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Sample records for non-o157 stec infections

  1. Bacterial genetic determinants of non-O157 STEC outbreaks and hemolytic-uremic syndrome after infection.

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    Wickham, Mark E; Lupp, Claudia; Mascarenhas, Mariola; Vazquez, Alejandra; Coombes, Brian K; Brown, Nat F; Coburn, Bryan A; Deng, Wanyin; Puente, Jose L; Karmali, Mohamed A; Finlay, B Brett

    2006-09-15

    Although O157:H7 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are the predominant cause of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in the world, non-O157:H7 serotypes are a medically important cause of HUS that are underdetected by current diagnostic approaches. Because Shiga toxin is necessary but not sufficient to cause HUS, identifying the virulence determinants that predict severe disease after non-O157 STEC infection is of paramount importance. Disease caused by O157:H7 STEC has been associated with a 26-gene pathogenicity island known as O island (OI) 122. To assess the public-health significance of this pathogenicity island, we examined the association between OI122 genes and outbreaks and HUS after non-O157 STEC infection. We found that a subset of OI122 genes is independently associated with outbreaks and HUS after infection with non-O157 STEC. The presence of multiple virulence genes in non-O157 serotypes strengthened this association, which suggests that the additive effects of a variable repertoire of virulence genes contribute to disease severity. In vivo, Citrobacter rodentium mutants lacking outbreak- and HUS-associated genes were deficient for virulence in mice; in particular, nleB mutant bacteria were unable to cause mortality in mice. The present study shows that virulence genes associated epidemiologically with outbreaks and HUS after non-O157 STEC infection are pivotal to the initiation, progression, and outcome of in vivo disease.

  2. Prolonged and mixed non-O157 Escherichia coli infection in an Australian household.

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    Staples, M; Graham, R M A; Doyle, C J; Smith, H V; Jennison, A V

    2012-05-01

    An Australian family was identified through a Public Health follow up on a Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) positive bloody diarrhoea case, with three of the four family members experiencing either symptomatic or asymptomatic STEC shedding. Bacterial isolates were submitted to stx sequence sub-typing, multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and binary typing. The analysis revealed that there were multiple strains of STEC being shed by the family members, with similar virulence gene profiles and the same serogroup but differing in their MLVA and MLST profiles. This study illustrates the potentially complicated nature of non-O157 STEC infections and the importance of molecular epidemiology in understanding disease clusters.

  3. Classification of non-O157 shiga toxin-producing escherichia coli(STEC) serotypes with hyperspectral microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains such as O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145 are recognized as serious outbreak to cause human illness due to their toxicity. A conventional microbiological method for cell counting is laborious and needs long time for the results. Since ...

  4. Detection of non-O157 STEC in ground beef using the GeneDisc real-time PCR system

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    Certain non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups have emerged as important public health threats. The development of methods for rapid and reliable detection of this heterogeneous group of pathogens has been challenging. A GeneDisc real-time PCR assay was evaluated for det...

  5. Comparison of Clinical and Epidemiological Features of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157 and Non-O157 Infections in British Columbia, 2009 to 2011

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    Xuetao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC are major foodborne agents that have the potential to cause severe enteric illnesses and large outbreaks worldwide. Several studies found non-O157 infections to be clinically milder than O157 STEC infections.

  6. Assessment of commercial chromogenic solid media for the detection of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelyas, Nathan; Poon, Alan; Patterson-Fortin, Laura; Johnson, Roger P; Lee, Winki; Chui, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has evolved significantly since the introduction of sorbitol-MacConkey agar. This study compares four chromogenic media (CHROMagar™ STEC, Rainbow® O157 agar, CHROMagar™ O157, and Colorex® O157) in their identification of non-O157 STEC. When 161 non-O157 STEC were directly inoculated onto each medium, detection rates on CHROMagar™ STEC, Rainbow® O157 agar, CHROMagar™ O157 and Colorex® O157 were 90%, 70%, 3.7% and 6.8%, respectively. Tellurite minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) correlated with growth on CHROMagar™ STEC as 20 of 22 isolates with poor or no growth had MICs ≤1μg/mL. Stool spiking experiments revealed that CHROMagar™ STEC had the highest recovery of the six most common non-O157 STEC, ranging from 30% (in mucoid stool) to 98% (in watery stool). When using clinical stool samples, CHROMagar™ STEC had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 84.6%, 87%, 13.9%, and 99.6%, respectively.

  7. Comparison of Six Chromogenic Agar Media for the Isolation of a Broad Variety of Non-O157 Shigatoxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Serogroups.

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    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Zutter, Lieven

    2015-06-17

    The isolation of non-O157 STEC from food samples has proved to be challenging. The selection of a suitable selective isolation agar remains problematic. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate six chromogenic agar media for the isolation of STEC: Tryptone Bile X-glucuronide agar (TBX), Rainbow® Agar O157 (RB), Rapid E. coli O157:H7 (RE), Modified MacConkey Agar (mMac), CHROMagarTM STEC (Chr ST) and chromIDTM EHEC (Chr ID). During this study, 45 E. coli strains were used, including 39 STEC strains belonging to 16 different O serogroups and 6 non-STEC E. coli. All E. coli strains were able to grow on TBX and RB, whereas one STEC strain was unable to grow on Chr ID and a number of other STEC strains did not grow on mMac, CHROMagar STEC and Rapid E. coli O157:H7. However, only the latter three agars were selective enough to completely inhibit the growth of the non-STEC E. coli. Our conclusion was that paired use of a more selective agar such as CHROMagar STEC together with a less selective agar like TBX or Chr ID might be the best solution for isolating non-O157 STEC from food.

  8. Numbers of coliforms, Escherichia coli, F-RNA phage, rotavirus, bovine enteric calicivirus and presence of non-O157 STEC on commercial vacuum packaged beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T H; Nattress, F M; Dilts, B; Olsen, D; Muehlhauser, V

    2014-09-01

    The numbers of coliforms, Escherichia coli, F-RNA coliphages, bovine enteric calicivirus (BEC) and rotavirus (RV) and presence of non-O157 shiga toxigenic E. coli (STEC) were determined on commercial vacuum packaged beef subprimals at the retail level from swabs obtained from the entire surfaces of 150 cuts that originated from federally and provincially registered plants. The prevalence and log mean numbers of E. coli were higher in provincially registered plants than in federally registered plants; 64% vs 20%, respectively, and -0.3 vs -1.22 log cfu/100 cm(2), respectively. In contrast, the prevalence and mean log numbers of F-RNA coliphages were lower for the provincially registered plants than for the federally registered plants; 31% vs 68% and -0.86 vs -0.13 log cfu/100 cm(2), respectively. One E. coli sample tested positive for stx2 and eae. F-RNA coliphages associated with human origin (GII/GIII) were detected in 12% and 30% of samples that originated from provincially and federally registered plants, respectively. RV RNA was detected in 4% of samples while BEC RNA was not detected. Although the infectivity of RV is unknown, the presence of viable F-RNA coliphages suggests that consumers could potentially be at risk when consuming undercooked meat that is contaminated with RV. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. VIABILIDADE DE Escherichia coli PRODUTORA DE TOXINA SHIGA (STEC NÃO-O157 EM QUEIJO TIPO MINAS FRESCAL. VIABILITY OF NON-O157 SHIGA TOXIN-PRODUCING Escherichia coli (STEC IN MINAS FRESCAL CHEESE

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    Tammy Priscila Chioda

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli, produtora de toxina Shiga (STEC, um patógeno emergente capaz de causar diarreia, colite hemorrágica e síndrome hemolítica urêmica em humanos, representa um grave problema de saúde pública em todo o mundo. O principal reservatório de STEC são os bovinos. STEC são transmitidas aos humanos, principalmente através de alimentos contaminados, destacando-se aqueles de origem bovina como carne, leite e seus derivados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a viabilidade de STEC não-O157 em queijo minas frescal preparado com leite artificialmente contaminado com diferentes cepas dessas bactérias. Os queijos foram mantidos a 4°C e analisados no 1º, 2º, 4º, 6º e 10º dias de estocagem. As cepas de STEC mantiveram-se viáveis em 100% (32/32 dos queijos mantidos sob refrigeração por até dez dias. Os resultados mostram que o queijo minas pode ser veículo de transmissão de STEC. Recomenda-se a adoção de métodos higiênicos e sanitários desde a ordenha até o processo de produção do queijo para reduzir a possibilidade de contaminação com STEC.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: PCR, queijo minas, segurança alimentar, STEC.

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC an emergent foodborne pathogen that cause diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome in humans, represents a public health problem all over the world. Cattle are the main source of STEC. STEC are transmitted to humans by contaminated food, mainly those of bovine origin as meat and dairy products. This study aimed evaluates the non-O157 STEC viability of artificially inoculated in the milk used for the Minas Frescal cheese’s production. The cheese was kept at 4°C and analyzed at 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th and 10th days after its production. 100% (32/32 of the cheese storad under refrigeration during 10 days had been the STEC strains viable. These results show that minas frescal cheese can transmit STEC. The adoption of good

  10. Hyperspectral imaging for detection of non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups on spread plates of mixed cultures

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    Yoon, Seung Chul; Windham, William R.; Ladely, Scott; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon; Narang, Neelam; Cray, William C.

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging for rapid presumptive-positive screening of six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) on spread plates of mixed cultures. Although the traditional culture method is still the "gold standard" for presumptive-positive pathogen screening, it is time-consuming, labor-intensive, not effective in testing large amount of food samples, and cannot completely prevent unwanted background microflora from growing together with target microorganisms on agar media. A previous study was performed using the data obtained from pure cultures individually inoculated on spot and/or spread plates in order to develop multivariate classification models differentiating each colony of the six non-O157 STEC serogroups and to optimize the models in terms of parameters. This study dealt with the validation of the trained and optimized models with a test set of new independent samples obtained from colonies on spread plates of mixed cultures. A new validation protocol appropriate to a hyperspectral imaging study for mixed cultures was developed. One imaging experiment with colonies obtained from two serial dilutions was performed. A total of six agar plates were prepared, where O45, O111 and O121 serogroups were inoculated into all six plates and each of O45, O103 and O145 serogroups was added into the mixture of the three common bacterial cultures. The number of colonies grown after 24-h incubation was 331 and the number of pixels associated with the grown colonies was 16,379. The best model found from this validation study was based on pre-processing with standard normal variate and detrending (SNVD), first derivative, spectral smoothing, and k-nearest neighbor classification (kNN, k=3) of scores in the principal component subspace spanned by 6 principal components. The independent testing results showed 95% overall

  11. Influence of primer sequences and DNA extraction method on detection of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in ground beef by real-time PCR targeting the eae, stx, and serogroup-specific genes

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    Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infections, particularly those caused by the “big six”/”top six” non-O157 serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) can result in severe illness and complications. Due to their significant public health impact and the notable prevalence of STEC ...

  12. Comparison of different sample preparation procedures for the detection and isolation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Non-O157 STECs from leafy greens and cilantro.

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    Kase, Julie A; Maounounen-Laasri, Anna; Son, Insook; Deer, Deanne M; Borenstein, Stacey; Prezioso, Samantha; Hammack, Thomas S

    2012-12-01

    The FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method for the detection/isolation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) involves enrichment of produce rinses, blended homogenates or stomached homogenates. However, the effectiveness of rinsing produce to remove attached bacteria is largely unknown. Moreover, PCR inhibitors can be released under physical treatment. The study objective was to determine the relative effectiveness of recovery methods for STEC contaminated produce. Spinach, lettuce, and cilantro were contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 or a non-O157 STEC, subjected to both the BAM method and a soak method, and tested by real-time PCR and cultural methods. For O157:H7 and non-O157:H7 STECs, the soak method was significantly more productive than leafy green rinses. Of 320 test portions, PCR of recovered colonies confirmed 148 were positive by rinsing and 271 were positive by soaking (an 83% increase in sensitivity). For recovery of O157:H7 from cilantro, of 60 test portions, positives were 38 by soaking, 41 by stomaching, and 28 by blending. Soaking and stomaching were significantly more productive than blending, although soaking was only arithmetically superior to stomaching. Based upon these results, it is recommended that a soak method replace the current BAM procedures. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Outbreak of Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Infection from Consumption of Beef Sausage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethelberg, S.; Smith, B.; Torpdahl, M.;

    2009-01-01

    We describe an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26: H11 infection in 20 patients (median age, 2 years). The source of the infection was an organic fermented beef sausage. The source was discovered by using credit card information to obtain and compare customer transaction records...

  14. Feces of feedlot cattle contain a diversity of bacteriophages that lyse non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

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    Wang, Jiaying; Niu, Yan D; Chen, Jinding; Anany, Hany; Ackermann, Hans-W; Johnson, Roger P; Ateba, Collins N; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterize bacteriophages that lyse non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from cattle feces. Of 37 non-O157 STEC-infecting phages isolated, those targeting O26 (AXO26A, AYO26A, AYO26B), O103 (AXO103A, AYO103A), O111 (AXO111A, AYO111A), O121 (AXO121A, AXO121B), and O145 (AYO145A, AYO145B) were further characterized. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the 11 isolates belonged to 3 families and 6 genera: the families Myoviridae (types rV5, T4, ViI, O1), Siphoviridae (type T5), and Podoviridae (type T7). Genome size of the phages as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis ranged from 38 to 177 kb. Excluding phages AXO26A, AYO103A, AYO145A, and AYO145B, all other phages were capable of lysing more than 1 clinically important strain from serogroups of O26, O91, O103, O111, O113, O121, and O128, but none exhibited infectivity across all serogroups. Moreover, phages AYO26A, AXO121A, and AXO121B were also able to lyse 4 common phage types of STEC O157:H7. Our findings show that a diversity of non-O157 STEC-infecting phages are harbored in bovine feces. Phages AYO26A, AYO26B, AXO103A, AXO111A, AYO111A, AXO121A, and AXO121B exhibited a broad host range against a number of serogroups of STEC and have potential for the biocontrol of STEC in the environment.

  15. Genetically marked strains of Shiga toxin-producing O157:H7 and non-O157 Escherichia coli: Tools for detection and modelling

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    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) are among the most important foodborne pathogens in the United States and worldwide. Nearly half of all STEC-induced diarrheal disease in the United States is caused by STEC O157:H7 while non-O157 STEC account for the remaining illnesses. Thus, the USDA Food Safe...

  16. Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in U. S. retail ground beef.

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    Liao, Yen-Te; Miller, Markus F; Loneragan, Guy H; Brooks, J Chance; Echeverry, Alejandro; Brashears, Mindy M

    2014-07-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O157:H7 and serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 are the leading cause of STEC-associated infections in humans in the United States. In the United States, these organisms are considered adulterants in raw nonintact beef products and in intact beef destined to be made into or used in nonintact raw beef products. The objective of this study was to provide an estimate of the burden of the six serogroups of non-O157 STEC in ground beef obtained from retail stores across the United States. A convenience sample of commercial ground beef products (n = 1,129) were purchased from retail stores in 24 states from October 2011 to May 2012. The samples had various lean/fat proportions, muscle group of origin (chuck, round, sirloin, or not specified), and packaging types. For each ground beef sample, 25 g was inoculated in 225 ml of modified tryptic soy broth, stomached for 1 min, and then incubated at 41°C for 18 ± 2 h. These enrichment cultures were then screened for stx, eae, and O group genes using a commercially available, closed-platform PCR-based method. The potential positive samples were subjected to immunomagnetic separation and plated on modified Rainbow agar. Morphologically typical colonies were subjected to latex agglutination and PCR determination of stx and eae genes. Nine (0.8%) of the ground beef samples were potentially positive for at least one STEC serogroup after PCR screening. The serogroups detected by PCR assay were O26 (four samples), O103 (four samples), O145 (three samples), O45 (two samples), and O121 (one sample). No STEC isolates belonging to these serogroups were recovered from the sample cultures. The current research provides updated surveillance data for non-O157 STEC isolates among commercial ground beef products and information regarding the potential sources of contamination from different parts of beef trims destined for ground beef production.

  17. Colonization of the meat extracellular matrix proteins by O157 and non-O157 enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

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    Chagnot, Caroline; Caccia, Nelly; Loukiadis, Estelle; Ganet, Sarah; Durand, Alexandra; Bertin, Yolande; Talon, Régine; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-10-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are anthropozoonotic agents that range third among food-borne pathogens respective to their incidence and dangerousness in the European Union. EHEC are Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) responsible for foodborne poisoning mainly incriminated to the consumption of contaminated beef meat. Among the hundreds of STEC serotypes identified, EHEC mainly belong to O157:H7 but non-O157 can represent 20 to 70% of EHEC infections per year. Seven of those serogroups are especially of high-risk for human health, i.e. O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O104. While meat can be contaminated all along the food processing chain, EHEC contamination essentially occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. Investigating bacterial colonization to the skeletal-muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, it appeared that environmental factors influenced specific and non-specific bacterial adhesion of O157 and non-O157 EHEC as well as biofilm formation. Importantly, mechanical treatment (i.e. shaking, centrifugation, pipetting and vortexing) inhibited and biased the results of bacterial adhesion assay. Besides stressing the importance of the protocol to investigate bacterial adhesion to ECM proteins, this study demonstrated that the colonization abilities to ECM proteins vary among EHEC serogroups and should ultimately be taken into consideration to evaluate the risk of contamination for different types of food matrices.

  18. Novel sequence types of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cattle.

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    Isiko, J; Khaitsa, M; Bergholz, T M

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolates from cattle. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) was used to identify and compare the sequence types (STs) of 43 non-O157 STEC cattle isolates using the EcMLST database curated by the STEC Center at Michigan State University. For the 43 isolates, 19 STs were identified and 10 of those STs were novel compared to those in EcMLST. For the 43 isolates, 19 different serotypes were identified. STEC O22:H8, O174:H28 and O8:H19 were most common, and STEC O8 isolates were the most diverse, with seven different STs for isolates with that O group. STEC strains with O types identified in this study have been isolated from cattle by other researchers, as well as from cases of human gastroenteritis. Of the 10 novel STs identified, six were found to be closely related to previously identified STs, indicating that populations of non-O157 STEC in cattle are similar to those from other sources, including human clinical cases. Significance and impact of the study: The foodborne pathogen Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a significant public health concern. One of the main reservoirs for STEC are cattle, which can directly or indirectly contribute to STEC in the food supply. The genetic subtype data presented here highlight the diversity of STEC that can be isolated from cattle. These results further our understanding of the ecology of STEC in the primary production environment, which is important for developing effective control measures to reduce this pathogen in the food supply.

  19. Isolation and characterization of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli from beef carcasses, cuts and trimmings of abattoirs in Argentina

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    Brusa, Victoria; Restovich, Viviana; Galli, Lucía; Teitelbaum, David; Signorini, Marcelo; Brasesco, Hebe; Londero, Alejandra; García, Diego; Padola, Nora Lía; Superno, Valeria; Sanz, Marcelo; Petroli, Sandra; Costa, Magdalena; Bruzzone, Mariana; Sucari, Adriana; Ferreghini, Marcela; Linares, Luciano; Suberbie, Germán; Rodríguez, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Several foods contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are associated with human diseases. Some countries have established microbiological criteria for non-O157 STEC, thus, the absence of serogroups O26, O45, O103, O104, O111, O121, and O145 in sprouts from the European Union or ground beef and beef trimmings from the United States is mandatory. While in Argentina screening for O26, O103, O111, O145 and O121 in ground beef, ready-to-eat food, sausages and vegetables is mandatory, other countries have zero-tolerance for all STEC in chilled beef. The aim of this study was to provide data on the prevalence of non-O157 STEC isolated from beef processed in eight Argentinean cattle slaughterhouses producing beef for export and local markets, and to know the non-O157 STEC profiles through strain characterization and genotypic analysis. Samples (n = 15,965) from 3,205 beef carcasses, 9,570 cuts and 3,190 trimmings collected between March and September 2014 were processed in pools of five samples each. Pools of samples (n = 3,193) from 641 carcasses, 1,914 cuts and 638 trimming were analyzed for non-O157 STEC isolation according to ISO/CEN 13136:2012. Of these, 37 pools of carcasses (5.8%), 111 pools of cuts (5.8%) and 45 pools of trimmings (7.0%) were positive for non-O157 STEC. STEC strains (n = 200) were isolated from 193 pools of samples. The most prevalent serotypes were O174:H21, O185:H7, O8:H19, O178:H19 and O130:H11, and the most prevalent genotypes were stx2c(vh-b) and stx2a/saa/ehxA. O103:H21 strain was eae-positive and one O178:H19 strain was aggR/aaiC-positive. The prevalence of non-O157 STEC in beef carcasses reported here was low. None of the non-O157 STEC strains isolated corresponded to the non-O157 STEC serotypes and virulence profiles isolated from human cases in Argentina in the same study period. The application of microbiological criteria for each foodstuff should be determined by risk analysis in order to have a stringent

  20. Evaluation of CHROMagar STEC and STEC O104 chromogenic agar media for detection of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli in stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouali, Malika; Ruckly, Corinne; Carle, Isabelle; Lejay-Collin, Monique; Weill, François-Xavier

    2013-03-01

    The performance of CHROMagar STEC and CHROMagar STEC O104 (CHROMagar Microbiology, Paris, France) media for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) was assessed with 329 stool specimens collected over 14 months from patients with suspected STEC infections (June 2011 to August 2012). The CHROMagar STEC medium, after an enrichment broth step, allowed the recovery of the STEC strain from 32 of the 39 (82.1%) Shiga toxin-positive stool specimens, whereas the standard procedure involving Drigalski agar allowed the recovery of only three additional STEC strains. The isolates that grew on CHROMagar STEC medium belonged to 15 serotypes, including the prevalent non-sorbitol-fermenting (NSF) O157:H7, O26:H11, and O104:H4 serotypes. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the CHROMagar STEC medium were between 89.1% and 91.4%, 83.7% and 86.7%, 40% and 51.3%, and 98% and 98.8%, respectively, depending on whether or not stx-negative eae-positive E. coli was considered atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) or STEC that had lost Shiga toxin genes during infection. In conclusion, the good performance of CHROMagar STEC agar medium, in particular, the high negative predictive value, and its capacity to identify NSF O157:H7 as well as common non-O157 STEC may be useful for clinical bacteriology, public health, and reference laboratories; it could be used in addition to a method targeting Shiga toxins (detection of stx genes by PCR, immunodetection of Shiga toxins in stool specimens, or Vero cell cytotoxicity assay) as an alternative to O157 culture medium. This combined approach should allow rapid visualization of both putative O157 and non-O157 STEC colonies for subsequent characterization, essential for real-time surveillance of STEC infections and investigations of outbreaks.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 recovered from feces of domestic farm animals in Northwestern Mexico

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    Antimicrobial resistance in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157 is a matter of increasing concern. Inappropriate antimicrobial use in human and animal therapy has been associated with an acquired resistance in enteric microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to de...

  2. Growth of Stressed Strains of Four Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Serogroups in Five Enrichment Broths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van Damme, Inge; De Zutter, Lieven

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate (i) the behavior of several strains of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O103, O111, and O145) exposed to different stress conditions and (ii) the growth dynamics of stressed and nonstressed non-O157 STEC cells in five enrichment media. STEC strains were exposed to acid, cold, and freeze stresses. Lethal and sublethal injuries were determined by plating in parallel on selective and nonselective agar media. Freeze stress (8 days, 20°C) caused the most lethal (95.3% ± 2.5%) injury, as well as the most sublethal (89.1% ± 8.8%) injury in the surviving population. Growth of stressed and nonstressed pure cultures of non-O157 STEC on modified tryptic soy broth, buffered peptone water (BPW), BPW with sodium pyruvate, Brila, and STEC enrichment broth (SEB) was determined using total viable counts. To compare growth capacities, growth after 7 and 24 h of enrichment was measured; lag phases and maximum growth rates were also calculated. In general, growth on BPW resulted in a short lag phase followed by a high maximum growth rate during the enrichment of all tested strains when using all three stress types. Furthermore, BPW ensured the highest STEC count after 7 h of growth. Supplementing the medium with sodium pyruvate did not improve the growth dynamics. The two selective media, Brila and SEB, were less efficient than BPW, but Brila's enrichment performance was remarkably better than that of SEB. This study shows that irrespective of the effect of background flora, BPW is still recommended for resuscitation of non-O157 STEC.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance profiles of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 and Non-O157 recovered from domestic farm animals in rural communities in Northwestern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca A. Amézquita-López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC O157 and non-O157 is a matter of increasing concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profiles of STEC O157 and non-O157 recovered from feces of domestic farm animals in the agricultural Culiacan Valley in Northwestern Mexico. Findings All of the examined STEC strains showed susceptibility to five antimicrobials, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. However, resistance to the four antimicrobials, ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin was commonly observed. Interestingly, non-susceptibility to cephalothin was predominant among the examined STEC strains, corresponding to 85 % (22/26 of the O157:H7 from cattle, sheep and chicken and 73 % (24/33 of the non-O157 strains from cattle and sheep. Statistical analyses revealed that resistance to ampicillin was significantly correlated to 38 % (10/26 of STEC O157:H7 strains from multiple animal sources. Another significant correlation was found between serotype, source, and antimicrobial resistance; all of the O20:H4 strains, recovered from sheep, were highly resistant to tetracycline. Multidrug resistance profiles were identified in 42 % (22/53 of the non-susceptible STEC strains with clinically-relevant serotypes O8:H9, O75:H8, O146:H21, and O157:H7. Conclusions STEC O157 and non-O157 strains, recovered from domestic farm animals in the Culiacan Valley, exhibited resistance to classes of antimicrobials commonly used in Mexico, such as aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, cephalosporins and penicillin but were susceptible to fluoroquinolones, quinolones, and sulfonamides. These findings provide fundamental information that would aid in the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in an important agricultural region in Northwestern Mexico.

  4. Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli Infections Associated with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Italy, 1988–2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioli, Alfredo; Minelli, Fabio; Gianviti, Alessandra; De Petris, Laura; Edefonti, Alberto; Montini, Giovanni; Ferretti, Alfonso; De Palo, Tommaso; Gaido, Maurizio; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2003-01-01

    The mean annual incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome in persons <15 years of age in Italy from 1988 to 2000 was 0.28 per 100,000 population. Laboratory investigations showed that Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection occurred in 73.1% of patients. STEC O157 was the most common serotype, but a considerable number of cases were from infections by non-O157 STEC. PMID:12533290

  5. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome, Italy, 1988-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Caprioli, Alfredo; Minelli, Fabio; Gianviti, Alessandra; De Petris, Laura; Edefonti, Alberto; Montini, Giovanni; Ferretti, Alfonso; De Palo, Tommaso; Gaido, Maurizio; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2003-01-01

    The mean annual incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome in persons STEC) infection occurred in 73.1% of patients. STEC O157 was the most common serotype, but a considerable number of cases were from infections by non-O157 STEC.

  6. Thermal tolerance of O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxigenic strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and potential pathogen surrogates, in frankfurter batter and ground beef of varying fat levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Akhila; Geier, Renae; Ingham, Steve C; Ingham, Barbara H

    2014-09-01

    The non-O157 Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups most commonly associated with illness are O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145. We compared the thermal tolerance (D55°C) of three or more strains of each of these six non-O157 STEC serogroups with five strains of O157:H7 STEC in 7% fat ground beef. D55°C was also determined for at least one heat-tolerant STEC strain per serogroup in 15 and 27% fat ground beef. D55°C of single-pathogen cocktails of O157 and non-O157 STEC, Salmonella, and potential pathogen surrogates, Pediococcus acidilactici and Staphylococcus carnosus, was determined in 7, 15, and 27% fat ground beef and in frankfurter batter. Samples (25 g) were heated for up to 120 min at 55°C, survivors were enumerated, and log CFU per gram was plotted versus time. There were significant differences in D55°C across all STEC strains heated in 7% fat ground beef (P < 0.05), but no non-O157 STEC strain had D55°C greater than the range observed for O157 STEC. D55°C was significantly different for strains within serogroups O45, O145, and O157 (P < 0.05). D55°C for non-O157 STEC strains in 15 and 27% fat ground beef were less than or equal to the range of D55°C for O157. D55°C for pathogen cocktails was not significantly different when measured in 7, 15, and 27% fat ground beef (P ≥ 0.05). D55°C of Salmonella in frankfurter batter was significantly less than for O157 and non-O157 STEC (P < 0.05). Thermal tolerance of pathogen cocktails in ground beef (7, 15, or 27% fat) and frankfurter batter was significantly less than for potential pathogen surrogates (P < 0.05). Results suggest that thermal processes in beef validated against E. coli O157:H7 have adequate lethality against non-O157 STEC, that thermal processes that target Salmonella destruction may not be adequate against STEC in some situations, and that the use of pathogen surrogates P. acidilactici and S. carnosus to validate thermal processing interventions in ground beef and

  7. Mathematical modeling and numerical analysis of the growth of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in spinach leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lihan

    2012-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the growth of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in spinach leaves and to develop kinetic models to describe the bacterial growth. Six serogroups of non-O157 STEC, including O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, were used in the growth studies conducted isothermally at 4, 8, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 °C. Both STEC and background microflora were enumerated to develop kinetic models. Growth of STEC in spinach leaves was observed at elevated temperatures (15-35 °C), but not at 4 and 8 °C. This study considered the dynamic interactions between the STEC cells and the background microflora. A modified Lotka-Volterra and logistic equation was used to simulate the bacterial growth. In combination with an unconstrained optimization procedure, the differential growth equations were solved numerically to evaluate the dynamic interactions between the STEC cells and the background microflora, and to determine the kinetic parameters by fitting each growth curve to the growth equations. A close agreement between the experimental growth curves and the numerical analysis results was obtained. The analytical results showed that the growth of STEC in spinach leaves was unhindered when the population was low, but the growth was suppressed by the background microflora as the STEC population approached the maximum population density. The effect of temperature on the growth of both STEC and background microflora was also evaluated. Secondary models, evaluating the effect of temperature on growth rates, were also developed. The estimated apparent minimum growth temperature for STEC was 11 °C in commercial spinach leaves. The methodology and results of this study can be used to examine the dynamic interactions and growth between different bacteria in foods, and to conduct risk assessments of STEC in spinach leaves. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Latex agglutination assays for detection and of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latex agglutination assays were developed for the top six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups utilizing polyclonal antibodies. Rabbit antisera were affinity purified through Protein A/G columns and the isolated immunoglobulins (IgG) were covalently immobilized onto pol...

  9. Evaluation of detection methods for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli from food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Bavo; Van Damme, Inge; Heyndrickx, Marc; Botteldoorn, Nadine; Elhadidy, Mohamed; Verstraete, Karen; Dierick, Katelijne; Denayer, Sarah; De Zutter, Lieven; De Reu, Koen

    2016-02-16

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) remains a major foodborne pathogen of concern across the globe. Rapid detection and isolation of this pathogen is of great importance for public health reasons. In this study the detection and isolation of four non-O157 STEC strains (O26, O103, O111, O145) from different artificially contaminated matrices, namely ground (minced) beef, cattle carcass swab, lettuce mix and sprouted soy beans, were evaluated. Low amounts of STEC were used (0.25-1.40 cfu/g) to spike the samples. All samples were enriched in parallel in Buffered Peptone Water (BPW) and Brila broth. After enrichment, detection was performed using real-time PCR (qPCR), and isolation using two chromogenic agar media, CHROMagar™ STEC and ChromID™ EHEC. Inoculation on the agar media was performed either directly after enrichment or after the use of an acid treatment procedure. Furthermore, the use of this procedure was also tested on naturally contaminated food products, using 150 stx-positive samples. Although the qPCR Cycle Threshold (Ct) values were lower after enrichment in Brila broth, no significant differences in recovery were observed between both enrichment broths. Both agar media were equally suitable for the isolation of STEC, although a significantly higher recovery was obtained when using both agar media in parallel. For samples with a Ct value above 25, an acid treatment step prior to isolation ensured a significant improvement in the recovery of STEC due to the reduction in background microbiota. This acid treatment procedure proved especially useful for the isolation of STEC from sprouted soy bean samples.

  10. Biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Non-O157 strains and their tolerance to sanitizers commonly used in the food processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Bono, James L; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Shackelford, Steven; Harhay, Dayna M

    2012-08-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are important foodborne pathogens. Among these, E. coli O157:H7 is the most frequently isolated STEC serotype responsible for foodborne diseases. However, the non-O157 serotypes have been associated with serious outbreaks and sporadic diseases as well. It has been shown that various STEC serotypes are capable of forming biofilms on different food or food contact surfaces that, when detached, may lead to cross-contamination. Bacterial cells at biofilm stage also are more tolerant to sanitizers compared with their planktonic counterparts, which makes STEC biofilms a serious food safety concern. In the present study, we evaluated the potency of biofilm formation by a variety of STEC strains from serotypes O157:H7, O26:H11, and O111:H8; we also compared biofilm tolerance with two types of common sanitizers, a quaternary ammonium chloride-based sanitizer and chlorine. Our results demonstrated that biofilm formation by various STEC serotypes on a polystyrene surface was highly strain-dependent, whereas the two non-O157 serotypes showed a higher potency of pellicle formation at air-liquid interfaces on a glass surface compared with serotype O157:H7. Significant reductions of viable biofilm cells were achieved with sanitizer treatments. STEC biofilm tolerance to sanitization was strain-dependent regardless of the serotypes. Curli expression appeared to play a critical role in STEC biofilm formation and tolerance to sanitizers. Our data indicated that multiple factors, including bacterial serotype and strain, surface materials, and other environmental conditions, could significantly affect STEC biofilm formation. The high potential for biofilm formation by various STEC serotypes, especially the strong potency of pellicle formation by the curli-positive non-O157 strains with high sanitization tolerance, might contribute to bacterial colonization on food contact surfaces, which may result in downstream product

  11. Genotypic analyses of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 recovered from feces of domestic animals on rural farms in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amézquita-López, Bianca A; Quiñones, Beatriz; Cooley, Michael B; León-Félix, Josefina; Castro-del Campo, Nohelia; Mandrell, Robert E; Jiménez, Maribel; Chaidez, Cristóbal

    2012-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are zoonotic enteric pathogens associated with human gastroenteritis worldwide. Cattle and small ruminants are important animal reservoirs of STEC. The present study investigated animal reservoirs for STEC in small rural farms in the Culiacan Valley, an important agricultural region located in Northwest Mexico. A total of 240 fecal samples from domestic animals were collected from five sampling sites in the Culiacan Valley and were subjected to an enrichment protocol followed by either direct plating or immunomagnetic separation before plating on selective media. Serotype O157:H7 isolates with the virulence genes stx2, eae, and ehxA were identified in 40% (26/65) of the recovered isolates from cattle, sheep and chicken feces. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis grouped most O157:H7 isolates into two clusters with 98.6% homology. The use of multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) differentiated isolates that were indistinguishable by PFGE. Analysis of the allelic diversity of MLVA loci suggested that the O157:H7 isolates from this region were highly related. In contrast to O157:H7 isolates, a greater genotypic diversity was observed in the non-O157 isolates, resulting in 23 PFGE types and 14 MLVA types. The relevant non-O157 serotypes O8:H19, O75:H8, O111:H8 and O146:H21 represented 35.4% (23/65) of the recovered isolates. In particular, 18.5% (12/65) of all the isolates were serotype O75:H8, which was the most variable serotype by both PFGE and MLVA. The non-O157 isolates were predominantly recovered from sheep and were identified to harbor either one or two stx genes. Most non-O157 isolates were ehxA-positive (86.5%, 32/37) but only 10.8% (4/37) harbored eae. These findings indicate that zoonotic STEC with genotypes associated with human illness are present in animals on small farms within rural communities in the Culiacan Valley and emphasize the need for the development of control

  12. Behavior of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on alfalfa sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Torres-Vitela, M Del Refugio; Villarruel-López, Angélica; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2013-08-01

    Data about the behavior of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (non-O157 STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) on seeds and alfalfa sprouts are not available. The behavior of STEC, EIEC, ETEC, and EPEC was determined during germination and sprouting of alfalfa seeds at 20 ± 2°C and 30 ± 2°C and on alfalfa sprouts at 3 ± 2°C. When alfalfa seeds were inoculated with STEC, EIEC, ETEC, or EPEC strains, all these diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) grew during germination and sprouting of seeds, reaching counts of approximately 5 and 6 log CFU/g after 1 day at 20 ± 2°C and 30 ± 2°C, respectively. However, when the sprouts were inoculated after 1 day of seed germination and stored at 20 ± 2°C or 30 ± 2°C, no growth was observed for any DEP during sprouting at 20 ± 2°C or 30 ± 2°C for 9 days. Refrigeration reduced significantly (P < 0.0.5) the number of viable DEPs on sprouts after 20 days in storage; nevertheless, these decreases have no practical significance for the safety of the sprouts.

  13. Acid Resistance and Molecular Characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Different Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Serogroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwang-Hee; Breidt, Frederick; Fratamico, Pina; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the acid resistance (AR) of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains belonging to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O104, O111, O121, and O145 with O157:H7 STEC isolated from various sources in 400 mM acetic acid solutions (AAS) at pH 3.2 and 30 °C for 25 min with or without glutamic acid. Furthermore, the molecular subgrouping of the STEC strains was analyzed with the repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) method using a DiversiLab(TM) system. Results for a total of 52 strains ranged from 0.31 to 5.45 log reduction CFU/mL in the absence of glutamic acid and 0.02 to 0.33 CFU/mL in the presence of glutamic acid except for B447 (O26:H11), B452 (O45:H2), and B466 (O104:H4) strains. Strains belonging to serogroups O111, O121, and O103 showed higher AR than serotype O157:H7 strains in the absence of glutamic acid. All STEC O157:H7 strains exhibited a comparable DNA pattern with more than 95% similarity in the rep-PCR results, as did the strains belonging to serogroups O111 and O121. Surprisingly, the DNA pattern of B458 (O103:H2) was similar to that of O157:H7 strains with 82% similarity, and strain B458 strain showed the highest AR to AAS among the O103 strains with 0.44 log reduction CFU/mL without glutamic acid. In conclusion, STEC serotypes isolated from different sources exhibited diverse AR and genetic subtyping patterns. Results indicated that some non-O157 STEC strains may have higher AR than STEC O157:H7 strains under specific acidic conditions, and the addition of glutamic acid provided enhanced protection against exposure to AAS.

  14. [Survival of VTEC O157 and non-O157 in water troughs and bovine feces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polifroni, Rosana; Etcheverría, Analía I; Arroyo, Guillermo H; Padola, Nora L

    2014-01-01

    Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) is the etiologic agent of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which typically affects children ranging in age from six months to five years old. Transmission is produced by consumption of contaminated food, by direct contact with animals or the environment and from person to person. In previous studies we determined that the environment of a dairy farm is a non-animal reservoir; thus, we proposed to study the survival of 4 VTEC isolates (O20:H19; O91:H21; O157:H7 and O178:H19) in sterile water troughs and bovine feces by viable bacteria count and detection of virulence genes by PCR. It was demonstrated that the survival of different VTEC isolates (O157 and non-O157) varied in terms of their own characteristics as well as of the environmental conditions where they were found. The main differences between isolates were their survival time and the maximal counts reached. The competitive and adaptive characteristics of some isolates increase the infection risk for people that are visiting or working on a farm, as well as the risk for reinfection of the animals and food contamination. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Disinfectant and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of the Big Six Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains from Food Animals and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ross C; Franz, Eelco; Bono, James L; Mandrell, Robert E; Fratamico, Pina M; Callaway, Todd R; Andrews, Kathleen; Poole, Toni L; Crippen, Tawni L; Sheffield, Cynthia L; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2016-08-01

    The disinfectant and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of 138 non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains (STECs) from food animals and humans were determined. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was moderate (39.1% of strains) in response to 15 antimicrobial agents. Animal strains had a lower AMR prevalence (35.6%) than did human strains (43.9%) but a higher prevalence of the resistance profile GEN-KAN-TET. A decreasing prevalence of AMR was found among animal strains from serogroups O45 > O145 > O121 > O111 > O26 > O103 and among human strains from serogroups O145 > O103 > O26 > O111 > O121 > O45. One animal strain from serogroups O121 and O145 and one human strain from serogroup O26 had extensive drug resistance. A high prevalence of AMR in animal O45 and O121 strains and no resistance or a low prevalence of resistance in human strains from these serogroups suggests a source other than food animals for human exposure to these strains. Among the 24 disinfectants evaluated, all strains were susceptible to triclosan. Animal strains had a higher prevalence of resistance to chlorhexidine than did human strains. Both animal and human strains had a similar low prevalence of low-level benzalkonium chloride resistance, and animal and human strains had similar susceptibility profiles for most other disinfectants. Benzyldimethylammonium chlorides and C10AC were the primary active components in disinfectants DC&R and P-128, respectively, against non-O157 STECs. A disinfectant FS512 MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml was more prevalent among animal O121 strains (61.5%) than among human O121 strains (25%), which may also suggest a source of human exposure to STEC O121 other than food animals. Bacterial inhibition was not dependent solely on pH but was correlated with the presence of dissociated organic acid species and some undissociated acids.

  16. Survival in acidic and alcoholic medium of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157:H7 isolated in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Marcelo E

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of Argentina having one of the highest frequencies of haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS, the incidence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 is low in comparison to rates registered in the US. Isolation of several non-O157 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains from cattle and foods suggests that E. coli O157:H7 is an uncommon serotype in Argentina. The present study was undertaken to compare the survival rates of selected non-O157 STEC strains under acidic and alcoholic stress conditions, using an E. coli O157:H7 strain as reference. Results Growth at 37°C of E. coli O26:H11, O88:H21, O91:H21, O111:H-, O113:H21, O116:H21, O117:H7, O157:H7, O171:H2 and OX3:H21, was found to occur at pH higher than 4.0. When the strains were challenged to acid tolerance at pH as low as 2.5, viability extended beyond 8 h, but none of the bacteria, except E. coli O91:H21, could survive longer than 24 h, the autochthonous E. coli O91:H21 being the more resistant serotype. No survival was found after 24 h in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with 12% ethanol, but all these serotypes were shown to be very resistant to 6% ethanol. E. coli O91:H21 showed the highest resistance among serotypes tested. Conclusions This information is relevant in food industry, which strongly relies on the acid or alcoholic conditions to inactivate pathogens. This study revealed that stress resistance of some STEC serotypes isolated in Argentina is higher than that for E. coli O157:H7.

  17. Comparison of eight different agars for the recovery of clinically relevant non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli from baby spinach, cilantro, alfalfa sprouts and raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Julie A; Maounounen-Laasri, Anna; Son, Insook; Lin, Andrew; Hammack, Thomas S

    2015-04-01

    The FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Chapter 4a recommends several agars for isolating non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC); not all have been thoroughly tested for recovering STECs from food. Using E. coli strains representing ten clinically relevant O serogroups (O26, O45, O91, O103, O104, O111, O113, O121, O128, O145) in artificially-contaminated fresh produce--bagged baby spinach, alfalfa sprouts, cilantro, and raw milk--we evaluated the performance of 8 different agars. Performance was highly dependent upon strain used and the presence of inhibitors, but not necessarily dependent on food matrix. Tellurite resistant-negative strains, O91:-, O103:H6, O104:H21, O113:H21, and O128, grew poorly on CHROMagar STEC, Rainbow agar O157, and a modified Rainbow O157 (mRB) agar. Although adding washed sheep's blood to CHROMagar STEC and mRB agars improved overall performance; however, this also reversed the inhibition of non-target bacteria provided by original formulations. Variable colony coloration made selecting colonies from Rainbow agar O157 and mRB agars difficult. Study results support a strategy using inclusive agars (e.g. L-EMB, SHIBAM) in combination with selective agars (R & F E. coli O157:H7, CHROMagar STEC) to allow for recovery of the most STECs while increasing the probability of recovering STEC in high bacterial count matrices. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Latex agglutination assays for detection of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Marjorie B; Shelver, Weilin L; Fratamico, Pina M; Fortis, Laurie; Tillman, Glenn; Narang, Neelam; Cray, William C; Esteban, Emilio; Debroy, Andchitrita

    2012-05-01

    Latex agglutination assays utilizing polyclonal antibodies were developed for the top six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups. Rabbit antisera were affinity purified through protein A/G columns, and the isolated immunoglobulins (IgGs) were covalently immobilized onto polystyrene latex particles. The resulting latex-IgG complex had a protein (IgG) load of 0.20 to 0.28 mg/ml in a 1% latex suspension. Optimum conditions for the agglutination assay consisted of utilizing 20 μm l of latex-IgG reagent containing 2.0 to 2.8 μm g IgG in a 0.5% latex suspension. Agglutination or flocculation was observed almost instantly after mixing the colonies with the latex-IgG, indicating STEC strains. More than 100 target and nontarget strains were tested in more than 3,000 test replicates. All target organisms produced positive results, but three antisera (anti-O26, anti-O103, and anti-O145) cross-reacted with some other STECs. The anti-O103 and anti-O145 latex reagents cross-reacted with O26 strains, and the anti-O26 cross-reacted with O103 strains. The latex-IgG reagents are stable for at least 1 year and are easy to prepare. These agglutination assays can be used for identification of presumptive non-O157 STEC colonies from agar media. The techniques used to prepare the latex reagents also can be utilized for testing other STEC serogroups, other E. coli serotypes, or other pathogens to ensure safe foods to consumers.

  19. Classification of shiga toxin-producing escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes with hyperspectral microscope imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-O157:H7 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains such as O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145 are recognized as serious outbreak to cause human illness due to their toxicity. Since a conventional microbiological method for cell counting is laborious and time-consuming process, optica...

  20. Mexican unpasteurised fresh cheeses are contaminated with Salmonella spp., non-O157 Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli and potential uropathogenic E. coli strains: A public health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Hernandez, Rosa; Contreras-Rodriguez, Araceli; Hernandez-Velez, Rosa; Perez-Martinez, Iza; Lopez-Merino, Ahide; Zaidi, Mussaret B; Estrada-Garcia, Teresa

    2016-11-21

    Fresh cheeses are a main garnish of Mexican food. Consumption of artisanal fresh cheeses is very common and most of them are made from unpasteurised cow milk. A total of 52 fresh unpasteurised cheeses of five different types were purchased from a variety of suppliers from Tabasco, Mexico. Using the most probable number method, 67% and 63% of samples were positive for faecal coliforms and E. coli, respectively; revealing their low microbiological quality. General hygienic conditions and practices of traditional cheese manufacturers were poor; most establishments had unclean cement floors, all lacked windows and doors screens, and none of the food-handlers wore aprons, surgical masks or bouffant caps. After analysing all E. coli isolates (121 strains) for the presence of 26 virulence genes, results showed that 9 (17%) samples were contaminated with diarrheagenic E. coli strains, 8 harboured non-O157 Shiga toxin producing E. coli (STEC), and one sample contained both STEC and diffusely adherent E. coli strains. All STEC strains carried the stx1 gene. Potential uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains were isolated from 15 (29%) samples; the most frequent gene combination was fimA-agn43. Two samples were contaminated with Salmonella. The results demonstrated that unpasteurised fresh cheeses produced in Tabasco are of poor microbiological quality and may frequently harbour foodborne pathogens. Food safety authorities in Mexico need to conduct more rigorous surveillance of fresh cheeses. Furthermore, simple and inexpensive measures as establishing programs emphasizing good hand milking practices and hygienic manufacturing procedures may have a major effect on improving the microbiological quality of these food items. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fate of non O157 Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli in composted cattle manure Eliminação de Escherichia coli Shigatoxigênica não-O157 em compostagem de esterco bovino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Gonçalves

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available To determine the fate of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC non-O 157 in composted manure from naturally colonized cattle, fresh manure was obtained from three cows carrying non-O157 STEC strains possessing the stx2 gene. Two composting systems were used: a 0.6m deep cave opened in the soil and an one meter high solid manure heap in a pyramidal architecture. Every day, for the 10 first days, and every five days for a month, one manure sample from three different points in both systems was collected and cultured to determine the presence of E. coli and the presence of the stx 2 gene in the cells. The temperature was verified at each sampling. STEC non-O157 E. coli cells survived for 8, 25 and 30 days at 42, 40 and 38ºC, respectively, in the deep cave and 4, 4 and 7 days at 65, 58 and 52ºC, respectively, in the heap, during the composting manure. Temperature and indigenous microorganisms appear to contribute to pathogen disappearance in the composting system. It is concluded that both composting systems were efficient to eliminate STEC cells. Land application of composted manure should minimize environmental risk associated with the dissemination of the pathogen.Determinou-se o tempo necessário para a eliminação de Escherichia coli Shigatoxigênica (STEC não-O157 em esterco bovino composto, obtido de fezes frescas de três vacas portadoras de cepas STEC não-O157 que apresentavam o gene stx 2. Foram utilizados dois sistemas de compostagem, o primeiro foi um buraco de 0,6m escavado no solo e o segundo um monte apresentando uma arquitetura piramidal com um metro de altura. Todos os dias, durante os primeiros 10 dias e a cada cinco dias durante um mês, uma amostra de três pontos diferentes dos dois sistemas de compostagem foram coletadas e semeadas para determinar a presença de E. coli e a presença do gene stx 2 nas células, sendo que em cada coleta a temperatura do sistema de compostagem foi determinada. Células de STEC não-O157

  2. Topological data analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157 survival in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 have been implicated in many foodborne illnesses caused by the consumption of contaminated fresh produce. However, data on their persistence in major fresh produce-growing soils are limited due to the complexity in datasets generated from different ...

  3. Emergence of Escherichia coli encoding Shiga toxin 2f in human Shiga toxin-producing E-coli (STEC) infections in the Netherlands, January 2008 to December 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesema, I.; van der Zwaluw, K.; Schuurman, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; Franz, E.; van Duynhoven, Y.; van Pelt, W.

    2014-01-01

    The Shiga toxins of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can be divided into Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) with several sub-variants. Variant Stx(2f) is one of the latest described, but has been rarely associated with symptomatic human infections. In the enhanced STEC survei

  4. Evaluation of lactic acid as an initial and secondary subprimal intervention for Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and a nonpathogenic E. coli surrogate for E. coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, C I; Geornaras, I; Woerner, D R; Nightingale, K K; Sofos, J N; Goodridge, L; Belk, K E

    2012-09-01

    Lactic acid can reduce microbial contamination on beef carcass surfaces when used as a food safety intervention, but effectiveness when applied to the surface of chilled beef subprimal sections is not well documented. Studies characterizing bacterial reduction on subprimals after lactic acid treatment would be useful for validations of hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) systems. The objective of this study was to validate initial use of lactic acid as a subprimal intervention during beef fabrication followed by a secondary application to vacuum-packaged product that was applied at industry operating parameters. Chilled beef subprimal sections (100 cm(2)) were either left uninoculated or were inoculated with 6 log CFU/cm(2) of a 5-strain mixture of Escherichia coli O157:H7, a 12-strain mixture of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), or a 5-strain mixture of nonpathogenic (biotype I) E. coli that are considered surrogates for E. coli O157:H7. Uninoculated and inoculated subprimal sections received only an initial or an initial and a second "rework" application of lactic acid in a custombuilt spray cabinet at 1 of 16 application parameters. After the initial spray, total inoculum counts were reduced from 6.0 log CFU/cm(2) to 3.6, 4.4, and 4.4 log CFU/cm(2) for the E. coli surrogates, E. coli O157:H7, and non-O157 STEC inoculation groups, respectively. After the second (rework) application, total inoculum counts were 2.6, 3.2, and 3.6 log CFU/cm(2) for the E. coli surrogates, E. coli O157:H7, and non-O157 STEC inoculation groups, respectively. Both the initial and secondary lactic acid treatments effectively reduced counts of pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains of E. coli and natural microflora on beef subprimals. These data will be useful to the meat industry as part of the HACCP validation process.

  5. Development of a Robust Method for Isolation of Shiga Toxin-Positive Escherichia coli (STEC) from Fecal, Plant, Soil and Water Samples from a Leafy Greens Production Region in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Michael B.; Jay-Russell, Michele; Atwill, Edward R.; Carychao, Diana; Nguyen, Kimberly; Quiñones, Beatriz; Patel, Ronak; Walker, Samarpita; Swimley, Michelle; Pierre-Jerome, Edith; Gordus, Andrew G.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    During a 2.5-year survey of 33 farms and ranches in a major leafy greens production region in California, 13,650 produce, soil, livestock, wildlife, and water samples were tested for Shiga toxin (stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Overall, 357 and 1,912 samples were positive for E. coli O157:H7 (2.6%) or non-O157 STEC (14.0%), respectively. Isolates differentiated by O-typing ELISA and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) resulted in 697 O157:H7 and 3,256 non-O157 STEC isolates saved for further analysis. Cattle (7.1%), feral swine (4.7%), sediment (4.4%), and water (3.3%) samples were positive for E. coli O157:H7; 7/32 birds, 2/145 coyotes, 3/88 samples from elk also were positive. Non-O157 STEC were at approximately 5-fold higher incidence compared to O157 STEC: cattle (37.9%), feral swine (21.4%), birds (2.4%), small mammals (3.5%), deer or elk (8.3%), water (14.0%), sediment (12.3%), produce (0.3%) and soil adjacent to produce (0.6%). stx1, stx2 and stx1/stx2 genes were detected in 63%, 74% and 35% of STEC isolates, respectively. Subtilase, intimin and hemolysin genes were present in 28%, 25% and 79% of non-O157 STEC, respectively; 23% were of the “Top 6″ O-types. The initial method was modified twice during the study revealing evidence of culture bias based on differences in virulence and O-antigen profiles. MLVA typing revealed a diverse collection of O157 and non-O157 STEC strains isolated from multiple locations and sources and O157 STEC strains matching outbreak strains. These results emphasize the importance of multiple approaches for isolation of non-O157 STEC, that livestock and wildlife are common sources of potentially virulent STEC, and evidence of STEC persistence and movement in a leafy greens production environment. PMID:23762414

  6. Topological data analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157 survival in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, Abasiofiok M; Ma, Jincai; Crowley, David E; Yang, Ching-Hong; Johnson, Alexis M; Petrossian, Tanya C; Lum, Pek Y

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 have been implicated in many foodborne illnesses caused by the consumption of contaminated fresh produce. However, data on their persistence in soils are limited due to the complexity in datasets generated from different environmental variables and bacterial taxa. There is a continuing need to distinguish the various environmental variables and different bacterial groups to understand the relationships among these factors and the pathogen survival. Using an approach called Topological Data Analysis (TDA); we reconstructed the relationship structure of E. coli O157 and non-O157 survival in 32 soils (16 organic and 16 conventionally managed soils) from California (CA) and Arizona (AZ) with a multi-resolution output. In our study, we took a community approach based on total soil microbiome to study community level survival and examining the network of the community as a whole and the relationship between its topology and biological processes. TDA produces a geometric representation of complex data sets. Network analysis showed that Shiga toxin negative strain E. coli O157:H7 4554 survived significantly longer in comparison to E. coli O157:H7 EDL 933, while the survival time of E. coli O157:NM was comparable to that of E. coli O157:H7 EDL 933 in all of the tested soils. Two non-O157 strains, E. coli O26:H11 and E. coli O103:H2 survived much longer than E. coli O91:H21 and the three strains of E. coli O157. We show that there are complex interactions between E. coli strain survival, microbial community structures, and soil parameters.

  7. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O22:H8 isolated from cattle reduces E. coli O157:H7 adherence in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorelli, L; Albanese, A; Vilte, D; Cantet, R; Bentancor, A; Zolezzi, G; Chinen, I; Ibarra, C; Rivas, M; Mercado, E C; Cataldi, A

    2017-09-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a group of bacteria responsible for food-associated diseases. Clinical features include a wide range of symptoms such as diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening condition. Our group has observed that animals naturally colonized with STEC strains of unknown serotype were not efficiently colonized with E. coli O157:H7 after experimental infection. In order to assess the basis of the interference, three STEC strains were isolated from STEC persistently-colonized healthy cattle from a dairy farm in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The three isolated strains are E. coli O22:H8 and carry the stx1 and stx2d genes. The activatable activity of Stx2d was demonstrated in vitro. The three strains carry the adhesins iha, ehaA and lpfO113. E. coli O22:H8 formed stronger biofilms in abiotic surface than E. coli O157:H7 (eae+, stx2+) and displayed a more adherent phenotype in vitro towards HeLa cells. Furthermore, when both serotypes were cultured together O22:H8 could reduce O157:H7 adherence in vitro. When calves were intragastrically pre-challenged with 10(8) CFU of a mixture of the three STEC strains and two days later challenged with the same dose of the strain E. coli O157:H7 438/99, the shedding of the pathogen was significantly reduced. These results suggest that E. coli O22:H8, a serotype rarely associated with human illness, might compete with O157:H7 at the bovine recto-anal junction, making non-O157 carrying-calves less susceptible to O157:H7 colonization and shedding of the bacteria to the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial resistance of STEC strains isolated from healthy cattle in 2011 and 2013 in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, A; Porrero, M C; DE LA Cruz, M L; Saez, J L; Barcena, C; Lopez, G; Gortazar, C; Dominguez, L; Alvarez, J

    2016-10-01

    Prevention of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) foodborne outbreaks is hampered by its complex epidemiology. We assessed the distribution of virulence genes (VGs), main serogroups/serotypes for public health [haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS)-related], antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns in a collection of STEC isolates obtained from cattle hide (n = 149) and faecal (n = 406) samples collected during a national survey conducted in Spain in 2011 and 2013. Isolates were cultured using McConkey and CT-SMAC agar after enrichment, and confirmed as STEC by PCR. STEC prevalence in hides (15·4%) was higher than in faeces (10·7%) and O157:H7 was more frequent in the former (2·7% vs. 0·99%). Non-O157 HUS-related serogroups were present albeit at low frequencies. The non-O157 isolates were more heterogeneous than O157:H7 in their VG patterns, with 25/64 presenting VGs from both STEC and enterotoxigenic pathotypes (hybrid isolates). Of the STEC isolates, 62·5% were resistant at least to one antimicrobial, and no differences in AMR between O157:H7 and non-O157 were detected. All isolates had different profiles by PFGE and did not form a cluster. Overall, our results demonstrated that STEC in the cattle reservoir is still a matter of concern for human health due to the presence of HUS-related serogroups, the occurrence of certain VGs, AMR and the additional risks that hybrid isolates may pose, and thus warrants further investigation.

  9. Development and validation of predictive models for growth of non-0157 shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and Salmonella spp. in ground beef, lettuce, and non fat dry milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial predictive models are food safety tools that can be used to evaluate potential risk of pathogen growth in foods to facilitate effective decision-making. Research is limited regarding growth characteristics of non-O157 Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC) in food and on Salmonella spp. in lettuc...

  10. Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 isolated from feces of domestic farm animals in Culiacan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial resistance in E. coli O157 and non-O157 strains is a matter of increasing concern, and the association with some virulence traits in the same bacteria remains unclear. Inappropriate antimicrobial use in human and animal therapy has been associated with selective pressure in enteric mi...

  11. Purification and characterization of lipopolysaccharides from six strains of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Loreen R; Stromberg, Zachary R; Banisadr, Afsheen; Graves, Steven W; Moxley, Rodney A; Mukundan, Harshini

    2015-09-01

    Certain Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are virulent human pathogens that are most often acquired through contaminated food. The United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service has declared several serogroups of STEC as adulterants in non-intact raw beef products. Hence, sensitive and specific tests for the detection of these STEC are a necessity for implementation in food safety programs. E. coli serogroups are identified by their respective O-antigen moiety on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) macromolecule. We propose that the development of O-antigen-specific immunological assays can facilitate simple and rapid discriminatory detection of STEC in beef. However, the resources (antigens and antibodies) required for such development are not readily available. To overcome this, we extracted and characterized LPS and O-antigen from six STEC strains. Using hot phenol extraction, we isolated the LPS component from each strain and purified it using a series of steps to eliminate proteins, nucleic acids, and lipid A antigens. Antigens and crude LPS extracts were characterized using gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and modified Western blotting with commercially available antibodies, thus assessing the serogroup specificity and sensitivity of available ligands as well. The results indicate that, while many commercially available antibodies bind LPS, their activities and specificities are highly variable, and often not as specific as those required for serogroup discrimination. This variability could be minimized by the production of antibodies specific for the O-antigen. Additionally, the antigens generated from this study provide a source of characterized LPS and O-antigen standards for six serogroups of STEC. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Urease genes in non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli : mostly silent but valuable markers for pathogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, A W; Lukas, R; Mellmann, A; Köck, R; Zhang, W; Mathys, W; Bielaszewska, M; Karch, H

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of ureC was investigated among 294 Escherichia coli isolates, comprising 72 strains from the E. coli standard reference collection (ECOR), 62 strains from the diarrhoeagenic E. coli (DEC) collection, and 160 clinical isolates of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). The ureC gene wa

  13. Urease genes in non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli : mostly silent but valuable markers for pathogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, A W; Lukas, R; Mellmann, A; Köck, R; Zhang, W; Mathys, W; Bielaszewska, M; Karch, H

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of ureC was investigated among 294 Escherichia coli isolates, comprising 72 strains from the E. coli standard reference collection (ECOR), 62 strains from the diarrhoeagenic E. coli (DEC) collection, and 160 clinical isolates of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). The ureC gene wa

  14. Variable tellurite resistance profiles of clinically-relevant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) influence their recovery from foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerangart, Stéphane; Douëllou, Thomas; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Beutin, Lothar; Sergentet-Thévenot, Delphine; Cournoyer, Benoit; Loukiadis, Estelle

    2016-10-01

    Tellurite (Tel)-amended selective media and resistance (Tel-R) are widely used for detecting Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from foodstuffs. Tel-R of 81 O157 and non-O157 STEC strains isolated from animal, food and human was thus investigated. Variations of STEC tellurite minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values have been observed and suggest a multifactorial and variable tellurite resistome between strains. Some clinically-relevant STEC were found highly susceptible and could not be recovered using a tellurite-based detection scheme. The ter operon was highly prevalent among highly Tel-R STEC but was not always detected among intermediately-resistant strains. Many STEC serogroup strains were found to harbor sublines showing a gradient of MIC values. These Tel-R sublines showed statistically significant log negative correlations with increasing tellurite concentration. Whatever the tellurite concentration, the highest number of resistant sublines was observed for STEC belonging to the O26 serogroup. Variations in the number of these Tel-R sublines could explain the poor recovery of some STEC serogroups on tellurite-amended media especially from food products with low levels of contamination. Comparison of tellurite MIC values and distribution of virulence-related genes showed Tel-R and virulence to be related.

  15. Changes in Gene Transcription Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment of Verotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Non-O157 Serotypes on Romaine Lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Gui-Ying; Tang, Joshua; Bach, Susan; Kostrzynska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Disease outbreaks of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) O157:H7 and non-O157 serotypes associated with leafy green vegetables are becoming a growing concern. A better understanding of the behavior of VTEC, particularly non-O157 serotypes, on lettuce under stress conditions is necessary for designing more effective control strategies. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be used as a sanitizer to reduce the microbial load in leafy green vegetables, particularly in fresh produce destined for the organic market. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that H2O2 treatment of contaminated lettuce affects in the same manner transcription of stress-associated and virulence genes in VTEC strains representing O157 and non-O157 serotypes. Six VTEC isolates representing serotypes O26:H11, O103:H2, O104:H4, O111:NM, O145:NM, and O157:H7 were included in this study. The results indicate that 50 mM H2O2 caused a population reduction of 2.4–2.8 log10 (compared to non-treated control samples) in all six VTEC strains present on romaine lettuce. Following the treatment, the transcription of genes related to oxidative stress (oxyR and sodA), general stress (uspA and rpoS), starvation (phoA), acid stress (gadA, gadB, and gadW), and virulence (stx1A, stx2A, and fliC) were dramatically downregulated in all six VTEC serotypes (P ≤ 0.05) compared to not treated control samples. Therefore, VTEC O157:H7 and non-O157 serotypes on lettuce showed similar survival rates and gene transcription profiles in response to 50 mM H2O2 treatment. Thus, the results derived from this study provide a basic understanding of the influence of H2O2 treatment on the survival and virulence of VTEC O157:H7 and non-O157 serotypes on lettuce.

  16. Occurrence of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in two commercial swine farms in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwu, Chinwe Juliana; Iweriebor, Benson Chuks; Obi, Larry Chikwelu; Okoh, Anthony Ifeanyi

    2016-02-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is one of the most significant causes of food-borne infections capable of causing serious health complications in humans. Even though ruminants are known to be the major reservoirs of STEC, other non-ruminant food producing animals may also harbour pathogenic E. coli strains. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of E. coli serogroups O26, O111, O121, O145, and O157 and their associated virulence genes (stx1, stx2, eae, and ehxA) in swine faecal samples obtained from the two major commercial farms located in the Nkonkobe Municipality, Eastern Cape, South Africa. The proportions of serogroups detected were O26; 35 (7%), O145; 14 (2.8%), and O157:H7; 43 (8.6%) of the total animals sampled. Out of the 500 animals sampled, 22 isolates of E. coli (1.4%) tested positive for the stx2 gene, and 7 of these isolates belonged to E. coli O26 serogroup, while the remaining 15 most likely belonged to serogroups untargeted in this study. Other virulence genes (stx1, eae, and ehxA) that we screened for were not detected. These findings reveal that pigs within the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa can harbour Shiga toxin-producing E. coli.

  17. Validation of the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli (STEC) Detection Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Matheny, Sharon; Swimley, Michelle; Tebbs, Robert; Burrell, Angelia; Flannery, Jonathan; Bastin, Benjamin; Bird, Patrick; Benzinger, M Joseph; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Salfinger, Yvonne; Brodsky, Michael; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-11-01

    The Applied Biosystems™ RapidFinder™ STEC Detection Workflow (Thermo Fisher Scientific) is a complete protocol for the rapid qualitative detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and the "Big 6" non-O157 Shiga-like toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serotypes (defined as serogroups: O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145). The RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow makes use of either the automated preparation of PCR-ready DNA using the Applied Biosystems PrepSEQ™ Nucleic Acid Extraction Kit in conjunction with the Applied Biosystems MagMAX™ Express 96-well magnetic particle processor or the Applied Biosystems PrepSEQ Rapid Spin kit for manual preparation of PCR-ready DNA. Two separate assays comprise the RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow, the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder STEC Screening Assay and the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder STEC Confirmation Assay. The RapidFinder STEC Screening Assay includes primers and probes to detect the presence of stx1 (Shiga toxin 1), stx2 (Shiga toxin 2), eae (intimin), and E. coli O157 gene targets. The RapidFinder STEC Confirmation Assay includes primers and probes for the "Big 6" non-O157 STEC and E. coli O157:H7. The use of these two assays in tandem allows a user to detect accurately the presence of the "Big 6" STECs and E. coli O157:H7. The performance of the RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow was evaluated in a method comparison study, in inclusivity and exclusivity studies, and in a robustness evaluation. The assays were compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) 5.09: Detection, Isolation and Identification of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Meat Products and Carcass and Environmental Sponges for raw ground beef (73% lean) and USDA/FSIS-MLG 5B.05: Detection, Isolation and Identification of Escherichia coli non-O157:H7 from Meat Products and Carcass and Environmental Sponges for raw beef trim. No statistically significant

  18. Quantitative risk assessment of haemolytic and uremic syndrome linked to O157:H7 and non-O157:H7 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli strains in raw milk soft cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Frédérique; Tenenhaus-Aziza, Fanny; Michel, Valérie; Miszczycha, Stéphane; Bel, Nadège; Sanaa, Moez

    2015-01-01

    Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains may cause human infections ranging from simple diarrhea to Haemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). The five main pathogenic serotypes of STEC (MPS-STEC) identified thus far in Europe are O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, O111:H8, and O145:H28. Because STEC strains can survive or grow during cheese making, particularly in soft cheeses, a stochastic quantitative microbial risk assessment model was developed to assess the risk of HUS associated with the five MPS-STEC in raw milk soft cheeses. A baseline scenario represents a theoretical worst-case scenario where no intervention was considered throughout the farm-to-fork continuum. The risk level assessed with this baseline scenario is the risk-based level. The impact of seven preharvest scenarios (vaccines, probiotic, milk farm sorting) on the risk-based level was expressed in terms of risk reduction. Impact of the preharvest intervention ranges from 76% to 98% of risk reduction with highest values predicted with scenarios combining a decrease of the number of cow shedding STEC and of the STEC concentration in feces. The impact of postharvest interventions on the risk-based level was also tested by applying five microbiological criteria (MC) at the end of ripening. The five MCs differ in terms of sample size, the number of samples that may yield a value larger than the microbiological limit, and the analysis methods. The risk reduction predicted varies from 25% to 96% by applying MCs without preharvest interventions and from 1% to 96% with combination of pre- and postharvest interventions.

  19. Growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli , and Salmonella in Water and Hydroponic Fertilizer Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Angela; Helterbran, Kara; Evans, Michael R; Currey, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    The desire for local, fresh produce year round is driving the growth of hydroponic growing systems in the United States. Many food crops, such as leafy greens and culinary herbs, grown within hydroponics systems have their root systems submerged in recirculating nutrient-dense fertilizer solutions from planting through harvest. If a foodborne pathogen were introduced into this water system, the risk of contamination to the entire crop would be high. Hence, this study was designed to determine whether Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli , and Salmonella were able to survive and reproduce in two common hydroponic fertilizer solutions and in water or whether the bacteria would be killed or suppressed by the fertilizer solutions. All the pathogens grew by 1 to 6 log CFU/ml over a 24-h period, depending on the solution. E. coli O157:H7 reached higher levels in the fertilizer solution with plants (3.12 log CFU/ml), whereas non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and Salmonella reached higher levels in the fertilizer solution without plants (1.36 to 3.77 log CFU/ml). The foodborne pathogens evaluated here survived for 24 h in the fertilizer solution, and populations grew more rapidly in these solutions than in plain water. Therefore, human pathogens entering the fertilizer solution tanks in hydroponic systems would be expected to rapidly propagate and spread throughout the system and potentially contaminate the entire crop.

  20. Evaluation of a novel antimicrobial solution and its potential for control E. coli O157:H7, non-O157:H7 shiga toxin-producing E. coli, Salmononella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes on beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel antimicrobial solution made with chitosan, lauric arginate ester, and organic acids on Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli cocktails and to test its potential to b...

  1. Effect of Citrus Byproducts on Survival of O157:H7 and Non-O157 Escherichia coli Serogroups within In Vitro Bovine Ruminal Microbial Fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Duoss-Jennings

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus byproducts (CBPs are utilized as a low cost nutritional supplement to the diets of cattle and have been suggested to inhibit the growth of both Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella. The objective of this study was to examine the effects in vitro that varying concentrations of CBP in the powdered or pelleted variety have on the survival of Shiga-toxin Escherichia coli (STEC serotypes O26:H11, O103:H8, O111:H8, O145:H28, and O157:H7 in bovine ruminal microorganism media. The O26:H11, O111:H8, O145:H28, and O157:H7 serotypes did not exhibit a change in populations in media supplemented with CBP with either variety. The O103:H8 serotype displayed a general trend for an approximate 1log10 reduction in 5% powdered CBP and 20% pelleted CBP over 6 h. There was a trend for reductions in populations of a variant form of O157:H7 mutated in the stx1 and stx2 genes in higher concentrations of CBP. These results suggest that variations exist in the survival of these serotypes of STEC within mixed ruminal microorganism fluid media when supplemented with CBP. Further research is needed to determine why CBPs affect STEC serotypes differently.

  2. Design and evaluation of two-stage multiplex real-time PCR method for detecting O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC strains from beef samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: E. coli O157:H7 was first recognized as a human pathogen in 1982 and until recently was the only E. coli strain mandated for testing by the USDA. In June 2012, the USDA declared six additional Shiga-toxin producing E. coli serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) as adulterant...

  3. Role of bacteriophages in STEC infections: new implications for the design of prophylactic and treatment approaches [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/437

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime H. Amorim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is considered the main virulence factor in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. Previously we reported the expression of biologically active Stx by eukaryotic cells in vitro and in vivo following transfection with plasmids encoding Stx under control of the native bacterial promoter1,2. Since stx genes are present in the genome of lysogenic bacteriophages, here we evaluated the relevance of bacteriophages during STEC infection. We used the non-pathogenic E. coli C600 strain carrying a lysogenic 933W mutant bacteriophage in which the stx operon was replaced by a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. Tracking GFP expression using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS, we detected fluorescence in liver, kidney, and intestine of mice infected with the recombinant E. coli strain after treatment with ciprofloxacin, which induces the lytic replication and release of bacteriophages. In addition, we showed that chitosan, a linear polysaccharide composed of d-glucosamine residues and with a number of commercial and biomedical uses, had strong anti-bacteriophage effects, as demonstrated at in vitro and in vivo conditions. These findings bring promising perspectives for the prevention and treatment of haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS cases.

  4. Risk of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter spp. in Food Animals and Their Products in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hussni O; Stipetic, Korana; Salem, Ahmed; McDonough, Patrick; Chang, Yung Fu; Sultan, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 E. coli, and Campylobacter spp. are among the top-ranked pathogens that threaten the safety of food supply systems around the world. The associated risks and predisposing factors were investigated in a dynamic animal population using a repeat-cross-sectional study design. Animal and environmental samples were collected from dairy and camel farms, chicken processing plants, and abattoirs and analyzed for the presence of these pathogens using a combination of bacterial enrichment and real-time PCR tests without culture confirmation. Data on putative risk factors were also collected and analyzed. E. coli O157:H7 was detected by PCR at higher levels in sheep and camel feces than in cattle feces (odds ratios [OR], 6.8 and 21.1, respectively). Although the genes indicating E. coli O157:H7 were detected at a relatively higher rate (4.3%) in fecal samples from dairy cattle, they were less common in milk and udder swabs from the same animals (1 and 2%, respectively). Among the food adulterants, E. coli O103 was more common in cattle fecal samples, whereas O26 was more common in sheep feces and O45 in camel feces compared with cattle (OR, 2.6 and 3.1, respectively). The occurrence of E. coli in the targeted populations differed by the type of sample and season of the year. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli were more common in sheep and camel feces than in cattle feces. Most of the survey and surveillance of E. coli focused on serogroup O157 as a potential foodborne hazard; however, based on the PCR results, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serotypes appeared to be more common, and efforts should be made to include them in food safety programs.

  5. Use of lactic acid with electron beam irradiation for control of Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 VTEC E. coli, and Salmonella serovars on fresh and frozen beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuliu; Kundu, Devapriya; Holley, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Lactic acid pre-treatment was examined to enhance the antimicrobial action of electron (e-) beam irradiation of beef trim. Meat samples were inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 VTEC E. coli or Salmonella cocktails and treated with 5% lactic acid at 55 °C. Samples were packaged aerobically or vacuum-packed, kept at 4 °C and treated with 1 kGy e-beam energy. Frozen samples were treated with 1, 3 or 7 kGy and stored at -20 °C for ≤ 5 d. Lactic acid enhanced the antimicrobial action of 1 kGy e-beam treatment against Salmonella by causing an additional E. coli viability by 4.5 log CFU/g, and while lactic acid did not improve the reduction, after freezing additive effects were found. After 3 kGy irradiation, Salmonella was reduced by 2 and 4 log CFU/g in the irradiated and lactic acid plus irradiated samples, respectively. Lactic acid pre-treatment was of limited value with 1 kGy treatment for improving control of toxigenic E. coli in fresh beef trim, however, it would be useful with low dose irradiation for controlling both VTEC E. coli and Salmonella in frozen product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of methods for the identification and sub-typing of O157 and non-O157 Escherichia coli serotypes and their integration into a polyphasic taxonomy approach

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    Prieto-Calvo M.A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic data from 12 strains of Escherichia coli were collected, including carbon source utilisation profiles, ribotypes, sequencing data of the 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed region (ITS and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic profiles. The objectives were to compare several identification systems for E. coli and to develop and test a polyphasic taxonomic approach using the four methodologies combined for the sub-typing of O157 and non-O157 E. coli. The nucleotide sequences of the 16S–23S rRNA ITS regions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, sequenced and compared with reference data available at the GenBank database using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST . Additional information comprising the utilisation of carbon sources, riboprint profiles and FT-IR spectra was also collected. The capacity of the methods for the identification and typing of E. coli to species and subspecies levels was evaluated. Data were transformed and integrated to present polyphasic hierarchical clusters and relationships. The study reports the use of an integrated scheme comprising phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic information (carbon source profile, sequencing of the 16S–23S rRNA ITS, ribotyping and FT-IR spectroscopy for a more precise characterisation and identification of E. coli. The results showed that identification of E. coli strains by each individual method was limited mainly by the extension and quality of reference databases. On the contrary, the polyphasic approach, whereby heterogeneous taxonomic data were combined and weighted, improved the identification results, gave more consistency to the final clustering and provided additional information on the taxonomic structure and phenotypic behaviour of strains, as shown by the close clustering of strains with similar stress resistance patterns.

  7. Comparative Genomics and Characterization of Hybrid Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Outi; Halkilahti, Jani; Wiklund, Gudrun; Okeke, Uche; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Background Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor. Methods The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied. Results The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, enteroaggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only. Conclusions This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can co-exist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which

  8. Comparative Genomics and Characterization of Hybrid Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC Strains.

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    Outi Nyholm

    Full Text Available Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor.The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied.The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, enteroaggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only.This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can co-exist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which challenges the

  9. Top-down proteomic identification of Shiga toxin 2 variants from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS/MS-PSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are increasingly linked to severe outbreaks of foodborne illness throughout the world, e.g. Germany and France in 2011. STEC infections can result in bloody diarrhea, hemolytic uremic syndrome, kidney failure and death. New analytical techniques are ne...

  10. Hybrids of Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) Among Human and Animal Isolates in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, O; Heinikainen, S; Pelkonen, S; Hallanvuo, S; Haukka, K; Siitonen, A

    2015-11-01

    Diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. Total of 450 Shigatoxigenic E. coli (STEC) strains isolated from humans, animals and environment in Finland were examined by multiplex PCR targeting the virulence genes of various DEC pathogroups simultaneously. One per cent (3/291) of the human STEC and 14% (22/159) of the animal and environmental STEC had genes typically present in enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). The strains possessed genes encoding both Shiga toxin 1 and/or 2 (stx1 and/or stx2 ) and ETEC-specific heat-stable (ST) enterotoxin Ia (estIa). The identified stx subtypes were stx1a, stx1c, stx2a, stx2d and stx2g. The three human STEC/ETEC strains were isolated from the patients with haemolytic uraemic syndrome and diarrhoea and from an asymptomatic carrier. The animal STEC/ETEC strains were isolated from cattle and moose. The human and animal STEC/ETEC strains belonged to 11 serotypes, of which O2:H27, O15:H16, O101:H-, O128:H8 and O141:H8 have previously been described to be associated with human disease. Identification of multiple virulence genes offers further information for assessing the virulence potential of STEC and other DEC. The emergence of novel hybrid pathogens should be taken into account in the patient care and epidemiological surveillance.

  11. Novel Compounds from Shark and Stingray Epidermal Mucus With Antimicrobial Activity Against Wound Infection Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    infection pathogens, bacterial symbionts, culturable bacterial isolates 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER...anthracis and B. cereus), Enterococcus sp, VRE, Listeria, Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA or MRSA), Yersinia pestis, Acinetobacter sp, Pseudomonas...Enterococcus sp, VRE, Listeria, Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA or MRSA), Yersinia pestis, Acinetobacter sp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. coli (O157-H7 and nonO157

  12. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 outbreak, The Netherlands, September-October 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduyn, Y; de Jager, C M; van der Zwaluw, W K; Friesema, I H M; Heuvelink, A E; de Boer, E; Wannet, W J B; van Duynhoven, Y T H P

    2006-07-01

    In September 2005, the first national food-related outbreak of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 was investigated in the Netherlands. A total of 21 laboratory-confirmed cases (including one secondary case), and another 11 probable cases (two primary and nine secondary cases) were reported in patients who became ill between 11 September and 10 October 2005. Preliminary investigation suggested consumption of a raw beef product, steak tartare (in the Netherlands also known as "filet americain"), and contact with other symptomatic persons as possible risk factors. A subsequent case-control study supported the hypothesis that steak tartare was the source of the outbreak (matched odds ratio (OR) 272, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3-23,211). Consumption of ready-to-eat vegetables was also associated with STEC O157 infection (matched OR 24, 95% CI 1.1-528), but was considered a less likely source, as only 40% of the cases were exposed. Samples of steak tartare collected from one chain of supermarkets where it is likely that most patients (67%) bought steak tartare, all tested negative for STEC O157. However, sampling was done three days after the date of symptom onset of the last reported case. Since 88% of the cases became ill within a two week period, point source contamination may explain these negative results. It is concluded that steak tartare was the most likely cause of the first national food-related outbreak of STEC O157 in the Netherlands.

  13. 75 FR 81613 - Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... this notice. Proposed Project FoodNet Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Study: Assessment of Risk Factors for Laboratory-Confirmed Infections and Characterization of Illnesses by Microbiological... (STEC) infections occur in the United States, ranging in severity from mild diarrhea, to hemorrhagic...

  14. Genotypes and phenotypes of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC in Abeokuta, Southwestern Nigeria

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    Olowe OA

    2014-10-01

    stx1 were in the 0–10-year-old age group, 3.5% of stx2 were aged ≥40 and above, and 1.0% of the hlyA isolates were in the 0–10-year-old age group. Conclusion: The prevalence of virulent STEC is a public health concern. The use of polymerase chain reaction assay should aid quick detection of this virulent serotype and help curb the severe epidemic of human diseases associated with STEC infections. Keywords: STEC, resistance, stx1, stx2, hlyA, Nigeria

  15. The long polar fimbriae of STEC O157:H7 induce expression of pro-inflammatory markers by intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, Mauricio J; Cantero, Lidia; Vergara, Alejandra; Vidal, Roberto; Torres, Alfredo G

    2013-03-15

    Infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 is characterized by acute inflammation of the colonic mucosa. STEC O157:H7 contains two non-identical loci encoding long polar fimbriae (Lpf), which play a role in the STEC colonization of the intestinal epithelial cells. However, no information is available regarding the involvement of Lpf in the STEC-induced host inflammatory response. Hence, in this study we assess the role of Lpf as an inducer of inflammation on intestinal epithelial cells. Secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to STEC wild type and lpf isogenic mutants was evaluated on intestinal T84 cells. Of the 27 cytokines assayed, IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, FGF, GM-CSF and IP-10 were significantly reduced, when compared to the wild-type strain, in the lpfA1 lpfA2 double mutant. Further, the host intracellular signaling pathways activated in response to Lpf were determined by using an array containing genes representative of 18 different signal transduction pathways. The analysis indicated that the NF-κB pathway is activated in response to Lpf-expressing STEC. Therefore, our study supports the role of Lpf as a STEC factor mediating intestinal inflammation.

  16. Revisiting the STEC testing approach: using espK and espV to make enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC detection more reliable in beef

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    Sabine eDelannoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current methods for screening Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157 and non-O157 in beef enrichments typically rely on the molecular detection of stx, eae, and serogroup-specific wzx or wzy gene fragments. As these genetic markers can also be found in some non-EHEC strains, a number of ‘false positive’ results are obtained. Here, we explore the suitability of five novel molecular markers, espK, espV, ureD, Z2098, and CRISPRO26:H11 as candidates for a more accurate screening of EHEC strains of greater clinical significance in industrialized countries. Of the 1,739 beef enrichments tested, 180 were positive for both stx and eae genes. Ninety (50% of these tested negative for espK, espV, ureD, and Z2098, but twelve out of these negative samples were positive for the CRISPRO26:H11 gene marker specific for a newly emerging virulent EHEC O26:H11 French clone. We show that screening for stx, eae, espK, and espV, in association with the CRISPRO26:H11 marker is a better approach to narrow down the EHEC screening step in beef enrichments. The number of potentially positive samples was reduced by 48.88% by means of this alternative strategy compared to the European and American reference methods, thus substantially improving the discriminatory power of EHEC screening systems. This approach is in line with the EFSA (European Food Safety Authority opinion on pathogenic STEC published in 2013.

  17. Use of probiotics to reduce faecal shedding of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigobelo, E E C; Karapetkov, N; Maestá, S A; Avila, F A; McIntosh, D

    2015-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are zoonotic, foodborne pathogens of humans. Ruminants, including sheep, are the primary reservoirs of STEC and there is a need to develop intervention strategies to reduce the entry of STEC into the food chain. The initiation of the majority of bacterial, enteric infections involves colonisation of the gut mucosal surface by the pathogen. However, probiotic bacteria can serve to decrease the severity of infection via a number of mechanisms including competition for receptors and nutrients, and/or the synthesis of organic acids and bacteriocins that create an environment unfavourable for pathogen development. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the administration of a probiotic mixture to sheep experimentally infected with a non-O157 STEC strain, carrying stx1, stx2 and eae genes, was able to decrease faecal shedding of the pathogen. The probiotic mixture contained Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecium. The numbers of non-O157 STEC in faecal samples collected from sheep receiving daily doses of the probiotic mixture were significantly lower at the 3rd, 5th and 6th week post-inoculation when compared to the levels recorded in untreated animals. It was concluded that administration of the probiotic mixture reduced faecal shedding of non-O157 STEC in sheep, and holds potential as a pre-harvest intervention method to reduce transmission to humans.

  18. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC: principal virulence factors and epidemiology Escherichia coli produtora de toxina shiga (STEC: principais fatores de virulência e dados epidemiológicos

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    Halha Ostrensky Saridakis

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli is an important food borne pathogen, mainly beef products, and is associated to mild and severe bloody diarrhea. In some individuals, STEC infection can progress to hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS, a sequela characterized by renal failure, and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP, with possible central nervous system involvement. Cattle, usually healthy, is the principal reservoir of STEC, although these strains have also been isolated from other domestic animals: sheep, goats, dogs, cats and pigs. The principal virulence feature, the production of Shiga toxins, is not enough to cause diseases, and other factors are considered important, as enterohemolysin and fimbrial and afimbrial adhesions production. Although human diseases associated to STEC have not been frequently reported in Brazil, their presence is frequent in cattle, as well as the correlation between serotypes found in these animals and human patients. Escherichia coli produtora de toxina Shiga (STEC é um importante patógeno veiculado por alimentos, principalmente produtos derivados de carne bovina e está associado a quadros de diarréias leves a severas e sanguinolentas. Em alguns indivíduos, a infecção por STEC pode progredir para a síndrome hemolítico-urêmica (HUS, seqüela caracterizada pela falência renal e a púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica (TTP, com possível envolvimento do sistema nervoso central. O gado bovino, geralmente saudável, é o principal reservatório de STEC, embora estas cepas também tenham sido isoladas de outros animais domésticos: ovelhas, cabras, cães, gatos e suínos. A principal característica de virulência, a produção de toxinas Shiga, não é suficiente para causar doenças e outros fatores são considerados relevantes, como a produção de enterohemolisina e de adesinas fimbriais e afimbriais. Embora as doenças humanas associadas a STEC sejam pouco descritas no Brasil, podemos observar

  19. [Epidemiological role of pets in urban transmission cycle of STEC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentancor, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important constitutional element of both animal's and men's microbiote. Rumiants in general and bovine in particular have been pointed out as reservoirs of shigatoxigenic (STEC) and enterohemorragic strains (EHEC). These strains are rarely reported in pets isolations and are badly documented. Revisions of the pathogenic role of E. coli in small animals, particulary based on intestinal and urogenital isolations, involve in a very low proportion the STEC strains. In dogs, ocasional isolations are reported, from feces coming from both healthy and diarreic dogs. The STEC intestinal strains prevalence in dogs and cats from urban centers, based on the habit of including regular or ocasional raw meat in their diet, should not be understimated.

  20. Detection, Characterization, and Typing of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Brendon D; Zelyas, Nathan; Berenger, Byron M; Chui, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are responsible for gastrointestinal diseases reported in numerous outbreaks around the world. Given the public health importance of STEC, effective detection, characterization and typing is critical to any medical laboratory system. While non-O157 serotypes account for the majority of STEC infections, frontline microbiology laboratories may only screen for STEC using O157-specific agar-based methods. As a result, non-O157 STEC infections are significantly under-reported. This review discusses recent advances on the detection, characterization and typing of STEC with emphasis on work performed at the Alberta Provincial Laboratory for Public Health (ProvLab). Candidates for the detection of all STEC serotypes include chromogenic agars, enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Culture methods allow further characterization of isolates, whereas qPCR provides the greatest sensitivity and specificity, followed by EIA. The virulence gene profiles using PCR arrays and stx gene subtypes can subsequently be determined. Different non-O157 serotypes exhibit markedly different virulence gene profiles and a greater prevalence of stx1 than stx2 subtypes compared to O157:H7 isolates. Finally, recent innovations in whole genome sequencing (WGS) have allowed it to emerge as a candidate for the characterization and typing of STEC in diagnostic surveillance isolates. Methods of whole genome analysis such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and k-mer analysis are concordant with epidemiological data and standard typing methods, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis while offering additional strain differentiation. Together these findings highlight improved strategies for STEC detection using currently available systems and the development of novel approaches for future surveillance.

  1. The epidemiology, microbiology and clinical impact of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in England, 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, L; Jenkins, C; Launders, N; Elson, R; Adak, G K

    2015-12-01

    Between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2012 in England, a total of 3717 cases were reported with evidence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection, and the crude incidence of STEC infection was 1·80/100 000 person-years. Incidence was highest in children aged 1-4 years (7·63/100 000 person-years). Females had a higher incidence of STEC than males [rate ratio (RR) 1·24, P < 0·001], and white ethnic groups had a higher incidence than non-white ethnic groups (RR 1·43, P < 0·001). Progression to haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) was more frequent in females and children. Non-O157 STEC strains were associated with higher hospitalization and HUS rates than O157 STEC strains. In STEC O157 cases, phage type (PT) 21/28, predominantly indigenously acquired, was also associated with more severe disease than other PTs, as were strains encoding stx2 genes. Incidence of STEC was over four times higher in people residing in rural areas than urban areas (RR 4·39, P < 0·001). Exposure to livestock and/or their faeces was reported twice as often in cases living in rural areas than urban areas (P < 0·001). Environmental/animal contact remains an important risk factor for STEC transmission and is a significant driver in the burden of sporadic STEC infection. The most commonly detected STEC serogroup in England was O157. However, a bias in testing methods results in an unquantifiable under-ascertainment of non-O157 STEC infections. Implementation of PCR-based diagnostic methods designed to detect all STEC, to address this diagnostic deficit, is therefore important.

  2. Evaluation of beef trim sampling methods for detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major concern in ground beef. Several methods for sampling beef trim prior to grinding are currently used in the beef industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the sampling methods for detecting STEC in beef ...

  3. Captive wild birds as reservoirs of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Lilian Aparecida; Gomes, Marcelo da Silva; Teixeira, Rodrigo Hidalgo Friciello; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Xavier de; Vieira, Mônica Aparecida Midolli; Gomes, Tânia Aparecida Tardelli; Knobl, Terezinha

    2017-06-02

    Psittacine birds have been identified as reservoirs of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, a subset of pathogens associated with mortality of children in tropical countries. The role of other orders of birds as source of infection is unclear. The aim of this study was to perform the molecular diagnosis of infection with diarrheagenic E. coli in 10 different orders of captive wild birds in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Fecal samples were analyzed from 516 birds belonging to 10 orders: Accipitriformes, Anseriformes, Columbiformes, Falconiformes, Galliformes, Passeriformes, Pelecaniformes, Piciformes, Psittaciformes and Strigiformes. After isolation, 401 E. coli strains were subjected to multiplex PCR system with amplification of genes eae and bfp (EPEC), stx1 and stx2 for STEC. The results of these tests revealed 23/401 (5.74%) positive strains for eae gene, 16/401 positive strains for the bfp gene (3.99%) and 3/401 positive for stx2 gene (0.75%) distributed among the orders of Psittaciformes, Strigiformes and Columbiformes. None of strains were positive for stx1 gene. These data reveal the infection by STEC, typical and atypical EPEC in captive birds. The frequency of these pathotypes is low and restricted to few orders, but the data suggest the potential public health risk that these birds represent as reservoirs of diarrheagenic E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Biotinylation of environmentally isolated Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) – specific bacteriophages for biosensor and biocontrol applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like common bacteriophages, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteriophages are viruses that recognize and bind to specific bacterial host (STEC) for propagation. They co-exist with STEC hosts, which cause epidemic food and waterborne illnesses, but may act as host populations limiting ...

  5. Intestinal Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli bacteria mitigate bovine leukemia virus infection in experimentally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferens, Witold A; Cobbold, Rowland; Hovde, Carolyn J

    2006-05-01

    Ruminants often carry gastrointestinal Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Stxs belong to a large family of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), found in many plants and some bacteria. Plant RIPs, secreted into extracellular spaces, limit the spread of viruses through plant tissues by penetrating and killing virally infected cells. Previously, we showed Stx activity against bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cells in vitro and hypothesized that STEC bacteria have antiviral activity in ruminant hosts. Here, we investigated the impact of STEC on the initial phases of BLV infection in sheep. Sheep were treated with biweekly oral doses of E. coli O157:H7 (an STEC) or an isogenic stx mutant strain. A different group of sheep were similarly treated with five naturally occurring ovine STEC isolates or stx-negative E. coli. Intestinal STEC bacteria were enumerated and identified by standard fecal culture and DNA hybridization. Oral STEC treatment did not always result in carriage of STEC, although many animals consistently presented with >10(4) CFU/g feces. BLV viremia was assessed by spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation (SLP) in cultures of blood mononuclear cells and by syncytium formation in cocultures of the same with F-81 indicator cells. SLP was lower (P < 0.05) and syncytia were fewer (P < 0.05) in STEC-treated sheep than in untreated sheep. Both lower SLP and fewer syncytia positively correlated with fecal STEC numbers. Average weight gain post-BLV challenge was higher in STEC-treated sheep than in untreated sheep (P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that in ruminants, intestinal STEC bacteria have antiviral activity and mitigate BLV-induced disease.

  6. Evaluation of the performance of the IQ-Check kits and the USDA Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook methods for detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and STEC and Salmonella simultaneously in ground beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranzoni, G M; Fratamico, P M; Boccia, F; Bagi, L K; Kim, G-H; Anastasio, A; Pepe, T

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the performance of the IQ-Check kits and the USDA Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) methods for detection of the top seven Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) (O157:H7, O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145) in ground beef and both STEC and Salmonella in co-inoculated samples. Ground beef samples inoculated with ~10 CFU of STEC or both STEC and Salmonella Typhimurium were stored at 4°C for 72 h, followed by screening with the IQ-Check and BAX System kit (MLG) methods that employ different enrichment media. STEC and S. Typhimurium were detected after 12 and 18 h and their presence was confirmed by colony isolation. Both methods were able to detect STEC in ground beef after 12 h of enrichment in samples inoculated with low levels of the pathogen. STEC and S. Typhimurium can be detected and isolated in co-inoculated ground beef samples. The IQ-Check methods are comparable to the MLG methods for detection of STEC and simultaneous detection of STEC and S. Typhimurium in seeded ground beef after a short enrichment time, thus the IQ-Check method can be useful for the food industry for rapid detection of these pathogens. Published 2016. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Ionospheric tomography by gradient-enhanced kriging with STEC measurements and ionosonde characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkwitz, David; van den Boogaart, Karl Gerald; Gerzen, Tatjana; Hoque, Mainul; Hernández-Pajares, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The estimation of the ionospheric electron density by kriging is based on the optimization of a parametric measurement covariance model. First, the extension of kriging with slant total electron content (STEC) measurements based on a spatial covariance to kriging with a spatial-temporal covariance model, assimilating STEC data of a sliding window, is presented. Secondly, a novel tomography approach by gradient-enhanced kriging (GEK) is developed. Beyond the ingestion of STEC measurements, GEK assimilates ionosonde characteristics, providing peak electron density measurements as well as gradient information. Both approaches deploy the 3-D electron density model NeQuick as a priori information and estimate the covariance parameter vector within a maximum likelihood estimation for the dedicated tomography time stamp. The methods are validated in the European region for two periods covering quiet and active ionospheric conditions. The kriging with spatial and spatial-temporal covariance model is analysed regarding its capability to reproduce STEC, differential STEC and foF2. Therefore, the estimates are compared to the NeQuick model results, the 2-D TEC maps of the International GNSS Service and the DLR's Ionospheric Monitoring and Prediction Center, and in the case of foF2 to two independent ionosonde stations. Moreover, simulated STEC and ionosonde measurements are used to investigate the electron density profiles estimated by the GEK in comparison to a kriging with STEC only. The results indicate a crucial improvement in the initial guess by the developed methods and point out the potential compensation for a bias in the peak height hmF2 by means of GEK.

  8. Antibiotic resistance and integrons in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colello, Rocío; Etcheverría, Analía I; Di Conza, Jose A; Gutkind, Gabriel O; Padola, Nora L

    2015-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans (HUS). Cattle are the main reservoir of STEC and transmission to humans occurs through contaminated food and water. Antibiotics are used in pig production systems to combat disease and improve productivity and play a key role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes to the bacteria. Integrons have been identified in resistant bacteria allowing for the acquisition and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. STEC strains isolated from humans and animals have developed antibiotic resistance. In our laboratory, 21 non-157 STEC strains isolated from pigs were analyzed to detect class 1 and 2 integrons by PCR. Eight carried integrons, 7 of them harbored intl2. In another study 545 STEC strains were also analyzed for the presence of intl1 and intl2 . Strains carrying intl1 belonged to isolates from environment (n = 1), chicken hamburger (n = 2), dairy calves (n = 4) and pigs (n = 8). Two strains isolated from pigs harbored intl2 and only one intl1 / intl2 , highlighting the presence of intl2 in pigs. The selection for multiresistant strains may contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens and facilitate the spreading of the mobile resistance elements to other bacteria.

  9. Antibiotic resistance and integrons in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Colello

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans (HUS. Cattle are the main reservoir of STEC and transmission to humans occurs through contaminated food and water. Antibiotics are used in pig production systems to combat disease and improve productivity and play a key role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes to the bacteria. Integrons have been identified in resistant bacteria allowing for the acquisition and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. STEC strains isolated from humans and animals have developed antibiotic resistance. In our laboratory, 21 non-157 STEC strains isolated from pigs were analyzed to detect class 1 and 2 integrons by PCR. Eight carried integrons, 7 of them harbored intl2. In another study 545 STEC strains were also analyzed for the presence of intl1 and intl2. Strains carrying intl1 belonged to isolates from environment (n = 1, chicken hamburger (n = 2, dairy calves (n = 4 and pigs (n = 8. Two strains isolated from pigs harbored intl2 and only one intl1/intl2, highlighting the presence of intl2 in pigs. The selection for multiresistant strains may contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens and facilitate the spreading of the mobile resistance elements to other bacteria.

  10. Antibiotic resistance and integrons in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colello, Rocío; Etcheverría, Analía I.; Conza, Jose A. Di; Gutkind, Gabriel O.; Padola, Nora L.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans (HUS). Cattle are the main reservoir of STEC and transmission to humans occurs through contaminated food and water. Antibiotics are used in pig production systems to combat disease and improve productivity and play a key role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes to the bacteria. Integrons have been identified in resistant bacteria allowing for the acquisition and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. STEC strains isolated from humans and animals have developed antibiotic resistance. In our laboratory, 21 non-157 STEC strains isolated from pigs were analyzed to detect class 1 and 2 integrons by PCR. Eight carried integrons, 7 of them harbored intl2. In another study 545 STEC strains were also analyzed for the presence of intl1 and intl2 . Strains carrying intl1 belonged to isolates from environment (n = 1), chicken hamburger (n = 2), dairy calves (n = 4) and pigs (n = 8). Two strains isolated from pigs harbored intl2 and only one intl1 / intl2 , highlighting the presence of intl2 in pigs. The selection for multiresistant strains may contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens and facilitate the spreading of the mobile resistance elements to other bacteria. PMID:26221083

  11. Evaluation of the performance of the IQ-check kits and the USDA microbiology laboratory guidebook methods for detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli (STEC) and STEC and Salmonella simultaneously in ground beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To evaluate the performance of the IQ-Check kits and the USDA Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) methods for detection of the top 7 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) (O157:H7, O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) in ground beef and both STEC and Salmonella in co-inoculated samples. M...

  12. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from Humans in the Netherlands : Novel diagnostic approach, molecular characterization and phylogenetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdous, Mithila

    2017-01-01

    The shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacterium poses a serious public health risk as it can cause life threatening condition hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome besides diarrhea. STEC is associated with several food related outbreaks worldwide, including the famous one in

  13. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages as potential agents against Shiga toxin – producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga – toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a significant group of foodborne pathogens that can cause mild diarrhea to serious human illnesses. The gastrointestinal tracts of cattle and other ruminants are the primary reservoirs of STEC strains and may co-harbor bacteriophages as part of its ...

  14. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from Humans in the Netherlands : Novel diagnostic approach, molecular characterization and phylogenetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdous, Mithila

    2017-01-01

    The shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacterium poses a serious public health risk as it can cause life threatening condition hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome besides diarrhea. STEC is associated with several food related outbreaks worldwide, including the famous one in

  15. Contaminación de carne molida con cepas de Escherichia coli shigatoxigénico (STEC provenientes de comercios minoristas de San Martín, Buenos Aires, categorizados según nivel socioeconómico Contamination of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC in fresh ground beef from butcher shops in San Martin, Buenos Aires Province, among different socioeconomic strata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Miccio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli shigatoxigénico (STEC produce enfermedades de transmisión alimentaria, desde diarreas leves a Síndrome Urémico Hemolítico, enfermedad de impacto en Argentina. Dentro de los alimentos implicados se destaca la carne bovina insuficientemente cocida. La contaminación de la carne molida y su relación con los estratos socioeconómicos no ha sido estudiada. El objetivo de este trabajo fue identificar en muestras de carne cepas STEC y establecer su perfil de virulencia, considerando la zona socioeconómica de procedencia y la persistencia de la contaminación en el local de venta. Se seleccionó el 30% de las bocas de expendio habilitadas en cada nivel socioeconómico. Se analizaron 72 muestras provenientes de 36 carnicerías de San Martín, Buenos Aires, en dos muestreos independientes utilizando PCR múltiple para stx1/stx2 e inmunocaptura para O157 al tamizaje. Se obtuvieron 11 cepas de 26 muestras sospechosas, 7% de los aislamientos fueron STEC O157. La proporción en la contaminación ponderada fue mayor en las zonas media y baja. No se comprobó persistencia. El grado de contaminación por STEC en carne para el área estudiada fue elevado y las cepas aisladas fueron altamente virulentas. En consideración a ello es necesario implementar programas de capacitación y control para reducir los riesgos para la salud pública.Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC causes foodborne diseases, from mild diarrhea to hemolytic uremic syndrome which impact in Argentina. Many human infections were acquired from eating undercooked contaminated beef. The contamination of ground beef and their relation to socio-economic strata has not been studied. The aim of this study was to identify STEC in meat samples and establish virulence profile, considering the socio-economic area of origin and persistence of contamination in local sales. It was selected 30% of the butcher shop of each socioeconomic level. It was analyzed 72 samples from 36

  16. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 outbreak, The Netherlands, September - October 2005.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduyn, Y; Jager, C M de; Zwaluw, W K; Friesema, Ihm; Heuvelink, Ae; Boer, E de; Wannet, W J B; Duynhoven, Y T H P van

    2006-01-01

    In September 2005, the first national food-related outbreak of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 was investigated in the Netherlands. A total of 21 laboratory-confirmed cases (including one secondary case), and another 11 probable cases (two primary and nine secondary cases) w

  17. Rapid detection of E. coli produced shiga-like toxins by lateral flow immunoassay in multiple food matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxigenic E. coli (STEC) produce shiga-like toxins (Stx) that can cause human disease and death. The STEC serotype O157:H7 is a well-recognized foodborne contaminant and effective detection methods have been established. However, the emergence of non-O157 STEC strains has necessitated the deve...

  18. Antibiotic therapy in Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli infection and colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knobloch, Johannes K.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The post diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is a major complication of enteric infections with Shiga toxin producing (STEC. According to the present recommendations, antibiotic therapy of acute bloody diarrhea caused by STEC is generally discouraged. These recommendations are based on historically conflicting results describing the potential induction of HUS by antibiotic treatment during the early phase of infection with enterohemorrhagic O157 whereas no guidelines are available for the use of antibiotics in cases of already fully established HUS or in asymptomatic long term STEC carriers. In 2011, a large outbreak of hemorrhagic colitis complicated by HUS occurred in northern Germany caused by a STEC strain of serotype O104:H4 harbouring both a phage encoding Stx 2 as well as a plasmid mediated enteroaggregative phenotype. The majority of infections were observed in adults, complicated by the highest number of HUS cases ever encountered. Due to different newly introduced therapeutic strategies (e.g. complement blockade antibiotic therapy was used in many patients once HUS was established. The outbreak therefore provided important new insights for the understanding of antibiotic therapy of STEC associated HUS in adults and for decolonization of long term STEC carriers. This review highlights new aspects concerning use of antibiotics in STEC infection and colonization.

  19. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in beef retail markets from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eBrusa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxing-producing Escherichia coli (STEC are foodborne pathogens that cause mild or serious diseases and can lead to people death. This study reports the prevalence and characteristics of STEC O157 and non-O157 in commercial ground beef and environmental samples, including meat table, knife, meat mincing machine and manipulator hands (n= 450 obtained from 90 retail markets over a nine-month period. The STEC isolates were serotyped and virulence genes as stx (Shiga toxin, rfbO157 (O157 lipopolysaccharide, fliCH7 (H7 flagellin, eae (intimin, ehxA (enterohemolysin and saa (STEC autoagglutinating adhesin, were determined. STEC O157 were identified in 23 (25.5% beef samples and 16 (4.4% environmental samples, while STEC non-O157 were present in 47 (52.2% and 182 (50.5%, respectively. Among 54 strains isolated, 17 were STEC O157:H7 and 37 were STEC non-O157. The prevalent genotype for O157 was stx2/eae/ehxA/fliCH7 (83.4%, and for STEC non-O157 the most frequent ones were stx1/stx2/saa/ehxA (29.7%; stx2 (29.7%; and stx2/saa/ehxA (27%. None of the STEC non-O157 strains were eae-positive. Besides O157:H7, other 20 different serotypes were identified, being O8:H19, O178:H19 and O174:H28 the prevalent. Strains belonging to the same serotype could be isolated from different sources of the same retail market. Also, the same serotype could be detected in different stores. In conclusion, screening techniques are increasingly sensitive, but the isolation of STEC non-O157 is still a challenge. Moreover, with the results obtained from the present work, although more studies are needed, cross-contamination between meat and the environment could be suspected.

  20. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC): Zoonotic risks associated with psittacine pet birds in home environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia-Di Chiacchio, R M; Cunha, M P V; Sturn, R M; Moreno, L Z; Moreno, A M; Pereira, C B P; Martins, F H; Franzolin, M R; Piazza, R M F; Knöbl, T

    2016-02-29

    Psittacidae are frequently bred as pets worldwide, but little is known about the zoonotic risks of these animals. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in the feces of psittacine birds housed as pets. A total of 171 fecal samples (67 cockatiels, 59 budgerigars, and 45 agapornis) were cultured. Forty-two (E. coli) strains were identified, and the presence of the eae, stx1, and stx2 genes was determined using PCR. The antimicrobial resistance profiles of the STEC strains were determined using the disk diffusion method and phylogenetic analysis according to the new Clermont phylotyping method. Using these methods, 19.4% (8/42) of the STEC strains were determined to be positive for the eae and stx2 genes. The results revealed a STEC frequency of 4.6% in the birds (8/171), with a percentage of 8.47% in budgerigars (5/59), 4.47% in cockatiels (3/67), and 0% in agapornis (0/45). None of the STEC isolates belonged to the O157 serogroup. Most of the strains were classified as sensitive to the 18 antibiotics tested. None of the strains exhibited a multiresistance profile. In the phylogenetic analysis, two strains were classified as non-typeable, three were classified as B2, two were classified as F, and one was classified as Clade I. Seven of the eight STEC strains showed a clonal profile using AFLP. E. coli strains that are stx2(+) plus eae(+) are usually associated with severe human diseases such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The STEC-positive results indicate the zoonotic risk of breeding psittacidae in home environments.

  1. Mouldy feed, mycotoxins and Shiga toxin - producing Escherichia coli colonization associated with Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome in beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masson Luke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin - producing Escherichia coli (STECs cause serious human disease outbreaks through the consumption of contaminated foods. Cattle are considered the main reservoir but it is unclear how STECs affect mature animals. Neonatal calves are the susceptible age class for STEC infections causing severe enteritis. In an earlier study, we determined that mycotoxins and STECs were part of the disease complex for dairy cattle with Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome (JHS. For STECs to play a role in the development of JHS, we hypothesized that STEC colonization should also be evident in beef cattle with JHS. Aggressive medical and surgical therapies are effective for JHS, but rely on early recognition of clinical signs for optimal outcomes suggesting that novel approaches must be developed for managing this disease. The main objective of this study was to confirm that mouldy feeds, mycotoxins and STEC colonization were associated with the development of JHS in beef cattle. Results Beef cattle developed JHS after consuming feed containing several types of mycotoxigenic fungi including Fusarium poae, F. verticillioides, F. sporotrichioides, Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus fumigatus. Mixtures of STECs colonized the mucosa in the hemorrhaged tissues of the cattle and no other pathogen was identified. The STECs expressed Stx1 and Stx2, but more significantly, Stxs were also present in the blood collected from the lumen of the hemorrhaged jejunum. Feed extracts containing mycotoxins were toxic to enterocytes and 0.1% of a prebiotic, Celmanax Trademark, removed the cytotoxicity in vitro. The inclusion of a prebiotic in the care program for symptomatic beef calves was associated with 69% recovery. Conclusions The current study confirmed that STECs and mycotoxins are part of the disease complex for JHS in beef cattle. Mycotoxigenic fungi are only relevant in that they produce the mycotoxins deposited in the feed. A

  2. Characterization of the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26 isolated from human in Poland between 1996 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, A; Wołkowicz, T; Chróst, A; Szych, J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 infections can be comparable with STEC O157 infections in severity of the acute haemolytic-uremic syndrome HUS and long-term sequelae. Among O26 STEC isolates, highly virulent clone O26:H11/H- Sequence Type 29 (ST 29) emerged in Germany in mid-1990s and spread to European countries. However, up to date, no STEC O26:H11/H- belonging to ST29 has been documented in Poland. In this study, we determined the relationship and clonal structure, stx genotypes, plasmid gene profiles and antimicrobial resistance of nine human STEC O26:H11/H- strains from human patients in Poland between 1996 and 2014. Of the 9 human STEC O26:H11/H- strains, two belonged to ST29 and were isolated from two children with HUS and renal failure with sepsis respectively. These strains showed the molecular characteristics of the emerging human-pathogenic ST29 clone (stx1-, stx2a+, eae+, ehxA+, etpD+, katP-, espP-). The remaining STEC O26:H11/H- strains examined in this study, belonged to ST21, with plasmid genes profiles frequently reported in ST21 strains in Europe. STEC O26 infections with serious human health consequences highlight the need of continuous surveillance of non-O157 STEC and implementation of the diagnostic approaches focused on their detection. Significance and impact of the study: These study provides the first data on the occurrence of emerging Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 ST 29 clone in human patients in Poland. Those strains show the molecular characteristics of highly virulent new ST29 pathotype (stx1-, stx2a+, eae+ ehxA+, etpD+, katP-, espP-). These results demonstrated prompt efforts to implement diagnostic approaches detection of those pathogen in the European countries.

  3. Differences in Shiga toxin and phage production among stx2g-positive STEC strains

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    Claudia Viviana Granobles Velandia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Shigatoxigenic E. coli (STEC are characterized by the production of Shiga toxins (Stx encoded by temperate bacteriophages. Stx production is linked to the induction of the phage lytic cycle. Several stx variants have been described and differentially associated with the risk of developing severe illness.The variant named stx2g was first identified in a STEC strain isolated from the faeces of healthy cattle. Analysis of stx2g-positive strains isolated from humans, animals and environmental sources have shown that they have a close relationship. In this study, stx2g-positive STEC isolated from cattle were analyzed for phage and Stx production, with the aim to relate the results to differences observed in cytotoxicity.The presence of inducible phages was assessed by analyzing the bacterial growth/lysis curves and also by plaque assay. Bacterial growth curves in the absence of induction were similar for all isolates, however, notably differed among induced cultures. The two strains that clearly evidenced bacteriolysis under this condition also showed higher phage titers in plaque assays. However, only the phage plaques produced by one of these strains (FB 62 hybridized with a stx2-probe. Furthermore, the production of Stx was evaluated by EIA and Western immunoblotting in overnight supernatants. By EIA, we detected Stx only in supernatants of FB 62, with a higher signal with induced than in uninduced cultures. By immunoblotting, Stx2 could be detected after induction in all stx2g-positive isolates, but with lower amounts of Stx2B subunit in those supernatants where phages could not be detected.Taking into account all the results, several differences could be found among stx2g-positive strains. The strain with the highest cytotoxic titer showed higher levels of stx2-phages and toxin production by EIA, and the opposite was observed for strains that previously showed low cytotoxic titers, confirming that in stx2g-positive strains Stx production is

  4. Validation of fermentation and cooking parameters for dry-fermented sausage to control Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) have been occasionally associated with causing illness due to under-processed and/or undercooked raw, further processed, and/or fermented meats. Regarding the latter, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (...

  5. Molecular screening of bovine raw milk for the presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC on dairy farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Vendramin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Milkborne transmission of Shiga toxin- producing Escherichia coli (STEC has raised considerable concern due to recent outbreaks worldwide and poses a threat to public health. The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and specific multiplex PCR assay to detect the presence of STEC in bovine raw milk. To identify E. coli (ATCC 25922 contamination, the gene uspA was used, and PCR sensitivity and specificity were accessed by testing diluted samples ranging from 2 to 2.0 × 10(6 CFU/mL. To detect STEC, the stx1 and stx2 genes were selected as targets. After reaction standardization, the multiplex assay was tested in raw milk collected from 101 cows on dairy farms. PCR assay for E. coli detection had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 79% (P<0.0001, with a lower detection limit of 2 CFU/mL. Multiplex PCR assay had 100% sensitivity for E. coli positive raw milk samples, and 31.1% were contaminated with STEC, 28.3% of stx2, and 1.9% of stx1. The multiplex PCR assay described in the present study can be employed to identify and screen E. coli harboring stx1 and stx2 genes in raw milk on dairy farms and in industries.

  6. Simultaneous direct detection of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains by gold nanoparticle optical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains (“Big Six” – O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157) represent significant groups of pathogens responsible for foodborne diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a colorimetric optical sensing assay that can simultaneously detect ...

  7. Antibodies to intimin and Escherichia coli secreted proteins A and B in patients with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpman, Diana; Békássy, Zivile D; Sjögren, Ann-Christine; Dubois, Maria S; Karmali, Mohamed A; Mascarenhas, Mariola; Jarvis, Karen G; Gansheroff, Lisa J; O'Brien, Alison D; Arbus, Gerald S; Kaper, James B

    2002-03-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli produce an attaching and effacing lesion upon adhering to the intestinal epithelium. Bacterial factors involved in this histopathology include the intimin adhesin and E. coli secreted proteins (Esps) A and B. In this study we investigated the serum antibody responses to recombinant E. coli O157:H7 intimin, EspA, and EspB by immunoblotting. Canadian patients with O157:H7 infection (n=10), Swedish patients with O157:H7 (n=21), non-O157 (n=18), or infection from which the serotype was not available (n=3), and asymptomatic household members (n=25) were studied and compared with Canadian (n=20) and Swedish controls (n=52). In Canadian patients, IgG antibodies to intimin, EspA, and EspB were analyzed, in Swedish patients and their household members IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies to EspA and EspB were studied. Patients and household members mounted an antibody response to the antigens. Significantly more patients developed an acute response to EspB compared with controls (P<0.01 Canadian patients, P<0.0001 Swedish patients). EspB IgA, IgG, and IgM had a specificity of 100%, 86%, and 86%, positive predictive value of 100%, 83%, and 81%, and sensitivity of 57%, 69%, and 63%, respectively, and appear to be an appropriate assay for the detection of EHEC infection. In cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome or hemorrhagic colitis this assay may be useful when a fecal strain has not been isolated, or in epidemics of non-O157 infection.

  8. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products... manufacturing trimmings for six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45..., non-intact product, that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26,...

  9. Cytolethal distending toxin from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 causes irreversible G2/M arrest, inhibition of proliferation, and death of human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Sinha, Bhanu; Kuczius, Thorsten; Karch, Helge

    2005-01-01

    Recently, cytolethal distending toxin V (CDT-V), a new member of the CDT family, was identified in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and particular non-O157 serotypes. Here we investigated the biological effects of CDT-V from STEC O157:H(-) (strain 493/89) on human endothelial cells

  10. Strategies for On-Line Decontamination of Carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byelashov, Oleksandr A.; Sofos, John N.

    Microbial food safety has been one of the most important challenges for the meat industry during the last two decades due to important foodborne outbreaks traced to contaminated products and associated costly product recalls from the market. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) strains, as well as Salmonella serotypes, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Bacillus cereusare important pathogenic contaminants of meat and poultry products (Sofos, 2004a). STEC, especially, have been of major concern for the beef industry for a number of years, since for almost two decades contaminated beef products have been major sources of foodborne E. coli O157:H7 infection (Rangel, Sparling, Crowe, Griffin, & Swerdlow, 2005).

  11. Incidencia, comportamiento y control de tipos pat??genos de "Escherichia coli" (STEC y EPEC) en leche y queso de oveja

    OpenAIRE

    Otero ??lvarez, Ver??nica

    2014-01-01

    302 p. Existen seis grupos de E. coli asociados a enfermedad intestinal en humanos. Esta tesis se ha centrado en el estudio de dos de ellos (patotipo productor de toxinas Shiga ??STEC- y enteropatog??nico ??EPEC-). Se han descrito brotes debidos a cepas STEC relacionados con leche y productos l??cteos de origen bovino y tambi??n se han aislado cepas STEC de leche y queso de oveja. Asimismo, se han aislado cepas at??picas de EPEC (aEPEC) de animales dom??sticos, entre ellos, de ganado ovino...

  12. Chromogenic agar medium for detection and isolation of Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 from fresh beef and cattle feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchayanand, Norasak; Arthur, Terrance M; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Wells, James E; Wheeler, Tommy L

    2013-02-01

    Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are clinically important foodborne pathogens. Unlike E. coli O157:H7, these foodborne pathogens have no unique biochemical characteristics to readily distinguish them from other E. coli strains growing on plating media. In this study, a chromogenic agar medium was developed in order to differentiate among non-O157 STEC strains of serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 on a single agar medium. The ability of this chromogenic agar medium to select and distinguish among these pathogens is based on a combination of utilization of carbohydrates, b -galactosidase activity, and resistance to selective agents. The agar medium in combination with immunomagnetic separation was evaluated and successfully allowed for the detection and isolation of these six serogroups from artificially contaminated fresh beef. The agar medium in combination with immunomagnetic separation also allowed successful detection and isolation of naturally occurring non-O157 STEC strains present in cattle feces. Thirty-five strains of the top six non-O157 STEC serogroups were isolated from 1,897 fecal samples collected from 271 feedlot cattle. This chromogenic agar medium could help significantly in routine screening for the top six non-O157 STEC serogroups from beef cattle and other food.

  13. Survey on the occurrence of shiga toxin producing strains of Escherichia coli (STEC) in drinking water from central Hessia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelz, A.; Zschoeck, M. [Untersuchungsamt Hessen, Giessen (Germany); Fels, K.; Alter, E. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Consumption of unheated bovine food is said to be the main cause of outbreaks of enterohemorrhagic colitis (EC) and hemolytic syndrome (HUS) by E. coli O157 in man. Some cases were attributed to the ingestion of contaminated drinking water. Certain types of resources for drinking water supply are at risk of contamination with cattle faeces or sewage. In routine drinking water control E. coli is an index organism and must not be found in a sample of 100 ml. We investigated a total of 1700 drinking water samples from central Hessia (Germany) for shiga toxin producing strains of E. coli (STEC). A developed sensitive investigation scheme made it possible to detect up to 10 STEC per 100 ml water sample at least. ELISA was used for detection of shiga toxins 1 and 2, m-PCR for the genes encoding stx1, stx2, EHEC-hlyA and eaeA, plating on Enterohemolysin agar for detection of the enterohemolysin phenotype and slide agglutination technique for confirming E. coli O157. In 108 out of 1700 drinking water samples E. coli was detected, but none of the isolates belonged to serotype O157. ST1 and ST2 were not produced by the isolates. Thus, under normal circumstances drinking water in central Hessia seems to be no vehicle for STEC. (orig.)

  14. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Carriers of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli (STEC in Dairy Cattle Farms in the Governorate of Blida (Algeria

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    Baazize-Ammi Djamila

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether dairy beef cattle raised in Algeria are Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC carriers. Stx1 and stx2 genes were analysed in DNA isolated from 200 faecal samples collected from adult dairy cows from 27 randomly selected farms in Blida, North Algeria, after amplification by PCR. Samples from 61 (30.5% animals out of the 200 were positive and were located in 18 farms with a prevalence of 66.7%. Interestingly, no sample from any cow was positive for only the stx2 gene, while in contrast, samples from 51 cows were positive for the stx1 gene alone (83.6% and those from 10 other cows were positive for both stx1 and stx2 genes (16.4%. It should be noted that the faecal samples infected with pathogens carrying the two genes originated from 4 out of the 18 farms that were found to be positive, with a rate of 22.2%.

  15. Enteropathogens Associated with Acute Diarrhea in Children from Households with High Socioeconomic Level in Uruguay

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    Gustavo Varela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diarrhea, a common disease of children, deserves permanent monitoring in all social groups. To know the etiology and clinical manifestations of acute diarrhea in children up to 5 years of age from high socioeconomic level households, we conducted a descriptive, microbiological, and clinical study. Stools from 59 children with acute community-acquired diarrhea were examined, and their parents were interviewed concerning symptoms and signs. Rotavirus, adenovirus, and norovirus were detected by commercially available qualitative immunochromatographic lateral flow rapid tests. Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, and Shigella were investigated by standard bacteriological methods and diarrheagenic E. coli by PCR assays. We identified a potential enteric pathogen in 30 children. The most frequent causes of diarrhea were enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, viruses, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli (STEC. Only 2 patients showed mixed infections. Our data suggest that children with viral or Campylobacter diarrhea were taken to the hospital earlier than those infected with EPEC. One child infected with STEC O26 developed “complete” HUS. The microbiological results highlight the importance of zoonotic bacteria such as atypical EPEC, Campylobacter, STEC, and Salmonella as pathogens associated with acute diarrhea in these children. The findings also reinforce our previous communications about the regional importance of non-O157 STEC strains in severe infant food-borne diseases.

  16. Emerging types of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC O178 present in cattle, deer and humans from Argentina and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eMiko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available More than 400 serotypes of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC have been implicated in outbreaks and sporadic human diseases. In recent years STEC strains belonging to serogroup O178 have been commonly isolated from cattle and food of bovine origin in South America and Europe. In order to explore the significance of these STEC strains as potential human pathogens, 74 German and Argentinean E. coli O178 strains from animals, food and humans were characterized phenotypically and investigated for their serotypes, stx-genotypes and forty-three virulence-associated markers by a real-time PCR-microarray. The majority (n=66 of the O178 strains belonged to serotype O178:H19. The remaining strains divided into O178:H7 (n=6, O178:H10 (n=1 and O178:H16 (n=1. STEC O178:H19 strains were mainly isolated from cattle and food of bovine origin, but one strain was from a patient with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Genotyping of the STEC O178:H19 strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed two major clusters of genetically highly related strains which differ in their stx-genotypes and non-Stx putative virulence traits, including adhesins, toxins and serine-proteases. Cluster A-strains including the HUS-strain (n=35 carried genes associated with severe disease in humans (stx2a, stx2d, ehxA, saa, subAB1, lpfAO113, terE combined with stx1a, espP, iha. Cluster B-strains (n=26 showed a limited repertoire of virulence genes (stx2c, pagC, lpfAO113, espP, iha. Among O178:H7 strains isolated from deer meat and patients with uncomplicated disease a new STEC variant was detected that is associated with the genotype stx1c/stx2b/ehxA/subAB2/espI/[terE]/espP/iha. None of the STEC O178 strains was positive for locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE- and nle-genes. Results indicate that STEC O178:H19 strains belong to the growing group of LEE-negative STEC that should be considered with respect to their potential to cause diseases in humans.

  17. Risk factors for sporadic Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections in children, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Marta; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Rangel, Josefa; Caletti, Maria G; Vallés, Patricia; Roldán, Carlos D; Balbi, Laura; Marsano de Mollar, Maria C; Amoedo, Diego; Miliwebsky, Elizabeth; Chinen, Isabel; Hoekstra, Robert M; Mead, Paul; Griffin, Patricia M

    2008-05-01

    We evaluated risk factors for sporadic Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection among children in Argentina. We conducted a prospective case-control study in 2 sites and enrolled 150 case-patients and 299 controls. The median age of case-patients was 1.8 years; 58% were girls. Serotype O157:H7 was the most commonly isolated STEC. Exposures associated with infection included eating undercooked beef, living in or visiting a place with farm animals, and contact with a child <5 years of age with diarrhea. Protective factors included the respondent reporting that he or she always washed hands after handling raw beef and the child eating more than the median number of fruits and vegetables. Many STEC infections in children could be prevented by avoiding consumption of undercooked beef, limiting exposure to farm animals and their environment, not being exposed to children with diarrhea, and washing hands after handling raw beef.

  18. Risk Factors for Sporadic Shiga Toxin–producing Escherichia coli Infections in Children, Argentina1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Marta; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Rangel, Josefa; Caletti, Maria G.; Vallés, Patricia; Roldán, Carlos D.; Balbi, Laura; Marsano de Mollar, Maria C.; Amoedo, Diego; Miliwebsky, Elizabeth; Chinen, Isabel; Hoekstra, Robert M.; Mead, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated risk factors for sporadic Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection among children in Argentina. We conducted a prospective case–control study in 2 sites and enrolled 150 case-patients and 299 controls. The median age of case-patients was 1.8 years; 58% were girls. Serotype O157:H7 was the most commonly isolated STEC. Exposures associated with infection included eating undercooked beef, living in or visiting a place with farm animals, and contact with a child <5 years of age with diarrhea. Protective factors included the respondent reporting that he or she always washed hands after handling raw beef and the child eating more than the median number of fruits and vegetables. Many STEC infections in children could be prevented by avoiding consumption of undercooked beef, limiting exposure to farm animals and their environment, not being exposed to children with diarrhea, and washing hands after handling raw beef. PMID:18439359

  19. Molecular epidemiology of a household outbreak of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli in Poland due to secondary transmission of STEC O104:H4 from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Szych, Jolanta; Rastawicki, Waldemar; Wołkowicz, Tomasz; Chróst, Anna; Leszczyńska, Beata; Kuźma, Elżbieta; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Gierczyński, Rafał

    2012-04-01

    We characterized two STEC O104 : H4 clinical isolates collected in Poland from a 7-year-old boy with haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) and his nanny. This household outbreak began on 29 May 2011. Because of its time-frame, the outbreak was assumed to be part of the international STEC O104 : H4 outbreak that arose in Germany in May 2011. The two Polish isolates were Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx2 lpf) with enteroaggregative E. coli pathotype (aggR aap aggA), thereby sharing the unique virulence properties of the epidemic STEC O104 : H4 strain from the international outbreak. The Polish isolates were multi-drug resistant and carried bla(TEM), strA, strB, tetA, sul1 and sul2 markers together with the bla(CTX-M-15) gene for CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase. PFGE patterns and plasmid profiles of the Polish isolates and the epidemic STEC O104 : H4 strain corresponded closely. This finding suggested an epidemiological link between the Polish STEC O104 : H4 isolates and the international outbreak. Retrospective serological investigations proved person-to-person transmission of the epidemic STEC O104 : H4 strain from a father who had visited Dortmund, Germany, to his 7-year-old son in Giżycko, Poland. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of household transmission of Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli in Poland.

  20. Approaches to treatment of emerging Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections highlighting the O104:H4 serotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Elias A; Fadlallah, Sukayna M; Nassar, Farah J; Kazzi, Natalie; Matar, Ghassan M

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a group of diarrheagenic bacteria associated with foodborne outbreaks. Infection with these agents may result in grave sequelae that include fatality. A large number of STEC serotypes has been identified to date. E. coli serotype O104:H4 is an emerging pathogen responsible for a 2011 outbreak in Europe that resulted in over 4000 infections and 50 deaths. STEC pathogenicity is highly reliant on the production of one or more Shiga toxins that can inhibit protein synthesis in host cells resulting in a cytotoxicity that may affect various organ systems. Antimicrobials are usually avoided in the treatment of STEC infections since they are believed to induce bacterial cell lysis and the release of stored toxins. Some antimicrobials have also been reported to enhance toxin synthesis and production from these organisms. Various groups have attempted alternative treatment approaches including the administration of toxin-directed antibodies, toxin-adsorbing polymers, probiotic agents and natural remedies. The utility of antibiotics in treating STEC infections has also been reconsidered in recent years with certain modalities showing promise.

  1. STEC:O111-HUS complicated by acute encephalopathy in a young girl was successfully treated with a set of hemodiafiltration, steroid pulse, and soluble thrombomodulin under plasma exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Noritaka; Fujioka, Masayuki; Bennett, Charles L; Inoki, Kazuya; Miki, Toyokazu; Watanabe, Akihiko; Yoshida, Toshiko; Hayakawa, Masaki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-01

    We report a 14-year-old girl, who developed shigatoxin-producing E. coli (STEC)-HUS complicated by encephalopathy. She was successfully treated with hemodiafiltration, high-dose methylprednisolone pulse therapy, and soluble recombinant thrombomodulin under plasma exchange. von Willebrand factor multimers analysis provides potential insights into how the administered therapies might facilitate successful treatment of STEC-HUS.

  2. Detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7, O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, and Salmonella in retail raw ground beef using the DuPont BAX system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Salmonella are food-borne pathogens commonly associated with beef, and reliable methods are needed to determine their prevalence in beef and to ensure food safety. Retail ground beef was tested for the presence of E. coli O157:H7, STEC serogroups O2...

  3. Microbiological water quality of Igapó Lake Londrina - PR and genotypic characterization of virulence factors associated with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Alfonso Schuroff

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at the detection and quantification of Total Coliforms and Escherichia coli in Igapó Lake, in order to evaluate the quality of these waters as proper or unfit for recreation, in addition to the genotypic characterization of virulence factors associated with EPEC and STEC by PCR. The study area was the Igapó Lake I, II, III and IV. Samples were collected monthly from March 2011 to February 2012. The technique used for the detection and quantification of Total Coliforms and E. coli was the Colilert chromogenic substrate. In the technique of PCR, the eae and bfp genes were tested to characterize the typical EPEC pathotype; stx1, stx2, eae and hlyA the STEC pathotype and the samples that presented only the eae gene were characterized as atypical EPEC. According to CONAMA Resolution 357/2005, it has been observed that only Igapó Lake III was rated inappropriate for primary contact recreation, while for secondary contact recreation, all lakes were considered appropriate. Moreover, a strong relationship between rainfall and E. coli indices in Igapó Lake can be observed, which in dry months the quantity drastically decreases, while in rainy months the opposite relationship was observed. Of the 97 strains of E. coli isolated, two had the eae gene (atypical EPEC. None of the isolates contained genes stx1, stx2, bfp and hlyA. Thus, we hope to educate the population and public agencies of the importance of microbiological monitoring of recreational waters to prevent outbreaks of waterborne infections.

  4. Detection of shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) in leafy greens sold at local retail markets in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Rowaida K S; Gomaa, Mohamed A E; Khalil, Mahmoud I M

    2015-03-16

    Leafy green vegetables, a popular and an indispensable ingredient of the daily menus of Egyptians' diets, currently presents a great concern in terms of microbiological hazards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that provides scientific evidence for prevalence of shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) in leafy greens sold at open air local retail markets and superstores in the Egyptian environment. A total of 486 conventional and organic leafy green samples that are eaten raw were collected from different areas in Alexandria, evaluated for total E. coli counts (ECCs), and screened for E. coli O157:H7 using conventional and molecular methods. Recovery of E. coli (≥10(2)CFU/g) from all studied types of leafy greens was indicative of fecal contamination. Total ECCs in conventional samples ranged from 5.47 to 2.56 log CFU/g. Based on their inability to ferment sorbitol on CT-SMAC media, 26 presumptive E. coli O157 isolates were detected in 71.4% (270/378) of the studied conventional samples. From all studied organic samples, only 2 types (organic cabbage and parsley, 16.7%) were contaminated with presumptive E. coli O157. All 28 isolates were further serotyped as E. coli O157 by latex agglutination test, and biochemically confirmed as E. coli. Multiplex PCR assays confirmed the ability of 21.4% (6/28) of the E. coli O157 strains to produce shiga-toxins (Stxs), and their virulence markers were as follows: stx1, 66.6% (4/6); stx2, 50% (3/6); stx1/stx2, 16.7% (1/6); eaeA, 83.3% (5/6); and hlyA, 16.7% (1/6). Only 2 strains recovered from conventional and organic parsley could possibly be classified as E. coli O157:H7 based on the presence of stx-genes (either stx1 or stx2 or both). Results of the present research highlight that high E. coli loads, together with recovery of STEC O157 isolates could pose serious health risks to the produce consumers. This emphasizes the urgent need for health authorities to value and utilize the existing knowledge to

  5. Exploiting the explosion of information associated with whole genome sequencing to tackle Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in global food production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rates of foodborne disease caused by gastrointestinal pathogens continue to be a concern in both the developed and developing worlds. The growing world population, the increasing complexity of agri-food networks and the wide range of foods now associated with STEC are potential drivers for incre...

  6. Development of a High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP Approach Based on the Accessory Genome of Escherichia coli to Characterize Shiga-toxin Producing E. coli (STEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eMichelacci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains possess a large accessory genome composed of virulence genes existing in multiple allelic variants, which sometimes segregate with specific STEC subpopulations. We analyzed the allelic variability of 91 virulence genes of STEC by Real Time PCR followed by melting curves analysis in 713 E. coli strains including 358 STEC. The 91 genes investigated were located on the LEE, OI-57 and OI-122 pathogenicity islands and displayed a total of 476 alleles in the study population. The combinations of the 91 alleles of each strain were termed allelic signatures and used to perform cluster analyses. We termed such an approach High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP and used it to investigate the phylogeny of STEC of multiple serogroups. The dendrograms obtained identified groups of STEC segregating approximately with the serogroups and allowed the identification of subpopulations within the single groups. The study of the allelic signatures provided further evidence of the coevolution of the LEE and OI-122, reflecting the occurrence of their acquisition through a single event. The HReVAP analysis represents a sensitive tool for studying the evolution of LEE-positive STEC.

  7. Development of a High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP) Approach Based on the Accessory Genome of Escherichia coli to Characterize Shiga-Toxin Producing E. coli (STEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelacci, Valeria; Orsini, Massimiliano; Knijn, Arnold; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains possess a large accessory genome composed of virulence genes existing in multiple allelic variants, which sometimes segregate with specific STEC subpopulations. We analyzed the allelic variability of 91 virulence genes of STEC by Real Time PCR followed by melting curves analysis in 713 E. coli strains including 358 STEC. The 91 genes investigated were located on the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), OI-57, and OI-122 pathogenicity islands and displayed a total of 476 alleles in the study population. The combinations of the 91 alleles of each strain were termed allelic signatures and used to perform cluster analyses. We termed such an approach High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP) and used it to investigate the phylogeny of STEC of multiple serogroups. The dendrograms obtained identified groups of STEC segregating approximately with the serogroups and allowed the identification of subpopulations within the single groups. The study of the allelic signatures provided further evidence of the coevolution of the LEE and OI-122, reflecting the occurrence of their acquisition through a single event. The HReVAP analysis represents a sensitive tool for studying the evolution of LEE-positive STEC. PMID:26941726

  8. Role of climate in the spread of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection among children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaotta, Fiorella; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Fratianni, Simona; Perrone, Michela

    2017-04-01

    Haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (HUS) is a rare disease mainly affecting children that develops as a complication of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection. It is characterised by acute kidney injury, platelet consumption and mechanical destruction of red blood cells (haemolysis). In order to test the working hypothesis that the spread of the infection is influenced by specific climatic conditions, we analysed all of the identified cases of infection occurring between June 2010 and December 2013 in four provinces of Lombardy, Italy (Milano, Monza Brianza, Varese and Brescia), in which a STEC surveillance system has been developed as part of a preventive programme. In the selected provinces, we recorded in few days a great number of cases and clusters which are unrelated for spatially distant or for the disease are caused by different STEC serotypes. In order to investigate a common factor that favoured the onset of infection, we have analysed in detail the weather conditions of the areas. The daily series of temperature, rain and relative humidity were studied to show the common climate peculiarities whilst the correlation coefficient and the principal component analysis (PCA) were used to point out the meteorological variable, maximum temperature, as the principal climate element in the onset of the infection. The use of distributed lag non-linear models (DLNM) and the climate indices characterising heat waves (HWs) has allowed to identify the weather conditions associated with STEC infection. The study highlighted a close temporal correlation between STEC infection in children and the number, duration and frequency of heat waves. In particular, if the maximum temperature is greater than 90th percentile, days classified as very hot, for 3 or more consecutive days, the risk of infection is increasing.

  9. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and rectoanal junction persistence in ruminants: a study of bacterial-epithelial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) was the first Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serotype to be associated with bloody diarrhea or hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. It has since been implicated in several outbreaks in the U.S. and globally. Non-O157 STEC have not bee...

  10. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time PCR method for detecting Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in beef and comparison to the FSIS microbiology laboratory guidebook method

    Science.gov (United States)

    The “top-six” non-O157 STEC (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) most frequently associated with outbreaks and cases of food-borne illnesses have been declared as adulterants in beef by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), and regulatory testing for these serogroups in beef began in...

  11. Characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on veal hides and carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) associated with the most severe forms of foodborne illnesses. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has identified a higher percentage of non-O157 EHEC compared to E....

  12. Development and application of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing E. coli O103 surrogate for tracking contamination through grinding and identifying persistent points of contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: To 1.) develop and validate an easily trackable E. coli O157:H7/non-O157 STEC surrogate that can be detected to the same level of sensitivity as E. coli O157:H7; and 2.) apply the trackable surrogate to model contamination passage through grinding and identify points where contamination ...

  13. A simulated metagenomic approach for bacterial serotyping using shotgun genome sequences coupled with O-Antigen gene cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Accurate determination of food-borne pathogen serotype and genotype information is important for disease surveillance and outbreak source tracking. E. coli serotype O157:H7 and non-O157 of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serogroups, including O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 (top ...

  14. Outbreak of E. coli 0157:H7 Infections Associated With Ready-To ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VIKENNY

    Shiga toxin- producing E coli (STEC) world-wide has raised safety concerns ... of 41.13%; nitrogenous matter of 9.7%; starch 5.9% protein ... although serious bacterial infection on cashew nuts has ... Both bacteria and fungi are responsible for.

  15. Implications of screening and childcare exclusion policies for children with Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli infections: lessons learned from an outbreak in a daycare centre, Norway, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Emily; Dalane, Per Kjetil; Aavitsland, Preben; Brandal, Lin Thorstensen; Wester, Astrid Louise; Vold, Line

    2014-12-18

    In Norway, it is recommended that children with Shiga-Toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections are excluded from daycare centers until up to five consecutive negative stool cultures are obtained. Children with gastrointestinal illness of unknown etiology are asked to remain home for 48 hours after symptoms subside. On 16 October 2012, two cases of STEC infection were reported from a daycare center, where other children were also symptomatic. Local health authorities temporarily closed the daycare center and all children and staff were screened for pathogenic E. coli. We present the results of the outbreak investigation in order to discuss the implications of screening and the exclusion policies for children attending daycare in Norway. Stool specimens for all children (n = 91) and employees at the daycare center (n = 40) were tested for pathogenic E. coli. Information on demographics, symptoms and potential exposures was collected from parents through trawling interviews and a web-based questionnaire. Cases were monitored to determine the duration of shedding and the resulting exclusion period from daycare. We identified five children with stx1- and eae-positive STEC O103:H2 infections, and one staff member and one child with STEC O91:H- infections. Three additional children who tested positive for stx1 and eae genes were considered probable STEC cases. Three cases were asymptomatic. Median length of time of exclusion from daycare for STEC cases was 53 days (range 9 days-108 days). Survey responses for 75 children revealed mild gastrointestinal symptoms among both children with STEC infections and children with negative microbiological results. There was no evidence of common exposures; person-to-person transmission was likely. The results of screening indicate that E. coli infections can spread in daycare centres, reflected in the proportion of children with STEC and EPEC infections. While screening can identify asymptomatic cases, the

  16. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Does My Child Need? How to Safely Give Acetaminophen Is It a Cold or the Flu? Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family? Too Late for the Flu Vaccine? Common Childhood Infections Can Chronic Ear Infections Cause Long-Term Hearing Loss? Chickenpox Cold Sores Common Cold Diarrhea Fever and ...

  17. Detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in meat marketed in Casablanca (Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, S; Fassouane, A; Filliol, I; Hassar, M; Cohen, N

    2011-03-01

    The contamination of meat and meat products with Shiga toxin-producing O157:H7 and non-O157 Escherichia coli (STEC), obtained from markets in Casablanca, Morocco, was investigated. A total of 460 meat and meat products were sampled between March 2004 and July 2006 analysed and 176 strains of E. coli were isolated from these samples. The presence of the stx1, stx2, eae and ehxA genes, recognized as major virulence factors of STEC, was tested in E. coli isolates by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). STEC was detected in 4 (0.9%) samples. The result of serotyping by molecular method showed that two of these STEC isolates corresponded to the serotype O157:H7. The others Shiga toxin-producing E. coli non-O157 corresponded to O6:H21 and O76:H19. The presence of O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC in meat and meat products marketed in Casablanca, Morocco, emphasizes the importance of implementing the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system, as well as the need for implementing, evaluating, and validating antimicrobial interventions to reduce the presence of potential pathogenic microorganisms.

  18. Exploiting the explosion of information associated with whole genome sequencing to tackle Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in global food production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Eelco; Delaquis, Pascal; Morabito, Stefano; Beutin, Lothar; Gobius, Kari; Rasko, David A; Bono, Jim; French, Nigel; Osek, Jacek; Lindstedt, Bjørn-Arne; Muniesa, Maite; Manning, Shannon; LeJeune, Jeff; Callaway, Todd; Beatson, Scott; Eppinger, Mark; Dallman, Tim; Forbes, Ken J; Aarts, Henk; Pearl, David L; Gannon, Victor P J; Laing, Chad R; Strachan, Norval J C

    2014-09-18

    The rates of foodborne disease caused by gastrointestinal pathogens continue to be a concern in both the developed and developing worlds. The growing world population, the increasing complexity of agri-food networks and the wide range of foods now associated with STEC are potential drivers for increased risk of human disease. It is vital that new developments in technology, such as whole genome sequencing (WGS), are effectively utilized to help address the issues associated with these pathogenic microorganisms. This position paper, arising from an OECD funded workshop, provides a brief overview of next generation sequencing technologies and software. It then uses the agent-host-environment paradigm as a basis to investigate the potential benefits and pitfalls of WGS in the examination of (1) the evolution and virulence of STEC, (2) epidemiology from bedside diagnostics to investigations of outbreaks and sporadic cases and (3) food protection from routine analysis of foodstuffs to global food networks. A number of key recommendations are made that include: validation and standardization of acquisition, processing and storage of sequence data including the development of an open access "WGSNET"; building up of sequence databases from both prospective and retrospective isolates; development of a suite of open-access software specific for STEC accessible to non-bioinformaticians that promotes understanding of both the computational and biological aspects of the problems at hand; prioritization of research funding to both produce and integrate genotypic and phenotypic information suitable for risk assessment; training to develop a supply of individuals working in bioinformatics/software development; training for clinicians, epidemiologists, the food industry and other stakeholders to ensure uptake of the technology and finally review of progress of implementation of WGS. Currently the benefits of WGS are being slowly teased out by academic, government, and industry or

  19. Molecular characterization and phylogeny of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) from imported beef meat in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelhassan, Nawal Nouridaim; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Gimba, Fufa Ido; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed at determining the presence and characterization of Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) from imported frozen beef meats. Seventy-four (74) frozen imported beef meat samples from two countries, India (42 samples) and Australia (32 samples), were collected and tested for E. coli. These samples were purchased from the frozen meat sections of five different supermarkets in different locations in Selangor, Malaysia, from April 2012 to October 2014. A total of 222 E. coli strains were isolated from the meat samples; 126 strains were isolated from country A (India), and 96 E. coli strains were from country of origin B (Australia), respectively. A total of 70 E. coli strains were identified and characterized. All E. coli strains were isolated into Fluorocult medium and identified using API 20E kit. All selected E. coli strains were characterized for Shiga toxin genes (stx1 and stx2). All biochemically identified E. coli in this study were further subjected to molecular detection through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and characterization using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. Of the 70 E. coli strains, 11 strains were positive for both Shiga toxin genes (stx1 and stx2) and 11 (11/70) strains were positive for stx1 gene, while 25 (25/70) strains were positive for stx2 gene. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene of all the E. coli isolates in this study was successfully sequenced and analyzed, and based on sequence data obtained, a phylogenetic tree of the 16S rRNA gene was performed using Clustal W programme in MEGA 6.06 software. Phylogenetic tree showed that the E. coli isolates in our study cluster with the strain of E. coli isolated in other countries, which further confirm that the isolates of E. coli in this study are similar to those obtained in other studies. As a result, all the strains obtained in this study proved to be a strain of pathogenic E. coli, which may cause a serious outbreak

  20. Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Vanzzini Zago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective, and descriptive study about the support that the laboratory of microbiology aids can provide in the diagnosis of ocular infections in patients whom were attended a tertiary-care hospital in México City in a 10-year-time period. We describe the microbiological diagnosis in palpebral mycose; in keratitis caused by Fusarium, Aspergillus, Candida, and melanized fungi; endophthalmitis; one Histoplasma scleritis and one mucormycosis. Nowadays, ocular fungal infections are more often diagnosed, because there is more clinical suspicion and there are easy laboratory confirmations. Correct diagnosis is important because an early medical treatment gives a better prognosis for visual acuity. In some cases, fungal infections are misdiagnosed and the antifungal treatment is delayed.

  1. Characterization of Shiga-toxin producing E.coli (STEC and enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC using multiplex Real-Time PCR assays for stx1 , stx2 , eaeA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejman Abbasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheal disease is still a major health problem, especially in developing countries, where it is considered as one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality especially in children. Studies showed that Diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC such as STES and EPEC strains are among the most prevalent causative agents in acute diarrhea, particularly in children. Aim of the present study was to investigate the presence and the frequency of STEC and EPEC as etiologic agent of diarrhea in children less than 2 years of age with diarrhea in Shiraz.A total of 285 stool samples were collected from patients with diarrhea in Shiraz, in 2012. Diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC strains were isolated by standard biochemical analysis. In this study, we used multiplex Real time PCR and single PCR to detect the presence of indicator genes stx1 , stx2 and eaeA for STEC and EPEC strains, respectively.A total of 285 stool samples were tested in which 49 (17% were identified as contaminated with E. coli by biochemical tests. Out of total samples, 15 STEC (31% and 13 EPEC (27% were identified using multiplex Real-Time PCR assay. Among STEC isolates, 2 strains were stx1 (+, 8 isolates stx2 (+, 3 isolates were stx1 (+ , stx2 (+ and 2 isolates were stx1 (+ , stx2 (+, eaeA (+.In this study, we found rather high occurrence of STEC and EPEC virulence genes in children with diarrhea. The results of this study showed that, real time PCR can be used as a replacement for conventional PCR assay in the detecting virulence genes of STEC and EPEC strains. Real-time PCR offers the advantage of being a faster, more robust assay, because it does not require post-PCR procedures to detect amplification products.

  2. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Interactions between biofilms and the environment. FEMS Microbiol Rev. 1997;20:291–303. 4. Webb LX, Wagner W, Carroll D, et al. Osteomyelitis and...treatment of osteomyelitis . Biomed Mater. 2008;3: 034114. 6. Gristina AG. Biomaterial-centered infection: microbial adhesion versus tissue integration...vertebral osteomyelitis . Spine. 2007;32: 2996–3006. 15. Beckham JD, Tuttle K, Tyler KL. Reovirus activates transforming growth factor ß and bone

  3. Implementation of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS for Identification and Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L Lindsey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC is an important foodborne pathogen capable of causing severe disease in humans. Rapid and accurate identification and characterization techniques are essential during outbreak investigations. Current methods for characterization of STEC are expensive and time-consuming. With the advent of rapid and cheap whole genome sequencing (WGS benchtop sequencers, the potential exists to replace traditional workflows with WGS. The aim of this study was to validate tools to do reference identification and characterization from WGS for STEC in a single workflow within an easy to use commercially available software platform. Publically available serotype, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance databases were downloaded from the Center for Genomic Epidemiology (CGE (www.genomicepidemiology.org and integrated into a genotyping plug-in with in silico PCR tools to confirm some of the virulence genes detected from WGS data. Additionally, down sampling experiments on the WGS sequence data were performed to determine a threshold for sequence coverage needed to accurately predict serotype and virulence genes using the established workflow. The serotype database was tested on a total of 228 genomes and correctly predicted from WGS for 96.1% of O serogroups and 96.5% of H serogroups identified by conventional testing techniques. A total of 59 genomes were evaluated to determine the threshold of coverage to detect the different WGS targets, 40 were evaluated for serotype and virulence gene detection and 19 for the stx gene subtypes. For serotype, 95% of the O and 100% of the H serogroups were detected at > 40x and ≥ 30x coverage, respectively. For virulence targets and stx gene subtypes, nearly all genes were detected at > 40x, though some targets were 100% detectable from genomes with coverage ≥20x. The resistance detection tool was 97% concordant with phenotypic testing results. With isolates sequenced to > 40x

  4. Growth media and temperature effects on biofilm formation by serotype O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilm formation in most Escherichia coli strains is dependent on curli fimbriae and cellulose, and the expression of both varies widely among pathogenic strains. Curli and cellulose expression are often identified by their affinity for Congo red dye (CR). However, media composition and incubation ...

  5. Growth media and temperature effects on biofilm formation by serotype O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlich, Gaylen A; Chen, Chin-Yi; Cottrell, Bryan J; Nguyen, Ly-Huong

    2014-05-01

    Biofilm formation in most Escherichia coli strains is dependent on curli fimbriae and cellulose, and the production of both varies widely among pathogenic strains. Curli and cellulose production by colonies growing on agar are often identified by their affinity for Congo red dye (CR). However, media composition and incubation temperature can affect dye affinity and impose limitations on red phenotype detection by this method. In this study, we compared different Shiga toxin-producing E. coli for CR affinity and biofilm formation under different media/temperature conditions. We found strain and serotype differences in CR affinities and biofilm formation, as well as temperature and media requirements for maximum CR binding. We also constructed strains with deletions of curli and/or cellulose genes to determine their contributions to the phenotypes and identified two O45 strains with a medium-dependent induction of cellulose.

  6. Comparison of immunomagnetic separation beads for detection of six Non-O157:H7 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli serogroups in different matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    A concern in public health and food safety in the United States involves the need to accurately and efficiently detect Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 which have caused outbreaks on numerous occasions. The detection of these organisms is challenging becau...

  7. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on the risk posed by Shiga toxinproducing Escherichia coli (STEC) and other pathogenic bacteria in seeds and sprouted seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine

    Sprouted seeds are young seedlings obtained from the germination of seeds. They are ready-to-eat foods which have caused large outbreaks. The bacterial pathogens most frequently associated with illness due to contaminated sprouted seeds are Salmonella and to a lesser extent STEC. Bacillus cereus...... be contaminated during production, harvest, storage and transport, and there may be difficulties in traceability of seeds from production to sprouting. Bacterial pathogens on seeds may survive for long periods during seed storage. There is so far no guarantee of a bactericidal step which is able to control...... contamination of seeds with bacterial foodborne pathogens acquired prior to germination. Due to the high humidity and the favourable temperature during sprouting, bacterial pathogens present on dry seeds can multiply on the sprouts. Contamination with pathogenic bacteria must be minimized by identification...

  8. Validation of the detection of STEC (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O157 in raw burgers using real-time PCR (BAX® System Q7, DuPont in “WET POOLS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Mussio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC O157:H7 and no-O157:H7 have been identified as emerging foodborne pathogens responsible for an increasing number of outbreaks worldwide. Many foods have been associated to these outbreaks, mainly undercooked beef burgers. Due to the increasing production and consumption of burgers in our country, it is important to have a rapid technique to identify and isolate the most important STEC strains in foods matrixes.The objective of these investigation was to assess the sensitivity, specificity and limit detection for the screening of the most prevalent STEC in frozen raw beef burgers, using the "STEC Screening stx/eae " kit to detect the stx/eae genes and the "Panel 1 STEC E. coli O26, O111, O121" and "Panel 2 STEC E. coli O45, O103, O145" and "E. coli O157: H7 MP” (DuPont kits for the detection of the different serogroups. The use of composed samples (wet pools, the recovery of each strain from the positives samples on selective media after specified inmunoconcentration and the detection of stx/eae virulence genes in isolates by PCR were also evaluated. We validated a technique that allows the detection of the mentioned STEC strains with limits of detection between 1-5 CFU in 65 grams of raw frozen hamburgers, using wet pools. 

  9. Biological Activities of Uric Acid in Infection Due to Enteropathogenic and Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Jacqueline E.; Lis, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, we identified xanthine oxidase (XO) as an important enzyme in the interaction between the host and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC). Many of the biological effects of XO were due to the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme. We wondered, however, if uric acid generated by XO also had biological effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Uric acid triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, including increased submucosal edema and release of extracellular DNA from host cells. While uric acid alone was unable to trigger a chloride secretory response in intestinal monolayers, it did potentiate the secretory response to cyclic AMP agonists. Uric acid crystals were formed in vivo in the lumen of the gut in response to EPEC and STEC infections. While trying to visualize uric acid crystals formed during EPEC and STEC infections, we noticed that uric acid crystals became enmeshed in the neutrophilic extracellular traps (NETs) produced from host cells in response to bacteria in cultured cell systems and in the intestine in vivo. Uric acid levels in the gut lumen increased in response to exogenous DNA, and these increases were enhanced by the actions of DNase I. Interestingly, addition of DNase I reduced the numbers of EPEC bacteria recovered after a 20-h infection and protected against EPEC-induced histologic damage. PMID:26787720

  10. Two cases of urinary tract infection caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7 strains Dos casos de infección del tracto urinario causados por cepas de Escherichia coli 0157:H7 productoras de toxina Shiga.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Del P. Gadea

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT STEC strains can infect extra-intestinal sites such as the human urinary tract and sometimes cause severe complications. We report two cases of urinary tract infection caused by STEC in two elderly women with comorbidities. Although both strains belonged to the 0157:H7 serotype and carried genes associated with severe illness, none of the patients developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. These findings provide additional evidence for the presence of these agents in our country and in the region, and highlight the need to maintain an active surveillance system of HUS cases, placing special emphasis on the study of other sites of infection in patients with non-diarrheal HUS.En los seres humanos, las cepas STEC pueden producir infección en sitios extraintestinales, como el tracto urinario, y causar complicaciones graves. Comunicamos dos casos de infección urinaria por STEC en dos mujeres ancianas con comorbilidades. Aunque ambas cepas correspondieron al serotipo 0157:H7 y portaban los genes asociados con enfermedad grave, ninguna de las pacientes desarrolló síndrome urémico hemolítico (SUH. Estos hallazgos constituyen una evidencia adicional de la presencia de estos agentes en nuestro país y en la región, y destacan la necesidad de mantener un sistema activo de vigilancia, con especial énfasis en el estudio de otros sitios de Infección en pacientes que presentan SUH no asociado a diarrea.

  11. Development of a dual vaccine for prevention of Brucella abortus infection and Escherichia coli O157:H7 intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannino, Florencia; Herrmann, Claudia K; Roset, Mara S; Briones, Gabriel

    2015-05-05

    Zoonoses that affect human and animal health have an important economic impact. In the study now presented, a bivalent vaccine has been developed that has the potential for preventing the transmission from cattle to humans of two bacterial pathogens: Brucella abortus and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). A 66kDa chimeric antigen, composed by EspA, Intimin, Tir, and H7 flagellin (EITH7) from STEC, was constructed and expressed in B. abortus Δpgm vaccine strain (BabΔpgm). Mice orally immunized with BabΔpgm(EITH7) elicited an immune response with the induction of anti-EITH7 antibodies (IgA) that clears an intestinal infection of E. coli O157:H7 three times faster (t=4 days) than mice immunized with BabΔpgm carrier strain (t=12 days). As expected, mice immunized with BabΔpgm(EITH7) strain also elicited a protective immune response against B. abortus infection. A Brucella-based vaccine platform is described capable of eliciting a combined protective immune response against two bacterial pathogens with diverse lifestyles-the intracellular pathogen B. abortus and the intestinal extracellular pathogen STEC.

  12. Investigation of an Escherichia coli O145 outbreak in a child day-care centre - extensive sampling and characterization of eae- and stx1-positive E. coli yields epidemiological and socioeconomic insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruheim Torkjel

    2011-09-01

    aEPEC strains in the outbreak population. MLVA-typing of the STEC-isolates strongly indicates a common source of infection. The study describes epidemiological aspects and socioeconomic consequences of a non-O157 STEC outbreak, which are less commonly reported than O157 outbreaks.

  13. Comprehensive Evaluation and Implementation of Improvement Actions in Butcher Shops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leotta, Gerardo A.; Brusa, Victoria; Galli, Lucía; Adriani, Cristian; Linares, Luciano; Etcheverría, Analía; Sanz, Marcelo; Sucari, Adriana; Peral García, Pilar; Signorini, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne pathogens can cause acute and chronic diseases and produce a wide range of symptoms. Since the consumption of ground beef is a risk factor for infections with some bacterial pathogens, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of butcher shops, implemented improvement actions for both butcher shops and consumers, and verified the impact of those actions implemented. A comprehensive evaluation was made and risk was quantified on a 1–100 scale as high-risk (1–40), moderate-risk (41–70) or low-risk (71–100). A total of 172 raw ground beef and 672 environmental samples were collected from 86 butcher shops during the evaluation (2010–2011) and verification (2013) stages of the study. Ground beef samples were analyzed for mesophilic aerobic organisms, Escherichia coli and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus enumeration. Salmonella spp., E. coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and Listeria monocytogenes were detected and isolated from all samples. Risk quantification resulted in 43 (50.0%) high-risk, 34 (39.5%) moderate-risk, and nine (10.5%) low-risk butcher shops. Training sessions for 498 handlers and 4,506 consumers were held. Re-evaluation by risk quantification and microbiological analyses resulted in 19 (22.1%) high-risk, 42 (48.8%) moderate-risk and 25 (29.1%) low-risk butcher shops. The count of indicator microorganisms decreased with respect to the 2010–2011 period. After the implementation of improvement actions, the presence of L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and stx genes in ground beef decreased. Salmonella spp. was isolated from 10 (11.6%) ground beef samples, without detecting statistically significant differences between both study periods (evaluation and verification). The percentage of pathogens in environmental samples was reduced in the verification period (Salmonella spp., 1.5%; L. monocytogenes, 10.7%; E. coli O157:H7, 0.6%; non-O157 STEC, 6.8%). Risk quantification was useful to identify those

  14. A polyclonal antibody based immunoassay detects seven subtypes of Shiga toxin 2 produced by Escherichia coli in human and environmental samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC are frequent causes of severe human diseases ranging from diarrhea to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The existing strategy for detection of STEC relies on the unique sorbitol-negative fermentation property of the O157 strains, the most commonly identified serotype has been E. coli O157. It is becoming increasingly evident, however, that numerous non-O157 STEC serotypes also cause outbreaks and severe illnesses. It is necessary to have new methods that are capable of detecting all STEC strains. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we describe the development of a sandwich ELISA assay for detecting both O157 and non-O157 STECs by incorporating a novel polyclonal antibody (pAb against Stx2. The newly established immunoassay was capable of detecting Stx2a spiked in environmental samples with a limit of detection between 10 and 100 pg/mL in soil and between 100 and 500 pg/mL in feces. When applied to 36 bacterial strains isolated from human and environmental samples, this assay detected Stx2 in all strains that were confirmed to be stx2-positive by real-time PCR, demonstrating a 100% sensitivity and specificity. CONCLUSIONS: The sandwich ELISA developed in this study will enable any competent laboratory to identify and characterize Stx2-producing O157 and non-O157 strains in human and environmental samples, resulting in rapid diagnosis and patient care. The results of epitope mapping from this study will be useful for further development of a peptide-based antibody and vaccine.

  15. Comparison of Agar Media for Detection and Quantification of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Cattle Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Zachary R; Lewis, Gentry L; Moxley, Rodney A

    2016-06-01

    The isolation and quantification of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from cattle feces are challenging. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of selected agar media in an attempt to identify an optimal medium for the detection and quantification of non-O157 STEC in cattle feces. Comparison studies were performed using CHROMagar STEC, Possé differential agar (Possé), Possé modified by the reduction or addition of antimicrobials, STEC heart infusion washed blood agar with mitomycin C (SHIBAM), and SHIBAM modified by the addition of antimicrobials. Fourteen STEC strains, two each belonging to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157, were used to test detection in inoculated fecal suspensions at concentrations of 10(2) or 10(3) CFU/g. One STEC strain from each of these seven serogroups was used to estimate the concentration of recovered STEC in feces inoculated at 10(3), 10(4), or 10(5) CFU/g. Significantly more suspensions (P < 0.05) were positive for STEC when plated on Possé containing reduced concentrations of novobiocin and potassium tellurite compared with SHIBAM, but not SHIBAM modified by containing these same antimicrobials at the same concentrations. Numerically, more suspensions were positive for STEC by using this same form of modified Possé compared with Possé, but this difference was not statistically significant. More suspensions were positive for STEC cultured on CHROMagar STEC compared with those on Possé (P < 0.05) and on modified Possé (P = 0.05). Most inoculated fecal suspensions below 10(4) CFU/g of feces were underestimated or not quantifiable for the concentration of STEC by using CHROMagar STEC or modified Possé. These results suggest that CHROMagar STEC performs better than Possé or SHIBAM for detection of STEC in bovine feces, but adjustments in the concentrations of novobiocin and potassium tellurite in the latter two media result in significant improvements in their

  16. Virulence Profiling of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Recovered from Domestic Farm Animals in Northwestern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Anabel Amézquita-López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC is a zoonotic enteric pathogen that causes human gastrointestinal illnesses. The present study characterized the virulence profiles of O157 and non-O157 STEC strains, recovered from domestic animals in small rural farms within the agricultural Culiacan Valley in Mexico. Virulence genes coding for adhesins, cytotoxins, proteases, subtypes of Shiga toxin (Stx, and other effectors were identified in the STEC strains by PCR. The genotyping analysis revealed the presence of the effectors nleA, nleB, nleE and nleH1-2, espK, and espN in the O157:H7 and O111:H8 STEC strains. Furthermore, the genes encoding the autoagglutinating adhesin (Saa and subtilase (SubA were exclusively identified in the O8:H19 eae-negative strains. The adhesin (iha and the silent hemolysin (sheA genes were detected in 79% of the O157 and non-O157 strains. To examine the relative toxicities of the STEC strains, a fluorescent Vero cell line, Vero-d2EGFP, was employed to measure the inhibition of protein synthesis by Stx. Analysis of culture supernatants from serotype O8:H19 strains with the stx gene profile stx1a, stx2a and stx2c and serotypes O75:H8 and O146:H8 strains with the stx gene profile stx1a, stx1c and stx2b, resulted in a significant reduction in the Vero-d2EGFP fluorescent signal. These observations suggest that these non-O157 strains may have an enhanced ability to inhibit protein synthesis in Vero cells. Interestingly, analysis of the stx2c-positive O157:H7 strains resulted in a high fluorescent signal, indicating a reduced toxicity in the Vero-d2EGFP cells. These findings indicate that the O157 and non-O157 STEC strains, recovered in the Culiacan Valley, display distinct virulence profiles and relative toxicities in mammalian cells and have provided information for evaluating risks associated with zoonotic STEC in this agricultural region in Mexico.

  17. Factores de riesgo de infección por cepas de Escherichia coli shigatoxigénicas en gatos y perros Risk factors for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in cats and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bentancor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available El Síndrome Urémico Hemolítico causado por Escherichia coli shigatoxigénico, STEC, es endémico en Argentina. Si bien es una enfermedad de Transmisión Alimentaria, se postula que el contagio persona-persona tiene alto impacto en nuestro país. Dada la estrecha relación personasanimales de compañía en los centros urbanos, esta ruta ha sido evaluada. El objetivo del trabajo es comunicar los factores de riesgo asociados a la portación-infección por STEC en animales de compañía de Buenos Aires, Argentina, proporcionando información útil para evaluar el riesgo de transmisión de este patógeno. Se recolectaron hisopados rectales de 149 gatos y 450 perros desde abril de 2005 a marzo de 2006. Se elaboró una ficha epidemiológica para cada animal. Se realizó rastrillaje de los genes de Shigatoxina (stx en los cultivos bacterianos por PCR. Todas las cepas aisladas en los cultivos stx+ fueron stx2+. De los 113 gatos clínicamente sanos evaluados, 4 (2,7% fueron stx+. De los 373 perros clínicamente sanos 4 (1,1% fueron stx+ mientras que de 29 perros con diarrea 1 fue positivo (3,4%. El análisis de 12 parámetros, evidenció algunos factores de riesgo de presencia de STEC: comida potencialmente contaminada, edad del animal, contacto frecuente con otras mascotas y estación del año. No se determinaron diferencias significativas entre los animales clínicamente sanos o diarreicos respecto al riesgo de portación de cepas STEC.Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, STEC, is endemic in Argentina. Although the disease is classified as a Food Transmitted Disease, personto- person infection has been postulated to have a high impact in our country. Given the close relationship between pets and their owners, the pet-owner transmission route has been analyzed in urban centers. The aim of this work is to communicate the risk-factor analysis in pets that carry STEC in Buenos Aires, Argentina, providing useful

  18. 肝片吸虫 Fh8明显增强 STEC 的 Stx1可溶性表达及 Stx1单克隆抗体制备%Fasciola hepatica 8 Significantly Enhances Soluble Expression of Stx1 from STEC and Stx1 Monoclonal Antibody Preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪寒; 张碧成; 张强; 汪伟; 何孔旺

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1 ),AB5 pentamers protein,is one of major virulent factors of Shiga Toxin-produ-cing Escherichia coli (STEC).The N-terminal fragment of Stx1 A subunit encodes a signal peptide,and its C-termi-nal amino acid sequences presents high hydrophobicity and low immunogenicity by bioinformatics software analysis, and these features lead to expression failure and inclusion of target protein.In this study,our aim is to clone stx1 gene and express soluble protein for development of monoclonal antibodies against Stx1 A.The 21 0 bp of Fh8 gene from Fasciola hepatica was cloned into pCold Ⅰ with Nde Ⅰ and Xho Ⅰ,and the middle fragment between 73 -759 ntof stx1A subunit was amplified,fused with Fh8 gene to construct recombinant strain of BL21 (DE3)/pColdⅠ-Fh8-stx1.His-Fh8-stx1A was immunized Balb /c mice to prepare positive hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies by Sp2 /0 cell fusion screening.We successfully constructed a recombinant plasmid pCold Ⅰ-Fh8-stx1a,expressed His-Fh8-Stx1 A in prokaryotic cells in soluble form.Three stably secreting anti-Stx1 A monoclonal antibodies (McAb)of hybridoma cell lines were developed,one of them was used to prepare high titer ascites.Western Blot assay showed ascites after purified are able to react with recombinant His-Fh8-Stx1 A and Shiga toxin 1 crude ex-tract.We successfully prepared soluble Stx1 A protein with good antigenicity,and three monoclonal antibodies with high titers,these will lay substantial foundation for future study,i.e.developing sandwich ELISA and colloidal gold test strip to detect STEC.%志贺毒素1(Shiga toxin 1,Stx1),系五聚体蛋白,是产志贺毒素性大肠杆菌(Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli,STEC)主要的毒素因子,但 Stx1体外极不易可溶性表达,旨在克隆和表达志贺毒素1(Shiga toxin 1,Stx1)A 亚基,体外获得可溶性表达的 Stx1,以研制单克隆抗体。生物信息学软件分析 Stx1 A 亚基氨基酸序列,Stx1 A1

  19. Prevalence and Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated from Slaughtered Qurban Animal in Jakarta Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Gusti Ningrum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the presence of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC and the possibility of carrying rfbE gene and H7 flagellar on meat, liver, and stool samples collected from Jakarta Province of Indonesia. A total of 51 samples collected from meat, liver, and stool of slaughtered cattle from qurban festival were tested using conventional culture and multiplex PCR methods. STEC non O157 were detected in meat (5.3% and stool (8.3% with one isolate from stool carried H7 flagellar. However, all isolates were lacking of rfbE gene. In antimicrobial susceptibility tests, the STEC isolates showed antibiotic resistance to erythromycin and oxacillin. Overall, the result shows that meat and liver of this origin activity represents a potential risk to human health.

  20. National Survey of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Serotypes O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 in Australian Beef Cattle Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Glen E; Fegan, Narelle; Duffy, Lesley L; McMILLAN, Kate E; Jordan, David; Barlow, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    Escherichia coli O157 and six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serotypes (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, colloquially referred to as the "big 6") have been classified as adulterants of raw nonintact beef products in the United States. While beef cattle are a known reservoir for the prototype STEC serotype, E. coli O157, less is known about the dissemination of non-O157 STEC serotypes in Australian cattle. In the present study, 1,500 fecal samples were collected at slaughter from adult (n =628) and young (n =286) beef cattle, adult (n =128) and young (n =143) dairy cattle, and veal calves (n = 315) across 31 Australian export-registered processing establishments. Fecal samples were enriched and tested for E. coli O157 and the big 6 STEC serotypes using BAX System PCR and immunomagnetic separation methods. Pathogenic STEC (pSTEC; isolates that possess stx, eae, and an O antigen marker for O157 or a big 6 serotype) were isolated from 115 samples (7.7%), of which 100 (6.7%) contained E. coli O157 and 19 (1.3%) contained a big 6 serotype. Four of the 115 samples contained multiple pSTEC serotypes. Among samples confirmed for big 6 pSTEC, 15 (1%) contained E. coli O26 and 4 (0.3%) contained E. coli O111. pSTEC of serotypes O45, O103, O121, and O145 were not isolated from any sample, even though genes indicative of E. coli belonging to these serotypes were detected by PCR. Analysis of animal classes revealed a higher pSTEC prevalence in younger animals, including veal (12.7%), young beef (9.8%), and young dairy (7.0%), than in adult animals, including adult beef (5.1%) and adult dairy (3.9%). This study is the largest of its kind undertaken in Australia. In contrast to E. coli O157 and consistent with previous findings, this study reports a relatively low prevalence of big 6 pSTEC serotypes in Australian cattle populations.

  1. Assessment of virulence factors characteristic of human Escherichia coli pathotypes and antimicrobial resistance in O157:H7 and non-O157:H7 isolates from livestock in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, A; Gómez-Barrero, S; Porrero, C; Bárcena, C; López, G; Cantón, R; Gortázar, C; Domínguez, L; Álvarez, J

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of virulence factors (VFs) typical of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles were assessed in 780 isolates from healthy pigs, broilers, and cattle from Spain. VF distribution was broader than expected, although at low prevalence for most genes, with AMR being linked mainly to host species.

  2. Assessment of Virulence Factors Characteristic of Human Escherichia coli Pathotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance in O157:H7 and Non-O157:H7 Isolates from Livestock in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of virulence factors (VFs) typical of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles were assessed in 780 isolates from healthy pigs, broilers, and cattle from Spain. VF distribution was broader than expected, although at low prevalence for most genes, with AMR being linked mainly to host species.

  3. Impact of antibiotics on the intestinal microbiota and on the treatment of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szych, Jolanta; Wołkowicz, Tomasz; La Ragione, Roberto; Madajczak, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    This review evaluates the current literature based on the impact of antibiotics on the intestinal microbiota and the critical role of intestinal bacteria in controlling infection and subsequent clinical disease caused by STEC and Salmonella, and the transmissibility of these important pathogens.A number of studies have indicated that antibiotic therapy could result in unexpected changes in the clinical picture of disease. This is observed, for example, in the case of infections associated with Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), when antibiotics used in treatment of the disease may increase the risk of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thus fatal outcomes. In the case of such infections, treatment with antibiotics is usually discouraged. The use of antibiotics could cause also undesirable changes in the intestinal microbial flora and prolonged pathogen shedding, which is observed in the case of Salmonella infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy can result in Salmonella remaining in the host's cells (intracellular) and thus resulting in further asymptomatic carriage and a further complication is the development of resistance.

  4. Role of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the swine production chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ercoli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC can cause severe clinical diseases in humans, such as haemorrhagic colitis (HC and haemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS. Although ruminants, primarily cattle, have been suggested as typical reservoirs of STEC, many food products of other origins, including pork products, have been confirmed as vehicles for STEC transmission. Only in rare cases, pork consumption is associated with severe clinical symptoms caused by high pathogenic STEC strains. However, in these outbreaks, it is unknown whether the contamination of food products occurs during swine processing or via cross-contamination from foodstuffs of different sources. In swine, STEC plays an important role in the pathogenesis of oedema disease. In particular a Shiga toxin subtype, named stx2e, it is considered as a key factor involved in the damage of swine endothelial cells. On the contrary, stx2e-producing Escherichia coli has rarely been isolated in humans, and usually only from asymptomatic carriers or from patients with mild symptoms, such as uncomplicated diarrhoea. In fact, the presence of gene stx2e, encoding for stx2e, has rarely been reported in STEC strains that cause HUS. Moreover, stx2e-producing STEC isolated from humans and pigs were found to differ in serogroup, their virulence profile and interaction with intestinal epithelial cells. Because of the limited epidemiologic data of STEC in swine and the increasing role of non-O157 STEC in human illnesses, the relationship between swine STEC and human disease needs to be further investigated.

  5. Outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 infection associated with a day camp petting zoo--Pinellas County, Florida, May-June 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    On June 7, 2007, the Pinellas County Health Department in central Florida was notified by a private physician regarding a positive laboratory result for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 (STEC O157) infection in a child aged 9 years. Initial interviews revealed the child had attended a week-long session at a day camp and had come into contact with animals in the camp's petting zoo. On June 8, an investigation was begun by the Pinellas County Health Department; the same day, the petting zoo was closed on the recommendation of the health department. This report summarizes the results of the investigation, which identified seven cases of STEC O157 infection: four laboratory-confirmed primary cases, two probable primary cases, and one laboratory-confirmed secondary case, all associated directly or indirectly with the petting zoo. Two children were hospitalized; all seven patients recovered. Petting zoo operators should adhere to guidelines for supervised handwashing and other prevention measures that will help minimize the risk in children for infection from animal contact.

  6. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time PCR method for detecting shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in beef and comparison to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology laboratory guidebook method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratamico, Pina M; Wasilenko, Jamie L; Garman, Bradley; Demarco, Daniel R; Varkey, Stephen; Jensen, Mark; Rhoden, Kyle; Tice, George

    2014-02-01

    The "top-six" non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) most frequently associated with outbreaks and cases of foodborne illnesses have been declared as adulterants in beef by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). Regulatory testing in beef began in June 2012. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the DuPont BAX System method for detecting these top six STEC strains and strains of E. coli O157:H7. For STEC, the BAX System real-time STEC suite was evaluated, including a screening assay for the stx and eae virulence genes and two panel assays to identify the target serogroups: panel 1 detects O26, O111, and O121, and panel 2 detects O45, O103, O145. For E. coli O157:H7, the BAX System real-time PCR assay for this specific serotype was used. Sensitivity of each assay for the PCR targets was ≥1.23 × 10(3) CFU/ml in pure culture. Each assay was 100% inclusive for the strains tested (20 to 50 per assay), and no cross-reactivity with closely related strains was observed in any of the assays. The performance of the BAX System methods was compared with that of the FSIS Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) methods for detection of the top six STEC and E. coli O157:H7 strains in ground beef and beef trim. Generally, results of the BAX System method were similar to those of the MLG methods for detecting non-O157 STEC and E. coli O157:H7. Reducing or eliminating novobiocin in modified tryptic soy broth (mTSB) may improve the detection of STEC O111 strains; one beef trim sample inoculated with STEC O111 produced a negative result when enriched in mTSB with 8 mg/liter novobiocin but was positive when enriched in mTSB without novobiocin. The results of this study indicate the feasibility of deploying a panel of real-time PCR assay configurations for the detection and monitoring of the top six STEC and E. coli O157:H7 strains in beef. The approach could easily be adapted

  7. Behavior of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains on whole and sliced jalapeño and serrano peppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and non-O157 shiga toxin-producing E. coli (non-O157-STEC) on whole and slices of jalapeño and serrano peppers as well as in blended sauce at 25 ± 2 °C and 3 ± 2 °C was investigated. Chili peppers were collected from markets of Pachuca city, Hidalgo, Mexico. On whole serrano and jalapeño stored at 25 ± 2 °C or 3 ± 2 °C, no growth was observed for EPEC, ETEC, EIEC and non-O157-STEC rifampicin resistant strains. After twelve days at 25 ± 2 °C, on serrano peppers all diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEP) strains had decreased by a total of approximately 3.7 log, whereas on jalapeño peppers the strains had decreased by approximately 2.8 log, and at 3 ± 2 °C they decreased to approximately 2.5 and 2.2 log respectively, on serrano and jalapeño. All E. coli pathotypes grew onto sliced chili peppers and in blended sauce: after 24 h at 25 ± 2 °C, all pathotypes had grown to approximately 3 and 4 log CFU on pepper slices and sauce, respectively. At 3 ± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiological and Microbiological Investigation of an Outbreak of Severe Disease from Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157 Infection Associated with Consumption of a Slaw Garnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Lisa; Adams, Natalie; Glen, Kirsten; Dallman, Timothy J; Kar-Purkayastha, Ishani; Beasley, Gillian; Willis, Caroline; Padfield, Simon; Adak, Goutam; Jenkins, Claire

    2016-07-01

    Investigating outbreaks of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in England is a priority due to the potential severity of disease. However, there are often challenges in investigating outbreaks due to the small numbers of cases, poor patient recall, and low levels of bacteria that are challenging to detect in food samples using traditional laboratory culture techniques, and frequently a source is not identified. In September 2014, we investigated an STEC O157 outbreak associated with consuming a slaw garnish, and we report our findings here. Twenty confirmed cases were identified. Outbreak cases were interviewed, and menus reviewed to identify dishes consumed outside the home. Cases shared a history of eating meals at different chain restaurants. Analysis of menu items indicated shared consumption of slaw garnishes by 85.6% cases, although just 35.7% reported consuming them during interviews. Whole-genome sequencing linked cases where interpretation of the multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis profile was obscured and indicated that the strain originated from a domestic (i.e., United Kingdom) source. Traceback identified that carrots and cabbages grown in the United Kingdom were the likely source of infection. Samples of products were examined, but STEC was not recovered. Epidemiological investigations linked the outbreak to consumption of a slaw garnish, which was poorly recalled by cases, and likely comprised of domestically produced raw vegetables. The causative organism was not isolated from food samples, and we conclude that future investigations should include sampling of animals and wildlife in the vicinity of farms where implicated produce is grown.

  9. Central line infections - hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infection; Central venous catheter - infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired ...

  10. Hookworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ... The infection is caused by infestation with any of the following ... Ancylostoma duodenale Ancylostoma ceylanicum Ancylostoma ...

  11. Kidney Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-ray called a voiding cystourethrogram. Antibiotics for kidney infections Antibiotics are the first line of treatment ... the infection is completely eliminated. Hospitalization for severe kidney infections For a severe kidney infection, your doctor ...

  12. Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated from Ground Beef Collected in Different Socioeconomic Strata Markets in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Llorente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of raw/undercooked ground beef is the most common route of transmission of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC. The aim of the study was to determine the STEC contamination level of the ground beef samples collected in 36 markets of different socioeconomic strata in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the characterization of the isolated strains. Ninety-one out of 252 (36.1% samples were stx+. Fifty-seven STEC strains were recovered. Eleven STEC strains belonged to O157 serogroup, and 46 to non-O157 serogroups. Virulence markers of the 57 STEC were stx1, 5.3% (3/57; stx2, 86.0% (49/57; stx1/stx2, 8.8% (5/57; ehxA, 61.4% (35/57; eae, 26.3% (15/57; saa, 24.6% (14/57. Shiga toxin subtypes were stx2, 31.5% (17/54; stx2c-vhb, 24.1% (13/54; stx2c-vha, 20.4% (11/54; stx2/stx2c-vha, 14.8% (8/54; stx2/stx2c-vhb, 5.6% (3/54; stx2c-vha/vhb, 3.7% (2/54. Serotypes O178:H19 and O157:H7 were prevalent. Contamination rate of STEC in all strata was high, and the highest O157 contamination was observed at low strata at several sampling rounds. Persistence of STEC was not detected. Sixteen strains (28.1% were resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin, amikacin, or tetracycline. The STEC contamination level of ground beef could vary according to the sociocultural characteristics of the population.

  13. Evaluation of eight agar media for the isolation of shiga toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Alexander; Huszczynski, George; Gauthier, Martine; Blais, Burton

    2014-01-01

    The growth characteristics of 96 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains representing 36 different O-types (including priority O types O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O157) on commercial and in-house agar media were studied. The ability of the strains to grow on agar media with varying selective supplement formulations was evaluated using MacConkey Agar (MAC); Rainbow® Agar O157 (RBA); Rainbow® Agar O157 with manufacturer-recommended selective supplements (RBA-NT); Rainbow® Agar O157 with USDA-recommended selective supplements (RBA-USDA); CHROMagar STEC™ (CH STEC); Tryptone Bile agar containing cefixime and tellurite (TBA-CT); Tryptone Bile agar containing cefixime, tellurite, eosin and methylene blue (TBA-EM); and VTEC agar. All of the strains were able to grow on MAC, RBA and VTEC agar, whereas a number of strains (including some non-O157 priority O types) were unable to grow on the highly selective media CH STEC, RBA-NT, RBA-USDA, TBA-EM and TBA-CT. Only RBA-NT and CH STEC exhibited significant inhibition of background flora from ground beef enrichment. Significant inhibition of background flora from beef trim enrichment was observed with RBA-NT, RBA-USDA, CH STEC, TBA-EM and VTEC agar. With exception of E. coli O157, several different colony morphologies were observed on the differential plating media among strains of the same O type, indicating that this colony morphology is not a reliable means of identifying target STEC. These results suggest that an approach to maximize the recovery of target STEC from beef enrichment cultures is dual plating on lesser (RBA, MAC, VTEC agar) and more highly (RBA-NT, CH STEC) selective agars.

  14. A novel vehicle for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to humans: multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections associated with consumption of ready-to-bake commercial prepackaged cookie dough--United States, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Karen P; Biggerstaff, Gwen; MacDonald, J Kathryn; Trees, Eija; Medus, Carlota; Musser, Kimberlee A; Stroika, Steven G; Zink, Don; Sotir, Mark J

    2012-02-15

     Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) associated with numerous foodborne outbreaks in the United States and is an important cause of bacterial gastrointestinal illness. In May 2009, we investigated a multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections.  Outbreak-associated cases were identified using serotyping and molecular subtyping procedures. Traceback investigation and product testing were performed. A matched case-control study was conducted to identify exposures associated with illness using age-, sex-, and state-matched controls.  Seventy-seven patients with illnesses during the period 16 March-8 July 2009 were identified from 30 states; 35 were hospitalized, 10 developed hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and none died. Sixty-six percent of patients were dough, compared with 4 of 36 controls (11%) (matched odds ratio = 41.3; P dough, 94% reported brand A. Three nonoutbreak STEC strains were isolated from brand A cookie dough. The investigation led to a recall of 3.6 million packages of brand A cookie dough and a product reformulation.  This is the first reported STEC outbreak associated with consuming ready-to-bake commercial prepackaged cookie dough. Despite instructions to bake brand A cookie dough before eating, case patients consumed the product uncooked. Manufacturers should consider formulating ready-to-bake commercial prepackaged cookie dough to be as safe as a ready-to-eat product. More effective consumer education about the risks of eating unbaked cookie dough is needed.

  15. Shigella Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Shigella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Shigella Infections Print A ... the Doctor en español Infecciones por Shigella About Shigella Shigella are bacteria that can infect the digestive ...

  16. Spinal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections may occur following surgery or spontaneously in patients with certain risk factors. Risk factors for spinal infections include poor nutrition, immune suppression, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Surgical risk factors ...

  17. Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Infective Endocarditis Updated:Oct 10,2016 View an illustration of endocarditis Infective endocarditis (IE), also called bacterial endocarditis (BE), ...

  18. [Fenotypic and genotypic characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O111 strain isolated from patient with hemolytic-uremic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Podsiadły, Edyta; Szych, Jolanta; Semkowicz-Chmielewska, Anna; Demkow, Urszula; Pierzchlewicz, Anna; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2010-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157 and non-O157 are important emergance pathogens that can cause diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis with life-threatening complications, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). A few cases of EHEC infections are documented per year in Poland. Among them only one patient with EHEC O157 infection developed HUS. We characterized the first VTEC non-O157 strain isolated from child with HUS in Poland. The VTEC O111 strain produced Stx2 which was cytotoxic for Vero cell. Using DNA microarray analysis we have found set of virulence genes in VTEC O111 strain as: stx2A, stx2B, ehly, eae, tir tccP espA, espJ, cif nleA, nleB, lpfA, iha, efa1, cba. The strain was fenotypic resistant to streptomycin, tetracyclin and sulphonamides (strA, tetA, sul2 genes were detected).

  19. Hand Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a skin infection that can cause skin redness, warmth, and pain. People with cellulitis may have a ... cause the skin around the nail to be red, swollen, and tender. If the infection is treated ...

  20. Staph Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture Household Safety: Preventing Cuts Dealing With Cuts Osteomyelitis Tetanus First Aid: Skin Infections Toxic Shock Syndrome ... Abscess Paronychia Dealing With Cuts and Wounds Cellulitis Osteomyelitis Impetigo Staph Infections MRSA Cuts, Scratches, and Scrapes ...

  1. Streptococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... red rash on the body. Impetigo - a skin infection Toxic shock syndrome Cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease) Group B strep can cause blood infections, pneumonia and meningitis in newborns. A screening test ...

  2. Tapeworm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Tapeworm infection By Mayo Clinic Staff Tapeworm infection is caused by ingesting food or water contaminated with tapeworm eggs or larvae. If you ingest certain tapeworm eggs, they can migrate outside ...

  3. Infection Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lives are lost because of the spread of infections in hospitals. Health care workers can take steps ... of infectious diseases. These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective ...

  4. Tinea Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The skin may become itchy and red, with blisters and cracking of the skin. The infection may ... my sheets and towels every day? ResourcesDiagnosis and Management of Common Tinea Infections by SL Noble, Pharm. ...

  5. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter infection is a common foodborne illness. You get it from eating raw or undercooked poultry. You ... whether you need to take antibiotics. To prevent campylobacter infection, cook poultry thoroughly. Use a separate cutting ...

  6. Spinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bobby K-B; Deckey, Jeffrey; Hu, Serena S

    2002-01-01

    Spinal infections can occur in a variety of clinical situations. Their presentation ranges from the infant with diskitis who is unwilling to crawl or walk to the adult who develops an infection after a spinal procedure. The most common types of spinal infections are hematogenous bacterial or fungal infections, pediatric diskitis, epidural abscess, and postoperative infections. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of spinal infections, the cornerstone of treatment, requires a high index of suspicion in at-risk patients and the appropriate evaluation to identify the organism and determine the extent of infection. Neurologic function and spinal stability also should be carefully evaluated. The goals of therapy should include eradicating the infection, relieving pain, preserving or restoring neurologic function, improving nutrition, and maintaining spinal stability.

  7. Anaerobic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the face and neck, sometimes after a dental infection or procedure such as a tooth extraction or ... adults of all ages. The most common are dental infections, inflammation of the abdominal lining (peritonitis), and abscesses ...

  8. Hantavirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but deadly viral infection. It is spread by mice and rats. They shed the virus in their ... breathe infected air or come into contact with rodents or their urine or droppings. You cannot catch ...

  9. Rotavirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  10. [Update on the treatment of endemic hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathogenesis and treatment of the most severe systemic complication of infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Brando, Romina J; Bentancor, Leticia V; Mejías, María Pilar; Panek, Analía C; Cabrera, Gabriel G; Exeni, Ramón A; Palermo, Marina S

    2011-01-01

    The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. HUS is a critical health problem in Argentina since it is the main cause of acute renal failure in children and the second cause of chronic renal failure, giving account for 20% of renal transplants in children and adolescents in our country. In spite of the extensive research in the field, the mainstay of treatment for patients with HUS is supportive therapy, and there are no specific therapies preventing or ameliorating the disease course. In this review, we present the current knowledge about pathogenic mechanisms and discuss traditional and innovative therapeutic approaches, with special focus in national status and contributions made by Argentinean groups.

  11. The occurrence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in bathing water of the Sierra de la Ventana region, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marucci, Patricia L; Olivera, Nelda L; Brugnoni, Lorena I; Sica, Maria G; Cubitto, Maria Amelia

    2011-04-01

    The region of Sierra de la Ventana is located in the southwest of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Traditionally, this area has been devoted to livestock and agriculture, but tourism has had a significant development in recent years. In the region, there are many rivers and streams that are used for swimming and bathing. A survey of the occurrence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in these waters was conducted, and the microbiological quality of rivers and streams was investigated. No E. coli O157 was recovered by immunomagnetic separation. Nevertheless, the Shiga toxin gene, exclusively stx2 genotype, was detected in four non-O157 E. coli strains. Two STEC strains carried eae factor, but none of them harbored the EHEC-hlyA gene. Three of the STEC isolates belonged to samples obtained in the warm months, and one to the winter sampling. In the sample sites where STEC strains were isolated the counts of E. coli/100 ml exceeded or were close to the limit recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for bathing water. The relationship observed between the rainy season and E. coli counts suggests that among the main causes for the hygienic indicator increase is the runoff of manure deposited on soils that may also induce the entrance of pathogens into the aquatic environment. This research, the first reporting STEC isolation from recreational waters in this area, revealed that streams and rivers from a beef-producing area of Argentina are a reservoir of STEC strains.

  12. [Serotype identification and antibiotic susceptibility of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in the Weishan area in Shandong Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, C C; Hu, B; Bi, Z W; Kou, Z Q; Fang, M; Chen, B L; Bi, Z Q

    2017-01-06

    Objective: To determine the serotypes and drug resistance profiles of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in animal stools from the Weishan area in Shandong Province, China. To provide the basis for further study. Methods: Five hundred animal stool samples (from pigs, cattle, sheep, dogs and birds) were collected from the Weishan area and STEC strains were isolated from these samples. Strains were serotyped by a serum agglutination test, and their drug resistance profiles were determined through antimicrobial sensitivity experiments. In this study, PCR was used to detect tetracycline resistance genes (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetD) and beta-lactam resistance genes (blaSHV-1, blaCTX-M, blaTEM). Results: Sixteen strains of STEC were isolated from animal stool samples. Thirteen strains were isolated from pig stool samples, two from bovine stool samples and one from a sheep stool sample. Two of the strains were identified as E. coli O157:H7, and other 14 strains were non-O157 STEC of different serotypes. Antimicrobial sensitivity experiments showed that 15 of the strains were multidrug resistant. The rates of resistance were as follows: nalidixic acid (12/16 strains), sulfisoxazole (11/16), trimethoprim and sulphame-thoxazole (11/16), doxycycline (9/16), azithromycin (9/16), tetracycline (9/16), chloramphenicol (8/16) and streptomycin (8/16). Therefore, nalidixic acid showed the highest rate of resistance among the strains, followed by trimethoprim and sulphame-thoxazole, and sulfisoxazole. Resistance to cefepime or imipenem was not detected. In total, three types of drug resistance genes (tetA, tetB and tetC) were detected among the 16 strains. Conclusion: The results showed that STEC strains isolated from animals in the Weishan area were of a range of serotypes. The 16 strains of STEC isolated from animal stools in this area were resistant to a number of antibiotics, with many strains displaying multidrug resistance.

  13. Protozoan Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    cooked meat of infected animals, especially sheep and pigs. Toxoplasma infects one-third to one-half of normal humans by age 40, but causes...Toxoplasma in the first trimester, 30-50 per cent deliver an obviously affected infant. Congenital infection is associated with hydrocephalus...chorioretinitis, hepatosplenomegaly, and rash. In survivors, mental retardation, deaf- ness, and cardiac malformations may be noted. Chorioretinitis may also

  14. [Hand infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Philippe; Le Nen, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Superficial and deep hand infections are frequent in general medical practice. Clinical examination is a crucial step for an adapted provided care. Most of the time, surgery is the only way to heal infections. However, in some cases (like bites), empiric antibiotherapy is first indicated to limit infection. Staphyloccocus aureus as well as Group Beta Streptococcus are the most frequently pathogenes associated with hand infections. Methicillin resistant S. Aureus must always be considered in the diagnoses. Whatever treatment is provided, clinical assessement must be repeated within two days. An early adaquated treatment prevent functional complications and in some cases death of the patients.

  15. Rhinovirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  16. Eye Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  17. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  18. Construction of the XZ113 △ eaeA, XZ113 △stx2 and XZ113 △ ehxA mutants of STEC O18 XZ113 and their pathogenicity in mice%产志贺毒素大肠杆菌O18XZ113株主要毒力基因eaeA、stx2、ehxA突变株的构建及其对小鼠的致病作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛涛; 陈先亮; 高崧; 刘秀梵

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探讨毒力基因eaeA、stx2、ehxA与产志贺毒素大肠杆菌O18致病力的关系.[方法]利用λ-Red重组系统,构建STEC XZ113株eaeA、stx2、ehxA基因缺失突变株并进行一系列生物学特性的研究.[结果]细胞粘附试验表明突变株XZ113△eaeA对HEp-2细胞的粘附能力明显降低;Vero细胞毒素试验表明突变株XZ113 △stx2失去了使Vero细胞发生病变的能力;溶血活性试验表明突变株XZ113△ehxA无法在血平板上产生溶血圈,丢失了溶血能力.回复株在以上表型方面与野生株XZ113一致;与亲本株的体外竞争试验结果表明,突变株竞争力减弱,体内竞争结果表明突变株XZ1 13△eaeA被中度致弱;突变株XZ113 △stx2和突变株XZ113△ehxA被高度致弱.[结论]stx2、ehxA基因在STEC O18 XZ113株的致病过程中发挥着更为重要的作用.%[Objective] To study the contribution of virulence genes of STEC 018 XZ113 isolate to the pathogenicity in mice. [Methods] The eaeA, stx2 and ehxA knock-out mutants of STEC strain XZ113 were generated using λ-Red recombination system. [ Results] Bacterial adherence test showed that the eaeA mutant adhered to Hep-2 cells in a diffuse manner with no microcolony formation. Vero cells assay showed that the stx mutant had no cytotoxicity to Vero cells. Enterohemolytic activity test showed that the ehxA mutant lost the ability to express the enterohemolytic activity. Competition assay between the wild-type strain XZ113 and its mutants in vivo and in vitro showed that all mutants were mildly attenuated in vitro, but in vivo, XZ113△eaeA was moderate attenuated, XZ113 △stx2 and XZ11△ehxA were all highly attenuated. [Conclusions] These results indicate that the virulence factors encoded by the stx2 and ehxA genes were important for the pathogenesis of STEC O18 in mice.

  19. Staph Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ill or the area spreads and gets very red or and hot — it's a good idea to see a doctor. Wound infections generally show up 2 or more days after the injury or surgery. The signs of a wound infection (redness, pain, swelling, and warmth) are similar to those found in cellulitis. A ...

  20. Staphylococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you should be familiar with include the following: Cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that first affects the outer layers of the ... skin. Although other types of bacteria can cause cellulitis, Saureus ... may diagnose the infection by examining the area. The doctor may take ...

  1. Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Skin ... (bacterial infection of the deeper layers of the skin and tissues beneath) are typical childhood skin infections. The usual bacterial culprits in skin ...

  2. Prevalence of diarrhea-associated virulence genes and genetic diversity in Escherichia coli isolates from fecal material of various animal hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Abhirosh; Mazumder, Asit

    2013-12-01

    In order to assess the health risk associated with a given source of fecal contamination using bacterial source tracking (BST), it is important to know the occurrence of potential pathogens as a function of host. Escherichia coli isolates (n=593) from the feces of diverse animals were screened for various virulence genes: stx1 and stx2 (Shiga toxin-producing E. coli [STEC]), eae and EAF (enteropathogenic E. coli [EPEC]), STh, STp, and LT (enterotoxigenic E. coli [ETEC]), and ipaH (enteroinvasive E. coli [EIEC]). Eleven hosts were positive for only the eae (10.11%) gene, representing atypical EPEC, while two hosts were positive for both eae and EAF (1.3%), representing typical EPEC. stx1, stx2, or both stx1 and stx2 were present in 1 (0.1%,) 10 (5.56%), and 2 (1.51%) hosts, respectively, and confirmed as non-O157 by using a E. coli O157 rfb (rfbO157) TaqMan assay. STh and STp were carried by 2 hosts (2.33%) and 1 host (0.33%), respectively, while none of the hosts were positive for LT and ipaH. The repetitive element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprint analysis identified 221 unique fingerprints with a Shannon diversity index of 2.67. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that majority of the isolates clustered according to the year of sampling. The higher prevalence of atypical EPEC and non-O157 STEC observed in different animal hosts indicates that they can be a reservoir of these pathogens with the potential to contaminate surface water and impact human health. Therefore, we suggest that E. coli from these sources must be included while constructing known source fingerprint libraries for tracking purposes. However, the observed genetic diversity and temporal variation need to be considered since these factors can influence the accuracy of BST results.

  3. infection i

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Summary: The ... Keywords: Pneumonia, West African Dwarf goats,Lung morphometry, Infection. ... high incidence of infectious diseases with pneumonia being an ...

  4. Neonatal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as careful care and monitoring in the hospital. Listeriosis What is it? Infection with Listeria monocytogenes bacteria ... properly cleaned, pasteurized, or cooked may give someone listeriosis . Babies can acquire bacteria from their mothers if ...

  5. Campylobacter infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the small intestine from a bacteria called Campylobacter jejuni . It is a type of food poisoning. Causes ... testing for white blood cells Stool culture for Campylobacter jejuni Treatment The infection almost always goes away on ...

  6. Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  7. Chlamydia Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You can get chlamydia during oral, vaginal, or anal sex with someone who has the infection. A woman ... to prevent chlamydia is to not have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but ...

  8. Salmonella Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children, use an oral rehydration solution, such as Pedialyte, unless your doctor advises otherwise. Salmonella infection can ... can use an oral rehydration solution, such as Pedialyte, unless your doctor advises otherwise. The U.S. Department ...

  9. Whipworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... don't have symptoms. Symptoms mainly occur in children, and range from mild to severe. A severe infection may cause: Bloody diarrhea Iron-deficiency anemia Fecal incontinence (during sleep) Rectal prolapse (the ...

  10. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  11. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008050 The establishment of a rat model of chronic pulmonary infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. WANG Weifang(王炜芳), et al. Dept Respir, PLA General Hosp, Beijing 100853. Natl Med J China 2008;88(1):46-50. Objective To establish a rat model of chronic pulmonary infection by inoculating two different Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in minute seaweed algiante beads made by an ejection set with an acuminate hole to

  12. Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Ground Beef Using the GeneDisc Real-Time PCR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina eFratamico

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O157:H7 and certain non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC serogroups have emerged as important public health threats. The development of methods for rapid and reliable detection of this heterogeneous group of pathogens has been challenging. GeneDisc real-time PCR assays were evaluated for detection of the stx1, stx2, eae, and ehx genes and a gene that identifies the O157 serogroup followed by a second GeneDisc assay targeting serogroup-specific genes of STEC O26, O45, O91, O103, O111, O113, O121, O145, and O157. The ability to detect the STEC serogroups in ground beef samples artificially inoculated at a level of ca. 2-20 CFU/25 g and subjected to enrichment in mTSB or BPW was similar. Following enrichment, all inoculated ground beef samples showed amplification of the correct set of target genes carried by each strain. Samples inoculated with STEC serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 were subjected to immunomagnetic separation, and isolation was achieved by plating onto Rainbow agar O157. Colonies were confirmed by PCR assays targeting stx1, stx2, eae, and serogroup-specific genes. Thus, this work demonstrated that GeneDisc assays are rapid, sensitive, and reliable and can be used for screening ground beef and potentially other foods for STEC serogroups that are important food-borne pathogens worldwide.

  13. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when fluid or an infection ...

  14. Ear Infections in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Ear Infections in Children On this page: What is ... additional information about ear infections? What is an ear infection? An ear infection is an inflammation of ...

  15. Cerebral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karampekios, Spyros [University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Hesselink, John [UCSD, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Despite the development of many effective antibiotic therapies and the general improvement in hygiene and health care systems all over the world, the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) infection has increased significantly in the past 15 years. This can be attributed primarily to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its devastating effect on the immune system and secondarily to various immunosuppressive agents that are being used in aggressive cancer treatment and in organ transplantations. The brain particularly is protected from infection by the calvarium, meninges and blood brain barrier. However, different types of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, can reach the brain hematogenously or, less likely, by direct extension from an adjacent infected focus. The early detection and specific diagnosis of infection are of great importance, since brain infections are potentially treatable diseases. Imaging studies play a crucial role in the diagnostic process, along with the history (exposure to infectious agents), host factors (open head trauma, CSF leak, sinusitis, otitis, immune status), physical examination and laboratory analysis of CSF. (orig.)

  16. Anchoretic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gokkulakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Active and passive mouth opening exercises are a very common practice in oral and maxillofacial surgery especially for various conditions causing limited mouth opening like space infections, trauma, and ankylosis. But most of the practitioners do not follow basic principles while advocating these active mouth opening exercises and also take it for granted that it would benefit the patient in the long run. Because of this, the mouth opening physiotherapy by itself can at times lead to unwanted complications. We report a case wherein due to active physiotherapy, the patient had complications leading to persistent temporal space infection which required surgical intervention and hospitalization. This could have been because of hematoma formation during physiotherapy which got infected due to anchoretic infection of unknown etiology and resulted in temporal space infection. Hence, our conclusion is that whenever mouth opening exercises are initiated, it should be done gradually under good antibiotic coverage to avoid any untoward complications and for optimum results. According to the current English literature, such a complication has not been documented before.

  17. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  18. 非O157产志贺毒素大肠杆菌分离株的多位点序列分型研究%Multilocus sequence typing of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白向宁; 赵爱兰; 夏胜利; 熊衍文; 徐建国

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of non-0157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates collected from some locations in China over a period of time, a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme provided by Escherichia coli MLST database was performed. Seven housekeeping genes were amplified by PCR and then sequenced. The sequence types (STs) were determined by sequence comparison. The MEGA and eBURST were used for phylogenetic analysis, MLST analysis showed that there were 13 STs identified in 29 isolates, including 3 new STs named ST2460, ST2467 and ST2468. The predominant sequence type was ST155, which consisted of 10 isolates (34. 48%), following by ST906 (17. 24%), ST446 (10. 44%) and ST33 (6. 90%). The other 9 STs consisted of only one isolate. It could be concluded that there exists molecular diversity among the non-()157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates, which showed genetic relationship with the popular strains worldwide. The detection and surveillance of this kind of isolates is of great significance to public health.%目的 对国内部分地区非O157产志贺毒素大肠杆菌分离株进行分子分型分析,了解菌株间的遗传进化关系.方法 根据mist.ucc.ie数据库提供的大肠杆菌多位点序列分型(Multilocus Sequence Typing,MLST)方案,对来自我国河南、黑龙江2省的29株非O157产志贺毒素大肠杆菌分离株的7个管家基因进行PCR扩增并测序,通过序列比对确定其等位基因谱及菌株序列型(Sequence type,ST),使用MEGA、eBURST生物信息软件分析不同ST序列群及菌株间的进化关系.结果 29株非O157产志贺毒素大肠杆菌呈现较大的遗传多态性,可分为13个ST型别,其中ST155为优势型别(34.48%).同时研究发现2个新等位基因型(fumC376、recA214)和3个新序列型(ST2460、ST2467、ST2468).结论 29株非O157产志贺毒素大肠杆菌菌株之间具有分子多态性,与国际流行菌株具有一定的亲缘关系.加强我国对这一类菌株的检测和监测具有重要的公共卫生意义.

  19. Baylisascaris Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-27

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing baylisascariasis and on providing patients at risk of Baylisascaris infection with prevention messages.  Created: 8/27/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  20. opportunistic infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN JOURNAL OF HIV MEDICINE. 28 ... micronutrients and herbal concoctions have been advocated.4 But none has provided the survival benefit, freedom from ... trimoxazole (CTX) use in patients with advanced HIV infection became .... A further Zambian study noted birth outcomes in pregnant.

  1. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fecal matter from an infected person (especially a child in diapers). Household pets can carry and transmit the bacteria to their ... by the person with diarrhea. Also, if a pet dog or cat has diarrhea, wash your hands often and check ... lab tests also might be needed, especially if your child has blood in the stool. If your doctor ...

  2. Fusarium Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Maged; Anagnostou, Theodora; Desalermos, Athanasios; Kourkoumpetis, Themistoklis K.; Carneiro, Herman A.; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Coleman, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fusarium species is a ubiquitous fungus that causes opportunistic infections. We present 26 cases of invasive fusariosis categorized according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria of fungal infections. All cases (20 proven and 6 probable) were treated from January 2000 until January 2010. We also review 97 cases reported since 2000. The most important risk factors for invasive fusariosis in our patients were compromised immune system, specifically lung transplantation (n = 6) and hematologic malignancies (n = 5), and burns (n = 7 patients with skin fusariosis), while the most commonly infected site was the skin in 11 of 26 patients. The mortality rates among our patients with disseminated, skin, and pulmonary fusariosis were 50%, 40%, and 37.5%, respectively. Fusarium solani was the most frequent species, isolated from 49% of literature cases. Blood cultures were positive in 82% of both current study and literature patients with disseminated fusariosis, while the remaining 16% had 2 noncontiguous sites of infection but negative blood cultures. Surgical removal of focal lesions was effective in both current study and literature cases. Skin lesions in immunocompromised patients should raise the suspicion for skin or disseminated fusariosis. The combination of medical monotherapy with voriconazole or amphotericin B and surgery in such cases is highly suggested. PMID:24145697

  3. Fungal nail infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  4. Anthrax Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Daniel A.; Hicks, Caitlin W.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis infection is rare in developed countries. However, recent outbreaks in the United States and Europe and the potential use of the bacteria for bioterrorism have focused interest on it. Furthermore, although anthrax was known to typically occur as one of three syndromes related to entry site of (i.e., cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational), a fourth syndrome including severe soft tissue infection in injectional drug users is emerging. Although shock has been described with cutaneous anthrax, it appears much more common with gastrointestinal, inhalational (5 of 11 patients in the 2001 outbreak in the United States), and injectional anthrax. Based in part on case series, the estimated mortalities of cutaneous, gastrointestinal, inhalational, and injectional anthrax are 1%, 25 to 60%, 46%, and 33%, respectively. Nonspecific early symptomatology makes initial identification of anthrax cases difficult. Clues to anthrax infection include history of exposure to herbivore animal products, heroin use, or clustering of patients with similar respiratory symptoms concerning for a bioterrorist event. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with Gram stain and culture from blood or surgical specimens followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR or immunohistochemistry). Although antibiotic therapy (largely quinolone-based) is the mainstay of anthrax treatment, the use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists is a consideration. PMID:21852539

  5. Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection in any part of ... UTI spreads to your kidneys. Doctors typically treat urinary tract infections with antibiotics. But you can take steps to ...

  6. Fish tapeworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish tapeworm infection is an intestinal infection with the tapeworm parasite found in fish. ... The fish tapeworm ( Diphyllobothrium latum ) is the largest parasite that infects humans. Humans become infected when they eat raw ...

  7. Toxoplasmosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Clara Delgado Varela

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxoplasmosis is the most widespread zoonosis worldwide. Its prevalence can double in rural populations in relation to urban populations, and it is different in persons of different races within the same community. Objective: To determine the characteristics of toxoplasmosis infection in Charavalle community, Bermúdez municipality, Sucre State, Venezuelan Republic. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was developed between April and September 2006. Through observation and interview the primary data on the 343 patients selected through simple sampling was obtained. The studied population was classified according to socio-demographic variables, the serum presence of IgG antibodies anti-Toxoplasma gondii was determine through indirect hemagglutination and the main risk factors l inked to toxoplasmosis infection were identified. Results: There was a prevalence of the age group between 16 and 30 years, mainly females in the Stratum III of socioeconomic level. Serological prevalence rate of antibodies IgG anti-Toxoplasma gondii was 63, 56/100 inhabitants and the most significant risk factors were: cohabitation with dogs and cats, raw vegetables and fruit intake, and no drinkable water intake. Conclusions: Results largely agree with other researches on the same subject.

  8. Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Of 168 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection-related liver disease, 20 patients who had received 100 mg of lamivudine plus 10 mg/day of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV (ADV group and 124 patients who had received 0.5 mg/day of entecavir or 100 mg/day of lamivudine (non-ADV group for >1 year were enrolled. For comparative analyses, 19 well-matched pairs were obtained from the groups by propensity scores. At the time of enrollment, serum creatinine and phosphate concentrations were similar between the ADV and non-ADV groups; however, urinary phosphate ( and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP ( concentrations were significantly higher in the ADV group than in the non-ADV group. Serum BAP was significantly higher at the time of enrollment than before ADV administration in the ADV group (, although there was no significant change in serum BAP concentration in the non-ADV group. There was a significant positive correlation between the period of ADV therapy and ΔBAP (, . Serum BAP concentration increased before increase in serum creatinine concentration and was useful for early detection of adverse events and for developing adequate measures for continuing ADV for chronic HBV infection-related liver disease.

  9. Occurrence of diarrheagenic virulence genes and genetic diversity in Escherichia coli isolates from fecal material of various avian hosts in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Abhirosh; Mazumder, Asit

    2014-03-01

    Contamination of surface water by fecal microorganisms originating from human and nonhuman sources is a public health concern. In the present study, Escherichia coli isolates (n = 412) from the feces of various avian host sources were screened for various virulence genes: stx1 and stx2 (Shiga toxin-producing E. coli [STEC]), eae (enteropathogenic E. coli [EPEC]), est-h, est-p, and elt (encoding heat-stable toxin [ST] variants STh and STp and heat-labile toxin [LT], respectively) (enterotoxigenic E. coli [ETEC]), and ipaH (enteroinvasive E. coli [EIEC]). None of the isolates were found to be positive for stx1, while 23% (n = 93) were positive for only stx2, representing STEC, and 15% (n = 63) were positive for only eae, representing EPEC. In addition, five strains obtained from pheasant were positive for both stx2 and eae and were confirmed as non-O157 by using an E. coli O157 rfb (rfbO157) TaqMan assay. Isolates positive for the virulence genes associated with ETEC and EIEC were not detected in any of the hosts. The repetitive element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprint analysis identified 143 unique fingerprints, with an overall Shannon diversity index of 2.36. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that the majority of the STEC and EPEC isolates were genotypically distinct from nonpathogenic E. coli and clustered independently. MANOVA analysis also revealed spatial variation among the E. coli isolates, since the majority of the isolates clustered according to the sampling locations. Although the presence of virulence genes alone cannot be used to determine the pathogenicity of strains, results from this study show that potentially pathogenic STEC and EPEC strains can be found in some of the avian hosts studied and may contaminate surface water and potentially impact human health.

  10. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930120 A clinical study of 50 cases of legion-naires disease.WANG Baofa(王保法),et al.Dept Intern Med,2nd Affili Hosp,Hehei MedColl,Shijiazhuang,050000.Chin J Tuberc &Respir Dis 1992;15(5):266-268.The clinical features and X-ray manifesta-tions of 50 cases of legionnaires disease wereanalysed.8 cases might be due to nosocomial in-fection through breathing in flying particles ofthe saliva or phlegm.According to the mainclinical features,this disease could be dividedinto common pneumonia type,acute gastroen-teritis type,encephalopathy type,shock type,and acute renal insufficiency type.The differen-

  11. Prolonged fecal shedding of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli among children attending day-care centers in Argentina Excreción prolongada de Escherichia coli productor de toxina Shiga en niños que concurren a jardines maternales de Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Miliwebsky

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report we describe the detection and duration of fecal shedding of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC O157 and non-O157 in symptomatic and asymptomatic cases during four events occurred among children in day-care centers in Argentina. In each event, the cases were identified among children, family contacts and staff members of the Institution. The isolates were characterized by pheno-genotyping and subtyping methods. The STEC fecal shedding was prolonged and intermittent. Strains O157:H7 (1st event; O26:H11 (2nd event; O26:H11 (3rd event and O145:NM (4th event were shed during 23-30, 37, 31 and 19 days, respectively. Considering the possibility of STEC intermittent long-term shedding, symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals should be excluded from the Institution until two consecutive stool cultures obtained at least 48 h apart, test negative.En el presente trabajo se describe la detección y el tiempo de excreción de Escherichia coli productor de toxina Shiga (STEC O157 y no-O157 en casos sintomáticos y asintomáticos durante cuatro eventos ocurridos en jardines maternales de Argentina. En cada evento se identificaron los casos entre los niños, sus familiares y el personal del jardín. Los aislamientos fueron caracterizados por técnicas feno-genotípicas y de subtipificación. La excreción de STEC fue, en general, prolongada e intermitente. Cepas STEC O157:H7 (1er evento; O26:H11 (2do evento; O26:H11 (3er evento y O145:NM (4to evento fueron excretadas durante 23-30, 37, 31 y 19 días, respectivamente. Dadas las características de la excreción, no debe permitirse el reingreso a la institución de todo niño o adulto con infección por STEC, sintomático o asintomático, hasta no tener dos coprocultivos negativos sucesivos, con intervalos de 48 horas entre ellos.

  12. Therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics inhibit Shiga toxin release from enterohemorrhagic E. coli O104:H4 from the 2011 German outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corogeanu Diana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC O104:H4 caused a major outbreak in Germany in spring 2011. STEC are usually susceptible to common antibiotics. However, antibiotic treatment of STEC-infected patients is not recommended because STEC may enhance production and release of shiga toxins (STX in response to antibiotics, which eventually enhances the frequency and severity of clinical symptoms, including haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS and fatalities. Results We characterized the response to antibiotics of STEC O104:H4 isolates from two HUS patients during the German STEC outbreak in spring 2011 in comparison to the common STEC O157:H7. Liquid cultures of STEC O157:H7 and O104:H4 were incubated with graded dilutions of the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, fosfomycin, gentamicin, rifampicin, and chloramphenicol. At defined times of antibiotic treatment, transcriptional activation of the STX2 gene, contents of STX and STX-activity in the culture supernatants were quantified. Unlike the common serotype O157:H7, STEC O104:H4 does not release STX in response to therapeutic concentrations of ciprofloxacin, meropenem, fosfomycin, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions In future outbreaks, the response of the respective epidemiologic STEC strain to antibiotics should be rapidly characterized in order to identify antibiotics that do not enhance the release of STX. This will eventually allow clinical studies tackling the question whether antibiotic treatment impacts on the eradication of STEC, clinical course of disease, and frequency of carriers.

  13. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Listeria Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Listeria Infections A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Listeriosis About Listeria Listeria infections (known as listeriosis ) are rare. When ...

  14. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Listeria Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Listeria Infections Print A A ... your risk of getting this infection. continue Treating Listeriosis Listeriosis is usually treated with antibiotics in the ...

  15. Listeria Infection (Listeriosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria infection Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Listeria infection is a foodborne bacterial illness that can be very serious for pregnant women and people with impaired immune systems. Listeria infection is most ...

  16. Urinary tract infection - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000521.htm Urinary tract infection - adults To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection, or UTI, is an infection of the urinary ...

  17. Urinary tract infection - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000505.htm Urinary tract infection - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection is an infection of the urinary tract. This ...

  18. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ear infection (middle ear) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff An ear infection (acute otitis media) is most often a bacterial or viral infection that affects the middle ear, the air-filled space behind the eardrum that ...

  19. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Enterobiasis (also known as Pinworm Infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk ...

  20. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Enterobiasis (also known as Pinworm Infection) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk ...

  1. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Shin, Tae-Sung; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance spectra measured in the visible and near-infrared spectral range from 400 and 1,000 nm (473 narrow spectral bands). Multivariate regression methods were used to estimate and predict hyperspectral data from RGB color values. The six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Eschetichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) were grown on Rainbow agar plates. A line-scan pushbroom hyperspectral image sensor was used to scan 36 agar plates grown with pure STEC colonies at each plate. The 36 hyperspectral images of the agar plates were divided in half to create training and test sets. The mean Rsquared value for hyperspectral image estimation was about 0.98 in the spectral range between 400 and 700 nm for linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial regression models and the detection accuracy of the hyperspectral image classification model with the principal component analysis and k-nearest neighbors for the test set was up to 92% (99% with the original hyperspectral images). Thus, the results of the study suggested that color-based detection may be viable as a multispectral imaging solution without much loss of prediction accuracy compared to hyperspectral imaging.

  2. [Hantavirus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strady, C; Jaussaud, R; Remy, G; Penalba, C

    2005-03-12

    Hantaviruses are cosmopolite anthropozoonosis considered as an emerging disease. Four pathogenic types for humans and part of the Bunyaviridae species are hosted by rodents and have been isolated: the Sin nombre virus responsible for the severe American respiratory form; the Hantaan and Seoul viruses responsible for hemorrhagic fevers with renal syndrome (HFRS) of severe to moderate expression in Asia and also in the Balkans; the Puumala virus responsible for HFRS of moderate expression or the socalled nephropathia epidemica in Europe. The Puumala virus is responsible for a minor form of the disease that is observed in areas of the Occidental sector of the ex-URSS, in Scandinavia and in the rest of Europe, notably in the North-East of France. The epidemic episodes occur every three years. They follow the proliferation of rodents, notably russet voles, the reservoir hosts, and their degree of infection. The concept of an occupation at risk in 20 to 49 year-old men (working in forests, agriculture, living near a forest, contact with wood) in an endemic area has not always been found. Its clinical form can vary greatly in its presentation. Basically it is a severe algic influenza syndrome accompanied by acute myopia in 38% of cases, but is nearly pathognomonic in the context. Respiratory involvement is frequent but benign. The initial syndrome can suggest an abdominal or urological surgical emergency, which is source of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. Early biological examination reveals thrombopenia and proteinuria. Then more or less severe acute kidney failure appears in slightly more than 50% of cases. Although it usually regresses with symptomatic treatment, after effects remain in some patients. The environmental changes, the geographical distribution depending on the biotope, the dynamics and behaviour of rodents and the viral circulation between them and its transmission to human beings and its risk factors must continue to be studied in order to gain

  3. What Is Infective Endocarditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Cardiovascular Conditions What Is Infective Endocarditis? Infective (bacterial) endocarditis (IE) is an infection of either the heart’s inner lining (endocardium) or the heart valves. Infective endocarditis is a serious — and sometimes fatal — illness. Two ...

  4. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, C.L.F. [Department of Radiology, North District Hospital, NTEC, Fanling, NT, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: c8681@yahoo.com; Griffith, J.F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, NTEC, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented.

  5. Shewanella putrefaciens infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, Jonathan; Chernev, Ivan; Gomez, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes infection in humans. In the last few decades a growing number of cases have been described. The following report outlines the case of a 40-year-old immunocompetent white man with S. putrefaciens infective endocarditis. This is the first known case of infective endocarditis due to an apparently monomicrobial S. putrefaciens infection, and the second known case of S. putrefaciens-related infective endocarditis worldwide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Shewanella putrefaciens infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Constant

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes infection in humans. In the last few decades a growing number of cases have been described. The following report outlines the case of a 40-year- old immunocompetent white man with S. putrefaciens infective endocarditis. This is the first known case of infective endocarditis due to an apparently monomicrobial S. putrefaciens infection, and the second known case of S. putrefaciens-related infective endocarditis worldwide.

  7. Detection and characterization of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli by automated 5 ' nuclease PCR assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Andersen, Marianne Thorup

    2003-01-01

    In recent years increased attention has been focused on infections caused by isolates of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) serotypes other than O157. These non-O157 VTEC isolates are commonly present in food and food production animals. Easy detection, isolation, and characterization...... and enteropathogenic E. coli strains) and VTEC strains isolated from calves were tested to validate the PCR assays. The expected virulence profiles were detected for all reference strains. In addition, new information on the subtypes of LEE genes was obtained. For reference strains as well as bovine isolates...

  8. Characterization of Escherichia coli isolates from hospital inpatients or outpatients with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toval, Francisco; Köhler, Christian-Daniel; Vogel, Ulrich; Wagenlehner, Florian; Mellmann, Alexander; Fruth, Angelika; Schmidt, M Alexander; Karch, Helge; Bielaszewska, Martina; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common cause of community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Isolates from uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs express a variety of virulence traits that promote the efficient colonization of the urinary tract. In contrast, nosocomial UTIs can be caused by E. coli strains that differ in their virulence traits from the community-acquired UTI isolates. UPEC virulence markers are used to distinguish these facultative extraintestinal pathogens, which belong to the intestinal flora of many healthy individuals, from intestinal pathogenic E. coli (IPEC). IPEC is a diarrheagenic pathogen with a characteristic virulence gene set that is absent in UPEC. Here, we characterized 265 isolates from patients with UTIs during inpatient or outpatient treatment at a hospital regarding their phylogenies and IPEC or UPEC virulence traits. Interestingly, 28 of these isolates (10.6%) carried typical IPEC virulence genes that are characteristic of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC), although IPEC is not considered a uropathogen. Twenty-three isolates harbored the astA gene coding for the EAEC heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1), and most of them carried virulence genes that are characteristic of UPEC and/or EAEC. Our results indicate that UPEC isolates from hospital patients differ from archetypal community-acquired isolates from uncomplicated UTIs by their spectrum of virulence traits. They represent a diverse group, including EAEC, as well as other IPEC pathotypes, which in addition contain typical UPEC virulence genes. The combination of typical extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and IPEC virulence determinants in some isolates demonstrates the marked genome plasticity of E. coli and calls for a reevaluation of the strict pathotype classification of EAEC.

  9. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-04-02

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI.

  10. Actualización en el tratamiento del síndrome urémico hemolítico endémico: Patogénesis y tratamiento de la complicación sistémica más grave de las infecciones por Escherichia coli productor de toxina Shiga Update on the treatment of endemic hemolytic uremic syndrome: Pathogenesis and treatment of the most severe systemic complication of infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina J. Fernández-Brando

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available La forma típica o post-diarreica del síndrome urémico hemolítico (SUH es la complicación más grave de las infecciones por cepas de Escherichia coli productoras de toxina Shiga (STEC. En la Argentina el SUH es un problema crítico de salud pública, ya que representa la principal causa de falla renal aguda en la infancia, la segunda causa de falla renal crónica, y aporta el 20% de los casos de transplante renal durante la infancia y la adolescencia. A pesar de los avances en el conocimiento de su patogénesis, el único tratamiento actual de los pacientes con SUH es de sostén, y no existen terapias específicas ni preventivas. En la presente revisión expondremos los conocimientos básicos de los mecanismos patogénicos y discutiremos los enfoques terapéuticos tradicionales e innovadores, con especial foco en la situación nacional y los aportes hechos por grupos de la Argentina.The typical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is the major complication of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. HUS is a critical health problem in Argentina since it is the main cause of acute renal failure in children and the second cause of chronic renal failure, giving account for 20% of renal transplants in children and adolescents in our country. In spite of the extensive research in the field, the mainstay of treatment for patients with HUS is supportive therapy, and there are no specific therapies preventing or ameliorating the disease course. In this review, we present the current knowledge about pathogenic mechanisms and discuss traditional and innovative therapeutic approaches, with special focus in national status and contributions made by Argentinean groups.

  11. Detection of Shiga-like toxin producing Escherichia coli from raw milk cheeses produced in Wallonia [Belgium].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Lioui M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Shiga-like toxin Escherichia coli (STEC implicated in aqueous diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uraemic syndrome, has become a serious health problem in various countries. In Belgium, all cases are sporadic and no outbreak has been detected so far. Cattle are thought to be a reservoir for E. coli O157:H7, and many foodborne diseases have been associated with the consumption of minced beef, beefburgers and raw milk. Recently, foodborne outbreaks were concerned with different unusual foods such as acidic products. Although some data suggest that STEC are not prevalent within dairy products, the aim of this work was to assess the prevalence of E. coli O157 and non-O157 STEC in raw milk cheeses produced in the southern part of Belgium (Wallonia. For this purpose, 153 frozen samples of soft and semi-soft cheeses made with raw cow, ewe and goat milk were analysed for the presence of E. coli O157 and STEC. By using a dynabeads immunomagnetic separation technique (Dynabeads anti-E. coli O157, Dynal followed by streaking onto sorbitol MacConckey agar, no sample was found contaminated by E. coli O157 serotype. By using polymerase chain reaction achieved from a loopful of confluent bacterial material growing onto MacConckey agar, the use of consensus primers detected stx genes in 11.1/ of the samples but Shiga-like toxin producing strains could be isolated only in five of them (3.3/. The isolation rate seems to be optimum for samples with a thermotolerant coliform count arround or below 102 cfu per g. The five Shiga-like toxin isolates were identified as belonging to the species Hafnia alvei or Enterobacter amnigenius without any accessory virulence factors needed to cause illness. Nevertheless, because of the ability of STEC to survive adverse conditions and the possibility for commensal non-pathogenic enteric bacteria to become pathogenic, raw milk cheeses are to be considered at risk for foodborne STEC contamination.

  12. Risk factors for poor renal prognosis in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianviti, Alessandra; Tozzi, Alberto E; De Petris, Laura; Caprioli, Alfredo; Ravà, Lucilla; Edefonti, Alberto; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Montini, Giovanni; Zacchello, Graziella; Ferretti, Alfonso; Pecoraro, Carmine; De Palo, Tommaso; Caringella, Angela; Gaido, Maurizio; Coppo, Rosanna; Perfumo, Francesco; Miglietti, Nunzia; Ratsche, Ilse; Penza, Rosa; Capasso, Giovambattista; Maringhini, Silvio; Li Volti, Salvatore; Setzu, Carmen; Pennesi, Marco; Bettinelli, Alberto; Peratoner, Leopoldo; Pela, Ivana; Salvaggio, Elio; Lama, Giuliana; Maffei, Salvatore; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2003-12-01

    Many factors have been proposed as predictors of poor renal prognosis in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), but their role is still controversial. Our aim was to detect the most reliable early predictors of poor renal prognosis to promptly identify children at major risk of bad outcome who could eventually benefit from early specific treatments, such as plasmapheresis. Prognostic factors identifiable at onset of HUS were evaluated by survival analysis and a proportional hazard model. These included age at onset, prodromal diarrhea (D), leukocyte count, central nervous system (CNS) involvement, and evidence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection. Three hundred and eighty-seven HUS cases were reported; 276 were investigated for STEC infection and 189 (68%) proved positive. Age at onset, leukocyte count, and CNS involvement were not associated with the time to recovery. Absence of prodromal D and lack of evidence of STEC infection were independently associated with a poor renal prognosis; only 34% of patients D(-)STEC(- )recovered normal renal function compared with 65%-76% of D(+)STEC(+), D(+)STEC(-) and D(-)STEC(+ )patients. In conclusion, absence of both D and evidence of STEC infection are needed to identify patients with HUS and worst prognosis, while D(-) but STEC(+) patients have a significantly better prognosis.

  13. New aspects in the pathogenesis of enteropathic hemolytic uremic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karch, Helge; Friedrich, Alexander W; Gerber, Angela; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B; Schmidt, M Alexander; Bielaszewska, Martina

    2006-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) subtyping suggests that the clinical outcome of infections caused by Shiga toxin-producing ESCHERICHIA COLI (STEC) depends, in large part, on the STX genotype of the infecting strain. Whereas the presence of the STX2 or STX2C genotype is associated with the ability of STEC to cause

  14. Novel sequence variation affects GPIb α in post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokina, E.; Jakobi, A.J.; Urbanus, R.T; Huizinga, E.G.; Sluiter, H.; Middel, C.; Westra, D.; van Heerde, W.L.; van de Kar, N.; van den Heuvel, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is one of the major causes of renal failure in children. In most cases the disease is caused by infection with Shiga toxin- producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and preceded by diarrhea. Only in 15% of cases STEC infection leads to HUS. Genetic predisposition

  15. Cancer treatment - preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation - preventing infection; Bone marrow transplant - preventing infection; Cancer treatment - immunosuppression ... this is a short-lived side effect of cancer treatment. Your provider may give you medicines to help ...

  16. Bacterial Nasal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vestibule. Nasal furuncles may develop into a spreading infection under the skin (cellulitis) at the tip of the nose. A doctor becomes concerned about infections in this part of the face because veins ...

  17. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  18. Staph infections - hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000449.htm Staph infections - hospital To use the sharing features on this page, ... one person to another. Staph Infections in the Hospital Staph germs are mostly spread by skin-to- ...

  19. Middle Ear Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Middle Ear Infections Page Content Article Body What are the ... illness. What if a child with a middle ear infection is in great pain and discomfort? The ...

  20. Tapeworm infection - Hymenolepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by 1 of 2 species of tapeworm: Hymenolepis nana or Hymenolepis diminuta . The disease is also called ... bowel, so infection can last for years. Hymenolepis nana infections are much more common than Hymenolepis diminuta ...

  1. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for most infections in humans is carried by chickens, cows, pigs, and reptiles (such as turtles, lizards, ... groups, most doctors will treat an infection with antibiotics to prevent it from spreading to other parts ...

  2. Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis (IE) is a disease of increasing importance, with more patients infected, increasing frequency of health-care associated infections and increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistances. The typical clinical presentation is a subacute course with fever...... or ceftriaxone. E. faecalis infective endocarditis continues to be a very serious disease with considerable percentages of high-level gentamicin resistant strains and in-hospital mortality around 20%. Strategies to prevent E. faecalis IE, improve diagnostics, optimize treatment and reduce morbidity...

  3. Serine protease espP subtype alpha, but not beta or gamma, of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is associated with highly pathogenic serogroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Basit; Naim, Asma; Orth, Dorothea; Grif, Katharina; Mohsin, Mashkoor; Prager, Rita; Dierich, Manfred P; Würzner, Reinhard

    2009-04-01

    Besides Shiga toxins (Stx), Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) harbour several other putative virulence factors, including the serine protease EspP. We have investigated 214 STEC strains from Austria belonging to 61 different serotypes from humans, animals, and food for the presence of this serine protease gene and have determined the espP subtypes and their association with clinical outcome. espP was detected in 121 (57%) out of 214 strains. Sixty-five of 68 strains (96%) of non-sorbitol-fermenting (NSF) O157:H7/NM (NM, non-motile) were positive for espP, while none of 8 SF E. coli O157:NM isolates contained this gene. All 9 strains of serotype O145:NM and 17 of 21 strains (81%) of serotype O26:H11/NM were positive for espP. Nineteen STEC serogroups including O103 and O111 serogroups--considered to be highly pathogenic--were completely negative for espP. Only 5 of 12 strains isolated from patients suffering from haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) were espP-positive (all serogroup NSF O157) as well as 28 of 39 strains from patients with bloody diarrhoea, 40 of 63 strains from patients with non-bloody diarrhoea, and 15 of 19 strains from asymptomatic patients. In O157:H7/NM, O26:H11/NM, and O145:NM only espP subtype alpha was found, whereas in most of the other non-O157 serogroups, subtypes beta and gamma were found. Subtype delta was not detected in our strain collection. Regarding the espP subtypes, only subtype alpha, but not beta and gamma, were found in HUS patients. Moreover, we could demonstrate that espP, and in particular subtype alpha, is associated with highly pathogenic serogroups.

  4. Parechoviruses: Infection and Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Harvala, Heli; Midgley, Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Infections with human parechoviruses (HPeV) are highly prevalent, particularly in neonates, where they may cause substantial morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of HPeV infection is often indistinguishable from that of enterovirus (EV) infection and may vary from mild disease invol...

  5. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Salmonella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Salmonella Infections A A A What's in this article? Salmonella ... contaminated food (usually meat, poultry, eggs, or milk). Salmonella infections affect the intestines and cause vomiting, fever, and ...

  6. Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Bundgaard, Henning;

    2013-01-01

    Because of the nephrotoxic effects of aminoglycosides, the Danish guidelines on infective endocarditis were changed in January 2007, reducing gentamicin treatment in enterococcal infective endocarditis from 4 to 6 weeks to only 2 weeks. In this pilot study, we compare outcomes in patients with En...... with Enterococcus faecalis infective endocarditis treated in the years before and after endorsement of these new recommendations....

  7. Brucella Infection in HIV Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the possible correlation between Brucella and HIV infections. Iran is a country where HIV infection is expanding and Brucellosis is prevalent. In the present study, 184 HIV infected patients were assigned and for all of them HIV infection was confirmed by western blot test. In order to identify the prevalence rate of Brucella infection and systemic brucellosis in these subjects, sera samples were obtained and Brucella specific serological tests were performed to reveal antibody titers. Detailed history was taken and physical examination was carried out for all of patients. 11 (6% subjects had high titers but only 3 of them were symptomatic. Most of these subjects were injection drug user (IDU men and one was a rural woman. Considering both prevalence rates of Brucella infection (3% and symptomatic brucellosis (0.1% in Iran, our HIV positive patients show higher rates of Brucella infection and systemic brucellosis. Preserved cellular immunity of participants and retention of granulocytes activity may explain this poor association; whereas other explanations such as immunological state difference and non-overlapping geographical distribution of the 2 pathogens have been mentioned by various authors.

  8. Inflammation, Infection, and Future Cardiovascular Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Myocardial Infarction; Venous Thromboembolism; Heart Diseases; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Herpesviridae Infections; Inflammation

  9. Diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemechu, Fassil W; Seemant, Fnu; Curley, Catherine A

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic foot infection, defined as soft tissue or bone infection below the malleoli, is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus leading to hospitalization and the most frequent cause of nontraumatic lower extremity amputation. Diabetic foot infections are diagnosed clinically based on the presence of at least two classic findings of inflammation or purulence. Infections are classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Most diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial. The most common pathogens are aerobic gram-positive cocci, mainly Staphylococcus species. Osteomyelitis is a serious complication of diabetic foot infection that increases the likelihood of surgical intervention. Treatment is based on the extent and severity of the infection and comorbid conditions. Mild infections are treated with oral antibiotics, wound care, and pressure off-loading in the outpatient setting. Selected patients with moderate infections and all patients with severe infections should be hospitalized, given intravenous antibiotics, and evaluated for possible surgical intervention. Peripheral arterial disease is present in up to 40% of patients with diabetic foot infections, making evaluation of the vascular supply critical. All patients with diabetes should undergo a systematic foot examination at least once a year, and more frequently if risk factors for diabetic foot ulcers exist. Preventive measures include patient education on proper foot care, glycemic and blood pressure control, smoking cessation, use of prescription footwear, intensive care from a podiatrist, and evaluation for surgical interventions as indicated.

  10. Imaging of hepatic infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, D.J. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)]. E-mail: doyledj@hotmail.com; Hanbidge, A.E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada); O' Malley, M.E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    Imaging plays a significant role in the detection, characterization and treatment of hepatic infections. Infectious diseases of the liver include pyogenic and amoebic abscesses and parasitic, fungal, viral and granulomatous infections. With increases in worldwide travel, immunosuppression and changing population demographics, identification of cases of hepatic infection is becoming more common in daily practice. Knowledge of the imaging features seen with hepatic infections can assist in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. This review presents the imaging appearances of hepatic infections, emphasizing specific features that may contribute to the diagnosis. Examples of the imaging findings seen with pyogenic and amoebic abscesses, infection with Echinococcus granulosus (Hydatid), schistosomiasis, candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) are presented.

  11. Urinary Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerklund Johansen, Truls E.; Naber, Kurt G.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequently acquired infections in the community, but also in hospitals and other health care institutions, causing a huge amount of antibiotic consumption. During the last decade we have seen significant changes in the field of urinary tract infections regarding causative pathogens and antibiotic treatment calling for an update of current trends. The worldwide increase of uropathogens resistant to former first line antibiotics, such as cotrim...

  12. Imaging of Periprosthetic Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carty, Fiona

    2013-05-22

    Periprosthetic infection is one of the most challenging and difficult complications in orthopaedics. It can result in significant patient distress and disability, with repeated surgeries, increased cost and utilization of medical resources, and in rare cases even mortality. The biggest challenge to date is the correct diagnosis of periprosthetic infection and implementation of effective treatment regimens capable of eradicating the organism. This article reviews the various modalities used in the imaging of periprosthetic and post-arthroplasty infection.

  13. Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a significant and increasing medical problem, surpassing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as the most common hospital-onset or facility-associated infection, and a key element in the challenging battle against hospital-acquired infections. This Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming colonizes the intestinal tract after antibiotics have altered the normal intestinal flora.

  14. Infections in outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian Mobin, Sheila S; Keyes, Geoffrey R; Singer, Robert; Yates, James; Thompson, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    In the plastic surgery patient population, outpatient surgery is cost effective and will continue to grow as the preferred arena for performing surgery in healthy patients. Although there is a widespread myth that outpatient surgery centers may suffer from increased infection rates due to lax infection control, the data presented from American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities-accredited facilities prove the contrary. There is a lack of data investigating infection prevention in the perioperative period in plastic surgery patients. As data collection becomes more refined, tracking the postoperative care environment should offer additional opportunities to lower the incidence of postoperative infections.

  15. Infections following epidural catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, MS; Andersen, SS; Andersen, Ove

    1995-01-01

    patients with only local symptoms of infection. The microorganisms isolated from the tips of the epidural catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci (41%), Staphylococcus aureus (35%), Gram-negative bacilli (14%) and others (10%). The Gram-negative bacilli and S. aureus caused serious infections more......Seventy-eight patients with culture-positive epidural catheters, were studied. Fifty-nine had symptoms of exit site infection and 11 patients had clinical meningitis, two of whom also had an epidural abscess. This corresponds to a local infection incidence of at least 4.3% and an incidence...

  16. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection.

  17. Laparoscopic splenectomy and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyit Kuş

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Partial laparoscopic splenectomy is performed commonly in hereditary spherocytosis. Vaccination against capsulatedbacteria is essential before undergoing splenectomy. Hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy is known to be effectiveand convenient in the removal of a spleen larger than 20 cm in size. Laparoscopic splenectomy provides less hemorrhage,reduced surgical trauma and pain, shorter duration of hospital stay, and early recovery. Laparoscopic approachwas particularly effective in reducing the infectious complication rate compared with the open surgery. Infectious complicationsof splenectomy were observed to be wound infection, subphrenic abscess, and sometimes pulmonary infection.J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013; 3(1: 1-2Key words: Laparoscopy, splenectomy, infection

  18. Freshwater Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections as a result of freshwater exposure or trauma are fortunately rare. Etiologic agents are varied, but commonly include filamentous fungi and Candida. This narrative review describes various sources of potential freshwater fungal exposure and the diseases that may result, including fungal keratitis, acute otitis externa and tinea pedis, as well as rare deep soft tissue or bone infections and pulmonary or central nervous system infections following traumatic freshwater exposure during natural disasters or near-drowning episodes. Fungal etiology should be suspected in appropriate scenarios when bacterial cultures or molecular tests are normal or when the infection worsens or fails to resolve with appropriate antibacterial therapy.

  19. Infections following epidural catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, MS; Andersen, SS; Andersen, Ove

    1995-01-01

    Seventy-eight patients with culture-positive epidural catheters, were studied. Fifty-nine had symptoms of exit site infection and 11 patients had clinical meningitis, two of whom also had an epidural abscess. This corresponds to a local infection incidence of at least 4.3% and an incidence of cen...... frequently than the others. We discuss the symptoms and diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and suggest a proposal for prophylactic and diagnostic guidelines for epidural catheter-related infections. Comment in: J Hosp Infect. 1997 Mar;35(3):245....

  20. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  2. Arcanobacterium Haemolyticum Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  3. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  4. Genetic characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coil O26 : H11 strains isolated from animal, food, and clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krueger, Alejandra; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.; Mariel Sanso, A.; Etcheverria, Analia I.; Bustamante, Ana V.; Burgan, Julia; Fernandez, Luciana; Fernandez, Daniel; Leotta, Gerardo; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Padola, Nora L.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) may cause serious illness in human. Here we analyze O26:H11 strains known to be among the most reported STEC strains causing human infections. Genetic characterization of strains isolated from animal, food, and clinical specimens in Argentina showed

  5. A new era in the diagnosis and treatment of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, D.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Volokhina, E.B.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de

    2012-01-01

    The haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is characterised by haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. The majority of cases are seen in childhood and are preceded by an infection with Shiga-like toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC-HUS; so-called typical HUS). Non-STEC or atypica

  6. [News on Bartonella infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melter, Oto

    2013-06-01

    The review specifies 25 Bartonella species known so far and describes epidemiology and pathogenesis of Bartonella infections which are classified using patient symptomatology including culture-negative endocarditis. Microbiological diagnosis and significant principles of antibiotic therapy of Bartonella infections are also stated.

  7. Infections following epidural catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, MS; Andersen, SS; Andersen, Ove

    1995-01-01

    patients with only local symptoms of infection. The microorganisms isolated from the tips of the epidural catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci (41%), Staphylococcus aureus (35%), Gram-negative bacilli (14%) and others (10%). The Gram-negative bacilli and S. aureus caused serious infections more...

  8. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection) FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effective means of preventing pinworm infection. This includes washing hands with soap and warm water after using the toilet, changing diapers, and before handling food. Keep fingernails clean and short, avoid ... of washing hands to prevent infection. Daily morning bathing and ...

  9. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  10. [Emergent viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infecti

  11. [Nosocomial infection: clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frottier, J

    1993-05-01

    Nosocomial infections develop within a hospital or are produced by microorganisms acquired during hospitalization. They may involve not only patients (2 to 10 percent) but also hospital personnel. They arise from complex interactions of multiple causal factors. Patients risk factors are these that reduce the patient's capacity for resisting the injurious effects of the microorganisms and impair natural host defense mechanisms: patients with malignant disorders or immunosuppressive therapy, poor nutritional status, extensive burn wounds ... The young and the elderly are generally more susceptible to infection. Other infections are preventable. Disease causation is often multifactorial. Nosocomial urinary tract infections had the highest rate, followed by lower respiratory tract infections, surgical infections and bacteremias. The emergence of other nosocomial infections, caused by bacteria (tuberculosis), virus (HIV, hepatitis B and C virus, cytomegalovirus...), Aspergillus species or Pneumocystis carinii appears to be recent in origin and is of importance to immunocompromised hosts, other patients and hospital personnel. Nosocomial infections and their social and economic impacts require for their prevention vigorous organized hospital-wide surveillance and control programs.

  12. Staphylococcus epidermidis infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Cuong; Otto, Michael

    2002-04-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis has become the most important cause of nosocomial infections in recent years. Its pathogenicity is mainly due to the ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices. In a biofilm, S. epidermidis is protected against attacks from the immune system and against antibiotic treatment, making S. epidermidis infections difficult to eradicate.

  13. Preventing Giardia Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, W. Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Outdoor recreationists are at risk for developing giardia infection from drinking contaminated stream water. Giardia is the most common human parasite found in contaminated water that causes gastrointestinal illness. Describes medical treatment and ways of preventing infection through water treatment, including heat, filtration, and chemical…

  14. Diagnosis of Fusarium Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Brankovics, Balázs; Iltes, Jearidienne; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Waalwijk, Cees

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by the genus Fusarium have emerged over the past decades and range from onychomycosis and keratitis in healthy individuals to deep and disseminated infections with high mortality rates in immune-compromised patients. As antifungal susceptibility can differ between the different

  15. Asymptomatic Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, G P; Nadelman, R B; Nowakowski, J; Schwartz, I

    2001-10-01

    Little is known about the natural history of asymptomatic Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Our analysis of the asymptomatic infections diagnosed serologically in a recent OspA vaccine trial conducted in the United States (N Engl J Med 1998;339: 209-215), suggests that the natural history of this event is more benign than that reported for untreated patients with erythema migrans (Ann Intern Med 1987;107: 725-731). We hypothesize that this is due either to incorrect diagnosis since the specificity of the serologic criteria used to diagnose asymptomatic infection in the vaccine study is unknown, or to infection with non-pathogenic strains of B. burgdorferi. Increasing evidence indicates that the invasive potential of strains of B. burgdorferi varies according to the specific subtype. Theoretically, a serologic testing method could be devised which would distinguish infection with invasive versus non-invasive strains of B. burgdorferi, and allow testing of the second hypothesis.

  16. [Nosocomial urinary infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butreau-Lemaire, M; Botto, H

    1997-09-01

    The concept of nosocomial urinary tract infection now corresponds to a precise definition. It is generally related to bladder catheterization, constitutes the most frequent form of nosocomial infection (30 to 50% of infections), and represents the third most frequent portal of entry of bacteraemia. The organism most frequently isolated is Escherichia coli; but the flora is changing and the ecological distribution is continually modified. Despite their usually benign nature, these nosocomial infections can nevertheless influence hospital mortality; they increase the hospital stay by an average of 2.5 days and their treatment represents a large share of the antibiotic budget. Prevention of these infections is therefore essential, with particular emphasis on simple and universally accessible measures: very precise indications for vesical catheterization, use of closed circuit drainage, maximal asepsis when handling catheters, after washing the hands.

  17. Key aspects congenital infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The key questions to solve the problem of congenital infection in the Russian Federation are: using in national practice over world accepted terminology adapted to the recommendations of the World Health Organization; representation of the modern concepts of an infectious process in the classification of congenital infections; scientific development and introducing in clinical practice the «standard case definitions», applied to different congenital infections; optimization of protocols and clinical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of congenital infections; improvement a knowledge in the infectious disease for all  pecialists involved in the risk assessment of congenital infections, manage pregnancy and children. Based on our experience and analysis of publications, the authors suggest possible solutions.

  18. [Infections in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, M; Muhlemann, K; Aebi, C; Taüber, M G

    1999-10-01

    Infections in pregnancy may complicate its course and harm the fetus or newborn after vertical transmission. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is mandatory in pregnant women given the high risk of secondary pyelonephritis. Intraamniotic infection usually arises by the ascending route and is associated with premature rupture of membranes. Vaginal infections promote preterm labour or premature rupture of membranes and may be transmitted to the child during labour. They must therefore be treated although they often cause little discomfort to the pregnant woman. Systemic infections due to viral, protozoal and bacterial pathogens may be transmitted transplacentally and cause embryopathies, fetopathies or neonatal infections. Depending on the responsible agent the negative impact on the course of pregnancy and on the fetus' or neonate's health can be prevented or reduced by prophylactic or therapeutic interventions.

  19. Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection - UTI) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Urologic Diseases A-Z Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection—UTI) in Adults View or Print All Sections ... Bladder infections are the most common type of urinary tract infection (UTI), but any part of your urinary tract ...

  20. Bacteriophage secondary infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen; T; Abedon

    2015-01-01

    Phages are credited with having been first described in what we now, officially, are commemorating as the 100 th anniversary of their discovery. Those one-hundred years of phage history have not been lacking in excitement, controversy, and occasional convolution. One such complication is the concept of secondary infection, which can take on multiple forms with myriad consequences. The terms secondary infection and secondary adsorption, for example, can be used almost synonymously to describe virion interaction with already phage-infected bacteria, and which can result in what are described as superinfection exclusion or superinfection immunity. The phrase secondary infection also may be used equivalently to superinfection or coinfection, with each of these terms borrowed from medical microbiology, and can result in genetic exchange between phages, phage-on-phage parasitism, and various partial reductions in phage productivity that have been termed mutual exclusion, partial exclusion, or the depressor effect. Alternatively, and drawing from epidemiology, secondary infection has been used to describe phage population growth as that can occur during active phage therapy as well as upon phage contamination of industrial ferments. Here primary infections represent initial bacterial population exposure to phages while consequent phage replication can lead to additional, that is, secondary infections of what otherwise are not yet phage-infected bacteria. Here I explore the varying meanings and resultant ambiguity that has been associated with the term secondary infection. I suggest in particular that secondary infection, as distinctly different phenomena, can in multiple ways influence the success of phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria, also known as, phage therapy.

  1. Epidemiology, clinical presentation, and pathophysiology of atypical and recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Besbas, N.; Jungraithmayr, T.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Karch, H.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Loirat, C.; Proesmans, W.; Prufer, F.; Rizzoni, G.; Taylor, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) includes a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Among the identified causes of HUS are infections, particularly infections with Shiga toxin-producing ESCHERICHIA COLI (STEC), complement disorders, and disorders interfering with the degradation of von Willebrand

  2. Epidemiology, clinical presentation, and pathophysiology of atypical and recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Besbas, N.; Jungraithmayr, T.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Karch, H.; Karpman, D.; Landau, D.; Loirat, C.; Proesmans, W.; Prufer, F.; Rizzoni, G.; Taylor, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) includes a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Among the identified causes of HUS are infections, particularly infections with Shiga toxin-producing ESCHERICHIA COLI (STEC), complement disorders, and disorders interfering with the degradation of von Willebrand

  3. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These types of infections are called healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Hospital staff and healthcare providers do everything they can ... IV tube) can increase your risk for fungal infection. During your hospital stay you may need a central venous catheter, ...

  4. Candida infection of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000880.htm Candida infection of the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Candida infection of the skin is a yeast infection ...

  5. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Middle Ear Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections Print ... 3 years old. A Close Look at the Ear To understand how ear infections develop, let's review ...

  6. PREVALENCE OF PARAGONIMUS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nworie Okoro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paragonimiasis (human infections with the lung fluke Paragonimus westermani is an important public health problem in parts of Africa. This study was aimed at assessing the prevalence of Paragonimus infection in Ebonyi State. Deep sputum samples from 3600 individuals and stool samples from 900 individuals in nine Local Government Areas in Ebonyi State, Nigeria were examined for Paragonimus ova using concentration technique. The overall prevalence of pulmonary Paragonimus infection in the area was 16.30%. Six foci of the infection were identified in Ebonyi North and Ebonyi Central but none in Ebonyi South. The intensity of the infection was generally moderate. Of the 720 individuals examined, 16 (12.12% had less than 40 ova of Paragonimus in 5 mL sputum and 114 (86.36% had between 40 and 79 ova of Paragonimus in 5 mL sputum. While 2 individuals (1.52% had over 79 ova of Paragonimus in 5 mL Sputum. Furthermore, there was higher prevalence of paragonimiasis in rainy season than in dry season. The results of this study indicated the growing public health threat posed by paragonimiasis in Ebonyi North and Ebonyi Central. A combination of chemotherapy, to bring relief to persons already infected by the disease and public health education related to paragonimiasis transmission to increase awareness of the infection in the areas is recommended.

  7. HPV Infection in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Palefsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While much is known about the natural history of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV infection and its consequences, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer, relatively little is known about the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and diseases in men. In part this reflects difficulties in penile sampling and visual assessment of penile lesions. Anal HPV infection and disease also remain poorly understood. Although HPV is transmitted sexually and infects the genitals of both sexes, the cervix remains biologically more vulnerable to malignant transformation than does the penis or anus in men. An understanding of male HPV infection is therefore important in terms of reducing transmission of HPV to women and improving women's health. However, it is also important due to the burden of disease in men, who may develop both penile and anal cancer, particularly among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Improved sampling techniques of the male genitalia and cohort studies in progress should provide important information on the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and disease in men, including risk factors for HPV acquisition and transmission. The impact of HPV vaccination in women on male anogenital HPV infection will also need to be assessed.

  8. Pregnancy and Toxoplasma Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Cetin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is an infectious disease caused by a protozoa named Toxoplasma gondii. It is a very important disease because it is related to fetal anomalies and poor perinatal outcomes like abortus and stillbirth. It spreads via uncooked meat and contaminated food. Timely and appropriate treatment and management of this infection prenatally reduces the risk of serious neurological sequelae. Therefore it is crucial that clinician who takes care of pregnant women know this infection deeply. In this review we aimed to summarize the prenatal diagnosis, complications and treatment of toxoplasma infection. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 457-466

  9. [Heart transplantation and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozábalová, Eva; Krejčí, Jan; Hude, Petr; Godava, Julius; Honek, Tomáš; Špinarová, Lenka; Pavlík, Petr; Bedáňová, Helena; Němec, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is a method of treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure with severe symptoms despite complex therapy. Post-transplant difficulties include acute rejection and infectious complications, which are the most common reason of morbidity and mortality in the first year after heart transplant. It requires the patient to remain on immunosuppressive medication to avoid the possibility of graft rejection. Therefore the range of infection is much larger. The diagnosis and treatment of viral, bacterial and fungal infections is often difficult.Key words: heart transplantation - immunosuppression - infection.

  10. Toxocara infection in gardener

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beuy; Joob; Viroj; Wiwanitkit

    2015-01-01

    <正>To the editor,The report on Toxocara infection in gardener is very interesting[1].Esquivel et al.concluded that"gardeners do not have a higher risk for Toxocara infection than subjects of the general population in Durango City,Mexico"[1].In fact,considering the source of infection of Toxocara,it can be at risk for anyone who contacts it.As an occupation,gardener might have a chance to contact soil.In fact,everyone has to contact soil and the gardener does not live all day but part of

  11. Healthcare Associated Infections - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - state data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  12. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  13. Latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuermberger, Eric; Bishai, William R; Grosset, Jacques H

    2004-06-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a clinical condition characterized by a positive tuberculin skin test in the absence of clinical or radiological signs of active tuberculosis disease. It has been estimated that one third of the world's population is latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and serves as an enormous reservoir for future cases of active tuberculosis. The detection and treatment of individuals with LTBI and a high risk of progression to active tuberculosis are effective means to control the spread of tuberculosis. Furthermore, a better understanding of the host-pathogen interactions that result in latent infection could provide important insights for future drug or vaccine development. This chapter reviews recent developments in the molecular genetics, natural history, diagnosis, and treatment of LTBI within its historical context, including the impact of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Current treatment recommendations are also summarized.

  14. HIV infection in Bophuthatswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was known about HIV infection and AIDS in the country. However, the health authorities were aware of the report ... natal, family planning and sexually transmitted diseases ..... Francis DP, Chin J. The prevention of acquired immunodeficiency.

  15. Giardia Infection (Giardiasis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sex. The giardia parasite is a very common intestinal parasite. Although anyone can pick up giardia parasites, some ... Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/giardia/. Accessed Sept. ... infections and trichomoniasis. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal ...

  16. Vaginal yeast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge to thick, white, and chunky (like cottage cheese). Itching and burning of the vagina and labia ... a wet mount and KOH test. Sometimes, a culture is taken when the infection does not get ...

  17. Infections and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  18. [Update on infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parize, P; Mainardi, J-L

    2011-10-01

    Infective endocarditis has continuously evolved since its first clinical description by William Osler in the late 19th century. The epidemiological and microbiological profile of the disease has changed as the result of the progress of the medical care and demographic mutation in industrialized countries. Furthermore, advances in anti-infective therapy and in cardiovascular surgery have contributed to an improvement in the management and the prognosis of this severe infectious disease. During the past decade, the recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have changed dramatically. Guidelines on management of infective endocarditis and state-of-the-art articles have been published recently and this work aims to outline current recommendations about this evolving disease.

  19. Preventing infections when visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dockrell H, Zuckerman M, et al. Hospital infection, sterilization and disinfection. In: Goering R, Dockrell H, Zuckerman M, et al., eds. Mims' Medical Microbiology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap ...

  20. Blastocytosis hominis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blastocystis hominis infection Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Blastocystis hominis is a microscopic organism that may be ... people who aren't having any digestive symptoms. Blastocystis hominis is also sometimes found in the stools ...

  1. Urticaria and infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedi Bettina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Urticaria is a group of diseases that share a distinct skin reaction pattern. Triggering of urticaria by infections has been discussed for many years but the exact role and pathogenesis of mast cell activation by infectious processes is unclear. In spontaneous acute urticaria there is no doubt for a causal relationship to infections and all chronic urticaria must have started as acute. Whereas in physical or distinct urticaria subtypes the evidence for infections is sparse, remission of annoying spontaneous chronic urticaria has been reported after successful treatment of persistent infections. Current summarizing available studies that evaluated the course of the chronic urticaria after proven Helicobacter eradication demonstrate a statistically significant benefit compared to untreated patients or Helicobacter-negative controls without urticaria (p

  2. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tight or made of materials like nylon that trap heat and moisture might make yeast infections more ... Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  3. Neuroinvasive flavivirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, Gregorius J.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    Flaviviruses, including Dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, and Tick-borne encephalitis virus, are major emerging human pathogens, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Many clinically important flaviviruses elicit CNS diseases in infected hosts, including traditional "hemorrhagic"

  4. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bacteria begins to grow and release harmful substances (toxins) that kill tissue and affect blood flow to ... pressure ( hyperbaric oxygen therapy ) for certain types of bacterial infections Outlook (Prognosis) How well you do depends ...

  5. Neuroinvasive flavivirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, Gregorius J.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses, including Dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, and Tick-borne encephalitis virus, are major emerging human pathogens, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Many clinically important flaviviruses elicit CNS diseases in infected hosts, including traditional "hemorrhagic" viru

  6. Fungal Eye Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment & Outcomes Statistics More Resources Fungal Nail Infections Histoplasmosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & ... CDC at Work Global Fungal Diseases Cryptococcal Meningitis Histoplasmosis ... Resistance Resources Laboratory Submission Information Reportable Fungal ...

  7. Sexually transmitted infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Wolfgang; Brockmeyer, Norbert H

    2014-06-01

    In no other medical field former rare infections of the 1980(th) and 1990(th) occur again as this is seen in the field of venerology which is as well based on the mobility of the population. Increasing rates of infections in Europe, and increasing bacteriological resistances face health professionals with new challenges. The WHO estimates more than 340 million cases of illnesses worldwide every year. Diseases caused by sexually transmitted infections (STI) in a strict sense are syphilis, gonorrhea, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale, and chancroid. In a wider sense, all illnesses are included which can mainly be transmitted through sexual contact. The term "sexual contact" has to be seen widely, from close physical contact to all variants of sexual behavior. This CME article is an overview of the most common occurring sexually transmitted infections in clinical practice. Both, basic knowledge as well as recent developments are discussed below.

  8. Infection and Atherosclerosis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lee Ann; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease hallmarked by chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation in the vasculature. Although lipid modification and deposition are thought to be a major source of the continuous inflammatory stimulus, a large body of evidence suggests that infectious agents may contribute to atherosclerotic processes. This could occur by either direct effects through infection of vascular cells and/or through indirect effects by induction of cytokine and acute phase reactant proteins by infection at other sites. Multiple bacterial and viral pathogens have been associated with atherosclerosis by seroepidemiological studies, identification of the infectious agent in human atherosclerotic tissue, and experimental studies demonstrating an acceleration of atherosclerosis following infection in animal models of atherosclerosis. This review will focus on those infectious agents for which biological plausibility has been demonstrated in animal models and on the challenges of proving a role of infection in human atherosclerotic disease. PMID:26004263

  9. Chlamydia infections in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Names Cervicitis - chlamydia; STI - chlamydia; STD - chlamydia; Sexually transmitted - chlamydia; ... for Disease Control and Prevention. Chlamydial infections in adolescents and adults. Updated June 4, 2015. www.cdc. ...

  10. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and mortality as well as significant financial implications. Worldwide it has ... common nosocomial infection amongst surgical patients with up to 38% .... antibiotics as soon as the sensitivity results are available. ... Breast surgery. Staph Aureus/ ...

  11. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of food poisoning, are frequently found in raw chicken or eggs. Shigella bacteria are highly contagious and ... bacterial intestinal illness may need to take prescription antibiotics to prevent the infection from spreading throughout the ...

  12. Infection Prevention in Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergam, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients undergoing hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation are increasing every year, as are the number of centers both transplanting and caring for these patients. Improvements in transplant procedures, immunosuppressive regimens, and prevention of transplant-associated complications have led to marked improvements in survival in both populations. Infections remain one of the most important sources of excess morbidity and mortality in transplant, and therefore, infection prevention strategies are a critical element for avoiding these complications in centers caring for high-risk patients. This manuscript aims to provide an update of recent data on prevention of major healthcare-associated infections unique to transplantation, reviews the emergence of antimicrobial resistant infections, and discusses updated strategies to both identify and prevent transmission of these pathogens in transplant recipients.

  13. Sexually transmitted infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    treatment practices of sexually transmitted infections among brothel based female sex workers Three hundred and twenty three consenting ... five top diseases for which Nigerians seek medical ... in other countries have also revealed a high.

  14. Skin infections in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllegger, Robert R; Häring, Nina S; Glatz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A wide array of infectious diseases can occur in pregnancy. Their acquisition, clinical presentation, and course during gestation may be altered due to an impairment of the maternal cellular immunity. Some infectious diseases can lead to serious consequences for the mother or the offspring, including congenital malformations. This review describes in detail the clinical presentation, course, management, and associated maternal and fetal risks of selected viral (varicella-zoster virus infections, condylomata acuminata), fungal (candida vulvovaginitis), bacterial (Lyme borreliosis), and parasitic (scabies) infections. The treatment options are critically reviewed. First-line therapies include acyclovir and varicella-zoster virus immunoglobulin for varicella-zoster virus infections, surgical modalities for genital warts, topical clotrimazole and oral fluconazole for Candida vulvovaginitis, amoxicillin and cefuroxime for Lyme borreliosis, and permethrin for scabies. A synopsis of maternal and fetal risks of other important infections is also included. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuroinvasive flavivirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, Gregorius J.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses, including Dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, and Tick-borne encephalitis virus, are major emerging human pathogens, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Many clinically important flaviviruses elicit CNS diseases in infected hosts, including traditional "hemorrhagic" viru

  16. CNS infections in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm, Anne Christine; Søborg, Bolette; Andersson, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Indigenous Arctic people suffer from high rates of infectious diseases. However, the burden of central nervous system (CNS) infections is poorly documented. This study aimed to estimate incidence rates and mortality of CNS infections among Inuits and non-Inuits in Greenland...... and in Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide cohort study using the populations of Greenland and Denmark 1990-2012. Information on CNS infection hospitalizations and pathogens was retrieved from national registries and laboratories. Incidence rates were estimated as cases per 100,000 person......-years. Incidence rate ratios were calculated using log-linear Poisson-regression. Mortality was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Log Rank test. RESULTS: The incidence rate of CNS infections was twice as high in Greenland (35.6 per 100,000 person years) as in Denmark (17.7 per 100,000 person years...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  18. Healthcare Associated Infections - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measures - provider data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  19. Healthcare Associated Infections - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) measures - national data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and...

  20. Immunity to parasitic infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamb, Tracey J

    2012-01-01

    ... be manipulated to develop therapeutic interventions against parasitic infection. For easy reference, the most commonly studied parasites are examined in individual chapters written by investigators at the forefront of their field...

  1. Mycoplasma infections of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, J M

    1981-07-01

    Plants can be infected by two types of wall-less procaryotes, spiroplasmas and mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO), both located intracellularly in the phloem tissues of affected plants. Spiroplasmas have been cultured, characterized and shown to be true members of the class Mollicutes. MLO have not yet been cultured or characterized; they are thought to be mycoplasma-like on the basis of their ultrastructure as seen in situ, their sensitivity to tetracycline and resistance to penicillin. Mycoplasmas can also be found on the surface of plants. These extracellularly located organisms are members of the following genera: Spiroplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. The presence of such surface mycoplasmas must not be overlooked when attempts to culture MLO from affected plants are undertaken. Sensitive serological techniques such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can successfully be used to compare the MLO located in the phloem of affected plants with those eventually cultured from the same plants. In California and Morocco periwinkles naturally infected with both Spiroplasma citri and MLO have been reported. With such doubly infected plants, the symptom expression has been that characteristic of the MLO disease (phyllody or stolbur), not that given by S. citri. Only S. citri can be cultured from such plants, but this does not indicate that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease expressed by the plant. In California many nonrutaceous plants have been found to be infected with S. citri. Stubborn affected citrus trees represent an important reservoir of S. citri, and Circulifer tenellus is an active leafhopper vector of S. citri. Hence, it is not surprising that in California MLO-infected fruit trees could also become infected with S. citri but it would not mean that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease. Criteria are discussed that are helpful in distinguishing between MLO infections and S. citri infections.

  2. An Infected Mediastinal Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M Lawson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a 43-year-old patient who had a mediastinal mass that became infected after a transbronchial needle aspirate biopsy. A paraspinal, extrapleural window with a saline-lidocaine mixture was created that allowed the placement of a percutaneous drainage catheter into the infected lesion. This procedure resulted in an excellent clinical outcome, and obviated the need for a thoracotomy and more invasive surgical management.

  3. Infected cardiac hydatid cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Ceviz, M; Becit, N; Kocak, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with chest pain and palpitation. The presence of a semisolid mass—an echinococcal cyst or tumour—in the left ventricular apex was diagnosed by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The infected cyst was seen at surgery. The cyst was removed successfully by using cardiopulmonary bypass with cross clamp.


Keywords: cardiac hydatid cyst; infected cardiac hydatid cyst

  4. [Infections and fingolimod].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Carlos

    2012-08-16

    Fingolimod is the first approved drug with oral availability for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis. To review the mechanism of action of fingolimod and its relationship with the development of infections. To propose preventive measures for those patients who are receiving the drug or will initiate a new treatment. In addition, the role of fingolimod in the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy on the basis of recent knowledge of its pathophysiology will be discussed. The mechanism of action of fingolimod is based on an antagonic effect on the sphingosine 1-phospate receptors that will generate an inhibition of the egress of naive and central memory lymphocytes into the bloodstream, allowing the free recirculation of memory effectors T lymphocytes. This effect will produce lymphopenia. Fingolimod-associated lymphopenia is a consequence of lymphocyte redistribution, and it is selective and reversible. There is no evidence of higher number of opportunistic and non-opportunistic infections in comparison to placebo or interferon beta-1a in patients receiving fingolimod. However, two patients developed severe herpetic infections under fingolimod. Fingolimod induce a selective and reversible lymphopenia that, taking into account the most recent available data, does not seem to be associated with higher risk of opportunistic infections due to a preservation of immuno-surveillance. The risk of herpesvirus infection should be taken into consideration and more studies are warranted to confirm if an association of these infections with the use of fingolimod exists.

  5. Postoperative Spine Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  6. Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STIs other than HIV have reappeared as an important public health problem in developed countries (1. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, research and treatment of the 'classic' STIs - gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia - were a major focus of infectious diseases practice and research. There were large outbreaks of syphilis in parts of Canada (2, penicillin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae was a concern (3, and high rates of Chlamydia trachomatis infection with complications of pelvic inflammatory disease and ectopic pregnancy were being reported (4,5. Then, HIV infection emerged, with its spectre of a wasting, early death. There was no effective treatment, and safe sexual practices were embraced and adhered to by high-risk populations as the only effective way to avoid infection. These practices effectively prevented other STIs; rates of syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia infection plummeted in developed countries (5. For at least a decade, it appeared that HIV might be an end to all STIs, at least for some parts of the world. STIs continued unabated in developing countries, as many epidemiological and therapeutic studies explored the association of STIs with HIV infection.

  7. Diaper Area Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Sarıcaoğlu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic signs of infectious diseases may occur as primary infection of skin, accompanying of skin to systemic infections and noninfectious skin eruption of systemic infectious disease. In this review, skin infections of diaper area and diaper area manifestations of infections causing generalized skin lesions will be discussed. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2008; 6: 31-9

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Urinary Tract Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Urinary Tract Infections Print A ... especially girls — visit a doctor. What Is a Urinary Tract Infection? A bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI) is the ...

  9. Current management of fungal infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meis, J.F.G.M.; Verweij, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    The management of superficial fungal infections differs significantly from the management of systemic fungal infections. Most superficial infections are treated with topical antifungal agents, the choice of agent being determined by the site and extent of the infection and by the causative organism,

  10. Worm Infections in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherhead, Jill E; Hotez, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    • On the basis of research evidence, worm infections are important global child health conditions causing chronic disability that lasts from childhood into adulthood (Table 1). (2)(3) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, the major worm infections found in developing countries include ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infection, and schistosomiasis; toxocariasis, enterobiasis, and cysticercosis are also found in poor regions of North America and Europe. (4)(9)(13) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of expert consensus, children and adolescents are often vulnerable to acquiring large numbers of worms, ie, high-intensity infections (Fig 1)(21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: D • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, moderate and heavy worm burdens cause increased morbidity because of growth and intellectual stunting in children and adolescents. Many of these effects may result from helminth-induced malnutrition. (21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: C • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, worm infections are also commonly associated with eosinophilia. (48) (49) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence as well as consensus, helminthes can cause inflammation in the lung (asthma), gastrointestinal tract (enteritis and colitis), liver (hepatitis and fibrosis), and urogenital tract. (7)(21)(22)(23)(27)(28)(40)(41)(43) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, microscopy techniques for diagnosis of worm infections in children often exhibit suboptimal sensitivities and specificities, necessitating new or improved diagnostic modalities such as polymerase chain reaction. (54)(55) Evidence Quality: A • On the basis of research evidence and expert consensus, mass drug administration (“preventive chemotherapy”) has becomea standard practice for ministries of health in low- and middle-income countries to control intestinal helminth infections and schistosomiasis. (67)(68) Evidence

  11. Infected nonunion of tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind Madhav Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infected nonunions of tibia pose many challenges to the treating surgeon and the patient. Challenges include recalcitrant infection, complex deformities, sclerotic bone ends, large bone gaps, shortening, and joint stiffness. They are easy to diagnose and difficult to treat. The ASAMI classification helps decide treatment. The nonunion severity score proposed by Calori measures many parameters to give a prognosis. The infection severity score uses simple clinical signs to grade severity of infection. This determines number of surgeries and allows choice of hardware, either external or internal for definitive treatment. Co-morbid factors such as smoking, diabetes, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and hypovitaminosis D influence the choice and duration of treatment. Thorough debridement is the mainstay of treatment. Removal of all necrotic bone and soft tissue is needed. Care is exercised in shaping bone ends. Internal fixation can help achieve union if infection was mild. Severe infections need external fixation use in a second stage. Compression at nonunion site achieves union. It can be combined with a corticotomy lengthening at a distant site for equalization. Soft tissue deficit has to be covered by flaps, either local or microvascular. Bone gaps are best filled with the reliable technique of bone transport. Regenerate bone may be formed proximally, distally, or at both sites. Acute compression can fill bone gaps and may need a fibular resection. Gradual reduction of bone gap happens with bone transport, without need for fibulectomy. When bone ends dock, union may be achieved by vertical or horizontal compression. Biological stimulus from iliac crest bone grafts, bone marrow aspirate injections, and platelet concentrates hasten union. Bone graft substitutes add volume to graft and help fill defects. Addition of rh-BMP-7 may help in healing albeit at a much higher cost. Regeneration may need stimulation and augmentation. Induced

  12. Dengue viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurugama Padmalal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  13. [Atherosclerosis and infection?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, K

    2006-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is guided by chronicle inflammation process. In the last decades of the 20th century, studies considering infection another possible risk factor of atherosclerosis development were written. Helicobacter pylori, Porphyromas gingivalis, some viruses but most frequently Chlamydia pneumonie are infection agens mentioned in these studies. Some of them emphasize also combined infections caused by more pathogenic factors having influence on vascular inflammation. Serological, epidemiological, histological and imunological studies show the pathogenic influence of acute or chronic infections. Many studies selected makrolid antibiotics as treatment in patients with ischaemic heart disease. However, existing experience with antibiotics did not bring clear results. These studies have mentioned the fact antibiotics have not been indicated as treatment in patients with acute or chronic vascular system infliction by atherosclerosis. Since the experimental and clinical research of influence of inflammations on the development of atherosclerosis moved forward a lot, no exact evidence of this complicated pathogenic mechanism was given. It will obviously take some time to confirm whether the relation between infections and artherosclerosis is causal, i.e. initiating the pathogenic process, accelerating it or keeping it alive.

  14. Microvesicles and viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, David G; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2011-12-01

    Cells secrete various membrane-enclosed microvesicles from their cell surface (shedding microvesicles) and from internal, endosome-derived membranes (exosomes). Intriguingly, these vesicles have many characteristics in common with enveloped viruses, including biophysical properties, biogenesis, and uptake by cells. Recent discoveries describing the microvesicle-mediated intercellular transfer of functional cellular proteins, RNAs, and mRNAs have revealed additional similarities between viruses and cellular microvesicles. Apparent differences include the complexity of viral entry, temporally regulated viral expression, and self-replication proceeding to infection of new cells. Interestingly, many virally infected cells secrete microvesicles that differ in content from their virion counterparts but may contain various viral proteins and RNAs. For the most part, these particles have not been analyzed for their content or functions during viral infection. However, early studies of microvesicles (L-particles) secreted from herpes simplex virus-infected cells provided the first evidence of microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication. In the case of Epstein-Barr virus, recent evidence suggests that this tumorigenic herpesvirus also utilizes exosomes as a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication through the transfer of signaling competent proteins and functional microRNAs to uninfected cells. This review focuses on aspects of the biology of microvesicles with an emphasis on their potential contributions to viral infection and pathogenesis.

  15. Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Agnese Latino

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis (C.t. infection is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease in Europe and in developed countries. The main biological features and pathogenic mechanisms of C.t. infection are summarized in this review. It usually occurs without symptoms and often goes undiagnosed. If untreated, it can cause severe consequences for women, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, ectopic pregnancy and tubal infertility. Several studies have found that Chlamydia is more common among young women <25 years old, with multiple sexual partners within six months and non protected intercourses. Because re-infection rates are high, complications may be reduced if partners are treated and women re-tested. This paper emphasizes the importance of counselling and prevention programs and underlines that selective screening of high-risk population remains an essential component of C.t. control. In the last years, the detection of C.t. infection has been improved in sensitivity and specificity.We describe the main diagnostic techniques, from culture, enzyme immunoassay (EIA, direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA to the new DNA-based test systems. Actually, NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests are regarded as the gold standard diagnostic techniques for chlamydial infections.

  16. Surgical infection in art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meakins, J L

    1996-12-01

    The earliest images of medicine and surgery in Western art are from the late Middle Ages. Although often attractive, at that time they were illustrative and mirrored the text on how to diagnose or treat a specific condition. These drawings in medieval manuscripts represent management of abscesses, perianal infection and fistulas, amputation, and wound dressings. With the Renaissance, art in all its forms flourished, and surgeons were represented at work draining carbuncles, infected bursae, and mastoiditis; managing ulcers, scrofula, and skin infections; and performing amputations. Specific diagnosis can be made, such as streptococcal infection in the discarded leg of the miraculous transplantation performed by Saints Cosmas and Damian and in the works of Rembrandt van Rijn and Frederic Bazille. Evocations of cytokine activity are evident in works by Albrecht Dürer, Edvard Munch, and James Tissot. The iconography of society's view of a surgeon is apparent and often not complimentary. The surgeon's art is a visual art. Astute observation leads to early diagnosis and better results in surgical infection and the septic state. Learning to see what we look at enhances our appreciation of the world around us but, quite specifically, makes us better clinicians.

  17. HPV Infections in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Barbara Moscicki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents who are sexually active have the highest rates of prevalent and incident HPV infection rates with over 50–80% having infections within 2–3 years of initiating intercourse. These high rates reflect sexual behavior and biologic vulnerability. Most infections are transient in nature and cause no cytologic abnormality. However, a small number of adolescents will not clear the infection. Persistence of HPV is strongly linked to the development of high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (HSIL and invasive cancer. The HSIL detected, however, does not appear to progress rapidly to invasive cancer. Understanding the natural history of HPV in adolescents has shed light into optional treatment strategies which include watchful observation of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS and low grade (LSIL. The association between age of first intercourse and invasive cancer cannot be ignored. Consequently, initiating screening at appropriate times in this vulnerable group is essential. In addition, with the advent of the HPV vaccine, vaccination prior to the onset of sexual activity is critical since most infections occur within a short time frame post initiation.

  18. Chlamydiaceae infections in pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schautteet Katelijn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria. They are responsible for a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. In pigs, Chlamydia suis, Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia psittaci have been isolated. Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs are associated with different pathologies such as conjunctivitis, pneumonia, pericarditis, polyarthritis, polyserositis, pseudo-membranous or necrotizing enteritis, periparturient dysgalactiae syndrome, vaginal discharge, return to oestrus, abortion, mummification, delivery of weak piglets, increased perinatal and neonatal mortality and inferior semen quality, orchitis, epididymitis and urethritis in boars. However, Chlamydiaceae are still considered as non-important pathogens because reports of porcine chlamydiosis are rare. Furthermore, Chlamydiaceae infections are often unnoticed because tests for Chlamydiaceae are not routinely performed in all veterinary diagnostic laboratories and Chlamydiaceae are often found in association with other pathogens, which are sometimes more easily to detect. However, recent studies have demonstrated that Chlamydiaceae infections in breeding sows, boars and piglets occur more often than thought and are economically important. This paper presents an overview on: the taxonomy of Chlamydiaceae occurring in pigs, diagnostic considerations, epidemiology and pathology of infections with Chlamydiaceae in pigs, public health significance and finally on prevention and treatment of Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs.

  19. Optimizing application parameters for lactic acid and sodium metasilicate against pathogens on fresh beef, pork and deli meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGeer, Staci L; Wang, Luxin; Hill, Gretchen N; Singh, Manpreet; Bilgili, Sacit F; Bratcher, Christy L

    2016-08-01

    Lactic acid (LA) and sodium metasilicate (SM) have been approved for use as antimicrobials on meat. The objectives were to determine optimum concentrations, temperatures and hot-water dips of LA and SM for reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes on beef, pork and deli meats. LA was applied at 1, 2, 3, and 4% and SM was applied at 2, 3, 4, and 5%. SM4 and LA4 were the lowest concentrations most effective against all pathogens. LA4 and SM4, the combination of the two (LASM), and distilled water control were applied at 4, 25, and 60°C. Temperature of application had no effect on pathogens. LA or SM alone were more effective in reduction of pathogens than LASM. Regardless of anti-microbial used in post-packaging lethality treatments, there were no differences in L. monocytogenes. Treating deli meats with LA or SM did not reduce L. monocytogenes. Both LA and SM can be applied to fresh beef and pork to decrease pathogens.

  20. Infection and anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanra, Güler Y; Ozen, Hasan; Kara, Ateş

    2006-01-01

    Whereas anorexia is a common behavioral response to infectious diseases, the reasons for and mechanisms behind this observation are still unknown. When it is considered on an evolutionary basis, the organism must have net benefits from anorexia. The first response to infection is the development of acute phase response (APR). The APR is triggered by microbial products and characterized by production of several cytokines known to induce anorexia. Several microbial products and cytokines reduce food intake after parenteral administration, suggesting a role of these substances in the anorexia during infection. Locally released cytokines may inhibit feeding by activating peripheral sensory fibers directly or indirectly, and without a concomitant increase in circulating cytokines. However, the final center for appetite or eating is the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, these peripheral signals must reach and interact with brain regions that control appetite. In addition, a direct action of cytokines and microbial products on the CNS is presumably involved in the anorexia during infection.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  2. Apoptosis in Pneumovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinout A. Bem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumovirus infections cause a wide spectrum of respiratory disease in humans and animals. The airway epithelium is the major site of pneumovirus replication. Apoptosis or regulated cell death, may contribute to the host anti-viral response by limiting viral replication. However, apoptosis of lung epithelial cells may also exacerbate lung injury, depending on the extent, the timing and specific location in the lungs. Differential apoptotic responses of epithelial cells versus innate immune cells (e.g., neutrophils, macrophages during pneumovirus infection can further contribute to the complex and delicate balance between host defense and disease pathogenesis. The purpose of this manuscript is to give an overview of the role of apoptosis in pneumovirus infection. We will examine clinical and experimental data concerning the various pro-apoptotic stimuli and the roles of apoptotic epithelial and innate immune cells during pneumovirus disease. Finally, we will discuss potential therapeutic interventions targeting apoptosis in the lungs.

  3. [Clinically documented fungal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakeya, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2008-12-01

    Proven fungal infections are diagnosed by histological/microbiological evidence of fungi at the site of infection and positive blood culture (fungemia). However, invasive diagnosing examinations are not always applied for all of immunocompromised patients. Clinically documented invasive fungal infections are diagnosed by typical radiological findings such as halo sign on chest CT plus positive serological/molecular evidence of fungi. Serological tests of Aspergillus galactomannan antigen and beta-glucan for aspergillosis and cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan antigen for cryptococcosis are useful. Hence, none of reliable serological tests for zygomycosis are available so far. In this article, risk factors, sign and symptoms, and diagnostic methods for clinically documented cases of invasive aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis, and zygomycosis with diabates, are reviewed.

  4. Pregnancy and HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mete Sucu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection is progressing rapidly. In developed countries, the perinatal transmission rates have decreased from 20-30% to 1-2% with the use of antiretroviral therapy and cesarean section. Interventions for the prevention of prenatal transmission has made the prenatal care of pregnant patients with HIV infection more complex. Rapid development of standard care and continuing increase in the distribution of HIV infection has required clinicians taking care of pregnants to have current information. Therefore, in our review we aimed to summarize the prenatal course, treatment and preventive methods for perinatal transmission of HIV. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 522-535

  5. Mycobacterial Infections in AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ross Hill

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains uniquely important among acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-associated opportunistic infections: it presents the greatest public health hazard worldwide, is the most readily curable, and is largely preventable with existing means. Given the expanding pool of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV seropositive persons, particularly in developing nations where Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading health problem, one can expect a continued rise in TB cases during the 1990s. Global efforts to eliminate TB are now inextricably entwined with the effectiveness of measures to curtail the HIV epidemic. Mycobacterium avium complex infection, currently an intractable late complication of aids, may increase in clinical importance as success in managing other opportunistic infections and HIV disease itself improves. Understanding of the pathogenesis and management of mycobacterial diseases should increase rapidly given the renewed research spurred on by the advent of HIV.

  6. Immunopathology of Brucella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Pablo C; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the protean nature of the disease, inflammation is a hallmark of brucellosis and affected tissues usually exhibit inflammatory infiltrates. As Brucella lacks exotoxins, exoproteases or cytolysins, pathological findings in brucellosis probably arise from inflammation-driven processes. The cellular and molecular bases of immunopathological phenomena probably involved in Brucella pathogenesis have been unraveled in the last few years. Brucella-infected osteoblasts, either alone or in synergy with infected macrophages, produce cytokines, chemokines and matrixmetalloproteinases (MMPs), and similar phenomena are mounted by fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The released cytokines promote the secretion of MMPs and induce osteoclastogenesis. Altogether, these phenomena may contribute to the bone loss and cartilage degradation usually observed in brucellar arthritis and osteomyelitis. Proinflammatory cytokines may be also involved in the pathogenesis of neurobrucellosis. B. abortus and its lipoproteins elicit an inflammatory response in the CNS of mice, leading to astrogliosis, a characteristic feature of neurobrucellosis. Heat-killed bacteria (HKBA) and the L-Omp19 lipoprotein elicit astrocyte apoptosis and proliferation (two features of astrogliosis), and apoptosis depends on TNF-α signaling. Brucella also infects and replicates in human endothelial cells, inducing the production of chemokines and IL-6, and an increased expression of adhesion molecules. The sustained inflammatory process derived from the longlasting infection of the endothelium may be important for the development of endocarditis. Therefore, while Brucella induces a low grade inflammation as compared to other pathogens, its prolonged intracellular persistence in infected tissues supports a long-lasting inflammatory response that mediates different pathways of tissue damage. In this context, approaches to avoid the invasion of host cells or limit the intracellular survival of the bacterium may be

  7. Intrauterine infection and prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luís F; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Romero, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    Intrauterine infection is a major cause of premature labor with and without intact membranes. Intrauterine infection is present in approximately 25% of all preterm births and the earlier the gestational age at delivery, the higher the frequency of intra-amniotic infection. Microorganisms may also gain access to the fetus before delivery. A fetal inflammatory response syndrome elicited in response to microbial products is associated with the impending onset of preterm labor and also with multi-systemic organ involvement in the human fetus and a higher rate of perinatal morbidity. The most common microorganisms involved in intrauterine infections are Ureaplasma urealyticum, Fusobacterium species and Mycoplasma hominis. The role of Chlamydia trachomatis and viruses in preterm labor remain to be determined. Use of molecular microbiology techniques to diagnose intrauterine infection may uncover the role of fastidious microorganisms that have not yet been discovered. Antibiotic administration to patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with a significant reduction in the rate of preterm birth. However, such benefit has not been demonstrated for patients with bacterial vaginosis, or women who carry Streptococcus agalactia, Ureaplasma urealyticum or Trichomonas vaginalis. Antibiotic administration to patients with preterm premature rupture of membranes is associated with prolongation of pregnancy and a reduction in the rate of clinical chorioamnionitis and neonatal sepsis. The benefit has not been demonstrated in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes. Major efforts are required to determine why some women develop an ascending intrauterine infection and others do not and also what interventions may reduce the deleterious effect of systemic fetal inflammation. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Relevance of Biofilms in the Pathogenesis of Shiga-Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the relationships among biofilm formation, cellular stress and release of Shiga toxin (Stx) by three different clinical Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. The biofilm formation was determined using crystal violet stain in tryptic soy broth or thioglycollate medium with the addition of sugars (glucose or mannose) or hydrogen peroxide. The reactive oxygen species (ROSs) were detected by the reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium an...

  9. Promising Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Assay Plus PCR for Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Yoshitaka; Takeshita, Kana; Nishiyama, Yasutaka; Morishita, Naoki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Morimatsu, Fumiki

    2015-08-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a frequent cause of foodborne infections, and methods for rapid and reliable detection of STEC are needed. A nucleic acid lateral flow assay (NALFA) plus PCR was evaluated for detecting STEC after enrichment. When cell suspensions of 45 STEC strains, 14 non-STEC strains, and 13 non-E. coli strains were tested with the NALFA plus PCR, all of the STEC strains yielded positive results, and all of the non-STEC and non-E. coli strains yielded negative results. The lower detection limit for the STEC strains ranged from 0.1 to 1 pg of genomic DNA (about 20 to 200 CFU) per test, and the NALFA plus PCR was able to detect Stx1- and Stx2-producing E. coli strains with similar sensitivities. The ability of the NALFA plus PCR to detect STEC in enrichment cultures of radish sprouts, tomato, raw ground beef, and beef liver inoculated with 10-fold serially diluted STEC cultures was comparable to that of a real-time PCR assay (at a level of 100 to 100,000 CFU/ml in enrichment culture). The bacterial inoculation test in raw ground beef revealed that the lower detection limit of the NALFA plus PCR was also comparable to that obtained with a real-time PCR assay that followed the U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines. Although further evaluation is required, these results suggest that the NALFA plus PCR is a specific and sensitive method for detecting STEC in a food manufacturing plant.

  10. Neglected Parasitic Infections: Toxocariasis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-05

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Neglected Parasitic Infections in the United States. Neglected Parasitic Infections are a group of diseases that afflict vulnerable populations and are often not well studied or diagnosed. A subject matter expert from CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of toxocariasis.  Created: 1/5/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM); Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 1/9/2012.

  11. Dipylidium caninum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Raúl Romero; Ruiz, Aurora Candil; Feregrino, Raul Romero; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Feregrino, Rodrigo Romero; Zavala, Jorge Tay

    2011-11-15

    Dipylidium caninum is a cestode that requires from the participation of an arthropod in its life cycle. This parasitosis occurs in dogs and cats, and occasionally in human beings. Human cases of D caninum infection have been reported in Europe, Philippines, China, Japan, Latin America and the United States; mostly children, one third of them being infants under 6 months old. The diagnosis of this disease is done by the parasitological study of the feces, observing the characteristics of the gravid proglottids. The treatment is performed by administering broad-spectrum anthelmintics. The authors report a case of a rare infection in a Mexican child.

  12. Dipylidium caninum infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Raúl Romero; Ruiz, Aurora Candil; Feregrino, Raul Romero; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Feregrino, Rodrigo Romero; Zavala, Jorge Tay

    2011-01-01

    Dipylidium caninum is a cestode that requires from the participation of an arthropod in its life cycle. This parasitosis occurs in dogs and cats, and occasionally in human beings. Human cases of D caninum infection have been reported in Europe, Philippines, China, Japan, Latin America and the United States; mostly children, one third of them being infants under 6 months old. The diagnosis of this disease is done by the parasitological study of the feces, observing the characteristics of the gravid proglottids. The treatment is performed by administering broad-spectrum anthelmintics. The authors report a case of a rare infection in a Mexican child. PMID:22674592

  13. Viral infections in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, D; Vindevogel, H

    2006-07-01

    This review provides a current update on the major viral diseases of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica), based on scientific reports and clinical experience. Paramyxovirus 1, adenovirus, rotavirus, herpesvirus 1, poxvirus and circovirus infections are described according to common clinical signs and target tissues. Since pigeons are sometimes treated as if they were poultry, the review also summarises the common viral infections of poultry for which pigeons are considered resistant. It is hoped that the review will provide a useful reference for veterinarians and others and offer advice on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major infectious diseases of pigeons.

  14. Imaging spinal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection involving the vertebral column, including the bone, intervertebral disk, and paravertebral soft tissues is critical and early diagnosis and directed treatment is paramount. Different infectious organisms present with variable imaging characteristics, which when examined in conjunction with the clinical history, can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately prevent patient morbidity and mortality. This article discusses the pathophysiology of infection of the vertebral column, as well as the imaging findings of bacterial, tuberculous, and fungal spondylitis/spondylodiskitis. We review the imaging findings utilizing plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as a discussion regarding advanced imaging techniques.

  15. Herpes zoster infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster (HZ or ′shingles′ results from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV. Developmental anomalies, osteonecrosis of jaw bones, and facial scarring are the other complications associated with it. Primary VZV infections in sero-negative individuals are known as varicella or chicken pox. Secondary or reactivated disease is known as shingles or herpes zoster. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of the disease in the prodromal phase by the use of antiviral agents should be the mainstay of its management. This paper presents a case report of such an infection and its management.

  16. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang,Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-Yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pa...

  17. PRODUCT SAFETY AND COLOR CHARACTERISTICS OF GROUND BEEF PROCESSED FROM BEEF TRIMMINGS TREATED WITH PEROXYACETIC ACID ALONE OR FOLLOWED BY NOVEL ORGANIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Pohlman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial interventions using peroxyacetic acetic acid (PAA followed by novel organic acids on beef trimmings prior to grinding with conventional spray (CS or electrostatic spray (ES on ground beef microbial populations and color. Beef trimmings (80/20; 25kg were inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, non- O157:H7 shiga toxin producing (STEC E. coli (EC and Salmonella spp. (SA at 105 CFU/g. Inoculated trimmings (1.5 kg /treatment/replicate, 2 replicates were treated with CS application of 0.02% PAA alone or followed by CS or ES application of 3% octanoic acid (PO, 3% pyruvic acid (PP, 3% malic acid (PM, saturated solution of fumaric acid (PF or deionized water (W. Findings from this study suggest that PA as a single or multiple chemical hurdle approach with malic, pyruvic, octanoic and fumaric acid on beef trimmings may be effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 as well as non-STEC serotypes and Salmonella in ground beef up to day 2 of simulated retail display. Results of this study showed that instrumental color properties of ground beef treated with peroxyacetic acid followed by organic acids had little or no difference (P > 0.05 compared to the untreated un-inoculated control ground beef samples. The results also indicate that ES application of some organic acids may have similar or greater efficiency in controlling ground beef microbial populations compared to the CS application of the same acid providing a more economical and waste manageable decontamination approach.

  18. Effects of Escherichia Coli Subtilase Cytotoxin and Shiga Toxin 2 on Primary Cultures of Human Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Laura B.; Velázquez, Natalia; Repetto, Horacio A.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Ibarra, Cristina; Silberstein, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause post-diarrhea Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in many parts of the world. Several non-O157 STEC strains also produce Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis. The aim of the present work was to examine the cytotoxic effects of SubAB on primary cultures of human cortical renal tubular epithelial cells (HRTEC) and compare its effects with those produced by Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2), in order to evaluate their contribution to renal injury in HUS. For this purpose, cell viability, proliferation rate, and apoptosis were assayed on HRTEC incubated with SubAB and/or Stx2 toxins. SubAB significantly reduced cell viability and cell proliferation rate, as well as stimulating cell apoptosis in HRTEC cultures in a time dependent manner. However, HRTEC cultures were significantly more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of Stx2 than those produced by SubAB. No synergism was observed when HRTEC were co-incubated with both SubAB and Stx2. When HRTEC were incubated with the inactive SubAA272B toxin, results were similar to those in untreated control cells. Similar stimulation of apoptosis was observed in Vero cells incubated with SubAB or/and Stx2, compared to HRTEC. In conclusion, primary cultures of HRTEC are significantly sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of SubAB, although, in a lesser extent compared to Stx2. PMID:24466317

  19. Hyperspectral imaging using a color camera and its application for pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Shin, Tae-Sung; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon; Gamble, Gary

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports the results of a feasibility study for the development of a hyperspectral image recovery (reconstruction) technique using a RGB color camera and regression analysis in order to detect and classify colonies of foodborne pathogens. The target bacterial pathogens were the six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) grown in Petri dishes of Rainbow agar. The purpose of the feasibility study was to evaluate whether a DSLR camera (Nikon D700) could be used to predict hyperspectral images in the wavelength range from 400 to 1,000 nm and even to predict the types of pathogens using a hyperspectral STEC classification algorithm that was previously developed. Unlike many other studies using color charts with known and noise-free spectra for training reconstruction models, this work used hyperspectral and color images, separately measured by a hyperspectral imaging spectrometer and the DSLR color camera. The color images were calibrated (i.e. normalized) to relative reflectance, subsampled and spatially registered to match with counterpart pixels in hyperspectral images that were also calibrated to relative reflectance. Polynomial multivariate least-squares regression (PMLR) was previously developed with simulated color images. In this study, partial least squares regression (PLSR) was also evaluated as a spectral recovery technique to minimize multicollinearity and overfitting. The two spectral recovery models (PMLR and PLSR) and their parameters were evaluated by cross-validation. The QR decomposition was used to find a numerically more stable solution of the regression equation. The preliminary results showed that PLSR was more effective especially with higher order polynomial regressions than PMLR. The best classification accuracy measured with an independent test set was about 90%. The results suggest the potential of cost-effective color imaging using hyperspectral image

  20. Effects of Escherichia coli subtilase cytotoxin and Shiga toxin 2 on primary cultures of human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Márquez

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC cause post-diarrhea Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS, which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in many parts of the world. Several non-O157 STEC strains also produce Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis. The aim of the present work was to examine the cytotoxic effects of SubAB on primary cultures of human cortical renal tubular epithelial cells (HRTEC and compare its effects with those produced by Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2, in order to evaluate their contribution to renal injury in HUS. For this purpose, cell viability, proliferation rate, and apoptosis were assayed on HRTEC incubated with SubAB and/or Stx2 toxins. SubAB significantly reduced cell viability and cell proliferation rate, as well as stimulating cell apoptosis in HRTEC cultures in a time dependent manner. However, HRTEC cultures were significantly more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of Stx2 than those produced by SubAB. No synergism was observed when HRTEC were co-incubated with both SubAB and Stx2. When HRTEC were incubated with the inactive SubAA272B toxin, results were similar to those in untreated control cells. Similar stimulation of apoptosis was observed in Vero cells incubated with SubAB or/and Stx2, compared to HRTEC. In conclusion, primary cultures of HRTEC are significantly sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of SubAB, although, in a lesser extent compared to Stx2.

  1. Necrotizing Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, procedures, news and more, written in everyday language. * This is ... officials say 13 cases of a potentially deadly, drug-resistant fungal infection... More News Tweets by Merck and the Merck Manuals Merck & ...

  2. Bacterial Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, procedures, news and more, written in everyday language. * This is ... officials say 13 cases of a potentially deadly, drug-resistant fungal infection... More News Tweets by Merck and the Merck Manuals Merck & ...

  3. Vitamin C and Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Hemilä

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose–response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6–8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3–4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

  4. Investigating Shigella sonnei Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-17

    Dr. Nancy Strockbine, Chief of the Escherichia and Shigella Reference Unit at CDC, discusses Shigella sonnei infections.  Created: 11/17/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  5. Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  6. Indoor airborne infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Airborne infection from person to person is an indoor phenomenon. The infectious organisms are atomized by coughing, sneezing, singing, and even talking. The smallest droplets evaporate to droplet nuclei and disperse rapidly and randomly throughout the air of enclosed spaces. Droplet nuclei have negligible settling velocity and travel wherever the air goes. Outdoors, dilution is so rapid that the chance of inhaling an infectious droplet nucleus is minimal. Measles and other childhood contagions, the common respiratory virus infections, pulmonary tuberculosis, and Legionnaires' Disease are typically airborne indoors. In analyzing a measles outbreak, the probability that a susceptible person would breathe a randomly distributed quantum of airborne infection during one generation of an outbreak was expressed mathematically. Estimates of the rate of production of infectious droplet nuclei ranged between 93 and 8 per min, and the concentration in the air produced by the index case was about 1 quantum per 5 m/sup 3/ of air. Infectious aiborne particles are thus few and far between. Control of indoor airborne infection can be approached through immunization, therapeutic medication, and air disinfection with ultraviolet radiation.

  7. Mycobacterium ulcerans infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, TS; van der Graaf, WTA; Tappero, JW; Asiedu, K

    1999-01-01

    After tuberculosis and leprosy, Buruli-ulcer disease (caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans) is the third most common mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent people. Countries in which the disease is endemic have been identified, predominantly in areas of tropical rain forest; the emergen

  8. Challenges in Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas J; Baddour, Larry M; Habib, Gilbert; Hoen, Bruno; Salaun, Erwan; Pettersson, Gosta B; Schäfers, Hans Joachim; Prendergast, Bernard D

    2017-01-24

    Infective endocarditis is defined by a focus of infection within the heart and is a feared disease across the field of cardiology. It is frequently acquired in the health care setting, and more than one-half of cases now occur in patients without known heart disease. Despite optimal care, mortality approaches 30% at 1 year. The challenges posed by infective endocarditis are significant. It is heterogeneous in etiology, clinical manifestations, and course. Staphylococcus aureus, which has become the predominant causative organism in the developed world, leads to an aggressive form of the disease, often in vulnerable or elderly patient populations. There is a lack of research infrastructure and funding, with few randomized controlled trials to guide practice. Longstanding controversies such as the timing of surgery or the role of antibiotic prophylaxis have not been resolved. The present article reviews the challenges posed by infective endocarditis and outlines current and future strategies to limit its impact. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaginal infections update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Vaginal symptoms are one of the leading reasons that women visit their health care providers. Women often self-diagnose and may treat themselves inappropriately. This article describes the etiology, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of the 3 most common vaginal infections: bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  10. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  11. Mycobacterium ulcerans infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, TS; van der Graaf, WTA; Tappero, JW; Asiedu, K

    1999-01-01

    After tuberculosis and leprosy, Buruli-ulcer disease (caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans) is the third most common mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent people. Countries in which the disease is endemic have been identified, predominantly in areas of tropical rain forest; the

  12. Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  13. Testing for TB Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Facts Tuberculosis - The Connection between TB and HIV 12-Dose Regimen for Latent TB Infection-Patient Education Brochure Posters Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test Wall Chart World TB Day Think TB Stop TB Reports & Articles Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWRs) DTBE Authored ...

  14. Chlamydial infections - male

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have symptoms of a chlamydia infection, the health care provider may suggest a lab test called PCR. You provider will take a sample of discharge from the penis. This discharge is sent to a lab to be tested. Results ...

  15. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  16. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  17. Parasite infections revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegertjes, G.F.; Forlenza, M.; Joerink, M.; Scharsack, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Studying parasites helps reveal basic mechanisms in immunology. For long this has been recognized for studies on the immune system of mice and man. But it is not true for immunological studies on fish. To support this argument we discuss selected examples of parasite infections not only in warm-bloo

  18. Odontogenic Orofacial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertossi, Dario; Barone, Antonio; Iurlaro, Antonio; Marconcini, Simone; De Santis, Daniele; Finotti, Marco; Procacci, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    Acute dental abscess is a frequent and sometimes underestimated disease of the oral cavity. The acute dental abscess usually occurs secondary to caries, trauma, or failed endodontic treatment. After the intact pulp chamber is opened, colonization of the root canals takes place with a variable set of anaerobic bacteria, which colonize the walls of the necrotic root canals forming a specialized mixed anaerobic biofilm. Asymptomatic necrosis is common. However, abscess formation occurs when these bacteria and their toxic products breach into the periapical tissues through the apical foramen and induce acute inflammation and pus formation. The main signs and symptoms of the acute dental abscess (often referred to as a periapical abscess or infection) are pain, swelling, erythema, and suppuration usually localized to the affected tooth, even if the abscess can eventually spread causing a severe odontogenic infection which is characterized by local and systemic involvement culminating in sepsis syndrome. The vast majority of dental abscesses respond to antibiotic treatment, however, in some patients surgical management of the infection may be indicated. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of the patients with dental orofacial infections referred to the Unit of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University of Verona from 1991 to 2011 has been performed.

  19. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only because of the threatened vision loss associated with orbital cellulitis but also because of the potential for central nervous system complications including cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, and death. "nOrbital imaging should be obtained in all patients suspected of having orbital cellulitis. CT is preferred to MR imaging, as the orbital tissues have high con-trast and the bone can be well visualized. Orbital CT scanning allows localization of the disease process to the preseptal area, the extraconal or intraconal fat, or the subperiosteal space. Axial CT views allow evaluation of the medial orbit and ethmoid sinuses, whereas coronal scans image the orbital roof and floor and the frontal and maxillary sinuses. If direct coronal imaging is not possible, reconstruction of thin axial cuts may help the assessment of the orbital roof and floor. Potential sources of orbital cellulitis such as sinusitis, dental infection, and facial cellulitis are often detectable on CT imaging. "nIn this presentation, the imaging considerations of the orbital infections; including imaging differentiation criteria of all types of orbital infections are reviewed.

  20. Pathogenesis of gastrointestinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alan

    2008-06-01

    The last 30 years has seen the recognition of many intestinal pathogens, through a combination of microscopy, tissue availability and open minds. In the developing world the challenge to eradicate such infections continues, especially in infancy and early childhood. In developed communities, however, the challenge is shifting to pathogens ('super bugs') arising from our own interventions and lifestyles which will occupy many future careers.

  1. [Urinary calculi and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchieri, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Infection urinary stones resulting from urease-producing bacteria are composed by struvite and/or carbonate apatite. Bacterial urease splits urea and promotes the formation of ammonia and carbon dioxide leading to urine alkalinization and formation of phosphate salts. Proteus species are urease-producers, whereas a limited number of strains of other Gram negative and positive species may produce urease. Ureaplasma urealyticum and Corynebacterium urealyticum are urease-producers that are not isolated by conventional urine cultures, but require specific tests for identification. Primary treatment requires surgical removal of stones as complete as possible. Extracorporeal and endoscopic treatments are usually preferred, while open surgery is actually limited to few selected cases. Residual stones or fragments should be treated by chemolysis via ureteral catheter or nephrostomy or administration of citrate salts in order to achieve a stone-free renal unit. Postoperatively, recurrent urinary tract infection should be treated with appropriate antibiotic treatment although long-term antibiotic prophylaxis can cause resistance. Urinary acidification has been proposed for the prophylaxis of infection stones, but long-term acidification is difficult to achieve in urine infected by urease-producing bacteria. Urease inhibitors lead to prevention and/or dissolution of stones and encrustations in patients with infection by urea-splitting bacteria, but their use is limited by their toxicity. The administration of citrate salts involves an increase of the value of nucleation pH (pHn), that is the pH value at which calcium and magnesium phosphate crystallization occurs, in a greater way than the corresponding increase in the urinary pH due to its alkalinizing effect and resulting in a reduction of the risk of struvite crystallization. In conclusion prevention of the recurrence of infection stones can be achieved by an integrated approach tailored on the single patient. Complete

  2. CIED infection with either pocket or systemic infection presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Møller-Hansen, Michael; Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections are increasing in numbers. The objective was to review the clinical presentation and outcome in patients affected with CIED infections with either local pocket or systemic presentation. DESIGN: All device removals due to CIED...... infection during the period from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. CIED infections were categorized as systemic or pocket infections. Treatment included complete removal of the device, followed by antibiotic treatment of six weeks. RESULTS: Seventy-one device removals due to infection (32 systemic...... and 39 pocket infections) were recorded during the study period. Median follow-up time was 26 (IQR 9-41) months, 30 day and 12 month mortality were 4% and 14%, respectively. There was no long-term difference in mortality between patients with pocket vs. systemic infection (p = 0.48). During follow...

  3. Nosocomial infections in patients with acute central nervous system infections

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Due to current increase in the rate of nosocomial infections, our objective was to examine the frequency, risk factors, clinical presentation and etiology of nosocomial infections in patients with central nervous system infections. 2246 patients with central nervous system infections, treated in the intensive care units of the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade and at the Department of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Hospital Center Kraguj...

  4. Isolation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli from raw milk in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantea Mohammadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diarrhoeal diseases are great problem throughout the world and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC is a major cause of gastroenteritis that may be complicated by hemorrhagic colitis (HC or the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, which is the main cause of acute renal failure in children. Food-borne outbreaks associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli have been well documented worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains in raw milk samples.Raw milk samples collected from various cow farms in Kermanshah, Iran during June - September 2009 were investigated for STEC using PCR targeting stx1 and stx2 and then eaeA.Of 206 samples, 36 (17.47% were contaminated with STEC. STEC isolates harbored 56.41% and 43.59% stx 2 and stx 1 gene respectively. In antibiotic resistance test, all strains were sensitive to ceftazidime, cefepime, gentamicin, imipenem and ciprofloxacin. 23.08% of isolates were resistat to tetracycline, and 38.5% of them showed intermediate sensitvity to cephalothin.The high presence of STEC in raw milk confirms the important role of raw milk as putative vehicle of infection to human. Moreover, this study suggests that the development of antibiotic resistant STEC must be a major concern in Iran and more studies are needed to identify the prevalence of STEC in other food samples.

  5. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eligio Pizzigallo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”. Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis. The etiopathogenetic role of EBV is demonstrated only in a well-examined subgroup of patients, while in most of the remaining cases this role should be played by other infectious agents - able to remain in a latent or persistent way in the host – or even by not infectious agents (toxic, neuroendocrine, methabolic, etc.. However, the pathogenetic substrate of the different etiologic forms seems to be the same, much probably represented by the oxidative damage due to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines as a response to the triggering event (infectious or not infectious. Anyway, recently the scientists turned their’s attention to the genetic predisposition of the subjects affected by the syndrome, so that in the last years the genetic studies, together with those of molecular biology, received a great impulse

  6. Preventing Infections in the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share | With attention increasing on the incidence of infection in hospitals, patients everywhere need sensible principles to manage their ... will reduce the chance of developing a lung infection while in the hospital and may also improve your healing abilities following ...

  7. HIV/AIDS and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Having HIV/AIDS weakens your body's immune system. It destroys the white blood cells that fight infection. This puts ... such as crypto (cryptosporidiosis) and toxo (toxoplasmosis) Having HIV/AIDS can make infections harder to treat. People ...

  8. Salmonella typhi sternal wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfeir, Maroun; Youssef, Pierre; Mokhbat, Jacques E

    2013-12-01

    Samonella typhi usually causes gastrointestinal infections. Few reports in the literature described skin and soft tissue infections related to Salmonella species, especially in immunocompetent patients. Our case exhibited sternal abscess growing Salmonella typhi.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  10. Fungal infection following renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, H A; Berman, R A; Cate, T R; Hamilton, J D; Gunnells, J C; Stickel, D L

    1975-09-01

    Twenty-seven deep fungal infections developed in 22 of 171 patients following renal transplantation. These infections included cryptococcosis (ten), nocardiosis (seven), candidiasis (four), aspergillosis (two), phycomycosis (two), chromomycosis (one), and subcutaneous infection with Phialophora gougeroti (one). Twelve infections occurred in living-related and ten in cadaveric recipients. Nineteen of the 22 patients were male. Infections occurred from 0 to 61 months after transplantation. Complicating non-fungal infections were present concomitantly in 15 patients. Thirteen patients died, eight probably as a result of fungal infection. Appropriate diagnostic procedures yielded a diagnosis in 20 of 27 infections, and therapy was begun in 18 patients. Serologic, culture, and biopsy procedures useful in making rapid diagnoses are advocated in the hope of increasing survival.

  11. Zika Virus Infection and Microcephaly

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2016-01-01

    A Task Force established by the Brazil Ministry of Health investigated the possible association of microcephaly with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and a registry for microcephaly cases among women suspected to have had Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

  12. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tract Infections (UTIs) Print A A A What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? ... happen because bacteria have caused an infection somewhere in your urinary tract. Let's find out more. What ...

  13. Zika Virus Infection and Microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2016-01-01

    A Task Force established by the Brazil Ministry of Health investigated the possible association of microcephaly with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and a registry for microcephaly cases among women suspected to have had Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

  14. Infective endocarditis, 1984 through 1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Hagelskjaer, L H; Tvede, M

    1997-01-01

    To characterize the epidemiology and the clinical and microbiological spectrum of infective endocarditis in a Danish population.......To characterize the epidemiology and the clinical and microbiological spectrum of infective endocarditis in a Danish population....

  15. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pathological and microbiological findings. Chest X-rays showed that co-infected animals had disseminated lesions in both left and right lungs, while M.tb mono-infected animals displayed the lesions only in right lungs. Necropsy of co-infected animals revealed a disseminated M.tb infection not only in the lungs but also in the extrapulmonary organs including spleen, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart. The bacterial counts in the lungs, the bronchial lymph nodes, and the extrapulmonary organs of co-infected animals were significantly higher than those of M.tb mono-infected animals. The mechanistic studies demonstrated that two of three co-infected animals had lower levels of M.tb specific IFN-γ and IL-22 in PBMCs than M.tb mono-infected animals. These findings suggest that Chinese rhesus macaque is a suitable and alternative non-human primate model for SIV/M.tb coinfection studies. The impairment of the specific anti-TB immunity is likely to be a contributor of SIV-mediated enhancement M.tb infection. PMID:28133458

  16. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-Yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pathological and microbiological findings. Chest X-rays showed that co-infected animals had disseminated lesions in both left and right lungs, while M.tb mono-infected animals displayed the lesions only in right lungs. Necropsy of co-infected animals revealed a disseminated M.tb infection not only in the lungs but also in the extrapulmonary organs including spleen, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart. The bacterial counts in the lungs, the bronchial lymph nodes, and the extrapulmonary organs of co-infected animals were significantly higher than those of M.tb mono-infected animals. The mechanistic studies demonstrated that two of three co-infected animals had lower levels of M.tb specific IFN-γ and IL-22 in PBMCs than M.tb mono-infected animals. These findings suggest that Chinese rhesus macaque is a suitable and alternative non-human primate model for SIV/M.tb coinfection studies. The impairment of the specific anti-TB immunity is likely to be a contributor of SIV-mediated enhancement M.tb infection.

  17. Mucosal Immunology of HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the immunology, pathogenesis, and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continue to reveal clues to the mechanisms involved in the progressive immunodeficiency attributed to infection but more importantly have shed light on the correlates of immunity to infection and disease progression. HIV selectively infects, eliminates, and/or dysregulates several key cells of the human immune system, thwarting multiple arms of the host immune response, and inflicti...

  18. Hand infections: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Türker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hand infections are common, usually resulting from an untreated injury. In this retrospective study, we report on hand infection cases needing surgical drainage in order to assess patient demographics, causation of infection, clinical course, and clinical management.Methods. Medical records of patients presenting with hand infections, excluding post-surgical infections, treated with incision and debridement over a one-year period were reviewed. Patient demographics; past medical history; infection site(s and causation; intervals between onset of infection, hospital admission, surgical intervention and days of hospitalization; gram stains and cultures; choice of antibiotics; complications; and outcomes were reviewed.Results. Most infections were caused by laceration and the most common site of infection was the palm or dorsum of the hand. Mean length of hospitalization was 6 days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, beta-hemolytic Streptococcus and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus were the most commonly cultured microorganisms. Cephalosporins, clindamycin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, penicillin, vancomycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were major antibiotic choices. Amputations and contracture were the primary complications.Conclusions. Surgery along with medical management were key to treatment and most soft tissue infections resolved without further complications. With prompt and appropriate care, most hand infection patients can achieve full resolution of their infection.

  19. LES INFECTIONS NOSOCOMIALES NEONATALEj

    OpenAIRE

    BELHOCINE, Meryem; BELGAID, Hanane

    2013-01-01

    introduction: Les infections nosocomiales représentent un réel problème dans les unités de néonatologie. Elles ont vu leur incidence croitre en raison de l'extension des procédures invasives de diagnostics et thérapeutiques. Objectif: déterminer l'épidémiologie des infections nosocomiales dans le sente de néonatologie a i'EHS Mère-Enfant de Tlemcen. Matériel et méthodes: Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective de type cas —témoin incluant tous les nouveau-nés admis en 2011 e...

  20. [Sexually transmitted infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni, T; Fontana, I

    2002-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are quite common and observed more frequently in teens. The adolescents represent a group at particular risk for STD due to biological, sociocultural and psychological factors. Undectected infections may lead to unwanted sequelae, including pelvic inflammatory disease, chronic abdominal pain, tubal scarring and increased risk of ectopic pregnancy. This paper deals with infections by Candida albicans, Chlamidia tracomatis, Neisseria gonorrheae, Gardnerella vaginalis, Treponema pallidum, Tricomonas vaginalis, Herpes simplex, Papilloma virus. In regard to gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and papilloma virus, the expectation is that improved detection will decrease sequelae by early diagnosis and treatment. Prevention programs (information, use of hormonal contraception associated with condom use) and improved access to STD diagnosis and treatment services are useful to reduce the incidence of STD among young people.

  1. LES INFECTIONS NOSOCOMIALES NEONATALEj

    OpenAIRE

    BELHOCINE, Meryem; BELGAID, Hanane

    2013-01-01

    introduction: Les infections nosocomiales représentent un réel problème dans les unités de néonatologie. Elles ont vu leur incidence croitre en raison de l'extension des procédures invasives de diagnostics et thérapeutiques. Objectif: déterminer l'épidémiologie des infections nosocomiales dans le sente de néonatologie a i'EHS Mère-Enfant de Tlemcen. Matériel et méthodes: Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective de type cas —témoin incluant tous les nouveau-nés admis en 2011 e...

  2. Third molar infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Pericoronitis is an infectious disease often associated with the eruption of a third molar. It can be either acute (serous and suppurative) or chronic. Pain is usually the predominant symptom in acute stages, whereas chronic forms of the disease may display very few symptoms. Both present exudate. The infection is multimicrobial, predominantly caused strictly by betalactamase-producing anaerobeic microorganisms. Treatment measures are symptomatic, antimicrobial and surgical. Antimicrobial treatment is indicated for preoperative prophylaxis when there is a high risk of postoperative infection and, during the acute stages of suppurative pericoronitis when surgery must be postponed. First-line treatment in this case consists of amoxicillin with associated clavulanic acid. Although surgical treatment of pericoronitis presenting at the third molar is indicated as a Grade C recommendation for extraction, it is the most common indication for extraction of a retained third molar, owing to the improved quality of life it can offer the patient.

  3. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria...

  4. Postcircumcision urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, H A; Drucker, M M; Vainer, S; Ashkenasi, A; Amir, J; Frydman, M; Varsano, I

    1992-06-01

    The possible association of urinary tract infection (UTI) with ritual circumcision on the eighth day of life was studied by analyzing the epidemiology of urinary tract infections during the first year of life in 169 children with UTI (56 males and 113 females) born in Israel from 1979 to 1984. Forty-eight percent of the episodes of UTI occurring in males appeared during the 12 days following circumcision, and the increased incidence during that period was highly significant. The median age of the males at the time of the UTI was 16 days, compared with seven months in females. Ritual Jewish circumcision as practiced in Israel may be a predisposing factor for UTI during the 12-day period following that procedure.

  5. Fusobacterium infections in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arane, Karen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Question A 2-year-old patient in my practice with acute otitis media that has progressed to mastoiditis with a high fever returns with positive culture results for Fusobacterium. What should I do next? Answer Fusobacterium is a genus of anaerobic bacteria. Although Fusobacterium infections are rare, they can become severe if not treated promptly. Appropriate treatment is combination antibiotic therapy consisting of a β-lactam (penicillin, cephalosporin) and an anaerobic antimicrobial agent (metronidazole, clindamycin). At times surgical involvement is required for mastoiditis such as drainage of abscesses or insertion of a ventilation tube. Delayed treatment of an infection caused by Fusobacterium can lead to serious complications, including Lemierre syndrome. Children should be seen in a hospital for close monitoring. PMID:27737977

  6. Varicella infection modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Martin, Nathaniel; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Evans, Leland B.; Berger, Taylor Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates to improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.

  7. Chronic helminth infection does not exacerbate Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Hübner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic helminth infections induce a Th2 immune shift and establish an immunoregulatory milieu. As both of these responses can suppress Th1 immunity, which is necessary for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection, we hypothesized that chronic helminth infections may exacerbate the course of MTB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Co-infection studies were conducted in cotton rats as they are the natural host for the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis and are an excellent model for human MTB. Immunogical responses, histological studies, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures were assessed two months after MTB challenge in cotton rats with and without chronic L. sigmodontis infection. Spleen cell proliferation and interferon gamma production in response to purified protein derivative were similar between co-infected and MTB-only infected animals. In contrast to our hypothesis, MTB loads and occurrence and size of lung granulomas were not increased in co-infected animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that chronic filaria infections do not exacerbate MTB infection in the cotton rat model. While these results suggest that filaria eradication programs may not facilitate MTB control, they indicate that it may be possible to develop worm-derived therapies for autoimmune diseases that do not substantially increase the risk for infections.

  8. Infection Prophylaxis Update

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Patrick; Bullocks, Jamal; Matthews, Martha

    2006-01-01

    The use of prophylactic antibiotics in surgery has been debated for numerous years. Although their indications have been elucidated in the general surgery literature, their role in plastic surgery has yet to be clearly defined. Although the incidence of surgical site infections in clean, elective plastic surgery procedures has been reported to be as low as 1.1%, the use of antibiotics has surged over the past 20 years. Much of the increased use has been attributed to common surgical practice ...

  9. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-01-01

    Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only...

  10. Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  11. Managing urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Saadeh, Sermin A.; Mattoo, Tej K.

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in childhood. Presence of pyuria and bacteriuria in an appropriately collected urine sample are diagnostic of UTI. The risk of UTI is increased with an underlying urological abnormality such as vesicoureteral reflux, constipation, and voiding dysfunction. Patients with acute pyelonephritis are at risk of renal scarring and subsequent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria with and without FSGS, pregnancy-related complications and even end-sta...

  12. Science challenging HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R R; Lakshi, V

    1993-04-01

    The first accepted report of a novel human, slow virus disease belonging to "lentivirus" known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be traced to reports of June 1981. HIV-1 and HIV-2 were later found over the period 1984-86 to be unequivocally associated with AIDS. They are two serologically distinct viruses belonging to the same family with the unique properties of integration and latency in the host cell genome and the presence of reverse transcriptase. Typical of all retroviruses, the HIV genome comprises three genes governing the synthesis of all core proteins, replication protein encoding, and envelope proteins. HIV uses the CD4 antigen on T-helper cells, and about 40% of blood monocytes and tissue macrophages as a cell surface receptor. HIV may, however, also infect cells which contain no CD4. Macrophages serve as the main reservoir of HIV and may carry the virus to different organs. Very recently a rare type of white blood cell called the dendritic cell has been found to allow for direct infection by HIV during sexual intercourse. These cells are prominently present in the anal and vaginal mucosa. The authors discuss facts and figures on the HIV epidemic, the Indian scenario, classification of the clinical spectrum, the enzyme immunoassay HIV testing format, Western blot, immunofluorescence antibody, HIV culture, flow cytometry, radio immuno precipitation assay, and the detection of HIV DNA. Significant advances have been made over the last ten years in understanding the pathogenesis of HIV infection and accurately diagnosing infected individuals, with recombinant technology, polymerase chain reaction, and the construction of synthetic hybrid virus rapidly becoming part of routine diagnostics. More sensitive, specific, and rapid techniques are, however, needed for the early diagnosis and management of AIDS cases. The need for more ideal antibody incorporating both regulatory and structural proteins of the virion, preferably manufactured using

  13. Dipylidium caninum infection

    OpenAIRE

    Cabello, Raúl Romero; Ruiz, Aurora Candil; Feregrino, Raul Romero; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Feregrino, Rodrigo Romero; Zavala, Jorge Tay

    2011-01-01

    Dipylidium caninum is a cestode that requires from the participation of an arthropod in its life cycle. This parasitosis occurs in dogs and cats, and occasionally in human beings. Human cases of D caninum infection have been reported in Europe, Philippines, China, Japan, Latin America and the United States; mostly children, one third of them being infants under 6 months old. The diagnosis of this disease is done by the parasitological study of the feces, observing the characteristics of the g...

  14. Stop C. difficile Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-06

    This podcast is based on the March 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. C. difficile is a germ that causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 deaths in the US each year. This podcast helps health care professionals learn how to prevent C. difficile infections.  Created: 3/6/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/6/2012.

  15. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  16. Chikungunya infection in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Menezes Bezerra Duarte

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: the infection of chikungunya virus presents clinical manifestations variables, particularly in infants in which may present multiple cutaneous manifestations. Description: a case series study was carried out in an analytical character of 14 infants (>28 days to < 2 years old admitted in a hospital between November 2015 and January 2016 with suspected case of chikungunya, by a specific IgM reactive serology. Patients positive for dengue fever, Zika virus, bacterial infections and other exanthematic diseases were excluded. Fever and cutaneous alterations were the most frequent clinical manifestations in 100% of the cases, followed by irritability (64.3%, vomits and arthralgia/arthritis in 35.7% each. Three children presented alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid compatible to meningitis. Anemia frequency was 85.7%. The median white blood cells count was 7.700/mm3 (2.600 to 20.300/mm3. High levels of aminotransferases were observed in three cases (230 to 450 U/L. Antibiotic therapy was indicated in 64.3% of the cases. Two infants needed opioid derivatives for analgesia while others took acetaminophen and/or dipyrone. Discussion: the study shows evident multi-systemic involvement of chikungunya infection in infants. The treatment is supportive, giving special attention to hydration, analgesia, skin care, and rational use of antibiotic therapy.

  17. Dimorphic fungal osteoarticular infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammaert, B; Gamaletsou, M N; Zeller, V; Elie, C; Prinapori, R; Taj-Aldeen, S J; Roilides, E; Kontoyiannis, D P; Brause, B; Sipsas, N V; Walsh, T J; Lortholary, O

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this investigation was to review the clinical manifestations, management, and outcome of osteoarticular infections caused by dimorphic fungi. We exhaustively reviewed reports of bone and joint infections caused by dimorphic fungi published between 1970 and 2012. Underlying conditions, microbiological features, histological characteristics, clinical manifestations, antifungal therapy, and outcome were analyzed in 222 evaluable cases. Among 222 proven cases (median age 41 years [interquartile range (IQR) 26-57]), 73 % had no predisposing condition. Histopathology performed in 128 (57 %) cases and culture in 170 confirmed diagnosis in 63 % and 98 % of the cases, respectively. Diagnosis was obtained from an extra-osteoarticular site in 16 cases. The median diagnostic time was 175 days (IQR 60-365). Sporothrix schenckii was the most frequent pathogen (n = 84), followed by Coccidioides immitis (n = 47), Blastomyces dermatitidis (n = 44), Histoplasma capsulatum (n = 18), Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (n = 16), and Penicillium marneffei (n = 13). Arthritis occurred in 87 (58 %) cases and osteomyelitis in 64 (42 %), including 19 vertebral osteomyelitis. Dissemination was reported in 123 (55 %) cases. Systemic antifungal agents were used in 216 (97 %) patients and in combination with surgery in 129 (60 %). Following the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines, a successful initial medical strategy was observed in 97/116 (84 %) evaluable cases. The overall mortality was 6 %, and was highest for P. marneffei (38.5 %). This study demonstrates that dimorphic osteoarticular infections have distinctive clinical presentations, occur predominantly in apparently immunocompetent patients, develop often during disseminated disease, and may require surgical intervention.

  18. Tetracyclines and prion infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forloni, Gianluigi; Salmona, Mario; Marcon, Gabriella; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2009-02-01

    In the last decade information has accumulated on the potential anti-prion activity of polycyclic compounds. Initially we showed that the antitumoral idodoxorubicin reduced the infectivity in experimental scrapie. On the basis of the chemical homology with anthracyclines, we rapidly moved to tetracyclines, compounds that are safer and widely used as antibiotics in clinical practice. The tetracyclines, essentially doxycycline and minocycline, were characterized as a therapeutical tool in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) through the cell-free condition, in cellular and animal models and they are now being investigated clinically with this indication. Tetracyclines interact with aggregates obtained by synthetic PrP peptides or pathological PrP (PrPsc) extracted from TSE brains, and they destabilize the structure of amyloid fibrils, reducing their resistance to digestion by proteinase K. Tetracyclines also interact with peptide oligomeric structures and inhibit the protein misfolding associated with PrPsc formation. These activities have been accompanied by a reduction of infectivity, verified by doxycycline treatment in experimental scrapie, and some curative effects after either peripheral or intracerebral infection. The anti-amyloidogenic activity of tetracyclines was tested in other forms of peripheral and central amyloidosis, with interesting results. This article analyzes the development of tetracyclines as a therapeutic tool in TSE in the light of recent results obtained in our laboratories.

  19. Amebic infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Gourdas; Rangan, Murali

    2012-07-01

    Clinical human infections with the protozoa Entamoeba histolytica is still estimated to occur in 50 million people worldwide, of which approximately 100,000 die annually. Although most clinical symptoms are due to involvement of the large intestine, 1 % present with involvement of the liver in the form of a liver abscess, a potentially fatal condition. Distinguishing an invasive form (E. histolytica) from a morphologically identical non-invasive one (E. dispar) requires molecular or enzymatic characterization. Further, the pattern of infection, interpretation of presence of antibodies in the host, manifestations of disease, approach to investigations and strategies for management remain complex. This article also provides a comprehensive review of the parasite and host factors that govern the complex relationship of the prozoa and humans, and tries to explain why some develop a particular form of the disease in endemic zones. Application of modern imaging and image guided therapy seems to be playing a major role in diagnosis and management of the potentially most serious form of the disease, amebic liver abscess. Despite lack of controlled studies there is a tendency to lower the threshold of their use in clinical practice, and indeed in-hospital mortality rate seems to be falling for amebic liver abscess. In a world getting increasingly swamped by non-infectious metabolic diseases, awareness of amebic infections, its bed-side diagnosis, the use of appropriate laboratory tests, and decision making in management are shrinking. This review tries to update the scientific developments in amebiasis.

  20. Infection and Pulp Regeneration

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    Sahng G. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex has been a great challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Previous work has shown that the presence of prior infection may influence the characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space after regenerative endodontic treatment. The formation of ectopic tissues such as periodontal ligament, bone, and cementum has been observed in the root canal space of immature necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis, while the regeneration of dentin and pulp has been identified in previously non-infected teeth. The current regenerative endodontic therapy utilizes disinfection protocols, which heavily rely on chemical irrigation using conventional disinfectants. From a microbiological point of view, the current protocols may not allow a sufficiently clean root canal microenvironment, which is critical for dentin and pulp regeneration. In this article, the significance of root canal disinfection in regenerating the pulp-dentin complex, the limitations of the current regenerative endodontic disinfection protocols, and advanced disinfection techniques designed to reduce the microorganisms and biofilms in chronic infection are discussed.

  1. Infections and vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Konstantinos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    To review recent evidence for infection rates in patients with systemic vasculitides, the role of specific infectious agents in the pathogenesis of vasculitis and recent breakthroughs in the treatment of virus-associated vasculitides. In well designed recent studies, infections were found to be common during the first 6-12 months in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to contribute significantly to increased mortality during this period. New therapeutic schemes with lower cyclophosphamide doses and shorter corticosteroid courses were associated with decreased infectious rates in elderly patients with AAV whereas a prednisone dose greater than 10 mg/day at the end of the first year were associated with increased infectious-related mortality in patients with GCA. Recently, a potential role for varicella zoster virus in GCA pathogenesis has been proposed but more data are needed in order to establish a causal relationship. Finally, preliminary data show excellent short-term efficacy and safety of the new, interferon-free, oral antiviral agents in the treatment of hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Infections continue to be one of the main causes of mortality in patients with systemic vasculitides, emphasizing the need for safer immunosuppressive therapies and appropriate prophylaxis.

  2. [West Nile virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Ruiz, Mercedes; Gámez, Sara Sanbonmatsu; Clavero, Miguel Angel Jiménez

    2011-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus usually transmitted by mosquitoes. The main reservoirs are birds, although the virus may infect several vertebrate species, such as horses and humans. Up to 80% of human infections are asymptomatic. The most frequent clinical presentation is febrile illness, and neuroinvasive disease can occur in less than 1% of cases. Spain is considered a high-risk area for the emergence of WNV due to its climate and the passage of migratory birds from Africa (where the virus is endemic). These birds nest surrounding wetlands where populations of possible vectors for the virus are abundant. Diagnosis of human neurological infections can be made by detection of IgM in serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid samples, demonstration of a four-fold increase in IgG antibodies between acute-phase and convalescent-phase serum samples, or by detection of viral genome by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (especially useful in transplant recipients). Since WNV is a biosafety level 3 agent, techniques that involve cell culture are restricted to laboratories with this level of biosafety, such as reference laboratories. The National Program for the Surveillance of WNV Encephalitis allows the detection of virus circulation among birds and vectors in areas especially favorable for the virus, such as wetlands, and provides information for evaluation of the risk of disease in horses and humans.

  3. Epidemiology of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli in Australia, 2000-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are an important cause of gastroenteritis in Australia and worldwide and can also result in serious sequelae such as haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). In this paper we describe the epidemiology of STEC in Australia using the latest available data. Methods National and state notifications data, as well as data on serotypes, hospitalizations, mortality and outbreaks were examined. Results For the 11 year period 2000 to 2010, the overall annual Australian rate of all notified STEC illness was 0.4 cases per 100,000 per year. In total, there were 822 STEC infections notified in Australia over this period, with a low of 1 notification in the Australian Capital Territory (corresponding to a rate of 0.03 cases per 100,000/year) and a high of 413 notifications in South Australia (corresponding to a rate of 2.4 cases per 100,000/year), the state with the most comprehensive surveillance for STEC infection in the country. Nationally, 71.2% (504/708) of STEC infections underwent serotype testing between 2001 and 2009, and of these, 58.0% (225/388) were found to be O157 strains, with O111 (13.7%) and O26 (11.1%) strains also commonly associated with STEC infections. The notification rate for STEC O157 infections Australia wide between 2001-2009 was 0.12 cases per 100,000 per year. Over the same 9 year period there were 11 outbreaks caused by STEC, with these outbreaks generally being small in size and caused by a variety of serogroups. The overall annual rate of notified HUS in Australia between 2000 and 2010 was 0.07 cases per 100,000 per year. Both STEC infections and HUS cases showed a similar seasonal distribution, with a larger proportion of reported cases occurring in the summer months of December to February. Conclusions STEC infections in Australia have remained fairly steady over the past 11 years. Overall, the incidence and burden of disease due to STEC and HUS in Australia appears comparable or lower than

  4. Infections in open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, L M; Kluge, R M

    1989-01-01

    More than 250,000 open heart surgical procedures are performed annually in the United States. The majority of these procedures are coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG) and valve replacements. In this forum our authors discuss the kinds of infections that occur in patients following open heart surgery, as well as the documented risk factors and microbiology of these infections. We also asked each author to outline the criteria used to diagnose post open heart surgery infections, and to address associated consequences and complications. Finally, we were interested in each author's definition of the infection control practitioner's role in the prevention of this particular subset of nosocomial infections.

  5. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Frequently Asked Questions about Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is ... an incision above the pubis. What is a urinary tract infection? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection ...

  6. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Infections That Pets Carry KidsHealth > For Parents > Infections That Pets Carry ... how to protect your family from infections. How Pets Spread Infections Like people, all animals carry germs . ...

  7. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Racciatti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”.

    Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis

  8. Infections caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choroszy-Król, Irena; Frej-Mądrzak, Magdalena; Hober, Martyna; Sarowska, Jolanta; Jama-Kmiecik, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    High affinity to the epithelial lining of the airways makes Chlamydophila pneumoniae a common etiological agent of respiratory tract infections (RTI). It causes among others: pharyngitis, tracheitis, sinusitis, otitis media, bronchitis and bronchiolitis, and pneumonia. It is estimated that Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection is responsible for about 20% of lower respiratory tract infections. Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection may play an important role in the pathogenesis and course of bronchial asthma. The recent results indicate that Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection may be a factor responsible for 4-16% of COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) exacerbations. A relationship of chlamydial infection with atherosclerosis raises huge interest. A connection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection with other non-communicable diseases such as lung cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis and erythema nodosum is also recognized, although the role of these bacteria has not been fully understood in any of the listed diseases.

  9. Heterogeneity in Induction Level, Infection Ability, and Morphology of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Phages (Stx Phages) from Dairy and Human Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Ludivine; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Loukiadis, Estelle; Michel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteria are foodborne pathogens responsible for diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxin, the main STEC virulence factor, is encoded by the stx gene located in the genome of a bacteriophage inserted into the bacterial chromosome. The O26:H11 serotype is considered to be the second-most-significant HUS-causing serotype worldwide after O157:H7. STEC O26:H11 bacteria and their stx-negative counterparts have been detected in dairy products. They may convert from the one form to the other by loss or acquisition of Stx phages, potentially confounding food microbiological diagnostic methods based on stx gene detection. Here we investigated the diversity and mobility of Stx phages from human and dairy STEC O26:H11 strains. Evaluation of their rate of in vitro induction, occurring either spontaneously or in the presence of mitomycin C, showed that the Stx2 phages were more inducible overall than Stx1 phages. However, no correlation was found between the Stx phage levels produced and the origin of the strains tested or the phage insertion sites. Morphological analysis by electron microscopy showed that Stx phages from STEC O26:H11 displayed various shapes that were unrelated to Stx1 or Stx2 types. Finally, the levels of sensitivity of stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 to six Stx phages differed among the 17 strains tested and our attempts to convert them into STEC were unsuccessful, indicating that their lysogenization was a rare event. PMID:26826235

  10. Post-Laminectomy Wound Infections: Colonized Seromas Mimicking Wound Infections

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    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Post-operative laminectomy wounds are frequently accompanied by seromas. Post-operative wound drainage may be colonized or infected. The differentiation of wound colonization from infection is difficult for non-infectious disease physicians. Methods: External chart reviewers classified 31/1531 laminectomies (over three years as post-operative wound infections. We re-evaluated these cases using infectious disease criteria, i.e., while pathogens may be cultured from both colonized and infected wounds, only wound infections have a purulent discharge with abundant white blood cells (WBCs on Gram stain. Colonized wounds have positive wound cultures but no/few WBCs on Gram stain. Results: We found only 11/31 actual wound infections, the remainder were not bona fide wound infections, but were colonized seromas. Conclusion: Post-laminectomy colonized seromas that are culture positive for one or more organisms often mimic wound infections. In the era of public reporting of nosocomial infections, it is important that external reviewers differentiate colonization from infection to provide regulatory agencies with accurate data.

  11. Post-Laminectomy Wound Infections: Colonized Seromas Mimicking Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Abruzzo, Eileen D; Schoch, Paul E

    2014-02-14

    Post-operative laminectomy wounds are frequently accompanied by seromas. Post-operative wound drainage may be colonized or infected. The differentiation of wound colonization from infection is difficult for non-infectious disease physicians. External chart reviewers classified 31/1531 laminectomies (over three years) as post-operative wound infections. We re-evaluated these cases using infectious disease criteria, i.e., while pathogens may be cultured from both colonized and infected wounds, only wound infections have a purulent discharge with abundant white blood cells (WBCs) on Gram stain. Colonized wounds have positive wound cultures but no/few WBCs on Gram stain. We found only 11/31 actual wound infections, the remainder were not bona fide wound infections, but were colonized seromas. Post-laminectomy colonized seromas that are culture positive for one or more organisms often mimic wound infections. In the era of public reporting of nosocomial infections, it is important that external reviewers differentiate colonization from infection to provide regulatory agencies with accurate data.

  12. Nematode Infections Are Risk Factors for Staphylococcal Infection in Children

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    Sandra F Moreira-Silva

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Nematode infection may be a risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess in children and we hypothesized that the immunomodulation induced by those parasites would be a risk factor for any staphylococcal infection in children. The present study was designed to compare, within the same hospital, the frequency of intestinal nematodes and Toxocara infection in children with and without staphylococcal infections. From October 1997 to February 1998, 80 children with staphylococcal infection and 110 children with other diseases were submitted to fecal examination, serology for Toxocara sp., evaluation of plasma immunoglobulin levels, and eosinophil counts. Mean age, gender distribution, birthplace, and socioeconomic conditions did not differ significantly between the two groups. Frequency of intestinal nematodes and positive serology for Toxocara, were remarkably higher in children with staphylococcal infections than in the non-staphylococcal group. There was a significant correlation between intestinal nematodes or Toxocara infection and staphylococcal infection in children, reinforced by higher eosinophil counts and higher IgE levels in these children than in the control group. One possible explanation for this association would be the enhancement of bacterial infection by the immunomodulation induced by helminth infections, due to strong activation of the Th2 subset of lymphocytes by antigens from larvae and adult worms.

  13. Cryptic Leishmania infantum infection in Italian HIV infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubino Raffaella

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a protozoan diseases caused in Europe by Leishmania (L. infantum. Asymptomatic Leishmania infection is more frequent than clinically apparent disease. Among HIV infected patients the risk of clinical VL is increased due to immunosuppression, which can reactivate a latent infection. The aims of our study were to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic L. infantum infection in HIV infected patients and to study a possible correlation between Leishmania parasitemia and HIV infection markers. Methods One hundred and forty-five HIV infected patients were screened for the presence of anti-Leishmania antibodies and L. infantum DNA in peripheral blood. Statistical analysis was carried out by using a univariate regression analysis. Results Antibodies to L. infantum were detected in 1.4% of patients. L. infantum DNA was detected in 16.5% of patients. Significant association for PCR-Leishmania levels with plasma viral load was documented (p = 0.0001. Conclusion In our area a considerable proportion of HIV infected patients are asymptomatic carriers of L. infantum infection. A relationship between high HIV viral load and high parasitemic burden, possibly related to a higher risk of developing symptomatic disease, is suggested. PCR could be used for periodic screening of HIV patients to individuate those with higher risk of reactivation of L. infantum infection.

  14. Nosocomial infections: Epidemiology, prevention, control and surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Ahmed Khan; Fatima Kanwal Baig; Riffat Mehboob

    2017-01-01

    Nosocomial infections or healthcare associated infections occur in patients under medical care. These infections occur worldwide both in developed and developing countries. Nosocomial infections accounts for 7% in developed and 10% in developing countries. As these infections occur during hospital stay, they cause prolonged stay, disability, and economic burden. Frequently prevalent infections include central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections...

  15. Haemolymph Components of Infected & None Infected Lymnaea Snails with Xiphidiocercariae

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    AA Saboor Yaraghi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study the haemolymph components of infected and none infected Lymnaea gedrosiana with xiphidiocercaria larvae was compared.Methods: Five hundred Fifty Lymnaea snails were collected from Ilam and Mazandaran prov­inces, Iran, during 2008-2009. The snails were transported to the lab at Tehran University of Medi­cal Sciences and their cercarial sheddings were studied. Haemolmyphs of snails were ex­tracted and cells were counted using haemocytometer and cell-surface carbohydrate were recog­nized by conjugated lectin (Lentil. Haemolymph protein concentrations were measured by Brad­ford protein assay method and soluble protein compositions were determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE.Result: From the 550 examined Lymnaea snails for cercariae, 27 snails were infected with xiphidiocer­cariae. Mean of haemolymph cells (haemocyte number were obtained 93480±2.43 (cells/ml for none infected snails (25 snail and 124560±2800 (cells/ml for infected snails (25 snail. Mannose carbohydrate was recognized on haemocyte of none infected and infected snails. Mean of protein concentration of haemolymph plasma was obtained as 1354 ± 160 μg/ml (1.4 mg/ml for none infected snails (25 snails and 1802±138 μg/ml (1.8 mg/ml for infected snail (25 snails. Comparing to none infected snails, the SDS-PAGE results of haemolymph plasma of infected snails, showed an extra protein band (70 kDa. The results showed a significant differ­ence between the amounts and the kinds of proteins in haemolymph of infected and none infected snails.Conclusion: This information might be useful to understand of parasite detection, adhesion, engulf­ment and antigen agglutination by snail.

  16. Nosocomial fungal infections: candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduyn Lunel, F M; Meis, J F; Voss, A

    1999-07-01

    Candida species are frequently encountered as part of the human commensal flora. Colonization mostly precedes candidemia and is an independent risk factor for the development of candidemia. Genotyping methods showed the similarity between colonizing and infecting strains, thus making endogenous origin likely, though exogenous sources like total parenteral nutrition also have been described. Health care workers (HCWs) play an important role in the transmission of yeasts. Candida species are frequently isolated from the hands of HCWs and can be transmitted from hands to patients. Granulocytopenia and damage of the mucosal lining resulting from intensive chemotherapy due to cancer, the increasing use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and the use of intravenous catheters are other important risk factors for the development of candidemia. Candidemia is associated with a high mortality and prolonged hospitalization. Therefore, and because of the high frequency of dissemination, all candidemias should be treated. Amphotericin B was considered the standard drug for the systemic treatment of candidemia. Fluconazole has been shown to be an effective and safe alternative in non-neutropenic patients. 5-Fluorocytosine has been used in combination with amphotericin B in the treatment of deep-seated infections. Liposomal formulations of amphotericin B and other new antifungal drugs currently are under investigation. C. albicans is the most frequently isolated Candida species, although the proportion of infections caused by non-C. albicans species is increasing. Also, there are reports of development of resistance to amphotericin B. C. lusitaniae is known for primary resistance and the development of resistance to amphotericin B. Development of resistance to fluconazole is mainly seen in AIDS patients with recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis who receive longer courses of therapy.

  17. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infection: From an Infection Prevention Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Sangeeta; Rahman, Riaz; Yassin, Mohamed H.

    2015-01-01

    A cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) is indicated for patients with severely reduced ejection fraction or with life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Infection related to a CIED is one of the most feared complications of this life-saving device. The rate of CIED infection has been estimated to be between 2 and 25; though evidence shows that this rate continues to rise with increasing expenditure to the patient as well as healthcare systems. Multiple risk factors have been attributed to the increased rates of CIED infection and host comorbidities as well as procedure related risks. Infection prevention efforts are being developed as defined bundles in numerous hospitals around the country given the increased morbidity and mortality from CIED related infections. This paper aims at reviewing the various infection prevention measures employed at hospitals and also highlights the areas that have relatively less established evidence for efficacy. PMID:26550494

  18. Circoviral infections in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivetić Vojin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Circoviral infections in swine have appeared only recently and they today attract the attention of large numbers of researchers all over the world. They represent a great mystery, an unknown in veterinary medicine, both in our country and in the world. The causes of these infections are circoviruses, called after the DNA which is shaped like a circle. A large number of authors today believe the PCV-2 causes two pathological entities in weaned piglets which are known as porcine multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS and porcine dermatitis nephropathy syndrome (PDNS. Current investigations indicate that there is a causal connection between these two syndromes. These two new diseases, which have recently spread all over the world, cause serious losses, great concern and confusion, especially when they occur simultaneously or in a sequence in the same herd, or in parallel with other pathogenes, primarily with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV and the porcine parvovirus (PPV. PMWS was first described in Canada in 1991. It most often affect pigs aged 5-12 weeks. The main clinical expression, depending on the stage of progression is diarrhea, delayed development or depressed growth, stuntedness, dyspnea ictherus, eyelid swelling, and lymphadenopathy. More rarely, there are neurological symptoms. Prominent suppression of the immune system is the main characteristic of PMWS, and a wave of secondary bacterial infection is also observed. PDNS is a new disease of economic importance, which mostly affects older swine, from 5 weeks to 5 months of age. The most prominent clinical symptoms in seriously ill piglets is extensive dermatitis, mostly on the chest, abdomen, haunches and forelegs, with the appearance of purple-red swellings of different shape and size. The swine are depressive febrile, anorectic, all of which leads to stunted growth. They are inactive. Mortality is often about 15%. PDNS is a differentially diagnostically

  19. Silymarin for HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Stephen J; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Dahari, Harel; Ferenci, Peter; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and silymarin-derived compounds have been considered hepatoprotective since the plant was first described in ancient times. Hepatoprotection is defined as several non-mutually exclusive biological activities including antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions. Despite clear evidence for silymarin-induced hepatoprotection in cell culture and animal models, evidence for beneficial effects in humans has been equivocal. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge on silymarin in the context of HCV infection. The information was collated from a recent workshop on silibinin in Germany.

  20. Giardia infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeczko, Stephanie; Griffin, Brenda

    2010-08-01

    The protozoon Giardia duodenalis is a common gastrointestinal parasite of cats. While most Giardia-infected cats are asymptomatic, acute small bowel diarrhea, occasionally with concomitant weight loss, may occur. Giardia poses a diagnostic challenge, but newer tests, including a commercially available ELISA kit, have improved clinicians' ability to obtain an accurate diagnosis. Several treatment options have been reported, and although none has been shown to be universally effective, most cases can be successfully managed with drug therapy, supportive measures, and environmental control. Current recommendations suggest that combination therapy with fenbendazole and metronidazole may be the safest, most effective treatment option for symptomatic cats.

  1. Tropheryma whipplei infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2009-01-01

    Whipple's disease was initially described in 1907. Over the next century, the clinical and pathological features of this disorder have been better appreciated. Most often, weight loss, diarrhea, abdominal and joint pain occur. Occasionally, other sites of involvement have been documented, including isolated neurological disease, changes in the eyes and culture-negative endocarditis. In the past decade, the responsible organism Tropheryma whipplei has been cultivated, its genome sequenced and its antibiotic susceptibility defined. Although rare, it is a systemic infection that may mimic a wide spectrum of clinical disorders and may have a fatal outcome. If recognized, prolonged antibiotic therapy may be a very successful form of treatment.

  2. Congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Soo Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is currently the most common agent of congenital infection and the leading infectious cause of brain damage and hearing loss in children. Symptomatic congenital CMV infections usually result from maternal primary infection during early pregnancy. One half of symptomatic infants have cytomegalic inclusion disease (CID, which is characterized by involvement of multiple organs, in particular, the reticuloendothelial and central nervous system (CNS. Moreover, such involvement may or may not include ocular and auditory damage. Approximately 90% of infants with congenital infection are asymptomatic at birth. Preterm infants with perinatal CMV infection can have symptomatic diseases such as pneumonia, hepatitis, and thrombocytopenia. Microcephaly and abnormal neuroradiologic imaging are associated with a poor prognosis. Hearing loss may occur in both symptomatic and asymptomatic infants with congenital infection and may progress through childhood. Congenital infection is defined by the isolation of CMV from infants within the first 3 weeks of life. Ganciclovir therapy can be considered for infants with symptomatic congenital CMV infection involving the CNS. Pregnant women of seronegative state should be counseled on the importance of good hand washing and other control measures to prevent CMV infection. Heat treatment of infected breast milk at 72?#608;for 5 seconds can eliminate CMV completely.

  3. Characterizing Internet Worm Infection Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qian; Chen, Chao

    2010-01-01

    Internet worm infection continues to be one of top security threats. Moreover, worm infection has been widely used by botnets to recruit new bots and construct P2P-based botnets. In this work, we attempt to characterize the network structure of Internet worm infection and shed light on the micro-level information of "who infects whom." Our work quantifies the infection ability of individual hosts and reveals the key characteristics of the underlying topologies formed by worm infection, i.e., the number of children and the generation of the Internet worm infection family tree. Specifically, we first analyze the infection tree of a wide class of worms, for which a new victim is compromised by each existing infected host with equal probability. We find that the number of children has asymptotically a geometric distribution with parameter 0.5. We also discover that the generation follows closely a Poisson distribution and the average path length of the worm infection family tree increases approximately logarithmi...

  4. Leishmania / HIV co-infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjeux, P

    1995-11-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), which is transmitted by sandflies, is always present in at least 62 countries and is spreading to areas where it had not existed in the past. VL/HIV co-infections are becoming more and more common. In southern Europe, 25-70% of adult VL cases also have HIV infection. 1.5-9% of AIDS cases have newly acquired or reactivated VL. In the Mediterranean area, VL is the most common opportunistic parasitic infection among AIDS cases (i.e., 100 CD4/mcl). AIDS patients with VL have a much shorter survival period than other AIDS patients. VL can lie dormant for years but emerge clinically if an infected person has immunosuppression. Most VL/HIV co-infections in the western hemisphere are in Brazil. East African countries reporting VL/HIV co-infections include Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, and Sudan. Only one VL/HIV co-infected case has been found in Cameroon and in Guinea Bissau. VL/HIV co-infection cases tend to not have the usual VL clinical signs and symptoms (fever, weight loss, hepatosplenomegaly, polyadenopathies), making clinical diagnosis difficult. Since VL test sensitivity in HIV positive patients is reduced 20-40%, it is also difficult to make a serological diagnosis. In the first VL episode of HIV-infected patients, clinicians should use BMA, the safest and most sensitive test. Drug options for VL treatment include pentavalent antimonials, pentamidine, amphotericin B, and amphotericin B encapsulated in liposomes. Treatment failure is rather common in VL/HIV co-infected patients. Researchers from different centers need to conduct trials of various multi-therapy schedules. 70% of VL/HIV co-infected cases in southern Europe use intravenous drugs, suggesting that sharing of needles may account for the co-infection. The World Health Organization has mobilized against VL/HIV co-infections, including setting up a minimal surveillance system.

  5. [Associated infections in acute bronchopulmonary infections in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykova, E A; Vorob'ev, A A; Bokovoĭ, A G; Karazhas, N V; Evseeva, L F

    2003-01-01

    A total of 189 children with bacterial complications of the acute respiratory viral infection (ARVI)--primarily with pneumonia and bronchitis--were dynamically examined for typical and atypical pneumotropic causative agents of the infection process (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Pneumocystis carini, and Citomegalovirus). A high frequency rate of the associative infection involving mycoplasmas and pneumocysts was registered (45-50%); it was lower in the cases involving Chlamydias, hemophilic bacteria, pneumococcus, and cytomegalovirus--up to 25-30%. No sharp difference was found between the indices of an infection degree and those of an active clinical infectious process involving the same pneumotropic agent: the biggest difference was observed in Chlamydia infections (9.4%) and the lowest one--in mycoplasma infections (3%). A dynamic comparison of different classes of immunoglobulins revealed that, in acute bronchitis and pneumonias, the Chlamydia and cytomegalovirus infections are, primarily, of the persistent nature; the hemophilic and pneumocystic infections are of a mixed nature; and the pneumococcus one is of the acute nature. The Mycoplasma infection, which is more often encountered in pre-school children, is of the primary type with a trend towards a prolonged clinical course. All pneumonias had a typical clinical course; the clinical picture was compared in 128 patients with the etiological factor (including a description of characteristic symptoms).

  6. Submasseteric Infection: A Rare, Deep Space Cheek Infection Causing Trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard H; Bahadori, Robert S; Willis, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Submasseteric space infections are rare at any age but particularly so in primary school children. The origin of the infection is usually odontogenic, from pericoronitis in a third molar. Submasseteric inflammation is a deep facial space inflammation, often progressing to mature abscess, and usually misdiagnosed as staphylococcal or streptococcal lymphadenitis or pyogenic parotitis. The hallmark of a masticatory space infection is trismus. The cardinal signs of this infection include a firm mass in the body of the masseter muscle with overlying cellulitis with trismus.

  7. [HIV infection and immigration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Susana; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2016-01-01

    Migrants represent around one third of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Spain and they constitute a population with higher vulnerability to its negative consequences due to the socio-cultural, economical, working, administrative and legal contexts. Migrants are diagnosed later, which worsens their individual prognosis and facilitates the maintenance of the HIV epidemic. In spite of the different barriers they experience to access healthcare in general, and HIV-related services in particular, access to antiretroviral treatment has been similar to that of the autochthonous population. However, benefits of treatment have been not, with women in general and men from Sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the worse response to treatment. We need to proactively promote earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid new infections, and to deliver accessible, adapted and high-quality health-care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Enterovirus D68 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Esposito

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available First described in 1962 in children hospitalized for pneumonia and bronchiolitis, the Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68 is an emergent viral pathogen. Since its discovery, during the long period of surveillance up to 2005, EV-D68 was reported only as a cause of sporadic outbreaks. In recent years, many reports from different countries have described an increasing number of patients with respiratory diseases due to EV-D68 associated with relevant clinical severity. In particular, an unexpectedly high number of children have been hospitalized for severe respiratory disease due to EV-D68, requiring intensive care such as intubation and mechanical ventilation. Moreover, EV-D68 has been associated with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction in children, which has caused concerns in the community. As no specific antiviral therapy is available, treatment is mainly supportive. Moreover, because no vaccines are available, conventional infection control measures (i.e., standard, for contacts and droplets in both community and healthcare settings are recommended. However, further studies are required to fully understand the real importance of this virus. Prompt diagnosis and continued surveillance of EV-D68 infections are essential to managing and preventing new outbreaks. Moreover, if the association between EV-D68 and severe diseases will be confirmed, the development of adequate preventive and therapeutic approaches are a priority.

  9. Infection and the IUD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoort, P; Thiery, M

    1981-04-01

    While certain complications of IUD use, such as perforation and pregnancy, are no doubt related to the infectious morbidity, IUD use accounts for only a moderate or even no increase of the PID rate. One problem hampering assessment and comparison of the magnitude of the risk involved is that little is known about the PID rate in the standard population. Furthermore, many findings related to the bacteriology of the IUD-containing uterine cavity and to the bacterial conductivity of tailless and tailed IUDs are contradictory, and claims of a very high PID risk in IUD-bearing nulliparas have not been unequivocally substantiated. Weaknesses inherent in case-control studies include difficult statistical interpretability coupled with an almost total disre.gard of technical aspects (e.g, patient selection, insertion technic, and IUD design) that may be of major prophylactic importance. It is imperative that the problem of IUD-related genital infection be further elucidated by prospective studies paying the necessary attention to these aspects. There is a body of literature and experience which suggests that, provided these risk factors are properly taken into account, the risk of IUD-related infection need not be significantly enhanced

  10. Presence of faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes in ready-to-eat salads, from an area where crops are irrigated with untreated sewage water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Rosas, Javier; Cerna-Cortés, Jorge F; Méndez-Reyes, Eligio; Lopez-Hernandez, Daniel; Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Estrada-Garcia, Teresa

    2012-05-15

    from restaurant A(2) and 3 were (Mixed salad) samples from each C restaurant. Three samples harboured non-O157 STEC strains, 2 EIEC, 1 ETEC and 2 samples had non-O157 STEC and EIEC strains, simultaneously. A significant difference (p=0.008) between the prevalence of E. coli vs. DEPs was observed. Independently of the restaurants' overall hygienic status, most RTE-salads had a poor microbiological quality and some harboured DEPs that have been associated with illness in Mexico. Health authorities should focus on implementing DEPs screening in raw vegetables and enforcing the legislation that forbids irrigation with untreated sewage water of both root and leafy vegetables. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hyperammonemia in Urinary Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuneaki Kenzaka; Ken Kato; Akihito Kitao; Koki Kosami; Kensuke Minami; Shinsuke Yahata; Miho Fukui; Masanobu Okayama

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study investigated the incidence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections and explored the utility of urinary obstruction relief and antimicrobial administration to improve hyperammonemia. Methods This was an observational study. Subjects were patients who were diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized between June 2008 and June 2009. We measured plasma ammonia levels on admission in patients who were clinically diagnosed with urinary tract infection ...

  12. Opportunistic infections following renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic infection is common following renal transplantation. Prompt diagnosis and management can be life saving. Four different types of opportunistic respiratory infections diagnosed at our center during the period of January 1998 to December 2000 are discussed. Of the four cases one had Aspergillus, second had Sporothrix, third had Nocardia and fourth case Actinomyces species. Microbiologist has an important role to play by being aware of such opportunistic infections and helping the clinician to make early aetiological diagnosis.

  13. [Pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi

    2012-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain a life-threatening disease. The development of invasive fungal disease is dependent on multiple factors, such us colonization and efficient host immune response. We aimed to review the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections, in particular, those caused by Candida and Aspergillus. For this we propose, to describe the fungal characteristics, to detail the host defence mechanisms against fungus and to analyse the host risk factors for invasive fungal infection.

  14. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intens...

  15. Toxoplasma gondii infection in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Maria Ruiz Lopes

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is caused by an intracellular protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii, which has a wide geographical distribution. The main infection routes are ingestion of cysts from raw or badly-cooked meat, ingestion of oocysts from substrates contaminated with the feces of infected felines and congenital transmission by tachyzoites. The congenital form results in a severe systemic disease, because if the mother is infected for the first time during gestation, she can present a temporary parasitemia that will infect the fetus. Many of the clinical symptoms are seen in congenitally-infected children, from a mild disease to serious signs, such as mental retardation. Early diagnosis during the pregnancy is highly desirable, allowing prompt intervention in cases of infection, through treatment of pregnant women, reducing the probability of fetal infection and consequent substantial damage to the fetus. Conventional tests for establishment of a fetal diagnosis of toxoplasmosis include options from serology to PCR. Prevention of human toxoplasmosis is based on care to avoid infection, understanding the disease and serological exams during gestation. Pregnant women should be tested serologically from three months gestation, until one month after childbirth. Inclusion of serology for congenital toxoplasmosis along with the basic Guthrie test for PKU is of fundamental importance for early diagnosis of infection and so that treatment is initiated, in order to avoid possible sequels in the infant.

  16. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman.

  17. Tapeworm infection - beef or pork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teniasis; Pork tapeworm; Beef tapeworm; Tapeworm; Taenia saginata ; Taenia solium ; Taeniasis ... undercooked meat of infected animals. Cattle usually carry Taenia saginata ( T. saginata ). Pigs carry Taenia solium (T. ...

  18. Dermatologic manifestations of infective endocarditis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rafael Tomaz; Tiberto, Larissa Rezende; Bello, Viviane Nardin Monte; Lima, Margarete Aparecida Jacometo; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, infective endocarditis still shows considerable morbidity and mortality rates. The dermatological examination in patients with suspected infective endocarditis may prove very useful, as it might reveal suggestive abnormalities of this disease, such as Osler’s nodes and Janeway lesions. Osler’s nodes are painful, purple nodular lesions, usually found on the tips of fingers and toes. Janeway lesions, in turn, are painless erythematous macules that usually affect palms and soles. We report a case of infective endocarditis and highlight the importance of skin examination as a very important element in the presumptive diagnosis of infective endocarditis.

  19. Odontogenic infections. Complications. Systemic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Yolanda; Bagán, José Vicente; Murillo, Judith; Poveda, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    The term, odontogenic infection refers to an infection that originates in the tooth proper or in the tissues that closely surround it; said infection then progresses along the periodontia down to the apex, involving periapical bone and from this area, it then spreads through the bone and periosteum towards near-by or more distant structures. The relevance of this type of infection lies in that it can cause infections that compromise more distant structures (via direct spread and distant spread), for example, intracraneal, retropharyngeal and pulmonary pleural infections. Dissemination by means of the bloodstream can lead to rheumatic problems and deposits on the valves of the heart (endocarditis), etc. The conditions or factors that influence the spread of infection are dependent on the balance between patient-related conditions and microorganism-related conditions. The virulence of the affecting germs is dependent upon their quality and quantity and is one of the microbiological conditions that influences the infection. It is this virulence that promotes infectious invasion and the deleterious effects the microbe will have on the host. Patient-related conditions include certain systemic factors that determine host resistance, which may be impaired in situations such as immunodeficiency syndrome or in brittle diabetes, as well as local factors that will also exert their impact on the spread of the infection.

  20. Medications for Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  1. Thrush and Other Candida Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  2. Rhinovirus Infection Induces Degradation of Antimicrobial Peptides and Secondary Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Mallia; Joseph Footitt; Rosa Sotero; Annette Jepson; Marco Contoli; Maria-Belen Trujillo-Torralbo; Tatiana Kebadze; Julia Aniscenko; Gregory Oleszkiewicz; Katrina Gray; Message, Simon D.; Kazuhiro Ito; Peter J Barnes; Ian M Adcock; Alberto Papi

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are associated with virus (mostly rhinovirus) and bacterial infections, but it is not known whether rhinovirus infections precipitate secondary bacterial infections.

  3. Bacteriophages infecting Propionibacterium acnes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lood, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  4. Anaerobes in pleuropulmonary infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 76 anaerobes and 122 aerobes were isolated from 100 patients with pleuropulmonary infections, e.g. empyema (64, pleural effusion (19 and lung abscess (13. In 14% of the patients, only anaerobes were recovered, while a mixture of aerobes and anaerobes was encountered in 58%. From all cases of lung abscess, anaerobic bacteria were isolated, alone (04 or along with aerobic bacteria (13. From empyema and pleural effusion cases, 65.6% and 68.4% anaerobes were recovered respectively. Amongst anaerobes, gram negative anaerobic bacilli predominated (Prevotella melaninogenicus 16, Fusobacterium spp. 10, Bacteroides spp. 9, followed by gram positive anaerobic cocci (Peptostreptococcus spp. 31. Coliform bacteria (45 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42 were the predominant aerobic isolates.

  5. Les infections nosocomiale

    OpenAIRE

    AMMOLR, Naima; ZEKRI, DjaIeI; Lazreg, Mohammed

    2006-01-01

    L'infection hospitalière est un phénomène grave et coûteux pour la société et pour le malade; • elle prolonge la durée de séjours; • augmente la consommation thérapeutique ( antibiotique, antalgique...); • entraîne une mobilisation excessive du personnel; • nuit la réputation du personnel soignant et de l'établissement; • multiplie l'évaluation du coût de prise en charge; • induit des séquelles neurologiques irréversibles. Mieux vaut investir dans les mesures de préven...

  6. Morbillivirus Infections: An Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory D. de Vries

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Research on morbillivirus infections has led to exciting developments in recent years. Global measles vaccination coverage has increased, resulting in a significant reduction in measles mortality. In 2011 rinderpest virus was declared globally eradicated – only the second virus to be eradicated by targeted vaccination. Identification of new cellular receptors and implementation of recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent proteins in a range of model systems have provided fundamental new insights into the pathogenesis of morbilliviruses, and their interactions with the host immune system. Nevertheless, both new and well-studied morbilliviruses are associated with significant disease in wildlife and domestic animals. This illustrates the need for robust surveillance and a strategic focus on barriers that restrict cross-species transmission. Recent and ongoing measles outbreaks also demonstrate that maintenance of high vaccination coverage for these highly infectious agents is critical. This introduction briefly summarizes the most important current research topics in this field.

  7. Immunogenetics of viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maureen P; Carrington, Mary

    2005-10-01

    The HLA class I and II genes encode molecules that lie at the heart of the acquired immune response against infectious diseases. Associations between these polymorphic loci and genetically complex infectious diseases have been historically elusive, in contrast to the more obvious HLA associations with autoimmune diseases. High resolution molecular typing of large, clinically well-defined cohorts has begun to uncover evidence for the influence of HLA diversity on diseases of viral etiology, such as those caused by HIV-1, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human papilloma virus. Combinations of HLA and KIR also appear to affect outcome to viral infection, supporting a role for HLA class I diversity in the innate immune response in addition to the acquired immune response.

  8. Les infections nosocomiale

    OpenAIRE

    AMMOLR, Naima; ZEKRI, DjaIeI; Lazreg, Mohammed

    2006-01-01

    L'infection hospitalière est un phénomène grave et coûteux pour la société et pour le malade; • elle prolonge la durée de séjours; • augmente la consommation thérapeutique ( antibiotique, antalgique...); • entraîne une mobilisation excessive du personnel; • nuit la réputation du personnel soignant et de l'établissement; • multiplie l'évaluation du coût de prise en charge; • induit des séquelles neurologiques irréversibles. Mieux vaut investir dans les mesures de préven...

  9. Gastrointestinal infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Children living in developing countries are particularly susceptible to infectious diarrhea because of poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Although the magnitude of diarrheal illnesses in developed countries is less, costly hospital admissions are still frequent. The causal agent of infectious diarrhea is most frequently related to age, geographical location, lifestyle habits, use of antibiotics, associated medical conditions, social circumstances, and degree of immune competence. In this article we present some of the most important articles published in the field during the last year. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease has been shown in adults and children. Information about the natural history of H. pylori, symptomatology, and diagnostic therapeutic approaches for children are being generated constantly; we discuss some of the most relevant information in this review.

  10. Epigenetics and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

  11. Managing urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, Sermin A; Mattoo, Tej K

    2011-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in childhood. Presence of pyuria and bacteriuria in an appropriately collected urine sample are diagnostic of UTI. The risk of UTI is increased with an underlying urological abnormality such as vesicoureteral reflux, constipation, and voiding dysfunction. Patients with acute pyelonephritis are at risk of renal scarring and subsequent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria with and without FSGS, pregnancy-related complications and even end-stage renal failure. The relevance and the sequence of the renal imaging following initial UTI, and the role of antimicrobial prophylaxis and surgical intervention are currently undergoing an intense debate. Prompt treatment of UTI and appropriate follow-up of those at increased risk of recurrence and/or renal scarring are important.

  12. Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Brüggemann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs. Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  13. "SAPHO syndrome and infections".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Marcello; Colina, Matteo; Massara, Alfonso; Trotta, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The syndrome of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) encompasses a broad spectrum of cutaneous manifestations associated with osteitic and hyperostotic lesions, which typically may involve the anterior chest wall (ACW). The aetiopathogenetic mechanisms as well as the nosographic framing of the disease are still not fully defined although an important role has been suggested for Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). This germ might be able to stimulate both the innate and the T-cell-mediated immune system. The elicited immunological response could be an attempt to eliminate the germ thus inducing the perpetuation of the inflammation. Whether the osteo-articular changes seen in SAPHO could be attributable directly to the infection or to an inflammatory reaction induced by pathogenic material remains a debated issue. The current concept of SAPHO syndrome as a reactive infectious osteitis in genetic predisposed subjects seems appealing, but it has not been yet demonstrated.

  14. The Eosinophil in Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Karen A; Loy, Michael

    2016-04-01

    First described by Paul Ehrlich in 1879, who noted its characteristic staining by acidophilic dyes, for many years, the eosinophil was considered to be an end-effector cell associated with helminth infections and a cause of tissue damage. Over the past 30 years, research has helped to elucidate the complexity of the eosinophil's function and establish its role in host defense and immunity. Eosinophils express an array of ligand receptors which play a role in cell growth, adhesion, chemotaxis, degranulation, and cell-to-cell interactions. They play a role in activation of complement via both classical and alternative pathways. Eosinophils synthesize, store and secrete cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. They can process antigen, stimulate T cells, and promote humoral responses by interacting with B cells. Eosinophils can function as antigen presenting cells and can regulate processes associated with both T1 and T2 immunity. Although long known to play a role in defense against helminth organisms, the interactions of eosinophils with these parasites are now recognized to be much more complex. In addition, their interaction with other pathogens continues to be investigated. In this paper, we review the eosinophil's unique biology and structure, including its characteristic granules and the effects of its proteins, our developing understanding of its role in innate and adaptive immunity and importance in immunomodulation, and the part it plays in defense against parasitic, viral, fungal and bacterial infections. Rather than our worst enemy, the eosinophil may, in fact, be one of the most essential components in host defense and immunity.

  15. Candida infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddley, J W; Benjamin, D K; Patel, M; Miró, J; Athan, E; Barsic, B; Bouza, E; Clara, L; Elliott, T; Kanafani, Z; Klein, J; Lerakis, S; Levine, D; Spelman, D; Rubinstein, E; Tornos, P; Morris, A J; Pappas, P; Fowler, V G; Chu, V H; Cabell, C

    2008-07-01

    Candida infective endocarditis (IE) is uncommon but often fatal. Most epidemiologic data are derived from small case series or case reports. This study was conducted to explore the epidemiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes of patients with Candida IE. We compared 33 Candida IE cases to 2,716 patients with non-fungal IE in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis-Prospective Cohort Study (ICE-PCS). Patients were enrolled and the data collected from June 2000 until August 2005. We noted that patients with Candida IE were more likely to have prosthetic valves (p < 0.001), short-term indwelling catheters (p < 0.0001), and have healthcare-associated infections (p < 0.001). The reasons for surgery differed between the two groups: myocardial abscess (46.7% vs. 22.2%, p = 0.026) and persistent positive blood cultures (33.3% vs. 9.9%, p = 0.003) were more common among those with Candida IE. Mortality at discharge was higher in patients with Candida IE (30.3%) when compared to non-fungal cases (17%, p = 0.046). Among Candida patients, mortality was similar in patients who received combination surgical and antifungal therapy versus antifungal therapy alone (33.3% vs. 27.8%, p = 0.26). New antifungal drugs, particularly echinocandins, were used frequently. These multi-center data suggest distinct epidemiologic features of Candida IE when compared to non-fungal cases. Indications for surgical intervention are different and mortality is increased. Newer antifungal treatment options are increasingly used. Large, multi-center studies are needed to help better define Candida IE.

  16. Imaging fungal infections in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O.; Sathekge, Mike M; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections in children rarely occur, but continue to have a high morbidity and mortality despite the development of newer antifungal agents. It is essential for these infections to be diagnosed at the earliest possible stage so appropriate treatment can be initiated promptly. The addition of

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    in gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...

  18. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  19. Urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970374 The relationship between chronic pyelitis andcytomegalovirus infection: a primary study. LI Na(李娜), et al. 81021st Milit Hosp, Changchun,130021. Chin J Med Lab Sci 1997; 20(1): 26-27. Objective: To research the relationship betweenchronic pyelitis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection.

  20. Extraintestinal Vibrio infections in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issack, Mohammad I; Appiah, Deoraz; Rassoul, Ameen; Unuth, Mahesswaree N; Unuth-Lutchun, Nehma

    2008-10-01

    Few extraintestinal Vibrio infections have been reported in the African region. We report 3 cases from Mauritius: one case of Vibrio alginolyticus otitis externa; one case of soft tissue infection caused by non-O1 Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus; and one fatal case of non-O1 V. cholerae cellulitis and septicaemia.