoptysis (κ = 0.22). There were few differences in demographic or clinical characteristics between patients prescribed monotherapy and dual therapy. Triple therapy rather than monotherapy or dual therapy was more often prescribed for patients with greater frequency of symptoms, negative impact of COPD on daily life and interpersonal relationships, and respiratory impairment based on the most recent FEV1. Diverse factors influence US physicians' perceptions of disease and treatment choices, including patient symptoms, quality of life, and disease impact. Our results highlight that concordance between physicians and patients regarding symptoms and physical function may contribute to optimal management of COPD.

  8. Optimising postoperative pain management in the ambulatory patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Allan B; Gan, Tong J

    2003-01-01

    Over 60% of surgery is now performed in an ambulatory setting. Despite improved analgesics and sophisticated drug delivery systems, surveys indicate that over 80% of patients experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Inadequate postoperative pain relief can prolong recovery, precipitate or increase the duration of hospital stay, increase healthcare costs, and reduce patient satisfaction. Effective postoperative pain management involves a multimodal approach and the use of various drugs with different mechanisms of action. Local anaesthetics are widely administered in the ambulatory setting using techniques such as local injection, field block, regional nerve block or neuraxial block. Continuous wound infusion pumps may have great potential in an ambulatory setting. Regional anaesthesia (involving anaesthetising regional areas of the body, including single extremities, multiple extremities, the torso, and the face or jaw) allows surgery to be performed in a specific location, usually an extremity, without the use of general anaesthesia, and potentially with little or no sedation. Opioids remain an important component of any analgesic regimen in treating moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. However, the incorporation of non-opioids, local anaesthetics and regional techniques will enhance current postoperative analgesic regimens. The development of new modalities of treatment, such as patient controlled analgesia, and newer drugs, such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, provide additional choices for the practitioner. While there are different routes of administration for analgesics (e.g. oral, parenteral, intramuscular, transmucosal, transdermal and sublingual), oral delivery of medications has remained the mainstay for postoperative pain control. The oral route is effective, the simplest to use and typically the least expensive. The intravenous route has the advantages of a rapid onset of action and easier titratibility, and so is recommended for the

  9. Web-Based Self-Management in Chronic Care: A Study of Change in Patient Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Web-based self-management interventions (W-SMIs) are designed to help a large number of chronically ill people become more actively engaged in their health care. Despite the potential to engage more patients in self-managing their health, the use of W-SMIs by patients and their clinicians is low. Using a self-management conceptual model based on…

  10. Cardiovascular risk and dyslipidemia management in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, James H

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy each appear to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Increased risk may be attributable to the inflammatory effects of HIV infection and dyslipidemia associated with some antiretroviral agents. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease is increasing as patients live longer, age, and acquire traditional coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. In general, any additional cardiovascular risk posed by HIV infection or antiretroviral therapy is of potential concern for patients who are already at moderate or high risk for CHD. Long-term and well-designed studies are needed to more accurately ascertain to what degree HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy affect long-term cardiovascular disease risk. Management of dyslipidemia to reduce CHD risk in HIV-infected patients is much the same as in the general population, with the cornerstone consisting of statin therapy and lifestyle interventions. Smoking cessation is a major step in reducing CHD risk in those who smoke. This article summarizes a presentation by James H. Stein, MD, at the IAS-USA live continuing medical education activity held in New York City in March 2012.

  11. Malnutrition and cachexia in ovarian cancer patients: pathophysiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadducci, A; Cosio, S; Fanucchi, A; Genazzani, A R

    2001-01-01

    In ovarian cancer patients the poor nutritional status and cachexia are caused by the metabolic effects of the enlarging tumor masses and bowel obstruction. These patients may have a high resting energy expenditure due to increase in Cori cycle activity, glucose and triglyceride-fatty acid cycling and gluconeogenesis. Biochemical mediators of cachexia include cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6, and tumor-produced catabolic factors, such as lipid-mobilizing factor, proteolysis-inducing factor, and anemia-inducing factor. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of obstruction may include extrinsic occlusion of the bowel due to pelvic, mesenteric omental masses, or intestinal motility disorders due to infilor tration of the mesentery or bowel muscle and nerves. The relief of malnutrition and cachexia may be attempted through nutritional support, pharmacological approach (megestrol acetate, cyclooxygenase inhibitors) and palliative treatment of bowel obstruction. Very few agents have been demonstrated to have true anticachectic activity, so future research should be addressed to the identification of drugs able to block the activity of tumor-produced catabolic factors. The decision regarding optimum management of bowel obstruction should be individualized. Krebs' and Goplerud's score (based on age, nutritional status, tumor status, ascites, previous chemotherapy and irradiation) seems to offer reliable eligibility criteria for those patients who can benefit from surgery.

  12. Management of Sexual Disorders in Spinal Cord Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R Vaccaro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injured (SCI patients have sexual disorders including erectile dysfunction (ED, impotence, priapism, ejaculatory dysfunction and infertility. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include four steps. Step 1 involves smoking cessation, weight loss, and increasing physical activity. Step 2 is phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I such as Sildenafil (Viagra, intracavernous injections of Papaverine or prostaglandins, and vacuum constriction devices. Step 3 is a penile prosthesis, and Step 4 is sacral neuromodulation (SNM. Priapism can be resolved spontaneously if there is no ischemia found on blood gas measurement or by Phenylephrine. For anejaculatory dysfunction, massage, vibrator, electrical stimulation and direct surgical biopsy can be used to obtain sperm which can then be used for intra-uterine or in-vitro fertilization. Infertility treatment in male SCI patients involves a combination of the above treatments for erectile and anejaculatory dysfunctions. The basic approach to and management of sexual dysfunction in female SCI patients are similar as for men but do not require treatment for erectile or ejaculatory problems.

  13. Practical management of patients with myelofibrosis receiving ruxolitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Claire; Mesa, Ruben; Ross, David; Mead, Adam; Keohane, Clodagh; Gotlib, Jason; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2013-10-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by bone marrow fibrosis, progressive anemia and extramedullary hematopoiesis, primarily manifested as splenomegaly. Patients also experience debilitating constitutional symptoms, including sequelae of splenomegaly, night sweats and fatigue. Ruxolitinib (INC424, INCB18424, Jakafi, Jakavi), a JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, was approved in November 2011 by the US FDA for the treatment of intermediate- or high-risk MF, and more recently in Europe and Canada for the treatment of MF-related splenomegaly or symptoms. These approvals were based on data from two randomized Phase III studies: COMFORT-I randomized against placebo, and COMFORT-II randomized against best available therapy. In these studies, ruxolitinib rapidly improved multiple disease manifestations of MF, reducing splenomegaly and improving quality of life of patients and potentially prolonging survival. However, as with other chemotherapies, ruxolitinib therapy is associated with some adverse events, such as anemia and thrombocytopenia. The aims of this article are to provide a brief overview of ruxolitinib therapy, to discuss some common adverse events associated with ruxolitinib therapy and to provide clinical management recommendations to maximize patients' benefit from ruxolitinib.

  14. MR enterography in the management of patients with Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyendecker, John R; Bloomfeld, Richard S; DiSantis, David J; Waters, Gregory S; Mott, Ryan; Bechtold, Robert E

    2009-10-01

    Crohn disease is a complex pathologic process with an unpredictable lifelong course that includes frequent relapses. It often affects young patients, who are most vulnerable to the potential adverse effects of repeated exposure to ionizing radiation from computed tomography performed for diagnosis and surgical planning. The small intestine is the bowel segment that is most frequently affected, but it is the least accessible with endoscopic techniques. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography has the potential to safely and noninvasively meet the imaging needs of patients with Crohn disease without exposing them to ionizing radiation. Appropriate use of MR enterography requires a carefully crafted protocol to depict signs of active inflammation as well as complications such as bowel obstruction, fistulas, and abscesses. Interpretation of MR enterographic images requires familiarity with the imaging signs and mimics of active bowel inflammation and stenosis. Although MR enterography currently is helpful for management in individual patients, the standardization of acquisition protocols and interpretive methods would increase its usefulness for more rigorous, systematic assessments of Crohn disease treatment regimens.

  15. Evaluation and management of patients with refractory ascites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bahaa Eldeen Senousy; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Some patients with ascites due to liver cirrhosis become no longer responsive to diuretics. Once other causes of ascites such as portal vein thrombosis,malignancy or infection and non-compliance with medications and low sodium diet have been excluded,the diagnosis of refractory ascites can be made based on strict criteria. Patients with refractory ascites have very poor prognosis and therefore referral for consideration for liver transplantation should be initiated. Search for reversible components of the underlying liver pathology should be undertaken and targeted therapy, when available, should be considered. Currently, serial large volume paracentesis (LVP) and transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic stent-shunt (TIPS) are the two mainstay treatment options for refractory ascites. Other treatment options are available but not widely used either because they carry high morbidity and mortality (most surgical options) rates, or are new interventions that have shown promise but still need further evaluation. In this comprehensive review, we describe the evaluation and management of patients with refractory ascites from the prospective of the practicing physician.

  16. Anaesthetic management of a patient with familial normokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, F

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: We describe the anaesthetic management of a patient with the autosomal dominant inherited disease, normokalaemic periodic paralysis. The disease results in intermittent bouts of limb and respiratory muscular weakness in association with hypothermia, stress, prolonged fasting or exercise. Unlike hypokalaemic and hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis, the more common variants of the disease, normokalaemic periodic paralysis is not accompanied by alterations in the plasma potassium concentration. CLINICAL FEATURES: A five-year-old boy presented for emergency scrotal exploration. He had a family history of periodic paralysis and had experienced previous episodes of weakness, two of which had required hospitalization for respiratory distress. On admission there was no evidence of weakness and serum potassium concentration was 4.2 mMol.L-1. A spinal anaesthetic was performed and the procedure was uncomplicated by muscle paralysis above the level of the spinal block. CONCLUSION: Avoidance of known precipitating factors and judicious use of neuromuscular blocking drugs has been advocated in patients with this disorder presenting for surgery. In appropriate circumstances, spinal anaesthesia represents a useful option in patients with normokalaemic periodic paralysis.

  17. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barbin Zuccolotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord, characterized by muscle weakness, cognitive dysfunction, memory loss, and personality disorders. Factors that promote disease exacerbation are stress, physical trauma, infection, surgery, and hyperthermia. The objective is to describe the anesthetic management of a case referred to urological surgery. Case report: A female patient, 44 years of age, with multiple sclerosis, diagnosed with nephrolithiasis, referred for endoscopic ureterolythotripsy. Balanced general anesthesia was chosen, with midazolam, propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion; sevoflurane via laryngeal mask airway; and spontaneous ventilation. Because the patient had respiratory difficulty presenting with chest wall rigidity, it was decided to discontinue the infusion of remifentanil. There was no other complication or exacerbation of disease postoperatively. Conclusion: The use of neuromuscular blockers (depolarizing and non-depolarizing is a problem in these patients. As there was no need for muscle relaxation in this case, muscle relaxants were omitted. We conclude that the combination of propofol and sevoflurane was satisfactory, not resulting in hemodynamic instability or disease exacerbation.

  18. Genetics and Management of the Patient with Orofacial Cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Abreu Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip or palate (CL/P is a common facial defect present in 1 : 700 live births and results in substantial burden to patients. There are more than 500 CL/P syndromes described, the causes of which may be single-gene mutations, chromosomopathies, and exposure to teratogens. Part of the most prevalent syndromic CL/P has known etiology. Nonsyndromic CL/P, on the other hand, is a complex disorder, whose etiology is still poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies have contributed to the elucidation of the genetic causes, by raising reproducible susceptibility genetic variants; their etiopathogenic roles, however, are difficult to predict, as in the case of the chromosomal region 8q24, the most corroborated locus predisposing to nonsyndromic CL/P. Knowing the genetic causes of CL/P will directly impact the genetic counseling, by estimating precise recurrence risks, and the patient management, since the patient, followup may be partially influenced by their genetic background. This paper focuses on the genetic causes of important syndromic CL/P forms (van der Woude syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, and Robin sequence-associated syndromes and depicts the recent findings in nonsyndromic CL/P research, addressing issues in the conduct of the geneticist.

  19. Dental management of patients taking novel oral anticoagulants (NOAs): Dabigatran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Alberto; Alvarado, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Background A new group of oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) with clear advantages over classic dicoumarin oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocoumarol) has been developed in recent years. Patients being treated with oral anticoagulants are at higher risk for bleeding when undergoing dental treatments. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through April 2016 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed and Cochrane Library using the keywords “dabigatran”, “rivaroxaban”, “apixaban”, “edoxaban”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “novel oral anticoagulants”, “bleeding” and “dental treatment”. Results There is no need for regular coagulation monitoring of patients on dabigatran therapy. Whether or not to temporarily discontinue dabigatran must be assessed according to the bleeding risk involved in the dental procedure to be performed. Conclusions The number of patients under treatment with new oral anticoagulants will increase in the coming years. It is essential to know about the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of new oral anticoagulants and about their interactions with other drugs. It is necessary to develop clinical guidelines for the perioperative and postoperative management of these new oral anticoagulants in oral surgical procedures, and to carefully evaluate the bleeding risk of dental treatment, as well as the thrombotic risk of suppressing the new oral anticoagulant. Key words:Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, novel oral anticoagulants, bleeding. PMID:28210451

  20. Management of patients taking rivaroxaban for dental treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Curto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several novel anticoagulant drugs that are being increasingly used as an alternative to warfarin and acenocoumarol. Novel oral anticoagulants have emerged in recent years to overcome some of the drawbacks of classic oral anticoagulants. Rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban, and edoxaban were approved by the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. This paper examines the available evidence regarding rivaroxaban and sets out proposals for the clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care. Literature search was conducted through May 2016 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, and Cochrane Library using the keywords, "rivaroxaban," "dabigatran," "apixaban," "edoxaban," "new oral anticoagulants," "novel oral anticoagulants," "bleeding," and "dental treatment." For patients requiring minor oral surgery procedures, interruption of rivaroxaban is not generally necessary while a higher control of bleeding and discontinuation of the drug (at least 24 h should be requested before invasive surgical procedure, depending on renal functionality. Their increased use means that oral care clinicians should have a sound understanding of the mechanism of action, pharmacology, reversal strategies, and management of bleeding in patients taking rivaroxaban. Currently, recommendations are based on poor quality scientific data and clinical trials are required to establish best evidence-based practice guidance.

  1. Management of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miulescu Rucsandra Dănciulescu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is a human immune system disease characterized by increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, certain cancers and neurological disorders. The syndrome is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV that is transmitted through blood or blood products, sexual contact or contaminated hypodermic needles. Antiretroviral treatment reduces the mortality and the morbidity of HIV infection but is increasingly reported to be associated with increasing reports of metabolic abnormalities. The prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus in patients on antiretroviral therapy is high. Recently, a joint panel of American Diabetes Association (ADA and European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD experts updated the treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes (T2DM in a consensus statement which provides guidance to health care providers. The ADA and EASD consensus statement concur that intervention in T2DM should be early, intensive, and uncompromisingly focused on maintaining glycemic levels as close as possible to the nondiabetic range. Intensive glucose management has been shown to reduce microvascular complications of diabetes but no significant benefits on cardiovascular diseases. Patients with diabetes have a high risk for cardiovascular disease and the treatment of diabetes should emphasize reduction of the cardiovascular factors risk. The treatment of diabetes mellitus in AIDS patients often involves polypharmacy, which increases the risk of suboptimal adherence

  2. Is the DHEAS/cortisol ratio a potential filter for non-operable constipated cases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AM; El-Tawil

    2010-01-01

    Constipation is a significant manifestation of a number of psychological disorders.Published papers recommend using self-assessment questionnaires for discriminating psychological from non-psychological constipated patients before operating on them but reports from major surveys revealed that general practitioners failed to diagnose 70%of depressed patients using self-assessment questionnaires.Lower circulating concentrations of progesterone,17-hydroxyprogesterone,cortisol,testosterone,androstenedione,and d...

  3. Determinants of activation for self-management in patients with COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Y. J G; Bos-Touwen, I. D.; de Man, Janneke; Lammers, J. W J; Schuurmans, M. J.; Trappenburg, J. C A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD self-management is a complex behavior influenced by many factors. Despite scientific evidence that better disease outcomes can be achieved by enhancing self-management, many COPD patients do not respond to self-management interventions. To move toward more effective self-management

  4. Determinants of activation for self-management in patients with COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Yvonne J.G.; Bos-Touwen, I.D.; Man-van Ginkel, J.M. de; Lammers, J.-W.J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; Trappenburg, J.C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: COPD self-management is a complex behavior influenced by many factors. Despite scientific evidence that better disease outcomes can be achieved by enhancing self-management, many COPD patients do not respond to self-management interventions. To move toward more effective self-management

  5. Incidence of flap procedures in the management of burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineaweaver, William C; Craft-Coffman, Beretta; Oswald, Tanya M

    2015-03-01

    Increased survival of burn patients presents opportunities for reconstructive strategies to improve outcomes in management of acute and secondary burn injuries. To assess one such strategy, namely flap reconstruction, we reviewed cases performed during the first 4.5 years of the JMS Burn and Reconstruction Center. We found that flap procedures accounted for 0.8% of acute cases (23 of 2723 procedures) and 33% of secondary cases (260 of 790 procedures). This initial finding shows that in this practice flap procedures are applied to a small number of acute problems while flap procedures comprise 33% of secondary procedures. Reconstructive flap surgery plays a measurable role in burn treatment at this center. Further study of outcomes and timing could lead to better understanding of optimal strategies for flap reconstruction in burns.

  6. Current Concepts in the Intensive Care Management of Neurosurgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been some major conceptual changes in the approach to patients with both traumatic and nontraumatic cerebral injury, in recent years. These changes have their basis in a better understanding of the cerebral pathophysi-ology and availability of some recent monitors of cerebral function. Both traditional and modern therapeutic innova-tions are being subjected to extensive investigation. Evidence-based guidelines are now available for the management of traumatic brain injury. Increasing emphasis is being laid on monitoring not only intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure, but also cerebral blood flow, oxygenation and metabolism. Alternative osmotherapeutic choices are being explored. With a large pool of high quality evidence, more focused and precise therapeutic innovations are likely to emerge in near future.

  7. Hepatitis B Management in the Pregnant Patient: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Walid S.; Cohen, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic hepatitis B is a worldwide disease, with significant burden on health care systems. While universal vaccination programs have led to an overall decrease in incidence of transmission of hepatitis B, unfortunately, there remain large areas in the world where vaccination against hepatitis B is not practiced. In addition, vertical transmission of hepatitis B persists as a major concern. Hepatitis B treatment of the pregnant patient requires a thorough assessment of disease activity and close monitoring for flares, regardless of initiation of antiviral therapy. We discuss, in this article, the current and emergent strategies which aim to reduce the rate of transmission of hepatitis B from the pregnant mother to the infant and we review the updated guidelines regarding management of liver disease in pregnant women with hepatitis B. PMID:27777892

  8. Prosthetic management of a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhan R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins syndrome encompasses a group of closely related defects of the head and neck. It is a rare syndrome characterized by bilaterally symmetrical abnormalities derived from the first and second brachial arches and the nasal placode. It is an autosomal dominant disorder and its occurence ranges from 1 in 25,000 to 1 in 50,000 live births. The facial appearance of these patients can be improved by either surgical or prosthetic rehabilitation. In this case report we are presenting the features of a 13-year-old boy with Treacher Collins syndrome. A multidisplinary approach was followed in managing the situation. The various treatment options and the steps involved in making an auricular prosthesis are also discussed.

  9. The management of hypogonadism in aging male patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishwamitra; Perros, Petros

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the evaluation and management of hypogonadism in aging male patients in the light of recent guidelines. The benefits of treating severe hypogonadism resulting from identifiable pituitary or primary gonadal disease are well established. Milder forms of hypogonadism in the aging male, known as andropause, are common, and constitute an expanding area of clinical interest and research. Several studies indicate that testosterone replacement therapy may produce a wide range of benefits for men with hypogonadism, including improvement in libido, bone density, muscle mass, body composition, mood, and cognition. Currently available data are insufficient to permit a definitive verdict on the balance between risks and benefits of testosterone replacement therapy in aging males.

  10. Exercise training in the management of patients with resistant hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fernando; Ribeiro; Rui; Costa; José; Mesquita-Bastos

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a very prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of resistant hypertension, i.e., uncontrolled hypertension with 3 or more antihypertensive agents including 1 diuretic, is between 5% and 30% in the hypertensive population. The causes of resistant hypertension are multifactorial and include behavioral and biological factors, such as nonadherence to pharmacological treatment. All current treatment guidelines highlight the positive role of physical exercise as a non-pharmacological tool in the treatment of hypertension. This paper draws attention to the possible role of physical exercise as an adjunct non-pharmacological tool in the management of resistant hypertension. A few studies have investigated it, employing different methodologies, and taken together they have shown promising results. In summary, the available evidence suggests that aerobic physical exercise could be a valuable addition to the optimal pharmacological treatment of patients with resistant hypertension.

  11. New paradigms of urinary tract infections: Implications for patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Dennis J; Dabdoub, Shareef M; Li, Birong; Vanderbrink, Brian A; Justice, Sheryl S

    2012-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent one of the most commonly acquired diseases among the general population as well as hospital in-patients, yet remain difficult to effectively and consistently treat. High rates of recurrence, anatomic abnormalities, and functional disturbances of the urinary tract all contribute to the difficulty in management of these infections. However, recent advances reveal important molecular and genetic factors that contribute to bacterial invasion and persistence in the urinary tract, particularly for the most common causative agent, uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Recent studies using animal models of experimental UTIs have recently provided mechanistic insight into the clinical observations that question the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in treatment. Ultimately, continuing research will be necessary to identify the best targets for effective treatment of this costly and widespread infectious disease.

  12. Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease patients and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claassen DO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel O Claassen, Scott J KutscherDepartment of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor complaints of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD, and can have a great impact on quality of life. These disturbances manifest in a variety of ways; for instance, insomnia, sleep fragmentation, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep-related movement disorders such as restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements may share a common pathophysiology, and occurrence of rapid eye movement behavior disorder may predate the onset of PD or other synucleinopathies by several years. Medications for PD can have a significant impact on sleep, representing a great challenge to the treating physician. Awareness of the complex relationship between PD and sleep disorders, as well as the varied way in which sleep disturbances appear, is imperative for successful long-term management.Keywords: sleep disorders, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, Parkinson disease, fatigue, REM behavior disorder

  13. Managing capacity and demand across the patient journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allder, Steven; Silvester, Kate; Walley, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Bed availability remains the main operational focus for managers and clinicians on a day-to-day basis within the NHS. There is now published research that establishes a lack of bed stock is too simplistic an explanation of the situation. Other reasons for bed shortage include the daily and weekly lack of synchronisation of admissions and discharges, the large variation in bed occupancy over time, the downtime during weekends and holiday periods, wasted time during inpatient stays and the variation in patient length of stay. So far most of what little work has been done has focused on the front end of the process, to 'buffer' unplanned admissions through the use of short-stay facilities, such as medical assessment units, as a short-term solution. This paper reviews the evidence for the hypothesis that bed availability problems can be solved by actions other than the addition of more beds to the system.

  14. New paradigms of urinary tract infections: Implications for patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Horvath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs represent one of the most commonly acquired diseases among the general population as well as hospital in-patients, yet remain difficult to effectively and consistently treat. High rates of recurrence, anatomic abnormalities, and functional disturbances of the urinary tract all contribute to the difficulty in management of these infections. However, recent advances reveal important molecular and genetic factors that contribute to bacterial invasion and persistence in the urinary tract, particularly for the most common causative agent, uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Recent studies using animal models of experimental UTIs have recently provided mechanistic insight into the clinical observations that question the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in treatment. Ultimately, continuing research will be necessary to identify the best targets for effective treatment of this costly and widespread infectious disease.

  15. MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN DIABETIC PATIENTS: ISFAHAN. 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P ABAZARI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetic control and its acute and chronic complications needed to investigate the characteristics medical and self care in diabetics. This evaluation can detect conflicts in this field and provide the possibility of better planning to arrive the ideal control of diabetes. Methods. This study was a cross sectional survey. Samples were 344 diabetic patients who were living in Isfahan. Data was collected by a questionnaire described diabetics contextual characteristics, position of medical services use, position of diabetic education, self blood glucose monitoring (SMBG, attendance to diet regimen and so on. Questionnaires were cmpeleted through interview. Results. Mean age of patients was 56.5±13.6 years. More than fifty percent (57.7 percent were female. More than one third (57.6 percent were illiterate. Patients had 1 to 40 years history of diabetes. More than one forth (27.4 percent did not seek medical advice and 61.2 percent had referred to physician only when they were encountering with a problem for example lack of insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. Over eighty percent never had foot examination by their physicians. Only 7.4 percent, had heared about glycosylated hemoglubine. This test had not been accomplished for 95.9 percent of patients. 46.2 percent had not performed self foot examination till study time. More than eighty percent of interviewers had reported their lost blood glucose value above 130 mg/dl. Only ten percent of the study population had performed 5MBG. About fifty percent (45.3 percent, did not educated about diabetes. Only 26.8 percent reported that they always follow their dietary regimen. Discussion. Results of this survey showed irregular calls to physicians, poor blood glucose control, high rate of hospitalization due to acute and chronic diabetes complications, irregular blood glucose monitoring. Diabetes management needs more attention in our city.

  16. Lipodystrophy in HIV patients: its challenges and management approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhania R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rohit Singhania, Donald P KotlerDepartment of Medicine, St Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: HIV-associated lipodystrophy is a term used to describe a constellation of body composition (lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy and metabolic (dyslipidemia and insulin resistance alterations that accompany highly active antiretroviral therapy. These changes, which resemble metabolic syndrome, have been associated with a variety of adverse outcomes including accelerated cardiovascular disease. The body composition and metabolic changes appear to cluster in HIV infection, although they are distinct alterations and do not necessarily coexist. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated multiple pathogenic influences associated with host, disease, and treatment-related factors. The adverse treatment effects were more prominent in early regimens; continued drug development has led to the application of metabolically safer regimens with equal or greater potency than the regimens being replaced. Disease-related factors include HIV infection as well as inflammation, immune activation, and immune depletion. The body composition changes promote anxiety and depression in patients and may affect treatment adherence. Treatment of dyslipidemia and alterations in glucose metabolism is the same as in non-HIV-infected individuals. Lipoatrophy is managed by strategic choice of antivirals or by antiviral switching, and in some cases by plastic/reconstructive surgery. Lipohypertrophy has been managed mainly by lifestyle modification, ie, a hypocaloric diet and increased exercise. A growth hormone releasing factor, which reduces central fat, has recently become available for clinical use.Keywords: lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, body composition, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance

  17. The Management of Secondary Glaucoma in Nanophthalmic Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengsong Huang; Minbin Yu; Changyu Qiu; Tiancai Ye

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristcs, management of secondary glaucoma in nanophthalmos, and the prevention of its complications.Methods: Retrospectively, 9 cases (17 eyes) with nanophthalmic glaucoma were studied.Results: The axial length of the eyes ranged (14.36 ~ 19.33) mm; All of the cases combined with hyperopia ranged (+7.00~+16.00)D. All 17 eyes had the manifestation like angle-closure glaucoma.The glaucoma was controlled in 9 of 17 eyes at the early stage, which underwent laser iridotomy (4 of 9 eyes also underwent laser iridoplasty). 1 eye underwent ciliary photocoagulation because its visual acuity was lost and the patient complained of pain. The other 7 eyes underwent filtration surgery and 3 of them had permanent loss of vision caused by disastrous complications after the surgery.Conclusions: Management of secondary glaucoma in nanophthalmos is complicated. The laser iris surgery is safe and effective in glaucoma at the early stage. Vortex vein decompression, sclerotectomy or anterior sclerotomy may be performed to reduce disastrous complications.

  18. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac DM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Migliarese Isaac,1 Jessica Wu,2 Diana R Mager,3,4 Justine M Turner1 1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta; 2Alberta Health Services–Child Health Nutrition Services, Stollery Children’s Hospital; 3Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutritional Science; 4Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. Keywords: celiac disease

  19. Non-operative residual biliary stone extraction by using steerable catheter and basket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. W.; Chang, J. C.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    Nonoperative residual biliary stone removal through the T-tube sinus tract was performed in 9 patients by using steerable catheter and basket under fluoroscopic guidance and the result was satisfactory. There is no significant complication or morbidity. We concluded that this method is 1. easy of performance, highly successful and of no demonstrable risk. 2. can be performed without any medication and in our patient department. 3. the method of choice of treatment in post-op residual biliary stone with T-tube.

  20. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Ad A; Fischer, Maarten J; Scharloo, Margreet

    2014-01-01

    In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients' functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD.

  1. Management of Antiviral Induced Anemia in HCV Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Ranjbar

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHepatitis C virus (HCV infection affects more than 170 million people worldwide(1,2. Approximately 80% of patients with acute infection will subsequently develop chronic disease, and an estimated 20% to 30% will develop cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma(3. The maost effective therapeutic regimen for chronic hepatitis C is the combination of pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin, which yields a sustained virologic response (SVR in up to 56% of patients(4, 5. However, combination therapy is also associated with significant adverse events and is contraindicated in certain patient populations. Development of side effects, particularly hematologic ones, may result in suboptimal dosing or discontinuation of therapy that can reduce the likelihood of SVR.IncidenceIn clinical trials, significant anemia (hemoglobin 10.6 mg/kg/d is 65% compared with a rate of 50% for those receiving peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin at dosages of 10.6 mg/kg/d or less.It has been shown that SVR rates are significantly higher in patients who receive more than 80% of their full interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin doses for more than 80% of the time for more than 80% of the intended duration of therapy(14. In the Hepatitis C Long-term Treatment Against Cirrhosis (HALT-C trial, a trial involving patients who were previous nonresponders to or relapsers after therapy, reduction of ribavirin dose from> 80% to 10.6 mg/kg/d. The standard-of-care management of ribavirin induced anemia has been dose reduction to 600 mg/d when the hemoglobin level decreases to =2g/dL decrease inhemoglobinduring any 4-weektreatment period 12g/dL despite 4weeks at reduceddose Recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in the HCV-infected patient who becomes anemic during antiviral therapy represents an alternative to ribavirin dose reduction or discontinuation. Erythropoietin is mainly produced by the kidney in adults in response to tissue hypoxia, and it increases the number of

  2. Effective social support resources in self- management of diabetic patients in Bushehr (2011-12)

    OpenAIRE

    Azita Noroozi; Rahim Tahmasebi; Seyed Javad Rekabpour

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a serious problem and self- management is effective factor for diabetes control. Social support is one of the important factors in diabetes self-management. In this study, purpose was determination of effective support resources in self- management. Material and Methods: Data were collected from a convenience sample of 396 diabetic patients, using self- management and social support resources in chronic patient scales. For data analysis with SPSS version 16, multiple l...

  3. Patient factors that influence clinicians' decision making in self-management support: A clinical vignette study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; van der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J; de Wit, Niek J

    2017-01-01

    Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current decision making of health professionals can support future tailoring of self-management interventions. The aim of this study is to identify the relative importance of patient factors in health professionals' decision making regarding self-management support. A factorial survey was presented to primary care physicians and nurses. The survey consisted of clinical vignettes (case descriptions), in which 11 patient factors were systematically varied. Each care provider received a set of 12 vignettes. For each vignette, they decided whether they would give this patient self-management support and whether they expected this support to be successful. The associations between respondent decisions and patient factors were explored using ordered logit regression. The survey was completed by 60 general practitioners and 80 nurses. Self-management support was unlikely to be provided in a third of the vignettes. The most important patient factor in the decision to provide self-management support as well as in the expectation that self-management support would be successful was motivation, followed by patient-provider relationship and illness perception. Other factors, such as depression or anxiety, education level, self-efficacy and social support, had a small impact on decisions. Disease, disease severity, knowledge of disease, and age were relatively unimportant factors. This is the first study to explore the relative importance of patient factors in decision making and the expectations regarding the provision of self-management support to chronic disease patients. By far, the most important factor considered was patient's motivation; unmotivated patients were less likely to receive self-management support

  4. Tendinopathy in diabetes mellitus patients-Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, P P Y

    2017-08-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a frequent and disabling musculo-skeletal problem affecting the athletic and general populations. The affected tendon is presented with local tenderness, swelling, and pain which restrict the activity of the individual. Tendon degeneration reduces the mechanical strength and predisposes it to rupture. The pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy are not fully understood and several major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses including activation of the hypoxia-apoptosis-pro-inflammatory cytokines cascade, neurovascular ingrowth, increased production of neuromediators, and erroneous stem cell differentiation have been proposed. Many intrinsic and extrinsic risk/causative factors can predispose to the development of tendinopathy. Among them, diabetes mellitus is an important risk/causative factor. This review aims to appraise the current literature on the epidemiology and pathology of tendinopathy in diabetic patients. Systematic reviews were done to summarize the literature on (a) the association between diabetes mellitus and tendinopathy/tendon tears, (b) the pathological changes in tendon under diabetic or hyperglycemic conditions, and (c) the effects of diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia on the outcomes of tendon healing. The potential mechanisms of diabetes mellitus in causing and exacerbating tendinopathy with reference to the major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses of the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy as reported in the literature are also discussed. Potential strategies for the management of tendinopathy in diabetic patients are presented. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Optimising the management of patients with difficult asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Evelyn; Higgins, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Asthma affects 5.4 million people in the UK, around 1 in 12 of the population. Between 5 and 10% of asthma (depending on the definition used) is categorised as difficult asthma, a term which generally refers to patients who continue to experience symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite the prescription of high-dose asthma therapy. Difficult asthma is an indication for specialist review by an appropriate respiratory physician, but close liaison between primary, secondary and tertiary care is critical and it is therefore important that primary care health professionals should be aware of the principles of management. One of the most important questions to ask is whether the individual with difficult asthma is taking their treatment Identifying this, however, is not easy. GPs could assess prescription uptake, looking for low use of preventers and excess use of short-acting bronchodilators. Newer means of assessing adherence have been developed. Inhaler devices that can monitor completion and timing of actuations have been produced. Meters that measure FeNO are available. A recent UK study found that 12 out of 100 patients referred for difficult asthma did not have reversible airflow obstruction or a history suggestive of asthma. Diagnoses included COPD, cystic fibrosis, cardiomyopathy, respiratory muscle dysfunction and severe anxiety with vocal cord dysfunction.

  6. Surgical management of 143 patients with adult primary retroperitoneal tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Hong Xu; Ke-Jian Guo; Ren-Xuan Guo; Chun-Lin Ge; Yu-Lin Tian; San-Guang He

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the surgical management of adult primary retroperitoneal tumors (APRT) and the factors influencing the outcome after operation.METHODS: Data of 143 cases of APRT from 1990 to 2003 in the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University were evaluated retrospectively.RESULTS: A total of 143 cases of APRT were treated surgically. Among them, 122 (85.3%) underwent complete resection, 16 (11.2%) incomplete resection,and 3 (3%) surgical biopsies. Twenty-nine (20.2%)underwent tumor resection plus multiple organ resections. Ninety-five malignant cases were followed up for 1 mo to 5 years. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year survival rates of the patients subject to complete resection was 94.9%, 76.6% and 34.3% and that of patients with incomplete resection was 80.4%, 6.7%,and 0%, respectively (P < 0.001). The Cox multi-various regression analysis showed the completeness of tumor,sex and histological type were associated closely with local recurrence.CONCLUSION: Sufficient preoperative preparation and complete tumor resection play important roles in reducing recurrence and improving survival.

  7. [Management of vascular risk factors in patients older than 80].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Formiga, Francesc; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Camafort, Miguel; Galve, Enrique; Gil, Pedro; Lobos, José María

    2014-08-04

    The number of patients older than 80 years is steadily increasing and it represents the main basis for increasing population figures in developed countries. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of mortality and disability causes result in a huge burden of disease in elderly people. However, available scientific evidence to support decision-making on cardiovascular prevention in elderly patients is scarce. Currently available risk assessment scales cannot be applied to elderly people. They are focused on cardiovascular mortality risk and do not provide information on factors with a proven prognostic value in the very old (functioning disability, dementia). Elderly people are a highly heterogeneous population, with a variety of co-morbidities, as well as several functional and cognitive impairment degrees. Furthermore, aging-associated physiological changes and common use of multiple drugs result in an increased risk of adverse drug reactions. Thus, drug use should always be based on a risk/benefit assessment in the elderly. Therefore, therapeutic decision-making in the very old must be an individually tailored and based on an appropriate clinical judgement and a comprehensive geriatric assessment. The current consensus report aims to present a proposal for clinical practices in the primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention in the very old and to provide a number of recommendations on lifestyle changes and drug therapy for the management of major cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Management and rehabilitation of neurologic patients with sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Rosemary; Bronner, Gila

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disease frequently negatively affects sexual experience in multiple ways. The patient's sexual self-image, sexual function, propensity to sexual pain, and motivation to be sexually active may be impacted, as may the sexual experiences of the partner. Difficulties with mobility can limit both partners' sexual arousal and pleasure. Conditions associated with chronic pain or continence concerns add further distress. Thus sexual rehabilitation needs to address many areas. Comorbid depression is common and needs to be stabilized before definitive treatment of sexual dysfunction. Management strategies include cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and sex therapy and, for erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation, pharmacotherapy can be added. Benefit from all these modalities is confirmed in the general population but only pharmacologic treatment of erectile dysfunction has been studied in neurologic patients, where benefit is also seen. Testosterone is indicated only for comorbid testosterone deficit: very occasionally the neurologic condition causes secondary male hypogonadism. No androgen deficiency state has been identified in women. Results of testosterone treatment in women are conflicting: recruited women were not clearly dysfunctional and women with neurologic conditions have not been studied. Future research involving both partners using combined medical and psychologic therapy as followed in clinical practice is advocated.

  9. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study

    OpenAIRE

    Scacco Salvatore; Inchingolo Alessio D; Marrelli Massimo; Abenavoli Fabio M; Tatullo Marco; Inchingolo Francesco; Papa Francesco; Inchingolo Angelo M; Dipalma Gianna

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. Materials and methods A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76) undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol a...

  10. Orthopedic Management of Patients with Pompe Disease: A Retrospective Case Series of 8 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Haaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pompe disease (PD, a lysosomal storage disease as well as a neuromuscular disorder, is a rare disease marked by progressive muscle weakness. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT in recent years allowed longer survival but brought new problems to the treatment of PD with increasing affection of the musculoskeletal system, particularly with a significantly higher prevalence of scoliosis. The present paper deals with the orthopedic problems in patients with PD and is the first to describe surgical treatment of scoliosis in PD patients. Patients and Methods. The orthopedic problems and treatment of eight patients with PD from orthopedic consultation for neuromuscular disorders are retrospectively presented. We analyzed the problems of scoliosis, hip dysplasia, feet deformities, and contractures and presented the orthopedic treatment options. Results. Six of our eight PD patients had scoliosis and two young patients were treated by operative spine stabilization with benefits for posture and sitting ability. Hip joint surgery, operative contracture release, and feet deformity correction were performed with benefits for independent activity. Conclusion. Orthopedic management gains importance due to extended survival and musculoskeletal involvement under ERT. Surgical treatment is indicated in distinct cases. Further investigation is required to evidence the effect of surgical spine stabilization in PD.

  11. Self-Management Patient Education and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stombaugh, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-management of a disease is defined as "having or being able to obtain, the skills and resources necessary to best accommodate to the chronic disease and its consequences" (Holman & Lorig, 1992, p. 309). Self-management has been used in the management of several chronic conditions and this model may be useful in the management of weight loss.…

  12. Self-Management Patient Education and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stombaugh, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-management of a disease is defined as "having or being able to obtain, the skills and resources necessary to best accommodate to the chronic disease and its consequences" (Holman & Lorig, 1992, p. 309). Self-management has been used in the management of several chronic conditions and this model may be useful in the management of weight loss.…

  13. Optimal management of nail disease in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piraccini BM

    2015-01-01

    psoriasis and the optimal management of nail disease in patients with psoriasis. Keywords: biologics, nail psoriasis, topical therapy, systemic therapy

  14. The management of oral erythema multiforme in juvenile patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Savitri Ernawati

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Erythema multiforme is an acute inflammatory disease of the skin and mucous membranes that causes a variety of the skin lesionhence the name ‘multiforme’.The oral mucosa looks severely inflamed, but the feature are non specific and usually a biopsy is required in order to confirm the diagnosis. Cracked, bleeding, Crusted, swollen and ulcers of the lips is very characteristic of erythema multiforme, and lip involvement may cause significant morbidity. EM is assumed as an immune complex disorder which rises as a result of an immune response to an external agent such as herpes simplex virus or various drugs. We reported: 14-year girl, complained she suffered from painful oral ulceration for one week. One weeks advance the patient received a treatment of paracetamol and paramex for febris, headache and cough. Clinical examination of the skin showed no signs of cutaneous involvement. Other site such as the conjunctival, and genital were also free of lesions. The patients had several red-based superficial erosions on the upper and lower lips accompanied by crusting and bleeding. Intra oral findings showed multiple irregular erosions, ulcers and intense erythematous areas, mainly on the labial mucosa. The clinical diagnosis of EM was concluded by anamnesis and clinical appearance, with differential diagnosis of secondary herpes infection (herpes labialis and pemphigus vulgaris. Systemic and topical corticosteroid therapy is frequently used to treat EM Although it may partially suppress the disease. Objective: This report explains and describes the management of patients with EM which may help dentists to determine an accurate diagnosis to avoid further complication and to give medical intervention to the disease. Conclusion: Early recognition of this disease may prevent delayed diagnosis and incorrect treatment.

  15. Pain Management in the Emergency Chain: The Use and Effectiveness of Pain Management in Patients With Acute Musculoskeletal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, J.G.J.; IJzerman, M.J.; Gaakeer, Menno I.; Berben, Sivera A.; Eenennaam, Fred L.; Vugt, van Arie B.; Doggen, C.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint in emergency care, its management is often neglected, placing patients at risk for insufficient pain relief. Our aim is to investigate how often pain management is provided in the prehospital phase and emergency department (ED) and h

  16. Pain management in the emergency chain: the use and effectiveness of pain management in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, J.G.; IJzerman, M.J.; Gaakeer, M.I.; Berben, S.A.; Eenennaam, F.L. van; Vugt, A.B. van; Doggen, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint in emergency care, its management is often neglected, placing patients at risk for insufficient pain relief. Our aim is to investigate how often pain management is provided in the prehospital phase and emergency department (ED) and

  17. Gallstone disease in the elderly: are older patients managed differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Simon; Sourial, Nadia; Vedel, Isabelle; Hanna, Wael C; Fraser, Shannon A; Newman, Daniel; Bilek, Aaron J; Galatas, Christos; Marek, Jonah E; Monette, Johanne

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the differences in the management of symptomatic gallstone disease within different elderly groups and to evaluate the association between older age and surgical treatment. This single-institution retrospective chart review included all patients 65 years old and older with an initial hospital visit for symptomatic gallstone disease between 2004 and 2008. The patients were stratified into three age groups: group 1 (age, 65-74 years), group 2 (age, 75-84 years), and group 3 (age, ≥ 85 years). Patient characteristics and presentation at the initial hospital visit were described as well as the surgical and other nonoperative interventions occurring over a 1-year follow-up period. Logistic regression was performed to assess the effect of age on surgery. Data from 397 patient charts were assessed: 182 in group 1, 160 in group 2, and 55 in group 3. Cholecystitis was the most common diagnosis in groups 1 and 2, whereas cholangitis was the most common diagnosis in group 3. Elective admissions to a surgical ward were most common in group 1, whereas urgent admissions to a medical ward were most common in group 3. Elective surgery was performed at the first visit for 50.6% of group 1, for 25.6% of group 2, and for 12.7% of group 3, with a 1-year cumulative incidence of surgery of 87.4% in group 1, 63.5% in group 2, and 22.1% in group 3. Inversely, cholecystostomy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were used more often in the older groups. Increased age (odds ratio [OR], 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-0.91) and the Charlson Comorbidity Index (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69-0.94) were significantly associated with a decreased probability of undergoing surgery within 1 year after the initial visit. Even in the elderly population, older patients presented more frequently with severe disease and underwent more conservative treatment strategies. Older age was independently associated with a lower likelihood of surgery.

  18. Can the application of control theory assist patient management in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Cindy

    2010-09-01

    Supporting patient self-management is an important part of the care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but patients vary in their capacity and willingness to manage their illness and may feel overwhelmed by the challenge of controlling the impact on their life. This paper discusses the value and importance of control theory and how it might be applied to enhance patients' self-management. Not only does it offer a means of identifying those who might have greatest difficulty in managing their illness, but it also points the way to effective interventions.

  19. The management of depressive symptoms in patients with COPD: a postal survey of general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yohannes, A.M.; Hann, M.; Sibbald, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: We examined the management of depression by general practitioners (GPs), through the use of case vignettes, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), severe osteoarthritis and depressive symptoms alone. BACKGROUND: Depression is common in patients with COPD. Untreated

  20. Evaluation of the clinical management of HIV-infected patients by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-25

    Nov 25, 2009 ... management of HIV-infected patients by private sector doctors. Methods: A descriptive .... in the South African private healthcare sector since 1996, and although ..... the risk of not providing quality healthcare to their patients.

  1. Regional approaches to the management of patients with advanced, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brose, M.S.; Smit, J.W.; Capdevila, J.; Elisei, R.; Nutting, C.; Pitoia, F.; Robinson, B.; Schlumberger, M.; Shong, Y.K.; Takami, H.

    2012-01-01

    For patients with advanced, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer, current treatment guidelines recommend clinical trial enrollment or small-molecule kinase inhibitor therapy. However, details of patient management vary between countries depending on trial availability and

  2. Management of patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaa, Kristina H; Bundgaard, Henning; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diagnostics of patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are complex, and based on the 2010 Task Force document including different diagnostic modalities. However, recommendations for clinical management and follow-up of patients with ARVC and their relatives...

  3. Sodium Restriction in Patients With CKD : A Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-management Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W.; Navis, Gerjan; Vogt, Liffert; van der Boog, Paul J. M.; Bos, Willem Jan W.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van Dijk, Sandra

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of self-managed sodium restriction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Study Design: Open randomized controlled trial. Setting & Participants: Patients with moderately decreased kidney function from 4 hospitals in the Netherlands.

  4. Review of cancer pain management in patients receiving maintenance methadone therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowley, Dominic

    2011-05-01

    Methadone is commonly used in the treatment of heroin addiction. Patients with a history of opioid misuse or on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) with cancer often have difficult to manage pain. We studied 12 patients referred to the palliative care service with cancer pain who were on MMT. All had difficult to control pain, and a third required 5 or more analgesic agents. Two patients had documented \\'\\'drug-seeking\\'\\' behavior. Methadone was used subcutaneously as an analgesic agent in 1 patient. We explore why patients on MMT have difficult to manage pain, the optimal management of their pain, and the increasing role of methadone as an analgesic agent in cancer pain.

  5. Displaced midshaft fractures of the clavicle: non-operative treatment versus plate fixation (Sleutel-TRIAL. A multicentre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vos Dagmar I

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional view that the vast majority of midshaft clavicular fractures heal with good functional outcomes following non-operative treatment may be no longer valid for all midshaft clavicular fractures. Recent studies have presented a relatively high incidence of non-union and identified speciic limitations of the shoulder function in subgroups of patients with these injuries. Aim A prospective, multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT will be conducted in 21 hospitals in the Netherlands, comparing fracture consolidation and shoulder function after either non-operative treatment with a sling or a plate fixation. Methods/design A total of 350 patients will be included, between 18 and 60 years of age, with a dislocated midshaft clavicular fracture. The primary outcome is the incidence of non-union, which will be determined with standardised X-rays (Antero-Posterior and 30 degrees caudocephalad view. Secondary outcome will be the functional outcome, measured using the Constant Score. Strength of the shoulder muscles will be measured with a handheld dynamometer (MicroFET2. Furthermore, the health-related Quality of Life score (ShortForm-36 and the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH Outcome Measure will be monitored as subjective parameters. Data on complications, bone union, cosmetic aspects and use of painkillers will be collected with follow-up questionnaires. The follow-up time will be two years. All patients will be monitored at regular intervals over the subsequent twelve months (two and six weeks, three months and one year. After two years an interview by telephone and a written survey will be performed to evaluate the two-year functional and mechanical outcomes. All data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis, using univariate and multivariate analyses. Discussion This trial will provide level-1 evidence for the comparison of consolidation and functional outcome between two standardised

  6. 腰间盘突出症的手术与非手术治疗%With the non operative treatment of lumbar disc herniation surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘向阳; 杨宝来; 张辉

    2016-01-01

    目的:观察腰间盘突出症的手术与非手术治疗的疗效。方法选取2012年12月~2014年12月我院收治的腰间盘突出症患者300例作为研究对象,根据患者意愿,将其分为手术组和非手术组,各150例。分析对比两组患者的治疗总有效率。结果手术组的治疗总有效率为100.00%(150/150),非手术组为76.00%(114/150),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论对于患者来说,选择非手术治疗可以达到良好的治疗疗效,选择手术治疗时,应尽量选择对脊柱稳定性影响小的手术方法。%Objective With the non operative treatment of lumbar disc herniation surgery to observe the effect of.Methods This study selected in our hospital 300 cases of lumbar disc herniation patients (December December 2012~2014) will be divided into operation group and non operation group. Analysis and comparison of the two groups of patients with the total effective rate of treatment.Result The total effective rate was 100% (150/150) and 76% (114/150) in the surgery group (P<0.05).Conclusion For the patients with lumbar disc herniation, choose non surgical treatment can achieve good therapeutic effect, the choice of surgical treatment, should try to choose a small surgical methods infl uence on the stability of the spine.

  7. Physical activity: from epidemiological evidence to individualized patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charansonney, Olivier Luc; Vanhees, Luc; Cohen-Solal, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA), physical fitness (PF), and even a few sedentary behaviors (SB) are strongly and independently linked to improved survival rate. However, key questions remain: what are the physiological interrelationships between SB, PA, and PF? How should we differently emphasize promoting PA, increasing PF with exercise, and decreasing SB among other prevention measures? What are the interrelationships of both PA and SB levels with drug treatment efficacy? To address these questions we developed an integrated patient-centric model combining physiology with epidemiological evidence to characterize the individual risk attached to PA level, PF, and SB. Epidemiological data were collected by extensive literature review. Nine meta-analyses, 198 cohort studies (3.8 million people), and 13 controlled trials were reviewed. 1. A high level of SB induces chronic stress and increases the risk of both chronic disease and mortality. 2. Vigorous PA increases PF and physiological reserve, thereby improving survival rate. This effect is not mediated by improved traditional risk factors. The risk for most individuals is a mix of high SB, low to mild PA, and low to mild PF. This model can improve the individualized prescription of PA modalities. Furthermore, the benefit of treatments such as statins or beta-blockers can be cancelled out if a decrease in PA or an increase in SB is induced by drug related side effects. To improve patient management both types of therapeutic interventions and dose should be carefully chosen for each individual in order to maintain/increase PA level while decreasing SB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacy intervention on antimicrobial management of critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijo I

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Frequent, suboptimal use of antimicrobial drugs has resulted in the emergence of microbial resistance, compromised clinical outcomes and increased costs, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU. Mounting on these challenges is the paucity of new antimicrobial agents.Objectives: The study aims to determine the impact of prospective pharmacy-driven antimicrobial stewardship in the ICU on clinical and potential financial outcomes. The primary objectives were to determine the mean length of stay (LOS and mortality rate in the ICU resulting from prospective pharmacy interventions on antimicrobial therapy. The secondary objective was to calculate the difference in total drug acquisition costs resulting from pharmacy infectious diseases (ID-related interventions.Methods: In collaboration with an infectious disease physician, the ICU pharmacy team provided prospective audit with feedback to physicians on antimicrobial therapies of 70 patients over a 4-month period in a 31-bed ICU. In comparison with published data, LOS and mortality of pharmacy-monitored ICU patients were recorded. Daily cost savings on antimicrobial drugs and charges for medication therapy management (MTM services were added to calculate potential total cost savings. Pharmacy interventions focused on streamlining, dose optimization, intravenous-to-oral conversion, antimicrobial discontinuation, new recommendation and drug information consult. Antimicrobial education was featured in oral presentations and electronic newsletters for pharmacists and clinicians.Results: The mean LOS in the ICU was 6 days, which was lower than the published reports of LOS ranging from 11 to 36 days. The morality rate of 14% was comparable to the reported range of 6 to 20% in published literature. The total drug cost difference was a negative financial outcome or loss of USD192 associated with ID-related interventions.Conclusion: In collaboration with the infectious disease physician, prospective

  9. [Anesthetic Management for a Patient with Stiff-person Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kumiko; Murao, Kohei; Kimoto-Shirakawa, Michiyo; Takahira, Kazuyo; Toorabally, Farah; Shingu, Koh

    2016-02-01

    The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune neurologic disorder that affects the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated inhibitory network in the central nervous system with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies. SPS is characterized by muscle rigidity and painful episodic spasms in axial and lower limb muscles. This case report describes successful peri-operative management of a 61-year-old female (height, 158 cm; weight, 60 kg, ASA-PS 2) with her right upper arm fracture who was scheduled for open reduction and internal fixation. This patient had bulbar paralysis, dysphagia and muscle rigidity associated with a high titer of anti-GAD auto antibodies (2,800 U x ml(-1)). She was diagnosed as SPS and has been treated with predonisolone (30 mg x day(-1)) and diazepam (20 mg x day(-1)) for 1 year. Predonisolone (15 mg) and diazepam (30 mg) was given orally before induction of general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium bromide. Posture change from supine to beach-chair position led to sudden drop in blood pressure to 38/25 mmHg, which recovered promptly by injecting intravenous ephedrine hydrochloride (28 mg) and hydrocortisone (100 mg). Postanesthetic course was uneventful without postoperative neurologic abnormalities.

  10. The management of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Channa N; Franks, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women. The syndrome is typified by its heterogeneous presentation, which includes hirsutism (a function of hypersecretion of ovarian androgens), menstrual irregularity and infertility (that is due to infrequent or absent ovulation). Furthermore, PCOS predisposes patients to metabolic dysfunction and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aetiology of the syndrome has a major genetic component. Obesity exacerbates the insulin resistance that is a feature of PCOS in many women and amplifies the clinical and biochemical abnormalities. In clinical practice, the choice of investigations to be done depends mainly on the presenting symptoms. The approach to management is likewise dependent on the presenting complaint. Symptoms of androgen excess (hirsutism, acne and alopecia) require cosmetic measures, suppression of ovarian androgen function and anti-androgen therapy, alone or in combination. Ovulation rate is improved by diet and lifestyle intervention in overweight individuals but induction of ovulation by, in the first instance, anti-estrogens is usually required. Monitoring of glucose is important in overweight women and/or those with a family history of T2DM. Metformin is indicated for women with impaired glucose tolerance but whether this drug is otherwise useful in women with PCOS remains debatable.

  11. [Human factors and crisis resource management: improving patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, M; Oberfrank, S

    2013-10-01

    A continuing high number of patients suffer harm from medical treatment. In 60-70% of the cases the sources of harm can be attributed to the field of human factors (HFs) and teamwork; nevertheless, those topics are still neither part of medical education nor of basic and advanced training even though it has been known for many years and it has meanwhile also been demonstrated for surgical specialties that training in human factors and teamwork considerably reduces surgical mortality.Besides the medical field, the concept of crisis resource management (CRM) has already proven its worth in many other industries by improving teamwork and reducing errors in the domain of human factors. One of the best ways to learn about CRM and HFs is realistic simulation team training with well-trained instructors in CRM and HF. The educational concept of the HOTT (hand over team training) courses for trauma room training offered by the DGU integrates these elements based on the current state of science. It is time to establish such training for all medical teams in emergency medicine and operative care. Accompanying safety measures, such as the development of a positive culture of safety in every department and the use of effective critical incident reporting systems (CIRs) should be pursued.

  12. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campmans-Kuijpers MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marjo JE Campmans-Kuijpers,1 Lidwien C Lemmens,2 Caroline A Baan,2 Guy EHM Rutten1 1Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, 2Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Utrecht, the Netherlands Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention.Methods: This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100% was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non parametric tests.Results: Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002, and on its subdomains “access to

  13. [Anesthesia for geriatric patients : Part 2: anesthetics, patient age and anesthesia management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, A; Löser, S; Wilhelm, W

    2012-04-01

    Part 2 of this review on geriatric anesthesia primarily describes the multiple influences of age on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of different anesthetic agents and their impact on clinical practice. In the elderly the demand for opioids is reduced by almost 50% and with total intravenous anesthesia the dosages of propofol and remifentanil as well as recovery times are more determined by patient age than by body weight. As a result depth of anesthesia monitoring is recommended for geriatric patients to individually adjust the dosing to patients needs. With muscle relaxants both delayed onset of action and prolonged duration of drug effects must be considered with increasing age and as this may lead to respiratory complications, neuromuscular monitoring is highly recommended. The following measures appear to be beneficial for geriatric patients: thorough preoperative assessment, extended hemodynamic monitoring, use of short-acting anesthetics in individually adjusted doses best tailored by depth of anesthesia monitoring, intraoperative normotension, normothermia and normocapnia, complete neuromuscular recovery at the end of the procedure and well-planned postoperative pain management in order to reduce or avoid the use of opioids.

  14. Training patients in Time Pressure Management, a cognitive strategy for mental slowness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkens, I.; Heugten, C.M. van; Wade, D.T.; Fasotti, L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide clinical practitioners with a framework for teaching patients Time Pressure Management, a cognitive strategy that aims to reduce disabilities arising from mental slowness due to acquired brain injury. Time Pressure Management provides patients with compensatory strategies to deal

  15. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  16. Incidence and predictors of hospitalization or death in patients managed in multidisciplinary heart failure clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Schou, Morten; Videbaek, Lars

    2009-01-01

    AND RESULTS: A total of 4012 consecutive outpatients referred for HF management in 18 Danish HF clinics were included. Clinical data were collected prospectively. Outcome data were obtained from a validated, national registry. Mean follow-up time was 580 days. The mean age of patients was 69 years, 83% had...... predict poor outcome in patients managed in multidisciplinary HF clinics....

  17. Factors influencing exacerbation-related self-management in patients with COPD : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Y. J G; Vervoort, S. C J M; Nijssen, L. I T; Trappenburg, J. C A; Schuurmans, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with COPD, self-management skills are important to reduce the impact of exacerbations. However, both detection and adequate response to exacerbations appear to be difficult for some patients. Little is known about the underlying process of exacerbation-related self-management

  18. Dental management of a patient fitted with subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator device and concomitant warfarin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Shah

    2015-07-01

    This article presents the dental management of a 60 year-old person with an ICD and concomitant anticoagulant therapy. The patient was on multiple medications and was treated for a grossly neglected mouth with multiple carious root stumps. This case report outlines the important issues in managing patients fitted with an ICD device and at a risk of sudden cardiac death.

  19. Case management in aftercare of involuntarily committed patients with substance abuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Marianne Larsson; Berglund, Mats; Tönnesen, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Case management has since the 1970s been widely used to co-ordinate services for mental health patients. The methodology has expanded to support patients in many different types of conditions. This study is one of very few randomized trials on case management in a European setting. It examined...

  20. Training patients in Time Pressure Management, a cognitive strategy for mental slowness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkens, I.; Heugten, C.M. van; Wade, D.T.; Fasotti, L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide clinical practitioners with a framework for teaching patients Time Pressure Management, a cognitive strategy that aims to reduce disabilities arising from mental slowness due to acquired brain injury. Time Pressure Management provides patients with compensatory strategies to deal