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Sample records for non-native english teachers

  1. NATIVE VS NON-NATIVE ENGLISH TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masrizal Masrizal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of English language teachers worldwide are non-native English speakers (NNS, no research was conducted on these teachers until recently. A pioneer research by Peter Medgyes in 1994 took quite a long time until the other researchers found their interests in this issue. There is a widespread stereotype that a native speaker (NS is by nature the best person to teach his/her foreign language. In regard to this assumption, we then see a very limited room and opportunities for a non native teacher to teach language that is not his/hers. The aim of this article is to analyze the differences among these teachers in order to prove that non-native teachers have equal advantages that should be taken into account. The writer expects that the result of this short article could be a valuable input to the area of teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia.

  2. Preparing Non-Native English-Speaking ESL Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sarah J.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges that non-native English-speaking teacher trainees face as they begin teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) in Western, English-speaking countries. Despite a great deal of training, non-native speaker teachers may be viewed as inadequate language teachers because they often lack native speaker competence…

  3. Empowering Non-Native English Speaking Teachers through Critical Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Nur

    2010-01-01

    Critical pedagogy is a teaching approach that aims to develop students' critical thinking, political and social awareness, and self esteem through dialogue learning and reflection. Related to the teaching of EFL, this pedagogy holds the potential to empower non native English speaking teachers (NNESTs) when incorporated into English teacher…

  4. Overview of Native-speaker English Teacher Versus Non-native-speaker English Teacher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xu

    2015-01-01

    As much more non-native-speaker English teachers teach alongside native-speaker English teachers, either in China or any other non-English-speaking country, research on the differences between native-speaker English teacher and non-na⁃tive-speaker English teacher is necessary. This paper offers an overview of such difference between the two groups of English teachers in terms of their strengths and weaknesses, teaching styles and approaches. The conclusion suggests that cooperation and communication be emphsised and that the two groups of teachers communicate more and exchange their ideas on how to teach the same group of students more effectively.

  5. EMPOWERING NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKING TEACHERS THROUGH CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

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    Nur Hayati

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Critical pedagogy is a teaching approach that aims to develop students’ critical thinking, political and social awareness, and self esteem through dialogue learning and reflection. Related to the teaching of EFL, this pedagogy holds the potential to empower non native English speaking teachers (NNESTs when incorporated into English teacher education programs. It can help aspiring NNESTs to grow awareness of the political and sociocultural implications of EFL teaching, to foster their critical thinking on any concepts or ideas regarding their profession, and more importantly, to recognize their strengths as NNESTs. Despite the potential, the role of critical pedagogy in improving EFL teacher education program in Indonesia has not been sufficiently discussed. This article attempts to contribute to the discussion by looking at a number of ways critical pedagogy can be incorporated in the programs, the rationale for doing so, and the challenges that might come on the way.

  6. Native and Non-Native English Language Teachers

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    Ian Walkinshaw

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The English language teaching industry in East and Southeast Asia subscribes to an assumption that native English-speaking teachers (NESTs are the gold standard of spoken and written language, whereas non-native English-speaking teachers (non-NESTs are inferior educators because they lack this innate linguistic skill. But does this premise correspond with the views of second language learners? This article reports on research carried out with university students in Vietnam and Japan exploring the advantages and disadvantages of learning English from NESTs and non-NESTs. Contrary to the above notion, our research illuminated a number of perceived advantages—and disadvantages—in both types of teachers. Students viewed NESTs as models of pronunciation and correct language use, as well as being repositories of cultural knowledge, but they also found NESTs poor at explaining grammar, and their different cultures created tension. Non-NESTs were perceived as good teachers of grammar, and had the ability to resort to the students’ first language when necessary. Students found classroom interaction with non-NESTs easier because of their shared culture. Non-NESTs’ pronunciation was often deemed inferior to that of NESTs, but also easier to comprehend. Some respondents advocated learning from both types of teachers, depending on learners’ proficiency and the skill being taught.

  7. The Non-Native English Speaker Teachers in TESOL Movement

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    Kamhi-Stein, Lía D.

    2016-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since what is known as the non-native English-speaking (NNES) professionals' movement--designed to increase the status of NNES professionals--started within the US-based TESOL International Association. However, still missing from the literature is an understanding of what a movement is, and why non-native English…

  8. Non-Native English Language Teachers' Perspective on Culture in English as a Foreign Language Classrooms

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    Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the importance of raising non-native English language teachers' awareness of different dimensions of culture in the teaching of English as an international language. The author believes that the more critical English language teachers become about the involvement of culture in their English language teaching, the more they…

  9. The Factors Influencing the Motivational Strategy Use of Non-Native English Teachers

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    Solak, Ekrem; Bayar, Adem

    2014-01-01

    Motivation can be considered one of the most important factors determining success in language classroom. Therefore, this research aims to determine the variables influencing the motivational strategies used by non-native English teachers in Turkish context. 122 non-native English teachers teaching English at a state-run university prep school…

  10. The Impact of Non-Native English Teachers' Linguistic Insecurity on Learners' Productive Skills

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    Daftari, Giti Ehtesham; Tavil, Zekiye Müge

    2017-01-01

    The discrimination between native and non-native English speaking teachers is reported in favor of native speakers in literature. The present study examines the linguistic insecurity of non-native English speaking teachers (NNESTs) and investigates its influence on learners' productive skills by using SPSS software. The eighteen teachers…

  11. Non-Native English-Speaking Teachers, Context and English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, David

    2009-01-01

    This article contends that, in spite of a recent upsurge in writing on non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) in the global discourse of English language teaching (ELT), the experiences of NNESTSs working within their own state educational systems remain seriously under-investigated. To help to redress this, the article explores, from their…

  12. Native- and Non-Native Speaking English Teachers in Vietnam: Weighing the Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkinshaw, Ian; Duong, Oanh Thi Hoang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a common belief that learners of English as a foreign language prefer to learn English from native-speaker teachers rather than non-native speakers of English. 50 Vietnamese learners of English evaluated the importance of native-speakerness compared with seven qualities valued in an English language teacher: teaching…

  13. The Knowledge Base of Non-Native English-Speaking Teachers: Perspectives of Teachers and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Zhan, Ju

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the knowledge base of non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) working in the Canadian English as a second language (ESL) context. By examining NNESTs' experiences in seeking employment and teaching ESL in Canada, and investigating ESL program administrators' perceptions and hiring practices in relation to NNESTs, it…

  14. Taiwanese University Students' Attitudes to Non-Native Speakers English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted to explore issues surrounding non-native speakers (NNS) English teachers and native speaker (NS) teachers which concern, among others, the comparison between the two, the self-perceptions of NNS English teachers and the effectiveness of their teaching, and the students' opinions on and attitudes towards them.…

  15. Is my stress right or wrong? Studying the production of stress by non-native speaking teachers of English

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    Ika Apriani Fata

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at exploring the production of stress by non native English teachers in Aceh. It also inquires into how these teachers of English overcame their shortcomings in oral English language teaching. 45 non native English teachers from Aceh were recorded. They came from four regions in the province of Aceh, namely Aceh Timur, Langsa, Aceh Utara and Aceh Besar. The participants have taught English from five to 15 years. The approach used in this paper is qualitative by focusing on the...

  16. Facebook-Photovoice Interface: Empowering Non-Native Pre-Service English Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubrico, Jessie Grace U.; Hashim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Engaging non-native pre-service English teachers who are still learning the language themselves requires two tasks: facilitating their language teaching skills and scaffolding their language learning. This action research interfaced Facebook and Photovoice technologies in order to empower participants to be proactive in their language learning and…

  17. Facebook-Photovoice Interface: Empowering Non-Native Pre-Service English Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubrico, Jessie Grace U.; Hashim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Engaging non-native pre-service English teachers who are still learning the language themselves requires two tasks: facilitating their language teaching skills and scaffolding their language learning. This action research interfaced Facebook and Photovoice technologies in order to empower participants to be proactive in their language learning and…

  18. A COMPARISON OF ORAL EVALUATION RATINGS BY NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS AND NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS

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    Brittany Baitman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to explore the differences and similarities between native English speaker (NES teachers and non-native English speaker (NNES teachers in their oral evaluation ratings of the same university level English language learners. To this effect, the iBT/Next Generation TOEFL Test Independent Speaking Rubric and a questionnaire were employed. The results reveal that NES teachers are more lenient in their oral evaluation ratings than NNES teachers. In regards to the questionnaire employed, it was found that NES teachers take into consideration the aspects of fluency and pronunciation more so than NNES teachers when orally assessing students, while NNES teachers take more into consideration the aspects of grammatical accuracy and vocabulary. Further research is required in the area of oral assessment specifically pertaining to nationality, age, work experience, and knowledge of a second language.

  19. The Pedagogy and Its Effectiveness among Native and Non-Native English Speaking Teachers in the Korean EFL Context

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    Nam, Hyun Ha

    2010-01-01

    As English progressively becomes the global language, many native English speakers move to foreign countries to work as English teachers. However a review of the literature reveals that there is little research on their actual performance compared to the non-native local English teachers. This comparative case study examines pedagogic practices of…

  20. Effects of the Differences between Native and Non-Native English-Speaking Teachers on Students' Attitudes and Motivation toward Learning English

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    Pae, Tae-Il

    2017-01-01

    This study presents findings on three research agendas: (1) the difference between native English-speaking teachers (NESTs) and non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) in students' attitudes toward and motivation for learning English, (2) the moderating effect of the type of class (i.e., English Conversation vs. Practical English) on the…

  1. Exploring the beliefs of native and non-native English speaking kindergarten teachers in Taiwan

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    Chiung-Wen Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the beliefs of native and non-native English speaking teachers on teaching English in kindergartens. A qualitative case study design is used to construct individual portraits and a cross-case analysis of several kindergarten teachers and analyze data following the qualitative data analysis methods by Taylor and Bodgan (1998. Data collected by interview and classroom observation show 4 different beliefs to be salient across the cases: language learning, the role of the teacher, the role of the learner, and self-efficacy. Data analysis shows teacher beliefs that are complex and closely related to the teacher’s life and learning experiences, multiple identities, and different environmental affordances and constraints. Therefore, the teachers’ subjective account from an emic perspective is useful for describing this complexity. The findings of this study have implications for constructing "a technical culture" (Kleinsasser, 1993, in which teachers may find themselves, that supports the teacher, and that contributes to quality teaching and professional growth.

  2. Investigating Native and Non-Native English-Speaking Teacher Raters' Judgements of Oral Proficiency in the College English Test-Spoken English Test (CET-SET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Elder, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of raters' language background on their judgements of the speaking performance in the College English Test-Spoken English Test (CET-SET) of China, by comparing the rating patterns of non-native English-speaking (NNES) teacher raters, who are currently employed to assess performance on the CET-SET, with those of…

  3. A professional development scheme for non-native speaking teachers of English from the Arab world: an action research study

    OpenAIRE

    Rabi, Sally A

    2013-01-01

    Following an action research framework, my research investigates professional development for English Language teachers in the Arab World, who are non-native\\ud speakers of English themselves.\\ud \\ud The thesis has five chapters: Literature Review, Critical Contexts, Methodology of the Study, Data Analysis and Presentation, and finally the Discussion and Findings of the\\ud research. The Literature Review covers works relevant to the area of the study in relation to existing teacher practices,...

  4. Exploring Non-Native English-Speaking Teachers' Beliefs about the Monolingual Approach: Differences between Pre-Service and In-Service Korean Teachers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Ho

    2016-01-01

    The non-native English-speaking teachers' (NNESTs) beliefs about the monolingual approach have not been sufficiently studied in the teaching of English as a foreign language (EFL). In examining the NNESTs' beliefs about that issue, the present study adapts Guy Cook's recent framework, according to which the monolingual approach is based upon four…

  5. Learning to Teach English Language in the Practicum: What Challenges do Non-Native ESL Student Teachers Face?

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    Gan, Zhengdong

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the challenges sixteen non-native preservice ESL teachers in a Bachelor of Education (English Language) (BEdEL) programme from Hong Kong experienced in an eight-week teaching practicum. Qualitative data from semi-structured interviews and reflective journals were collected from all 16 participants to obtain a detailed…

  6. Making the Transition from Non-Native Speaker to Near-Native Speaker Teachers of English: Facing Globalization Challenges in Teaching English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Mohamed Ali, Haja Mohideen

    2009-01-01

    Many job advertisements seeking teachers of English to work in Japan, China, South Korea and Thailand, for instance, specify that they are looking for native speaking teachers from USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand. They do not seem to be interested even in trained non-native speaking teachers from their own countries. This situation also exists…

  7. Toward a Composite, Personalized, and Institutionalized Teacher Identity for Non-Native English Speakers in U.S. Secondary ESL Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Chen; Varghese, Manka M.

    2015-01-01

    Research in English language teaching and teacher identity has increasingly focused on understanding non-native English-speaking teachers. In addition, much of this research has been conducted in adult English as a second language (ESL) settings. Through a multiple-case qualitative study of four teachers in an underexplored research setting--that…

  8. Toward a Composite, Personalized, and Institutionalized Teacher Identity for Non-Native English Speakers in U.S. Secondary ESL Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Chen; Varghese, Manka M.

    2015-01-01

    Research in English language teaching and teacher identity has increasingly focused on understanding non-native English-speaking teachers. In addition, much of this research has been conducted in adult English as a second language (ESL) settings. Through a multiple-case qualitative study of four teachers in an underexplored research setting--that…

  9. Non-native educators in English language teaching

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    Braine, George

    2013-01-01

    The place of native and non-native speakers in the role of English teachers has probably been an issue ever since English was taught internationally. Although ESL and EFL literature is awash, in fact dependent upon, the scrutiny of non-native learners, interest in non-native academics and teachers is fairly new. Until recently, the voices of non-native speakers articulating their own concerns have been even rarer. This book is a response to this notable vacuum in the ELT literature, providing a forum for language educators from diverse geographical origins and language backgrounds. In additio

  10. Native and Non-native English Teachers' Perceptions of their Professional Identity: Convergent or Divergent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Tajeddin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is still a preference for native speaker teachers in the language teaching profession, which is supposed to influence the self-perceptions of native and nonnative teachers. However, the status of English as a globalized language is changing the legitimacy of native/nonnative teacher dichotomy. This study sought to investigate native and nonnative English-speaking teachers’ perceptions about native and nonnative teachers’ status and the advantages and disadvantages of being a native or nonnative teacher. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. A total of 200 native and nonnative teachers of English from the UK and the US, i.e. the inner circle, and Turkey and Iran, the expanding circle, participated in this study. A significant majority of nonnative teachers believed that native speaker teachers have better speaking proficiency, better pronunciation, and greater self-confidence. The findings also showed nonnative teachers’ lack of self-confidence and awareness of their role and status compared with native-speaker teachers, which could be the result of existing inequities between native and nonnative English-speaking teachers in ELT. The findings also revealed that native teachers disagreed more strongly with the concept of native teachers’ superiority over nonnative teachers. Native teachers argued that nonnative teachers have a good understanding of teaching methodology whereas native teachers are more competent in correct language. It can be concluded that teacher education programs in the expanding-circle countries should include materials for teachers to raise their awareness of their own professional status and role and to remove their misconception about native speaker fallacy.

  11. Novice Non-Native English Teachers’ Reflections on Their Teacher Education Programmes and Their First Years of Teaching

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    Sumru Akcan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates novice non-native English teachers’ opinions about the effectiveness of their teacher education programme and the challenges during their initial years of teaching. The results of a survey administered to fifty-five novice teachers and follow-up interviews identify strengths and weaknesses in their teacher education programme and catalogue the difficulties they faced when they star-ted to teach. The study found significant differences between the content of novice teachers’ academic courses in their teacher education programme and the conditions they experienced in classrooms. The major challenges of their first years of teaching were related to lesson delivery, managing behaviour, unmotivated students, and students with learning disabilities. The article includes suggestions to prepare teachers for the actualities of working in schools.

  12. When the Teacher Is a Non-native Speaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pèter Medgyes

    2005-01-01

    @@ In "When the Teacher is a Non-native Speaker," Medgyes examines the differences in teaching behavior between native and non-native teachers of English, and then specifies the causes of those differences. The aim of the discussion is to raise the awareness of both groups of teachers to their respective strengths and weaknesses, and thus help them become better teachers.

  13. Initial Teacher Training Courses and Non-Native Speaker Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study contrasting 41 native speakers (NSs) and 38 non-native speakers (NNSs) of English from two short initial teacher training courses, the Cambridge Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults and the Trinity College London CertTESOL. After a brief history and literature review, I present findings on teachers'…

  14. Initial Teacher Training Courses and Non-Native Speaker Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study contrasting 41 native speakers (NSs) and 38 non-native speakers (NNSs) of English from two short initial teacher training courses, the Cambridge Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults and the Trinity College London CertTESOL. After a brief history and literature review, I present findings on teachers'…

  15. Word Durations in Non-Native English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rachel E.; Baese-Berk, Melissa; Bonnasse-Gahot, Laurent; Kim, Midam; Van Engen, Kristin J.; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compare the effects of English lexical features on word duration for native and non-native English speakers and for non-native speakers with different L1s and a range of L2 experience. We also examine whether non-native word durations lead to judgments of a stronger foreign accent. We measured word durations in English paragraphs read by 12 American English (AE), 20 Korean, and 20 Chinese speakers. We also had AE listeners rate the `accentedness' of these non-native speakers. AE speech had shorter durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, greater reduction of function words, and less between-speaker variance than non-native speech. However, both AE and non-native speakers showed sensitivity to lexical predictability by reducing second mentions and high frequency words. Non-native speakers with more native-like word durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, and greater function word reduction were perceived as less accented. Overall, these findings identify word duration as an important and complex feature of foreign-accented English. PMID:21516172

  16. Teaching Physics in English: A Continuing Professional Development for Non-Native English-Speaking Teachers in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruekpramool, Chaninan; Sangpradit, Theerapong

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) using English integrated science approach training curriculum and to promote physics teacher's efficacy to be expert teachers and be able to teach Physics in English. The quality of the curriculum was at a high level corresponding to the congruence scores of the…

  17. Investigating Native and Non-Native English-Speaking Teacher Raters' Judgements of Oral Proficiency in the College English Test-Spoken English Test (CET-SET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Elder, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of raters' language background on their judgements of the speaking performance in the College English Test-Spoken English Test (CET-SET) of China, by comparing the rating patterns of non-native English-speaking (NNES) teacher raters, who are currently employed to assess performance on the CET-SET, with those…

  18. DIFFICULTIES FOR NON-NATIVE TEACHERS OF ENGLISH IN ACCEPTING THE COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionTraditionally in China teachers use the Grammar-Translation Method.This focuses on teaching newvocabulary,and explaining the text sentence by sentence.In this way,most students learn a lot ofvocabulary and knowledge of grammar,and native-like pronunciation.However,when they listen orspeak in a real-world situation,they have no idea how to express themselves appropriately.In otherwords,they need not only to read and write,but also listen and speak in English.In the future,they mayneed to attend international seminars or have discussions with foreign colleagues.Traditional methodsmay not meet these needs whereby the Communicative Approach(C.A.)may be more effective.

  19. Exploring Non-Native English Speaker Teachers' Classroom Language Use in South Korean Elementary Schools

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    Rabbidge, Michael; Chappell, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of English as a foreign language in South Korean public schools has seen the implementation of a number of new innovations. One such innovation, the teaching of English through English, dubbed TETE, is a government-initiated policy that requires public schools to teach English by only using English. Nevertheless, studies reveal that…

  20. Attitudes of Palestinian Undergraduate Students towards Native and Non-Native English Language Teachers and Their Relation to Students' Listening Ability

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    Nafi, Jamal Subhi Ismail; Qabaja, Ziad Mohammed Mahmoud; Al-Kar, Hibah Jabir Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the attitudes of Palestinian undergraduate students towards native and non-native English language teachers and their relation to students' listening ability. To achieve this purpose and to answer the research questions and test the hypotheses, the researchers adopted both the descriptive and inferential…

  1. Pragmatic assessment of request speech act of Iranian EFL learners by non-native English speaking teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Alemi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of raters' comments on pragmatic assessment of L2 learners is among new and understudied concepts in second language studies. To shed light on this issue, the present investigation targeted important variables such as raters’ criteria and rating patterns by analyzing the interlanguage pragmatic assessment process of the Iranian non-native English speaking raters (NNESRs regarding the request speech act, while considering important factors such as raters’ gender and background teaching experiences. For this purpose, 62 raters’ rating scores and comments on Iranian EFL learners’ requests based on six situations of specified video prompts were analyzed. The results of the content analysis of raters’ comments revealed nine criteria, including pragmalinguistic and socio-pragmatic components of language, which have been noted by raters differently through six request situations. Among the considered criteria, politeness, conversers’ relationship, style and register, and explanation were of great importance to NNESRs. Furthermore, t-test and chi-square analysis of raters’ assigned rating scores and mentioned criteria across different situations verified the insignificance of factors such as raters’ gender and teaching experiences on the process of EFL learners’ pragmatic assessment. In addition, the results of the study suggest the necessity of teaching L2 pragmatics in language classes and in teacher training courses.

  2. Improving the Classroom Language Proficiency of Non-Native Teachers of English: What and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    The present paper attempts to examine the possibilities of the Classroom Language Assessment Benchmark (CLAB) as a professional development tool for EFL teachers in Japan. Two questionnaire surveys were carried out several months after the last day of the graduate course (both in 2006 and 2007) where CLAB was used as a self- and peer-assessment…

  3. The Attitudes and Perceptions of Non-Native English Speaking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Attitudes and Perceptions of Non-Native English Speaking Adults toward Explicit Grammar Instruction. ... to excel in their academic careers, obtain good jobs, and interact well with those who speak English. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  4. Native Speakers' Perception of Non-Native English Speech

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    Jaber, Maysa; Hussein, Riyad F.

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the rating and intelligibility of different non-native varieties of English, namely French English, Japanese English and Jordanian English by native English speakers and their attitudes towards these foreign accents. To achieve the goals of this study, the researchers used a web-based questionnaire which…

  5. Non-Native Pre-Service English Teachers’ Narratives about Their Pronunciation Learning and Implications for Pronunciation Training

    OpenAIRE

    Chin Wen Chien

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes 58 non-native pre-service elementary school English teachers’ narratives about their pronunciation learning and teaching. Two important findings emerge in this study.  First, participants did not have the same attitude toward their roles as non-native English speakers regarding pronunciation learning and teaching. Second, regardless of their attitude or roles as non-native English speakers, participants claimed that when they become language teachers in the future, they wi...

  6. Juggling Identity and Authority: A Case Study of One Non-Native Instructor of English

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    Subtirelu, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Authority in the classroom is an important concept to teachers everywhere. The act of teaching continuously engages them in the negotiation and construction of an identity that is accepted as authoritative by their students. Identity and authority, however, are in conflict in the context of NNSTs ["non-native" speaker teachers] of English (and…

  7. Novice Non-Native English Teachers' Reflections on Their Teacher Education Programmes and Their First Years of Teaching (Reflexiones de profesores novatos y no nativos del inglés sobre sus programas de formación y sus primeros años de instrucción)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcan, Sumru

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates novice non-native English teachers' opinions about the effectiveness of their teacher education programme and the challenges during their initial years of teaching. The results of a survey administered to fifty-five novice teachers and follow-up interviews identify strengths and weaknesses in their teacher education…

  8. Non-Native English Varieties: Thainess in English Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhasak, Piyahathai; Methitham, Phongsakorn

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at examining Thainess as a writing strategy used in non-literary texts written by non-professional bilingual writers. These writers are advanced language learners who are pursuing their Master's degree in English. Seven English narratives of their language learning experiences were analyzed based on Kachruvian's framework of…

  9. Non-native novice EFL teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Erkmen, Besime

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the beliefs about teaching and learning English of nine non-native novice teachers at a private university in Northern Cyprus, and the extent to which these beliefs changed in their first year of teaching. Data was collected over an academic year of nine months by means of semi-structured interviews, credos, classroom observations, post-lesson reflection forms, stimulated-recall interviews, diaries and a metaphor-elicitation task. The study found that novice teachers’ ...

  10. Feedback in online course for non-native English-speaking students

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    Olesova, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Feedback in Online Course for Non-Native English-Speaking Students is an investigation of the effectiveness of audio and text feedback provided in English in an online course for non-native English-speaking students. The study presents results showing how audio and text feedback can impact on non-native English-speaking students' higher-order learning as they participate in an asynchronous online course. It also discusses the results of how students perceive both types of the feedback provided. In addition, the study examines how the impact and perceptions differ when the instructor giving the

  11. A Study of the Relationship between Korean Non-Native English Speaking Teachers' Prior Teaching Experience and Their L2 Pragmatic Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Ku

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to explore five Korean NNESTs' L2 pragmatic competence and its relationship with their teaching experiences using DCT questionnaires of English request. This study in particular examined (1) five Korean NNESTs pragmatic competencies in English requests, (2) the relationship between their English teaching and learning…

  12. Delayed Next Turn Repair Initiation in Native/Non-native Speaker English Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Examines a form of other-initiated conversational repair that is delayed within next turn position, a form that is produced by non-native speakers of English whose native language is Mandarin. Using the framework of conversational analysis, shows that in native/non-native conversation, other-initiated repair is not always done as early as possible…

  13. Facing Innovation: Preparing Lecturers for English-Medium Instruction in a Non-Native Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, R. G.; De Graaff, E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the effects of training on the teaching staff in an innovation process that is the implementation of English-medium instruction by non-native speaking lecturers to non-native speaking students. The workshop turned out to be the most appropriate professional development for the first two phases in the innovation process. (Contains 13…

  14. Free classification of American English dialects by native and non-native listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopper, Cynthia G; Bradlow, Ann R

    2009-10-01

    Most second language acquisition research focuses on linguistic structures, and less research has examined the acquisition of sociolinguistic patterns. The current study explored the perceptual classification of regional dialects of American English by native and non-native listeners using a free classification task. Results revealed similar classification strategies for the native and non-native listeners. However, the native listeners were more accurate overall than the non-native listeners. In addition, the non-native listeners were less able to make use of constellations of cues to accurately classify the talkers by dialect. However, the non-native listeners were able to attend to cues that were either phonologically or sociolinguistically relevant in their native language. These results suggest that non-native listeners can use information in the speech signal to classify talkers by regional dialect, but that their lack of signal-independent cultural knowledge about variation in the second language leads to less accurate classification performance.

  15. The relationship between conceptual metaphors and classroom management language: reactions by native and non-native speakers of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Low

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of the target language to manage a class and organise its work represents one of the few genuinely communicative uses of the target language in many formal foreign-language or bilingual-education teaching situations. It is thus important that both teachers and learners understand and know how to use the key expressions involved. These tend to be highly metaphoric (Low, 2008 with one particularly productive conceptual metaphor involving the JOURNEY (or TRAVEL source domain seemingly standing out. There seems to have been little investigation to date into whether or not learners whose first language is not English actually understand the expressions involved in such classroom management language. Moreover, with the recent growing interest in the area of content-based learning, there is increasing pressure on language teachers, whose first language is not English, to use English as their classroom management language. Our first aim was to look at whether the acceptability judgements for classroom management expressions offered by non-native speaking teachers of English resembled those of native speakers, and whether these judgements reflected corpus findings regarding the frequency of usage in spoken English. To do this, we analysed native and non-native speaker responses to a short questionnaire. Our second aim was to look at how non-native speakers of English perceive the meanings of these expressions, comparing our findings to native speaker judgements and corpus results.

  16. Critical Media Analysis in Teacher Education: Exploring Language-Learners' Identity through Mediated Images of a Non-Native Speaker of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin-Quinlisk, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Media literacy education has become increasingly present in curricular initiatives around the world as media saturate our cultural environments. For second-language teachers and teacher educators whose practice centers on language, communication, and culture, the need to address media as a pedagogical site of critique is imperative. In this…

  17. Turkish Students' Perspectives on Speaking Anxiety in Native and Non-Native English Speaker Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozavli, Ebubekir; Gulmez, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the effect of FLA (foreign language anxiety) in native/non-native speaker of English classrooms. In this study, two groups of students (90 in total) of whom 38 were in NS (native speaker) class and 52 in NNS (non-native speaker) class taking English as a second language course for 22 hours a week at Erzincan…

  18. Linguistic Support for Non-Native English Speakers: Higher Education Practices in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow Andrade, Maureen; Evans, Norman W.; Hartshorn, K. James

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions in English-speaking nations host significant populations of non-native English speakers (NNES), both international and resident. English language proficiency is a critical factor to their success. This study reviews higher education practices in the United States related to this population. Findings indicate…

  19. Non-native Chinese Foreign Language (CFL) Teachers: Identity and Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Native Chinese foreign language (CFL) teacher identity is an emerging subject of research interest in the teacher education. Yet, limited study has been done on the construction of Non-native CFL teachers in their home culture. Guided by a concept of teacher identity......-in-discourse, the paper reports on a qualitative study that explores how three Non-native CFL teachers construct their teacher identity as they interact with Danish students while teaching CFL at one Danish university. Data collected from in-depth interviews over a period of two years show that the Non-native CFL...... teachers face tensions and challenges in constructing their identities as CFL teachers, and the tensions and challenges that arose from Danish teaching culture could influence the Non-native CFL teachers' contributions to CFL teaching in their home cultures. The findings further show that in order to cope...

  20. Disadvantages of publishing biomedical research articles in English for non-native speakers of English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    English has become the most frequently used language for scientific communication in the biomedical field. Therefore, scholars from all over the world try to publish their findings in English. This trend has a number of advantages, along with several disadvantages. In the current article, the most important disadvantages of publishing biomedical research articles in English for non-native speakers of English are reviewed. The most important disadvantages of publishing biomedical research articles in English for non-native speakers may include: Overlooking, either unintentionally or even deliberately, the most important local health problems; failure to carry out groundbreaking research due to limited medical research budgets; violating generally accepted codes of publication ethics and committing research misconduct and publications in open-access scam/predatory journals rather than prestigious journals. The above mentioned disadvantages could eventually result in academic establishments becoming irresponsible or, even worse, corrupt. In order to avoid this, scientists, scientific organizations, academic institutions, and scientific associations all over the world should design and implement a wider range of collaborative and comprehensive plans.

  1. The relationship between brain reaction and English reading tests for non-native English speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-Wen; Tian, Yu-Jie; Kuo, Ting-Hua; Sun, Koun-Tem

    2016-07-01

    This research analyzed the brain activity of non-native English speakers while engaged in English reading tests. The brain wave event-related potentials (ERPs) of participants were used to analyze the difference between making correct and incorrect choices on English reading test items. Three English reading tests of differing levels were designed and 20 participants, 10 males and 10 females whose ages ranged from 20 to 24, voluntarily participated in the experiment. Experimental results were analyzed by performing independent t-tests on the ERPs of participants for gender, difficulty level, and correct versus wrong options. Participants who chose incorrect options elicited a larger N600, verifying results found in the literature. Another interesting result was found: For incorrectly answered items, different areas of brain showing a significant difference in ERPs between the chosen and non-chosen options corresponded to gender differences; for males, this area was located in the right hemisphere whereas for females, it was located in the left. Experimental results imply that non-native English speaking males and females employ different areas of the brain to comprehend the meaning of difficult items.

  2. Patterns of English phoneme confusions by native and non-native listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Weber, A.C.; Smits, R.; Cooper, N.

    2004-01-01

    Native American English and non-native (Dutch) listeners identified either the consonant or the vowel in all possible American English CV and VC syllables. The syllables were embedded in multispeaker babble at three signal-to-noise ratios (0, 8, and 16 dB). The phoneme identification performance of

  3. Automatically identifying characteristic features of non-native English accents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, Jelke; Wieling, Martijn; Nerbonne, John; Côté, Marie-Hélène; Knooihuizen, Remco; Nerbonne, John

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the application of statistical measures from dialectometry to the study of accented English speech. This new methodology enables a more quantitative approach to the study of accents. Studies on spoken dialect data have shown that a combination of representativeness (the

  4. Strategies for Improving Academic Performance by Non-Native English Speakers in Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Tracye A.; Stinson, Terrye A.; Sivakumaran, Thillainatarajan

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of non-native English speaking students in higher education has increased dramatically. Educators at all levels have experienced challenges in meeting the academic needs of these students and continue to seek strategies for addressing these challenges. This paper describes some of this research related to K-12 and…

  5. TOEFL11: A Corpus of Non-Native English. Research Report. ETS RR-13-24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Daniel; Tetreault, Joel; Higgins, Derrick; Cahill, Aoife; Chodorow, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This report presents work on the development of a new corpus of non-native English writing. It will be useful for the task of native language identification, as well as grammatical error detection and correction, and automatic essay scoring. In this report, the corpus is described in detail.

  6. Ethical Considerations in Conducting Research with Non-Native Speakers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouriotis, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The ethical considerations of three education researchers working with non-native English-speaking participants were examined from a critical theory stand-point in the light of the literature on research ethics in various disciplines. Qualitative inquiry and data analysis were used to identify key themes, which centered around honor and respect…

  7. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Anne J; Viswanathan, Navin; Aivar, M Pilar; Manuel, Sarath

    2013-01-01

    Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba]-[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from -60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b]) to +60 ms (long lag, English [p]) such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English). Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds.

  8. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie J Olmstead

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba] -[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from -60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b] to +60 ms (long lag, English [p] such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English. Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds.

  9. The Development and Validation of the "Academic Spoken English Strategies Survey (ASESS)" for Non-Native English Speaking Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Rui M.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the three-year development and validation of a new assessment tool--the Academic Spoken English Strategies Survey (ASESS). The questionnaire is the first of its kind to assess the listening and speaking strategy use of non-native English speaking (NNES) graduate students. A combination of sources was used to develop the…

  10. Research and Trends in the Studies of Native & Non-Native Speaker Teachers of Languages: A Review on Selected Researches and Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    SuriatiJusoh, Fathen; Alias, Norlidah; Siraj, Saedah; De Witt, Dorothy; Hussin, Zaharah; Darusalam, Ghazali

    2013-01-01

    Recruiting and employing native speaker teachers of English Language (NST) in non-native speakers' context are widely practised in countries which learn and use the target language taught by the native speaker teachers (NST) as either as a second or a foreign language. This paper reviews selected journals and thesis on the issues of Native and…

  11. An Analysis of Student Evaluations of Native and Non Native Korean Foreign Language Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Damron

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of native and non-native teaching assistants and part-time teachers (both referred to as TAs in this article, students completed 632 evaluations of Ko-rean Language TAs from 2005 to 2008, and these evaluations were compiled for an analysis of variants (ANOVA. The evaluations were categorized into three groups of TAs: native Korean-speaking female, native Korean-speaking male, and non-native male; non-native females would have been included in the study, but there were not enough non-native female teachers to have a reliable sample. In an effort to encourage more self-examined teaching practices, this study addresses the greatest strengths and weaknesses of each group. Results revealed several significant differences between the ratings of the groups: native female TAs rated lowest overall, and non-native male TAs rated highest overall. The most prominent differences be-tween groups occurred in ratings of amount students learned, TAs’ preparedness, TAs’ active involvement in students’ learning, TAs’ enthusiasm, and TAs’ tardiness. This study reviews students’ written comments on the evaluations and proposes possible causes of these findings, concluding that differences in ratings are based on both teaching patterns associated with each group of TAs and student re-sponse bias that favors non-native male speakers. Teaching patterns include a tendency for native (Korean female TAs to teach using a lecture format and non-native male TAs to teach using a discussion format; for native TAs to have difficulty adapting to the language level of the students; and for a more visible enthusiasm for Korean culture held by non-native TAs. Causes for bias may include “other-ing” females and natives, TA selection procedures, and trends in evaluating TAs based on language level.

  12. Future English Teachers' Attitudes towards EIL Pronunciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    English has become the world's international language, used for international communication mostly among non-native speakers of other languages and 80 percent of all the English teachers around the world are nonnative English-speaking (NNES) teachers (Canagarajah, 1999). Therefore, there is a growing need to investigate the EIL (English as an…

  13. Self-perceived oral communication competence in English, self-perceived employability and career expectations among non-native English speaking business professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokka, Tiia

    2016-01-01

    Objective of the Study: The objectives for this thesis were 1) to understand non-native English speaking business professionals' self-perception of their oral communication competence in English, 2) to understand the importance of English language and competence in English for non-native English speaking business professionals when they consider employability and career expectations and finally 3) to study whether the concepts of self-perceived oral English communication competence, self-...

  14. When the Teacher Is a Non-native Speaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pèter Medgyes

    2005-01-01

    @@ (Continued from Issue 57) The Bright Side of Being a Non-NEST One item in the questionnaire inquired whether the participants thought the NEST or the non-NEST was a better teacher.While an approximately equal number of votes went for either option (27 percent for NESTs and 29 percent for nonNESTs), 44 percent inserted "both," an alternative which had not even been supplied in the questionnaire.

  15. Descriptions of Difficult Conversations between Native and Non-Native English Speakers: In-Group Membership and Helping Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ray; Faux, William V., II

    2011-01-01

    This study illustrated the perceptions of native English speakers about difficult conversations with non-native English speakers. A total of 114 native English speakers enrolled in undergraduate communication courses at a regional state university answered a questionnaire about a recent difficult conversation the respondent had with a non-native…

  16. Durations of American English vowels by native and non-native speakers: acoustic analyses and perceptual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Jin, Su-Hyun; Chen, Chia-Tsen

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine durations of American English vowels produced by English-, Chinese-, and Korean-native speakers and the effects of vowel duration on vowel intelligibility. Twelve American English vowels were recorded in the /hVd/ phonetic context by native speakers and non-native speakers. The English vowel duration patterns as a function of vowel produced by non-native speakers were generally similar to those produced by native speakers. These results imply that using duration differences across vowels may be an important strategy for non-native speakers' production before they are able to employ spectral cues to produce and perceive English speech sounds. In the intelligibility experiment, vowels were selected from 10 native and non-native speakers and vowel durations were equalized at 170 ms. Intelligibility of vowels with original and equalized durations was evaluated by American English native listeners. Results suggested that vowel intelligibility of native and non-native speakers degraded slightly by 3-8% when durations were equalized, indicating that vowel duration plays a minor role in vowel intelligibility.

  17. Scaffolding Learning: Developing Materials to Support the Learning of Science and Language by Non-Native English-Speaking Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afitska, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the UK, like many other English first-language-speaking countries, has encountered a steady and continuous increase in the numbers of non-native English-speaking learners entering state primary and secondary schools. A significant proportion of these learners has specific language and subject learning needs, many of which can only…

  18. Scaffolding Learning: Developing Materials to Support the Learning of Science and Language by Non-Native English-Speaking Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afitska, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the UK, like many other English first-language-speaking countries, has encountered a steady and continuous increase in the numbers of non-native English-speaking learners entering state primary and secondary schools. A significant proportion of these learners has specific language and subject learning needs, many of which can only…

  19. Teachers of Englishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roby Marlina

    2010-01-01

    @@ Whilst running sessions in teacher training programmes on teaching methodologies for speaking and pronunciation,I often hear heartbreaking comments from my trainees.My non-native-English-speaking trainees,on the one hand,complain that they feel that they speak English with a strong accent and ask if it is possible to teach them some ways to eliminate their accents so that they sound more like the Americans or the British-and so that they can then use the same methodology with their own future students.

  20. Effects of noise, reverberation and foreign accent on native and non-native listeners' performance of English speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z Ellen; Wang, Lily M

    2016-05-01

    A large number of non-native English speakers may be found in American classrooms, both as listeners and talkers. Little is known about how this population comprehends speech in realistic adverse acoustical conditions. A study was conducted to investigate the effects of background noise level (BNL), reverberation time (RT), and talker foreign accent on native and non-native listeners' speech comprehension, while controlling for English language abilities. A total of 115 adult listeners completed comprehension tasks under 15 acoustic conditions: three BNLs (RC-30, RC-40, and RC-50) and five RTs (from 0.4 to 1.2 s). Fifty-six listeners were tested with speech from native English-speaking talkers and 59 with native Mandarin-Chinese-speaking talkers. Results show that, while higher BNLs were generally more detrimental to listeners with lower English proficiency, all listeners experienced significant comprehension deficits above RC-40 with native English talkers. This limit was lower (i.e., above RC-30), however, with Chinese talkers. For reverberation, non-native listeners as a group performed best with RT up to 0.6 s, while native listeners performed equally well up to 1.2 s. A matched foreign accent benefit has also been identified, where the negative impact of higher reverberation does not exist for non-native listeners who share the talker's native language.

  1. 3D Talking-Head Mobile App: A Conceptual Framework for English Pronunciation Learning among Non-Native Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmad Zamzuri Mohamad; Segaran, Kogilathah

    2013-01-01

    One of the critical issues pertaining learning English as second language successfully is pronunciation, which consequently contributes to learners' poor communicative power. This situation is moreover crucial among non-native speakers. Therefore, various initiatives have been taken in order to promote effective language learning, which includes…

  2. Students Writing Emails to Faculty: An Examination of E-Politeness among Native and Non-Native Speakers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesenbach-Lucas, Sigrun

    2007-01-01

    This study combines interlanguage pragmatics and speech act research with computer-mediated communication and examines how native and non-native speakers of English formulate low- and high-imposition requests to faculty. While some research claims that email, due to absence of non-verbal cues, encourages informal language, other research has…

  3. Language and Academic Identity: A Study of the Experiences of Non-Native English Speaking International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Olivia; Greenberg, Katherine; Paulus, Trena

    2009-01-01

    This phenomenological study explores the experiences of non-native English-speaking international students regarding language, culture and identity in the context of their graduate studies. Interviews were conducted with each of the eight participants. Interpretive analysis was used within a constructivist frame. The findings of this study are…

  4. The Acquisition of English Focus Marking by Non-Native Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rachel Elizabeth

    This dissertation examines Mandarin and Korean speakers' acquisition of English focus marking, which is realized by accenting particular words within a focused constituent. It is important for non-native speakers to learn how accent placement relates to focus in English because appropriate accent placement and realization makes a learner's English more native-like and easier to understand. Such knowledge may also improve their English comprehension skills. In this study, 20 native English speakers, 20 native Mandarin speakers, and 20 native Korean speakers participated in four experiments: (1) a production experiment, in which they were recorded reading the answers to questions, (2) a perception experiment, in which they were asked to determine which word in a recording was the last prominent word, (3) an understanding experiment, in which they were asked whether the answers in recorded question-answer pairs had context-appropriate prosody, and (4) an accent placement experiment, in which they were asked which word they would make prominent in a particular context. Finally, a new group of native English speakers listened to utterances produced in the production experiment, and determined whether the prosody of each utterance was appropriate for its context. The results of the five experiments support a novel predictive model for second language prosodic focus marking acquisition. This model holds that both transfer of linguistic features from a learner's native language (L1) and features of their second language (L2) affect learners' acquisition of prosodic focus marking. As a result, the model includes two complementary components: the Transfer Component and the L2 Challenge Component. The Transfer Component predicts that prosodic structures in the L2 will be more easily acquired by language learners that have similar structures in their L1 than those who do not, even if there are differences between the L1 and L2 in how the structures are realized. The L2

  5. Structural Correlates for Lexical Efficiency and Number of Languages in Non-Native Speakers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, A.; Parker Jones, O.; Ali, N.; Crinion, J.; Orabona, S.; Mechias, M. L.; Ramsden, S.; Green, D. W.; Price, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel based morphometry (VBM) to investigate whether the efficiency of word processing in the non-native language (lexical efficiency) and the number of non-native languages spoken (2+ versus 1) were related to local differences in the brain structure of bilingual and multilingual speakers.…

  6. Legitimacy of Teaching English Composition as a Non-Native Speaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulamur, Ayse Naz

    2013-01-01

    I examine how American students respond to foreign instructors, who teach English Composition and Research Writing. I discuss how minority teacher's cultural, lingual, and ethnic differences interfere with classroom dynamics in the United States. I rely on my experiences as a Turkish instructor of composition at the University of Wisconsin,…

  7. U.S. Airline Transport Pilot International Flight Language Experiences, Report 3: Language Experiences in Non-Native English-Speaking Airspace/Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    MacKay, I., and Meador D. (2002). The production of English vowels by fluent early and late Italian- English bilinguals. Phonetica, 59:49- 71...U.S. Airline Transport Pilot International Flight Language Experiences, Report 3: Language Experiences in Non-Native English -Speaking Airspace...International Flight Language Experiences, Report 3: Language Experiences in Non-Native English -Speaking Airspace/Airports 6. Performing Organization Code

  8. Has the emergence of English as a Lingua Franca been an entirely beneficial phenomenon for both native and non-native English speakers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; RUOXI

    2015-01-01

    <正>Recently,the emergence of English as a lingua franca generates a controversial issue which has been fiercely discussed whether it is a wholly beneficial phenomenon for both native and non-native English speakers.Based on the Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language,English was widely transmitted all over the world due to the British colonization in the early19th century.With advanced industry and frequent multilateral trade,Britain further impelled the spread of English.Besides,

  9. An event-related potential study of visual rhyming effects in native and non-native English speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botezatu, Mona R; Miller, Carol A; Misra, Maya

    2015-02-11

    English monolinguals and highly proficient, but first language (L1)-dominant, Spanish-English and Chinese-English bilinguals made rhyme judgments of visually presented English word pairs while behavioral and EEG measures were being recorded. Two types of conditions were considered: rhyming and nonrhyming pairs that were orthographically dissimilar (e.g. white-fight, child-cough) and those that were orthographically similar (e.g. right-fight, dough-cough). Both native and non-native English speakers were faster and more accurate in responding to nonrhyming than rhyming targets under orthographically dissimilar conditions, although the response times of Chinese-English bilinguals differed from those of the other groups. All groups were slower and less accurate in responding to nonrhyming targets under orthographically similar conditions, with the response times and accuracy rates of Spanish-English bilinguals differing from those of the other groups. All participant groups showed more negative N450 mean amplitudes to nonrhyming compared with rhyming targets, regardless of orthographic similarity, and this rhyming effect did not differ across groups under the orthographically similar conditions. However, under orthographically dissimilar conditions, the rhyming effect was less robust in non-native speakers, being modulated by English proficiency.

  10. who is the ideal english teacher?-a comparative study between nests and nnests in college english class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑庆芳

    2011-01-01

    who is the ideal english between the native english speaking teachers (nests) and non- native english speaking teachers (nnests) has been a hotly- debated issue for a long time.the research focuses attention on the students' attitudes for the two groups of teachers in a college.a total of 312 participants,including 6 native english speaker teachers (nests),6 non - native english speaker teachers (nnests) and 300 students were involved in the study. a questionnaire was designed for 300 students.the findings of the study throw light to oral english teaching,which have significant implications for english language teaching in china.

  11. STUDENTS WRITING EMAILS TO FACULTY: AN EXAMINATION OF E-POLITENESS AMONG NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun Biesenbach-Lucas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study combines interlanguage pragmatics and speech act research with computer-mediated communication and examines how native and non-native speakers of English formulate low- and high-imposition requests to faculty. While some research claims that email, due to absence of non-verbal cues, encourages informal language, other research has claimed the opposite. However, email technology also allows writers to plan and revise messages before sending them, thus affording the opportunity to edit not only for grammar and mechanics, but also for pragmatic clarity and politeness.The study examines email requests sent by native and non-native English speaking graduate students to faculty at a major American university over a period of several semesters and applies Blum-Kulka, House, and Kasper’s (1989 speech act analysis framework – quantitatively to distinguish levels of directness, i.e. pragmatic clarity; and qualitatively to compare syntactic and lexical politeness devices, the request perspectives, and the specific linguistic request realization patterns preferred by native and non-native speakers. Results show that far more requests are realized through direct strategies as well as hints than conventionally indirect strategies typically found in comparative speech act studies. Politeness conventions in email, a text-only medium with little guidance in the academic institutional hierarchy, appear to be a work in progress, and native speakers demonstrate greater resources in creating e-polite messages to their professors than non-native speakers. A possible avenue for pedagogical intervention with regard to instruction in and acquisition of politeness routines in hierarchically upward email communication is presented.

  12. THE ACQUISITION OF ENGLISH NEGATION 'NO' AND 'NOT': EVIDENCES FROM AN INDONESIAN CHILD IN NON-NATIVE PARENTS BILINGUAL PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anni Holila Pulungan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Every child is born with an innate endowment by which (a language(s acquisition is possible. This view emphasizes the role of universal properties every child is born with to acquire (a language(s. This paper presents the acquisition of English negation 'no' and 'not' by an Indonesian child brought up in Indonesian - English Non-native Parents Bilingual Program (NPBP. The analysis is directed to reveal the pattern of 'no' and 'not' use as the evidence that a child still acquires a targeted language despite the poor targeted language input s/he is exposed to. The result of the analysis shows that the acquisition of English negation 'no' and 'not' by an Indonesian child in Indonesian - English NPBP also has a pattern which falls into syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic cases. To some extent, it supports Universal Grammar frame, but there are some which provide new insights on this issue.

  13. The influence of visual speech information on the intelligibility of English consonants produced by non-native speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Saya; Hannah, Beverly; Wang, Yue

    2014-09-01

    This study examines how visual speech information affects native judgments of the intelligibility of speech sounds produced by non-native (L2) speakers. Native Canadian English perceivers as judges perceived three English phonemic contrasts (/b-v, θ-s, l-ɹ/) produced by native Japanese speakers as well as native Canadian English speakers as controls. These stimuli were presented under audio-visual (AV, with speaker voice and face), audio-only (AO), and visual-only (VO) conditions. The results showed that, across conditions, the overall intelligibility of Japanese productions of the native (Japanese)-like phonemes (/b, s, l/) was significantly higher than the non-Japanese phonemes (/v, θ, ɹ/). In terms of visual effects, the more visually salient non-Japanese phonemes /v, θ/ were perceived as significantly more intelligible when presented in the AV compared to the AO condition, indicating enhanced intelligibility when visual speech information is available. However, the non-Japanese phoneme /ɹ/ was perceived as less intelligible in the AV compared to the AO condition. Further analysis revealed that, unlike the native English productions, the Japanese speakers produced /ɹ/ without visible lip-rounding, indicating that non-native speakers' incorrect articulatory configurations may decrease the degree of intelligibility. These results suggest that visual speech information may either positively or negatively affect L2 speech intelligibility.

  14. "Convenience Editing" in Action: Comparing English Teachers' and Medical Professionals' Revisions of a Medical Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Ian; Tanimoto, Kimie

    2012-01-01

    Native English-speaking (NES) English teachers at universities in English as a foreign language (EFL) contexts are sometimes asked to edit English manuscripts written by non-native English-speaking (NNES) colleagues in scientific fields. However, professional peers may differ from English teachers in their approach towards editing scientific…

  15. Designing acoustics for linguistically diverse classrooms: Effects of background noise, reverberation and talker foreign accent on speech comprehension by native and non-native English-speaking listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhao Ellen

    The current classroom acoustics standard (ANSI S12.60-2010) recommends core learning spaces not to exceed background noise level (BNL) of 35 dBA and reverberation time (RT) of 0.6 second, based on speech intelligibility performance mainly by the native English-speaking population. Existing literature has not correlated these recommended values well with student learning outcomes. With a growing population of non-native English speakers in American classrooms, the special needs for perceiving degraded speech among non-native listeners, either due to realistic room acoustics or talker foreign accent, have not been addressed in the current standard. This research seeks to investigate the effects of BNL and RT on the comprehension of English speech from native English and native Mandarin Chinese talkers as perceived by native and non-native English listeners, and to provide acoustic design guidelines to supplement the existing standard. This dissertation presents two studies on the effects of RT and BNL on more realistic classroom learning experiences. How do native and non-native English-speaking listeners perform on speech comprehension tasks under adverse acoustic conditions, if the English speech is produced by talkers of native English (Study 1) versus native Mandarin Chinese (Study 2)? Speech comprehension materials were played back in a listening chamber to individual listeners: native and non-native English-speaking in Study 1; native English, native Mandarin Chinese, and other non-native English-speaking in Study 2. Each listener was screened for baseline English proficiency level, and completed dual tasks simultaneously involving speech comprehension and adaptive dot-tracing under 15 acoustic conditions, comprised of three BNL conditions (RC-30, 40, and 50) and five RT scenarios (0.4 to 1.2 seconds). The results show that BNL and RT negatively affect both objective performance and subjective perception of speech comprehension, more severely for non-native

  16. Students' and Teachers' Ideals of Effective Business English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinder, Ruth; Herles, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Learners' and teachers' evaluation of what constitutes useful, appropriate, and goal-relevant English may well shift in view of the globalization of English and its dominance in non-native contexts, business, and new media. Against this background, this study explores the extent to which a specific Business English university programme meets…

  17. Students' and Teachers' Ideals of Effective Business English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinder, Ruth; Herles, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Learners' and teachers' evaluation of what constitutes useful, appropriate, and goal-relevant English may well shift in view of the globalization of English and its dominance in non-native contexts, business, and new media. Against this background, this study explores the extent to which a specific Business English university programme meets…

  18. Talk About Mouth Speculums: Collocational Competence and Spoken Fluency in Non-Native English-Speaking University Lecturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westbrook, Pete

    Despite the large body of research into formulaic language and fluency, there seems to be a lack of empirical evidence for how collocations, often considered a subset of formulaic language, might impact on fluency. To address this problem, this dissertation examined to what extent correlations...... might exist between overall language proficiency, collocational competence and spoken fluency in non-native English-speaking university lecturers. The data came from 15 20-minute mini-lectures recorded between 2009 and 2011 for an English oral proficiency test for lecturers employed at the University...... of Copenhagen. The 15 lecturers came from three departments: Large Animal Science, Information Technology and Mathematics. Test examiners’ global and fluency scores from the test were analysed against collocational competence, measured as collocations produced per thousand words spoken, and three temporal...

  19. Why do students choose English as a medium of instruction? A Bourdieusian perspective on the study strategies of non-native English speakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa; Lueg, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    by the Bourdieusian perspective, this relationship is not directly observable but operates through hidden mechanisms, such as cultural capital (relative English proficiency) and a better sense of gaming and positioning (career orientation). Business students from the lowest stratum self-select against EMI due......Taking a Bourdieusian perspective, we analyze the relevance of social background and capital for choosing English as a medium of instruction (EMI). Our work focuses on students with a non-native English-language background in a business school setting. Although proponents argue that EMI generally...

  20. An English Teacher Struggle to Establish Voice in the Periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugrahenny T. Zacharias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores my identity formation and the struggle to establish voice as a non-native teacher working in the periphery. While publication on non-native speakers’ struggle into academia has been growing in the West, such publication is rare in the periphery where I have been working as an English language teacher for the last seven years. My personal reflection has shown that similar to their non-native colleagues working in the Center, non-native teachers also experienced marginalization that have fostered a perception that their nono-nativeness is a drawback. This leads to an identity of the non-native teacher s into a producer of errors and second-rate citizens despite years of learning English. From this personal narrative, I learned that it is crucial for teacher education programs to address issues of native/non-natives as an attempt to unfasten destructive identity constructions that non-native speakers are accustomed to.

  1. Investigating Applications of Speech-to-Text Recognition Technology for a Face-to-Face Seminar to Assist Learning of Non-Native English-Speaking Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadiev, Rustam; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Huang, Yueh-Min; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2016-01-01

    This study applied speech-to-text recognition (STR) technology to assist non-native English-speaking participants to learn at a seminar given in English. How participants used transcripts generated by the STR technology for learning and their perceptions toward the STR were explored. Three main findings are presented in this study. Most…

  2. The vowel inherent spectral change of English vowels spoken by native and non-native speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Su-Hyun; Liu, Chang

    2013-05-01

    The current study examined Vowel Inherent Spectral Change (VISC) of English vowels spoken by English-, Chinese-, and Korean-native speakers. Two metrics, spectral distance (amount of spectral shift) and spectral angle (direction of spectral shift) of formant movement from the onset to the offset, were measured for 12 English monophthongs produced in a /hvd/ context. While Chinese speakers showed significantly greater spectral distances of vowels than English and Korean speakers, there was no significant speakers' native language effect on spectral angles. Comparisons to their native vowels for Chinese and Korean speakers suggest that VISC might be affected by language-specific phonological structure.

  3. Some linguistic and pragmatic considerations affecting science reporting in English by non-native speakers of the language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourilova-Urbanczik, Magda

    2012-06-01

    Approximately 50% of publications in English peer reviewed journals are contributed by non-native speakers (NNS) of the language. Basic thought processes are considered to be universal yet there are differences in thought patterns and particularly in discourse management of writers with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. The study highlights some areas of potential incompatibility in native and NNS processing of English scientific papers. Principles and conventions in generating academic discourse are considered in terms of frequently occurring failures of NNS to meet expectations of editors, reviewers, and readers. Major problem areas concern organization and flow of information, principles of cohesion and clarity, cultural constraints, especially those of politeness and negotiability of ideas, and the complicated area of English modality pragmatics. The aim of the paper is to sensitize NN authors of English academic reports to problem areas of discourse processing which are stumbling blocks, often affecting acceptance of manuscripts. The problems discussed are essential for acquiring pragmalinguistic and sociocultural competence in producing effective communication.

  4. A note on the acoustic-phonetic characteristics of non-native English vowels produced in noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Nin; Munro, Murray J.

    2003-10-01

    The Lombard reflex occurs when people unconsciously raise their vocal levels in the presence of loud background noise. Previous work has established that utterances produced in noisy environments exhibit increases in vowel duration and fundamental frequency (F0), and a shift in formant center frequencies for F1 and F2. Most studies of the Lombard reflex have been conducted with native speakers; research with second-language speakers is much less common. The present study examined the effects of the Lombard reflex on foreign-accented English vowel productions. Seven female Cantonese speakers and a comparison group of English speakers were recorded producing three vowels (/i u a/) in /bVt/ context in quiet and in 70 dB of masking noise. Vowel durations, F0, and the first two formants for each of the three vowels were measured. Analyses revealed that vowel durations and F0 were greater in the vowels produced in noise than those produced in quiet in most cases. First formants, but not F2, were consistently higher in Lombard speech than in normal speech. The findings suggest that non-native English speakers exhibit acoustic-phonetic patterns similar to those of native speakers when producing English vowels in noisy conditions.

  5. Composition Medium Comparability in a Direct Writing Assessment of Non-Native English Speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W. Wolfe

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL contains a direct writing assessment, and examinees are given the option of composing their responses at a computer terminal using a keyboard or composing their responses in handwriting. This study sought to determine whether performance on a direct writing assessment is comparable for examinees when given the choice to compose essays in handwriting versus word processing. We examined this relationship controlling for English language proficiency and several demographic characteristics of examinees using linear models. We found a weak two-way interaction between composition medium and English language proficiency with examinees with weaker English language scores performing better on handwritten essays while examinees with better English language scores performing comparably on the two testing media. We also observed predictable differences associated with geographic region, native language, gender, and age.

  6. Non-native English language speakers benefit most from the use of lecture capture in medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Graham P; Molnar, David

    2011-01-01

    Medical education in the United States and Canada continues to evolve. However, many of the changes in pedagogy are being made without appropriate evaluation. Here, we attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of lecture capture technology as a learning tool in Podiatric medical education. In this pilot project, student performance in an inaugural lecture capture-supported biochemistry course was compared to that in the previous academic year. To examine the impact of online lecture podcasts on student performance a within-subjects design was implemented, a two way ANCOVA with repeated measures. The use of lecture capture-supported pedagogy resulted in significantly higher student test scores, than achieved historically using traditional pedagogy. The overall course performance using this lecture capture-supported pedagogy was almost 6% higher than in the previous year. Non-native English language speakers benefitted more significantly from the lecture capture-supported pedagogy than native English language speakers, since their performance improved by 10.0 points. Given that underrepresented minority (URM) students, whose native language is not English, makes up a growing proportion of medical school matriculates, these observations support the use of lecture capture technology in other courses. Furthermore, this technology may also be used as part of an academic enrichment plan to improve performance on the American Podiatric Medical Licensing Examination, reduce the attrition of URM students and potentially address the predicted minority physician shortage in 2020.

  7. Designing English-Medium Classroom Management Course for Non-Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Gokmenoglu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative phenomenological research study explores the practices of instructors teaching through the medium of English as a foreign language, in classroom management course. Data collection instruments are semi-structured interviews and the course syllabi. Phenomenological data analysis techniques (bracketing, determining themes were employed. Results indicate that instructors do not use a specific model for the classroom management course. The challenges faced with design of an English-medium instruction such as difficulty in finding cultural course materials, lack of confidence among local students, adaptation of international students and the solutions (dividing the course into two parts: theory and practice; sharing own experiences; using tentative course syllabus of instructors for these challenges were explored, and suggestions for the designers of English-medium courses were discussed

  8. Exploring Metacognitive Online Reading Strategies of Non-Native English-Speaking Translation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Shayesteh

    2016-01-01

    International students, a growing population in US universities, need to possess excellent reading skills in order to succeed. American universities also benefit from admitting students who do not require remedial English classes. Reading online has become an integrated part of college education, which requires students to have additional skills.…

  9. Exploring Metacognitive Online Reading Strategies of Non-Native English-Speaking Translation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Shayesteh

    2016-01-01

    International students, a growing population in US universities, need to possess excellent reading skills in order to succeed. American universities also benefit from admitting students who do not require remedial English classes. Reading online has become an integrated part of college education, which requires students to have additional skills.…

  10. Raising the Question #10 Non-Native Speakers of English: What More Can We Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Nancy F.

    2008-01-01

    The author believes that communication courses, especially those that require mastery of skills and behaviors, should be embedded with a sensitivity to culture and communication apprehension. Her reflections here are designed to support the critical need to develop curriculum options that address students' anxieties and speaking English as a…

  11. English Business Communication Skills Training Needs of Non-Native English-Speaking Managers: A Case in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Chia-Jung

    1992-01-01

    Discusses results of a survey of managers in high-technology industry in Taiwan regarding their needs for English business communication skills in the workplace. Finds that English conversation and English telephoning are the most urgently needed training courses. (SR)

  12. Designing English-Medium Classroom Management Course for Non-Natives

    OpenAIRE

    Tuba Gokmenoglu; Sevinç Gelmez-Burakgazi

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study explores the practices of instructors teaching through the medium of English as a foreign language, in classroom management course. Data collection instruments are semi-structured interviews and the course syllabi. Phenomenological data analysis techniques (bracketing, determining themes) were employed. Results indicate that instructors do not use a specific model for the classroom management course. The challenges faced with design of an Engli...

  13. Learning to Teach across Borders: Mainland Chinese Student English Teachers in Hong Kong Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The literature on non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) and native English-speaking teachers (NESTs) tends to focus on their respective strengths, the main strengths of NNESTs being their experience of learning English as a second language and their familiarity with their students' language and educational background. This article proposes…

  14. Learning to Teach across Borders: Mainland Chinese Student English Teachers in Hong Kong Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The literature on non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) and native English-speaking teachers (NESTs) tends to focus on their respective strengths, the main strengths of NNESTs being their experience of learning English as a second language and their familiarity with their students' language and educational background. This article proposes…

  15. The Death of the Non-Native Speaker? English as a Lingua Franca in Business Communication: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The impact of globalisation in the last 20 years has led to an overwhelming increase in the use of English as the medium through which many business people get their work done. As a result, the linguistic landscape within which we now operate as researchers and teachers has changed both rapidly and beyond all recognition. In the discussion below,…

  16. The Death of the Non-Native Speaker? English as a Lingua Franca in Business Communication: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The impact of globalisation in the last 20 years has led to an overwhelming increase in the use of English as the medium through which many business people get their work done. As a result, the linguistic landscape within which we now operate as researchers and teachers has changed both rapidly and beyond all recognition. In the discussion below,…

  17. The effect of visuals on non-native English students' learning of the basic principles and laws of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Quan

    2001-10-01

    This study, involving 154 undergraduate college students in China, was conducted to determine whether the surface structure of visual graphics affect content learning when the learner was a non-native English speaker and learning took place in a non-English speaking environment. Instruction with concrete animated graphics resulted in significantly higher achievement, when compared to instruction with concrete static, abstract static, abstract animated graphics or text only without any graphical illustrations. It was also found, unexpectedly, the text-only instruction resulted in the second best achievement, significantly higher than instruction with concrete static, abstract static, and abstract animated graphics. In addition, there was a significant interaction with treatment and test item, which indicated that treatment effects on graphic-specific items differed from those on definitional items. Additional findings indicated that relation to graphics directly or indirectly from the text that students studied had little impact on their performance in the posttests. Further, 51% of the participants indicated that they relied on some graphical images to answer the test questions and 19% relied heavily on graphics when completing the tests. In conclusion, concrete graphics when combined with animation played a significant role in enhancing ESL student performance and enabled the students to achieve the best learning outcomes as compared to abstract animated, concrete static, and abstract static graphics. This result suggested a significant innovation in the design and development of ESL curriculum in computer-based instruction, which would enable ESL students to perform better and achieve the expected outcomes in content area learning.

  18. Performance of Native and Non-Native Speakers of English on Subtests of the Comprehensive English Language Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Kenneth G.

    1978-01-01

    The listening comprehension and structure subtests of the Comprehensive English Language Test (CELT) were administered to 211 secondary students from an urban center on Canada's west coast. The subtests appeared to be powerful enough to separate immigrant students of English (Second Language) from Canadian born bilinguals and monolinguals. (EJS)

  19. The Relationship between English Language Proficiency, Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem of Non-Native-English-Speaking Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Smitha; Qiqieh, Sura

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to find out the relationship between English Language proficiency, self-esteem, and academic achievement of the students in Abu Dhabi University (ADU). The variables were analyzed using "t" test, chi-squire and Pearson's product moment correlation. In addition, Self-rating scale, Self-esteem inventory and Language…

  20. Non-native scientists, research dissemination and English neologisms: What happens in the early stages of reception and re-production?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Linder

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available That the English language is the prevailing language in international scientific discourse is an undeniable fact for research professionals who are non-native speakers of English (NNSE. An exploratory, survey-based study of scientists in the experimental disciplines of neuroscience and medicine seeks to reveal, on the one hand, the habits of scientists who in their research practice come across neologisms in English and need to use them in oral and written scientific discourse in their own languages, and, on the other hand, their attitudes towards these neologisms and towards English as the language of international science. We found that all scientists write and publish their research articles (RAs in English and most submit them unrevised by native speakers of English. When first encountering a neologism in English, scientists tend to pay close attention to these new concepts, ideas or terms and very early in the reception process attempt to coin acceptable, natural-sounding Spanish equivalents for use in the laboratory and in their Spanish texts. In conjunction with the naturalized Spanish term, they often use the English neologism verbatim in a coexistent bilingual form, but they avoid using only the English term and very literal translations. These behaviors show an ambivalent attitude towards English (the language of both new knowledge reception and dissemination of their RAs and Spanish (used for local professional purposes and for popularization: while accepting to write in their acquired non-native language, they simultaneously recognize that their native language needs to preserve its specificity as a language of science.

  1. Native and Non-Native Dichotomy: Challenges of and Attitudes Towards Native and Non-Native English Speaking Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Pérez, Jasmina Laura

    2015-01-01

    [ES]El número de profesores de inglés sigue creciendo debido a la importancia de esta lengua. El presente trabajo investiga el rol de los profesores de inglés nativos y los profesores de inglés no nativos en contextos en los que el inglés se enseña como lengua extranjera, mediante el análisis del concepto nativo, los desafíos de estos profesores y las actitudes de Perez 2 estudiantes, profesores de inglés nativos y no nativos hacia ambos grupos de profesores, con el propósito de identif...

  2. Pragmatic Competence and Social Power Awareness: The Case of Written and Spoken Discourse in Non-Native English Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sabater, Carmen; Montero-Fleta, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    Following one of the new challenges suggested by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, a treatment was developed to enhance pragmatic competence, since this competence is not easy to acquire by non-native speakers. Within this context, we focused on pragmatic awareness in the workplace, an area of expertise in growing demand…

  3. Hyperarticulation of vowels enhances phonetic change responses in both native and non-native speakers of English: evidence from an auditory event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uther, Maria; Giannakopoulou, Anastasia; Iverson, Paul

    2012-08-27

    The finding that hyperarticulation of vowel sounds occurs in certain speech registers (e.g., infant- and foreigner-directed speech) suggests that hyperarticulation may have a didactic function in facilitating acquisition of new phonetic categories in language learners. This event-related potential study tested whether hyperarticulation of vowels elicits larger phonetic change responses, as indexed by the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential (ERP) and tested native and non-native speakers of English. Data from 11 native English-speaking and 10 native Greek-speaking participants showed that Greek speakers in general had smaller MMNs compared to English speakers, confirming previous studies demonstrating sensitivity of the MMN to language background. In terms of the effect of hyperarticulation, hyperarticulated stimuli elicited larger MMNs for both language groups, suggesting vowel space expansion does elicit larger pre-attentive phonetic change responses. Interestingly Greek native speakers showed some P3a activity that was not present in the English native speakers, raising the possibility that additional attentional switch mechanisms are activated in non-native speakers compared to native speakers. These results give general support for models of speech learning such as Kuhl's Native Language Magnet enhanced (NLM-e) theory. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. My English Teacher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Of all the teachers, I love my English teacher best. He is a very good teacher and about thirty years old. We all call him Mr Chu. He is not tall but a little fat. He is a man with a good sense of humour and always friendly to us. We all like him and his lesson. In his class, we feel very happy. He always makes his English lesson interesting. We know English is rather difficult to learn but in his class,

  5. IMPROVING ENGLISH TEACHER TALK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Research shows teachers’speaking less so involvesstudents more.So English teacher talk determines tosome extent whether the teaching is successful or not.After giving a brief introduction to teacher talk inEnglish class,this paper analyzes the possible factorsthat affect teacher talk.It then suggests some im-provements of teacher talk in order to better our teach-ing methodology.

  6. Teacher of primary English

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed for September 2003 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply see http://enpferney.org/staff_vacancies.htm English National Programme, Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire (http://enpferney.org/)

  7. TEACHER OF ENGLISH NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed for September 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before 8 July. English National Programme, Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire.

  8. Teaching English in ASEAN: The voices of English teachers in ASEAN nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Waterworth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective teaching of the English language is regarded as an essential element in the creation of a culturally vibrant, economically sound and socially stable ASEAN community. The ASEAN region is populated by a culturally diverse collection of peoples with very different and complex linguistic histories, some of which included a strong English component. This paper examines the opinions and understandings of teachers of English in eight of the ten ASEAN nations. It arose out of a research study of English teaching in ASEAN being conducted jointly by Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia and CfBT Brunei. Although the teachers differed in their levels of competence in English and in their experience of local, national and international culture, they shared a remarkably similar story in attempting to provide the best instruction they possibly could to their students. As non-native speakers of English, they shared the responsibility of representing not only the English language but also the culture of first language English speakers to their non-native speaking students. The conflicts and tensions of their roles were identified and examined. The study concluded that teachers need support in their intercultural role as well as in their pedagogical responsibilities. Teachers reported that their students had little knowledge or appreciation of the ASEAN community or of the importance of their own capacity to speak English in it.

  9. The Acquisition of Multiple "Wh"-Questions by High-Proficiency Non-Native Speakers of English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bley-Vroman, Robert; Yoshinaga, Naoko

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the knowledge of multiple wh-questions such as "Who ate what?" by high-proficiency Japanese speakers of English. Acceptability judgments were obtained on six different types of questions. Acceptability of English examples was rated by native speakers of English, Japanese examples were judged by native speakers of Japanese,…

  10. The problems affecting English language learning for non-native speakers: similarities and differences from the East to the West

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Lirola, María; Stephen, Jeannet

    2007-01-01

    In our experience teaching English to Malay and Mexican students and after the revision of bibliographical references related to this topic, we have observed several difficulties in the second language acquisition. We intend to present an overview of the Teaching and Learning of English as an L2 in Malaysia and New Mexico. In our study we have compared the similarities and differences faced in the processes of teaching and learning English in Malaysia and New Mexico to highlight results in a ...

  11. The problems affecting English language learning for non-native speakers: similarities and differences from the East to the West

    OpenAIRE

    María MARTÍNEZ LIROLA; Stephen, Jeannet

    2007-01-01

    In our experience teaching English to Malay and Mexican students and after the revision of bibliographical references related to this topic, we have observed several difficulties in the second language acquisition. We intend to present an overview of the Teaching and Learning of English as an L2 in Malaysia and New Mexico. In our study we have compared the similarities and differences faced in the processes of teaching and learning English in Malaysia and New Mexico to highlight results in a ...

  12. Providing English Foreign Language Teachers with Content Knowledge to Facilitate Decoding and Spelling Acquisition: A Longitudinal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn-Horwitz, Janina

    2016-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study adds to the small existing literature on orthographic-related teacher knowledge in an English as a foreign language (EFL) context. The study examined the impact of a course on English orthography on predominantly non-native-speaking EFL preservice and inservice teachers' orthographic content knowledge, and the extent…

  13. Providing English Foreign Language Teachers with Content Knowledge to Facilitate Decoding and Spelling Acquisition: A Longitudinal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn-Horwitz, Janina

    2016-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study adds to the small existing literature on orthographic-related teacher knowledge in an English as a foreign language (EFL) context. The study examined the impact of a course on English orthography on predominantly non-native-speaking EFL preservice and inservice teachers' orthographic content knowledge, and the extent…

  14. Intelligibility of American English Vowels of Native and Non-Native Speakers in Quiet and Speech-Shaped Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Jin, Su-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    This study examined intelligibility of twelve American English vowels produced by English, Chinese, and Korean native speakers in quiet and speech-shaped noise in which vowels were presented at six sensation levels from 0 dB to 10 dB. The slopes of vowel intelligibility functions and the processing time for listeners to identify vowels were…

  15. Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What Are the Effects on Pupil Performance? CEE DP 137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geay, Charlotte; McNally, Sandra; Telhaj, Shqiponja

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the number of children going to school in England who do not speak English as a first language. We investigate whether this has an impact on the educational outcomes of native English speakers at the end of primary school. We show that the negative correlation observed in the raw data is mainly an…

  16. Intelligibility of American English Vowels of Native and Non-Native Speakers in Quiet and Speech-Shaped Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Jin, Su-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    This study examined intelligibility of twelve American English vowels produced by English, Chinese, and Korean native speakers in quiet and speech-shaped noise in which vowels were presented at six sensation levels from 0 dB to 10 dB. The slopes of vowel intelligibility functions and the processing time for listeners to identify vowels were…

  17. Questions English Teachers Ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, R. Baird

    This volume is based on the responses of 374 English teachers at the secondary and college levels to a letter asking them to describe the questions that most perplex them professionally. Answers are provided by 88 leaders in English education, including James R. Squire, Walter H. MacGinitie, R. Baird Shuman, Sheila Schwartz, and Ken Macrorie. The…

  18. NOMINAL GROUPS AS AN INDICATOR OF NON-NATIVE ENGLISH COMMUNICATION PROBLEMS IN TOP-RANKED BRAZILIAN SCIENCE JOURNALS

    OpenAIRE

    Hanes, William F.

    2014-01-01

    This study is an attempt to document the problematic nature of an intermediary linguistic system, the lingua franca used by the scientific community, on the production and impact of science from the broad area beyond the inner circle of native English speakers. To this end, a random cross-sectional sample (n=5) of current English-language articles from top-ranked journals in the Brazil-based metapublisher Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) was examined for grammatical issues, espec...

  19. Native or Non-Native-Speaking Teaching for L2 Pronunciation Teaching?--An Investigation on Their Teaching Effect and Students' Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Gouzhi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated L2 leaners' preferences between native-speaking teachers (NST) and non-native-speaking teachers (NNST) as their English pronunciation teacher, and examined the participants' accentedness and comprehensibility in L2-English pronunciation after being taught by a NST and a NNST. The participants were 30 undergraduates who were…

  20. Your Inner English Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Conrado L.; Kurz, Terri L.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    With the ever-changing dynamics of society, teachers are often faced with a classroom of students who have diverse linguistic and academic needs. Research has shown that schools are becoming more linguistically diverse throughout the United States and that English language learners (ELLs) are posing their own sets of challenges for teachers.…

  1. "It's All about Give and Take," or Is It?: Where, When and How Do Native and Non-Native Uses of English Shape U. K. University Students' Representations of Each Other and Their Learning Experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Juliet

    2009-01-01

    In this article the author draws on a larger project related to university internationalisation as represented by student voices to explore the part native and non-native speaker uses of English, as a marker of identity and legitimacy, play inside and outside formal curriculum delivery. Through the analysis of student voice constructions of…

  2. My English Teacher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万芊; 程中一

    2005-01-01

    My English teacher is about fifty years old. His name is Lin Jingtao.We all call him Mr Lin. Mr Lin is not very tall and he is very thin. Mr Lin likes wearing a blue shirt. He has sharp ears. If there are some students talking or even whispering in class, he can hear clearly. But he has poor eyesight, so he always wears his little glasses.

  3. Team teaching with NES and NNES teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sean Sutherland

    2009-01-01

    @@ Language teachers are often categorised as either native or non native speakers, with some students, fee-paying parents, teachers and researchers sub-scribing to the idea that being a native English speaker (NES) is enough to make a teacher more valuable than a non-native English speaker (NNES).

  4. 试论英语世界化与非母语英语国家的英语教育问题%English globalization and English education problems in non-native English countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽萍

    2015-01-01

    Compare with phonographic system language in most countries in the world, the English grammar system simple and clear, more easy to learn. Since the 16th century, Britain's political and economic rapid development has greatly influenced the spread of English around the world and use. In addition, compared to other table of writen language, English is more easy to learn, easy to communication, English became the most widely used international language, English education has been booming, however many non-native English speaking countries young people are too worship of Anglo-American culture, ignoring the traditional culture. Therefore, we in the education teaching of English, should be given by changing the existing teaching material model, general education and so on the many kinds of way to balance the relationship between language learning and cultural transmission, use critical thinking to think about diferent cultures.%与世界大部分国家都是表音系统的语言相比,英语有着简单明了的语法系统,更容易学习。自16世纪开始,英国的政治和经济的快速发展极大地影响了英语在全球的传播和使用。另外,相比其他表音文字的语言,英语更容易学习、易于交流,英语成为国际上使用最广泛的语言,英语教育也随之蓬勃发展,然而许多非母语英语国家的年轻人过于崇拜英美文化、忽视传统文化。因此,我们在英语的教育教学中,应通过改变现有教材模式、重视通识教育等多种方式平衡语言学习与文化传播的关系,用批判性的思维来看待不同的文化。

  5. Improving the Academic Performance of Non-Native English-Speaking Students: The Contribution of Pre-Sessional English Language Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Andy; Snell, Martin; Davey-Evans, Sue; Talman, Richard

    2017-01-01

    There is an established, if weak, inverse relationship between levels of English language proficiency and academic performance in higher education. In response, higher education institutions (HEIs) insist upon minimum entry requirements concerning language for international applicants. Many HEIs now also offer pre-sessional English courses to…

  6. Native and Non-Native Perceptions on a Non-Native Oral Discourse in an Academic Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Dikilitaş

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study investigates discourse-level patterns typically employed by a Turkish lecturer based on the syntactic patterns found in the collected data. More specifically, the study aims to reveal how different native and non-native speakers of English perceive discourse patterns used by a non-native lecturer teaching in English. The data gathered from a Turkish lecturer teaching finance, and the interviews both with the lecturer and the students. The lecturer and the students were videotaped and the data was evaluated by content analysis. The results revealed a difference between the way non-native and native speakers evaluate an oral discourse of a non-native lecturer teaching in English. Native speakers of English found the oral performance moderately comprehensible, while non-native speakers found it relatively comprehensible.

  7. U.S. Airline Transport Pilot International Flight Language Experiences, Report 6: Native English-Speaking Controllers Communicating With Non-Native English-Speaking Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    In 1998, the International Civil Aviation Organization ( ICAO ) took a heightened interest in the role of language in airline accidents. Member states...required were proficient in conducting and comprehending radiotelephony communications in English. Since then, ICAO developed its English language...Research is needed to determine the optimal speech rate for ATC messages. (2) ATC messages must be delivered using standard ICAO terms and phraseology. (3

  8. Junctural Variations of English Plosive Consonants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, M. P.

    1981-01-01

    Briefly examines ways in which native English speakers achieve junctural fluency with reference to plosive consonant phonemes to focus attention of non-native teachers of English on pronunciation problems. Examines complete elision, suppression, glottal stop and fusion. (BK)

  9. Teachers' Habitus for Teaching English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    In this examination of monolingual and multilingual pedagogies I draw on literature that explores the position of English globally and in the curriculum for English. I amplify the discussion with data from a project exploring how teachers responded to the arrival of Polish children in their English classrooms following Poland's entry to the…

  10. Teachers' Habitus for Teaching English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    In this examination of monolingual and multilingual pedagogies I draw on literature that explores the position of English globally and in the curriculum for English. I amplify the discussion with data from a project exploring how teachers responded to the arrival of Polish children in their English classrooms following Poland's entry to the…

  11. U.S. Airline Transport Pilot International Flight Language Experiences, Report 4: Non-Native English-Speaking Controllers Communicating with Native English-Speaking Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    speak in Spanish to Aero México pilots and English to pilots flying for British Airways or Qantas Airways . We explored how the controllers...first report (Prinzo & Campbell, 2008) provided an analysis of the first three sections of the structured interview: 1) Background Information...was not very good; one aircraft is coming out from Lima on the same airway we’re on coming in. They had to wait. ATC kept calling him for DME5

  12. Teacher to Teacher: Supporting English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    The student population is changing, and teachers need new tools to help their English language learner (ELL) students. ELL students are learning to read, write, and speak English at the same time as they study history, science, math, and all the other subjects taught in our schools. This article describes one tool, the Colorin Colorado website,…

  13. Evaluating the lexico-grammatical differences in the writing of native and non-native speakers of English in peer-reviewed medical journals in the field of pediatric oncology: Creation of the genuine index scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayle, Alberto Alexander; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2017-01-01

    The predominance of English in scientific research has created hurdles for "non-native speakers" of English. Here we present a novel application of native language identification (NLI) for the assessment of medical-scientific writing. For this purpose, we created a novel classification system whereby scoring would be based solely on text features found to be distinctive among native English speakers (NS) within a given context. We dubbed this the "Genuine Index" (GI). This methodology was validated using a small set of journals in the field of pediatric oncology. Our dataset consisted of 5,907 abstracts, representing work from 77 countries. A support vector machine (SVM) was used to generate our model and for scoring. Accuracy, precision, and recall of the classification model were 93.3%, 93.7%, and 99.4%, respectively. Class specific F-scores were 96.5% for NS and 39.8% for our benchmark class, Japan. Overall kappa was calculated to be 37.2%. We found significant differences between countries with respect to the GI score. Significant correlation was found between GI scores and two validated objective measures of writing proficiency and readability. Two sets of key terms and phrases differentiating NS and non-native writing were identified. Our GI model was able to detect, with a high degree of reliability, subtle differences between the terms and phrasing used by native and non-native speakers in peer reviewed journals, in the field of pediatric oncology. In addition, L1 language transfer was found to be very likely to survive revision, especially in non-Western countries such as Japan. These findings show that even when the language used is technically correct, there may still be some phrasing or usage that impact quality.

  14. Evaluating the lexico-grammatical differences in the writing of native and non-native speakers of English in peer-reviewed medical journals in the field of pediatric oncology: Creation of the genuine index scoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayle, Alberto Alexander; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The predominance of English in scientific research has created hurdles for “non-native speakers” of English. Here we present a novel application of native language identification (NLI) for the assessment of medical-scientific writing. For this purpose, we created a novel classification system whereby scoring would be based solely on text features found to be distinctive among native English speakers (NS) within a given context. We dubbed this the “Genuine Index” (GI). Methodology This methodology was validated using a small set of journals in the field of pediatric oncology. Our dataset consisted of 5,907 abstracts, representing work from 77 countries. A support vector machine (SVM) was used to generate our model and for scoring. Results Accuracy, precision, and recall of the classification model were 93.3%, 93.7%, and 99.4%, respectively. Class specific F-scores were 96.5% for NS and 39.8% for our benchmark class, Japan. Overall kappa was calculated to be 37.2%. We found significant differences between countries with respect to the GI score. Significant correlation was found between GI scores and two validated objective measures of writing proficiency and readability. Two sets of key terms and phrases differentiating NS and non-native writing were identified. Conclusions Our GI model was able to detect, with a high degree of reliability, subtle differences between the terms and phrasing used by native and non-native speakers in peer reviewed journals, in the field of pediatric oncology. In addition, L1 language transfer was found to be very likely to survive revision, especially in non-Western countries such as Japan. These findings show that even when the language used is technically correct, there may still be some phrasing or usage that impact quality. PMID:28212419

  15. Putting the learner in the spotlight – Future directions for English teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne P A Swan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper asserts that English teachers’ understanding of their professionalism enables them to ‘put the learner in the spotlight’ through their highly-developed awareness of local contexts of English use. Changing attitudes to English language teacher identity include a revaluation of the’ native-non-native speaker’ dichotomy which is fast becoming irrelevant as teachers assert new identities based on factors such as professional beliefs about their teaching, understanding their students’ needs and understanding the role of English in their contexts. In a globalising world, these aspects no longer require ‘so-called’ native speaker skills, such as pronunciation and knowledge of ‘English’ culture. In fact, dwelling at length on the issues surrounding native and non-native speaker teacher identity tends to cloud understanding of what qualities English teachers need. Interviews with multilingual teachers of English, working in a variety of countries, have revealed an understanding of the diminishing importance of the ‘native speaker’ and the concomitant growth in the confidence of the multilingual teacher. This confidence has been acquired through depth of linguistic knowledge, through observance of other cultures, and through resistance to the encroachment of English by finding a place for the language which satisfies the needs of multilingual users without requiring subservience. In discovering these strengths of multilingual teachers, I show how stepping outside the boundaries of one’s own limited environment allows English language teachers, wherever they come from, to develop a truly enlightened international professionalism which puts learners firmly in the spotlight.

  16. Perceptual assimilation and discrimination of non-native vowel contrasts

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Research on language-specific tuning in speech perception has focused mainly on consonants, while that on non-native vowel perception has failed to address whether the same principles apply. Therefore, non-native vowel perception was investigated here in light of relevant theoretical models: The Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) and the Natural Referent Vowel (NRV) framework. American-English speakers completed discrimination and L1-assimilation (categorization and goodnes...

  17. 认知语言学视角下的外向型汉英学习词典设计%Design of a Chinese-English Dictionary for Non-native Chinese Learners from the Perspective of Cognitive Linguistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚军

    2014-01-01

    According to cognitive linguistics , dictionary-compiling should be based on the law of learners ’ cognition .This paper has applied theories of cognitive lexicography into the compilation of Chinese -Eng-lish dictionary for non-native Chinese learners , and it has explored the designing features of Chinese-Eng-lish dictionary for non-native learners in great detail .Thus, a designing plan of Chinese-English dictiona-ry for non-native Chinese learners has been put forward:order meanings according to the prototype theo-ry;label word frequency according to corpus statistics;adding pragmatic notes and cultural notes;adding detailed grammatical information through the means of “get it right box”; adding illustrative examples from Chinese-English parallel corpus; adding necessary pictorial illustrations; adding detailed appendix and cross references of rich cultural information .%认知词典学认为词典编纂要以人类的认知规律为基础,本文将认知词典学理论应用于外向型汉英词典编纂,深入分析了认知语言学理论指导下的外向型汉英学习词典的设计特征,并且提出了认知语言学视角的外向型汉英词典的设计方案:利用原型理论排列义项;使用语料库统计数据标注词频;添加语用注释、文化注释;增加比较详细的语法信息;基于汉英平行语料库选词和配例;设立必要的插图和插页;提供包含详细文化信息的附录和参见系统。

  18. Addressing the "Essences": Making English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Larissa McLean; Grant, Ashleigh; Hehir, Emily; Matthews, Hagan; May, Caitlin; Thiel, Philip; Sparrow, Catherine; Trevaskis, Glen; Barton, Katherine; Elliot, Amelia; Ogden, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Garth Boomer's democratic and often provocative vision for English teaching continues to play an important part in the professional development of English teachers. In particular, Boomer's work is often used by Teacher Educators in preservice degrees to introduce emerging English teachers to key ideas such as curriculum negotiation and…

  19. Expectations for English Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁凤

    2009-01-01

    In the article,the author consciously compared American educational systems and the students' expectation of their teachers with their Chinese equivalents.An investigation about students' expectations towards their teachers is done among college freshmen she was teaching.The result is both exciting and worrying.Through careful analysis and summary she has made,the author hopes it will arouse concerns of both teachers and students.

  20. Non-Native Speakers Speak in Phonemes: A Phono-Acoustic Analysis of Fricatives and Affricates by Native and Chinese Speakers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation measured the acoustic properties of the English fricatives and affricates produced by native and Chinese L2 speakers of English to identify the phonetic basis and sources of a foreign accent and to explore the mechanism involved in L2 speech production and L2 phonological acquisition at the segmental level. Based on a Network…

  1. English Teachers Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saefurrohman; Balinas, Elvira S.

    2016-01-01

    The new language assessment policies in the Philippines and in Indonesia have impact on English teachers' assessment practices. Classroom assessment; as mandated in the current curriculum of both countries swifts from sources of information to the inseparable process of teaching and learning. This study describes Filipino and Indonesian high…

  2. The impact of teachers' limited English proficiency on English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... role of language in teacher education programmes and in children's learning is crucial. This study focuses on the use of English as the language of learning and ... its impact on the language development of English second language (ESL) ...

  3. Perceptual assimilation and discrimination of non-native vowel contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Michael D.; Best, Catherine T.; Faber, Alice; Levitt, Andrea G.

    2014-01-01

    Research on language-specific tuning in speech perception has focused mainly on consonants, while that on non-native vowel perception has failed to address whether the same principles apply. Therefore, non-native vowel perception was investigated here in light of relevant theoretical models: The Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) and the Natural Referent Vowel (NRV) framework. American-English speakers completed discrimination and L1-assimilation (categorization and goodness rating) tests on six non-native vowel contrasts. Discrimination was consistent with PAM assimilation types, but asymmetries predicted by NRV were only observed for single-category assimilations, suggesting that perceptual assimilation might modulate the effects of vowel peripherality on non-native vowel perception. PMID:24923313

  4. Cross-Linguistic Influence in Non-Native Languages: Explaining Lexical Transfer Using Language Production Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this research is on the nature of lexical cross-linguistic influence (CLI) between non-native languages. Using oral interviews with 157 L1 Italian high-school students studying English and German as non-native languages, the project investigated which kinds of lexis appear to be more susceptible to transfer from German to English and…

  5. Cross-Linguistic Influence in Non-Native Languages: Explaining Lexical Transfer Using Language Production Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this research is on the nature of lexical cross-linguistic influence (CLI) between non-native languages. Using oral interviews with 157 L1 Italian high-school students studying English and German as non-native languages, the project investigated which kinds of lexis appear to be more susceptible to transfer from German to English and…

  6. Investigating the Impact of Personality Factors on Perceived Communication Mobility of Non-Native English Speaking Thai Professionals in International Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Olga A.; Rajprasit, Krich

    2014-01-01

    Communication mobility has been suggested as an element of the complex construct of professional communicative competence, with a shared core of English in the oral mode, for professional international communication. This study aims (1) to investigate the possible correlation between the perceived level of communication mobility, and the influence…

  7. Phonological versus phonetic cues in native and non-native listening: Korean and Dutch listeners' perception of Dutch and English consonants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, T.; McQueen, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how listeners of two unrelated languages, Korean and Dutch, process phonologically viable and nonviable consonants spoken in Dutch and American English. To Korean listeners, released final stops are nonviable because word-final stops in Korean are never released in words spoken in is

  8. Teacher Talk in College English Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹灿; 王劲

    2014-01-01

    English teachers mainly pass on knowledge through teacher talk in China. This paper focuses on the analysis of charac⁃teristics of teacher talk and discusses some ways to make teacher talk more comprehensible for learners ’input. It has been conclud⁃ed that with conscious improvement or exploration on teacher talk in practice, teachers can greatly enhance their teacher talk and make an effective combination between teacher talk and comprehensible input.

  9. Native and Non-native Teachers’ Pragmatic Criteria for Rating Request Speech Act: The Case of American and Iranian EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Alemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Over the last few decades, several aspects of pragmatic knowledge and its effects on teaching  and  learning  a  second  language  (L2  have  been  explored  in  many  studies.  However, among  various  studies,  the  area  of  interlanguage  pragmatic  (ILP  assessment  is  quite  novel issue and many features of it have remained unnoticed. As ILP assessment has received more attention recently, the necessity of investigation on the EFL teachers‟ rating criteria for rating various  speech  acts  has  become  important.  In  this  respect,  the  present  study  aimed  to investigate  the  native  and  non-native EFL teachers‟ rating scores and criteria  regarding  the speech  act  of  request.  To  this  end,  50  American  ESL  teachers  and  50  Iranian  EFL  teachers participated to rate the EFL learners‟ responses to video-prompted Discourse Completion Tests (DCTs  regarding  the  speech  act  of  request.  Raters  were  supposed to rate the EFL learners‟ responses and mention their criteria for assessment. The results of the content analysis of raters‟ comments revealed nine criteria that they considered in their assessment. Moreover, the result of  the  t-test  and  chi-square analyses of raters‟ rating scores and criteria proved that there are significant differences between native and non-native EFL teachers‟ rating pattern. The results of this study also shed light on importance of sociopragmatic and pragmalinguistic features in native  and  non-native teachers‟ pragmatic rating, which can have several implications for L2 teachers, learners, and material developers. معیارهای معلمان زبان بومی و غیربومی در نمره دهی کنش کلامی درخواست : مورد معلمان انگلیسی زبان آمریکایی و ایرانی چکیده: طی چند دهه اخیر،  جنبه های 

  10. The Intelligibility of Natural and LPC-Vocoded Words and Sentences Presented to Native and Non-Native Speakers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-05

    especially important if rapid and/or accurate comprehension is essential. Hence. data from a variety of intelligibility tests should be examined if...through 19). Subjects were also asked to report their TOEFL scores (scores on a standardized test of English as a foreign language), but only three...as they were read at a normal speaking rate and with normal intonation and amplitude. Production of all stimuli was error free. In the DRT. the onset

  11. Investigating the lexico-grammatical resources of a non-native user of English: The case of can and could in email requests.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Individual users of English as a first or second language are assumed to possess or aspire to a monolithic grammar, an internally consistent set of rules which represents the idealized norms or conventions of native speakers. This position reflects a deficit view of L2 learning and usage, and is at odds with usage-based approaches to language development and research findings on idiolectal variation. This study problematizes the assumption of monolithic ontologies of grammar for TESOL by expl...

  12. The Determinants of the Types of Selves in Relation to Foreign Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirezen, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    In the field of Modern Higher Education, the background of teachers as native or non-native speakers of the language they teach is of major concern in the field of teacher education. First things first, in teacher education each teacher has an ideal self of her or his own as non-native English-speaking teachers of English, as a second or foreign…

  13. The Determinants of the Types of Selves in Relation to Foreign Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirezen, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    In the field of Modern Higher Education, the background of teachers as native or non-native speakers of the language they teach is of major concern in the field of teacher education. First things first, in teacher education each teacher has an ideal self of her or his own as non-native English-speaking teachers of English, as a second or foreign…

  14. Education for Teachers of English in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the types of education needed for teachers intending to teach English in modern China, discussing difficulties for English language teachers stemming from Hong Kong's colonial history and the necessity for cultural adaptability in expatriate teachers (which is even more necessary on mainland China). Rewards and challenges for second…

  15. Exploring Non-Native EFL Teachers’ Knowledge Base: Practices and Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchalee Jansem

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study was conducted to explore non-native EFL teachers’ knowledge base performed during instruction, perceived knowledge base underlying teaching practices, and perceived pathways of knowledge base construction.  The data from four sources including video recordings of classroom observations, interviews, detailed field-notes taken during classroom observations, and participants’ reflections revealed that the eight participants integrated knowledge of the English language, other content areas, instructional delivery, classroom management, and the changing world and social contexts in their instruction.  The findings indicated that the participants realized that their knowledge consisted of language construction and skills, other content areas, ability to teach, understanding students’ strengths, weaknesses, and needs, the changing world, social contexts, and technology, as well as problem solving ability.  Also, they perceived teacher education programs, additional learning experience, teaching experience, in-service professional development activities, and a working environment as key sources of knowledge base construction for non-native teachers. Keywords: knowledge base, English as a Foreign language teachers, knowledge construction

  16. The Attitudes of Anglophone and Francophone Cameroonians towards Cameroon English as a Model of English Language Teaching and Learning in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atechi, Samuel; Angwah, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Teachers of English in Cameroon are proficient speakers of Cameroon English and their non-native status militates against their usage of Standard British English in the English language classrooms. This makes the attainment of British English thorny and perhaps impossible in Cameroon. Standing on that premise, we were motivated to find out…

  17. English teachers as materials developers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez Salas, Marlene

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo enfatiza la necesidad de que los profesores de Inglés crean y adapten sus propios materiales. La autora presenta la definición de Desarrollo y Adaptación de Materiales, su proceso y algunos ejemplos elaborados por ella misma para ilustrar el tema. This article focuses on the need for English language teachers to become materials developers. The writer presents a definition of Materials Development and Adaptation, the process to follow to develop and/or adapt teaching materials, and some samples created or adapted by the writer to illustrate the topic.

  18. Pragmatic Assessment of Request Speech Act of Iranian EFL Learners by Non-Native English Speaking Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Minoo; Khanlarzadeh, Neda

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of raters' comments on pragmatic assessment of L2 learners is among new and understudied concepts in second language studies. To shed light on this issue, the present investigation targeted important variables such as raters' criteria and rating patterns by analyzing the interlanguage pragmatic assessment process of the Iranian…

  19. Why should a Business English Teacher be a Constructivist Teacher?

    OpenAIRE

    LEMPART, JOANNA

    2008-01-01

    The article provides some considerations related to the issue of learning and teaching Business English in Poland. It explains the difference between Business English, General English and English for Specific Purposes. The main aim of it is to present the characteristics of the Constructivist Business English Teachers. In order to this the constructivist approach to second language learning and teaching is briefly presented and a few. valuable suggestions are provided on how to it can be empl...

  20. Perceptual assimilation and discrimination of non-native vowel contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Michael D; Best, Catherine T; Faber, Alice; Levitt, Andrea G

    2014-01-01

    Research on language-specific tuning in speech perception has focused mainly on consonants, while that on non-native vowel perception has failed to address whether the same principles apply. Therefore, non-native vowel perception was investigated here in light of relevant theoretical models: the Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) and the Natural Referent Vowel (NRV) framework. American-English speakers completed discrimination and native language assimilation (categorization and goodness rating) tests on six nonnative vowel contrasts. Discrimination was consistent with PAM assimilation types, but asymmetries predicted by NRV were only observed for single-category assimilations, suggesting that perceptual assimilation might modulate the effects of vowel peripherality on non-native vowel perception.

  1. Modern Greek Language: Acquisition of Morphology and Syntax by Non-Native Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Georgia; Karapetsas, Anargyros; Galantomos, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of native and non native speakers of Modern Greek language on morphology and syntax tasks. Non-native speakers of Greek whose native language was English, which is a language with strict word order and simple morphology, made more errors and answered more slowly than native speakers on morphology but not…

  2. How to be a brilliant English teacher

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Now in its second edition, Trevor Wright's hugely popular How to be a Brilliant English Teacher is packed with practical advice drawn from his extensive and successful experience as an English teacher, examiner and teacher trainer. This accessible and readable guide offers sound theoretical principles with exciting practical suggestions for the classroom. Fully updated to include a new expanded section on differentiation and inclusion, as well as covering new material on behaviour management and teaching poetry for enjoyment and personal response, this book tackles other tricky areas such as: Starting with Shakespeare Effective planning and assessment Learning to love objectives Working small texts and big texts Drama. Trainee teachers will find support and inspiration in this book and practising English teachers can use it as an empowering self-help guide for improving their skills. Trevor Wright addresses many of the anxieties that English teachers face, offering focused and realistic solutions.

  3. Training English Language Student Teachers to Become Reflective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Issa, Ali; Al-Bulushi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Reflective teaching practice has become a central theme in professional growth at the pre-service teacher education level almost everywhere. English language teaching (ELT) teacher trainers, like any other teacher trainers, have a powerful role to play in fostering reflection in their student teachers through the approaches and strategies they…

  4. Professional Development Programs for Teachers of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singgih Widodo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Well-planned programs based on the needs for professional development of teachers are strongly needed to enhance the teaching-staff improvement.The impact of teacher improvement will effect the students learning and school achievement. This paper aims at raising awareness of English teachers to upgrade themselves as autonomous learners as well as researchers and broaden their horizon for stepping the ladder-career of their profession. For that purpose, a survey as reported here aimed to identify the needs of individual English teachers and the preferred programs for professional development. The findings indicated that the 36 teachers involved needed teacher training, teacher association, teacher materials, continuing education, and interschool visit and that teacher training was the most well known program among teachers.

  5. Ecological impacts of non-native species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are considered one of the greatest threats to freshwater biodiversity worldwide (Drake et al. 1989; Allen and Flecker 1993; Dudgeon et al. 2005). Some of the first hypotheses proposed to explain global patterns of amphibian declines included the effects of non-native species (Barinaga 1990; Blaustein and Wake 1990; Wake and Morowitz 1991). Evidence for the impact of non-native species on amphibians stems (1) from correlative research that relates the distribution or abundance of a species to that of a putative non-native species, and (2) from experimental tests of the effects of a non-native species on survival, growth, development or behaviour of a target species (Kats and Ferrer 2003). Over the past two decades, research on the effects of non-native species on amphibians has mostly focused on introduced aquatic predators, particularly fish. Recent research has shifted to more complex ecological relationships such as influences of sub-lethal stressors (e.g. contaminants) on the effects of non-native species (Linder et al. 2003; Sih et al. 2004), non-native species as vectors of disease (Daszak et al. 2004; Garner et al. 2006), hybridization between non-natives and native congeners (Riley et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2004), and the alteration of food-webs by non-native species (Nystrom et al. 2001). Other research has examined the interaction of non-native species in terms of facilitation (i.e. one non-native enabling another to become established or spread) or the synergistic effects of multiple non-native species on native amphibians, the so-called invasional meltdown hypothesis (Simerloff and Von Holle 1999). Although there is evidence that some non-native species may interact (Ricciardi 2001), there has yet to be convincing evidence that such interactions have led to an accelerated increase in the number of non-native species and cumulative impacts are still uncertain (Simberloff 2006). Applied research on the control, eradication, and

  6. Student perceptions of native and non-native speaker language instructors: A comparison of ESL and Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Callahan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The question of the native vs. non-native speaker status of second and foreign language instructors has been investigated chiefly from the perspective of the teacher. Anecdotal evidence suggests that students have strong opinions on the relative qualities of instruction by native and non-native speakers. Most research focuses on students of English as a foreign or second language. This paper reports on data gathered through a questionnaire administered to 55 university students: 31 students of Spanish as FL and 24 students of English as SL. Qualitative results show what strengths students believe each type of instructor has, and quantitative results confirm that any gap students may perceive between the abilities of native and non-native instructors is not so wide as one might expect based on popular notions of the issue. ESL students showed a stronger preference for native-speaker instructors overall, and were at variance with the SFL students' ratings of native-speaker instructors' performance on a number of aspects. There was a significant correlation in both groups between having a family member who is a native speaker of the target language and student preference for and self-identification with a native speaker as instructor. (English text

  7. Primary School English Teachers' Research Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuesong; Chow, Alice Wai Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Research engagement is an important means for teachers to develop their professional competence. This paper reports on an enquiry into the research engagement of a group of primary school English language teachers in Guangdong province on the Chinese mainland. Drawing on questionnaire data and teachers' interview narratives, the paper examines how…

  8. Learning English in Mexico: Perspectives from Mexican Teachers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    ESL and Language Arts teachers have noted a growing population of transnational students who--because of family migration patterns--have complex educational histories that straddle both Mexico and the US. Yet US teachers know little about the English-language training that such students receive in Mexico. This study attempts to bridge that gap,…

  9. The Roles of Teachers in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟瑛

    2014-01-01

    The issue of improving the efficiency of college English teaching and learning has long puzzled our educators and Eng⁃lish teachers. There are many ways to help the solving of the problem, but in China, where English is mainly taught in classroom, the teacher is a very important factor to influence the result of English teaching. In order to solve the problem, the teacher must know exactly what roles he should play in the process of teaching and make some changes in his old teaching methods.

  10. The influence of non-native language proficiency on speech perception performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eKilman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined to what extent proficiency in a non-native language influences speech perception in noise. We explored how English proficiency affected native (Swedish and non-native (English speech perception in four speech reception threshold (SRT conditions including two energetic (stationary, fluctuating noise and two informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English maskers. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, age between 28 and 64 years. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, non-verbal reasoning and working memory capacity. Our approach with focus on proficiency and the assessment of external as well as internal, listener-related factors allowed us to examine which variables explained intra-and interindividual differences in native and non-native speech perception performance. The main result was that in the non-native target, the level of English proficiency is a decisive factor for speech intelligibility in noise. High English proficiency improved performance in all four conditions when target language was English. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native language. The study also confirmed that the SRT's were better when target language was native compared to non-native.

  11. Karl Popper and the English Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Brian

    1974-01-01

    Analyzes the role of the English teacher in the open society, suggesting a need for greater awareness of wider issues which could inform debate about curriculum development and future patterns of education in a changing society. (RB)

  12. ATTITUDES OF ENGLISH TEACHER CANDIDATES TOWARD ICT

    OpenAIRE

    HİSMANOGLU, Murat; HİSMANOGLU, Sibel; Hismanoglu, Murat; HISMANOGLU, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of English teacher candidates at formal and distance higher education contexts toward ICT and reveal whether there was a significant difference between these two groups in terms of their attitudes toward ICT. The sample of the study consisted of 175 prospective English teachers at two different higher education contexts. The participants were randomly selected among forth-year students at the ELT departments of Euopean University of L...

  13. ATTITUDES OF ENGLISH TEACHER CANDIDATES TOWARD ICT

    OpenAIRE

    Hismanoglu, Murat; HISMANOGLU, Sibel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of English teacher candidates at formal and distance higher education contexts toward ICT and reveal whether there was a significant difference between these two groups in terms of their attitudes toward ICT. The sample of the study consisted of 175 prospective English teachers at two different higher education contexts. The participants were randomly selected among forth-year students at the ELT departments of Euopean University of L...

  14. English 341: Advanced Composition for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, William

    2013-01-01

    English 341: Advanced Composition for Teachers is a three-credit undergraduate course for pre-service educators at Francis Marion University, a mid-size public university located in northeast South Carolina. According to the university catalog, students enrolled in English 341 "explore connections among writing, teaching, and learning as they…

  15. The Case for Teachers' Classroom English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Donald

    2017-01-01

    New conceptualizations of English are challenging traditional norms of what the language is, as well as how it is taught and by whom. These changes, coupled with the expansion of teaching English across the educational spectrum from younger grades to tertiary levels, present challenges to many national education systems. The role of teachers'…

  16. English-for-Teaching: Rethinking Teacher Proficiency in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Donald; Katz, Anne; Garcia Gomez, Pablo; Burns, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of English teaching in state education systems places increasing demands on English language teachers and how they are trained. A major thrust of these efforts has focused on improving teachers' English language proficiency. This expectation is manifested in policy and pedagogical directives that teachers "teach English in…

  17. English-for-Teaching: Rethinking Teacher Proficiency in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Donald; Katz, Anne; Garcia Gomez, Pablo; Burns, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of English teaching in state education systems places increasing demands on English language teachers and how they are trained. A major thrust of these efforts has focused on improving teachers' English language proficiency. This expectation is manifested in policy and pedagogical directives that teachers "teach English in…

  18. Burnout among English Language Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Khandehroo, Koroush

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of burnout has always been under scrutiny, especially with reference to the teachers and their demographics. This study has deliberately focused on the English teachers' burnout and its relation with their demographics of age and workload in Malaysia. The findings showed that burnout is evident at high levels in all dimensions. In…

  19. English Teachers' Racial Literacy Knowledge and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Allison

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how secondary English teachers in two racially diverse schools--one in Massachusetts, USA, the other in Ontario, Canada--described their knowledge of and practices for teaching about race and racism. The extent and quality of teachers' racial literacy knowledge and practice were considered in light of the literature on racial…

  20. Perception of Non-Native Consonant Length Contrast: The Role of Attention in Phonetic Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porretta, Vincent J.; Tucker, Benjamin V.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation examines English speakers' ability to identify and discriminate non-native consonant length contrast. Three groups (L1 English No-Instruction, L1 English Instruction, and L1 Finnish control) performed a speeded forced-choice identification task and a speeded AX discrimination task on Finnish non-words (e.g.…

  1. The Relationship between Iranian English Language Teachers' and Learners' Gender and Their Perceptions of an Effective English Language Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishavan, Homa Babai

    2010-01-01

    In this study English language teachers and learners engaged in teaching and learning of English in Iranian universities, high schools and private language institutes were asked about characteristics of an effective English language teacher. The aim of the study was to investigate whether male and female teachers and learners of English hold…

  2. Discriminative Phoneme Sequences Extraction for Non-Native Speaker's Origin Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Bouselmi, Ghazi; Illina, Irina; Haton, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an automated method for the classification of the origin of non-native speakers. The origin of non-native speakers could be identified by a human listener based on the detection of typical pronunciations for each nationality. Thus we suppose the existence of several phoneme sequences that might allow the classification of the origin of non-native speakers. Our new method is based on the extraction of discriminative sequences of phonemes from a non-native English speech database. These sequences are used to construct a probabilistic classifier for the speakers' origin. The existence of discriminative phone sequences in non-native speech is a significant result of this work. The system that we have developed achieved a significant correct classification rate of 96.3% and a significant error reduction compared to some other tested techniques.

  3. Expanding Roles: Teacher Educators' Perspectives on Educating English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Shannon; Peercy, Megan Madigan

    2014-01-01

    Although the underpreparation of teachers to work with English learners is a documented problem in teacher education, little research has addressed teacher educators' perspectives in guiding prospective teachers to educate English learners. This case study of one 13-month elementary certification program highlights teacher educators' efforts and…

  4. Individual Variables, Attitudes towards English and Being a Teacher: A study on Prospective Teachers of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Güryay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The achievement in learning a foreign language depends not only on cognitive factors such as intelligence, aptitude etc., but also on affective factors such as attitude and motivation. As the main branch of prospective teachers of English is teaching a language, their attitudes towards English and towards being a teacher are of vital importance in their future careers. The purpose of this descriptive study is to determine whether the attitudes of the students of English Language Teaching Department towards English affect their attitudes towards being a teacher of English and whether the students’ attitudes indicate significant differences with regard to individual variables such as gender, class, the types of High Schools from which they have graduated, their socio-economic background, and whether there is a teacher in their family. The sample group of the study were composed 540 prospective English teachers of the first, second, third and fourth year students of the Department of English Language Teaching at Buca Faculty of Education at Dokuz Eylül University, İzmir. For data collection, personal information sheet, the scale for attitudes towards English developed by Altunay (2002 (Alpha Reliability Coefficient: 0.96 and the scale for attitudes towards Being a Teacher developed by Semerci (1999 (Alpha Reliability Coefficient: 0.68 were used. The results indicate that the more positive the students’ attitudes towards English are, the more positive the students’ attitudes towards teaching profession are. Fur thermore, when attitudes towards English and towards being a teacher are compared,” it is indicated that the students’ attitudes towards English are a little bit higher.

  5. The Difficulty of Teacher Dispositions: Considering Professional Dispositions for Preservice English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffner, Melanie; Sedberry, Tiffany; Alsup, Janet; Johnson, Tara Star

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the place of teacher dispositions in English teacher preparation by contextualizing the issue of dispositions in English teacher preparation. This allows consideration for the importance of developing professional dispositions during English teacher preparation by recognizing that various stakeholders (teacher educators,…

  6. Socialization Through Teacher Talk In An English Bilingual Class

    OpenAIRE

    Blerta Xheko

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the language practices of a teacher in an English bilingual class. The children were learning English in Year One of elementary school. The teacher consistently spoke English with the children. The description of the teacher's talk shows how she used English for classroom management, for instructions, for teaching subject content and for personal exchanges. The analysis reveals the significance of ongoing classroom activities for language learning. English was spoken in co...

  7. Action Research for English Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩秋实

    2014-01-01

    As a reflective approach to teacher development,Action Research (AR)is gaining significance in education and is especially credited as providing an opportunity for professionals including both teachers and teacher educators to investigate their own classroom practice and improve it,and hopefully bring favorable changes to their classrooms.It emphasizes the role of critical reflection and always involves a problem→hypothesis→resolution cycle or spiral during which teacher researchers exert efforts to explore teaching and learning.By doing action research,language teachers can not only apply theories into practice but also be more reflective,more critical and more open to change in teach-ing approaches and methods.Despite the difficulties that teachers may have in doing action research in their busy life,it is beneficial for teach-ers to be researchers in the long run.

  8. Globalization, English Language Policy, and Teacher Agency: Focus on Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, M. Obaidul; Nguyen, Hoa Thi Mai

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on English teachers in Asia in the context of globalization, the global spread of English and the emergence of English as an "Asian language." It highlights the dilemmas facing these teachers in meeting the growing social demands of English proficiency in a technology-influenced, managerial and neoliberal education…

  9. Teacher Beliefs regarding Bilingualism in an English Medium Reading Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Viniti

    2012-01-01

    Reading classes in schools where English is the medium of instruction are increasingly servicing a linguistically diverse population; however, teacher-training for English teachers lacks a focus on bilingualism. Using the context of Singapore, this paper analyses beliefs on bilingualism of English teachers in an early intervention reading program.…

  10. An Active Reading Model for English Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岩; 张琳

    2008-01-01

    Acuve reading makes a reader interact with the text.It promotes learning,Acuve reading model actually presents six reading strategies that teachers should consider when teaching English to a class of non-native speakers.That guides both teachers and students in their working and learning.

  11. Evidence for language transfer leading to a perceptual advantage for non-native listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Charles B; Mishler, Alan

    2012-10-01

    Phonological transfer from the native language is a common problem for non-native speakers that has repeatedly been shown to result in perceptual deficits vis-à-vis native speakers. It was hypothesized, however, that transfer could help, rather than hurt, if it resulted in a beneficial bias. Due to differences in pronunciation norms between Korean and English, Koreans in the U.S. were predicted to be better than Americans at perceiving unreleased stops-not only in their native language (Korean) but also in their non-native language (English). In three experiments, Koreans were found to be significantly more accurate than Americans at identifying unreleased stops in Korean, at identifying unreleased stops in English, and at discriminating between the presence and absence of an unreleased stop in English. Taken together, these results suggest that cross-linguistic transfer is capable of boosting speech perception by non-natives beyond native levels.

  12. The Effect of the Past on the Present: Cook Islands Teachers' Perceptions of Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Frances

    2013-01-01

    In many countries where English is taught as a second language, the majority of the language teachers are NNS (non-native speakers) of English. Little research based on the experience of NNS teachers in a Pacific Islands context seems to be available. This article explores the knowledge, beliefs, and insights of three Cook Islands teachers and the…

  13. EFL Students' and Teachers' Attitudes toward Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety: A Look at NESTs and Non-NESTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Turgay; Tanriöver, Ahmet Serkan; Sahan, Özgür

    2016-01-01

    Native English Speaking Teachers (NESTs) have been employed in various English language teaching (ELT) positions and departments at private and state universities in Turkey, particularly over the last three decades. However, undergraduate EFL students' attitudes toward NESTs and Non-Native English Speaking Teachers (Non-NESTs) remain seriously…

  14. Individual Variables, Attitudes towards English and Being a Teacher: A study on Prospective Teachers of English

    OpenAIRE

    Berna Güryay

    2016-01-01

    The achievement in learning a foreign language depends not only on cognitive factors such as intelligence, aptitude etc., but also on affective factors such as attitude and motivation. As the main branch of prospective teachers of English is teaching a language, their attitudes towards English and towards being a teacher are of vital importance in their future careers. The purpose of this descriptive study is to determine whether the attitudes of the students of Engl...

  15. English Language Teachers as Program Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannacito, Dan J.

    2013-01-01

    An administrator, broadly conceived, is a person who has authority to lead and manage people, practices, materials, and policies in an educational unit. Dan Tannacito shows teachers the pathway to becoming English language program administrators (ELPAs) and the myriad benefits they can derive. Most may be surprised to see that they are already on…

  16. Beyond Language: Teacher Education and English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley-Lubbs, Gresilda

    2012-01-01

    At the author's institution, the majority of preservice teachers pursuing a master's degree in education curriculum and instruction are White middle-class students, so preparing them to be reflective practitioners with adequate knowledge, skills, and dispositions to teach English learners, whose cultural perspectives often differ significantly…

  17. The Post 9/11 English Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    An English teacher offers his thoughts on what they could learn about their role in the post 9/11-world and suggests reflecting on the events of the incident as professionals. The 9/11 Commission Report defines an important role for education and recommends US funding to improve public education, vocational education, and halving adult illiteracy…

  18. Transnational Teachers of English in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petron, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written on the effects of Mexican immigration in the U.S., but little exists regarding the ways in which transnationals, who have returned to Mexico, have adapted to and/or transformed Mexican society and the education system. This article is based on a descriptive qualitative study of five transnational teachers of English in Mexico…

  19. The intelligibility of Lombard speech for non-native listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Martin; Lecumberri, Maria Luisa García

    2012-08-01

    Speech produced in the presence of noise--Lombard speech--is more intelligible in noise than speech produced in quiet, but the origin of this advantage is poorly understood. Some of the benefit appears to arise from auditory factors such as energetic masking release, but a role for linguistic enhancements similar to those exhibited in clear speech is possible. The current study examined the effect of Lombard speech in noise and in quiet for Spanish learners of English. Non-native listeners showed a substantial benefit of Lombard speech in noise, although not quite as large as that displayed by native listeners tested on the same task in an earlier study [Lu and Cooke (2008), J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 3261-3275]. The difference between the two groups is unlikely to be due to energetic masking. However, Lombard speech was less intelligible in quiet for non-native listeners than normal speech. The relatively small difference in Lombard benefit in noise for native and non-native listeners, along with the absence of Lombard benefit in quiet, suggests that any contribution of linguistic enhancements in the Lombard benefit for natives is small.

  20. Global English Teaching and Teacher Education: Praxis and Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogancay-Aktuna, Seran, Ed.; Hardman, Joel, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Today's English language teaching goes beyond the norms of English spoken and taught in native-English-speaking countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom, or Australia. Increasingly, a variety of countries have established, formally or informally, a kind of English unique to their own populations, and English language teachers within…

  1. English language knowledge for secondary teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Alison

    2013-01-01

    If teachers are to successfully develop their students' English language skills it is vital that they overcome any existing lack of confidence and training in grammar and language concepts. Language Knowledge for Secondary Teachers is an accessible book aiming to equip secondary teachers with the knowledge they need to teach language effectively. It clearly explains the essential concepts for language study, introduces the terminology needed for 'talking about language' and shows how this knowledge can be applied to the skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. This

  2. On the Effect of Teacher Talk on Teacher-Student Rapport in College English Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程佳

    2013-01-01

    This paper aimed to investigate the effect of teacher talk on teacher-student rapport in college English classroom. Be-sides, it attempted to analyze how to build teacher-student rapport in English classroom based on the theories of teacher Talk, hoping that it can assist teachers to upgrade their awareness in teacher talk and increase language learning and teaching efficiency.

  3. Questioning Strategies of English Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅

    2014-01-01

    AMY.B.M.TSUI thinks that most of the interactive learning starts with the teachers ’questioning. Richard and Lock-art (1994) think that the proper questioning can help the students to acquire the second language. Jin Chuanbao ( 1997) even thinks that the questioning process of the teachers should become the core of the class. Though almost all of the teachers are ques-tioning, they know little about the questioning strategies. In this case, it is urgent to study this subject. The present study reveals some problems of four teachers’questioning strategies in Junior Middle School. I hope some helpful ideas can be found in the thesis.

  4. Patterns in the Initial Teaching Assignments of Secondary English Teachers: Implications for Teacher Agency and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Deborah; Holmes, Stephen; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the teaching assignments of English teachers in 13 Mid-Atlantic high schools across five states. Data on the experience levels of 175 English teachers teaching 246 classes and surveys from 85 teacher participants were collected. Findings reveal that major agency-thwarting challenges face new English teachers: They typically are…

  5. Patterns in the Initial Teaching Assignments of Secondary English Teachers: Implications for Teacher Agency and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Deborah; Holmes, Stephen; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the teaching assignments of English teachers in 13 Mid-Atlantic high schools across five states. Data on the experience levels of 175 English teachers teaching 246 classes and surveys from 85 teacher participants were collected. Findings reveal that major agency-thwarting challenges face new English teachers: They typically are…

  6. The Pragmatic Application of English Euphemism on English Teacher's Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李倩; 刘丹

    2009-01-01

    Euphemism,as a linguistic form generated to seek ideal and effective communication, is widely and vividly used in people's daily life, and has become an indispensable part in English language. So it has intrigued linguists and scholars for long time. The researches about this subject cover many different fields, including linguistics, pragmatics, and psychology and so on. However, the researches on its pragmatic application in teachers' language are few. Based on the previous scholars' achievements, its application on teacher's language from the perspective of pragmatic function would be explored in this paper. Nowadays, student-centered teaching is advocated to improve teaching. Applying euphemisms on teaching is a typical embodiment. Teacher's applying euphemisms can shake off the fright of students in public, protect their self-esteem and stimulate their interest in study. When it is applied to teaching languages appropriately, relaxing and lively atmosphere built in class, students' confidence elevated, their initiative enhanced, good teaching results can be attained.

  7. Proficient beyond borders: assessing non-native speakers in a native speakers’ framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Fleckenstein

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background English language proficiency is considered a basic skill that students from different language backgrounds are expected to master, independent of whether they are native or non-native speakers. Tests that measure language proficiency in non-native speakers are typically linked to the common European framework of reference for languages. Such tests, however, often lack the criteria to define a practically relevant degree of proficiency in English. We approach this deficit by assessing non-native speakers’ performance within a native speakers’ framework. Method Items from two English reading assessments—the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA and the National Assessment (NA for English as a foreign language in Germany—were administered to N = 427 German high school students. Student abilities were estimated by drawing plausible values in a two-dimensional Rasch model. Results Results show that non-native speakers of English generally underperformed compared to native speakers. However, academic track students in the German school system achieved satisfactory levels of proficiency on the PISA scale. Linking the two scales showed systematic differences in the proficiency level classifications. Conclusion The findings contribute to the validation and international localization of NA standards for English as a foreign language. Practical implications are discussed with respect to policy-defined benchmarks for the successful participation in a global English-speaking society.

  8. The Effectiveness of Chinese NNESTs in Teaching English Syntax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chun-Hui; Bartz, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of Chinese non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) on Chinese ESL students' struggles with English syntax. The paper first classifies Chinese learners' syntactic errors into 10 common types. It demonstrates how each type of error results from an internal attempt to translate a common Chinese construction into…

  9. Educating English Learners: What Every Classroom Teacher Needs to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutta, Joyce W.; Strebel, Carine; Mokhtari, Kouider; Mihai, Florin M.; Crevecoeur-Bryant, Edwidge

    2014-01-01

    In "Educating English Learners," Joyce W. Nutta and her colleagues offer practical tools for helping schools and teachers successfully integrate English learners into mainstream classrooms. Drawing on the One Plus model presented in their award-winning book, "Preparing Every Teacher to Reach English Learners," the authors now…

  10. Issues of ICT Usage among Malaysian Secondary School English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Arumugam; Mohamed, Abdul Halim

    2013-01-01

    This study explored on perception, usage and obstacles of using ICT in teaching English Language among secondary school English teachers. The advancement of technology has given a space for teachers to boost teaching and learning of English language in secondary schools. It is believed that integration of ICT could enhance quality of teaching and…

  11. Assessing English speaking skills of prospective teachers at entry and graduation level in teacher education program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Alam, Muhammad; Hussain, Shafqat; Shah, Ashfaque Ahmad; Jabeen, Mehlah

    2014-01-01

    .... This study explores the extent of improvement in English speaking skills among prospective teachers of one year teacher education program at three public sector universities in Punjab, Pakistan...

  12. Non-natives: 141 scientists object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simberloff, D.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Supplementary information to: Non-natives: 141 scientists object Full list of co-signatories to a Correspondence published in Nature 475, 36 (2011); doi: 10.1038/475036a. Daniel Simberloff University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. dsimberloff@utk.edu Jake Alexander Institute of Integrative

  13. Non-natives: 141 scientists object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simberloff, D.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Supplementary information to: Non-natives: 141 scientists object Full list of co-signatories to a Correspondence published in Nature 475, 36 (2011); doi: 10.1038/475036a. Daniel Simberloff University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. dsimberloff@utk.edu Jake Alexander Institute of Integrative

  14. Research methods for English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonough, Jo

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a lively introduction to the research methods and techniques available to English language teachers who wish to investigate aspects of their own practice. It covers qualitative and quantitative methodology and includes sections on observation, introspection, diary studies, experiments, interviews, questionnaires, numerical techniques and case study research. Each method is illustrated with examples in language teaching contexts, and techniques of data collection and analysis are introduced. The authors focus particularly on research in the classroom, on tests, materials, the

  15. Teacher Talk and EFL Classroom Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程东岳

    2014-01-01

    Teacher talk and teacher-student classroom interaction have always been the central issue among the various classroom researches. Teacher talk is undoubtedly important in EFL (English as a foreign language) classroom in China. This paper attempts to discuss the features of teacher talk in EFL classroom, mainly of NNS (non-native speaker) teachers and the implications and suggestions of how to make teacher talk more appropriate and stimulative.

  16. Development of Primary English Education and Teacher Training in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikio, Shiga

    2008-01-01

    In 1997 English became a compulsory subject in Korean elementary schools. The education of English teachers for the elementary level was accelerated. The training curriculum was reformed according to the educational objective to enhance students' oral communication skills in English. Coupled to this change, the introduction of English Teacher…

  17. Cuban Voices: A Case Study of English Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven John

    2016-01-01

    This case study uses qualitative research methods and a postcolonial paradigm to listen to the voices of Cuban teacher educators describing how they educate and prepare English language teachers in Cuba. English language teacher education in Cuba includes features that are considered innovative, contemporary and good practice in the Western world.…

  18. Understanding Professional Challenges Faced by Chinese Teachers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liying; Wang, Hong

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on work in general education, second/foreign language teacher education has begun to recognize that within its knowledge base, teachers, apart from the methods and materials they may use, are central to improving English language teaching. To understand the professional development of teachers in the English as a foreign language context,…

  19. The Contextual Adaptation of English Teachers' Questioning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hong-mei; Li, Wang-zi; Lei, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In order to guarantee an interactive classroom atmosphere, English teachers pay much attention to the questioning strategies when they use question-answer teaching method. This paper makes a comprehensive analysis on English teachers' questioning strategies from the perspective of adaptation theory. It shows that the utilization of teachers'…

  20. How to Be a Brilliant English Teacher. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Now in its second edition, Trevor Wright's hugely popular "How to be a Brilliant English Teacher" is packed with practical advice drawn from his extensive and successful experience as an English teacher, examiner and teacher trainer. This accessible and readable guide offers sound theoretical principles with exciting practical suggestions for the…

  1. Service Learning and the Preparation of English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Heidi L.; Burdick, Melanie N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, service learning is explored as a pedagogical third space from which preservice teachers learn to teach the New English education. We argue that such a space has the potential to foster preservice English teachers' understanding of their role and identity as future teachers and how this identity is always relative to the students…

  2. Advocating School-University Partnership for Responsive Teacher Education and Classroom-based Curricula: Evidence from Teachers' Cognitions about Principles of Curriculum Design and Their Own Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Muhammad; Zhang, Lawrence Jun; Esfahani, Nasim Nasr

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the differences between novice and experienced non-native English-speaking English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) teachers' cognitions about EFL curriculum design principles and their own roles in designing an EFL curriculum. The challenge these teachers faced in their roles and the support system they needed were also…

  3. Efficient English Listening Teaching Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢小杰

    2014-01-01

    In non-native English speaking countries, the big problem to English learners is that it is difficult for them to under-stand what the English speaker is talking about because many English learners have trouble in listening. Though they are English learners, they still have difficulty in listening to the foreigners from English speaking countries and other nonnative English speak-ers. Therefore, listening teaching becomes the vital task of both English teachers and English learners. English educators are ex-pected to search an efficient way to help English learners improve their listening. Modern teaching equipments, such as film and video and other teaching facilities play an indispensable role in English listening teaching.

  4. Design of a Chinese-English Dictionary for Non-native Chinese Learners Based on the Theory of Dictionary as Communication%基于交际词典学理论的外向型汉英学习词典设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚军

    2014-01-01

    Lexicography is a process of communication .Lexicographers must investigate users ’ needs, and compile dictionaries with the aid of corpora .Based on the theory of communicative lexicography and bilingual pedagogical lexicography , this paper has analyzed the basic features of Chinese-English diction-ary for non-native learners in the age of Chinese as an international language , and basic requirements for compiling a Chinese-English dictionary for non-native learners are put forward:selecting entries and illus-trative examples with the aid of Chinese-English parallel corpus;adding necessary pragmatic information and cultural information through special columns or labels; adding necessary pictorial illustrations and cross references;adding detailed appendix of cultural information .%词典编纂是一个交际过程,词典编纂者必须调查词典用户的需求,借助语料库编写词典。根据交际词典学、双语学习词典编纂的相关理论,本文分析了汉语教育国际化时代的新一代外向型汉英学习词典的基本特征和主要的注意事项,设计出了外向型汉英学习词典的基本编纂要求:基于汉英平行语料库选词和配例;设立必要的语用标签和语用信息、文化信息栏目;设立必要的插图和参加系统;提供包含详细文化信息的附录。

  5. English Education Program Assessment: Creating Standards and Guidelines to Advance English Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zancanella, Don; Alsup, Janet

    2010-01-01

    When someone uses the term "standards," one tends to assume the topic under discussion is K-12 education, but standards for teacher preparation have their own parallel history. In English teacher education, that history has two strands: the NCTE Guidelines for the Preparation of Teachers of English Language Arts, which predate the "standards…

  6. Non-natives: 141 scientists object

    OpenAIRE

    Simberloff, D.; van der Putten, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Supplementary information to: Non-natives: 141 scientists object Full list of co-signatories to a Correspondence published in Nature 475, 36 (2011); doi: 10.1038/475036a. Daniel Simberloff University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Jake Alexander Institute of Integrative Biology, Zurich, Switzerland. Fred Allendorf University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, USA. James Aronson CEFE/CNRS, Montpellier, France. Pedro M. Antunes Algoma University, Sault Ste. Marie, Onta...

  7. 非母语环境下儿童英语听说能力培养策略探讨%The strategies for training children’s english listening and speaking ability in a non-native environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建荣

    2014-01-01

    儿童英语听说能力培养,应从儿童语言习得的基本理论入手,采用TPR教学法,适当运用英文童谣、英文动画片以及英文绘本等形式,激发儿童学习兴趣培养儿童英语听说能力。%The training of children′s English listening and speaking ability should start with the basic theory of child lan-guage acquisition. By using the TPR teaching method,the proper using of English nursery rhymes,English cartoon and English picture book to stimulate children′s interest in learning,and also to cultivate Children’s ability of English listening and speaking.

  8. On English Teachers' Roles in the Information Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽

    2016-01-01

    Teachers play an important role in both the traditional and modern teaching process. The role of the teacher as a topic has been discussed in the field of general education as well as the language education for many years. The main purpose of the paper is to analyze the historical roles of English teachers in three different periods and to reorient English teachers' roles in the new teaching model. With the support of the modern teaching means, English teachers can play roles as organizers, participants, prompters and supervisors in the Information Age.

  9. Teachers' Voice: A Needs Analysis of Teachers' Needs for Professional Development with the Emergence of the Current English Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Qahtani, Hind M.

    2015-01-01

    The study attempts to reveal the attitudes' of the English teachers toward teachers' professional development, to identify the needs of English teachers for Teachers' professional development, to clarify the challenges that faced by English teachers throughout their teachers' professional development. The study uses a descriptive methods to…

  10. Preparing teachers to teach English as an international language

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, Aya

    2017-01-01

    This book explores ways to prepare teachers to teach English as an International Language, and provides theoretically-grounded models for EIL-informed teacher education. It includes two chapters that present a theoretical approach to EIL teacher education, followed by descriptions of field-tested teacher education programs, courses and activities.

  11. Emotion and lying in a non-native language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L; Ayçiçeği-Dinn, Ayşe

    2009-03-01

    Bilingual speakers frequently report experiencing greater emotional resonance in their first language compared to their second. In Experiment 1, Turkish university students who had learned English as a foreign language had reduced skin conductance responses (SCRs) when listening to emotional phrases in English compared to Turkish, an effect which was most pronounced for childhood reprimands. A second type of emotional language, reading out loud true and false statements, was studied in Experiment 2. Larger SCRs were elicited by lies compared to true statements, and larger SCRs were evoked by English statements compared to Turkish statements. In contrast, ratings of how strongly participants felt they were lying showed that Turkish lies were more strongly felt than English lies. Results suggest that two factors influence the electrodermal activity elicited when bilingual speakers lie in their two languages: arousal due to emotions associated with lying, and arousal due to anxiety about managing speech production in non-native language. Anxiety and emotionality when speaking a non-naive language need to be better understood to inform practices ranging from bilingual psychotherapy to police interrogation of suspects and witnesses.

  12. INFLUENCE OF STUDENT ENGLISH UTILITY AND TEACHER EFFICACY ON ENGLISH PROFICIENCY OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. ORTEGA-DELA CRUZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning second language considers a number of factors that influence the manner in which the language is taught. Understanding of the learners’ goals and motivation for learning is one. Using descriptive-correlational research design, this study determined the influence of student English utility and teacher efficacy on the students’ English proficiency. A total of 101 students from first year to fourth year level served as the respondents of the study. The study quantified the students’ perception towards English utility and their evaluation of English teacher efficacy which employed a researcher-made survey questionnaire. Results revealed high positive perceptions of students towards English utility. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences in the perceptions of high school students on the efficacy of their English teachers. Correlation coefficients indicated a positive linear relationship among the given variables. The p-value revealed significant relationship of teacher efficacy (r = .691, p-value = .000 and English utility (r = .467, p-value = .000 to students’ English proficiency. Results of regression statistics revealed that English utility has no significant influence on the student English proficiency. Therefore, the main factor that must still be considered then should be the teacher. Finally, there is an explicit indication that high level of teachers’ efficacy performing in teaching has much powerful influence on the English proficiency of high school students. Thus improving the methods of teaching English provides a better way of motivating students to achieve higher levels of proficiency in the future.

  13. Providing English foreign language teachers with content knowledge to facilitate decoding and spelling acquisition: a longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn-Horwitz, Janina

    2016-04-01

    This quasi-experimental study adds to the small existing literature on orthographic-related teacher knowledge in an English as a foreign language (EFL) context. The study examined the impact of a course on English orthography on predominantly non-native-speaking EFL preservice and inservice teachers' orthographic content knowledge, and the extent to which these teachers retained orthographic-related content knowledge four months after participating in a semester course on the topic. In addition, the study examined the relationship between participants' acquired orthographic-related content knowledge and EFL spelling. Both groups of teachers that studied in the course improved on overall orthographic-related content knowledge, both immediately following the course and longitudinally. Preservice and inservice participants showed similar levels of orthographic knowledge prior to course participation and both showed significant improvements compared to controls following course participation. Participants also retained knowledge four months after course completion. Overall, the inservice teachers scored higher on orthographic-related knowledge, possibly as a result of the immediate application of their newly acquired knowledge. An unexpected finding was a lack of interaction between acquired orthographic-related content knowledge and pseudo word spelling scores. Possible methodological limitations, such as number of participants as well as the length and scope of the course, may explain this outcome. This paper also discusses practical implications of this study for EFL decoding and spelling instruction.

  14. "Oh! Who Is Me"? Conceiving of the Writer in the English Teacher Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Emily

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the identity of the English teacher, paying particular attention to the English teacher who is also a writer, or, "teacher-writer". Applying a degree of self-study, the author examines her own pathway into becoming an English teacher, noting that entry requirements to become an English teacher in Australia show a…

  15. Professional Development Needs of English Language Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandehroo, Koroush; Mukundan, Jayakaran; Alavi, Zhinoos Kamal

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed the professional development (PD) needs of school English language teachers at Melaka State in Malaysia. With close cooperation with the Department of Language at the Ministry of Education, the whole population of English language teachers had been studied on their types of professional development needs in instructional…

  16. Content-Focused Classrooms and Learning English: How Teachers Collaborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Angela

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the possibilities of content-based instruction in mainstream English secondary schools. It considers the continuum from a language to content focus in classrooms where teachers collaborate. English as an additional language (EAL) and subject curriculum teachers work together to support young people while they simultaneously…

  17. Preparing Elementary English Teachers: Innovations at Pre-Service Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, Mochamad Subhan

    2015-01-01

    The teaching of English for Young Learners has become a global phenomenon, but many countries are facing dilemma in terms of teacher preparation (Nunan, 2003; Kaplan, Baldauf, & Kamwangamalu, 2011). Indonesia is of no exception. Its pre-service system has not been adequate to sufficiently prepare elementary English teachers with knowledge and…

  18. Teachers as Mediators: An Exploration of Situated English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter; Hohmann, Ulrike; Pratt, Nick; Dorf, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Within the context of lower secondary English teaching in South West England, this study identifies in broad terms the competing goals between which English teachers mediate and the explicit and hidden tensions that result. To understand the interactions of competing goals, teachers' goal-oriented behaviours are referenced to a set of idealised…

  19. Mathematics, English and Gender Issues: Do Teachers Count?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Gilah C.; Forgasz, Helen J.; Jackson, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    Pedestrians were stopped in the street and asked about their views on the teaching and learning of mathematics and English for boys and girls. Many commented on the importance of teachers for both subject areas; some respondents self-identified as teachers. In this article we present findings on the gendering of mathematics and English and the…

  20. The Teacher of English: Pedagogic Relevance in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Intakhab Alam

    2011-01-01

    The present paper attempts to explore the characteristics of an effective teacher of English. Some related factors such as qualification, attributes, roles, and professional ethics have also been dealt with. In Saudi Arabia, the teacher of English plays the most important role in the process of teaching/learning. There are so many factors such as…

  1. Teachers as Mediators: An Exploration of Situated English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter; Hohmann, Ulrike; Pratt, Nick; Dorf, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Within the context of lower secondary English teaching in South West England, this study identifies in broad terms the competing goals between which English teachers mediate and the explicit and hidden tensions that result. To understand the interactions of competing goals, teachers' goal-oriented behaviours are referenced to a set of idealised…

  2. How TESOL Educators Teach Nonnative English-Speaking Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Stefan; Phillabaum, Scott

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of California TESOL educators about issues related to nonnative English-speaking teachers (NNESTs). A good deal of research suggests that NNESTs are as effective, if not more so, than native English-speaking teachers (NESTs) and that their treatment in today's work world should be reconsidered; in…

  3. Professional Development Needs of English Language Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandehroo, Koroush; Mukundan, Jayakaran; Alavi, Zhinoos Kamal

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed the professional development (PD) needs of school English language teachers at Melaka State in Malaysia. With close cooperation with the Department of Language at the Ministry of Education, the whole population of English language teachers had been studied on their types of professional development needs in instructional…

  4. Supporting English-Medium Pedagogy through an Online Corpus of Science and Engineering Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunioshi, Nílson; Noguchi, Judy; Tojo, Kazuko; Hayashi, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    As English-medium instruction (EMI) spreads around the world, university teachers and students who are non-native speakers of English (NNS) need to put much effort into the delivery or reception of content. Construction of scientific meaning in the process of learning is already complex when instruction is delivered in the first language of the…

  5. Making the Case Method Work in Teaching Business English: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Ana Almagro; Canado, Maria Luisa Perez

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to show how some drawbacks inherent in the use of the Case Method in teaching Business English can be surmounted, especially when students are non-native speakers of English and the teacher of ESP is not experienced in this method. The first part of the paper presents a brief account of the general features,…

  6. Law and the Teacher of English and Language Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Harold O., Ed.; Mullican, James S., Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This special issue of the "Indiana English Journal" focuses on the law and the teacher of English and language arts. Included in the issue are the following articles: "The High School Press and Prior Restraint" by Roy Colquitt, "What's Obscene in Indiana? The New Law, the Miller Decision, and the Teaching of English" by Peter Scholl, and "The Law…

  7. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN THE COURSE OF ENGLISH TEACHERS TRAINING

    OpenAIRE

    Meshcheryakova, E.V.; Meshcheryakova Ju, V.; Loktyushina, E.A.

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with English teachers training for intercultural interaction on the basis of competence approach using modular training technology, relying on interactive media communicative interaction. The research is based on the created and approved «Advanced English Guide» and «Advanced English» textbooks. It shows the principles of vocabulary selection, verbal tasks complex.

  8. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN THE COURSE OF ENGLISH TEACHERS TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshcheryakova, E.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with English teachers training for intercultural interaction on the basis of competence approach using modular training technology, relying on interactive media communicative interaction. The research is based on the created and approved «Advanced English Guide» and «Advanced English» textbooks. It shows the principles of vocabulary selection, verbal tasks complex.

  9. Chilean English Teacher Identity and Popular Culture: Three Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Recent discussions on English as an International Language have highlighted the important role played by English language popular culture for the identities and bilingual development of diverse global citizens who learn and use English. However, there has been little attention to connections between popular culture and "teacher"…

  10. Chilean English Teacher Identity and Popular Culture: Three Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Recent discussions on English as an International Language have highlighted the important role played by English language popular culture for the identities and bilingual development of diverse global citizens who learn and use English. However, there has been little attention to connections between popular culture and "teacher"…

  11. Japanese Elementary School Teachers and English Language Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    "Foreign language activities" (English) officially began in Japanese elementary schools in April 2011. Since that starting date, and despite insufficient knowledge and preparation, classroom teachers have been required to instruct in English. They also have been required to team-teach with native-English-speaking assistant language…

  12. Chilean English Teacher Identity and Popular Culture: Three Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Recent discussions on English as an International Language have highlighted the important role played by English language popular culture for the identities and bilingual development of diverse global citizens who learn and use English. However, there has been little attention to connections between popular culture and "teacher" identity. In this…

  13. English Education and Teacher Education in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Seongja

    2008-01-01

    The spread of the English language is a global phenomenon, but it has a particular resonance in South Korea, where English is second only to Korean as a common language. The paper examines the current educational context in South Korea and the policy and practice issues that arise within this context regarding teacher education in English as a…

  14. Cultural Awareness of Chinese English Teacher:a Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong; LUO Liu-ping

    2014-01-01

    As English is becoming an international Language, English teaching in China, especially at tertiary level, is transform-ing from linguistic study to interpersonal communication and cross-cultural communication. The case study of this article reaches a conclusion that English teachers should make every effort to cultivate cultural awareness.

  15. Class, Culture and the English Teacher: Beyond Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macclennan, Gary; Lingard, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Analyzes different approaches to English teaching in light of recent sociological accounts of the role in the reproduction of culture and society. Draws upon the work of Gramsci, Bourdieu, Passeron, and Bernstein to examine the class location of English and English teachers. (FL)

  16. An Exploration of Teachers' Perceptions Regarding the Professional Needs of English Immersion Teachers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Young

    2013-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the specific professional needs of pre-service English immersion teachers in Korea in order to establish key components of English immersion teacher preparation programs. As an alternative approach of English language education, immersion instruction has been employed by a number of private and public schools in…

  17. Surviving as an English Teacher in the West: A Case Study of Iranian English Teachers in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotovatian, Sepideh

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an account of social integration and professional recognition of non-English-speaking-background (NESB) teachers of English in Australia. The case study profiles two Iranian postgraduate students of English teaching in an Australian university and describes their struggle to construct a social and professional identity. The…

  18. Combined Acoustic and Pronunciation Modelling for Non-Native Speech Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Bouselmi, Ghazi; Illina, Irina

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present several adaptation methods for non-native speech recognition. We have tested pronunciation modelling, MLLR and MAP non-native pronunciation adaptation and HMM models retraining on the HIWIRE foreign accented English speech database. The ``phonetic confusion'' scheme we have developed consists in associating to each spoken phone several sequences of confused phones. In our experiments, we have used different combinations of acoustic models representing the canonical and the foreign pronunciations: spoken and native models, models adapted to the non-native accent with MAP and MLLR. The joint use of pronunciation modelling and acoustic adaptation led to further improvements in recognition accuracy. The best combination of the above mentioned techniques resulted in a relative word error reduction ranging from 46% to 71%.

  19. Attitudes of Japanese Learners and Teachers of English towards Non-Standard English in Coursebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    Over the decades, efforts have been made to incorporate diverse perspectives on World Englishes into English Language Teaching (ELT) practice and teaching materials. To date, the majority of ELT learners and teachers have not yet been exposed to materials which use and explore non-standard forms of English. This paper examines the attitudes of…

  20. Reading Experiences of Nonnative-English-Speaking Preservice English Teachers: A Turkish Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas-Cetinkaya, Yesim

    2012-01-01

    In an EFL context, where language learners and users lack sufficient opportunities to receive oral input, reading in English plays a major role in improving nonnative preservice English teachers' language proficiency and allowing them to access information recorded exclusively in English. The current study investigates prospective nonnative…

  1. Teacher Cultural Competency and Long-Term English Language Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jannis

    2015-01-01

    Students that have been designated English Language Learners for five or more years are Long-Term English Learners. The literature review addresses some typical characteristics and experiences of students that are Long- Term English Language Learners, and the need for culturally responsive practices to meet their needs. Teacher attitudes, perceptions about English Language Learners, positionality, and opportunities to learn are integrated into the review. The author discusses linguistic aware...

  2. The Identity (Re)Construction of Nonnative English Teachers Stepping into Native Turkish Teachers' Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Sevcan; Ortaçtepe, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored the identity (re)construction of five nonnative English teachers who went to the USA on a prestigious scholarship for one year to teach their native language, Turkish. In that sense, it investigated how this shift from being a nonnative English teacher to a native Turkish teacher influenced their self-image,…

  3. TEACHER BELIEFS: A CASE STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuYijie

    2004-01-01

    In recent years ELT has stressed the role which teachers' beliefs play in shaping what they do in the classroom. But so far as teaching English in China is concerned, we lack empirical insight into the relationship between teachers' beliefs and their classroom practice. With specific reference to the use of English in intensive reading classes, by presenting and discussing data from a case study of a non-native college English teacher,this exploratory qualitative classroom research sheds light on the nature of teachers' beliefs held consciously or unconsciously.Their subsequent change and impact on the classroom will also be reported and discussed.

  4. Looking through phonological shape to lexical meaning: the bottleneck of non-native sign language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, R I; Fischer, S D

    1989-11-01

    In two studies, we find that native and non-native acquisition show different effects on sign language processing. Subjects were all born deaf and used sign language for interpersonal communication, but first acquired it at ages ranging from birth to 18. In the first study, deaf signers shadowed (simultaneously watched and reproduced) sign language narratives given in two dialects, American Sign Language (ASL) and Pidgin Sign English (PSE), in both good and poor viewing conditions. In the second study, deaf signers recalled and shadowed grammatical and ungrammatical ASL sentences. In comparison with non-native signers, natives were more accurate, comprehended better, and made different kinds of lexical changes; natives primarily changed signs in relation to sign meaning independent of the phonological characteristics of the stimulus. In contrast, non-native signers primarily changed signs in relation to the phonological characteristics of the stimulus independent of lexical and sentential meaning. Semantic lexical changes were positively correlated to processing accuracy and comprehension, whereas phonological lexical changes were negatively correlated. The effects of non-native acquisition were similar across variations in the sign dialect, viewing condition, and processing task. The results suggest that native signers process lexical structural automatically, such that they can attend to and remember lexical and sentential meaning. In contrast, non-native signers appear to allocate more attention to the task of identifying phonological shape such that they have less attention available for retrieval and memory of lexical meaning.

  5. Effects of training on learning non-native speech contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Joan M.

    2002-05-01

    An animal psychoacoustic procedure was used to train human listeners to categorize two non-native phonemic distinctions. In Exp 1, Japanese perception of the English liquid contrast /r-l/ was examined. In Exp 2, American-English perception of the Hindi dental-retroflex contrast /d-D/was examined. The training methods were identical in the two studies. The stimuli consisted of 64 CVs produced by four different native talkers (two male, two female) using four different vowels. The procedure involved manually moving a lever to make either a ``go-left'' or ``go-right'' response to categorize the stimuli. Feedback was given for correct and incorrect responses after each trial. After 32 training sessions, lasting about 8 weeks, performance was analyzed using both percent correct and response time as measures. Results showed that the Japanese listeners, as a group, were statistically similar to a group of native listeners in categorizing the liquid contrast. In contrast, the Amercan-English listeners were not nativelike in categorizing the dental-retroflex contrast. Hypotheses for the different results in the two experiments are discussed, including possible subject-related variables. In addition, the use of an animal model is proposed to objectively ``calibrate'' the psychoacoustic salience of various phoneme contrasts used in human speech.

  6. Reconsideration on English Teaching Based on Teacher-Origin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐跃

    2013-01-01

    Unidirectional English Teaching based on Teacher origin is still the main way in our country at the present. Because of the humanistic process of English teaching reformation,man factor has become the important one in the English teaching re-search and in recent years for Student-centre English teaching calls for higher and higher, the teacher ’s role and position in teaching has been backward to the second importance. But in teaching, the flow of knowledge is not reciprocal, both teachers and students have equal personalities. Taking teaching contents, teaching structure and the language application into consider-ation, we may take a new look at the English teaching and reform it in order to improve the teaching mode based on teacher-ori-gin and improve the students’learning effect as well.

  7. Teacher Perfectionism and Iranian English Language Learners’ Motivation and Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Rezvani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Educational psychology has recently reflected a policy shift from focusing on “what goes wrong” in schools, including psychological, physical, and educational disabilities, to recognizing and promoting strengths and positive aspects of students and their environments. Within this scope, some lines of research have examined the extent to which setting personal high standards influences such positive outcomes as educational achievement and high level of motivation. The present study was motivated by the concern that Iranian English language teachers' setting high standards, i.e. perfectionism, may predict English language learners’ motivation and language achievement. Through cluster random sampling, a total of 30 English language teachers with more than one year of experience and 300 elementary English language learners were selected from English Language Institutes in Fars province, Iran. Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism scale and Motivations Underlying English Language Learning questionnaire were used to measure teachers' perfectionism and learners’ language learning motivation, respectively. The learners' final scores in the English courses were collected as a measure of their language learning achievement. The result of simple regression analysis revealed that the teachers' perfectionism did not predict English language learners’ motivation and language achievement. In other words, Iranian English language teachers' perfectionism did not account for any variance in these two variables of interest. Keywords: Perfectionism, Motivation, Language Learning Achievement

  8. English Teacher Training Programs in Denmark, Sweden and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Ekrem

    2016-01-01

    Teachers play one of the most important roles in reaching learning objectives. The qualifications of teachers in an education system reflect the potential of that system and directly influence the learners' achievement. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to compare Danish and Swedish English teacher training programs with that of Turkey and…

  9. Factors Affecting the Professional Development of Elementary English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, Subhan

    2016-01-01

    The poor classroom practices of English teachers at elementary level in Indonesia have been attributed to the inadequacy of pre-service education. Yet, whether in-service professional development (PD) also plays a role is unknown. This study investigated the perspectives of 23 teachers, 14 teacher educators and 3 school principals regarding the…

  10. English teacher education: the need for a new perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Florén Serrano, Celia

    1991-01-01

    The paper explores the drawbacks that may arise from an excessive emphasis on either teacher education or teacher training in the syllabus of the future English language teacher. Then it analyses the present limitations in the teaching practice within the E.U. del Profesorado de E.G.B. and how some of the existing problems might be overecome.

  11. EFL Teachers' Conceptions of Speaking Competence in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Nasrollahi Shahri, Mohammad Naseh

    2014-01-01

    The present article lies at the intersection of research on teacher cognition and speaking competence in a second language. It is a qualitative analysis of teacher accounts of speaking in the context of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Iran. More specifically, the study is an exploration of three EFL teachers' conceptions of learning and…

  12. EFL Teachers' Conceptions of Speaking Competence in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Nasrollahi Shahri, Mohammad Naseh

    2014-01-01

    The present article lies at the intersection of research on teacher cognition and speaking competence in a second language. It is a qualitative analysis of teacher accounts of speaking in the context of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Iran. More specifically, the study is an exploration of three EFL teachers' conceptions of learning…

  13. EFL Teachers' Conceptions of Speaking Competence in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Nasrollahi Shahri, Mohammad Naseh

    2014-01-01

    The present article lies at the intersection of research on teacher cognition and speaking competence in a second language. It is a qualitative analysis of teacher accounts of speaking in the context of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Iran. More specifically, the study is an exploration of three EFL teachers' conceptions of learning and…

  14. Comparison of Native and Non-Native English Language Teachers' Evaluation of EFL Learners' Speaking Skills: Conflicting or Identical Rating Behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Emrah

    2016-01-01

    Assessing speaking skills is regarded as a complex and hard process compared with the other language skills. Considering the idiosyncratic characteristics of EFL learners, oral proficiency assessment issue becomes even more important. Keeping this situation in mind, judgements and reliability of raters need to be consistent with each other. This…

  15. Job Satisfaction Factors Among English Language Teachers In Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zarisfizadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction is very essential to the continuing growth of educational systems around the world and actually nowadays teachers have a very crucial role in the success or failure of each educational system. The present study investigated different job satisfaction and dissatisfaction factors among Malaysian English language teachers. The study is a survey research which has 35 English teachers as its participants. To collect data the questionnaire titled ‘TEJOSAMOQ’ was used. Descriptive analysis method was used to have sum of values, mean and standard deviation for each factor. The result showed that personal growth and achievement is the most important job satisfaction factors while high workload is central source of dissatisfaction for English teachers in Malaysia. The result can be used to make better and more effective policies and administration to have high quality education system in future. Keywords: job satisfaction factors, job dissatisfaction factors, English language teachers

  16. On Cultural Identity of Teachers in Teaching English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐丽月

    2013-01-01

    English teaching is a big project in China, whenever we teach English, we transmit western cultures ,when taking in the essence of western culture, students also receive the bad things of western culture. Besides, because of learning English, many students know less and less about their own culture and are not interested in learning it. So there is a clash between Chinese cul-ture and western culture. So English teachers face a problem:what is their cultural identity in English teaching? Based on the anal-ysis of the necessity, demerits and clash of English language and culture teaching, this paper attempts to discuss about teachers ’ cultural identity in teaching English.

  17. The Effectiveness of Indonesian English Teachers Training Programs in Improving Confidence and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wati, Herlina

    2011-01-01

    This study intends to identify the effectiveness of the English teachers training program of elementary school English teachers in Riau province, Indonesia. The study also intends to identify the further needs of the English teachers in attending the training program. Fifty five English teachers who had attended the training program were the…

  18. PRAGMATIC AWARENESS IN MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS AND ENGLISH TEACHERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengMiaoling

    2004-01-01

    This study explores middle school students' and English teachers' pragmatic and grammatical awareness. The subjects for the survey were fifty-five students and forty-two English teachers. Statistical results show that whereas English teachers in the junior middle school ranked the grammatical errors as more serious than the pragmatic errors, the students showed the opposite pattern, ranking the pragmatic errors as more severe than the grammatical errors. This finding indicates that pragmatic and grammatical awareness are independent, i. e.,grammatical awareness is not a necessary condition for progress in pragmatic awareness.

  19. Focus of Teachers' Direct Written Feedback on English Majors' Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊

    2010-01-01

    This present study explored what English teachers focused on EFL students' writing with their direct written feedback. Eight hundred and sixty-four pieces of writing drafts were written by one hundred and fifty second year English major students. These drafts were provided with teachers' written feedback by five teaching assistants. Concerning the Direct Correction category, the findings showed that Word Choice, Word Appropriation, Sentence Appropriation and Spelling were most focused by the teachers. Several implications for English writing instruction in the similar context were emerged.

  20. The online application of binding condition B in native and non-native pronoun resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Clare; Trompelt, Helena; Felser, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that anaphor resolution in a non-native language may be more vulnerable to interference from structurally inappropriate antecedents compared to native anaphor resolution. To test whether previous findings on reflexive anaphors generalize to non-reflexive pronouns, we carried out an eye-movement monitoring study investigating the application of binding condition B during native and non-native sentence processing. In two online reading experiments we examined when during processing local and/or non-local antecedents for pronouns were considered in different types of syntactic environment. Our results demonstrate that both native English speakers and native German-speaking learners of English showed online sensitivity to binding condition B in that they did not consider syntactically inappropriate antecedents. For pronouns thought to be exempt from condition B (so-called "short-distance pronouns"), the native readers showed a weak preference for the local antecedent during processing. The non-native readers, on the other hand, showed a preference for the matrix subject even where local coreference was permitted, and despite demonstrating awareness of short-distance pronouns' referential ambiguity in a complementary offline task. This indicates that non-native comprehenders are less sensitive during processing to structural cues that render pronouns exempt from condition B, and prefer to link a pronoun to a salient subject antecedent instead.

  1. The online application of binding condition B in native and non-native pronoun resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare ePatterson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that anaphor resolution in a non-native language may be more vulnerable to interference from structurally inappropriate antecedents compared to native anaphor resolution. To test whether previous findings on reflexive anaphors generalise to non-reflexive pronouns, we carried out an eye-movement monitoring study investigating the application of binding condition B during native and non-native sentence processing. In two online reading experiments we examined when during processing local and/or non-local antecedents for pronouns were considered in different types of syntactic environment. Our results demonstrate that both native English speakers and native German-speaking learners of English showed online sensitivity to binding condition B in that they did not consider syntactically inappropriate antecedents. For pronouns thought to be exempt from condition B (so-called 'short-distance pronouns', the native readers showed a weak preference for the local antecedent during processing. The non-native readers, on the other hand, showed a preference for the matrix subject even where local coreference was permitted, and despite demonstrating awareness of short-distance pronouns' referential ambiguity in a complementary offline task. This indicates that non-native comprehenders are less sensitive during processing to structural cues that render pronouns exempt from condition B, and prefer to link a pronoun to a salient subject antecedent instead.

  2. English Language Teacher Education: Rewriting S-1 National Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Soenardi Djiwandono

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of an overall attempt to improve secondary school teacher education, a program has been launched to review and develop the national curriculum (KURNAS of English language teacher education in Indonesia as a means to improve the quality of teachers of English. The new curriculum is at the same time intended to be a revision of the 1995 national curriculum supposedly in use now. For the purpose a team of three members was appointed by the Secondary School Teacher Development Project (nationally known as Proyek PGSM, comprising English teaching professionalls from Universitas Negeri Malang, GAJAHMADA UNIVERSITY, and a senior high school teacher of English. Following a study of the existing documents related to ELT in Indonesia, an initial draft was written and gradually developed following a series of discussions and exchanges of ideas with teachers and profesionalls in the field of ELT. By the 3 rd year of the appointment of the team, the draft for the new KURNAS comprising Books I, II, and III, has been completed and ready for a try-out. The try-out was intended to put into practise the Intensive Course (IC Program as one of the most important components of the new KURNAS for the development of fluency in English as an essential basis for the preparation of competent high school teachers of English. This article describes the background and the underlying principles of the curriculum revision, along with the classification and identification of courses, descriptions of courses their and syllabus outlines.

  3. ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHER CANDIDATES’ PERCEPTIONS OF LANGUAGE TEACHERS: A METAPHOR STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep ÇETİN KÖROĞLU

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metaphor studies are accepted as research tools by general education and language pedagogy scholars in related fields. It is considered that metaphors are useful tools to investigate and construct teacher’s professional life. Metaphor studies generally focus on teacher-produced or student-produced metaphor images and qualitative data are used to analyze these images. The current research utilized pre-service English language teacher’s metaphor perceptions about English language teachers. Therefore, the participants of the study will be English language teachers in the future, their perceptions about English language teachers are quite important to investigate their identity building process. The participants of the present research are 128 English language teacher candidates who are first graders of English language teaching department at Gazi University. The data were collected in 2014- 2015 academic years. The data were collected through a scale which had been developed by researchers of the study. The scale consists of two part that are investigate participants’ perceptions through their drawings and metaphors. The data were analyzed through content analysis. The results show that English language teacher candidates’ perceptions vary and mostly positive metaphors were used to describe English language teachers. The current research is significant in terms of understanding English language teacher candidates’ perceptions about their future career.

  4. Structure and meaning in English a guide for teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Structure and Meaning in English is designed to help teachers of English develop an understanding of those aspects of English which are especially relevant for learners who speak other languages. Using corpus research, Graeme Kennedy cuts to the heart of what is important in the teaching of English. The book provides pedagogically- relevant information about English at the levels of sounds, words, sentences and texts. It draws attention to those linguistic items and processes which research has shown are typically hard for learners and which lead to errors.Each chapter contains:a description o

  5. Socialization Through Teacher Talk In An English Bilingual Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blerta Xheko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the language practices of a teacher in an English bilingual class. The children were learning English in Year One of elementary school. The teacher consistently spoke English with the children. The description of the teacher's talk shows how she used English for classroom management, for instructions, for teaching subject content and for personal exchanges. The analysis reveals the significance of ongoing classroom activities for language learning. English was spoken in contexts familiar to students and consistent with and coherent with school practices. Students heard and observed English as part of normal classroom activities. English was embedded in the social practices of classroom encounters. The paper proposes that children's experiences of classroom talk socialize them into the discourses of classroom activities and of school subjects. The children learnt English through observation and participation. This was a process of apprenticeship into using English for making meaning in social practices. From this perspective, the children were learning to mean in English through their participation in the social practices of the class.

  6. Defining the Impact of Non-Native Species

    OpenAIRE

    Jeschke, Jonathan M; Bacher, Sven; Tim M Blackburn; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; Essl, Franz; Evans, Thomas; Gaertner, Mirijam; Hulme, Philip E.; Kühn, Ingolf; Mrugała, Agata; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Ricciardi, Anthony; Richardson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-native species cause changes in the ecosystems to which they are introduced. These changes, or some of them, are usually termed impacts; they can be manifold and potentially damaging to ecosystems and biodiversity. However, the impacts of most non-native species are poorly understood, and a synthesis of available information is being hindered because authors often do not clearly define impact. We argue that explicitly defining the impact of non-native species will promote progress toward ...

  7. A Study on College English Teachers' Use of discourse Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冬梅

    2009-01-01

    The paper intends to explore the use of Discourse Markers (DMs) by college English teachers in the classroom and to achieve an understanding of the range of functions that those discourse markers perform.

  8. Curriculum Implementation and Re-Training of Teachers in English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Teachers in English Language: Pre-Conditions for. Functional Nigerian ... quality of education offered to learners at primary and secondary levels. It is also a pointer to ..... quality of training, low motivation, lack of quality control and lack of in-.

  9. Conceptualization of American English Native Speaker Norms: A Case Study of an English Language Classroom in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyungja

    2011-01-01

    This case study aims to reveal how conceptualization of native speakership was constructed and reinforced in a South Korean university classroom of English as a foreign language (EFL). In addition, it examines how this conceptualization positions native speakers, a non-native EFL teacher, and learners, and what learning opportunities were provided…

  10. The Impacts of Globalisation on EFL Teacher Education through English as a Medium of Instruction: An Example from Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thi Kim Anh; Nguyen, Hoa Thi Mai; Le, Truc Thi Thanh

    2013-01-01

    Recent research on language planning and policy highlights the effects of globalisation in spreading the English language as a medium of instruction (EMI) in non-native English speaking (NNES) countries. This trend has encouraged many universities in NNES countries to offer EMI education programmes with the objective of developing national human…

  11. Personal Problems and English Teachers: Are They Always Bad?

    OpenAIRE

    Muhd Khudri Johari; Nur Zaimah Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Personal problems involve things that are difficult to deal with, felt or experienced by certain people; in this particular study, Malaysian English language teachers. The relationship between personal problems and teaching reflection practice is researched quantitatively as there is a significant concern in the current education system that English language teachers are not doing well in educating the current generation, hence the professional developments needed to be carried out (Masilaman...

  12. Working with English Language Learners: Preservice Teachers and Photovoice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    This study utilizes documentary photography and storytelling, photovoice, to identify the educational realities of 16 Hispanic English Language Learners from an urban elementary school in the Southwest. Reflections from preservice teachers who utilized photovoice to gather data from the English Language Learners of this study are also discussed.…

  13. A Role for English Language Teachers in Trauma Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Because English language teachers should take into account the social-psychological situation of the students they teach, they must be sensitive to the effects of traumatic stress among learners. Refugee and immigrant children are frequently survivors of trauma, along with their peers in crisis-torn English as a foreign language settings around…

  14. A Role for English Language Teachers in Trauma Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Because English language teachers should take into account the social-psychological situation of the students they teach, they must be sensitive to the effects of traumatic stress among learners. Refugee and immigrant children are frequently survivors of trauma, along with their peers in crisis-torn English as a foreign language settings around…

  15. Why Do They Want to Become English Teachers: A Case Study of Taiwanese EFL Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Although it has been argued that knowledge on initial motivation for choosing teaching as a career is necessary for improving teacher education programmes and teacher education policies, there is a lack of research investigating this issue in the fields of English as a second language (ESL) and English as a foreign language (EFL). Grounded in Watt…

  16. Pronunciation and phonetics a practical guide for English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adam

    2014-01-01

    This engaging, succinct text is an introduction to both phonetics and phonology as applied to the teaching of pronunciation to English language learners. Section 1 selectively covers the main areas of phonetics and phonology, without going into any area in more depth than the average English language teacher requires or that the average English language teacher trainee can handle. Section 2 focuses on practical issues related to learners and how they learn languages, and what represents good practice in terms of classroom activities for pronunciation—including aspects such as targets, motiva

  17. Toward a Conversation between ESL Teachers and Intensive English Program Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussu, Lucie

    2010-01-01

    Several scholars have investigated the strengths and weaknesses of native-English-speaking (NES) and nonnative-English-speaking (NNES) teachers of English as a second language (ESL), but few researchers have explored intensive English program (IEP) administrators' and ESL teachers' perspectives on teacher training and the strengths and weaknesses…

  18. English Language Proficiency and Teacher Judgments of the Academic and Interpersonal Competence of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freberg, Miranda E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how English language proficiency is related to teacher judgments of students' academic and interpersonal competence. It was hypothesized that English Language Learner (ELL) students would generally be perceived as having weaker academic and interpersonal skills than their non-ELL counterparts regardless…

  19. The Impact of the "Teaching English through English" Policy on Teachers and Teaching in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Asian countries including South Korea have been trying to redefine the role of English in response to globalisation. The impact of this on English language teaching and on Korean society more generally has been well documented; however, the impact of this change on individual teachers and their teaching calls for further…

  20. An Investigation of Pre-Service English Language Teacher Attitudes towards Varieties of English in Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzenberg, Jason

    2013-01-01

    English has become the default language of global communication, and users around the world are adapting the traditional standards of grammar and interaction. It is imperative that teachers of English keep pace with these changing conceptualizations of the language as well as the changing expectations of its users so that they can best prepare…

  1. The Impact of the "Teaching English through English" Policy on Teachers and Teaching in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Asian countries including South Korea have been trying to redefine the role of English in response to globalisation. The impact of this on English language teaching and on Korean society more generally has been well documented; however, the impact of this change on individual teachers and their teaching calls for further…

  2. Pedagogy and Practice for Online English Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawan, Faridah; Wiechart, Kelly A.; Warren, Amber N.; Park, Jaehan

    2016-01-01

    Pedagogy--not technology--drives effective online instruction. The authors of "Pedagogy and Practice for Online English Language Teacher Education" discuss foundational theories of pedagogy and link those theories with their own practices in online courses for language teacher education and language teaching. This book discusses and…

  3. The Nature of Feedback in English: Teacher Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargusch, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a study that investigated formative assessment practices of Senior English teachers in the standards-based Queensland assessment system. This paper focuses in particular on the teachers' provision of feedback on rough draft summative assessment items. It identifies the links between assessment criteria and…

  4. Positioning Foreign English Language Teachers in the Japanese University Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsed, Craig; Volet, Simone

    2013-01-01

    This study employs positioning theory to explore the experiences of adjunct foreign English language teachers (AFELT) in the Japanese university sector. The research is located in the broad internationalisation discourse and considers AFELT positions as "foreign" teachers at a time when the Japanese university sector is aiming to…

  5. The Art of Being an English Teacher in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyden, Grace

    2015-01-01

    The role of the English teacher in Australia is constantly being negotiated and with every ideological development teachers are positioned to question their professional values and practices. Much attention has been afforded to this discussion. The purpose of this paper is to (a) provide an analysis of the evolution of the art of being an English…

  6. English Language Learner Teacher Effectiveness and the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tammy; Wells, Lorra

    2017-01-01

    Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and teacher effectiveness are among the most contentious issues in education today. With an increase in English language learners (ELLs) and the rigorous requirements imposed by the CCSS, teachers are left unprepared and ELLs struggle to stay afloat. Using California as a case study, this research synthesis…

  7. Supporting Teachers of English Learners by Leveraging Students' Linguistic Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Robert T.; David, Sam; Pacheco, Mark; Risko, Victoria J.; Pray, Lisa; Fagan, Keenan; Gonzales, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we seek to inform policy regarding the professional development of teachers of students who are learning English. To do this, we employ a framework that considers the pedagogical knowledge, practical teaching skills, and dispositions recommended by PD researchers and ELL teacher educators. We then present an approach that…

  8. The Art of Being an English Teacher in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyden, Grace

    2015-01-01

    The role of the English teacher in Australia is constantly being negotiated and with every ideological development teachers are positioned to question their professional values and practices. Much attention has been afforded to this discussion. The purpose of this paper is to (a) provide an analysis of the evolution of the art of being an English…

  9. Preparing Pre-Service English Teachers for Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how dialogue journals and response journals can be used to encourage reflection among pre-service teachers. Thirty-one pre-service English teachers from two Hong Kong universities participated in the study. One group wrote dialogue journals and the other group wrote response journals throughout two semesters on two separate…

  10. Teaching of Mathematics and Science in English: The Teachers' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Mohamad Fadhili Bin; Noor, Mohd Asri Bin Mohd; Mokhtar, Ahmad Azman Bin; Rawian, Rafizah Binti Mohd; Othman, Mahmod Bin; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The policy to change the medium of instruction in the teaching of Mathematics and Science from Bahasa Melayu (Malay Language) to English in 2003 is an important innovation affecting not only the students but also teachers of Mathematics and Science. However, how far the changes affect the teachers is the issue addressed in the paper. In fact the…

  11. On Teaching Methods: The Personal Experiences of Teachers of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Melinda L. F.

    2017-01-01

    With the globalization and internationalization of education, many teachers from Asian countries pursue their professional development in English-speaking settings. However, there seems to be scarce research on these teachers' expectations, lived experiences and identities in these contexts, and how their personal experiences influence their views…

  12. Business English as a Lingua Franca – A Cross-Cultural Perspective of Teaching English for Business Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Gajšt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In our era of globalisation, English is at the top of the languages used in international business. A vast majority of business communication in English is carried out by non-native speakers of English. In a cross-cultural exchange of information, the sender and the recipient come from different cultural backgrounds. The patterns of communication vary across the globe and non-native speakers tend to apply their native language patterns when communicating in English. This paper thus focuses on the concept of spoken communication and dimensions of culture and how they are reflected in communication patterns in different business situations. It also addresses the teaching of Business English as a lingua franca and the role of Business English teachers in helping learners develop their communicative and intercultural competence in order to communicate effectively in a multicultural work environment.

  13. Developing Teacher Oral Competency Framework for Secondary School Teachers: Moving Towards Meaningful Teaching of English Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahainis Mohd. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The secondary school English curriculum in Malaysia advocates that English could provide greater opportunities for students to improve their knowledge and skills in cross cultural settings. Additionally, they will be able to interact with students from other countries and improve their proficiency in English. Given the increasing importance of international interactions among English users from different backgrounds and the current approaches in ELT pedagogy in literature, this paper examines the oral competency skills of a group of English teachers. Data was collected in a seminar specially carried out for a group of selected English teachers. Through micro-teachings sessions, the English teachers demonstrated their use of oral communication skills in delivering the content of the subjects. This seminar was an attempt to establish the collaboration among recognised Excellent English Teachers and their colleagues to enhance their oral communication skills in classrooms. The results indicated the potential of developing an oral competency framework that could be constructed and referred to by secondary English teachers so as to enhance their effectiveness of teaching the content knowledge to their students. This oral competency framework would provide an excellent opportunity to help realise the purpose of using English as the medium of instruction as proposed within the curriculum.

  14. LITERARY CLINIC: GLOBAL LITERATURES AND ENGLISH TEACHER EDUCATION IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malia Spofford XAVIER

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Departing from the polyvalent metaphor of the “clinic,” this article discusses the results of the first phase of an English teacher education project, part of the Teaching Initiation Scholarship Program (PIBID/CAPES at a federal university in Brazil. Given the effects of globalization on language teaching and learning, the English teacher certification program needs to incorporate critical and intercultural perspectives in the reflexive dimension of the teacher education curriculum. One possible approach is the study of global English, or Anglophone, literatures utilizing a cultural studies and postcolonial theoretical framework. In accordance with recent observations by Festino (2011 and Lourenço (2011 about the importance of literatures in English for education in Brazil, I propose a multimodal and critical approach to the study of Anglophone literatures connected to teaching in basic education that also stimulates teacher reflection. This approach also seeks to illuminatethe role of English in Brazil and clarify the notion of content in English classes, as it relates to narrative. My analysis involves a triptych of literary genres from different countries: Kendal Hippolyte (poetry – St. Lucia, Chinua Achebe (novel – Nigeria, and Jhumpa Lahiri (short story – United States and India. Some strategies for transposing literary studies to the middle school English classroom in Brazil are also outlined.

  15. Pathways to Teacher Leadership among English-as-a-Second-Language Teachers: Professional Development by and for Emerging Teacher Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    While the scope of activities that constitute teacher leadership has become better defined, the professional development of emerging teacher leaders is just beginning to be discussed. In this study, the teacher leadership activities of beginning English-as-a-second-language teachers in a wide variety of settings in New York City public schools…

  16. Non-native speech perception in adverse conditions: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Lecumberri, M.L.; Cooke, M.P.; Cutler, A.

    2010-01-01

    If listening in adverse conditions is hard, then listening in a foreign language is doubly so: non-native listeners have to cope with both imperfect signals and imperfect knowledge. Comparison of native and non-native listener performance in speech-in-noise tasks helps to clarify the role of prior l

  17. Intelligibility of native and non-native Dutch Speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van

    2001-01-01

    The intelligibility of speech is known to be lower if the speaker is non-native instead of native for the given language. This study is aimed at quantifying the overall degradation due to limitations of non-native speakers of Dutch, specifically of Dutch-speaking Americans who have lived in the Neth

  18. Speech intelligibility of native and non-native speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The intelligibility of speech is known to be lower if the talker is non-native instead of native for the given language. This study is aimed at quantifying the overall degradation due to acoustic-phonetic limitations of non-native talkers of Dutch, specifically of Dutch-speaking Americans who have l

  19. English Pronunciation Lessons: A Teacher's Resource Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Catholic Migration Commission, Morong (Philippines).

    The manual for English pronunciation instruction is designed for use in intensive language courses for Southeast Asians learning English as a Second Language. An introductory section suggests classroom presentation and lesson planning techniques and gives background information on English phonology and pronunciation instruction. A variety of…

  20. Mathematics and English, Two Languages: Teachers' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Shosh; Markovits, Zvia

    2013-01-01

    English is an international language used all over the world. Mathematics is the language of sciences but it is also a language used in everyday life. Although both are perceived as languages, mathematics and English are considered as two completely distinct disciplines. In this paper we first discuss English and mathematics as languages. Then we…

  1. Challenges in Providing Trainings for English Teachers of Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nury Supriyanti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary English provision in Indonesia has started in 1994 in which English has the position as the local content subject in the elementary schools. English has then been part of the Indonesian elementary schoolchildren’s daily routines in many different ways. In the major cities, which are geographically then educationally more privileged,  the children might enjoy their English lessons because they have the qualified teachers who know English and how to teach it to young learners, they have appropriate and interesting materials as well as  appropriate techniques  to learn by. The case is quite different for the children of the less privileged areas where access to qualified teachers, appropriate materials and fun learning is almost impossible. These children have to be content with teachers with no English or child teaching background who are hired because only them who are available. The paper  describes the struggle of  the English Education department of the Yogyakarta State University  in the development of the EFC courses  in order to contribute to the provision of  English to elementary schools in Indonesia.

  2. Challenges in Providing Trainings for English Teachers of Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nury Supriyanti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary English provision in Indonesia has started in 1994 in which English has the position as the local content subject in the elementary schools. English has then been part of the Indonesian elementary schoolchildren’s daily routines in many different ways. In the major cities, which are geographically then educationally more privileged,  the children might enjoy their English lessons because they have the qualified teachers who know English and how to teach it to young learners, they have appropriate and interesting materials as well as  appropriate techniques  to learn by. The case is quite different for the children of the less privileged areas where access to qualified teachers, appropriate materials and fun learning is almost impossible. These children have to be content with teachers with no English or child teaching background who are hired because only them who are available. The paper  describes the struggle of  the English Education department of the Yogyakarta State University  in the development of the EFC courses  in order to contribute to the provision of  English to elementary schools in Indonesia.

  3. Types of Teacher Written Feedback on English Majors' Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊; SIRILUCK USAHA

    2010-01-01

    This present study focused on what major types of written feedback were often given by EFL writing teachers at Guizhou University. Eight hundred and sixty-four pieces of writing drafts by one hundred and fifty second year English major students provided with teacher written feedback by five teaching assistants, were analyzed and categorized in order to fred out the main types of feedback. It was found that Direct Correction was used most by the teachers, followed by Error Location, Verbal Cue, Marginal Commentary and End Commentary, respectively. The study raised several implications for English writing instruction in the similar context.

  4. Enacting Critical Literacy: The Case of a Language Minority Preservice Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyesun

    2014-01-01

    This narrative study of an Asian female prospective teacher describes a language minority student's ways of enacting critical literacy in a teacher preparation program in the United States. It discusses how she exerted her agency despite her perceived marginalization as a non-native English speaker. The findings demonstrate how she resisted…

  5. Speech Recognition of Non-Native Speech Using Native and Non-Native Acoustic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE ACOUSTIC MODELS David A. van Leeuwen and Rosemary Orr vanLeeuwentm .tno. nl R. 0rr~kno. azn. nl TNO Human Factors Research...a] is pronounced closer to the [c] by the vowels . Journal of Phonetics, 25:437-470, 1997. 32 [2] D. B. Paul and J. M. Baker. The design for [9] R. H...J. Kershaw, [12] Tony Robinson. Private Communication. L. Lamel, D. A. van Leeuwen , D. Pye, A. J. Robinson, H. J. M. Steeneken, and P. C. Wood- [13

  6. Attitudes of Rhode Island Secondary School English Teachers Toward Certain Objectives in the Teaching of English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, James David

    The purpose of this study was to (1) compile a list of English teaching objectives based upon a study of the literature, (2) discover teachers' attitudes toward these objectives, and (3) compare the attitudes of the teachers grouped according to age, sex, community composition, level of teaching, academic training, college major, longevity, and…

  7. Preservice English Teachers and Technology: A Consideration of Weblogs for the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffner, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Teaching with technology is a complex issue, at best, bound by issues of access, funding, support and time for both students and teachers (Young & Bush, 2004). When English teachers effectively integrate technology into their classrooms, however, they have the opportunity to positively engage students in the learning process. Considering the…

  8. The Teacher's Role and Teaching Procedures in the Teaching of Oral English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖倩

    2008-01-01

    English teachers in China are aware that what kind of English teaching method should be employed to improve student's linguistic acquisition and that communicative competence becomes more and more important.In English teaching, teachers always make it possible for students to be more often in contacts with the English language, thus creating an atmosphere of learning English language.Help students to jump over the gap between only reading English loudly and speaking English fluantly.Here I will show the importance of the teachers' role in English teaching and their applies in oral English teaching.

  9. Unveiling Pre-Service Language Teachers' Conceptualizations of Teachers of English through Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanoz, Suzan

    2016-01-01

    The present research aimed at conducting an analysis of metaphors Turkish pre-service language teachers generated about English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers. This study also examined whether and how the metaphors created by teacher candidates at different phases of their education demonstrated variation. The data gathered from 94…

  10. Teacher Education and Teacher Autonomy: Creating Spaces for Experimentation in Secondary School English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Phil

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a collective case study of four Hong Kong secondary school teachers' experiences of constraints on teacher autonomy in English language teaching, and their implications for teacher education. Findings suggested that the constraints were systemic and mainly organized around "Schemes of Work" and school-based…

  11. Dogs, Ponies, and the Improvement of Teaching: English Teachers' Perceptions of the Texas Teacher Appraisal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Renee T.; And Others

    This paper explores the impact of the Texas Teacher Appraisal System (TTAS) through an analysis of interviews with 24 high school English teachers. The first part of the paper discusses the development of the TTAS and the second section describes the study. The teachers were asked if and how the TTAS had affected their teaching performance, what…

  12. Thai Elementary School Teachers' English Pronunciation and Effects of Teacher Variables: Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoksilapatham, Budsaba

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe 147 Thai elementary school teachers' English pronunciation competence and to identify a teacher variable that has an impact on their pronunciation. The instrument used to collect data consisted of two parts: a questionnaire to elicit Thai teachers' personal information (i.e., seven variables in all),…

  13. Teachers' English Communication Skills: Using IELTS to Measure Competence of Graduates from a Singaporean Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ee-Ling; Chong, Sylvia; Ellis, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Possessing strong communication skills is essential in contributing to effective teaching. This paper investigates graduating student teachers' English language proficiency, as measured by IELTS tests scores, of graduating EL student teachers. The paper considers what teachers need to know about the English language given that English has been the…

  14. Reflections of a Non-professional Teacher of English (Native Speaker) on Teaching English in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    德里克·班以安

    1984-01-01

    @@ Between. 1979 and 1983 I have spent a total of almost 24 months teaching English to a variety of students in China, mainly at Fujian Teachers University and Sichuan Teachers College, but also at Jilin University and for a short time at Xiamen University. Most of my students were English majors, of the years '77, '78, '79 and '80,but they also included some young and middle-aged teachers, and some young staff members of foreign trade organisations.All in all, I had direct contact with over 500 students (mostly in classes of thirty or so) and taught for some 1200 hours.Contact with individual students was thus limited.

  15. Teaching Media in the Teaching of Arabic Language to Non-Native Arabic Speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rais Abdullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning media has demonstrated its superiority in helping educators or teachers in the process of conveying the message of learning more quickly and easily caught by the students. The media play a role in enriching the learning experience of students, increase their attention to the lesson, minimize differences in perception between teachers and students as well as to help resolve personal differences between students. The teaching Arabic to non-native speaker would be more interesting and easier to learn, remembered, understood and practiced by the students, if taught through the media. This article aims to explore the benefits, importance and role of instructional media in teaching Arabic to non- native Speaker

  16. How noise and language proficiency influence speech recognition by individual non-native listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Xie, Lingli; Li, Yongjun; Chatterjee, Monita; Ding, Nai

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how speech recognition in noise is affected by language proficiency for individual non-native speakers. The recognition of English and Chinese sentences was measured as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in sixty native Chinese speakers who never lived in an English-speaking environment. The recognition score for speech in quiet (which varied from 15%-92%) was found to be uncorrelated with speech recognition threshold (SRTQ/2), i.e. the SNR at which the recognition score drops to 50% of the recognition score in quiet. This result demonstrates separable contributions of language proficiency and auditory processing to speech recognition in noise.

  17. Every teacher is a language teacher: Preparing teacher candidates for English language learners through service-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary school teachers in the United States are facing urgent challenges in their increasingly heterogeneous classrooms where the presence of English language learners (ELLs is becoming the norm. This study reports preliminary findings of a qualitative, interpretive case study of secondary school teacher candidates learning to teach English language learners through service-learning in Northern California. In a semester-long tutoring project, candidates focused on individual ELLs in their inquiry into language learning, in which they (reconstructed their sociolinguistic knowledge of English and their tutees’ home languages in context. Moreover, the mutually beneficial relationships among members of the language community encouraged candidates’ critical reflections on language learning. The study offers instructional experiences for teachers and teacher educators to develop sociolinguistic and pedagogical tools while supporting, and being supported by, the ELL communities. Keywords: teacher education, service-learning, sociocultural perspective, English language learners, secondary schools, teacher knowledge

  18. Non-native English writing: an underestimated problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmett, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    Recently my husband, who works at a senior level in engineering science, grumbled about the amount of time he was having to put into reviewing research articles. “Doing the job of the supervisors” was how he put it. Articles are submitted that are nowhere near a “final” form. He implied that some su

  19. The NNEST lens non native english speakers in TESOL

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    Mahboob, Ahmar

    2010-01-01

    The NNEST Lens invites you to imagine how the field of TESOL and applied linguistics can develop if we use the multilingual, multicultural, and multinational perspectives of an NNEST lens to re-examine our assumptions, practices, and theories in the field

  20. Voice vs. Text Chats: Their Efficacy for Learning Probing Questions by Non-Native Speaking Medical Professionals in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Through an English for Specific Purposes (ESP): Communication in Nursing online course, the present study examines the efficacy of synchronous voice-based and text-based chats as instructional and communicative modes in learning to use open questions for probing in therapeutic dialogues by non-native speaking (NNS) participants, students of a…

  1. Integrating Academic Language, Thinking, and Content: Learning Scaffolds for Non-Native Speakers in the Middle Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to explore possibilities for scaffolding academic language and historical thinking for non-native English speaking students in two middle school classrooms. The teaching approach focused on six dimensions of historical thinking: background knowledge, cause, effect, bias, empathy, and application. The…

  2. Communicative Functions of the Nurse-Patient Relationship: Observations of Native and Non-Native Nurses in United States Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Jo Linda

    A study compared the nurse-patient communication of native and non-native English-speaking nurses. Examination of the literature on nurse-patient relationships and a brief survey of native nurses yielded an instrument for observation of nurses. Ten nurses were observed for 3 hourse each. Transcripts of the observations of the five non-native…

  3. Non-Native Japanese Listeners' Perception of Vowel Length Contrasts in Japanese and Modern Standard Arabic (MSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Kimiko

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the perception of short vs. long vowel contrasts in Japanese and Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) by four groups of listeners differing in their linguistic backgrounds: native Arabic (NA), native Japanese (NJ), non-native Japanese (NNJ) and Australian English (OZ) speakers. The NNJ and OZ groups shared the first language…

  4. Prereferral Process with Latino English Language Learners with Specific Learning Disabilities: Perceptions of English-as-a-Second-Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlis, Emily; Xu, Yaoying

    2016-01-01

    This study explored perceptions of English-as-a-second-language (ESL) teachers on the prereferral process for Latino English language learners (ELLs). Using Colaizzi's (1978) phenomenological approach, qualitative data were collected through interviews with four ESL teachers. Analyses of the data indicated that the ESL teachers used research-based…

  5. Vowel perception: Effects of non-native language versus non-native dialect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Smits, R.; Cooper, N.

    2005-01-01

    Three groups of listeners identified the vowel in CV and VC syllables produced by an American English talker. The listeners were (a) native speakers of American English, (b) native speakers of Australian English (different dialect), and (c) native speakers of Dutch (different language). The syllable

  6. Vowel perception: Effects of non-native language versus non-native dialect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Smits, R.; Cooper, N.

    2005-01-01

    Three groups of listeners identified the vowel in CV and VC syllables produced by an American English talker. The listeners were (a) native speakers of American English, (b) native speakers of Australian English (different dialect), and (c) native speakers of Dutch (different language). The

  7. Reflecting Teaching——An Effective Strategy of College English Teachers ' Autonomous Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宗娟

    2015-01-01

    Reflecing teaching is an effective way for college English teachers'autonomous development,college English teach-ers must concern about it.There are some Some specific ways of reflecting teaching for college English teachers,such as:Teach-ing journals,Surveys and questionnaire,Lesson reports,Audio or video recording of lesson,Observation.If these ways can be involved in the daily teaching,college English teachers'ability will be improved greatly.

  8. Ten Years on: The Hong Kong Language Proficiency Assessment for Teachers of English (LPATE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniam, David; Falvey, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The "Language Proficiency Assessment for Teachers of English" (LPATE) is a test of standards of English language ability for Hong Kong primary and secondary school teachers of English. The impetus for the creation of the LPATE arose, in 1996, because of concerns in business and education communities over falling English language…

  9. Motivation and Confidence of Indonesian Teachers to Use English as a Medium of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aritonang, Mangasa

    2014-01-01

    This research paper investigates the motivation and confidence of Indonesian teachers of non-English to learn English and to use it as a medium of instruction resulting from their participation in a blended learning course. The purpose of the English learning for this particular group of teachers was to enable them to create English-speaking…

  10. The Correlation between Teacher Feedback and Learner Motivation in Language Learning among non-English Majors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏发国

    2015-01-01

    This paper centers on the correlation between teacher feedback and learner motivation in language learning among English majors.Quantitative research is employed in this study.100 non-English majors and 20 teachers participated in the study.The major finding is that there is a significant positive correlation between teacher feedback and learner motivation in language learning among non-English majors.

  11. Teaching English for the First Time: Anxiety among Japanese Elementary-School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Tomohisa

    2011-01-01

    English language education officially started in Japanese elementary schools in 2009. Homeroom teachers, whether experienced or not, are responsible for teaching the subject to students. Additionally, teachers are often required to team-teach with a native English speaker. It is plausible that Japanese teachers are anxious about teaching English.…

  12. Learning and Teaching Technology in English Teacher Education: Findings from a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Donna L.; Hallman, Heidi L.; Caughlan, Samantha; Renzi, Laura; Rush, Leslie S.; Meineke, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on one aspect of a large-scale nationwide study that surveyed English teacher educators about English teacher preparation programs throughout the United States. One aspect of the study focused on how technology is integrated within the context of English teacher education programs, asking the question, "As an area of…

  13. Teaching English for the First Time: Anxiety among Japanese Elementary-School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Tomohisa

    2011-01-01

    English language education officially started in Japanese elementary schools in 2009. Homeroom teachers, whether experienced or not, are responsible for teaching the subject to students. Additionally, teachers are often required to team-teach with a native English speaker. It is plausible that Japanese teachers are anxious about teaching English.…

  14. Learning and Teaching Technology in English Teacher Education: Findings from a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Donna L.; Hallman, Heidi L.; Caughlan, Samantha; Renzi, Laura; Rush, Leslie S.; Meineke, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on one aspect of a large-scale nationwide study that surveyed English teacher educators about English teacher preparation programs throughout the United States. One aspect of the study focused on how technology is integrated within the context of English teacher education programs, asking the question, "As an area of…

  15. Contemporary Literacies and Technologies in English Language Arts Teacher Education: Shift Happens!

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Marshall; Pope, Carol; Reid, Louann

    2015-01-01

    Three leaders of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Conference on English Education (CEE) reflect on the changes that have occurred in English language arts teacher education in the past 15 years since the first edition of "Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education" ("CITE Journal") was published.…

  16. Primary School English Teachers'Research Engagement%Primary School English Teachers'Research Engagement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuesong Gao; Alice Wai Kwan Chow

    2012-01-01

    Research engagement is an important means for teachers to develop their professional competence. This paper reports on an enquiry into the research engagement of a group of primary school English language teachers in Guangdong province on the Chinese mainland. Drawing on questionnaire data and teachers' interview narratives, the paper examines how these Chinese primary school teachers experienced research and what their conceptions of good quality research were. While the enquiry revealed that the participants had a variety of research experiences, it also revealed that their

  17. The role of abstraction in non-native speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajak, Bozena; Levy, Roger

    2014-09-01

    The end-result of perceptual reorganization in infancy is currently viewed as a reconfigured perceptual space, "warped" around native-language phonetic categories, which then acts as a direct perceptual filter on any non-native sounds: naïve-listener discrimination of non-native-sounds is determined by their mapping onto native-language phonetic categories that are acoustically/articulatorily most similar. We report results that suggest another factor in non-native speech perception: some perceptual sensitivities cannot be attributed to listeners' warped perceptual space alone, but rather to enhanced general sensitivity along phonetic dimensions that the listeners' native language employs to distinguish between categories. Specifically, we show that the knowledge of a language with short and long vowel categories leads to enhanced discrimination of non-native consonant length contrasts. We argue that these results support a view of perceptual reorganization as the consequence of learners' hierarchical inductive inferences about the structure of the language's sound system: infants not only acquire the specific phonetic category inventory, but also draw higher-order generalizations over the set of those categories, such as the overall informativity of phonetic dimensions for sound categorization. Non-native sound perception is then also determined by sensitivities that emerge from these generalizations, rather than only by mappings of non-native sounds onto native-language phonetic categories.

  18. The Accented EFL Teacher: Classroom Implications (El acento del profesor de inglés como lengua extranjera: implicaciones pedagógicas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda Arboleda, Argemiro; Castro Garcés, Ángela Yicely

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a research study on how significant having a foreign accent is for non-native English as a foreign language teachers and learners at university level. It points out the perceptions that teachers and students have about the most relevant issues in the teaching and learning processes. Data were collected by means…

  19. Foreign English Language Teachers' Local Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusafzai, Hamid Ali Khan

    2015-01-01

    ELT methods have been criticized for being limited and inadequate. Postmethod pedagogy has been offered as an alternate to these methods. The postmethod pedagogy emphasises localization of pedagogy and celebrates local culture, teachers and knowledge. Localizing pedagogy is easy for local teachers as knowledge and understanding of the local comes…

  20. Communicative Teacher Talk in the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xuelian

    2009-01-01

    Communicative approach has become popular in ELT in recent years. Good teacher talk lays focus on how effectively it could promote genuine communication in the classroom. In this essay, communicative teacher talk is studied, and its features are explored based on authentic classroom transcripts, and a summary of the existing problems is provided.

  1. Native English Speaking Teachers' Beliefs about Korean EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Cheongsook

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate native English-speaking teachers' beliefs about Korean EFL learners, following a qualitative case study approach. Participants consisted of 3 Americans and 15 Canadians, aged 29-41, who were a part of a university teaching staff in Korea. The data collection employed questionnaires and interviews. The results…

  2. French Immersion for English Language Learners?: Kindergarten Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Callie

    2016-01-01

    Given the increasingly diverse, multilingual student body in Canada, the call for increased inclusion in education, and in light of research highlighting the potential for inclusion in French immersion (FI) to be limited by gatekeepers, this study examines the beliefs of kindergarten teachers regarding the inclusion of English language learners in…

  3. Intercultural Communicative Competence: Exploring English Language Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tony Johnstone; Sachdev, Itesh

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the beliefs and practices of experienced teachers in the USA, UK and France relating to the application of a model of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) to English language programmes. Broadly, "intercultural" approaches to language learning and teaching are strongly advocated in both the…

  4. The Professional Identity of English Teachers in the Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Kate

    2010-01-01

    The paper reports on a research study investigating the professional identity of English teachers in the secondary school in the UK, and the effects of their subject philosophies and their conceptions of learning on their teaching. The various and often competing definitions of the subject have a long history, and a number of factors have been…

  5. English Language Teacher Education in Turkey: Policy vs Academic Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingappa, Laura J.; Polat, Nihat

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines curriculum frameworks in English language teacher education (ELTE) programs in Turkey in light of current second language (L2) teaching standards and research vs Turkey's Higher Education Council (HEC) mandates. It also investigates program directors' perceptions about the current situations of their programs with…

  6. The Nature of Selected English Teachers' Online Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodesiler, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This article documents an investigation into the nature of selected secondary English teachers' online participation across platforms (i.e., blogs, microblogs, social networking sites) as they explored issues related to teaching, learning, and literacy. Ethnographic content analysis of online artifacts generated over approximately 10 months…

  7. English-Language Teachers' Engagement with Research: Findings from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.; Pervin, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on a small-scale study in which we investigated English-language teachers' engagement with educational research. We conceptualized engagement with research as reading and systematically using research for professional development. Using questionnaires and in-depth interviews, we gathered empirical materials from 40…

  8. Elementary Physical Education Teachers' Experiences in Teaching English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe and explain the views on teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) held by six elementary physical education (PE) teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. Situated in positioning theory, the research approach was descriptive-qualitative. The primary sources of data were face-to-face…

  9. Narrative Inquiry: Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Teaching English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Chang

    2012-01-01

    Informed by the narrative inquiry approach (Connelly & Clandinin, 1990), this qualitative study examined preservice teachers' narratives to investigate what they think, know, and believe in teaching English learners. Beyond just telling stories, narrative structures and meanings were examined with the goal of gaining insight of the preservice…

  10. Turkish Prospective English Teachers' Reflections on Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mine; Geçikli, Merve; Yesilyurt, Savas

    2016-01-01

    This study is an attempt to present the reflections of prospective English teachers in Turkey on teaching practice over their experiences and perceptions. A mixed-method research design was conducted through the use of a questionnaire involving a 5-Likert scale and one open-ended question. The participants were 120 senior students at ELT…

  11. Critical Literacy through Initial Teacher Education in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I seek to ascertain whether critical literacy may have an important and realisable place in current English pedagogy, having first tried to establish what is meant by critical literacy, and what its contexts are for my purposes here, including the nature of initial teacher education (ITE). The paper then reports and reflects on some…

  12. What English Teachers Need to Know about Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdick, William

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that English teachers need to know that grammar is a difficult subject; know what children know about grammar; know that grammatical error is complex; and know more about language than just grammar. Concludes with the advice of Noam Chomsky--that grammar should be taught for its own intrinsic interest. (RS)

  13. What English Teachers Need to Know about Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdick, William

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that English teachers need to know that grammar is a difficult subject; know what children know about grammar; know that grammatical error is complex; and know more about language than just grammar. Concludes with the advice of Noam Chomsky--that grammar should be taught for its own intrinsic interest. (RS)

  14. Critical Literacy through Initial Teacher Education in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I seek to ascertain whether critical literacy may have an important and realisable place in current English pedagogy, having first tried to establish what is meant by critical literacy, and what its contexts are for my purposes here, including the nature of initial teacher education (ITE). The paper then reports and reflects on some…

  15. A Study of the Factors Leading English Teachers to Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cephe, Pasa Tevfik

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a research study carried out on teacher burnout with a group of English instructors (N=44) in order to identify the major factor(s) leading instructors to burnout at various levels. A survey research model was first applied to find out the instructors (N=37) with a burnout problem and categorize them at different levels of…

  16. Narrative Inquiry: Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Teaching English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Chang

    2012-01-01

    Informed by the narrative inquiry approach (Connelly & Clandinin, 1990), this qualitative study examined preservice teachers' narratives to investigate what they think, know, and believe in teaching English learners. Beyond just telling stories, narrative structures and meanings were examined with the goal of gaining insight of the preservice…

  17. Elementary Physical Education Teachers' Experiences in Teaching English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe and explain the views on teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) held by six elementary physical education (PE) teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. Situated in positioning theory, the research approach was descriptive-qualitative. The primary sources of data were face-to-face…

  18. A Study of the Factors Leading English Teachers to Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cephe, Pasa Tevfik

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a research study carried out on teacher burnout with a group of English instructors (N=44) in order to identify the major factor(s) leading instructors to burnout at various levels. A survey research model was first applied to find out the instructors (N=37) with a burnout problem and categorize them at different levels of…

  19. English-Language Teachers' Engagement with Research: Findings from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.; Pervin, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on a small-scale study in which we investigated English-language teachers' engagement with educational research. We conceptualized engagement with research as reading and systematically using research for professional development. Using questionnaires and in-depth interviews, we gathered empirical materials from 40…

  20. Incorporating English Language Teaching Through Science for K-2 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Therese; Shea, Lauren M.

    2012-06-01

    English learners are faced with the dual challenge of acquiring English while learning academic content through the medium of the new language (Lee et al. in J Res Sci Teach 45(6):726-747, 2008; Stoddart et al. in J Res Sci Teach 39(8):664-687, 2002) and therefore need specific accommodations to achieve in both English and the content areas. Teachers require higher quality and new forms of professional development to learn and meet the needs of their students. This study examines the impact of one professional development model that explicitly embedded language learning strategies into science inquiry lessons. It also demonstrates how teachers involved in the PD program improve their self-efficacy about language instruction embedded in content and how they interpret and implement the methodology.

  1. A Study of Teacher Feedback in Different English Class Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huan

    2016-01-01

    This essay mainly focuses on the feedback move in IRF(initiate-response-feedback) to investigate the characters and functions of teacher feedback in different class types through classroom observation. The research finds that (1) teachers in dif-ferent class types prefer to adopt evaluative feedback and use more positive feedback .(2) the proportion of each feedback is dif-ferent in listening and speaking, reading and writing class. The implications are that English teachers in senior high school should adopt different feedback flexibly and consider what kind of feedback is more likely elicit the students’output in different class types.

  2. How to improve the students' grades for an English teacher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶长青

    2015-01-01

    The teacher plays a very important role on the stage of education. Although behaving well is important for a student, the grade of him is more. Then how to improve the students' grades for an English teacher? This passage tells you about it from three aspects:1. Lead-in in a novel way and motivate the students' learning interests;2. Set up the new relationship between the teachers and the students;3. Build the cooperative relationship between students and students,which are helpful to improve the students' grades.

  3. Teacher Autonomy through Reflective Journals among Teachers of English as a Foreign Language in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Zubeyde Sinem

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the use of reflective journals to help develop the autonomy and decision-making of in-service teachers of English as a foreign language in Turkey. It investigated how teachers gained autonomy and decision-making skills when they were given the opportunity to critically reflect on the classroom processes in their own contexts.…

  4. Becoming a Teacher: The Identity Construction Experiences of Beginning English Language Teachers in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, John

    2012-01-01

    Debate over educational reform in many countries has addressed the question of how to attract and retain teachers. As part of a multiple case study that includes eight beginning English language teachers in Hong Kong, this paper offers an in-depth analysis of the experiences of two participants, Christine and Samuel, during their initial year of…

  5. "Lion Tamers and Baby Sitters": First-Year English Teachers' Perceptions of Their Undergraduate Teacher Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Bill

    1983-01-01

    Personal narratives from first-year English teachers reveal that the social system of the schools in which they teach, the instructional system and its accompanying curriculum requirements and restraints, and the nature of the student population become dominant in determining teachers' behavior and their attitudes toward teaching. (HOD)

  6. Teachers' Professional Knowledge for Teaching English as a Foreign Language: Assessing the Outcomes of Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Johannes; Lammerding, Sandra; Nold, Günter; Rohde, Andreas; Strauß, Sarah; Tachtsoglou, Sarantis

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing research interest in subject-specific teacher knowledge, the scientific understanding regarding teachers' professional knowledge for teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) is very limited. This study therefore applies standardized tests to directly assess content knowledge (CK), pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), and…

  7. Teachers' Professional Knowledge for Teaching English as a Foreign Language: Assessing the Outcomes of Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Johannes; Lammerding, Sandra; Nold, Günter; Rohde, Andreas; Strauß, Sarah; Tachtsoglou, Sarantis

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing research interest in subject-specific teacher knowledge, the scientific understanding regarding teachers' professional knowledge for teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) is very limited. This study therefore applies standardized tests to directly assess content knowledge (CK), pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), and…

  8. An investigation into the language needs of pre-service teachers of English for the language proficiency assessment for teachers (English) in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the language needs of pre-service teachers of English for the Language Proficiency Assessment for Teachers (English) (LPATE)). More specifically, the study aims to identify 1) the language needs of pre-service teachers in terms of language difficulty(s) and 2) how different demographic backgrounds of these teachers (e.g. a major in an English language-related subject/ education and the length of stay in an English-speaking country) may affect their perceived areas of langu...

  9. An introduction to an English Teacher Education Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉华

    2012-01-01

      Teacher training for primary and secondary schools in the underdeveloped areas in China was rather inadequate in terms of teaching skills. It’s imperative to direct more attention to the English teachers in these areas and provide opportunities for them to receive in-service training so that they can update their subject matter knowledge and pedagogic knowledge to facili⁃tate their teaching. In light of this demand, this paper presents a one-year-long program that is tailored to the needs of the sec⁃ondary school teachers of English in the inland areas, by giving a detailed description of the knowledge base they need together with the rationale underlying such a design.

  10. The influence of the language proficiency of English teachers who are not native speakers of English on the language skills of their learners / Rhelda Krügel

    OpenAIRE

    Krügel, Rhelda

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the language proficiency of English teachers who are not native speakers of English on the language skills of their learners. The words: English teachers in this study refer to teachers teaching English as subject learning area but who are not native speakers of English. The word learners refer to English second language learners. Although the literature review highlights the specific features of each of the language skills namely l...

  11. The influence of the language proficiency of English teachers who are not native speakers of English on the language skills of their learners / Rhelda Krügel

    OpenAIRE

    Krügel, Rhelda

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the language proficiency of English teachers who are not native speakers of English on the language skills of their learners. The words: English teachers in this study refer to teachers teaching English as subject learning area but who are not native speakers of English. The word learners refer to English second language learners. Although the literature review highlights the specific features of each of the language skills namely l...

  12. Bridging the language gap: Exploring science teachers' dual role as teachers of content and English literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Suzanne C.

    Responsibility for educating English language learners is increasingly falling on the shoulders of content specialists at the secondary level, as students are mainstreamed into classes. Therefore, providing these students an opportunity to achieve academic success depends largely on the quality of mainstream instruction (Cornell, 1995). Most teachers receive little or no preparation in how to work with English language learners. In my study, I address the instructional issues confronting three white, monolingual English-speaking middle school science teachers who must meet the demands of an increasing English language learner population. Specifically, this study explores teacher beliefs and enactment of reform-oriented science and sheltered instructional approaches to develop English language learners scientific and English literacy skills. I also explore the relationships that exist between these two dynamics in an effort to determine the extent to which teachers take on a dual role as teachers promoting English language and science proficiency. Using a participant observation case study method and my adaptation of Schwab's commonplaces heuristic, I analyzed the relationship between teacher beliefs, milieu, subject matter, and enactment in bridging the language gap in the science classroom for English language learners. The most noteworthy finding of this study was the significant role of milieu in enacting lessons that bridge the language gap and foster the development of English language learners science and English literacy skills. The findings suggest that greater attention be given to helping teachers establish a relationship-driven classroom milieu. You can provide all kinds of courses or professional learning experiences to improve teachers' instructional practices, but they must also recognize the importance of establishing relationships with their students; the coursework they take will not supplant the need to foster a warm and safe environment for all

  13. On Guidelines for College English Teaching and Challenges for College English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyin

    2016-01-01

    This article performs an exploratory study of the newly formulated "Guidelines" for College English Teaching ("Draft Exposure")("2015")("Guidelines"), aiming at exploring how different the latest Guidelines is from the previous ones, what challenges it brings to teachers and how these challenges can be…

  14. The Relationship between University Learning Experiences and English Teaching Self-Efficacy: Perspectives of Five Final-Year Pre-Service English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Ksenia; Pill, Shane

    2015-01-01

    No literature exists on English teaching efficacy or self-efficacy or on pre-service teachers' English teaching self-efficacy and its relationship to pre-service teacher education. This project addressed this conceptual and methodological gap in current teacher efficacy research literature. Five pre-service English teachers in their final year of…

  15. Engineering biofuel tolerance in non-native producing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hu; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of renewable biofuels through microbiological processes has drawn significant attention in recent years, mostly due to the increasing concerns on the petroleum fuel shortages and the environmental consequences of the over-utilization of petroleum-based fuels. In addition to native biofuel-producing microbes that have been employed for biofuel production for decades, recent advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology have made it possible to produce biofuels in several non-native biofuel-producing microorganisms. Compared to native producers, these non-native systems carry the advantages of fast growth, simple nutrient requirements, readiness for genetic modifications, and even the capability to assimilate CO2 and solar energy, making them competitive alternative systems to further decrease the biofuel production cost. However, the tolerance of these non-native microorganisms to toxic biofuels is naturally low, which has restricted the potentials of their application for high-efficiency biofuel production. To address the issues, researches have been recently conducted to explore the biofuel tolerance mechanisms and to construct robust high-tolerance strains for non-native biofuel-producing microorganisms. In this review, we critically summarize the recent progress in this area, focusing on three popular non-native biofuel-producing systems, i.e. Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

  16. Defining the impact of non-native species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Jonathan M; Bacher, Sven; Blackburn, Tim M; Dick, Jaimie T A; Essl, Franz; Evans, Thomas; Gaertner, Mirijam; Hulme, Philip E; Kühn, Ingolf; Mrugała, Agata; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Ricciardi, Anthony; Richardson, David M; Sendek, Agnieszka; Vilà, Montserrat; Winter, Marten; Kumschick, Sabrina

    2014-10-01

    Non-native species cause changes in the ecosystems to which they are introduced. These changes, or some of them, are usually termed impacts; they can be manifold and potentially damaging to ecosystems and biodiversity. However, the impacts of most non-native species are poorly understood, and a synthesis of available information is being hindered because authors often do not clearly define impact. We argue that explicitly defining the impact of non-native species will promote progress toward a better understanding of the implications of changes to biodiversity and ecosystems caused by non-native species; help disentangle which aspects of scientific debates about non-native species are due to disparate definitions and which represent true scientific discord; and improve communication between scientists from different research disciplines and between scientists, managers, and policy makers. For these reasons and based on examples from the literature, we devised seven key questions that fall into 4 categories: directionality, classification and measurement, ecological or socio-economic changes, and scale. These questions should help in formulating clear and practical definitions of impact to suit specific scientific, stakeholder, or legislative contexts. © 2014 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. A Hybrid Acoustic and Pronunciation Model Adaptation Approach for Non-native Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yoo Rhee; Kim, Hong Kook

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid model adaptation approach in which pronunciation and acoustic models are adapted by incorporating the pronunciation and acoustic variabilities of non-native speech in order to improve the performance of non-native automatic speech recognition (ASR). Specifically, the proposed hybrid model adaptation can be performed at either the state-tying or triphone-modeling level, depending at which acoustic model adaptation is performed. In both methods, we first analyze the pronunciation variant rules of non-native speakers and then classify each rule as either a pronunciation variant or an acoustic variant. The state-tying level hybrid method then adapts pronunciation models and acoustic models by accommodating the pronunciation variants in the pronunciation dictionary and by clustering the states of triphone acoustic models using the acoustic variants, respectively. On the other hand, the triphone-modeling level hybrid method initially adapts pronunciation models in the same way as in the state-tying level hybrid method; however, for the acoustic model adaptation, the triphone acoustic models are then re-estimated based on the adapted pronunciation models and the states of the re-estimated triphone acoustic models are clustered using the acoustic variants. From the Korean-spoken English speech recognition experiments, it is shown that ASR systems employing the state-tying and triphone-modeling level adaptation methods can relatively reduce the average word error rates (WERs) by 17.1% and 22.1% for non-native speech, respectively, when compared to a baseline ASR system.

  18. Intercultural Competence of English Language Teachers in International Baccalaureate World Schools in Turkey and Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Serife; Çakir, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    The study explores the opinions and attitudes of International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) English language teachers from Turkey, the USA, the UK, New Zealand and Spain on intercultural language teaching. 16 teachers from Turkey, 15 teachers from the USA, 11 teachers from the UK, 10 teachers from New Zealand and 8 teachers from Spain,…

  19. Primary School English Teachers' Perceptions of the English Language Curriculum of 6th, 7th and 8th Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersen Yanik, Asli

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how the teachers who have different background characteristics perceive the goals and content of the English language curriculum implemented at the 6th, 7th and 8th grades of public primary schools. The study was conducted during the 2004-2005 school year with 368 English teachers selected from the seven regions of…

  20. Phonetic processing of non-native speech in semantic vs non-semantic tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Erin; Engstler, Caroline; Goldrick, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    Research with speakers with acquired production difficulties has suggested phonetic processing is more difficult in tasks that require semantic processing. The current research examined whether similar effects are found in bilingual phonetic processing. English-French bilinguals' productions in picture naming (which requires semantic processing) were compared to those elicited by repetition (which does not require semantic processing). Picture naming elicited slower, more accented speech than repetition. These results provide additional support for theories integrating cognitive and phonetic processes in speech production and suggest that bilingual speech research must take cognitive factors into account when assessing the structure of non-native sound systems.

  1. Across-talker effects on non-native listeners’ vowel perception in noise1

    OpenAIRE

    Bent, Tessa; Kewley-Port, Diane; Ferguson, Sarah Hargus

    2010-01-01

    This study explored how across-talker differences influence non-native vowel perception. American English (AE) and Korean listeners were presented with recordings of 10 AE vowels in ∕bVd∕ context. The stimuli were mixed with noise and presented for identification in a 10-alternative forced-choice task. The two listener groups heard recordings of the vowels produced by 10 talkers at three signal-to-noise ratios. Overall the AE listeners identified the vowels 22% more accurately than the Korean...

  2. The Halo surrounding native English speaker teachers in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Kramadibrata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Native Speaker Fallacy, a commonly held belief that Native English Speaker Teachers (NESTs are inherently better than Non-NESTs, has long been questioned by ELT researchers. However, this belief still stands strong in the general public. This research looks to understand how much a teacher’s nativeness affects a student’s attitude towards them, as well as the underlying reasons for their attitudes. Sixty seven respondents in two groups were asked to watch an animated teaching video, after which they completed a questionnaire that used Likert-scales to assess comprehensibility, clarity of explanation, engagement, and preference. The videos for both groups were identical apart from the narrator; one spoke in British English, while the other, Indian English. In addition, they were also visually identified as Caucasian and Asian, respectively. The video was controlled for speed of delivery. The quantitative data were then triangulated using qualitative data collected through open questions in the questionnaire as well as from a semi-structured interview conducted with 10 respondents. The data show that there is a significant implicit preference for NEST teachers in the video, as well as in respondent’s actual classes. However, when asked explicitly, respondents didn’t rank nativeness as a very important quality in English teachers. This discrepancy between implicit and explicit attitudes might be due to a subconscious cognitive bias, namely the Halo Effect, in which humans tend to make unjustified presumptions about a person based on known but irrelevant information.

  3. English as a Lingua Franca: Reflections on ELF-Related Issues by Pre-Service English Language Teachers in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Esma Biricik; Özkan, Yonca; Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    The leading position of English as a global language has evidently been continuing for several decades. This pivotal role has inevitably been influencing the agenda of English language teaching and teacher education in most domains of the profession. Although English as a lingua franca (ELF) implications and practices on teaching and teacher…

  4. Personal Problems and English Teachers: Are They Always Bad?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhd Khudri Johari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Personal problems involve things that are difficult to deal with, felt or experienced by certain people; in this particular study, Malaysian English language teachers. The relationship between personal problems and teaching reflection practice is researched quantitatively as there is a significant concern in the current education system that English language teachers are not doing well in educating the current generation, hence the professional developments needed to be carried out (Masilamani, et al., 2011; Schleicher, 2011; Schleicher, 2011. Based on the authors’ readings, there has yet been any research regarding this matter done in the Malaysian context. Hence, different types of personal problems have been identified via a validated questionnaire specifically made for this purpose. 45 English language teachers participated in this action research; all of whom are currently teaching in the same district in southern Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia. Although the results showed that personal problems affected teaching reflection practice negatively, it is hoped that future research will look into how teachers can utilize their problems as personal intrinsic motivators to obtain positive reinforcements and achieve success in their careers.

  5. A General Investigation of the In-Service Training of English Language Teachers at Elementary Schools in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Ebru Melek

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a critical diagnosis of in-service teacher-training activities offered to English-language teachers in Turkey and aims to investigate whether those teachers are satisfied with the activities. Thirty-two English-language teachers participated in this study. Data were collected from 32 elementary-school teachers of English as a…

  6. The Needs of Primary English Teachers for an In-Service Teacher Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enisa Mede

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the needs of the primary English teachers at a private school about an in-service teacher training program. Under the light of former studies and literature, this study attempts to find out their needs on the predefined concepts namely, adaptation of teaching methods, emphasis on language skills, utilization of technology, classroom environment, instructional practices and material development. The differences between the needs of the participating teachers according to their grade level (K1-4 were examined as well. A sample of 60 primary English teachers working in private schools around different cities in Turkey participated in this study. Data were collected through a triangulated approach, in which questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and teacher diaries were administered to the participating teachers. The findings revealed except for the material development, the primary English teachers are in a high need of a design for an in-service training program on the predefined concepts. Besides, the only difference between the grade levels was in relation to the utilization of technology. These findings will serve as basis for the design of a new in-service teacher training program to meet their needs in the following academic years.

  7. TEACHING LEGAL ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BADEA ELENA CODRUTA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, legal English has attracted increasing interest and awareness, especially because English is predominantly the language of international legal practice. Legal English must be seen in the overall context of English for Specific Purposes , as it shares the important elements of need analysis, syllabus design, course design, and materials selection and development which are common to all fields of work in ESP. As with other varieties of ESP, Legal English implies the definition of a specific language corpus, usages of various teaching strategies and emphasis on particular kinds of communication in a specific context.The article aims to highlight some aspects of teaching legal English by a non-native teacher who is not an expert in law. It particularly focuses attention on the development of basic communication skills and the use of lexical approaches in successful language acquisition in legal English.

  8. Carolina English Teacher 1992/1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Warren, Ed.; Westcott, Holly, Ed.

    This yearbook presents seven articles on topics of interest to teachers of language and literature at all levels, kindergarten through college. Articles are: "Fourth Grade Shakespeare" (Mary McNulty); "What's That There in Your Crystal Ball?: Using Journals to Make Predictions" (Katie Wood); "The University English…

  9. Teacher's Role in English Vocabulary Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵新颜

    2009-01-01

    Vocabulary is the basis for learning any language.Anyone who wants to learn a language well faces the challenge of enlarging his/her vocabulary effectively.From six aspects,this paper discusses what teachers should do to help their students with vocabulary acquisition.

  10. Becoming an English Language Teacher: Linguistic Knowledge, Anxieties and the Shifting Sense of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanelli, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    English language is a fast-growing and popular subject at A level, but the majority of qualified secondary teachers in the UK have subject expertise and backgrounds in literature. This paper reports on interviews with seven secondary English teachers who discuss the strategies they used when taking on the responsibility of A-level English language…

  11. A Case Study on Foreign English Teachers' Challenges in Taiwanese Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheryl Wei-yu; Cheng, Yuh-show

    2010-01-01

    With the spread of English as the global language, many people from English-speaking countries go to foreign land to work as English teachers. A review of the literature reveals that there is little research on these teachers' teaching-abroad experiences. The current study is an attempt to address this gap in the literature. Situated in an…

  12. How Does Australian-Based Digital English Resource Stack Up? Chinese University EFL Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yifeng; Shen, Huizhong; Ewing, Robyn

    2017-01-01

    For a long time, Australian English and culture have not been viewed in China as an equal to its American and British counterpart. This is reflected in teachers' choice of destination when it comes to English teaching and learning resources. This paper examines Chinese English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' perceptions of the contents and…

  13. The intercultural identities of nonnative English teachers : An overview of research worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, D.; Tigelaar, E.H.; Verloop, N.

    2016-01-01

    Nonnative-English-speaking teachers who teach English as a second or foreign language (ESL/EFL) can play an important role in the promotion of intercultural competence and often have an advantage over native-English-speaking ESL/EFL teachers because they once were language learners and more aware of

  14. Australian-Trained Vietnamese Teachers of English: Culture and Identity Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Phan Le

    2007-01-01

    The identity formation of Australian-trained Vietnamese teachers of English is explored by looking at their experiences as TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages) students in Australia and as teachers of English in Vietnam. On the one hand, the paper consolidates the understanding of identity in relation to difference and…

  15. A Case Study on Foreign English Teachers' Challenges in Taiwanese Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheryl Wei-yu; Cheng, Yuh-show

    2010-01-01

    With the spread of English as the global language, many people from English-speaking countries go to foreign land to work as English teachers. A review of the literature reveals that there is little research on these teachers' teaching-abroad experiences. The current study is an attempt to address this gap in the literature. Situated in an…

  16. The Importance of the Teacher for Developing Interest in Learning English by Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunbao

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the English teacher for the development of interest by students in the learning of English is discussed. In the Chinese context, the teacher is regarded traditionally as knowledgeable and the source of learning by students. Commonly, learners have no idea why English language is important to them and their interest in English…

  17. Dialogues across Disciplines: Preparing English-as-a-Second-Language Teachers for Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, Margo

    2009-01-01

    This study examines interdisciplinary collaboration between mainstream-English and English-as-a-second-language (ESL) in-service and pre-service teachers enrolled in graduate methods courses in their respective fields. During the semester, TESOL and secondary English Education teacher candidates collaborated to develop young adult literature based…

  18. The Reading Strategies Used by Prospective English Teachers in Turkish ELT Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Ekrem; Altay, Firat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine what types of reading strategies prospective English Teachers used to accomplish in their reading assignments and activities. The study was conducted at a state-run University, English Language Teaching Department in Turkey. The participants were 130 prospective English Teachers majoring English…

  19. The Cultural and Intercultural Identities of Transnational English Teachers: Two Case Studies from the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two long-time English language teachers: a California English as a second language instructor originally from Brazil, and a Chilean English as a foreign language teacher who worked for many years in the United States before returning home. Based on interview and classroom observation data, this research…

  20. Perception of native and non-native affricate-fricative contrasts: cross-language tests on adults and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Feng-Ming; Liu, Huei-Mei; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have shown improved sensitivity to native-language contrasts and reduced sensitivity to non-native phonetic contrasts when comparing 6-8 and 10-12-month-old infants. This developmental pattern is interpreted as reflecting the onset of language-specific processing around the first birthday. However, generalization of this finding is limited by the fact that studies have yielded inconsistent results and that insufficient numbers of phonetic contrasts have been tested developmentally; this is especially true for native-language phonetic contrasts. Three experiments assessed the effects of language experience on affricate-fricative contrasts in a cross-language study of English and Mandarin adults and infants. Experiment 1 showed that English-speaking adults score lower than Mandarin-speaking adults on Mandarin alveolo-palatal affricate-fricative discrimination. Experiment 2 examined developmental change in the discrimination of this contrast in English- and Mandarin-leaning infants between 6 and 12 months of age. The results demonstrated that native-language performance significantly improved with age while performance on the non-native contrast decreased. Experiment 3 replicated the perceptual improvement for a native contrast: 6-8 and 10-12-month-old English-learning infants showed a performance increase at the older age. The results add to our knowledge of the developmental patterns of native and non-native phonetic perception.

  1. GLOBALIZATION AND TEACHER DEVELOPMENT FOR SPOKEN ENGLISH INSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine C.M. Goh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The impact of globalization is experienced most strongly in business and commerce but also increasingly in education. As a result, some scholars have called for a re-envisioning of the role of teachers to model what it means to be a global citizen. In this paper, I acknowledge the need for ESL/EFL teachers to re-examine their identity and roles in light of these global developments. At the same time, I argue that teachers should not lose sight of the importance of honing the craft of teaching English so as to increase their professional capital to mediate the impact of globalization for their students. This article first discusses the changing roles of teachers in a globalized world and highlights the implications for English language teaching and learning.  The ideas are further related to teaching second language oracy (speaking and listening because of its centrality in developing important 21st Century skills in the globalized world. The article also offers ways in which teacher education that takes cognizance of globalization forces can develop ESL/ EFL teachers’ knowledge and beliefs to play their new roles more effectively.

  2. English Teachers' Role in Reading Comprehension Class From Pragmatic Perspective%English Teachers'Role in Reading Comprehension Class From Pragmatic Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党晨华

    2008-01-01

    With analysis on the teaching models of English reading comprehension class at present first,this paper aims to point out the necessity to transfer teaching models.With strong back-up of some pragmatics theories,this paper explores the roles that English teachers are expected to play for the sack of more efficient English teaching in reading comprehension class.

  3. Does Our English Teacher Education Need Re-Designing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bismoko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Change has been regarded as inherent in any living organization for quite a long time, for its own development and to keep up its external relevance as part of the development. Individual or random responses to external sources for change, however, tend to cause internal inconsistency and inefficiency. On this occasion a number of current issues, potential to be sources for change, such as diversified outcomes, the school-based management, and the competence-based curriculum will be looked over in terms of its relevance to our English-teacher education. There are obviously other sources of change, and they will keep coming in, but when we feel they become too many, and they come too often, it is time to read between the lines, to grab their underlying spirit. Perhaps the time is here for us to get our English-teacher education re-orientated, and subsequently re-designed.

  4. The Ceremonial Elements of Non-Native Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, Bert

    1994-01-01

    Explores reasons behind the wrongful adoption of Native American ceremonies by Euro-Americans. Focuses on the need for ceremony, its relevance to environmental education, and the fact that some immigrant cultural traditions neither fit this new land nor value the earth. Suggests how non-Natives can express their connection to the land by creating…

  5. Non-Native University Students' Perception of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ummul Khair; Mansourizadeh, Kobra; Ai, Grace Koh Ming

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex issue especially among non-native students and it has received a lot of attention from researchers and scholars of academic writing. Some scholars attribute this problem to cultural perceptions and different attitudes toward texts. This study evaluates student perception of different aspects of plagiarism. A small group of…

  6. On Learning to Teach English Teachers: A Textured Portrait of Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emily R.; Basmadjian, Kevin G.; Kirell, Leah; Koziol, Stephen M., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The Conference on English Education's Commission on the Preparation of English Teacher Educators, meeting over the course of a decade to discuss issues involved in the development of new faculty as English educators, articulate in their report a vision for the type of individuals they hope will complete graduate programs in English education and…

  7. English as a "Global Language" in China: An Investigation into Learners' and Teachers' Language Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lin; Block, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses issues related to language beliefs held by teachers and students of English in China; namely, the status of English, the learners' expectations of English and the focus of English teaching and learning in China. These beliefs are examined in the context of globalization and China's ever-deepening integration into the global…

  8. Exploring the importance of teacher-student interaction in EFL graduates'oral English class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈圆

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes teacher-student interaction situation in one foreign studies university graduate students' oral English class and seeks to investigate students' opinions of role of teacher-student interaction. The author has designed six interview questions for the study. Answers to the interviews have revealed that most students regard teacher-student interaction as important and necessary for postgraduates' oral English class.

  9. Exploring Japanese University English Teachers' Professional Identity. New Perspectives on Language and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Diane Hawley

    2012-01-01

    This book contributes to the growing field of EFL teacher identity, which is now recognized to influence numerous aspects of classroom teaching and of student learning. It focuses on an under-researched, and yet highly influential group of teachers that shape English language education in Japan: Japanese university English teachers. In three…

  10. Who Will Stay and Who Will Leave? Predicting Secondary English Teacher Attrition Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Carl B.; Scherff, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Although there are considerable large-scale data on teacher attrition, few researchers have culled information specifically related to English teachers' risk for attrition. This study examines the effects of teacher characteristics, teaching conditions, student variables, self-efficacy, external support, and salary on secondary English language…

  11. Teaching With(out) Technology: Secondary English Teachers and Classroom Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sara; Shoffner, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Technology plays an integral role in the English Language Arts (ELA) classroom today, yet teachers and teacher educators continue to develop understandings of how technology influences pedagogy. This qualitative study explored how and why two ELA teachers used different technologies in the secondary English classroom to plan for and deliver…

  12. Opening up "Spaces for Manoeuvre": English Teacher Perspectives on Learner Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explores teachers' perspectives on learner motivation for English in Chilean secondary schools. Drawing both on motivation theories and on concepts related to teacher cognition, autonomy and agency, the analysis of 19 semi-structured interviews with Chilean English teachers sheds light on the difficulties that many teachers…

  13. Factors Related to Professional Development of English Language University Teachers in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichadee, Saovapa

    2012-01-01

    Professional development is deemed necessary for university teachers at all levels, as it helps to enhance teaching quality. However, the extent of English language university teachers' professional development might depend on a number of factors. This paper reports on a study investigating English language university teachers' professional…

  14. Pre-Service Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching English to Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Mahesh B.; Karekatti, Tripti K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a part of an ongoing doctoral research on "Teacher Talk in ESL Classrooms". The idea for this was gained through the hypothesis that teachers' beliefs about English teaching may also mould their talk. The researcher intends here to analyse and comment on teachers' English teaching beliefs. It is generally accepted that…

  15. Teacher Views about Using Songs in Teaching English to Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevik, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to explore the views of Turkish state primary school EFL teachers about songs and using songs in teaching English to young learners. English language teachers' (n = 52) opinions were collected through a questionnaire and the results demonstrated that Turkish EFL teachers have strong beliefs about the pedagogical…

  16. Teacher Views about Using Songs in Teaching English to Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevik, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to explore the views of Turkish state primary school EFL teachers about songs and using songs in teaching English to young learners. English language teachers' (n = 52) opinions were collected through a questionnaire and the results demonstrated that Turkish EFL teachers have strong beliefs about the pedagogical…

  17. Investigating the Impact of Job Satisfaction/Dissatisfaction on Iranian English Teachers' Job Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Hassan Soodmand; Doosti, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    As part of a large-scale project, this study investigated the differences between satisfied and dissatisfied Iranian junior secondary school English teachers in terms of their job performance. To this end, 64 Iranian English teachers and 1774 of their students completed a validated questionnaire specifically developed to investigate EFL teachers'…

  18. Preparing Preservice English Teachers and School Counselor Interns for Future Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffner, Melanie; Wachter Morris, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    The authors believe that by working together, teachers and school counselors can better support students and more effectively work for their success. In this article, we present our efforts in creating a collaborative class for preservice English teachers and school counselor interns. While offering an overview of English teachers and school…

  19. Perspectives on English Teacher Development in Rural Primary Schools in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaires are used to examine Chinese rural primary school English teachers' needs and challenges and perceptions in the implementation of Standards for Teachers of English in Primary Schools as professional development in rural school contexts in China. A total of 300 teachers participated in the research. Their feedback illustrates that…

  20. Principals' Ethical and Social Justice Leadership in Serving English Language Learners: English as a Second Language and Bilingual Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Teresa M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine ESL and Bilingual teachers' perceptions of principals' ethical and social justice leadership in promoting equity and achievement for English language learners in Wisconsin. Over 140 teachers responded to this mixed- methods survey. Findings from the study indicated that while teachers viewed their…

  1. Principals' Ethical and Social Justice Leadership in Serving English Language Learners: English as a Second Language and Bilingual Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Teresa M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine ESL and Bilingual teachers' perceptions of principals' ethical and social justice leadership in promoting equity and achievement for English language learners in Wisconsin. Over 140 teachers responded to this mixed- methods survey. Findings from the study indicated that while teachers viewed their…

  2. The Preparation and Supervision of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarik, Panninee

    1973-01-01

    Paper contributed as Thailand's Country Report to the Eighth Regional Seminar on "The Training and Supervision of Teachers of English as a Second or Foreign Language," July 3-7, 1973, Regional English Language Centre, Singapore. (HW)

  3. Towards a LAPSE Theory of Teacher Preparation in English as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatis, James E.

    1974-01-01

    'LAPSE' is an organising acronym for the kinds of courses that should be included in any teacher education programme in English for speakers of other languages. The letters stand for Linguistics, Anthropology, Psychology, Sociolinguistics, English (and Education). (Author)

  4. Developing classroom language assessment benchmarks for Japanese teachers of English as a foreign language

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kimura, Yuzo; Nakata, Yoshiyuki; Ikeno, Osamu; Naganuma, Naoyuki; Andrews, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    ... in the classroom.This case study describes the theoretical aspect of the development of a benchmark assessment for use in English language classrooms with Japanese teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL...

  5. An Investigation of the Perceptions of Students' Proficiency in Reading and Writing as Indicated by Twelfth Grade English Teachers and College English Composition Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnet, Lara King

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in perceptions regarding students' proficiency in reading and writing skills between 12th grade English teachers and college English Composition instructors. A purposive, nonrandom sample of 12th grade English teachers and college English Composition instructors from West Tennessee were…

  6. German Migrant Teachers in Australia: Insights into the Largest Cohort of Non-English Speaking Background Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bense, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    The research reported in this paper investigates the situation of German migrant teachers in Australia. Although German born teachers represent the largest group of non-English speaking background teachers in Australia, there is no study of the circumstances and experiences of these teachers in Australia. This study aims to fill this gap. It…

  7. The Competencies of an English Teacher: Beginning Student Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn-Edwards, Sorrel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey conducted with first year Education students at a Queensland university on the levels of competency in literacies expected for teachers in schools. Eight aspects were chosen to be examined to discover the skill levels students thought to be essential for effective teaching and to compare these with their…

  8. The Needs of Primary English Teachers for an In-Service Teacher Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    Enisa Mede; Melike Işık

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the needs of the primary English teachers at a private school about an in-service teacher training program. Under the light of former studies and literature, this study attempts to find out their needs on the predefined concepts namely, adaptation of teaching methods, emphasis on language skills, utilization of technology, classroom environment, instructional practices and material development. The differences between the needs of the participating ...

  9. An investigation into the language needs of pre-service teachers of English for the language proficiency assessment for teachers (English in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barley Mak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the language needs of pre-service teachers of English for the Language Proficiency Assessment for Teachers (English (LPATE. More specifically, the study aims to identify 1 the language needs of pre-service teachers in terms of language difficulty(s and 2 how different demographic backgrounds of these teachers (e.g. a major in an English language-related subject/ education and the length of stay in an English-speaking country may affect their perceived areas of language difficulty(s in English. A total of 124 pre-service teachers who were the participants in a language enhancement course offered by a local university aiming at assisting the pre-service teachers to attain the required level in the language assessment for English participated in a questionnaire survey. This study has identified several areas of difficulty that pre-service teachers have in English language. The findings can shed lights on course design and materials development for the language enhancement courses, may they be provi ded during undergraduate or post-graduate training or continuing professional development. In so doing, teachers can then be effectively assisted to meet the standards of the language assessment.

  10. Continuous Professional Development of English Language Teachers: Perception and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulRahman Al Asmari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Professional development is considered as an essential element in enhancing the teaching and learning process to ensure student learning. Professional development can also be deemed as a cornerstone of teacher professionalism and quality. The governments and educational institutions invest significantly in Continuous Professional Development (CPD to improve teacher quality and to meet the changing needs of the students. To uncover the perceptions and practices of professional development in Saudi Arabia, a survey was conducted at Taif University English Language Centre. The sample consisted of 121 English language teachers from various countries and having varied educational and academic experiences. The survey comprised items relevant to learning approaches, concept of professional development, perceptions and feedback on CPD. The respondents supported lifelong learning and experiential learning leading towards learner centered approach. They perceived the CPD as a challenge to their existing knowledge and classroom practice. However, they expressed their concerns regarding indigenization of activities in CPDs, institutional support in conducting classroom activities, and follow up activities.  Keywords: Professional development, Teacher perception, ELT in Saudi Arabia

  11. Teachers' Beliefs in Teaching English for Kids at a Kindergarten: A Case Study of Students from the Department of Applied English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yu-wei

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore the changes in teachers' beliefs before and after teachings among four students from the Department of Applied English at Hungkuang University, who were conducting English teaching at a kindergarten. Teacher's beliefs included four aspects in terms of English teaching, teacher-student interaction in…

  12. Comparing varieties of in-service English Language Training for primary school teachers in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International trends show the formal teaching of English starting at an increasingly early age. This presents challenges for national education systems and in particular, for primary schools and for primary school teachers who are not necessarily trained as English teachers. The present study investigates two different ways of organising and designing in-service educational training (INSET) in Norway for those primary school teachers who currently teach English without any formal training as ...

  13. The first exploration of how to be a good English teacher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶长青

    2015-01-01

    The teacher is crucial to the education's success or failure of a nation. The demand to a teacher is being asked higher and higher by the society and the people. Then how to be a good teacher is a problem which we English teachers should solve right now. This passage will tell it from two aspects:1. The teacher should be humorous;2.The teacher should be a learned person, which are helpful to the teacher's progress and following the times.

  14. Musical ability and non-native speech-sound processing are linked through sensitivity to pitch and spectral information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Vera; Bublitz, Dennis; Brooks, Patricia J

    2015-05-01

    Is the observed link between musical ability and non-native speech-sound processing due to enhanced sensitivity to acoustic features underlying both musical and linguistic processing? To address this question, native English speakers (N = 118) discriminated Norwegian tonal contrasts and Norwegian vowels. Short tones differing in temporal, pitch, and spectral characteristics were used to measure sensitivity to the various acoustic features implicated in musical and speech processing. Musical ability was measured using Gordon's Advanced Measures of Musical Audiation. Results showed that sensitivity to specific acoustic features played a role in non-native speech-sound processing: Controlling for non-verbal intelligence, prior foreign language-learning experience, and sex, sensitivity to pitch and spectral information partially mediated the link between musical ability and discrimination of non-native vowels and lexical tones. The findings suggest that while sensitivity to certain acoustic features partially mediates the relationship between musical ability and non-native speech-sound processing, complex tests of musical ability also tap into other shared mechanisms. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Memory for non-native language: the role of lexical processing in the retention of surface form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Cristina; Konopka, Agnieszka E

    2013-01-01

    Research on memory for native language (L1) has consistently shown that retention of surface form is inferior to that of gist (e.g., Sachs, 1967). This paper investigates whether the same pattern is found in memory for non-native language (L2). We apply a model of bilingual word processing to more complex linguistic structures and predict that memory for L2 sentences ought to contain more surface information than L1 sentences. Native and non-native speakers of English were tested on a set of sentence pairs with different surface forms but the same meaning (e.g., "The bullet hit/struck the bull's eye"). Memory for these sentences was assessed with a cued recall procedure. Responses showed that native and non-native speakers did not differ in the accuracy of gist-based recall but that non-native speakers outperformed native speakers in the retention of surface form. The results suggest that L2 processing involves more intensive encoding of lexical level information than L1 processing.

  16. Teacher Self-Concept and Teacher Effectiveness as Perceived by Teachers of English and Students of Senior High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuzaimah Dahlan Diem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether self-concept of EFL teachers influenced their effectiveness in teaching English as a foreign language, as perceived by both teachers and students. The study involved 275 EFL teachers and 88 senior high school students in South Sumatra. Variables of education, teaching experience, and age were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, and specific hypotheses were tested to see whether the addition of the other independent variables could add to the effectiveness of the teacher. The results showed significant relationships between self-concept and all the four factors used to define teacher effectiveness. The combination of self-concept and experience serves as the first salient factor influencing the four factors of teacher effectiveness in addition to self-concept alone. Education was also found to be a factor which influenced teacher effectiveness

  17. MAKING USE OF FOREIGN TEACHERS TO HELP US IN OUR ENGLISH EDUCATION -- IDEAS ABOUT THESTANDARDIZATION OF MANAGEMENT TO FOREIGN TEACHERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangWeiping

    2004-01-01

    In accordance with the new situation, new challenges and new opportunities that China's entry into WTO has brought about to China's education, the author analyses the advantages and disadvantages of foreign teachers' joining into our English education, pointing out that the standardization of management to foreign teachers is one of the most effective measures to tap their potentials and push forward China's English education.

  18. What Motivates Pre-Service Teachers to Become Teachers and Their Perspectives of English Teaching as a Career Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustiawati, I. A. Mela

    2017-01-01

    Teaching motivation issues are well-researched in several countries. However, these issues have been rarely investigated in the Indonesian context. This study investigated motivational factors that influence pre-service teachers to enter English teacher training and their perspectives of English teaching as a career option. It comprised a survey…

  19. Research on the Mistakes Made by College English Teachers in Pronunciation of/n/&/l

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 桂严捷

    2014-01-01

    As an old saying goes that“once you open mouth, you are decided”. Thus, there is no doubt about the fact that Eng-lish pronunciation is of great importance, especially for English teachers whose pronunciation exerts far-reaching and direct influ-ences on that of students. Some of College English teachers, however, have poor pronunciation;most of them cannot distinguish/n/from/l/. Therefore, it is of huge practical value to commit to the research on the mistakes made by College English teachers in pronunciation of/n/&/l/and analyze the underlying causes in the hope of helping teachers to improve their poor pronuncia-tion.

  20. Teacher Reflections and Praxis: A Case Study of Indian Teachers of English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarani, Sakilahmed A. R.

    2012-01-01

    This case study engaged Gujarati English as Foreign Language (EFL) teachers in video-based reflection with the goal of increasing their reflective abilities and uncovering their understandings about reflective teaching practices in the Indian pedagogical and cultural context. The study aimed to explore, and gain a deeper understanding of how…

  1. A Foreign Model of Teacher Education and Its Local Appropriation: The English Teachers' Centres in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the implementation of the English model of teachers' centres in the context of 1980s Spain. Originally it was a top-down plan initiated by a national government. However, from the very beginning its fate was dependent on a bottom-up educational project carried out by pedagogical social movements. The first part of the article…

  2. Teaching Knowledge and Teacher Competencies: A Case Study of Turkish Preservice English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komur, Sevki

    2010-01-01

    What is the relationship between preservice teachers' teaching knowledge and self-rating of competencies and their practicum experience? The participants of this study are fourth year students in the Department of English Language Education of the Faculty of Education, Mugla University, Turkey. Three data collection instruments were used: the…

  3. Multicultural Teacher Education: Why Teachers Say It Matters in Preparing Them for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, Lan Quach; Dávila, Liv Thorstensson; Lachance, Joan; Coffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies show that mainstream classroom teachers still remain inadequately prepared to teach diverse students and lack the knowledge base and skills to teach English language learners (ELLs). This has profound implications, particularly in the Southeast, where the rate of school-aged Latino immigrants has grown significantly. Thus, this…

  4. The Instructional Dynamics of a Bilingual Teacher: One Teacher's Beliefs about English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rocio

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the qualitative study of a bilingual teacher's practice in working with a student with a learning disability. The author first examines student demographics as they specifically relate to the achievement of Latino school children and then segues to an examination of the nature of instruction provided to English language…

  5. 一个成功英语教师的特点%The Characteristics of An Effective English Teacher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王家全

    2001-01-01

    Whith the development of our society, education become more and more important;and with the open policy of China, English is widely used within the country. More people are involved in English. How to learn English well, to some degree, depends on the English teaching. How to teach English well is relative with the characteristics of English teacher. In this article, some Characteristics of effective English teacher are to be analyzed.

  6. STRATEGIES OF MAINTAINING PROFICIENCY BY TEACHERS OF ENGLISH IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaidi Mistar, Alfan Zuhairini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study are four-fold: (1 to identify the types of strategies to maintain proficiency used by teachers of English in Indonesia, (2 to know the intensity of use of the obtained strategy types, (3 to measure the inter-correlation in the use of the obtained strategy types, and (4 to investigate the effect of proficiency level on the use of maintaining strategies. The subjects were 93 teachers applying for S2 degree in 2010/2011 at the postgraduate program of the Islamic University of Malang. They were given two sets of instrument, a Likert-scale questionnaire of English proficiency maintaining strategies and a TOEFL test. Then, a factor analysis identified nine strategy categories, including language focusing, metacognitive and affective developing, reading and writing activating, language resource utilizing, cognitive processing, culture learning, social communicating, text analyzing, and radio listening strategies. These strategy types explained 63.84% of variances of maintaining strategies and they were used at high level of intensity. Moreover, the use of the nine strategy types were found to be inter-correlated with one another. Finally, no significant effect of proficiency level on strategy use was found, indicating that teachers with different level of proficiency reported using the same strategies of maintaining their proficiency.

  7. Drivers of Non-Native Aquatic Species Invasions across the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods Mapping the geographic distribution of non-native aquatic species is a critically important precursor to understanding the anthropogenic and environmental factors that drive freshwater biological invasions. Such efforts are often limited to local scales and/or to a single taxa, missing the opportunity to observe and understand the drivers of macroscale invasion patterns at sub-continental or continental scales. Here we map the distribution of exotic freshwater species richness across the continental United States using publicly accessible species occurrence data (e.g GBIF) and investigate the role of human activity in driving macroscale patterns of aquatic invasion. Using a dasymetric model of human population density and a spatially explicit model of recreational freshwater fishing demand, we analyzed the effect of these metrics of human influence on non-native aquatic species richness at the watershed scale, while controlling for spatial and sampling bias. We also assessed the effects that a temporal mismatch between occurrence data (collected since 1815) and cross-sectional predictors (developed using 2010 data) may have on model fit. Results/Conclusions Our results indicated that non-native aquatic species richness exhibits a highly patchy distribution, with hotspots in the Northeast, Great Lakes, Florida, and human population centers on the Pacific coast. These richness patterns are correlated with population density, but are m

  8. "Unruly Pupils" in Pre-Service English Language Teachers' Teaching Practicum Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuesong; Benson, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The teaching practicum is a pivotal event for pre-service teachers to experience the transition from being students to being teachers. This paper examines the emergence of "unruly pupils" as a central concern for pre-service English language teachers in their teaching practicum. The inquiry relates the pre-service teachers' perceived challenge of…

  9. Developing and Validating a Survey of Korean Early Childhood English Teachers' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung In

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop and validate a valid measure of the early childhood (EC) English teacher knowledge. Through extensive literature review on second/foreign language (L2/FL) teacher knowledge, early childhood teacher knowledge and early childhood language teacher knowledge, and semi-structured interviews from current…

  10. Perceptions, Attitudes, and the Identification of Dispositions for Teachers of English-Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midobuche, Eva; Benavides, Alfredo H.; de Guyenne, William de Rasez

    2010-01-01

    Most of the literature on dispositions is focused on mainstream teachers and on diversity and not specifically on the dispositions of teachers of English-language learners. Researchers have stated that while dispositions are extremely important, they continue to be elusive and a neglected part of teacher education, especially for teachers of…

  11. A Proposal for a CA-Integrated English Language Teacher Education Program in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Olcay

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes a comprehensive framework for a Conversation Analysis (CA) informed English language teacher education program in Turkey. By reviewing recent studies in CA, Critical Reflective Practice, Teacher Language Awareness and language teacher education in general; the author calls for a more effective language teacher education program…

  12. Teachers' Beliefs about English Language Learners in the Mainstream Classroom: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Stacie Kae

    2011-01-01

    This literature review on teachers' beliefs about English language learners (ELLs) in mainstream classrooms is organized into three sections: (a) inservice teachers' existing beliefs, (b) predictors of inservice teachers' beliefs, and (c) the connection between inservice teachers' beliefs and practices. This body of literature points to a clear…

  13. Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2008-11-18

    Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public

  14. Across-talker effects on non-native listeners' vowel perception in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Tessa; Kewley-Port, Diane; Ferguson, Sarah Hargus

    2010-11-01

    This study explored how across-talker differences influence non-native vowel perception. American English (AE) and Korean listeners were presented with recordings of 10 AE vowels in /bVd/ context. The stimuli were mixed with noise and presented for identification in a 10-alternative forced-choice task. The two listener groups heard recordings of the vowels produced by 10 talkers at three signal-to-noise ratios. Overall the AE listeners identified the vowels 22% more accurately than the Korean listeners. There was a wide range of identification accuracy scores across talkers for both AE and Korean listeners. At each signal-to-noise ratio, the across-talker intelligibility scores were highly correlated for AE and Korean listeners. Acoustic analysis was conducted for 2 vowel pairs that exhibited variable accuracy across talkers for Korean listeners but high identification accuracy for AE listeners. Results demonstrated that Korean listeners' error patterns for these four vowels were strongly influenced by variability in vowel production that was within the normal range for AE talkers. These results suggest that non-native listeners are strongly influenced by across-talker variability perhaps because of the difficulty they have forming native-like vowel categories.

  15. Learner Agency and Non-Native Speaker Identity in Pedagogical Lingua Franca Conversations: Insights from Intercultural Telecollaboration in Foreign Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Kurt; Hoffstaedter, Petra

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses insights gained from a case study on telecollaboration for intercultural communication in foreign language school contexts. Focus was on non-native English and German lingua franca conversations between pairs of students (aged 14-16, B1 level) from schools in France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Telecollaboration…

  16. Pre-service mathematics teachers' attitudes towards learning English: A case study in Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyaningrum, Wahyu

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated attitudes of pre-service mathematics teachers towards English as one of the subject at the university. It is a qualitative study in which questionnaire and face-to-face interview were employed to collect the data. The participants of this study were sixty students of mathematics education department at one of the university in Yogyakarta. The main research question was concern with how pre-service mathematics teachers perceive the importance of learning English. This study found that most of the participants perceive English as an important language that should be acquired by mathematics teachers. Their beliefs about the importance of English were mostly due to instrumental orientation rather than integrative orientation, such as getting a good job, getting a scholarship and understanding learning sources that are written in English. The data also revealed some obstacles faced by pre-service mathematics teachers in learning English as an additional language for them. The main obstacles were related to the differences between English for mathematics and English in daily life including its vocabulary and structure. Most of the participants argued that several mathematics vocabularies had precise meaning and different from daily English. In addition, they found difficult to understand some sentences used in the paper journal due to its structure. This study therefore, provided an insight into the pre-service mathematics teachers' perception and obstacles when learning English that could be use in improving pre-service teachers' education.

  17. Perceptions of Elementary School Teachers and Students Using Interactive Whiteboards in English Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju Yin; Teng, Ya Wen

    2014-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have been widely used in elementary schools in Taiwan. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of elementary school teachers and students using IWBs in English teaching and learning. Six public school English teachers and 614 students of 5th and 6th-grades in Yangmei Township, Taoyuan…

  18. Which Methodology Works Better? English Language Teachers' Awareness of the Innovative Language Learning Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated whether English language teachers were aware of the innovative language learning methodologies in language learning, how they made use of these methodologies and the learners' reactions to them. The descriptive survey method was employed to disclose the frequencies and percentages of 175 English language teachers'…

  19. English Reading Instruction in China: Chinese Teachers' Perspectives and Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ran; Baumann, James F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe teachers' perspectives and comments about their reading curriculum and instruction at different school levels. A brief historical examination of the English instruction and the contemporary education policies in China was provided. Twelve Chinese teachers of English at different schools levels…

  20. The Career Trajectories of English Language Teachers. Oxford Studies in Comparative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Penny, Ed.; Craig, Cheryl, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This volume identifies, illustrates, compares, contrasts and provides informed reflective commentary on the diverse career trajectories of English language teachers, teacher educators and researchers. Increased migration and globalisation pressures have led to dramatic changes in English language teaching over the last few decades. The resulting…