WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-minority students taught

  1. What My Refugee Students Taught Me

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990s, a coup in Haiti sent a new wave of political refugees to southern Florida. First-year teacher Sidney Brown taught ESOL classes to Haitian teens who came to Dillard High School in Ft. Lauderdale. As she got to know her students, she was surprised by the class distinctions that divided the French-speaking students, whose…

  2. Traditionally taught students learn; actively engaged students remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Scott V.; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Clark, Jessica W.

    2014-08-01

    A common narrative in physics education research is that students taught in lecture-based classes learn less than those taught with activity-based reformed methods. We show this narrative is simplistic and misses important dynamics of student learning. In particular, we find students of both methods show equal short-term learning gains on a conceptual question dealing with electric potential. For traditionally taught students, this learning rapidly decays on a time scale of weeks, vanishing by the time of the typical end-of-term post-test. For students in reform-based classes, however, the knowledge is retained and may even be enhanced by subsequent instruction. This difference explains the many previous pre- and post-test studies that have found minimal learning gains in lecture-based courses. Our findings suggest a more nuanced model of student learning, one that is sensitive to time-dependent effects such as forgetting and interference. In addition, the findings suggest that lecture-based courses, by incorporating aspects designed to reinforce student understanding of previously covered topics, might approach the long-term learning found in research-based pedagogies.

  3. Student Perceptions of a Course Taught in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheal, Catheryn

    2009-01-01

    Catheryn Cheal describes student reactions to a course she and Vagner Whitehead taught in Second Life. The course required students to research a topic about virtual worlds, write a paper, and illustrate their findings by building an environment in Second Life. Negative student responses to the course coupled with the observation that students…

  4. Human Sexuality: A Student Taught Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Edward S.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Four senior female students presented seminars in human sexuality to freshmen coeds. The seminar topics were (1) petting and intercourse, (2) masturbation, (3) venereal disease and problematic sexual behavior, and (4) abortion and sterilization. Improvement in knowledge was determined by pre- and post-course questionnaires. Student evaluations…

  5. A leadership elective course developed and taught by graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brandon J; Garza, Oscar W; Witry, Matthew J; Chang, Elizabeth H; Letendre, Donald E; Trewet, Coralynn B

    2013-12-16

    To develop and implement a flexible-credit elective course to empower student pharmacists to develop lifelong leadership skills and provide teaching practice opportunities for graduate students. An elective course focusing on leadership development for second- and third-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students was designed and taught by 4 graduate students under the mentorship of 2 faculty members. Student pharmacists could enroll in a 1-, 2-, or 3-credit-hour version of the course. Attainment of course objectives was measured using student pharmacist reflection papers and continuing professional development portfolios. Additionally, self-assessments of graduate students and faculty members delivering the course were conducted. In their responses on course evaluations, student pharmacists indicated they found the course a valuable learning experience. Graduate students found course development to be challenging but useful in developing faculty skills. This flexible-credit elective course taught by graduate students was an innovative way to offer formal leadership instruction using limited college resources.

  6. A Leadership Elective Course Developed and Taught by Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Oscar W.; Witry, Matthew J.; Chang, Elizabeth H.; Letendre, Donald E.; Trewet, CoraLynn B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To develop and implement a flexible-credit elective course to empower student pharmacists to develop lifelong leadership skills and provide teaching practice opportunities for graduate students. Design. An elective course focusing on leadership development for second- and third-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students was designed and taught by 4 graduate students under the mentorship of 2 faculty members. Student pharmacists could enroll in a 1-, 2-, or 3-credit-hour version of the course. Assessment. Attainment of course objectives was measured using student pharmacist reflection papers and continuing professional development portfolios. Additionally, self-assessments of graduate students and faculty members delivering the course were conducted. In their responses on course evaluations, student pharmacists indicated they found the course a valuable learning experience. Graduate students found course development to be challenging but useful in developing faculty skills. Conclusion. This flexible-credit elective course taught by graduate students was an innovative way to offer formal leadership instruction using limited college resources. PMID:24371347

  7. Selected Experiences of International Students Enrolled in English Taught Programs at German Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum Beatty, Krista L.

    2010-01-01

    Higher education is becoming increasingly internationalized, and a significant aspect of the internationalization of higher education is student mobility. A relatively new feature in international student mobility is the offer of English taught programs. Wachter and Maiworm (2008) define English taught programs as "programmes taught in…

  8. Examining why ethics is taught to veterinary students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magalhães-Sant’Ana, Manuel; Lassen, Jesper; Millar, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely agreed that veterinary students need to be introduced to ethics, there is limited empirical research investigating the reasons why veterinary ethics is being taught. This study presents the first extensive investigation into the reasons for teaching veterinary ethics...... and reports data collected in semi-structured interviews with educators involved in teaching undergraduate veterinary ethics at three European schools: the University of Copenhagen, the University of Nottingham, and the Technical University of Lisbon (curricular year 2010–2011). The content of the interview...... transcripts were analyzed using Toulmin's argumentative model. Ten objectives in teaching veterinary ethics were identified, which can be grouped into four overarching themes: ethical awareness, ethical knowledge, ethical skills, and individual and professional qualities. These objectives include recognizing...

  9. Science Achievement of Students in Co-Taught, Inquiry-Based Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca-Vega, Rita; Brown, Kathleen; Yasutake, David

    2011-01-01

    This case investigation followed the progress of middle students with disabilities, their peers, and teachers in co-taught science classrooms where a hands-on, inquiry-based curriculum was used. Students with disabilities (n=21), including learning disabilities, mild intellectual impairment, and mild autism were placed in co-taught classes with…

  10. Science Achievement of Students in Co-Taught, Inquiry-Based Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca-Vega, Rita; Brown, Kathleen; Yasutake, David

    2011-01-01

    This case investigation followed the progress of middle students with disabilities, their peers, and teachers in co-taught science classrooms where a hands-on, inquiry-based curriculum was used. Students with disabilities (n=21), including learning disabilities, mild intellectual impairment, and mild autism were placed in co-taught classes with…

  11. Future Goal Setting, Task Motivation and Learning of Minority and Non-Minority Students in Dutch Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, Iris; Phalet, Karen; Lens, Willy

    2006-01-01

    Background: Cross-cultural research on minority school achievement yields mixed findings on the motivational impact of future goal setting for students from disadvantaged minority groups. Relevant and recent motivational research, integrating Future Time Perspective Theory with Self-Determination Theory, has not yet been validated among minority…

  12. Future goal setting, task motivation and learning of minority and non-minority students in Dutch schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, Iris; Phalet, Karen; Lens, Willy

    2006-01-01

    Background. Cross-cultural research on minority school achievement yields mixed findings on the motivational impact of future goal setting for students from disadvantaged minority groups. Relevant and recent motivational research, integrating Future Time Perspective Theory with Self-Determination Th

  13. Evaluating Taught Postgraduate Awards from the Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kember, David; Ho, Amaly; Leung, Doris Y. P.

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for a questionnaire designed specifically to evaluate taught postgraduate (TPg) awards for quality assurance or enhancement purposes. Comparison of undergraduate and TPg awards suggests that as the former have broadened their ambit to better nurture generic graduate attributes, TPg awards have concentrated on advanced specialised…

  14. Can Elementary School Students Be Taught Touchtyping in Unsupervised Environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Vincent P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigates the effect of microcomputer typing tutorials on students' typing speed. Finds that the typing tutorial was effective regardless of the environment (supervised or unsupervised), grade level, gender, or prior typing experience. (RS)

  15. Once upon a time patients taught students interprofessional cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mulle Signe; Rasmussen, Annemette Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    . Process: We have used qualitative focusgroups and observations in the evaluation of the students learning process. Discussion: We invite the NIPNET-participants to share their experiences of IPE with different didactic approaches and in different learning settings. Findings & Conclusion: The qualitative...

  16. Developing Students' Appreciation for What is Taught in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jere

    2008-01-01

    This article elaborates a presentation made upon reception of the E. L. Thorndike Career Achievement Award in Educational Psychology from Division 15 of the American Psychological Association. It considers how value aspects of motivation apply to efforts to develop students' appreciation for school learning. Currently, we have only limited…

  17. Why should nanoscience students be taught to be ethically competent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Anna Julie; Ebbesen, Mette

    2014-12-01

    During the education of scientists at the university level the students become more and more specialized. The specialization of the students is a consequence of the scientific research becoming specialized as well. In the interdisciplinary field of nanoscience the importance of specialization is also emphasized throughout the education. Being an interdisciplinary field of study the specialization in this area is not focused on scientific disciplines, but on the different branches of the research. Historically ethics has not been a priority in science education, however, in recent years the importance of such teachings has been highly recognize especially in medicine, biotechnology and engineering. The rapid development, the many new and unknown areas and the highly specialized focus of nanotechnology suggest the importance of having ethically competent researchers. In this article the importance of ethical competence in nanoscience research is argued for by an example of a dilemma that could occur in a research project. The dilemma is analyzed using two different ethical views, generating two different choices for action. It is seen that the dilemma can have more than one solution and that ethical competence can help in justifying the choice of solution in a specific situation. Furthermore it is suggested that a way to reach this competence is through education in ethics incorporated into the nanoscience education curriculum.

  18. Prevalence of depressive symptoms among medical students taught using problem-based learning versus traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, José Aderval; Freire, Marianna Ribeiro de Menezes; Nolasco Farias, Lucas Guimarães; Diniz, Sarah Santana; Sant'anna Aragão, Felipe Matheus; Sant'anna Aragão, Iapunira Catarina; Lima, Tarcisio Brandão; Reis, Francisco Prado

    2017-10-03

    To compare depressive symptoms among medical students taught using problem-based learning (PBL) and the traditional method. Beck's Depression Inventory was applied to 215 medical students. The prevalence of depression was calculated as the number of individuals with depression divided by the total number in the sample from each course, with 95% confidence intervals. The statistical significance level used was 5% (p ≤ .05). Among the 215 students, 52.1% were male and 47.9% were female; and 51.6% were being taught using PBL methodology and 48.4% using traditional methods. The prevalence of depression was 29.73% with PBL and 22.12% with traditional methods. There was higher prevalence among females: 32.8% with PBL and 23.1% with traditional methods. The prevalence of depression with PBL among students up to 21 years of age was 29.4% and among those over 21 years, 32.1%. With traditional methods among students up to 21 years of age, it was 16.7%%, and among those over 21 years, 30.1%. The prevalence of depression with PBL was highest among students in the second semester and with traditional methods, in the eighth. Depressive symptoms were highly prevalent among students taught both with PBL and with traditional methods.

  19. Intraosseous access can be taught to medical students using the four-step approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzali, Monika; Kvisselgaard, Ask Daffy; Lyngeraa, Tobias Stenbjerg

    2017-01-01

    competencies in IO access when taught by a modified Walker and Peyton's four-step approach. METHODS: Nineteen students attended a human cadaver course in emergency procedures. A lecture was followed by a workshop. Fifteen students were presented with a case where IO access was indicated and their performance......BACKGROUND: The intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for vascular access when peripheral intravascular catheterization cannot be obtained. In Denmark the IO access is reported as infrequently trained and used. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate if medical students can obtain...... was evaluated by an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and rated using a weighted checklist. To evaluate the validity of the checklist, three raters rated performance and Cohen's kappa was performed to assess inter-rater reliability (IRR). To examine the strength of the overall IRR, Randolph...

  20. The Influence of Learning Styles on Student Perception and Satisfaction in a Highly Collaborative Team Taught Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Daniel; Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Team teaching an undergraduate business capstone course has the potential of providing students with an enhanced learning experience in a number of ways. This study examines the relationship between faculty and student learning styles and their impact on student perception and satisfaction in a highly collaborative team taught undergraduate…

  1. The impact of the language of instruction: How economics students in the Netherlands evaluate an English-taught Undergraduate Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grift, Y.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073586358; Meijer, A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140692592; van der Salm, F.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/344820742

    2012-01-01

    In this article student ratings of undergraduate level Economics courses are analysed on the basis of the aggregated results of end-of-term questionnaires. Two groups of students were involved, one of which was taught in Dutch and the other in English. In the analysis the influence was investigated

  2. Cultural Factors in High School Student Motivation to Study Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nunn

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning less commonly taught languages (LCTLs such as Japanese can be challenging for American students. Due to the difficulty of learning LCTLs, more effort is required of the learners to become proficient as compared to European languages. Motivation contributes to the learners’ academic success. In the socio-cultural perspective, the learners’ cultural background mediates their cognitive process. This study examines the motivational differences and similarities among two culturally diverse groups of high school learners of Japanese: Asians excluding Japanese-Americans and non-Asians. One hundred forty two students completed a survey. Factor analysis yielded six factors: integrative motivation, instrumental motivation, intrinsic motivation (doing activities for enjoyment, self-efficacy (a belief in one’s ability to succeed, goal specificity, and goal strategy. The motivational differences were confirmed in intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy. Implications of these findings for LCTL teachers suggest practical steps that can be taken on motivational factors that influence students from different cultural backgrounds.

  3. How neuroscience is taught to North American dental students: results of the Basic Science Survey Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Douglas J; Clarkson, Mackenzie J; Hutchins, Bob; Lambert, H Wayne

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how North American dental students are taught neuroscience during their preclinical dental education. This survey represents one part of a larger research project, the Basic Science Survey Series for Dentistry, which covers all of the biomedical science coursework required of preclinical students in North American dental schools. Members of the Section on Anatomical Sciences of the American Dental Education Association assembled, distributed, and analyzed the neuroscience survey, which had a 98.5 percent response from course directors of the sixty-seven North American dental schools. The eighteen-item instrument collected demographic data on the course directors, information on the content in each course, and information on how neuroscience content is presented. Findings indicate that 1) most neuroscience instruction is conducted by non-dental school faculty members; 2) large content variability exists between programs; and 3) an increase in didactic instruction, integrated curricula, and use of computer-aided instruction is occurring. It is anticipated that the information derived from the survey will help guide neuroscience curricula in dental schools and aid in identifying appropriate content.

  4. Challenges in Academic Reading and Overcoming Strategies in Taught Master Programmes: A Case Study of International Graduate Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on research into academic reading practices of international graduate students in taught Master programmes in a Malaysian university. The purpose of the study was to examine the challenges faced in the academic reading practices as well as the strategies employed to overcome the challenges in the academic reading practices.…

  5. Examining why ethics is taught to veterinary students: a qualitative study of veterinary educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; Lassen, Jesper; Millar, Kate M; Sandøe, Peter; Olsson, I Anna S

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely agreed that veterinary students need to be introduced to ethics, there is limited empirical research investigating the reasons why veterinary ethics is being taught. This study presents the first extensive investigation into the reasons for teaching veterinary ethics and reports data collected in semi-structured interviews with educators involved in teaching undergraduate veterinary ethics at three European schools: the University of Copenhagen, the University of Nottingham, and the Technical University of Lisbon (curricular year 2010-2011). The content of the interview transcripts were analyzed using Toulmin's argumentative model. Ten objectives in teaching veterinary ethics were identified, which can be grouped into four overarching themes: ethical awareness, ethical knowledge, ethical skills, and individual and professional qualities. These objectives include recognizing values and ethical viewpoints, identifying norms and regulations, developing skills of communication and decision making, and contributing to a professional identity. Whereas many of the objectives complement each other, there is tension between the view that ethics teaching should promote knowledge of professional rules and the view that ethics teaching should emphasize critical reasoning skills. The wide range of objectives and the possible tensions between them highlight the challenges faced by educators as they attempt to prioritize among these goals of ethics teaching within a crowded veterinary curriculum.

  6. Student Perceptions of University Physical Activity Instruction Courses Taught Utilizing Sport Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Derek J.; Sibley, Benjamin A.; Townsend, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Limited research exists on effective teaching methods in university physical activity instruction (PAI) program courses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PAI courses taught utilizing a sport education curriculum and instructional model. The Individual Development and Educational Assessment (IDEA) teaching evaluation was administered to…

  7. Lithuanian University Students' Knowledge of Biotechnology and Their Attitudes to the Taught Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanauskas, Vincentas; Makarskaite-Petkeviciene, Rita

    2008-01-01

    The impact of genetic engineering on peoples' everyday life has become present reality. In order to establish the level of the available schoolchildren and university students' knowledge of biotechnology, various investigations have been conducted. However, the current situation in Lithuania remains unclear. A total of 287 students--pre-service…

  8. Where Students with the Most Significant Cognitive Disabilities Are Taught: Implications for General Curriculum Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Harold; Towles-Reeves, Elizabeth; Quenemoen, Rachel; Thurlow, Martha; Fluegge, Lauren; Weseman, Laura; Kerbel, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Surveying 15 states and 39,837 students, this study examined the extent to which students who took an alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards in the 2010--2011 school year had access to regular education settings and the extent to which that access correlated with expressive communication, use of an augmentative or…

  9. Student Proficiency in Spanish Taught by Native and Nonnative Spanish Instructors: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczynski, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Foreign language educators as well as educators from other disciplines agree that learning any foreign language improves student language skills and stimulates creative thinking and flexibility to use the language. The purpose of the current quantitative, correlational study was to examine the relationship between student proficiency in Spanish…

  10. The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing Is Taught in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Kristen; Buchanan, Judy; Friedrich, Linda

    2013-01-01

    A survey of 2,462 Advanced Placement (AP) and National Writing Project (NWP) teachers finds that digital technologies are shaping student writing in myriad ways and have also become helpful tools for teaching writing to middle and high school students. These teachers see the internet and digital technologies such as social networking sites, cell…

  11. Student Proficiency in Spanish Taught by Native and Nonnative Spanish Instructors: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczynski, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Foreign language educators as well as educators from other disciplines agree that learning any foreign language improves student language skills and stimulates creative thinking and flexibility to use the language. The purpose of the current quantitative, correlational study was to examine the relationship between student proficiency in Spanish…

  12. Western medical ethics taught to junior medical students can cross cultural and linguistic boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis Stephen A

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about teaching medical ethics across cultural and linguistic boundaries. This study examined two successive cohorts of first year medical students in a six year undergraduate MBBS program. Methods The objective was to investigate whether Arabic speaking students studying medicine in an Arabic country would be able to correctly identify some of the principles of Western medical ethical reasoning. This cohort study was conducted on first year students in a six-year undergraduate program studying medicine in English, their second language at a medical school in the Arabian Gulf. The ethics teaching was based on the four-principle approach (autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice and delivered by a non-Muslim native English speaker with no knowledge of the Arabic language. Although the course was respectful of Arabic culture and tradition, the content excluded an analysis of Islamic medical ethics and focused on Western ethical reasoning. Following two 45-minute interactive seminars, students in groups of 3 or 4 visited a primary health care centre for one morning, sitting in with an attending physician seeing his or her patients in Arabic. Each student submitted a personal report for summative assessment detailing the ethical issues they had observed. Results All 62 students enrolled in these courses participated. Each student acting independently was able to correctly identify a median number of 4 different medical ethical issues (range 2–9 and correctly identify and label accurately a median of 2 different medical ethical issues (range 2–7 There were no significant correlations between their English language skills or general academic ability and the number or accuracy of ethical issues identified. Conclusions This study has demonstrated that these students could identify medical ethical issues based on Western constructs, despite learning in English, their second language, being in the third

  13. Student Preference Rates for Predominately Online, Compressed, or Traditionally Taught University Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Kevin S.; Dickson, Kole W.; Lessiter, Julie A.; Vassar, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Universities and colleges in the United States are actively searching for new ways to increase student enrollment as one means to offset recent government budget cuts in educational funding. One proposal at a particular institution involves transitioning a commuter university from a traditional semester length calendar to one that offers…

  14. Skype Videoconferencing for Less Commonly Taught Languages: Examining the Effects on Students' Foreign Language Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terantino, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This study compared students' foreign language anxiety levels while completing oral assessments administered face-to-face (F2F) and via Skype videoconferencing for university courses delivered under the self-instructional language program (SILP) model (Dunkel, Brill, & Kohl, 2002). Data were gathered by administering a modified Foreign…

  15. What the Computer Taught Me About My Students...or Is Binary Search "Natural"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquino, Anne

    1978-01-01

    Several examples of student-written programs "teaching" a computer to guess systematically in finding a number between 0 and 10,000 are illustrated. These lend support to the contention that rather than being a "natural" application, using a binary search is a learned technique. (MN)

  16. A qualitative analysis of factors influencing middle school students' use of skills taught by a violence prevention curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Albert D; Mehari, Krista R; Kramer-Kuhn, Alison M; Mays, Sally A; Sullivan, Terri N

    2015-06-01

    This study examined factors that influenced the use of skills taught in a school-based universal violence prevention program. Interviews were conducted with 91 students from two urban schools (83% were African American and 12% multiracial) and 50 students from a nearby county school (52% were White, 32% African American, and 12% multiracial). About half the sample (54%) was male. All had been in sixth grade classrooms where the Second Step (Committee for Children, 1997b) violence prevention curriculum had been implemented earlier in the school year or in the preceding school year. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts suggested that participants' use of intervention skills was influenced by their beliefs and values, perceived relevance and effectiveness of the skill, issues related to enacting the behavior, and contextual factors. These findings highlight the need for a more intensive and comprehensive effort to address barriers and supports that influence the relevance and impact of school-based violence prevention programs. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Are medical students being taught anatomy in a way that best prepares them to be a physician?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meral Savran, Mona; Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen; Frost Clementsen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reasoning in a clinical context is an attribute of medical expertise. Clinical reasoning in medical school can be encouraged by teaching basic science with a clinical emphasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anatomy is being taught in a way that facilitates the dev......, implying that the teaching they have received has not encouraged clinical reasoning. Clin. Anat., 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  18. What Must Not Be Taught.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigberg, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    Reviews nine U.S. history textbooks, evaluating their analyses of the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War. Documents their failure to link U.S. foreign policy to economic interests. Criticizes the texts' lack of an historical framework. Concludes students are taught neither historical truth nor critical analysis skills. (CH)

  19. After-school enrichment and the activity theory: How can a management service organization assist schools with reducing the achievement gap among minority and non-minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) during the after-school hours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Reagan D.

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate how a management service organization can assist schools with reducing the achievement gap between minority and non-minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) during the after-school hours. Developing a strategic plan through creating a program that provides support services for the implementation of hands-on activities in STEM for children during the after-school hours was central to this purpose. This Project Demonstrating Excellence (PDE), a social action project, also presents historical and current after-school program developments in the nation. The study is quantitative and qualitative in nature. Surveys were utilized to quantitatively capture the opinions of participants in the social action project on three specific education related issues: (1) disparity in academic motivation of students to participate in after-school STEM enrichment programs; (2) whether teachers and school administrators saw a need for STEM after-school enrichment; and (3) developing STEM after-school programs that were centered on problem-solving and higher-order thinking skills to develop students' interest in STEM careers. The sample consisted of 50 participants comprised of students, teachers, and administrators. The focus groups and interviews provided the qualitative data for the study. The qualitative sample consisted of 14 participants comprised of students, parents and teachers, administrators, an education consultant, and a corporate sponsor. The empirical data obtained from the study survey, focus groups, and interviews provided a comprehensive profile on the current views and future expectations of STEM after-school enrichment, student and school needs, and community partnerships with STEM companies. Results of the study and review of the implementation of the social action project, C-STEM (communication, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Teacher and Student Support

  20. Empathy - can it be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, D; Downie, R

    2016-06-01

    There is now a societal and cultural expectation that doctors and nurses should feel, and display, empathy for their patients. Many commentators argue that medical and nursing students should be taught empathy. Empathy, however, is difficult to define: it is not the same as kindness, as it implies a degree of psychological insight into what the patient is thinking or feeling. Empathy is seen by some as a form of emotional intelligence that can be systematically developed through teaching and positive role models. Here we debate the meaning of empathy, and whether it is truly a quality, or attribute, that can be taught.

  1. Developing Pictographic Impact on the Minds of the Students through Poetry of John Seely’s Textbook Taught at O’level in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Hayat Khokhar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Poetry is one of the chief ingredients of the textbooks taught in the classes of language as well as arts that appeals to our senses in several domains. Imagery in poetry bears pictographic impact on the minds of the readers. This study aims at finding out what kind of imagery and images are employed in the book and how far they succeed in bringing about pictographic impact on the minds of the students. Content analysis of the poems in qualitative paradigm was adopted for this study. Direct and indirect interviews of the students were also conducted. It was found out that the poems of the book contained all pervasive versatile imagery. Moreover, the images and imagery had verbal as well as visual impact on the minds of the students that helped them improve their memory, increase their vocabulary, enhance comprehension, and develop interest in reading. Keywords: Development, Pictographic, Impact, Poetry, Textbook, O’level, Pakistan

  2. Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the English Program Taught at the College of Technological Studies in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaihani, Hussein A.; Shuqair, Khaled M.; Alotaibi, Abdullah M.; Alrabah, Sulaiman

    2015-01-01

    This research aims at examining the Students' perceptions of the effectiveness of the English program implemented in the College of Technological Studies in Kuwait. A sample of 242 students was randomly selected from the population. The students were asked to respond to a 21-statement questionnaire designed to obtain information about how they…

  3. The Effectiveness of Peer Taught Group Sessions of Physiotherapy Students within the Clinical Setting: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Dee; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether learning from peers, learning from a clinical educator, or being the peer teacher during clinical group sessions was more effective at enhancing student learning outcomes for different health conditions. A secondary aim was to determine which method students found more satisfactory. Physiotherapy students at…

  4. Effects of the Use of Lecture Method and Wordle on the Performance of Students Taught Curriculum Studies 1: EDU222

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afurobi, Ada; Izuagba, Angela; Obiefuna, Carol; Ifegbo, Perpetua

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to determine the effects of the use of Wordle and lecture method in teaching Curriculum Studies 1 EDU: 222 on students' performance. 100 students were purposively selected and to ensure homogeneity and consistency, the WRub was given to the 100 students and they were then grouped based on their performance--above average, average…

  5. Written Assessment and Feedback Practices in Postgraduate Taught Courses in the UK: Staff and International Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen Solano, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In recent years UK universities have attracted an increasing number of international students. Their socialisation into different academic practices greatly depends on their ability to write in English since writing is the main way in which students demonstrate their learning at university. This paper looks into the widely-shared view that tutor…

  6. Can compassion be taught?

    OpenAIRE

    Pence, G E

    1983-01-01

    Socrates (in the Meno) denied that virtues like courage could be taught, whereas Protagoras defended this claim. Compassion is discussed below in this context; it is distinguished from related, but different, moral qualities, and the role of imagination is emphasised. 'Sympathy's and role-modelling views of compassion's acquisition are criticised. Compassion can indeed be taught, but neither by the example of a few, isolated physicians nor by creation of Departments of Compassion. In replying...

  7. Should engineering ethics be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaté, Charles J

    2011-09-01

    Should engineering ethics be taught? Despite the obvious truism that we all want our students to be moral engineers who practice virtuous professional behavior, I argue, in this article that the question itself obscures several ambiguities that prompt preliminary resolution. Upon clarification of these ambiguities, and an attempt to delineate key issues that make the question a philosophically interesting one, I conclude that engineering ethics not only should not, but cannot, be taught if we understand "teaching engineering ethics" to mean training engineers to be moral individuals (as some advocates seem to have proposed). However, I also conclude that there is a justification to teaching engineering ethics, insofar as we are able to clearly identify the most desirable and efficacious pedagogical approach to the subject area, which I propose to be a case study-based format that utilizes the principle of human cognitive pattern recognition.

  8. Can compassion be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, G E

    1983-12-01

    Socrates (in the Meno) denied that virtues like courage could be taught, whereas Protagoras defended this claim. Compassion is discussed below in this context; it is distinguished from related, but different, moral qualities, and the role of imagination is emphasised. 'Sympathy's and role-modelling views of compassion's acquisition are criticised. Compassion can indeed be taught, but neither by the example of a few, isolated physicians nor by creation of Departments of Compassion. In replying to one standard objection to teaching compassion, it is emphasised that scientific competence and compassion aren't mutually exclusive.

  9. Effects of multisensory resources on the achievement and science attitudes of seventh-grade suburban students taught science concepts on and above grade level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Patrice Helen

    This research was designed to determine the relationships among students' achievement scores on grade-level science content, on science content that was three years above-grade level, on attitudes toward instructional approaches, and learning-styles perceptual preferences when instructional approaches were multisensory versus traditional. The dependent variables for this investigation were scores on achievement posttests and scores on the attitude survey. The independent variables were the instructional strategy and students' perceptual preferences. The sample consisted of 74 educationally oriented seventh-grade students. The Learning Styles Inventory (LSI) (Dunn, Dunn, & Price, 1990) was administered to determine perceptual preferences. The control group was taught seventh-grade and tenth-grade science units using a traditional approach and the experimental group was instructed on the same units using multisensory instructional resources. The Semantic Differential Scale (SDS) (Pizzo, 1981) was administered to reveal attitudinal differences. The traditional unit included oral reading from the textbook, completing outlines, labeling diagrams, and correcting the outlines and diagrams as a class. The multisensory unit included five instructional stations established in different sections of the classroom to allow students to learn by: (a) manipulating Flip Chutes, (b) using Electroboards, (c) assembling Task Cards, (d) playing a kinesthetic Floor Game, and (e) reading an individual Programmed Learning Sequence. Audio tapes and scripts were provided at each location. Students circulated in groups of four from station to station. The data subjected to statistical analyses supported the use of a multisensory, rather than a traditional approach, for teaching science content that is above-grade level. T-tests revealed a positive and significant impact on achievement scores (p < 0.0007). No significance was detected on grade-level achievement nor on the perceptual

  10. The Probability of a General Education Student Placed in a Co-Taught Inclusive Classroom of Passing the 2014 New York State ELA and Mathematics Assessment in Grades 6-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Michael M.; Babo, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of placement in a co-taught inclusive classroom on the academic achievement of general education students in grades 6-8 in a suburban New York school district on the 2014 New York State ELA and Mathematics Assessments. Propensity Score Matching (PSM) was utilized for sample selection in order to simulate a more…

  11. 全日制自考生思想政治素质提升的对策分析%Countermeasures Analysis to Ideological and Political Quality Promotion for the Full-time Self-taught Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田建湘

    2016-01-01

    Through the analysis of the characteristics of full-time self-taught students,from the enrollment motivation,disci-pline consciousness,mental status,we can sum up the all aspects of reasons of limiting ideological and political quality promo-tion for the full-time self-taught students.From a practical point of view,this paper proposed some countermeasures to take an examination of oneself of the graduate school of management in order to provide some methods of promoting the ideological and political quality for the full-time self-taught students.%通过对全日制自考生的特点进行分析,从入学动机、纪律意识、心理状况等方面着手,归纳了制约全日制自考生思想政治教育提升的各方面原因,从实际出发,提出了一些对自考生管理的对策。以期给全日制自考生思想政治素质的提高,促进自考生全面健康发展提供一些方法。

  12. On Being Taught

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada S. Jaarsma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the definitions of the key words of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL—scholarship, teaching, and learning—in order to identify the hopes that animate SoTL research and examine these hopes in light of recent critical thinking about the corporatization of higher education. Arguing that Biesta’s (2013b distinction between “learning from” and “being taught by” offers an important corrective to the prevailing definitions of SoTL, the essay reflects on the tensions between scholarly teaching, as understood by SoTL, and teaching as a contingent and unpredictable event. Cet essai examine la définition des mots-clés de l’avancement des connaissances en enseignement et en apprentissage (ACEA – avancement des connaissances, enseignement, apprentissage – afin d’identifier les espoirs qui inspirent la recherche en ACEA et d’examiner ces espoirs à la lumière des pensées critiques récentes qui portent sur la tendance de l’enseignement supérieur à fonctionner comme une entreprise. Cet essai présente l’argument selon lequel la distinction faite par Biesta (2013b entre « apprendre de quelqu’un » et « être enseigné par quelqu’un » constitue une correction importante aux définitions actuelles de l’ACEA. L’essai propose une réflexion sur les tensions qui existent entre l’enseignement intellectuel, tel que compris par l’ACEA, et l’enseignement en tant qu’événement contingent et imprévisible.

  13. Can Ethics Be Taught? A Quasi-Experimental Study of the Impact of Class Size on the Cognitive Moral Reasoning of Freshmen Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ethan A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a business ethics course on the cognitive moral reasoning of freshmen business students. The sample consisted of 268 college students enrolled in a required business ethics course. The students took Rest's Defining Issues Test--Version 2 (DIT2) as a pre-test and then post-test (upon…

  14. Can Ethics Be Taught? A Quasi-Experimental Study of the Impact of Class Size on the Cognitive Moral Reasoning of Freshmen Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ethan A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a business ethics course on the cognitive moral reasoning of freshmen business students. The sample consisted of 268 college students enrolled in a required business ethics course. The students took Rest's Defining Issues Test--Version 2 (DIT2) as a pre-test and then post-test (upon…

  15. 论师生关系对自考学生英语学习的影响%The impact of teacher-student relationships on students’ English learning in the self-taught examination system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓文

    2014-01-01

    师生关系是一个在教学过程中不容忽视的重要因素,其和谐与否直接影响着学生的学习成效。英语学习对学生而言是一项漫长且复杂的过程,它受多方面的心理因素影响,师生关系便是其中之一。数据分析显示“师生关系”对学生学习英语的动力、兴趣和课堂表现产生明显的影响和作用。%The relationship teachers and students is an important factors in the teaching process should not be ignored,it is harmonious or not directly affects the students′learning effect.English learning for students is a long and complicated process,it is influenced by various psychological factors,the relationship between teachers and students is one of them.The analyses re-vealed that teacher-student relationships significantly influenced on the motivation,the interest and the performance in class of the self-taught-exam students.

  16. "The Military Taught Me How to Study, How to Work Hard": Helping Student-Veterans Transition by Building on Their Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaauw-Hara, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges are experiencing growing numbers of student veterans. Unfortunately, much training for faculty and staff tends to stem from a deficit mindset: the focus is on remediating what student veterans lack rather than building on their unique strengths. Training programs, courses, and college interventions that acknowledge and build on…

  17. "The Military Taught Me How to Study, How to Work Hard": Helping Student-Veterans Transition by Building on Their Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaauw-Hara, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges are experiencing growing numbers of student veterans. Unfortunately, much training for faculty and staff tends to stem from a deficit mindset: the focus is on remediating what student veterans lack rather than building on their unique strengths. Training programs, courses, and college interventions that acknowledge and build on…

  18. The impact of integrated team care taught using a live NHS contract on the educational experience of final year dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D R; Holmes, S; Woolford, M J; Dunne, S M

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the responses of the dental student body in the first three years of outreach education (2010-13) at the University of Portsmouth Dental Academy in the areas of integrated team work and use of a current NHS contact. Use of a questionnaire to allow both quantitative and qualitative data to be obtained, administered to the three cohorts of students at the end of their longitudinal attendance at the Academy in their final year of education at King's College London Dental Institute. Data were obtained from 227 students which represented a 95% return rate. Sixty-four percent of students strongly agreed with both statements: 'I am confident with working with a dental nurse' and 'I now understand properly the scope of practice of dental hygiene-therapists'. Sixty-seven percent strongly agreed with the statement 'I have had useful experience of working in NHS primary care during the final year'. Eighty percent either strongly agreed or agreed with the statement 'My experience of real Units of Dental Activity and Key Performance Indicators has encouraged me to positively consider NHS high street dentistry as a career option'. Within the limitations of this study the dental students reported having gained useful experience of working in integrated team care dentistry. They expressed strong support for the education that is being delivered in an outreach environment and, most importantly, the student body was looking forward to entering general dental practice in the UK.

  19. "The Military Taught Me Something about Writing": How Student Veterans Complicate the Novice-to-Expert Continuum in First-Year Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Corrine

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I summarize an interview-based, qualitative research study conducted with ten Marine student veterans on their experiences with college composition courses, focusing particularly on the how the participants' previous interactions with teaching, learning, and writing in the Marine Corps have impacted their perceptions and…

  20. An Analysis of Leamer Motivation of Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Ueno

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the process of student motivation construction. It explores the initial motivation of students studying less commonly taught languages, specifically Chinese, Japanese, and Russian, and how students' initial motivation changes over time. By utilizing a qualitative approach, students' unmodified views towards their motivation are analyzed in-depth. Data were collected in the beginning of the fall term and in the beginning of the winter term (four months later through questionnaires and interviews. The findings suggest that many students initially start to study the target language because of their attraction towards an uncommon language and the challenge that such languages hold. At the second stage, however, the majority of the students expressed a development of intrinsic motivation, i.e., enjoyment they obtained through learning the target language. Based on the findings, the study suggests how teachers and administrators can sustain students in less commonly taught language programs.

  1. Language Course Taught with Online Supplement Material: Is It Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Y. M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of the Internet is expected in foreign-language classrooms. The present study investigated and evaluated the effectiveness of a language course supplemented with online material for college-level Japanese learners. The study compared exam scores from students enrolled in traditional inclass instruction taught 5 consecutive days for 50…

  2. FEEDFORWARD AND FEEDBACK: HOW SHAKESPEARE IS TAUGHT IN SICHUAN UNIVERSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction ’Shakespeare’ as a course is taught to three different kinds of students in Sichuan University. First, as a degree course for English Major (Literature) postgraduates. Second, as a required course for English Major (Linguistics) postgraduates and third, as an optional course for fourth-year undergraduates. As their focus point is different, the teacher must meet these different needs by designing different courses, even preparing different materials and different examinations, while keeping a common core.

  3. Intelligence Is Dynamic and Can Be Taught

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present evidence that intelligence is dynamic and can be taught. The author reviews empirical studies, theoretical frameworks, qualitative research, and conceptual frameworks. Author employed several databases in a wide review of academic literature. There are many competing and complementary theories of…

  4. Applied Mathematics Should Be Taught Mixed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gary I.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the differences between applied and pure mathematics and provides extensive history of mixed mathematics. Argues that applied mathematics should be taught allowing for speculative mathematics, which involves breaking down a given problem into simpler parts until one arrives at first principles. (ASK)

  5. Herder and Modernity: From Lesser-Taught Languages to Lesser-Taught Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Votruba

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The typical North American curriculum of a lesser-taught Slavic language implicitly relies on the legacy of Johann Gottfried von Herder’s interpretation that language in and of itself contains national (ethnic culture. At the same time, enrolments are dwindling even in courses in the most commonly taught Slavic languages. Millennials’ understandable focus on the practicality of the courses they take make it unlikely for the lesser-taught languages to survive the slump. On the other hand, foreign culture courses are appearing to hold their ground more successfully. Slavic departments may reconsider Herder’s dictum as they try to maintain or establish programs in lesser-taught languages and cultures.

  6. How School Taught Me I Was Poor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author recounts how school taught him that he was poor. For him, third grade was the year in which he learned in school that he was poor. The author's story reminds everyone that all children do not experience school in the same way. Their social class (in the case described in this article), as well as their race, gender,…

  7. Cultural Contents Taught in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂孝春

    2007-01-01

    Language and culture are closely related to each other. From the aspect of language as the semiotic system, language is the carrier of culture and culture is the entailment of language .The language of any nation bears the deep content of its culture .It can be said that language is the reflection of a nation's culture .Therefore the learning of a language must be connected with the acquisition of the corresponding culture. In the English classrooms English teacher should teach the language and the culture as well. This paper deals with both the cultural contents to be taught and the principles of teaching them in the English classrooms.

  8. Reflections on an Interdisciplinary, Community-Based, Team-Taught Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, Anne Marie; Miller, Lisa K.; Lane, Paul; Farris, John

    2010-01-01

    A new team-taught course focused on interdisciplinary teaching and integrative learning was offered at Grand Valley State University during the Summer of 2008 at a regional campus in Holland, Michigan. Faculty from Engineering and Business developed this community-based, alternative-format course to engage students in the question: "What will…

  9. Can Thinking Be Taught? Linking Critical Thinking and Writing in an EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya Rao; Al-Mahrooqi, Rahma

    2015-01-01

    While thinking critically is often perceived to be the primary purpose of reading, the question of whether it can actually be taught in classrooms has been extensively debated. This paper bases itself on a qualitative case study of university students completing a degree in English Language and Literature. It explores the way in which critical…

  10. Reflections on an Interdisciplinary, Community-Based, Team-Taught Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, Anne Marie; Miller, Lisa K.; Lane, Paul; Farris, John

    2010-01-01

    A new team-taught course focused on interdisciplinary teaching and integrative learning was offered at Grand Valley State University during the Summer of 2008 at a regional campus in Holland, Michigan. Faculty from Engineering and Business developed this community-based, alternative-format course to engage students in the question: "What will…

  11. Can Thinking Be Taught? Linking Critical Thinking and Writing in an EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya Rao; Al-Mahrooqi, Rahma

    2015-01-01

    While thinking critically is often perceived to be the primary purpose of reading, the question of whether it can actually be taught in classrooms has been extensively debated. This paper bases itself on a qualitative case study of university students completing a degree in English Language and Literature. It explores the way in which critical…

  12. Molecular Modeling as a Self-Taught Component of a Conventional Undergraduate Chemical Reaction Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Erhard W.; Zygmunt, William E.

    2016-01-01

    We inserted a self-taught molecular modeling project into an otherwise conventional undergraduate chemical-reaction-engineering course. Our objectives were that students should (a) learn with minimal instructor intervention, (b) gain an appreciation for the relationship between molecular structure and, first, macroscopic state functions in…

  13. English Communication Skills: How Are They Taught at Schools and Universities in Oman?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahrooqi, Rahma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate, from a student perspective, how English communication skills are taught in Oman's schools and higher education institutions. Previous research has documented the lack of communicative ability in English among school and higher education graduates in Oman (Al-Issa, 2007; Moody, 2009). However, the reasons…

  14. The role of writing in learning less-commonly-taught languages in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Yigitoglu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates language learners' perceptions of foreign language writing and how writing influences their language learning to write in non-Latin alphabets. While most research studies have focused on writing in commonly-taught languages, recently, L2 writing researchers have begun to call for the importance of researching the language learning and writing experiences of speakers who learn less-commonly taught languages. To address this issue, this study investigates the role of writing in learning less-commonly-taught languages. The study was conducted at a large university in Istanbul, Turkey. Turkish students learning Arabic, Russian, and Chinese as foreign languages were surveyed and interviewed in different times of the semester. The results indicated that while lower level language learners stated the act of writing serves as the only way to memorize the characters, words, and sometimes sentences, higher level language learners talked about the role of communicative aspects of writing in their language learning processes.

  15. Facts and Methods need to be taught

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, George

    2015-03-01

    Current trends in the K-12 educational establishment tend to concentrate on ``understanding'', both the ``understanding `` of how the student thinks and the student's ``understanding'' of a concept. In many cases the teaching of facts upon which the student might base his/her ``understanding'' is neglected. The lack of facts is amplified in our digital age where the exposure to reality is replaced by a virtual experience. This is one of the reasons for the limitations our college students exhibit. Examples in physics and math will be discussed, as well as possible remedies.

  16. Jurisprudence and business management course content taught at accredited chiropractic colleges: A comparative audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleberzon, Brian J

    2010-03-01

    the purpose of this study was to conduct a comparative audit of the jurisprudence and business management courses offered at a number of different accredited chiropractic colleges. Faculty members responsible for teaching students jurisprudence and/or business management courses at a number of accredited colleges were contacted and asked to electronically submit their course outlines for review. Of the 62 different topics delivered at the 11 chiropractic colleges surveyed, not one topic was taught at all of them. The following topics were taught at 10 of the 11 respondent chiropractic colleges: business plan development; ethics and codes of conduct and; office staff/employees. Several topics were only taught at one accredited chiropractic college. While most chiropractic colleges provide some education in the areas of jurisprudence and business management, it would appear that there is no consensus opinion or 'model curriculum' on these topics towards which chiropractic programs may align themselves. Based on a literature search, this study is the first of its kind. A more extensive study is required, as well as a Delphi process to determine what should be taught to chiropractic students with respect to jurisprudence and business management in order to protect the public interest.

  17. How Should Human Relations Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputo, Helen N.; Gill, Nancy L.

    1972-01-01

    The best way to prepare prospective employees to get along with others on the job, is a separate course tailored to the interests of the students in the class--with case studies to add zest. (Editor/SB)

  18. Can nonverbal communication skills be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hirono; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kinoshita, Makoto; Yano, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    While nonverbal communication (NVC) is an essential part of a physician's interpersonal skills, it has attracted relatively little attention in medical education. To develop a program for teaching NVC skills, and to examine whether it would improve student's awareness and performance of NVC. A total of 106 preclerkship medical students were randomly assigned to 14 groups for a communication skills training session before an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Five faculty members served as session facilitators, of whom three provided the original program (n = 67) and two provided the NVC intervention program (n = 39). After the training session, students wrote their goals for the OSCE medical interview, which were analyzed for content. The student's performance of NVC was evaluated based on the video recording of the OSCE. Students in NVC group were significantly more likely to write goals related to NVC, but no significant differences were found in the NVC evaluations at the OSCE. The intervention was effective in increasing student's awareness of NVC, but it was not sufficient to change the actual performance. Further research is needed to explore whether additional training would actually improve their NVC performance.

  19. CALL and Less Commonly Taught Languages: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) researchers face many challenges in developing effective, high-quality CALL. CALL research has a very strong focus on the Most Commonly Taught Languages (MCLTs), particularly English. CALL researchers working with Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs) face further constraints. LCTLs can range from…

  20. How is veterinary parasitology taught in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Yi; Wang, Ming; Suo, Xun; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2006-12-01

    Many parasites of domestic animals in China are of major socioeconomic and medical importance. Hence, veterinary parasitology is one of the core subjects for undergraduate and postgraduate students of veterinary science. Here, we review the teaching of veterinary parasitology in Chinese universities, including a description of the veterinary science curricula and measures to improve the quality of veterinary parasitology teaching in China.

  1. Common Core Taught through the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    At the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, the painting "El Jaleo"--a canvas spanning 11 feet that features a flamenco dancer--is a popular starting point for getting students to spend time with a work of art. But viewing and discussing the 1882 piece by the American artist John Singer Sargent isn't just a cultural experience. It…

  2. Can English Listening really be Taught Efficiently?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qin

    2013-01-01

    Currently in most L2 litening classes, teachers tend to assume that listening lesson should mainly be responsible for by students themselves with the teachers acting as recording players. Based on the nature of listening and listening skills and strate-gies , this essay tries to point out the possibility of teaching English listening efficiently in class with some typical examples. Hope-fully it can provide some useful implications for L2 listening teaching.

  3. What Writing Skills Should Accounting Students Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas C.; Nelson, Sandra J.; Moncada, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    Responses from 150 public accountants and 108 management accountants identified communication skills needed in accounting. Top writing skills areas included working papers, memoranda, business letters, instructions and procedures, and systems documentation. (SK)

  4. Students Must be Taught to Think about Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Robert G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses myths of journalism that are perpetuated in undergraduate journalism classes. Describes techniques for teaching undergraduates to take a more critical stance concerning journalism issues. (HTH)

  5. Independence, Interaction, Interdependence and Interrelation: Learner Autonomy in a Web-based Less Commonly Taught Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Kostina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, teaching less commonly taught languages has been a very challenging task due to low student enrollment and the high costs of hiring permanent teaching faculty. Therefore, webbased distance learning (DL is beginning to attract serious attention from the less commonly taught languages profession (Fleming, Hiple and Du, 2002. However, DL classes are often associated with student isolation, where learners are deprived of non-verbal clues, vocal expression, and eye contact that are crucial for foreign language learning (White, 2005. Thus, working in a more isolated context requires higher learner autonomy (White, 2005. This article provides a review of literature on autonomy that exists in the foreign language field, and describes four aspects of autonomy that need to be considered by language teachers while developing their web-based courses. It also offers some practical suggestions for the less commonly taught language instructors that foster autonomy and decrease isolation online.

  6. New Proposals for Educational Development of Disciplines Taught in Foreign Languages in Multicultural Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Birch Gonçalves

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the current trend of offering courses in the undergraduate programs, taught in foreign languages, as a fundamental aspect for the formation of new global professionals who require different skills to work in multicultural markets. To do so, the research highlights some concepts of internationalization, academic mobility and curricula internationalization. A longitudinal case study was conducted over a period of three years (2010-2013, describing the trajectory of the Intercultural Communication discipline, taught in English in a multicultural classroom, in a Higher Education Institution. For the analysis, it was used the data provided by online assessment system. The results show the degree of satisfaction by students who attended this course and emphasizes the strong responsibility of professionals who teach courses in foreign languages where language proficiency is essential, however the content domain and the use of proper methodologies are no less important.

  7. Teachers' experiences of English-language-taught degree programs within health care sector of Finnish polytechnics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Kekki, Pertti

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to research teachers' experiences of the English-Language-Taught Degree Programs in the health care sector of Finnish polytechnics. More specifically, the focus was on teachers' experiences of teaching methods and clinical practice. The data were collected from eighteen teachers in six polytechnics through focus group interviews. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results suggested that despite the positive interaction between students and teachers, choosing appropriate teaching methods provided a challenge for teachers, due to cultural diversity of students as well as to the use of a foreign language in tuition. Due to students' language-related difficulties, clinical practice was found to be the biggest challenge in the educational process. Staffs' attitudes were perceived to be significant for students' clinical experience. Further research using stronger designs is needed.

  8. Influence of professional preparation and class structure on sexuality topics taught in middle and high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Darson L; Kirchofer, Gregg; Hammig, Bart J; Ogletree, Roberta J

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the impact of professional preparation and class structure on sexuality topics taught and use of practice-based instructional strategies in US middle and high school health classes. Data from the classroom-level file of the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs were used. A series of multivariable logistic regression models were employed to determine if sexuality content taught was dependent on professional preparation and /or class structure (HE only versus HE/another subject combined). Additional multivariable logistic regression models were employed to determine if use of practice-based instructional strategies was dependent upon professional preparation and/or class structure. Years of teaching health topics and size of the school district were included as covariates in the multivariable logistic regression models. Findings indicated professionally prepared health educators were significantly more likely to teach 7 of the 13 sexuality topics as compared to nonprofessionally prepared health educators. There was no statistically significant difference in the instructional strategies used by professionally prepared and nonprofessionally prepared health educators. Exclusively health education classes versus combined classes were significantly more likely to have included 6 of the 13 topics and to have incorporated practice-based instructional strategies in the curricula. This study indicated professional preparation and class structure impacted sexuality content taught. Class structure also impacted whether opportunities for students to practice skills were made available. Results support the need for continued advocacy for professionally prepared health educators and health only courses. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  9. How Is Qualitative Research Taught at the Masters' Level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisko, James W.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how qualitative research is taught in foundation MSW courses using a content analysis of syllabi and a survey. The Council on Social Work Education required qualitative research content in 1994 and several authors advocate for greater inclusion of it. Yet no research about what qualitative content is included on syllabi is…

  10. Should Gun Safety Be Taught in Schools? Perspectives of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Gun-related injuries and deaths among children occur at disproportionately high rates in the United States. Children who live in homes with guns are the most likely victims. This study describes teachers' views on whether gun safety should be taught to children in the preschool and elementary years. Methods: A total of 150 survey…

  11. How Is Qualitative Research Taught at the Masters' Level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisko, James W.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how qualitative research is taught in foundation MSW courses using a content analysis of syllabi and a survey. The Council on Social Work Education required qualitative research content in 1994 and several authors advocate for greater inclusion of it. Yet no research about what qualitative content is included on syllabi is…

  12. Should Gun Safety Be Taught in Schools? Perspectives of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Gun-related injuries and deaths among children occur at disproportionately high rates in the United States. Children who live in homes with guns are the most likely victims. This study describes teachers' views on whether gun safety should be taught to children in the preschool and elementary years. Methods: A total of 150 survey…

  13. Scholarly Appraisals of Literary Works Taught in High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Stephen, Ed.; Sams, Henry W., Ed.

    Critical essays on eight literary works--four from the conventional literature curriculum and four less widely taught--are collected in this publication. Each o f the four standard selections--"Great Expectations,""Julius Caesar,""The Scarlet Letter," and "Macbeth"--is treated in two essays and a bibliography; and each of the less widely taught…

  14. Asian Remedial Plan: A Study of Sheltered and Co-Taught Classes in New Instructional Model Secondary Schools. Final Report No. 9202.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Judy; And Others

    This study assesses students' perceptions of and performance in sheltered and co-taught classes in an Asian remedial plan in Philadelphia's (Pennsylvania) New Instructional Model (NIM) secondary schools. The study used end-of-year marks and student focus groups to collect data. The focus groups were conducted with 247 Asian limited English…

  15. Physics of climate change, taught as a topics a course for undergraduate physics majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Michael

    2012-10-01

    While anthropogenic (human-caused) climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population. Science students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). While the pertinent material is covered in undergraduate physics courses, it helps to review the basics in order to develop an educated perspective on this topic that is very volatile (socially and politically). The basic topics are introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, blackbody radiation, and appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research). These topics are usually covered in undergraduate modern physics and thermodynamics courses, but a separate course on climate change (taught in Spring 2012) helped ``put things together'' for both the students and their professor.

  16. Group by Subject or by Ability? Tertiary Mathematics for Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Michael; James, Alex; Hannah, John

    2011-01-01

    The mathematics topics taught to engineering students at university are ostensibly no different to those taught to mathematics majors, so should these students be taught together or separately? Should engineering students be segregated by ability in their mathematics classes? This study analyses the grades of over 1000 engineering students, and…

  17. Knowledge and attitude regarding mercury handling and disposal in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shruti; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R; Murarka, Shiva; Kumar, Sunil

    2011-07-01

    The present cross-sectional study was carried out in higher secondary schools of the science specialty in Ahmedabad. A total of 653 students (196 taught in English, 395 taught in Gujarati and 62 taught in Hindi) from seven schools were included. The interview technique was used for data collection using a predesigned questionnaire. A total of 457 (70%) were boys and 196 (30%) were girls. About two-thirds of the study participants had handled mercury at sometime in their life and home was the common place where it was handled. More than half of the Hindi-taught students did not know about its physical appearance. The majority of the Gujarati-taught students knew that mercury is harmful to health whereas one-third of the English- and Hindi-taught students considered mercury to be harmless. A total of 46% of the Gujarati-taught and 44% of the English-taught students had encountered spilled mercury at sometime in their life and 21.6% of English-taught and 25% of Hindi-taught students had either smelled or played with spilled mercury. More than two-thirds of the English- and Hindi-taught students recommended the usual cleaning method whereas 81.8% of Gujarati-taught students suggested a special method should be used for the disposal of spilled mercury. The majority of the students did not know whether mercury could be substituted by a harmless substance.

  18. Practices in Less Commonly Taught Languages: Factors that Shape Teachers’ Beliefs and Guide Their Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Saydee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this qualitative study, the researcher investigated teachers’ perceptions about effective teaching and learning methodologies and discovered the factors that shape teachers’ beliefs and lead them to prefer certain methodologies. Data was collected through interviews of Arabic, Chinese, Dari, Pashto, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Persian teachers (N=25 and their adult students, ten per teacher (N=241 at institutions of higher education in Southern California. In general, the teachers had similar views about effective teaching strategies and similar factors influenced their views- all the teachers emphasized the languages they teach differ from commonly taught languages; and, therefore, teaching and learning strategies should also be different. Knowing the factors that shape teachers’ beliefs significantly contributes to the field of teacher education. In particular, educators will become more cognizant of content to include in their teacher training program curriculum to better influence teachers and alter their instructional methodologies.

  19. Self-Taught convolutional neural networks for short text clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaming; Xu, Bo; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Suncong; Tian, Guanhua; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Bo

    2017-01-12

    Short text clustering is a challenging problem due to its sparseness of text representation. Here we propose a flexible Self-Taught Convolutional neural network framework for Short Text Clustering (dubbed STC(2)), which can flexibly and successfully incorporate more useful semantic features and learn non-biased deep text representation in an unsupervised manner. In our framework, the original raw text features are firstly embedded into compact binary codes by using one existing unsupervised dimensionality reduction method. Then, word embeddings are explored and fed into convolutional neural networks to learn deep feature representations, meanwhile the output units are used to fit the pre-trained binary codes in the training process. Finally, we get the optimal clusters by employing K-means to cluster the learned representations. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed framework is effective, flexible and outperform several popular clustering methods when tested on three public short text datasets.

  20. Survey of Digital Materials for Teaching Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Blankenship

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first phase of a survey of digital materials for teaching Less Commonly Taught Languages. The research, conducted by the UCLA Language Materials Project from August, 2010, through February, 2012, located more than 500 reliable digital resources from academic and governmental providers. The report details the survey’s selection criteria and primary sources, and describes trends in technology, distribution of materials, and types of content. Then narrowing its focus to the eleven languages supported by the federal Startalk and Flagship programs, the report summarizes the population of digital materials available for those languages and identifies needs. It ends with recommendations of categories of materials that need to be developed, along with comments on feasibility.

  1. What is empathy, and can empathy be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C M

    1990-11-01

    Empathy is a commonly used, but poorly understood, concept. It is often confused with related concepts such as sympathy, pity, identification, and self-transposal. The purposes of this article are to clearly distinguish empathy from related terms and to suggest that the act of empathizing cannot be taught. According to Edith Stein, a German phenomenologist, empathy can be facilitated. It also can be interrupted and blocked, but it cannot be forced to occur. What makes empathy unique, according to Stein, is that it happens to us; it is indirectly given to us, "nonprimordially." When empathy occurs, we find ourselves experiencing it, rather than directly causing it to happen. This is the characteristic that makes the act of empathy unteachable. Instead, promoting attitudes and behaviors such as self-awareness, nonjudgmental positive regard for others, good listening skills, and self-confidence are suggested as important in the development of clinicians who will demonstrate an empathic willingness.

  2. Student Attitudes and Calculus Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, Jack; Friedman, Charles P.

    1998-01-01

    Compares the attitudes about mathematics of students from traditionally taught calculus classes and those taught in a "reformed" calculus course. Reports that one to two years after, reform students felt significantly more that they understood how math was used and that they had been required to understand math rather than to memorize formulas.…

  3. Intellectual disability health content within nursing curriculum: An audit of what our future nurses are taught.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trollor, Julian N; Eagleson, Claire; Turner, Beth; Salomon, Carmela; Cashin, Andrew; Iacono, Teresa; Goddard, Linda; Lennox, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability experience chronic and complex health issues, but face considerable barriers to healthcare. One such barrier is inadequate education of healthcare professionals. To establish the quantity and nature of intellectual disability content offered within Australian nursing degree curricula. A two-phase national audit of nursing curriculum content was conducted using an interview and online survey. Australian nursing schools offering pre-registration courses. Pre-registration course coordinators from 31 universities completed the Phase 1 interview on course structure. Unit coordinators and teaching staff from 15 universities in which intellectual disability content was identified completed the Phase 2 online survey. Quantity of compulsory and elective intellectual disability content offered (units and teaching time) and the nature of the content (broad categories, specific topics, and inclusive teaching) were audited using an online survey. Over half (52%) of the schools offered no intellectual disability content. For units of study that contained some auditable intellectual disability content, the area was taught on average for 3.6h per unit of study. Units were evenly distributed across the three years of study. Just three participating schools offered 50% of all units audited. Clinical assessment skills, and ethics and legal issues were most frequently taught, while human rights issues and preventative health were poorly represented. Only one nursing school involved a person with intellectual disability in content development or delivery. Despite significant unmet health needs of people with intellectual disability, there is considerable variability in the teaching of key intellectual disability content, with many gaps evident. Equipping nursing students with skills in this area is vital to building workforce capacity. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The ketogenic diet: what has science taught us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Jong M; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2012-07-01

    Despite intense and growing interest in studying the mechanisms of ketogenic diet (KD) action, and recently published studies implicating novel molecular interactions with metabolic substrates, there nevertheless remains the pragmatic and scientific challenge of sustaining continued research in this field. This is in part a consequence of limited research funding and perhaps skepticism regarding the ultimate need to understand underlying mechanisms, particularly when clinical studies have increasingly validated the efficacy of the KD and its variants. After a decade and a half of more concerted laboratory efforts to understand KD mechanisms, it would be prudent to ask - what has all this scientific research really taught us? In this regard, it is instructive to compare and contrast laboratory research in dietary approaches for epilepsy with that traditionally used to screen for potential antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In this review, lessons learned from AED development are applied to the more recent experimental findings and approaches attempting to link metabolic changes induced by the KD to neuronal and network excitability in the brain. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Can the use of humor in psychotherapy be taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Lisa; Gabbard, Glen O

    2014-02-01

    Despite an abundance of literature detailing the potential benefits of the use of humor in therapy, humor is rarely taught to psychiatric residents as a method of therapeutic intervention. This communication attempts to explain how current understanding of attachment theory and neuroscience may assist psychiatric faculty and supervisors in their teaching of humorous therapeutic interventions. This article reviews and synthesizes the extant literature on the use of humor, as well as recent work in neuroscience, attachment theory, and mentalization. Humor can be conceptualized as an instance of implicit relational knowing and may thus contribute significantly to the therapeutic action of psychotherapy as a subcategory of "moments of meeting" between therapist and patient. However, training residents to use humor in psychotherapy requires more individualized attention in supervision and classroom seminars. Factors such as individual proclivities for humorous repartee, mentalizing capacity, and an authentic interest in adding humor to the session may be necessary to incorporate spontaneous humor into one's technique. New findings from the areas of attachment theory, neuroscience, and right-hemisphere learning are providing potential opportunities for sophisticated teaching of the use of humor in psychotherapy.

  6. Should Creationism be Taught in the Public Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Robert T.

    This article discusses philosophicalarguments relevant to the question of teachingcreationism, especially with regard to developments inthe debate since the early 1990s.Section 1 reviews the newfactions within the creationist movement, and theoverlapping views from young earth to intelligentdesign creationism, as well as non-Christianvarieties. It also considers what are the relevantdifferences for the policy question for private,public schools, and for home schoolers, as well aspossible differences in what it means to teachcreationism. Sections 2 & 3 discuss the main legal argumentsthat have ruled in the public school case, as well asarguments from academic freedom, fairness, censorship,parental rights and majority rule. Section 4 evaluates theepistemological issues regarding competing claims oftruth, and the contention that excluding whatChristians know (Alvin Plantinga) amounts toviewpoint discrimination (Phillip Johnson). Section 5argues that religious protection arguments actuallyfavor excluding creationism more than including it. Section 6 considers the goals of education, especiallyDewey's views on science education, and what theseimply regarding the teaching of a theistic science. In Section 7, I review a new argument of Alvin Plantingabased upon a purported Rawlsian basic right of aparent not to have her children taught anything thatviolates her comprehensive beliefs, and show whyRawlsian agents would reject it.

  7. Cultural Values Represented in First Certificate Masterclass Taught in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alimorad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crucial role textbooks play in any educational system, an urgent need is felt to examine, evaluate, and choose the most suitable ones available. This study is an attempt to critically examine and uncover the hidden curriculum in First Certificate Masterclass (FCM that is taught at Navid institute in Iran. To this aim, FCM was deeply examined to identify any instances of Western cultural norms and preferences and their potential influences on Iranian EFL (English as a Foreign Language learners’ thoughts and ideologies. Peterson’s distinction between Big “C” culture and little “c” culture constituted the theoretical framework of the study. To collect the necessary data, all passages, texts, exercises, and even listening excerpts were closely studied and evaluated by the researcher. Results indicated that among the elements of little “c” culture introduced by Peterson, preferences or tastes, food, hobbies, popular music, and popular issues could mainly be observed in the book. Furthermore, the majority of the representations introduced and depicted in the book were incompatible with Iranian Muslim people’s ideologies and beliefs. Implications of these findings for Iranian material developers and textbook writers as well as English teachers are also discussed.

  8. Should Reproductive Anatomy Be Taught in University Health Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Brent; Fletcher, J. Sue

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on undergraduate reproductive anatomy education. This pilot study explores knowledge of anatomical reproductive anatomy among university students in a lower division and upper division health course. Using a Qualtrics survey program, a convenience sample of 120 lower division and 157 upper division students for a…

  9. Gender and Diversity Topics Taught in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Ebony Joy; Piercy, Fred P.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how the topics of gender and diversity are being taught and defined in accredited marriage and family therapy programs through syllabi content analysis and interviews with selected faculty. We examined findings by program (master's and doctoral) and type of training (those that taught specific gender and culture courses and…

  10. Why Theology Can and Should Be Taught at Secular Universities: Lonergan on Intellectual Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddy, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Bernard Lonergan's "Method in Theology" (1972) I argue that theology can be taught because personal knowledge, of which it is an instance, is at the heart of academic inquiry; and it should be taught because critical engagement with basic ways of taking one's life as a whole (religion in a broad sense) furnishes a critique of the…

  11. Practices and Explorations on Talent-Training Mode of Self-Taught Higher Education Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Since the existence of self-taught higher education examination, its fast development has contributed a lot to national higher education reform and economic development. This paper, based on analyzing the talent-training mode of China self-taught higher education, proposes countermeasures and suggestions for problems in the mode at present.

  12. The Efficacy of Self-Taught Memory Training for Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Forrest; Prohaska, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Recall was assessed three times for older adults in three groups: (1) participants in self-taught memory training (n=22); (2) delayed-training control group (n=24); and (3) attention-placebo group (n=23). The self-taught group's recall was superior to the control but equal to the attention-placebo group. Self-teaching resulted in improved…

  13. An Examination of Teaching Behaviors and Learning Activities in Physical Education Class Settings Taught by Three Different Levels of Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Z.  Zeng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: To be an accredited teacher education program, physical education teacher education (PETE programs must fulfill the national standards established by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE. In order to meet the standards, a PETE program needs to have the cooperation of the following three levels of instructors: Specialist Teachers (STs, Inservice Teachers (ITs and Preservice Teachers (PTs. The STs are those who teach at colleges or universities, possess advanced degrees with full/associate/assistant professor titles and teach theoretical and skill courses. They participate in the academic activities of the PETE program; for instance, they serve as academic advisors and instructors of the PTs. The ITs are those who possess teacher certificates, bachelor or higher degrees and currently teach physical education/activity classes at middle/high schools. They also participate in the academic activities; for example, they serve as cooperating teachers providing guidelines and supports for the PTs. The PTs were college students who were studying in a PETE program. They intended to become PE teachers at K-12 school levels. They must complete the student teaching requirements at primary and secondary school class settings in order to graduate from colleges or universities. Approach: The purpose of this study was to examine the differences and similarities of Teaching Behaviors (TB and Learning Activities (LA in Physical Education (PE class settings taught by the three different levels of teachers. Participants were 45 PE teachers from the three levels and their students from a university and three high schools in an urban city of the United States. A total of 90 lessons taught by the three levels of teachers were videotaped and coded using the Direct Instruction Behavior Analysis (DIBA system. Results: Findings of the one-way independent group ANOVA revealed that eight out of 13 variables were significantly

  14. Rethinking How Business Purpose Is Taught in Catholic Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lyman; Naughton, Michael; Bojan, William

    2013-01-01

    Business education at a Catholic university should engage students and faculty across the university in critically examining the purpose of business in society. Following the best practices of leading business schools, the Catholic business curriculum has mostly focused on the shareholder and stakeholder approaches--with the shareholder approach…

  15. Best Practices for an Interdisciplinary Team-Taught Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Judi; Fox, Diane Poretta; Okagbue-Reaves, Janet; Lukomski, Angela

    2009-01-01

    In the interdisciplinary course, Aging to Infancy: A Life Course Retrospective, the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for education were embraced through the role modeling provided by faculty both across and between disciplines. Over the five years since its creation, the course has introduced students to aging in a positive manner,…

  16. Rethinking How Business Purpose Is Taught in Catholic Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lyman; Naughton, Michael; Bojan, William

    2013-01-01

    Business education at a Catholic university should engage students and faculty across the university in critically examining the purpose of business in society. Following the best practices of leading business schools, the Catholic business curriculum has mostly focused on the shareholder and stakeholder approaches--with the shareholder approach…

  17. Religious Education towards Justice: What Kind of Justice Is to Be Taught in a Christian Context?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Bobbert

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Education is a human right. It prepares human beings for life, helps to develop individual abilities and opens up social opportunities—e.g., earning one’s own living. Religion interprets our human existence in connection to a transcendental dimension. Religion can also influence moral values and behavior. The Christian religion established a basis for social life, and thus deals with religious and moral justice. As the Christian faith is understood as the identity of the qualities of love of God, of your neighbor and even of your enemy, it has to look for justice in the world. Modern Christian ethics does unfold interpersonal and global justice for all people and tries to give good reasons for moral claims. Religious education in a Christian context has to answer the question of what kind of justice is to be taught and by what means justice, as a goal of education, can be reached within such a setting. This article will unfold, from an ethical point of view, what kind of knowledge and competence teachers must have and what kind of goals can be followed with regard to their pupils or students. The results of this reflection imply certain pedagogical methods and means and exclude others—although it is not possible to go more deeply into a pedagogical discussion.

  18. Morality should be taught as a compulsory course in higher education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武星

    2014-01-01

    From the tragedy of campus shooting in United States to animal tortures of Chinese college student, the morality and the effect it can have on the young people is arresting all the time. There are several aims which participants in the higher edu-cational process. They may demonstrate as the aims about which they are concerned. Such aims, sometimes, may be referred to not as they were particular aims in the educational process but the proper aims of higher education itself. The aims of higher ed-ucation may vary. It may be claimed that the aim of higher education is to develop the potential of all individuals or to educa-tion is to develop the potential of all individuals or to educate the whole man. So how do we understand the education of the“whole man”? It is obviously a phrase which can easily catch eyeballs. I think that it includes the concept which various as-pects of human nature must be cultivated for, intellectual and imaginative, rational and emotional, or as it sometimes expressed, physical, mental, moral and spiritual. Someone argues that morality plays an important role in shaping lives and values of chil-dren, but not adults. In this paper, the author will discuss whether morality should be taught in college.

  19. Large-scale Assessment Yields Evidence of Minimal Use of Reasoning Skills in Traditionally Taught Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Beth

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale assessment data from Texas Tech University yielded evidence that most students taught traditionally in large lecture classes with online homework and predominantly multiple choice question exams, when asked to answer free-response (FR) questions, did not support their answers with logical arguments grounded in physics concepts. In addition to a lack of conceptual understanding, incorrect and partially correct answers lacked evidence of the ability to apply even lower level reasoning skills in order to solve a problem. Correct answers, however, did show evidence of at least lower level thinking skills as coded using a rubric based on Bloom's taxonomy. With the introduction of evidence-based instruction into the labs and recitations of the large courses and in a small, completely laboratory-based, hands-on course, the percentage of correct answers with correct explanations increased. The FR format, unlike other assessment formats, allowed assessment of both conceptual understanding and the application of thinking skills, clearly pointing out weaknesses not revealed by other assessment instruments, and providing data on skills beyond conceptual understanding for course and program assessment. Supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH) Challenge grant #1RC1GM090897-01.

  20. Graduate Nurse Education in Haiti: Lessons Taught and Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Steven L; Alexandre, Margarett S

    2016-10-01

    The plight of the people of Haiti that came to the world's attention following the devastating earthquake there in 2010 has for the most part receded into the background amid other issues despite their continuing economic and health problems. The purpose of this article is to explore the experiences of the first graduate nurse students in Haiti. The program is funded and operated by a nonprofit, nongovernment nursing organization, Promoting Health in Haiti, based in New York City. A narrative was generated by doing focus groups and interviews with 10 of the students in the program. Three themes found in the narrative are pressing on amid uncertainty and unanswered questions, living and learning amid competing responsibilities, and enjoying support while learning new skills that can make a difference. The implications for graduate nurse education in low-resource countries are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Gifted Middle School Students' Achievement and Perceptions of Science Classroom Quality during Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Anne K.; Galluzzo, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of problem-based learning (PBL) on student achievement and students' perceptions of classroom quality. A group of students taught using PBL and a comparison group of students taught using traditional instruction were studied. A total of 457 students participated in the study. Pre- and…

  2. Gifted Middle School Students' Achievement and Perceptions of Science Classroom Quality during Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Anne K.; Galluzzo, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of problem-based learning (PBL) on student achievement and students' perceptions of classroom quality. A group of students taught using PBL and a comparison group of students taught using traditional instruction were studied. A total of 457 students participated in the study. Pre- and…

  3. A Pilot Study of Students' Learning Outcomes Using Didactic and Socratic Instructional Methods: An Assessment Based on Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinde, Oluwatoyin Adenike

    2015-01-01

    This work is a pilot study on the learning outcomes of students, who were taught a research course for seven weeks, using didactic and Socratic instruction methods. The course was taught in two sessions concurrently. The students were divided into two groups (A and B) and both groups were taught either with Socratic instruction method or didactic…

  4. Students' Understanding of Trigonometric Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Keith

    2005-01-01

    In this article students' understanding of trigonometric functions in the context of two college trigonometry courses is investigated. The first course was taught by a professor unaffiliated with the study in a lecture-based course, while the second was taught using an experimental instruction paradigm based on Gray and Tall's (1994) notion of…

  5. Changing the way science is taught through gamified laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Makransky, G.; Wandall, J.

    2015-01-01

    constrained by safety concerns. Combining gamification elements with simulations may provide an opportunity for great gains in learning effectiveness and motivation of biotech students. An advanced laboratory simulation platform based on mathematical algorithms supporting open-ended investigations...... was developed and combined with gamification elements such as an immersive 3D universe, storytelling, conversations with fictional characters and a scoring system. Two gamified laboratory simulations were tested: a crime-scene lab and a genetic engineering lab (http://www.labster.com/biolabs/). A study testing...

  6. A Comparison of Student Outcomes and Student Satisfaction in Three MBA Human Resource Management Classes Based on Traditional vs. Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jane Whitney

    2008-01-01

    The author taught three MBA Human Resource Management classes in the spring term of 2007 at a large private university in Florida. Two of the classes were taught in a 100% online format while the third was taught off campus in a university-owned building in Orlando where students met in a face-to-face, weekend setting. This traditional class was…

  7. Teaching Ethics to Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joyce E.; Thompson, Henry O.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the ethics content to be taught in nursing education and the goals of ethics education for both undergraduate and graduate students. Teacher qualifications and evaluation of learning are also considered. (CH)

  8. How Should Alternative Medicine Be Taught to Medical Students and Physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes alleged deficiencies in medical education and concludes they are based on misrepresentations (for example, that physicians ignore mind-body interactions). Examines fundamental differences between traditional and alternative medicine and asserts that physicians need additional education in order to provide guidance to patients, but that…

  9. Learning History through Textbooks: Are Mexican and Spanish Students Taught the Same Story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, Mario; Jacott, Liliana; Lopez-Manjon, Asuncion

    2002-01-01

    Studied the representation of historical events in 1492 in elementary and junior high school textbooks in Mexico (five textbooks) and Spain (four textbooks). Findings show very different representations of the same events in these two countries. (SLD)

  10. Self-Management Strategies to Support Students with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is a set of procedures that students can be taught to apply to their own behaviors to change them. In self-management, students are taught to observe, assess, and modify their own behavior. These procedures include such things as self-identifying and observing a target behavior and setting a goal to change it. Self-management…

  11. A qualitative study of the instructional behaviors and practices of a dyad of educators in self-contained and inclusive co-taught secondary biology classrooms during a nine-week science instruction grading period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Shanon D.

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (1997) mandates that students with disabilities have access to the general education curriculum. School districts have developed a variety of service delivery models to provide challenging educational experiences for all students. Co-teaching or collaborative teaching is the most widely used of the different service delivery models. While the philosophy of inclusion is widely accepted, the efficacy of the various inclusion models has recently been the focus of educational research. Researchers have questioned whether the presence of a special educator in the general education classroom has resulted in students with high incidence disabilities receiving specialized instruction. A qualitative study was designed to examine the instructional behaviors and practices exhibited and used by a dyad of educators in self-contained learning disabilities and inclusive co-taught secondary Biology classrooms during a nine-week science instruction grading period. In addition to utilizing interviews, observations, and classroom observation scales to answer the research questions, supporting student data (time-sampling measurement/opportunity to learn and student grades) were collected. The study concluded that the presence of a special educator in a co-taught classroom: (1) did contribute to the creation of a new learning environment, and notable changes in the instructional behaviors and practices of a general educator; (2) did contribute to limited specialized instruction for students with disabilities in the co-taught classrooms and embedded (not overt) special education practices related to the planning and decision-making of the educators; (3) did contribute to the creation of a successful co-teaching partnership including the use of effective teaching behaviors; and (4) did impact success for some of the students with disabilities in the co-taught classrooms; but (5) did not ensure the continuation of some of the new

  12. Logic Sequence of the Approaches in Benjamin Franklin’s How I Taught Myself to Write

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭亮

    2013-01-01

    The best writing of Benjamin Franklin is founded in his own autobiography. This essay reveals the striking logic sequence of the approaches mentioned in the prose How I Taught Myself to Write from autobiography, and concludes the enlightenment for vast teachers when they lecture English writing.

  13. Should the Bible Be Taught as a Literary Classic in Public Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikow, Max

    2010-01-01

    The research question "Should the Bible be taught as a literary classic in public education?" was pursued by a survey of nineteen scholars from three disciplines: education, literature, and law. The collected data served to guide the researcher in the writing of an analytical essay responding to the research question. The research…

  14. Emerging Technologies: The Technological Imperative in Teaching and Learning Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Anyone in the United States who wants to learn Spanish can easily find local instructional options. Opportunities abound as well for maintaining one's Spanish: all-Spanish television stations, widely distributed print media, and an abundance of native speakers. Learning opportunities and resources for other commonly taught languages (CTL) such as…

  15. How My Daughter Taught Me to Teach: The Importance of Active Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt-Gierut, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how her daughter, who was diagnosed with a profound hearing loss when she was a year old, taught her to teach, and demonstrates the importance of active communication. Teaching her daughter English as her second language has posed many challenges, but has also revealed successful strategies that the author has…

  16. Grundfagligt Speciale: An advanced laboratory-research course for nonphysicists taught by physicists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, R A; Lebech, Jens; Mygind, Jesper;

    1979-01-01

    The pedagogical and research advantages of an advanced laboratory-research course for nonphysicists taught by physicists are discussed. The practical considerations which determine the structure and content of such a course are emphasized with particular attention given to those features which...

  17. Role Modelling in Manager Development: Learning that Which Cannot Be Taught

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhurst, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This is an empirical article which aims to examine the extent and nature of management role modelling and the learning achieved from role modelling. The article argues that the spread of taught management development and formal mentoring programmes has resulted in the neglect of practice-knowledge and facets of managerial character…

  18. Collaborative Classroom Management in a Co-Taught Primary School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytivaara, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers manage their classroom in co-taught lessons. The data were collected by observing and interviewing a pair of primary school teachers. The most important influence of collaboration on classroom management seemed to be the emotional support of another adult, and the opportunity to use different…

  19. Undergraduate, Nonprofessional Pharmacology: Status of Courses Taught by North American Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A study assessed and compared the current status of undergraduate, nonprofessional pharmacology courses as taught in the U. S. and Canadian colleges of pharmacy and medicine; courses offered by veterinary medicine are also noted. Pharmacy courses seek to increase general drug knowledge and promote rational drug use. (Author/MLW)

  20. Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, Zoe

    2011-01-01

    Between the turn of the twentieth century and the "Brown v. Board of Education" decision in 1954, the way that American schools taught about "race" changed dramatically. This transformation was engineered by the nation's most prominent anthropologists, including Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and Margaret Mead, during World War II.…

  1. The Team-Taught Cross-Functional Core: Insights from a Long-Term Undergraduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttermore, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A small number of undergraduate business schools have made significant changes to their curriculum to deliver a team-taught, cross-functional undergraduate core. The author examines an exemplary early-adopting program to better understand the long-term impact such a change has had on the overall organization, and to seek insights on implementation…

  2. Parents' Views Regarding the Values Aimed to be Taught in Social Studies Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bayram; Yildirim, Kasim

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at learning parents' ideas about the values aimed to be taught in Social Studies lessons in the 4th and 5th grades of the primary education and about values education. Study data were collected by administering "the Values Education I" and "Values Education II" questionnaire forms developed by the researchers.…

  3. Evaluation of WorldView Textbooks; Textbooks Taught at a Military University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Masoud; Jodai, Hojat

    2012-01-01

    This paper intends to evaluate the WorldView series textbooks of English learning, which are being taught at an Iranian military university foreign language center. No textbook evaluation had been conducted by the university administration prior to the introduction of the textbooks to the language program. Theorists in the field of ELT textbook…

  4. How to Reflect the Guiding position of Teachers in the English Self-Taught Higher Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟丹丹

    2012-01-01

    The paperaims to generalize the underlying teaching methods tailed to the self-taught higher education in China.The interview cast a specific experiment on the sophomores in one of the university.Considering the existing disadvantages and shortcomings on hand, the writer reveals the unveilings on depth.

  5. Collaborative Classroom Management in a Co-Taught Primary School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytivaara, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers manage their classroom in co-taught lessons. The data were collected by observing and interviewing a pair of primary school teachers. The most important influence of collaboration on classroom management seemed to be the emotional support of another adult, and the opportunity to use different…

  6. a correlational study of students 'theoretical and practical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Galadanci & Mukhtar

    Moment Correlation Coefficient, the Coefficients of Correlation obtained are ... students' understanding of subjects/courses that have been taught to ... Literature Review ... the theoretical and practical scores of students in some basic science ...

  7. Omani Students' Definitions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nofli, Mohammed Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on students' definitions of geography. The purpose of the present study was to add to the existing literature by exploring Omani students' definitions of geography. Participants were 477 students of grade 6 (ages 11-12) and grade 10 (ages 15-16) in one school district in Oman. They had been taught geography…

  8. I Can Assess Myself: Singaporean Primary Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Self-Assessment Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hwei Ming

    2016-01-01

    Student self-assessment engages the students in purposeful reflection about what they are learning and how they are learning it. This study investigated the perceptions of students and teachers towards the students' self-assessment ability in two Singapore primary schools. A total of 75 students were taught how to use self-assessment. Eighteen…

  9. Student Self-Assessment and Student Ratings of Teacher Rapport in Secondary Student Course Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, John Wilford

    2010-01-01

    This study involved administering two rating forms (student self-rating on commitment and student rating of teacher rapport) to approximately 1,400 secondary students taught by 12 different teachers at two different high school Latter-day Saint (LDS) released time seminaries along the Wasatch Front in Utah. Seminaries and Institutes of Religion…

  10. Information seeking and information retrieval curriculum development for courses taught in two LIS schools

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, Jessica; Vilar, Polona; Žumer, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This paper shows how the set of Information Seeking and Retrieval (information seeking and retrieval) topics (for devising a curriculum) relates to the curriculum of two modules taught at two different institutions: Department of Library and Information Science and Book Studies at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia and School of Information and Library Studies at University College Dublin, Ireland. Method. The information seeking and retrieval framework is compared to the str...

  11. Medical undergraduate primary care teaching across the UK: what is being taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Veronica; Ridd, Matthew; Blythe, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    All UK medical schools use primary care settings to deliver their undergraduate courses. However there is no national undergraduate curriculum for primary care and it is thought that the learning objectives of primary care teaching vary considerably between medical schools. The overall aim was to establish what is being taught within and by primary care across UK medical schools. We did this by collating learning objectives from the primary care department at each school. In order to categorise and compare the list of learning objectives from each school we mapped the learning objectives to the postgraduate curriculum of the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP). Cross sectional survey sent to heads of teaching of primary care at all 32 UK medical schools. GP teacher handbooks for primary care modules at each medical school were requested. Information was extracted based on key headings from the RCGP postgraduate curriculum. Topics taught by primary care at all medical schools include: consulting and communication skills, leading and working in teams, and developing yourself and others. Novel topics, taught at a few medical schools include: learning disability, genetics and multi-morbidity. The majority of medical schools address aspects of over half of the RCGP postgraduate curriculum headings in their learning objectives for primary care. This project provides valuable information about primary care teaching at an undergraduate level across the UK. Although it confirms widespread variation in learning objectives, it also highlights considerable common ground and opportunities for sharing teaching resources between schools.

  12. Assessing the impact of Native American elders as co-educators for university students in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkholy, Sarah Omar

    Introduction: Minorities are underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce, post-secondary STEM education, and show high academic attrition rates. Academic performance and retention improve when culturally relevant support is provided. The interface of Western Science and Indigenous Science provides an opportunity for bridging this divide. This three parts project is an example of Community-based participatory research (CBPR) that aims to support academic institutions that serve minority students in STEM, and implement educational components (pedagogy) to serve the needs of the underserved community. Method: Part 1: was a cross-sectional used a survey given to participants designed to assess prevalence of natural health products use by students, and to determine how students learn about NHPs. Part 2: was a longitudinal survey pilot study based upon an online STEM course offer at four universities to determine the differences between U.S. vs. Canadian and minority vs. non-minority university students regarding their perceptions of traditional Elders as STEM co-educators, interest in STEM, and science identity by using a pre-and post- course survey. Part 3: was a longitudinal quasi-experiment based upon an online STEM course offered at four universities show what Indigenous science claims regarding: Elders are viewed as valuable STEM co-educators; Elders increase student interest in STEM; students exposed to Indigenous science improve their identity as a scientist; students exposed to Indigenous Science/Elders show improved learning outcomes. Result: We found that Native/Aboriginal students learn information about natural health products from traditional Elders significantly more so than non-Native/Aboriginal students. There were no statistically significant results from the pilot study. Findings from the quasi-experiment show that students taught with Indigenous science Elder co-educators have significantly greater

  13. Heritage Learners versus Non-heritage Learners in Five Less Commonly Taught Languages: Conditions, Practices, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Redouane

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of five less commonly taught languages (LCTLs, this article investigates learners’ perceptions of the difficulty level of the language of study, their insights on their learning experience and their classrooms’ conditions and practices, and most importantly their views on having both heritage and non-heritage learners in the same classroom. 124 university students enrolled in Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, and Russian completed a questionnaire survey. The findings reveal that non-heritage learner of the five LCTLs view the LCTL of study as difficult because of the writing system; heritage learners, however, perceive it as neither easy nor difficult. In addition, among all learners, Arabic heritage learners are the only ones who recognize that the learning challenges are the various levels of proficiency in the same classroom, and the dissimilarity between the standard variety and the dialect are. Results also show that both heritage and non-heritage learners disapprove of the learning conditions and practices of the classrooms. Surprisingly, nearly all learners from the two groups are in favor of having both groups in the same classroom. Based on the findings, the researcher suggests some pedagogical implications and recommendations to accommodate needs of both heritage and non-heritage learners and enhance teaching such combined classes of LCTLs.

  14. Middle School Students' Writing and Feedback in a Cloud-Based Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binbin; Lawrence, Joshua; Warschauer, Mark; Lin, Chin-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Individual writing and collaborative writing skills are important for academic success, yet are poorly taught in K-12 classrooms. This study examines how sixth-grade students (n = 257) taught by two teachers used Google Docs to write and exchange feedback. We used longitudinal growth models to analyze a large number of student writing samples…

  15. Consistencies and Inconsistencies in Students' Solutions to Algebraic 'Single-Value' Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamir, Pessia; Bazzini, Luciana

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes students' solutions to a commonly taught and not commonly taught inequality. The findings showed students' difficulties. Participants implicitly and explicitly exhibited two intuitive beliefs: inequalities must result in inequalities and solving inequalities and equations are the same process. Following the analysis of…

  16. Using a Virtual Tissue Culture System to Assist Students in Understanding Life at the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauglin, Jacqueline S.; Seaquist, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    In every biology course ever taught in the nation's classrooms, and in every biology book ever published, students are taught about the "cell." The cell is as fundamental to biology as the atom is to chemistry. Truly, everything an organism does occurs fundamentally at the cellular level. Beyond memorizing the cellular definition, students are not…

  17. Using Pseudozoids to Teach Classification and Phylogeny to Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidenberg, Rolfe Jr.; Kelly, Martin G.

    2004-01-01

    This research compared the outcomes of teaching middle school students two different methods of classification and phylogeny. Two classes were randomly selected and taught using traditional methods of instruction. Three classes were taught using the "Pseudozoid" approach, where students learned to classify, develop and read dichotomous keys, and…

  18. The Effectiveness of Educational Games on Scientific Concepts Acquisition in First Grade Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tarawneh, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of educational games on scientific concepts acquisition by the first grade students. The sample of the study consisted of (53) male and female students distributed into two groups: experimental group (n = 26) which taught by educational games, and control group (n = 27) which taught by…

  19. Measuring Students' Attitudes towards Teachers' Use of Humour during Lessons: A Questionnaire Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdAli, Arafat; Ashur, Najoom; Ghazi, Luma; Muslim, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    There is a common saying that if students like their teachers, they will start liking the subjects taught by them and be more attentive in the class. "A strict teacher can be successful but a humorous teacher can be more successful" (Vijay, et al, 2014:260-61). Hence, students' attitudes towards their instructors and subjects taught by…

  20. Evaluation of Two Service Opportunity Programs for Junior High School Students: First Year Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Joel M.; And Others

    Cross-Age Tutoring and School Store, two courses combining classroom learning and application of specific skills outside the classroom are evaluated. Students in Cross-Age Tutoring were taught tutoring and communication skills and spent four days per week tutoring at nearby elementary schools; students in School Store were taught business and…

  1. Evaluation of Eleventh Grade Students' Writing Supports Teaching Italic Handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Betty

    The handwriting of 756 eleventh grade students was evaluated to determine whether their handwriting styles would be characteristic of the manuscript or cursive styles they had been taught. Subjects had been taught Zaner-Bloser manuscript in primary grades with a transition to cursive in third grade. Analysis of handwriting samples revealed a wide…

  2. Facilitating Student Learning through Contextualization. CCRC Brief. Number 53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Skills in reading, writing, and mathematics are key to academic learning but are conventionally taught separately from the discipline areas to which they must be applied. For example, students may be taught writing skills in the morning in an English course and then be expected to apply them to writing an essay in a history class in the afternoon.…

  3. Fostering English-taught higher education programs in a Spanish university: the "TechEnglish" innovative project

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco Gutiérrez, Irene; Alises Pérez, Ana; Allona Alberich, Isabel Marta; Argüelles Alvarez, Irina; Arribas, G.; Astillero, J. R.; Atienza Riera, José Miguel; Batalla, C.; BLANCO FONSECA Maria; Chaya Romero, Carolina; Abril, O.; Delgado, M.; Dieguez, Carmen; Gonzalez Guerrero, Manuel; Gonzalez Rodrigo, Sonsoles

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, coinciding with adjustments to the Bologna process, many European universities have attempted to improve their international profile by increasing course offerings in English. According to the Institute of International Education (IIE), Spain has notably increased its English-taught higher education programs, ranking fifth in the list of European countries by number of English-taught Master's programs in 2013. This article presents the goals and preliminary results of an on-g...

  4. Developing Students' Intelligent Character through Linguistic Politeness: The Case of English as a Foreign Language for Indonesian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Nanik

    2016-01-01

    English is a foreign language that must be taught at school, particularly in secondary school. Based on a preliminary observation of several secondary schools in Banjarmasin, it appears that the English taught focuses most on concepts or language formulas. Most of the students who interact in English during the learning process do not use…

  5. Analysis of Social Assistance Learning on the Serf-taught Higher Education Examinations%自学考试社会助学相关制度新探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范玲玲; 陈均; 孙长庚

    2011-01-01

    许多研究证明,参加助学者各门课程的及格率均高于未参加者,社会助学能够促进高等教育自学考试的发展,提高自考生的科学文化水平和学习能力。为了完善高教自考社会助学制度,建议加强对助学单位行政管理,确保社会助学指导思想正确;健全对助学单位经济管理,确保参加助学自考生的合法利益;完善助学单位内部的专业管理,确保社会助学的专业培养质量;建立对助学教师的培训制度,确保课堂的教学效果。%Much research proves that the pass rate of the students who participate in the social assistance learning is higher than that of the students who do not participate in it. Social assistance learning can promote the development of the Self-taught higher education examinations and raise the educational level and learning ability. In order to perfect the system of the Self-taught higher education examinations, we should enhance the administrative management, the economic management, the professional management of the departments that provide social assistance learning, through which we can make sure the correct guiding ideology, the legitimate interests of the students, and the professional quality of the social assistance learning. What' s more. we should also set up the training system of the teachers to ensure the teaching efficiencv.

  6. Concept mapping. Does it improve critical thinking ability in practical nursing students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Filburn, Monica J; Deringer, Susan O; Lum, Glen D

    2011-01-01

    Critical thinking is an essential skill taught at all levels of nursing education. This article reports on a study designed to determine if concept mapping is superior to traditional care planning as a teaching method for practical nursing students. Specifically, the study evaluated the effects of concept mapping as a teaching methodology on the development of critical thinking skills. A control group consisting of students taught through the traditional methodology was compared to two groups of students taught with concept mapping. Data were collected using the National League for Nursing Critical Thinking in Clinical Nursing Practice/PN Examination. Results indicated that students who were taught the nursing process using the traditional care planning method scored statistically significantly better on the examination than students taught with the concept mapping method.

  7. Where is Leadership Training Being Taught in U.S. Dental Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S.; Parkinson, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is vital in all professions and organizations. Our purpose was to determine where in dental schools leadership is taught, and to what degree it is emphasized so that we could establish a base line from which to generate recommendations for best practices. Therefore we surveyed all US Deans of Academic Affairs in Dental Schools to determine where in the curriculum leadership is taught and emphasized. Our results showed that leadership training is delivered in many different parts of the curriculum, and at various levels. Generally, respondents indicated that leadership education is delivered either in the setting of practice management, community outreach or in public health settings. In some cases, specific training programs are dedicated specifically to leadership development. Thus several models for leadership development were identified showing design and flexibility to address regional and national needs. In the future it would be of value to assess the effectiveness of the different models and whether single or multiple pathways for leadership training are most beneficial. PMID:22659699

  8. Letting Students Shape Instructional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borich, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    When the author was teaching in an elementary foreign language exposure (FLEX) program several years ago, she completed a research project that documented student learning gained from student dialogue journals. The action research initiative taught her the value of being reflective about her teaching practices. Her thesis research requirements…

  9. Personal View on How to Grasp the Teaching Emphases of the Self-taught Course Physics Curriculum%如何把握自考课程《物理(工)》教学重点之我见

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马禄彬

    2015-01-01

    《物理(工)》是自考课程中学习难度较大的一门课程,教师如何把握教学重点是帮助学生成功应对考试的关键。通过对近年国考试题的统计分析,结合试题特点以及出题规律,提出了应对策略。对各章的重要知识点进行了归纳,在教学方法上提出了一些自己的意见,希望给教师及自考学生带来一定的帮助。%Physics curriculum is comparatively difficult to learn among all the self-taught courses.It is very important for self-taught students that the teachers help them grasp the teaching emphases to successfully deal with the exam.From the analysis of the precious self-study examination papers on Physics Curriculum,the author gets the main characteristics of them,and gives us the countermeasures of the self-study examination.in addition,the important points of each chapter are summarized,puts forward some suggestions and methods to teaching method of the course,I hope that can be of some help to teachers and self-taught students.

  10. "Having to Shift Everything We've Learned to the Side": Expanding Research Methods Taught in Psychology to Incorporate Qualitative Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lynne D; Castell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    In Australia the tradition of conducting quantitative psychological research within a positivist framework has been challenged, with calls made for the inclusion of the full range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies within the undergraduate psychology curriculum. Despite this, the undergraduate psychology curriculum in most Australian universities retains a strong focus on teaching quantitative research methods. Limited research has examined attitudes toward qualitative research held by undergraduate psychology students taught within a positivist framework, and whether these attitudes are malleable and can be changed through teaching qualitative methodologies. Previous research has suggested that students from strong quantitative backgrounds experience some cognitive dissonance and greater difficulties in learning qualitative methods. In this article we examine 3rd year undergraduate psychology students' attitudes to qualitative research prior to commencing and upon completion of a qualitative research unit. All students had previously completed two 13 weeks units of study in quantitative research methods. At Time 1, 63 students (84.1% female) completed online surveys comprising attitudinal measures. Key themes to emerge from student comments were that qualitative research was seen as an alternative approach, representing a paradigmatic shift that was construed by some students advantageous for meeting future professional and educative goals. Quantitative measures of attitudes to qualitative research were associated with general attitudes toward research, and psychology-specific epistemological beliefs. Changes in attitudes following completion of the qualitative research methods unit were in the hypothesized direction, but non-significant (small effect sizes). The findings increase our understanding of psychology students' attitudes toward qualitative research and inform our recommendations for teaching research methods within the undergraduate

  11. Science Technology Society Simulations: Engaging Students with Issues-based Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Mamlok, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Describes Science Technology and Society (STS) simulations that teach students about human experiences involving controversial issues. When students are taught using controversial and authentic issues, science instruction becomes current and engaging. (SAH)

  12. Basic proof skills of computer science students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, P.H.; Es, van B.; Tromp, Th.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Computer science students need mathematical proof skills. At our University, these skills are being taught as part of various mathematics and computer science courses. To test the skills of our students, we have asked them to work out a number of exercises. We found that our students are not as well

  13. Student Effort, Consistency, and Online Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patron, Hilde; Lopez, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how student effort, consistency, motivation, and marginal learning, influence student grades in an online course. We use data from eleven Microeconomics courses taught online for a total of 212 students. Our findings show that consistency, or less time variation, is a statistically significant explanatory variable, whereas…

  14. Experience in Teaching OOAD to Various Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberic-Krsticev, Danijela; Tešendic, Danijela

    2013-01-01

    The paper elaborates on experiences and lessons learned from the course on object-oriented analyses and design at the Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad. The course on OOAD is taught to students of computer science and to the students of mathematical programme. Conclusions made in this paper are based on results of students' assignments as well as…

  15. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  16. Encouraging Student Participation in Large Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory astronomy is one of the most widely taught classes in the country and the majority of the students who take these classes are non-science majors. Because this demographic of students makes up the majority of astronomy enrollments, it is especially important as instructors that we do our best to make sure these students don't finish…

  17. Why a Calligraphy Course for Language Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Eugene

    There is a variety of reasons calligraphy should be taught to students of Chinese. It is pleasurable; it will help students learn to write Chinese characters better, through dexterity and confidence; it will help students learn to read better, especially when dealing with a variety of forms of cursive writing. Furthermore, it is an essential…

  18. Should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? An ethical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Hartin, Charles W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine the ethical implications of teaching general surgery residents laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Using the authors' previously presented ethical framework, and examining survey data of pediatric surgeons in the United States and Canada, a rigorous ethical argument is constructed to examine the question: should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? A survey was constructed that contained 24 multiple-choice questions. The survey included questions pertaining to surgeon demographics, if pyloromyotomy was taught to general surgery and pediatric surgery residents, and management of complications encountered during pyloromyotomy. A total of 889 members of the American Pediatric Surgical Association and Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons were asked to participate. The response rate was 45% (401/889). The data were analyzed within the ethical model to address the question of whether general surgery residents should be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies. From an ethical perspective, appealing to the ethical model of a physician as a fiduciary, the answer is no. We previously proposed an ethical model based on 2 fundamental ethical principles: the ethical concept of the physician as a fiduciary and the contractarian model of ethics. The fiduciary physician practices medicine competently with the patient’s best interests in mind. The role of a fiduciary professional imposes ethical standards on all physicians, at the core of which is the virtue of integrity, which requires the physician to practice medicine to standards of intellectual and moral excellence. The American College of Surgeons recognizes the need for current and future surgeons to understand professionalism, which is one of the 6 core competencies specified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Contracts are models of negotiation and ethically permissible compromise. Negotiated assent or consent is the core concept of contractarian

  19. An Evaluation of the Use of Student-Centred Investigations in Teaching Comparative Animal Physiology to Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John I.; Bonsall, Marie

    1995-01-01

    Taught comparative animal physiology to undergraduates (n=31) using student-centered (open-ended) investigations in small groups. Questionnaires and discussion found that students appeared to value learning through their own experience as highly as they did being taught and valued the opportunity to establish and develop skills less easily…

  20. My Body and Its Reflection: A Case Study of Eight Dance Students and the Mirror in the Ballet Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radell, Sally Anne; Keneman, Margaret Lynn; Adame, Daniel D.; Cole, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the impact of the mirror on a dancer's body image. Two groups of students enrolled in beginner ballet classes were taught the same classroom material; one group was taught with mirrors, the other, without. At the end of the semester four students from each class were randomly selected to participate in a private…

  1. Business Communication in Less Commonly Taught Languages: Teaching Suggestions through Discourse Analysis:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia V. Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge generated by studies in discourse analysis is rarely brought into the teaching of business communication in a foreign language. Instead of presenting learners with "samples" of language after which they will pattern their production, foreign language instructors may invite learners to analyze the interplay between text and context in their own and in others' discourses. Therefore, the teaching of communicative functions (such as requesting, apologizing, suggesting, etc. in foreign languages should go beyond the presentation, production and practice of textual forms: learners should be actively involved in doing discourse analysis in order to be able to make principled decisions when formulating suggestions in the workplace. In the case of less commonly taught languages, this approach is especially important, since textbooks and other teaching materials are not likely to include analysis and/ or focused applications of communicative functions. The recommendations included in this article contribute to fulfill this need in the teaching of LCTLs.

  2. Apparel Merchandising Students Learn Customer Service Strategies while Conducting Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, V, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Apparel merchandising students participated in a cooperative research project in which they observed customer service techniques by posing as customers in retail stores. The project taught research processes, collaboration, and principles of customer service. (SK)

  3. Apparel Merchandising Students Learn Customer Service Strategies while Conducting Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, V, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Apparel merchandising students participated in a cooperative research project in which they observed customer service techniques by posing as customers in retail stores. The project taught research processes, collaboration, and principles of customer service. (SK)

  4. Student and Instructor-Centered Approaches to Teaching Precalculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tara C.; Lu', Hùng

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a two-semester-long study of the effects of student-centered instruction on Precalculus courses. We also describe our teaching approaches centering around students, which include a mixture of lectures, student presentations, group work, discussion, and guided investigations. Students were taught with either the…

  5. Supporting International Students in UK Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Ian

    2014-01-01

    International students make up an increasingly large proportion of the UK's student population. Whether studying at undergraduate, postgraduate taught or postgraduate research level, they require support just like home students. However, international students can often bring additional issues and complications for the staff who are supporting…

  6. Student and Instructor-Centered Approaches to Teaching Precalculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tara C.; Lu', Hùng

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a two-semester-long study of the effects of student-centered instruction on Precalculus courses. We also describe our teaching approaches centering around students, which include a mixture of lectures, student presentations, group work, discussion, and guided investigations. Students were taught with either the…

  7. “Having to Shift Everything We’ve Learned to the Side”: Expanding Research Methods Taught in Psychology to Incorporate Qualitative Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Castell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    In Australia the tradition of conducting quantitative psychological research within a positivist framework has been challenged, with calls made for the inclusion of the full range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies within the undergraduate psychology curriculum. Despite this, the undergraduate psychology curriculum in most Australian universities retains a strong focus on teaching quantitative research methods. Limited research has examined attitudes toward qualitative research held by undergraduate psychology students taught within a positivist framework, and whether these attitudes are malleable and can be changed through teaching qualitative methodologies. Previous research has suggested that students from strong quantitative backgrounds experience some cognitive dissonance and greater difficulties in learning qualitative methods. In this article we examine 3rd year undergraduate psychology students’ attitudes to qualitative research prior to commencing and upon completion of a qualitative research unit. All students had previously completed two 13 weeks units of study in quantitative research methods. At Time 1, 63 students (84.1% female) completed online surveys comprising attitudinal measures. Key themes to emerge from student comments were that qualitative research was seen as an alternative approach, representing a paradigmatic shift that was construed by some students advantageous for meeting future professional and educative goals. Quantitative measures of attitudes to qualitative research were associated with general attitudes toward research, and psychology-specific epistemological beliefs. Changes in attitudes following completion of the qualitative research methods unit were in the hypothesized direction, but non-significant (small effect sizes). The findings increase our understanding of psychology students’ attitudes toward qualitative research and inform our recommendations for teaching research methods within the undergraduate

  8. Anatomy that must be taught to a medical undergraduate: an interview-based survey in an Indian medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Satheesha; Ramnarayan, K; Somayaji, S N

    2005-07-01

    Confusion still exists about the anatomy to be taught to the medical undergraduate. We did an interview-based survey at the Melaka Manipal Medical College in Manipal, India, to try to evaluate the quantum of anatomy that should be taught to the medical undergraduate. The results suggest that excluding trivia and making anatomy more clinically oriented would be advantageous. A hybrid approach to anatomy including both problem-based learning and discipline-based curricula would be a better option than the regional or systemic approaches. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Fostering of Less Commonly Taught Language Initiatives — The Minnesota Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Anthony Polakiewicz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available First, let me express my sincere gratitude to NCOLCTL for awarding me this prestigious recognition bearing the name of a man who was responsible for many important initiatives and contributions relating to the promotion of the interests of LCTLs. Although for the past 36 years I have been teaching Russian and Polish, in my discussion today I will focus mainly on Polish, the less common of my less commonly taught languages. We can view the future of LCTLs in two ways: paraphrasing Anton Chekhov—one is the view that everything passes and nothing matters; the other view is that nothing passes and everything matters. If we are guided by the first outlook in assessing the present and future status of LCTLs we will conclude that despite all of our initiatives to promote and safeguard the interests of LCTLs, in the final analysis developments beyond our control will threaten the survival of LCTLs as part of institutionalized curriculum at many institutions. Thus, all of our efforts will prove to be in vain.

  10. The Impact of an Intervention Taught by Trained Teachers on Childhood Overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a six-months’ nutrition program, delivered and taught by classroom teachers with in-service nutrition training, on the prevention of overweight and obesity among children in grades 1 to 4. In this randomized trial, four hundred and sixty four children from seven elementary schools were allocated to a nutrition educational program delivered by their own teachers. Intervened teachers had 12 sessions of three hours each with the researchers throughout six months, according to the topics nutrition and healthy eating, the importance of drinking water and healthy cooking activities. After each session, teachers were encouraged to develop activities in class focused on the learned topics. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, dietary, and physical activity assessments were performed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. In the intervention group the increase in Body Mass Index (BMI z-score was significantly lower than in the control group (p = 0.009; fewer proportion of children became overweight in the intervened group compared with the control (5.6% vs. 18.4%; p = 0.037. Our study provides further support to decrease the overweight epidemic, involving classroom teachers in a training program and making them dedicated interventionists.

  11. Searching for the right form: A self-taught village player recalling performance live

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Repertoire of the excellent self-taught traditional dvojnice-player, Miladin Arsenijević, from the vicinity of Topola (central Serbia consists of lyrical songs of a newer rural repertoire. During a 'cognitive interview', in his attempt to recall and reconstruct old-time traveler's (putničko playing through performance, a 'real music situation', he has gradually condensed the developed form of the homophonic shepherd's song into the fragmentary form of heterophonic traveler's playing. In this paper the accent is on the player's search and creative process in his attempt to derive the right musical form of a piece, using his long-term memory, since he has not heard or played the piece for quite a long time. It is also a successful attempt to bring musical data from passive to active musical memory, and a transit from one collective semantic musical code to another. The motoric component plays an important role as well. The analysis of musical change shows that musical memory is a distributive system, and data is organized in groups. Musical parameters change: rhythm and tone are changed first, while other parameters seem to depend mostly on the shape of the melodic model; they gradually change while this element finds its right form.

  12. Hand and Eye Dominance in Sport: Are Cricket Batters Taught to Bat Back-to-Front?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, David L; Runswick, Oliver R; Allen, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    When first learning to bimanually use a tool to hit a target (e.g., when chopping wood or hitting a golf ball), most people assume a stance that is dictated by their dominant hand. By convention, this means that a 'right-handed' or 'left-handed' stance that places the dominant hand closer to the striking end of the tool is adopted in many sports. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the conventional stance used for bimanual hitting provides the best chance of developing expertise in that task. Our study included 43 professional (international/first-class) and 93 inexperienced (hand and eye dominance) to compare the proportion of batters who adopted a reversed stance when batting (that is, the opposite stance to that expected based on their handedness). We found that cricket batsmen who adopted a reversed stance had a stunning advantage, with professional batsmen 7.1 times more likely to adopt a reversed stance than inexperienced batsmen, independent of whether they batted right or left handed or the position of their dominant eye. Findings imply that batsmen who adopt a conventional stance may inadvertently be batting 'back-to-front' and have a significant disadvantage in the game. Moreover, the results may generalize more widely, bringing into question the way in which other bimanual sporting actions are taught and performed.

  13. Current trends in pulp therapy: a survey analyzing pulpotomy techniques taught in pediatric dental residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Laquia A; Sanders, Brian J; Jones, James E; Williamson, C Andrew; Dean, Jeffrey A; Legan, Joseph J; Maupome, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The study's purpose was to survey directors of pediatric dental residency programs in order to evaluate the materials currently being taught and used for pulpotomy procedures for primary teeth in educational and clinical settings. A web-based survey was emailed to all graduate pediatric dental residency program directors in the United States. Seventy one emails were sent to program directors, 47 responded but only 39 respondents (55%) were included in the study. Results suggested a slight decrease in utilization of formocresol 1:5 dilution (Pformocresol (18% of respondents) were systemic health concerns and carcinogenicity, in addition to evidence-based literature. Even though 25% of respondents have begun to use MTA for primary pulpotomy procedures, the most common reason for utilization of other medicaments over MTA was its higher cost. With 82% of graduate pediatric dental residency programs still utilizing formocresol 1:5 dilution for pulpotomy procedures in primary teeth, there has been no major shift away from its clinical use, in spite of increased usage of newer medicaments over the last 5 years.

  14. Physiology Should Be Taught as Science Is Practiced: An Inquiry-Based Activity to Investigate the "Alkaline Tide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) strongly recommends that "science be taught as science is practiced." This means that the teaching approach must be consistent with the nature of scientific inquiry. In this article, the authors describe how they added scientific inquiry to a large lecture-based physiology…

  15. A retrospective study of social relations in a Danish primary school class taught in 'udeskole'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, Rikke Dalgaard; Mygind, Erik

    2016-01-01

    exhaustively. Therefore, we explored the conditions in ‘udeskole’ influencing pupils’ social relations based on an extreme case called the ‘Nature Class’. In the ‘Nature Class’ the pupils (third to fifth grades) were taught outside the classroom one day a week. Five pupils and two teachers were interviewed...

  16. A Study to Determine the Teaching Effectiveness of Faculty in Courses Taught on a Multiple Section Basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Joseph E.

    The present study attempted to discover if significant differences in grade distributions occurred in certain accounting courses taught on a multiple section basis at Johnson & Wales College during the academic years 1972-1973 and 1973-1974. All multiple section courses for the above mentioned years were identified and grade distributions…

  17. The Relative Efficacy of Explicit and Implicit Feedback in the Learning of a Less-Commonly-Taught Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Sook

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to test the generalizability of the role and contributions of interactional feedback in second language acquisition, this study examines the issue in the context of learning Korean as a less-commonly-taught foreign language at the post-secondary level. Further, it looks into the explicitness of feedback as a factor in foreign…

  18. A Study to Determine the Teaching Effectiveness of Faculty in Courses Taught on a Multiple Section Basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Joseph E.

    The present study attempted to discover if significant differences in grade distributions occurred in certain accounting courses taught on a multiple section basis at Johnson & Wales College during the academic years 1972-1973 and 1973-1974. All multiple section courses for the above mentioned years were identified and grade distributions…

  19. Combining Chemical Information Literacy, Communication Skills, Career Preparation, Ethics, and Peer Review in a Team-Taught Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mary Lou Baker; Seybold, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The widely acknowledged need to include chemical information competencies and communication skills in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum can be accommodated in a variety of ways. We describe a team-taught, semester-length course at Wright State University which combines chemical information literacy, written and oral communication skills,…

  20. Combining Chemical Information Literacy, Communication Skills, Career Preparation, Ethics, and Peer Review in a Team-Taught Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mary Lou Baker; Seybold, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The widely acknowledged need to include chemical information competencies and communication skills in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum can be accommodated in a variety of ways. We describe a team-taught, semester-length course at Wright State University which combines chemical information literacy, written and oral communication skills,…

  1. Students' Satisfaction with a Blended Instructional Design: The Potential of "Flipped Classroom" in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanclares, Núria Hernández; Rodríguez, Mónica Pérez

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the impact on promoting student satisfaction and improving their involvement in their own learning when applying a "Flipped classroom" design in a first-year bilingual, English-taught module in a non-English-speaking country. "World Economy" is taught in the Faculty of Business and Economics at a…

  2. The Effects of Advertising Education on Business Students' Attitudes toward Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkle, Denny E.; Alexander, Joe F.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental group of 98 business students taught advertising and management principles was compared to a group of 57 who were taught management principles only. Increased knowledge and understanding about the institution and instrument of advertising resulted in more positive attitudes. (Author/JOW)

  3. National Board Certification: Impact on Student Achievement and Teacher Practices. Information Capsule. Volume 0917

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    The combination of difficult economic times and increased accountability has led policymakers to call for evidence that students taught by National Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS)-certified teachers make greater achievement gains than those taught by non-NBPTS-certified teachers. Overall, studies show mixed results regarding the…

  4. The Effect of Project Based Learning on the Statistical Literacy Levels of Student 8th Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koparan, Timur; Güven, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of project based learning on 8th grade students' statistical literacy levels. A performance test was developed for this aim. Quasi-experimental research model was used in this article. In this context, the statistics were taught with traditional method in the control group and it was taught using project based…

  5. Proposing and Testing an Integrative Approach to Improve EFL Students' Communicative Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhussain, Aisha

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of using an integrative approach to improve EFL students' communicative skill. This was done by comparing the oral performance of the subjects who were taught grammar, listening, reading and speaking integratively to that of the subjects who were taught the same skills…

  6. Active versus Passive Teaching Styles: An Empirical Study of Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Norbert; Cater, John James, III; Varela, Otmar

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the impact of an active teaching approach and a traditional (or passive) teaching style on student cognitive outcomes. Across two sections of an introductory business course, one class was taught in an active or nontraditional manner, with a variety of active learning exercises. The second class was taught in a passive or…

  7. Use of Dramatization to Teach Cardiac Cycle Physiology to Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlati, Ehsan; Musick, David W.; Zhang, Lin; Thornton, Katherine; Carvalho, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Part of the educator's mission is to develop new methodologies that promote active learning. This study examines the use of dramatization of the cardiac cycle in medical school. Two groups (n = 42, 21 each) of first-year medical students participated. Group A was initially taught through dramatization alone, while Group B was taught through…

  8. Evaluation of a Computer-Based, Asynchronous Activity on Student Learning of Leadership Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Barry L.; Murphrey, Theresa Pesl

    2002-01-01

    Students taught leadership and ethics using asynchronous computer simulation (n=83) were compared with 113 taught conventionally. The treatment group performed better on questions written at the knowledge, comprehension, and analysis levels of Bloom's Taxonomy, regardless of learning mode preferences. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  9. Teacher Gender, Student Gender, and Primary School Achievement: Evidence from Ten Francophone African Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jieun; Rhee, Dong-eun; Rudolf, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Using an exceptionally rich dataset comprising over 1,800 primary schools and nearly 40,000 students from ten francophone Sub-Saharan African countries, this study analyzes the relationship between teacher gender, student gender, and student achievement in mathematics and reading. Findings indicate that being taught by a female teacher increases academic achievements and that both performance and subject appreciation rise when taught by a same-gender teacher. Traditional academic gender stere...

  10. Lessons in Generative Design, Publishing, and Circulation: What EM-Journal's First Year Has Taught Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Jana; Lonsdale, Chelsea; Morrison, Becky; Mueller, Derek; Nannini, Adam

    2013-01-01

    "EM-Journal" is a flexibly refereed online journal featuring writing produced by students of Eastern Michigan University. The journal showcases a variety of documents (articles, essays, reports, etc.) written and designed by students enrolled in EMU's First-Year Writing (FYW) program, in selected Writing Intensive (WI) courses affiliated…

  11. Should Cursive Handwriting Still Be Taught in Schools? Information Capsule. Volume 0916

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Elementary school students spend less time learning cursive handwriting than they did in years past. The declining emphasis on cursive writing has been attributed to the increasing use of technology, the growing proportion of class time spent preparing for standardized tests, and the perception that the time students spend learning to write in…

  12. How Issues of Professional Liability Are Taught in U.S. Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 120 medical schools found 61 percent have curricula on professional liability. Many indicated students' training has been compromised or jeopardized by physicians' concerns about medicolegal issues, and many had students named in malpractice suits. Findings suggest issues of professional liability have significantly affected…

  13. Conceptions of Good Teaching and How They Influence the Way Adults and School Leavers Are Taught.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kember, David; Kwan, Kam-Por; Ledesma, Jenilyn

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 17 university lecturers revealed ways in which they perceived adult students. Three types of accommodations were found: catering for weaknesses, treating older and younger students the same, and remediating weaknesses. Lecturers who viewed teaching as transmission tended to cater to weaknesses; those who believed in facilitation…

  14. How is the Elective-English Speaking Taught in High Schools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任丽燕

    2013-01-01

    English Speaking is the skill that the students will be judged upon most in real-life situations. This article written to discuss how to have the the optional course-English Speaking Training in high schools to train the students English speaking abil-ity.

  15. Lessons in Generative Design, Publishing, and Circulation: What EM-Journal's First Year Has Taught Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Jana; Lonsdale, Chelsea; Morrison, Becky; Mueller, Derek; Nannini, Adam

    2013-01-01

    "EM-Journal" is a flexibly refereed online journal featuring writing produced by students of Eastern Michigan University. The journal showcases a variety of documents (articles, essays, reports, etc.) written and designed by students enrolled in EMU's First-Year Writing (FYW) program, in selected Writing Intensive (WI) courses affiliated…

  16. Does Cooperative Learning Improve Student Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamarik, Steven

    2007-01-01

    What is the effect of small-group learning on student learning outcomes in economic instruction? In spring 2002 and fall 2004, the author applied cooperative learning to one section of intermediate macroeconomics and taught another section using a traditional lecture format. He identified and then tracked measures of student learning outcomes.…

  17. Effects of Ability Grouping on Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, James A.; Kulik, Chen-Lin C.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the effect of within-class and between-class ability groupings on the academic achievement of gifted elementary and secondary level students. Results showed that gifted students gained more academically than they would have if they had been taught in heterogeneous classes. (PS)

  18. Business Students' Perceptions of Ethics in Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaedeke, Ralph M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey investigating perceptions of 327 students about ethics in marketing today found that (1) students believe business leaders should be accountable; (2) they do not perceive the value of codes of ethics; and (3) they believe ethics should be taught in business and marketing curricula. (JOW)

  19. An Empirical Evaluation of Jolly Phonics Series Being Taught in Iran's Baby College Institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Derakhshan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With growth of EFL in Iran, based on context requirements, textbook evaluation has received substantial attention. Teachers' experiences and perceptions play vital roles in the process of book evaluation. The study is based on the Jolly Phonics series (Lloyd & Wernham, 1995 used by number of institutes and colleges in teaching in Iran. The main objective of the study was to find out whether this teaching material follows the essential objectives for teaching English as a foreign language to children or not. Considering the point that teachers have an indispensable role in analyzing and making an applicable and practical decision on evaluating and choosing the best possible material to be taught, the study focused on the teachers’ perceptions. The series were evaluated against Nokelainen's (2006 checklist. To this end, 72 female experienced teachers of Baby College institutes in Tehran and Gorgan branches, Iran, were randomly selected and given the Pedagogically Meaningful Learning Questionnaire (PMLQ of 40 questions to fill in. The findings showed that teachers mostly believe Jolly Phonics series and the teaching method can stand as a capable and trustable material for young EFL learners. However, in order to make it more profitable it may involve using decisions in adapting textual materials to the needs and interests of pupils as the learners' requirements are changing regarding the adventures of their environment. It is suggested that being a teacher’s guide to educate the teachers how to adapt and teach the materials on the base of learners' needs would be much better than just knowing or learning how to teach it. The textbook will continue to play an important role in helping teachers in teaching process, but it should not be a dictator (Williams, 1983, and the investigated material is respectful to this idea as it can well cover the flexibility, motivation, applicability, learner control and learner activity objectives since most of

  20. A self-taught artificial agent for multi-physics computational model personalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Dominik; Mansi, Tommaso; Itu, Lucian; Georgescu, Bogdan; Kayvanpour, Elham; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Amr, Ali; Haas, Jan; Katus, Hugo; Meder, Benjamin; Steidl, Stefan; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-12-01

    Personalization is the process of fitting a model to patient data, a critical step towards application of multi-physics computational models in clinical practice. Designing robust personalization algorithms is often a tedious, time-consuming, model- and data-specific process. We propose to use artificial intelligence concepts to learn this task, inspired by how human experts manually perform it. The problem is reformulated in terms of reinforcement learning. In an off-line phase, Vito, our self-taught artificial agent, learns a representative decision process model through exploration of the computational model: it learns how the model behaves under change of parameters. The agent then automatically learns an optimal strategy for on-line personalization. The algorithm is model-independent; applying it to a new model requires only adjusting few hyper-parameters of the agent and defining the observations to match. The full knowledge of the model itself is not required. Vito was tested in a synthetic scenario, showing that it could learn how to optimize cost functions generically. Then Vito was applied to the inverse problem of cardiac electrophysiology and the personalization of a whole-body circulation model. The obtained results suggested that Vito could achieve equivalent, if not better goodness of fit than standard methods, while being more robust (up to 11% higher success rates) and with faster (up to seven times) convergence rate. Our artificial intelligence approach could thus make personalization algorithms generalizable and self-adaptable to any patient and any model. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Helping Students Write Better Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber-Jimenez, Lola; Montelongo, Jose; Hernandez, Anita C.; Herter, Roberta; Hosking, David

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the vocabulary used in language arts and social studies, knowledge of expository text (text written to inform) and the language of science are required for reading and writing in science (Carrier 2005). This vocabulary, along with expository text structures, often is not taught in middle and high school classrooms, thus hindering students,…

  2. Student Appraisals of Collaborative Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Kimberly; Letterman, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Scholars have argued that team teaching promises great benefits for students. However, little systematic research exists to show how such benefits occur. Team teaching takes various forms including the simultaneously taught two-person course (coteaching), the alternating two-person course (alternate), and the panel of three or more faculty…

  3. ESL Students' Attitudes toward Punctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvela, Alan; Nussbaum, Alexander; Pierson, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Punctuation is a surprisingly underexplored area of second language writing and learning. The small body of published literature about punctuation tends to look at ways in which punctuation can be taught. Little is known, except anecdotally, about how English as a second language (ESL) students actually feel about using English punctuation,…

  4. Plagiarism: a case study of quality improvement in a taught postgraduate programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Tom; Taylor, Beck; Hothersall, Ellie; Pérez-Martín, Leticia

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism is a common issue in education. Software can detect plagiarism but little is known about prevention. To identify ways to reduce the incidence of plagiarism in a postgraduate programme. From 2006, all student assignments were monitored using plagiarism detection software (Turn It In) to produce percentage text matches for each assignment. In 2007, students were advised software was being used, and that plagiarism would result in penalties. In 2008, students attending a key module took part in an additional interactive seminar on plagiarism. A separate cohort of students did not attend the seminar, allowing comparison between attendees and non-attendees. Between 2006 and 2007, mean percentage text match values were consistent with a stable process, indicating advice and warnings were ineffective. Control chart analysis revealed that between 2007 and 2008, mean percentage text match changes showed a reduced text match in all nine modules, where students attended the interactive seminar, but none where students did not. This indicated that the interactive seminar had an effect. In 2008, there were no occurrences of plagiarism. Improvements were maintained in 2009. Advice and warnings against plagiarism were ineffective but a subsequent interactive seminar was effective at reducing plagiarism.

  5. Asian Remedial Plan: A Study of Sheltered and Co-Taught Classes in New Instructional Model Secondary Schools. Interim Report No. 9114.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Judy; And Others

    This study examined 69 sheltered classes and 26 co-taught classes established in 10 New Instructional Model secondary schools in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) in the 1990-91 school year. Focus is on the following topics: (1) the extent to which sheltered and co-taught classes are operational at each of the schools; (2) the type and quality of staff…

  6. Environmental Literacy Comparison between Students Taught in Eco-Schools and Ordinary Schools in the Madeira Island Region of Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinola, H.

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of environmental education is to improve environmental literacy, including not just more knowledge but also a better attitude toward the environment and a higher prevalence of pro-environmental behaviours. The Eco-School Program is considered the world largest environmental education program for schools, but it keeps growing without…

  7. Student Perceptions of Peer Assessment: An Interdisciplinary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas Lladó, Anna; Soley, Lídia Feliu; Fraguell Sansbelló, Rosa Maria; Pujolras, Gerard Arbat; Planella, Joan Pujol; Roura-Pascual, Núria; Suñol Martínez, Joan Josep; Moreno, Lino Montoro

    2014-01-01

    Peer assessment provides students with multiple benefits during their learning process. The aim of our study is to examine students' perception of peer assessment. Questionnaires were administered before and after the peer-assessment process to 416 students studying 11 different subjects in four different fields taught at the University of Girona.…

  8. Persuading Students with Emotional Disabilities to Write Fluently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.; Mills, Sara; Cerar, Nancy Irby; Cuenca-Sanchez, Yojanna; Allen-Bronaugh, Dannette; Thompson, Catherine; Guckert, Mary; Regan, Kelley

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-baseline design study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of strategy instruction in persuasive writing with eighth-grade students who attended a public day school for students with severe emotional and behavior disabilities. Students were taught to plan and write persuasive essays using the Self-Regulated Strategy Development…

  9. Using Sport to Engage and Motivate Students to Learn Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how technology has been used to motivate the learning of mathematics for students of Sports Technology at Loughborough University. Sports applications are introduced whenever appropriate and Matlab is taught to enable the students to solve realistic problems. The mathematical background of the students is varied and the…

  10. Sense-able Combinatorics: Student's Use of Personal Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlow, Lynn D.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a mathematics session in which students explored a challenging combinatorics task, a topic shown to be difficult for students when taught traditionally. The students developed a progression of personal representations, increasingly symbolic and abstract, which they used to find a solution and justification. (Contains 8…

  11. Biometric and Intelligent Self-Assessment of Student Progress System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaklauskas, A.; Zavadskas, E. K.; Pruskus, V.; Vlasenko, A.; Seniut, M.; Kaklauskas, G.; Matuliauskaite, A.; Gribniak, V.

    2010-01-01

    All distance learning participants (students, professors, instructors, mentors, tutors and the rest) would like to know how well the students have assimilated the study materials being taught. The analysis and assessment of the knowledge students have acquired over a semester are an integral part of the independent studies process at the most…

  12. Student and Professor Gender Effects in Introductory Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M. Ryan; Johnson, Marianne F.; Kuennen, Eric W.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have yielded highly mixed results as to differences in male and female student performance in statistics courses; the role that professors play in these differences is even less clear. In this paper, we consider the impact of professor and student gender on student performance in an introductory business statistics course taught by…

  13. "Argument!" Helping Students Understand What Essay Writing Is About

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Argumentation is a key requirement of the essay, which is the most common genre that students have to write. However, how argumentation is realised in disciplinary writing is often poorly understood by academic tutors, and therefore not adequately taught to students. This paper presents research into undergraduate students' concepts of argument…

  14. Soil Genesis and Development: Views Held by New Zealand Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happs, John C.

    1984-01-01

    To help plan effective teaching strategies, it is important to determine students' existing knowledge about the topic to be taught. Interviews with New Zealand students showed that they hold nonscientific ideas about soil. These student views should be respected by teachers. They should be discussed and compared with scientific viewpoints. (RM)

  15. Students' and Physicians' Evaluations of Gynecologic Teaching Associate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauche, Warren C.; Baugniet-Nebrija, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Gynecologic teaching associates taught third-year medical students to perform physical examination of the female pelvis and breasts. Evaluations by the students of this teaching method and assessment by the teaching associates of student problems were obtained from questionnaires. (Author/MLW)

  16. Studying the Ways Students Get Help with Classwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2015-01-01

    One of the first lessons students are taught in school is "If you need help, raise your hand" but as students learn in an increasing variety of settings--in and out of classrooms, in person and online--educators and researchers are starting to take another look at how students learn to ask for help. This brief article uses findings from…

  17. Fluent Persuasive Writing with Counterarguments for Students with Emotional Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.; Cerar, Nancy Irby; Allen-Bronaugh, Dannette; Thompson, Catherine; Guckert, Mary; Leins, Pat; Hauth, Clara; Cuenca-Sanchez, Yojanna

    2014-01-01

    Twelve seventh- and eighth-grade students with emotional disturbance participated in a multiple probe, multiple baseline design two-phase intervention study to improve persuasive writing skills. The first phase after baseline taught students to plan and write persuasive essays including counterarguments. In the second phase, students were taught…

  18. [Students as teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, A.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    and addressing their problems. Empirical studies support these theories and show that high levels of satisfaction are associated with near-peer teaching without compromising the learning outcome. In addition, student teachers achieve a substantial learning benefit from teaching. Much more research is needed......The concept of near-peer teaching is reviewed in this article. Theories of learning support the rationale for using students as teachers by explaining how near-peers as opposed to experts may have a superior understanding of the needs of the taught students and a better basis for identifying...

  19. An Examination of Reading and Mathematic Achievement among Second Grade Students Who Have Received Instruction from Either Teachers Who Have Been Trained in Choice Theory/Reality Therapy Methods or Teachers Who Have Not Been Trained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Jane V.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if second grade students who were taught by teachers trained in choice theory/reality therapy (CT/RT) methods had higher achievement scores in mathematics/reading compared to students who were taught by teachers who were not trained. The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model suggests that…

  20. A Theological Appraisal of the Doctrine that Jesus Died Spiritually, as Taught by Kenyon, Hagin and Copeland

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, William P

    2007-01-01

    This thesis appraises the doctrine that Jesus ‘died spiritually’ (JDS), as taught by E. W. Kenyon, Kenneth E. Hagin and Kenneth Copeland: important research because of the influence of these men and their teaching, not least on Pentecostalism. JDS teaching originated with Kenyon, was introduced to the Word-faith movement by Hagin, and continues to be offered by Copeland. However, it has been the subject of much criticism. The appraisal conducted in this project is primarily ...

  1. Software Engineering Education at Carnegie Mellon University: One University; Programs Taught in Two Places

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mel Rosso-Llopart

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Software Engineering to professional master‟s students is a challenging endeavor, and arguably for the past 20 years, Carnegie Mellon University has been quite successful. Although CMU teaches Software Engineering at sites world-wide and uses different pedagogies, the goal of the curriculum -- to produce world-class software engineers -- remains constant. This paper will discuss two of the most mature versions of Carnegie Mellon‟s Software Engineering program -- the main campus program and its "daughter program" at the Silicon Valley Campus. We discuss the programs with respect to the dimensions of curriculum, how students work and learn, how faculty teach, curricular materials, and how students are assessed to provide insight into how Carnegie Mellon continues to keep its programs fresh, to adapt them to local needs, and to meet its goal of excellence after 20 years.

  2. Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyereh Aminisani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Competency-based education has been recommended in training and education of public health to reduce the gap between traditional teaching and the competencies required in practice. Epidemiology as a fundamental of public health science has come to attention. The aim of this study was to introduce a complementary core competency program for Master of Science (MSc in epidemiology students in Iran. Methods: A workgroup in the department of statistics and epidemiology of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences including five epidemiologists and three biostatisticians prepared an outline of complementary core competencies for epidemiology MSc students. In the first step several discussion rounds were done to review the current curriculum, then the workgroup sought students’ opinions to find out about their needs. In addition, a review of the current literature around the topic was done. In the final step the program components were developed by the workgroup and initially implemented. Results: A complementary program consists of eight domains: general knowledge, problem finding, data analysis and interpretation, communications, management, consultation, leadership skills and professionalism. This program focused on basic competencies and those competencies outside the major field for a graduate of epidemiology to enhance their knowledge, attitude and skills. The program was scheduled to run in the third semester and approximate time for completion was three months. Conclusion: The development and initial implementation of the complementary core competency program was successful and the authors will attempt to extend the program and evaluate the implementation phase.

  3. Can Cultural Competence Be Taught? Evaluating the Impact of the SOAP Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin-Burque, Angie; Zugazaga, Carole B.; Davis-Maye, Denise

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the Self and Other Awareness Project (SOAP) cultural competence development model and presents the results of a study that evaluated its impact on the racial attitudes of 110 undergraduate students enrolled in an undergraduate interdisciplinary Minority Groups course at a mid-sized public university in the Southeastern…

  4. Acquisition and Generalization of Chained Tasks Taught with Computer Based Video Instruction to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Kevin M.; Maguire, Amy; McClimon, Desiree

    2009-01-01

    Three elementary aged students with autism participated in an evaluation of computer based video instruction that targeted functional life skills. The effects of the software were analyzed in the context of a multiple probe design across and replicated across participants. This study represents a departure from more traditional video based…

  5. What Classroom Technology Has Taught Me about Curriculum, Teaching, and Infinite Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Laura Christine

    2007-01-01

    The availability of new technology and a willingness to experiment led Laura Christine Rochette to re-imagine a successful high school English curriculum. A SMART Board, individual laptop computers, and blogs became essential tools to enhance the learning of all students and to renew her excitement about teaching.

  6. Interdisciplinary, Team-Taught, Undergraduate Business Courses: The Impact of Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoffe, Sandra J. Smith; Tromley, Cheryl L.; Tucker, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Given the widespread use and success of cross-functional teams in industry and the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business's focus on the importance of interdisciplinary education, many business schools have incorporated interdisciplinary elements into their curricula. This study examined current student and alumni perceptions of the…

  7. The Effects of an Inference-Making Strategy Taught with and without Goal Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Deborah K.; Lynn, Devon

    2016-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined the effects of a strategy for making text-dependent inferences--with and without embedded self-regulation skills--on the reading comprehension of 24 middle-grade students with disabilities. Classes were randomly assigned to receive the inference intervention only (IO), inference + individual goal setting…

  8. A Critical Multicultural Analysis of a Romanian Textbook Taught in Elementary International Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilescu, Dorian

    2014-01-01

    This case study proposes a critical multicultural analysis of a Romanian language textbook used for instructing students in grades one and two in the Elementary Language International Program (ELIP) in Toronto public schools in Ontario, Canada. Based on an analysis developed from Fairclough and Parker's criteria, this paper determined stereotypes…

  9. Influences of Teaching Methods and Personality on Junior College Students in Macroeconomic Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Saul Z.; Carr, Glenna D.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a study indicate that beginning courses in college economics should be taught with fewer lectures and more student involvement. Current events and group activities should be an integral part of classes. (Author/KC)

  10. Student Performance in Online and Face-to-Face Microeconomics: Evidence from Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medcalfe, Simon

    2009-01-01

    There have been few studies comparing student performance in online and face-to-face economics courses. Those studies that have been undertaken have concentrated on traditional students (18- to 22-year-olds). This paper examines student outcomes in an undergraduate course in microeconomics taught to non-traditional students (average age is 33…

  11. Self-Assembled Student Interactions in Undergraduate General Chemistry Clicker Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, James R.; Jones, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    Student interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations were used in an exploratory study of the nature of student interactions in a large (300+ students) general chemistry course taught with clickers. These data suggest that students are self-assembling their learning environment: choosing ways in which to interact with one another during…

  12. Development through Business: What Do American Business Students Know about Emerging Markets and Opportunities in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelli N.

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates how Africa is taught in business and examines African and American student perspectives on business in Africa. Conclusions find that African students, business students or not, had more knowledge about business and economic structures than American business students; however, learning about successful case studies on…

  13. Self-Assembled Student Interactions in Undergraduate General Chemistry Clicker Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, James R.; Jones, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    Student interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations were used in an exploratory study of the nature of student interactions in a large (300+ students) general chemistry course taught with clickers. These data suggest that students are self-assembling their learning environment: choosing ways in which to interact with one another during…

  14. Reducing Test Anxiety among Third Grade Students through the Implementation of Relaxation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Heidi A.; El Ramahi, Mera K.; Conn, Steven R.; Estes, Lincoln A.; Ghibellini, Amanda B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the negative effects that self-perceived levels of test anxiety have on third-grade students. The participants in this study consisted of 177 third-grade students at two Midwestern public elementary schools. Students at one school were taught relaxation techniques, while students at the second school served…

  15. A Report on Military Student Attitudes Towards Instructional Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    effective use of ITV in the classrooom and simply using TV because it appears to be the thing to do. On one hand we have the advocates of TV use whose...indicated that they would enroll in these courses taught all by Management ............ . .... .. .... 15 15.b Urban Planning ...................... 10 10.4...Quest. Question and Response Option N No. b 13 Students indicated that they would e’nroll in these courses taught all by TV: Management

  16. Increased instruction hours and the widening gap in student performance

    OpenAIRE

    Huebener, Mathias; Kuger, Susanne; Marcus, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Do increased instruction hours improve the performance of all students? Using PISA scores of students in ninth grade, we analyse the effect of a German education reform that increased weekly instruction hours by two hours (6.5 percent) overalmost five years. In the additional time, students are taught new learning content. On average, the reform improves student performance. However, treatment effects are small and differ across the student performance distribution. While low-performing stude...

  17. Practice and Thinking on the Management of Practice Curriculum Assessment in Self-taught Examination%自学考试实践课程考核管理的实践与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高凤萍

    2014-01-01

    实践课程考核是实现高等教育自学考试专业规格要求和培养目标的重要组成部分,对促进考生提高实际操作技能和创新思维能力,促进自学考试制度不断完善具有重大意义。本文以天津市高等教育自学考试委员会办公室开展的实践课程考核实践为例,探索了以社会证书考试代替实践课程考核、对实践课程实施分类考核、统一实践课程考核标准、建立实践课程考核基地等考核管理措施。后续应在课程设置、考官队伍建设、考核基地建设、有效的考核管理等方面改进和探索。%Practice Curriculum Assessment(PCA)plays an essential role in fulfilling the professional requirements and reaching the targets of Self-taught Examination. PCA is of great importance to enhance students ’creativity and practical ability, and is of great weight in the continuous development of Self-taught Examination system. Based on the real cases of PCA carried out by Tianjin Municipal Higher Education Self-taught Examination Committee Office, this paper presents the assessment management methods such as recognizing social certificates, categorizing the curriculum, unifying the assessment standards, and setting up the assessment bases. The next step should be focused on curriculum setting, examiner training, assessment bases building and effective management tactics.

  18. Special Needs Education and Inclusive Education : Where are the children with disabilities being taught?

    OpenAIRE

    池田, 浩明; Hiroaki, Ikeda; 藤女子大学人間生活学部保育学科

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relationship between special needs education and inclusive education with regard to where children study. It is said that Special Needs Education is education for students in consideration of individual educational needs according to MEXT. In Japan, children with disabilities usually attend special schools separated from regular schools. However, it seems that the level of inclusive education in Japan is not so different from that in UK and in USA, ...

  19. The Influence of Instructor Native Language on Student Learning and Instructor Ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Kent T. Saunders

    2001-01-01

    This paper uses two large databases in introductory microeconomics and introductory macroeconomics classes, to seek the answers to two key questions. First, is student learning significantly different in introductory economics classes taught by instructors whose native language is English than in classes taught by instructors whose native language is not English? Second, do students give significantly different instructor ratings to instructors whose native language is English than to instruc...

  20. Reflections: Improving Medical Students' Presentation Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Radoslaw

    2016-02-26

    Both good communication and presentation skills on the part of an academic teacher are crucial when trying to generate students' interest in the subject of a lecture. More generally, our task is to share knowledge in the most effective way possible. It is also worth teaching students presentation skills, as today's students are tomorrow's teachers. An engaging presentation is a powerful tool. There are some rules for presenting which I consider worthy of being discussed and taught at a medical university.

  1. Teachers' Roles in a Team-Taught Lesson : The Perspectives of Japanese Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Tajino, Akira; タジノ アキラ /; Akira, Tajino; Walker Larry

    1998-01-01

    The introduction of team teaching in Japan on a nationwide scale has been an ambiguous project from its start nearly fifteen years ago. Much effort and expense are devoted to the programme in the hopes of bringing to life the target language community in the Japanese classroom, as well as to cultivate some degree of cultural sensitivity in the students. Upon this foundation, however, the focus in team teaching has been on the teachers, and their relationship as team members. In an effort to b...

  2. Foreign Languages to Be Taught at School from Age Seven Planned national curriculum reforms also encourage science learning through study of nature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeevan Vasagar

    2012-01-01

    All children are to be taught a foreign language--which could include Mandarin, Latin or Greek~rom the age of seven under reforms to the national curriculum being unveiled by the education secretary, Michael Gove

  3. Data Acquisition and Preprocessing in Studies on Humans: What Is Not Taught in Statistics Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yeyi; Hernandez, Ladia M; Mueller, Peter; Dong, Yongquan; Forman, Michele R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to address issues in research that may be missing from statistics classes and important for (bio-)statistics students. In the context of a case study, we discuss data acquisition and preprocessing steps that fill the gap between research questions posed by subject matter scientists and statistical methodology for formal inference. Issues include participant recruitment, data collection training and standardization, variable coding, data review and verification, data cleaning and editing, and documentation. Despite the critical importance of these details in research, most of these issues are rarely discussed in an applied statistics program. One reason for the lack of more formal training is the difficulty in addressing the many challenges that can possibly arise in the course of a study in a systematic way. This article can help to bridge this gap between research questions and formal statistical inference by using an illustrative case study for a discussion. We hope that reading and discussing this paper and practicing data preprocessing exercises will sensitize statistics students to these important issues and achieve optimal conduct, quality control, analysis, and interpretation of a study.

  4. Evaluation of Parallel Authentic Research-Based Courses in Human Biology on Student Experiences at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Jacob; Annerstedt, Claes; Besier, Thor; Matheson, Gordon O.; Rydmark, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Under a previous grant (2005-08), researchers and teachers at Stanford University (SU) and the University of Gothenburg (GU) co-designed a ten-week interdisciplinary, research-based laboratory course in human biology to be taught online to undergraduate students. Essentials in the subject were taught during the first four weeks of this course.…

  5. An Analysis of the Relationship of Teaching Methodology and the Students' Level of Cognition with Student Achievement in Principles of Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kenneth Glenn

    A study investigated the relationship of students' cognitive level of development and teaching methodology with student achievement. The sample was composed of 79 students in two sections of the introductory marketing course at the University of Northern Colorado. The control group was taught by a lecture strategy, and the experimental group by a…

  6. High School Students "Do" and Learn Science through Scientific Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Susan Smetzer; Farnsworth, Valerie

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the research project Modeling for Understanding in Science Education (MUSE) which focuses on the improvement of high school students' learning. MUSE research investigated how lower and high achieving students learned to reason, inquire, present, and critique scientific arguments in a genetics course taught during the spring…

  7. Graduate Social Work Students' Attitudes toward Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccio, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    Service-learning attitudes among graduate social work students enrolled in a course on human diversity and oppression are presented. A survey was administered at the beginning and at the end of the semester to students enrolled in the course, which was taught using a service-learning approach. Among the results were believing that service-learning…

  8. Doing Literary Criticism: Helping Students Engage with Challenging Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Tim

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for English language arts teachers today is the call to engage students in more complex texts. Tim Gillespie, who has taught in public schools for almost four decades, has found the lenses of literary criticism a powerful tool for helping students tackle challenging literary texts. Tim breaks down the dense language…

  9. Practical Instruction in Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics for Sandwich Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. C.; Bishun, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the training and practical techniques taught to students involved in a sandwich course at the Tissue Culture and Cytogenetics Unit of the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation, Surrey, England. Students spend a minimum of six months involved in the sandwich course before returning to university for a final academic year. (JR)

  10. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  11. Nursing Students' Awareness and Intentional Maximization of Their Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Linda Riggs

    2012-01-01

    This small, descriptive, pilot study addressed survey data from four levels of nursing students who had been taught to maximize their learning styles in a first-semester freshman success skills course. Bandura's Agency Theory supports the design. The hypothesis was that without reinforcing instruction, the students' recall and application of that…

  12. Effectiveness of Small Group Social Skills Lessons with Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, Amy I.; Boes, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    This action research study (ARS) describes the effectiveness of small group social skills lessons with elementary students, using "Too Good for Violence: A Curriculum for Non-violent Living" by the Mendez Foundation. The school counselor and school social worker taught the curriculum in a structured small group of 4th grade students in 8…

  13. Teachers' Use of a Verbally Governed Algorithm and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Dolleen-Day; Greer, R. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The effects of instructing teachers in the use of a verbally governed algorithm to solve students' learning problems were measured. The teachers were taught to analyze students' responses to instruction using a strategic protocol, which included a series of verbally governed questions. The study was designed to determine whether the instructional…

  14. Attending to Student Epistemological Framing in a Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Paul; Hammer, David

    2010-01-01

    Studies of learning in school settings indicate that many students frame activities in science classes as the production of answers for the teacher or test, rather than as making new sense of the natural world. A case study of an episode from a class taught by the first author demonstrates what productive and unproductive student framing can look…

  15. Doing Literary Criticism: Helping Students Engage with Challenging Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Tim

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for English language arts teachers today is the call to engage students in more complex texts. Tim Gillespie, who has taught in public schools for almost four decades, has found the lenses of literary criticism a powerful tool for helping students tackle challenging literary texts. Tim breaks down the dense language…

  16. Spotlight on Computers: Students in Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimbach, Judy

    1982-01-01

    Describes a pilot program at Briar Glen School in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, in which academically gifted fifth grade students are introduced to microcomputers, taught basic programing skills, and allowed to develop computer programs in BASIC after they have mastered some fundamental computer skills. (JL)

  17. Engaging Millennial Students in Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arensdorf, Jill R.; Andenoro, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Leadership, regardless of definition, cannot be taught by a textbook alone, and if educators are to embrace the idea of highly engaged, holistic classrooms for Millennials, they must teach students to participate in real changes as both leaders and followers through practice and experiences. As new generations of young people mature and enter…

  18. Instructional Innovations: Preparing Students for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Norman

    1994-01-01

    Forward-looking educators are teaching students to be flexible, creative thinkers by using cooperative learning, authentic assessments, interdisciplinary units taught to heterogeneous groups. Principals should facilitate appropriate staff development, build master planning schedule providing for team planning periods, allow staff members to attend…

  19. Engaging Millennial Students in Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arensdorf, Jill R.; Andenoro, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Leadership, regardless of definition, cannot be taught by a textbook alone, and if educators are to embrace the idea of highly engaged, holistic classrooms for Millennials, they must teach students to participate in real changes as both leaders and followers through practice and experiences. As new generations of young people mature and enter…

  20. EMT--A Student Handbook. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This handbook is designed for use by students preparing for employment in the occupation of emergency medical technician-ambulance (EMT-A) in Iowa. Listed in the introduction are general course prerequisites, the 60 competencies taught in the course, pertinent federal and state requirements, and Iowa certification testing/retesting…

  1. Special Classes for Gifted Students? Absolutely!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Szabo, Sally

    1996-01-01

    This article makes a case for special classes for gifted students and answers objections to special classes raised by the middle school movement and the cooperative learning movement. A sample "Celebration of Me" unit taught to gifted seventh graders which involved poetry, literature, personal development, art, music, and physical fitness is…

  2. Are Future Doctors Taught to Respond to Intimate Partner Violence? A Study of Australian Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valpied, Jodie; Aprico, Karina; Clewett, Janita; Hegarty, Kelsey

    2015-07-16

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among women of childbearing age. This study aimed to describe delivery of IPV education in Australian pre-vocational medical degrees, and barriers and facilitators influencing this delivery. Eighteen Australian medical schools offering pre-vocational medical degrees were identified. Two were excluded as they had not finalized new curricula. One declined to participate. At least one staff member from each of the remaining 15 schools completed a telephone survey. Main outcome measures included whether IPV education was delivered within the degree, at what stage, and whether it was compulsory; mode and number of hours of delivery; and barriers and facilitators to delivery. Twelve of the medical schools delivered IPV education (median time spent per course = 2 hr). IPV content was typically included as part of Obstetrics and Gynecology or General Practice curriculum. Barriers included time constraints and lack of faculty commitment, resources, and funding. The two schools that successfully implemented a comprehensive IPV curriculum used an integrated, advocacy-based approach, with careful forward planning. Most Australian pre-vocational medical students receive little or no IPV education. The need remains for a more consistent, comprehensive approach to IPV education in medical degrees. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Student Evaluation of Instruction: In the New Paradigm of Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ou Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Distance education has experienced soaring development over the last decade. With millions of students in higher education enrolling in distance education, it becomes critically important to understand student learning and experiences with online education. Based on a large sample of 11,351 students taught by 1,522 instructors from 29 colleges and…

  4. Common Literacy Struggles with College Students: Using the Reciprocal Teaching Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Many college students struggle with the literacy skills needed to be successful in higher education (Bettinger & Long, 2009; Snyder, Tan, & Hoffman, 2004). The difficulties emerge within students' capabilities in reading and writing. Students must be taught the skills needed to be successful to complete the tasks assigned in college classes and in…

  5. Analyzing Student Teacher Critical Thinking through Blogs in an Electronic Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Taylorann K.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly popular in higher education in the way students are asked to communicate and collaborate. The student teaching experience is an integral part of developing critical thinking skills in pre-service teachers. During this experience, it is important that student teachers practice the theory they have been taught in…

  6. Teaching medicine of the person to medical students during the beginning of their clerkships.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Anita; Dekker, Hanke

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how medicine of the person is taught to 4th year medical students in Groningen, The Netherlands, as part of the teaching programme ‘Professional Development’. In that year, the students start with their clerkships. In this transitional phase from medical student to young

  7. How Heavy Is My Rock? An Exploration of Students' Understanding of the Measurement of Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Michael

    2013-01-01

    New Zealand and Australian curricula require students to learn about weight/mass for at least six years. However, little research identifies what should be taught. This study reports cognitive interviews with 17 Year 9 students who were asked "how heavy is my rock?" Only one student demonstrated some understanding of how to use analogue…

  8. Inquiring Astronomy: Incorporating Student-Centered Pedagogical Techniques in an Introductory College Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Debbie A.; Burrows, Andrea C.

    2017-01-01

    Increases in student-centered pedagogy have been more prevalent in K-12 education than in collegiate undergraduate science education. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of using student-centered pedagogy advocated in K-12 education on introductory astronomy students' content knowledge, interest, and recall of content taught in…

  9. Promoting Ethical Reasoning, Affect and Behaviour Among High School Students: An Evaluation of Three Teaching Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaan, Robert; Hanford, Russell; Kinlaw, Kathleen; Philler, David; Snarey, John

    1997-01-01

    Compares the effectiveness of three classes teaching ethical reasoning to high school students. The three classes were an introductory ethics class, a blended economics-ethics class, and a role-model ethics class taught by graduate students. Tests measured the ways students reason, feel, and act with regard to ethical-normative issues. (MJP)

  10. Teaching medicine of the person to medical students during the beginning of their clerkships.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Anita; Dekker, Hanke

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how medicine of the person is taught to 4th year medical students in Groningen, The Netherlands, as part of the teaching programme ‘Professional Development’. In that year, the students start with their clerkships. In this transitional phase from medical student to young docto

  11. Teaching with Multiple Methods in Mind: Eleven Ways to Reach All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondracek, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Teachers know what a daunting job it can be to ensure that all students in a class learn effectively. In addition to the usual difficulties of gaining everyone's attention at once, instructors also run into the issue of preferred learning styles. In any classroom environment, the same topic is taught to multiple students, and each student may…

  12. Teacher Behaviors Associated with Student Change in Attitude Toward a Teacher Education Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Mary M.

    The relationship between student perception of teacher behaviors and change in students' attitude toward a course in preservice teacher education was studied. The course selected was School and Society, a required course in educational foundations. Subjects included 87 students enrolled in eight sections taught by six instructors. A common…

  13. Analyzing Student Teacher Critical Thinking through Blogs in an Electronic Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Taylorann K.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly popular in higher education in the way students are asked to communicate and collaborate. The student teaching experience is an integral part of developing critical thinking skills in pre-service teachers. During this experience, it is important that student teachers practice the theory they have been taught in…

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Research on Student Team Effectiveness: A Proposed Application of Phased Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Charlotte S.

    Despite the increased emphasis on team work in the academic environment, managing a student team so that the team process is effective remains problematic. In fact, some professors believe students are being taught ineffective team behavior such as free loading or relying on star performers and procrastination . Most research on student team…

  15. Teaching Adolescent Students with Learning Disabilities to Self-Advocate for Accommodations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Mary Anne; Redman, Ashleigh Smith; Anderson, Darlene; Gibb, Gordon S.

    2014-01-01

    In the general education classroom students with learning disabilities (LD) often need academic accommodations to be successful. These accommodations are typically selected and implemented by their general education teachers, not by the students themselves. High school students with LD were taught to recognize when an accommodation was needed,…

  16. Changes in the images of teaching, teachers, and children expressed by student teachers before and after student teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Tomotaka; Horimoto, Akihiro; Mori, Toshiaki

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how education majors' images of teaching, teachers, and children change before and after student teaching, with special attention to the grade level (Grades 1-2, 3-4, 5-6) taught by the student teachers at primary school in Japan. A total of 126 student teachers from an education faculty (49 men, 77 women) participated in this study using metaphor-questionnaires before and after student teaching. For images of teaching, responses to the factors Dull Event and Live Event changed, suggesting that students started to develop more positive, active, and clear images of teaching. For images of teachers, responses on the factor Performer changed, suggesting that students started to develop more active images of teachers. For images of children, responses on the factors Critic and Pure-minded Person changed, suggesting that student teachers started to develop more realistic images of children. However, grade level taught had no significant effect.

  17. The comparison of Missouri mathematics project and teams games tournament viewed from emotional quotient eight grade student of junior school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, Indra; Budiyono, Slamet, Isnandar

    2017-08-01

    This research was a quasi-experimental research with 2 × 3 factorial design. It aimed to determine the learning model between Missouri Mathematics Project (MMP) and Teams Games Tournament (TGT) that gave the best achievement on mathematics subject viewed from emotional quotient. The population of this research were all of Junior High School students at the 8th grade in Surakarta City, Central Java, Indonesia in academic year 2016/2017 which applied KTSP curriculum. The sample was taken by using stratified cluster random sampling. The data were collected by using methods of documentation, emotional quotient questionnaires, and mathematics achievement test. Data analysis technique used two ways analysis of variance (ANOVA) with unequal cell. According to the research findings, it could be concluded that: (1) students' mathematics achievement which were taught by using MMP is as good as emotional quotient achievement which were taught by using TGT in straight-line equation material, (2) mathematics achievement of students with high emotional quotient is better than students with medium and low emotional quotient, and mathematics achievement of students with medium emotional quotient is as good as students with low emotional quotient in straight-line equation material, (3) in each learning model, mathematics achievement of students with high emotional quotient is better than students with medium and low emotional quotient, and mathematics achievement of students with medium emotional quotient is as good as students with low emotional quotient in straight-line equation material (4) in each category of high and medium emotional quotient, student's mathematics achievement which were taught by using MMP is better than student's mathematics achievement which were taught by using TGT and in low emotional quotient student's mathematics achievement which were taught by using MMP is as good as student's mathematics achievement which were taught by using TGT in straight

  18. The Day Bolivian Students Came to School Motivating Students through Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    Like many elementary foreign language teachers, the author traveled from room to room to teach. Each room had different materials and a different classroom culture. This article describes how the author taught her students about Bolivia and how to motivate them through culture. It discusses a service-learning project that brings life-changing…

  19. Using Student Group Leaders to Motivate Students in Cooperative Learning Methods in Crowded Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Rifat; Efe, Hulya Aslan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of employing student group leaders on the motivation of group members during co-operative learning activities in a secondary school classroom in Turkey. The study was carried out in a period of eight weeks in biology classes during which "living things" and "ecology" topics were taught to a class…

  20. "Your Professor Will Know You as a Person": Evaluating and Rethinking the Relational Boundaries between Faculty and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chory, Rebecca M.; Offstein, Evan H.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, several management educators have urged faculty to reexamine their relationships with students. To do this, many have proposed novel metaphors to reconceptualize the faculty-to-student relationship. These include embracing students not as pupils to be taught but rather as clients, consumers, and even employees. At the heart…

  1. Changes in Teacher Self-Efficacy from the Student Teaching Experience through the Third Year of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Benjamin G.; Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Cano, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in teacher self-efficacy from the student teaching experience to the third year of teaching. The population was the entire cohort of student teachers from The Ohio State University. Of the 34 individuals who student taught, 17 entered the teaching profession. The researchers utilized the Teachers…

  2. What's Our Position? A Critical Media Literacy Study of Popular Culture Websites with Eighth-Grade Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted; Tinio, Pablo P. L.; Nolan, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an action research project with 9 eighth-grade special education students in a self-contained classroom in an urban public school. The 1st author, in collaboration with the classroom teacher (3rd author), taught the students a critical media literacy framework to explore popular culture websites. Students learned to analyze…

  3. Effects of Explicit Instruction on Math Word-Problem Solving by Community College Students with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawaiza, Theda Ruth Wiles; Gerber, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    Community college students with learning disabilities (n=38) and math-competent peers (n=22) were taught representation-related strategies for solving compare word problems. Results generally supported the hypothesis that students receiving schema training would improve more than students assigned to linguistic training. (JDD)

  4. New Setting, Same Skill: Teaching Geography Students to Transfer Information Literacy Skills from Familiar to Unfamiliar Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Caleb; Laxman, Kumar; Lai, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Existing research shows that high school students do not possess information literacy skills adequate to function in a high-tech society that relies so heavily on information. If students are taught these skills, they struggle to apply them. This small-scale intervention focused on helping Geography students at a low-socioeconomic high school in…

  5. What's Our Position? A Critical Media Literacy Study of Popular Culture Websites with Eighth-Grade Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted; Tinio, Pablo P. L.; Nolan, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an action research project with 9 eighth-grade special education students in a self-contained classroom in an urban public school. The 1st author, in collaboration with the classroom teacher (3rd author), taught the students a critical media literacy framework to explore popular culture websites. Students learned to analyze…

  6. The Co-Authored Curriculum: High-School Teachers' Reasons for Including Students' Extra-Curricular Interests in Their Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagay, Galit; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet; Peleg, Ran

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of a gap between curricular requirements and what students actually want to know. One of the factors influencing what is taught in the classroom is teachers' attitudes towards integrating their students' interests. This study investigated what prompts high-school teachers who prepare students for national matriculation…

  7. The Classification of the Probability Unit Ability Levels of the Eleventh Grade Turkish Students by Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Ozcan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the probability unit ability levels of the eleventh grade Turkish students were classified through cluster analysis. The study was carried out in a high school located in Trabzon, Turkey during the fall semester of the 2011-2012 academic years. A total of 84 eleventh grade students participated. Students were taught about…

  8. Efficient and Effective Use of Peer Teaching for Medical Student Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    House, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is increasingly used in medical education, promoting active learning and retention; however, increasing use also requires considerable instructor resources. Simulation may provide a safe environment for students to teach each other, which many will need to do when they enter residency. Along with reinforcing learning and increasing retention, peer teaching could decrease instructor demands. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness of peer-taught simulation compared to physician-led simulation. We hypothesized that peer-taught simulation would lead to equivalent knowledge acquisition when compared to physician-taught sessions and would be viewed positively by participants. This was a quasi-experimental study in an emergency medicine clerkship. The control group was faculty taught. In the peer-taught intervention group, students were assigned to teach one of the three simulation-based medical emergency cases. Each student was instructed to master their topic and teach it to their peers using the provided objectives and resource materials. The students were assigned to groups of three, with all three cases represented; students took turns leading their case. Three groups ran simultaneously. During the intervention sessions, one physician was present to monitor the accuracy of learning and to answer questions, while three physicians were required for the control groups. Outcomes compared pre-test and post-test knowledge and student reaction between control and intervention groups. Both methods led to equally improved knowledge; mean score for the post-test was 75% for both groups (p=0.6 and were viewed positively. Students in the intervention group agreed that peer-directed learning was an effective way to learn. However, students in the control group scored their simulation experience more favorably. In general, students’ response to peer teaching was positive, students learned equally well, and found peer-taught sessions to be

  9. Subjects taught in VR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Frans; van den Broek, Egon; Stam, Liesbeth M.; Abrahamse, E.L.; Luursema, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This deliverable serves to reinstate a broad view on Virtual Reality (VR), capturing all its constituting disciplines. The core target of this report is to establish a foundation for an educational program where all disciplines subordinate to VR technology will converge. Over the past decade(s) the

  10. Subjects taught in VR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der Frans; Broek, van den Egon L.; Stam, Liesbeth M.; Abrahamse, Elger L.

    2006-01-01

    This deliverable serves to reinstate a broad view on Virtual Reality (VR), capturing all its constituting disciplines. The core target of this report is to establish a foundation for an educational program where all disciplines subordinate to VR technology will converge. Over the past decade(s) the

  11. On Being Taught

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaarsma, Ada S.

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the definitions of the key words of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL)--scholarship, teaching, and learning--in order to identify the hopes that animate SoTL research and examine these hopes in light of recent critical thinking about the corporatization of higher education. Arguing that Biesta's (2013b) distinction…

  12. Should Bioethics Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, George H.

    1980-01-01

    Examined is the issue concerning teaching bioethics. Differing points of view are discussed. The author concludes that moral and ethical reasoning should be incorporated into the public school curriculum, using morally laden issues that have grown out of advances in biological knowledge and biomedical technology. (CS)

  13. Can virtue be taught?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikitović Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The teachability of virtue is an issue on which were crossed swords during the struggle for supremacy between two basic principles of ancient Greek spirit - sophistry and ancient Greek ethics. Two great representatives of these opposite principles, Plato and Protagoras, confronted their arguments in Plato's dialog named after the great sophist. Paradoxically, during this philosophical struggle, Protagoras, who at the beginning supposed that virtue is teachable, later, on the contrary, states that virtue is not knowledge and this would make it least likely to be teachable. On the other hand Plato, who is trying to preserve the ancient Greek principle that virtue is innate, claims that virtue is knowledge. The solution of this great dispute between two principles of antiquity Plato sees in philosophical theoretization of ancient Greek mythical worldview.

  14. How was Mathematics taught in the Arab-Islamic Civilization? – Part 1: The Pedagogical Principles of Teaching & Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Moktadir ZERROUKI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No matter how societies have differed throughout history in their values, cultures, politics and systems of life, there has always been a common consensus regarding the importance of mathematics and its role in the social life. Arab-Islamic civilisation -like many others- had a reasonable command of many aspects of mathematics. This was apparent in various applications including not just in everyday life, civil and business transactions, and financial dealings, but also in certain religious rituals. This paper aims to highlight the important position that the scholars in the Muslim East and West attributed to mathematics, both in terms of teaching and practice. Furthermore, this work investigates the methodology of teaching fractions in the Arab-Islamic society. The latter is found to be one of the mathematical subjects that has been recommended to be taught to learners at their earliest learning stages, especially given the importance of fractions in everyday transactions such as calculating shares of a legacy. The paper also examines some of the educational requirements such as the teacher duties, student‟s qualities, education stages and what the relevant curriculum recommended by scholars during each stage. Finally, this work briefly highlights one of the contemporary issues which is the difficulty of teaching fractions for young learners and how this was addressed in the past by one of the early Muslim Arab mathematicians through the use of simple poetry.

  15. Impact of a Student-Teacher-Scientist Partnership on Students' and Teachers' Content Knowledge, Attitudes toward Science, and Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseal, Ana K.; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad; Destefano, Lizanne

    2014-01-01

    Engaging K-12 students in science-based inquiry is at the center of current science education reform efforts. Inquiry can best be taught through experiential, authentic science experiences, such as those provided by Student-Teacher-Scientist Partnerships (STSPs). However, very little is known about the impact of STSPs on teachers' and…

  16. Comparative Analysis on the Nature of Proof to Be Taught in Geometry: The Cases of French and Japanese Lower Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an international comparative study on the nature of proof to be taught in geometry. Proofs in French and Japanese lower secondary schools were explored by analyzing curricular documents: mathematics textbooks and national curricula. Analyses on the three aspects of proof--statement, proof, and theory--suggested by…

  17. Comparative Analysis on the Nature of Proof to Be Taught in Geometry: The Cases of French and Japanese Lower Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an international comparative study on the nature of proof to be taught in geometry. Proofs in French and Japanese lower secondary schools were explored by analyzing curricular documents: mathematics textbooks and national curricula. Analyses on the three aspects of proof--statement, proof, and theory--suggested by…

  18. El espanol basico que debe ensenarse en la universidad (Basic Spanish That Must be Taught at the University Level)

    Science.gov (United States)

    German Gallo, M.; Ruben Dario, Julio C.

    1975-01-01

    This article stresses the need for improved Spanish instruction in Spanish and Latin American universities for Spanish-speaking students. Obstacles to teaching such as student apathy and professional shortcomings are outlined. Suggestions for improved curriculum content and methodology are given. (Text is in Spanish.) (CLK)

  19. Frontalunterricht oder interaktive Gruppenarbeit? Ein Vergleich des Lernerfolgs und der studentischen Evaluation für das Fach Biochemie [Didactic lecture or interactive group discussion? A comparison of the learning success and the student evaluation in biochemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kadmon, Martina; Harter, Cordula; Schellberg, Dieter; Möltner, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    ...: A total of 421 second-year students were randomized into two groups: The control group was taught in a traditional lecture-like format, whereas the study group dealt with the same topic in an interactive group discussion...

  20. The Flipped Classroom Improves Student Achievement and Course Satisfaction in a Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    There are but a handful of experimental or quasi-experimental studies comparing student outcomes from flipped or inverted classrooms to more traditional lecture formats. In the current study, I present cumulative exam performance and student evaluation data from two sections of a statistics course I recently taught: one a traditional lecture (N =…

  1. Using Graphic Novels in the High School Classroom: Engaging Deaf Students with a New Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Linda; Odelson, Darah; Burns, Heidi; Grisham, Dana L.

    2009-01-01

    Two high school teachers of Deaf students and two teacher educators present this article about the use of graphic novels as an important genre for teaching literacy and academic skills in the high school classroom. During a summer session for failing Deaf students at a state-sponsored school, two English teachers taught and documented their…

  2. Attitudes of Jordanian Students towards Using Group Work in EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Sana'

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses itself to the outcomes of a field study which was carried out to identify Jordanian EFL students' attitudes towards using group work in EFL classrooms. The study sample consisted of 179 students enrolled in English 101, an elementary language skills course taught at Al- Huson University College, Al -Balqa' Applied University,…

  3. A Globalization Simulation to Teach Corporate Social Responsibility: Design Features and Analysis of Student Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Nathan D.; Shami, N. Sadat; Naab, Sara

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing need for business students to be taught the ability to think through ethical dilemmas faced by corporations conducting business on a global scale. This article describes a multiplayer online simulation game, ISLAND TELECOM, that exposes students to ethical dilemmas in international business. Through role playing and…

  4. Awareness, Interest, Sensitivity, and Advocacy--AISA: An Educational "Take-Away" for Business Ethics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brent

    2009-01-01

    It has been nearly 30 years since business schools began providing formal courses in business ethics to their students. In that time, the public has witnessed countless cases of business misconduct, often performed by these students. Scholars and researchers agree that ethics education is important, yet they disagree about how it should be taught,…

  5. Disaggregation of Student Achievement in the Principles of Economics Course: Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, Jerry

    The purpose of this research was to estimate the educational production functions for students belonging to different subgroups in a principles of economics course. Three samples were used: (1) a large lecture class at a large state university (185 students), (2) several small sections taught by different instructors at a small private university…

  6. Enhancing Argumentative Essay Writing of Fourth-Grade Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatline-Buchman, Andria; Jitendra, Asha K.

    2006-01-01

    A within-subject pretest-posttest comparison design was used to explore the effectiveness of a planning and writing intervention in improving the argumentative writing performance of five fourth-grade students with learning disabilities. Students were taught to collaboratively plan and revise their essays and independently write their essays using…

  7. Designing their own Future: Teaching Students how to Design Aerospace Operations Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, G.N.; Curran, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper tells of the development of a course designed to help students set up their own operations research projects. The course was taught in a lecture format with much room for interaction and the students were required to make submit formal research plans for their operations research projects

  8. Between Idealism and Pragmatism: A Case Study of Student Teachers' Pedagogical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkedi, A.; Laron, D.

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the pedagogical-professional development of student teachers in a teacher-training program, and focuses particularly on a description and analysis of the practicum in the first and second years of a 4-year training program. In the first year, the student teachers taught six seminars of 3 days each to seventh grade classes and…

  9. Learning by Teaching: Undergraduate Engineering Students Improving a Community's Response Capability to an Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvannatsiri, Ratchasak; Santichaianant, Kitidech; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a project in which students designed, constructed and tested a model of an existing early warning system with simulation of debris flow in a context of a landslide. Students also assessed rural community members' knowledge of this system and subsequently taught them to estimate the time needed for evacuation of the community…

  10. Characteristics and Performance of Students in an Online Section of Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, John; Dutton, Marilyn

    2005-01-01

    We compare students in online and lecture sections of a business statistics class taught simultaneously by the same instructor using the same content, assignments, and exams in the fall of 2001. Student data are based on class grades, registration records, and two surveys. The surveys asked for information on preparedness, reasons for section…

  11. Switch on the Learning: Teaching Students with Significant Disabilities to Use Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, John M.; Andzik, Natalie R.

    2016-01-01

    Students with significant disabilities often struggle to communicate their wants and needs but can be taught widely recognizable communication with the aid of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) supports. Simple speech generating devices (SGDs) such as Step-by-Step switches or GoTalk can be used by students to send specific messages.…

  12. Tools for Engaging Online Learners: Increasing Student Involvement in Online Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Tello, Enid

    2010-01-01

    Faculty who have taught in a traditional classroom are finding themselves having to teach in a setting in which they are unable to interact face-to-face with their students. Online instruction increases yearly. An important factor in the success of online instruction is the degree of student engagement. Though academic content remains…

  13. "So Much Potential in Reading!" Developing Meaningful Literacy Routines for Students with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenlon, Amanda G.; McNabb, Jessica; Pidlypchak, Harmony

    2010-01-01

    Children with multiple disabilities, often experience challenges in communication, mobility, and learning. Despite these challenges, substantial research exists that documents successful educational methods and strategies for these students. Specifically, students with multiple disabilities have successfully been taught to use a voice output…

  14. Ceremony Earth: Digitizing Silko's Novel for Students of the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Many students the author has taught get frustrated when they read Leslie Silko's canonical Native American novel, "Ceremony". Not only do they struggle with Silko's disruptions of linear temporality and her collapsing of binary oppositions, but they also struggle with the novel's geographic and cultural location. To help students better…

  15. Promoting a Deliberative and Active Citizenry: Developing Traditional First Year College Student Political Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, John T.; Bunting, Hadley; Dodson, Kyle; Horne, Miriam; Portilla, Julian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine the impact of a curriculum designed to increase first year college student political engagement. We used a staggered implementation design in which eight classes of traditional first year college students in were taught a political engagement curriculum by two instructors. The results confirm the positive impact of the…

  16. Examination of Factors Impacting Student Satisfaction with a New Learning Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lucy Santos; Inan, Fethi A.; Denton, Bree

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine factors that influenced student satisfaction with a new learning management system and to identify which of these factors were most important. The data was collected using an an online survey tool that was administered to students enrolled in courses designed and taught by faculty who participated in a…

  17. Teaching Paragraph Composition to Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders Using the Simultaneous Prompting Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Tina Marlene; Hinkson-Lee, Kim; Collins, Belva

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the simultaneous prompting procedure in teaching paragraph composition to 4, 5th grade students identified with emotional behavioral disorder (EBD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The instructor taught students how to construct and proofread a 5-sentence paragraph…

  18. Examining Student Writing Proficiencies across Genres: Results of an Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Hannah M.; Wolbers, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the patterns of growth across both taught and untaught genres of writing for deaf and hard of hearing students in grades 4-6. Twenty-three students were exposed to Strategic and Interactive Writing Instruction (SIWI) for 5 weeks, during which time they received guided, interactive instruction focused on how writers address…

  19. Promoting Students' Self-Directed Learning Ability through Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Richard; Rickards, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Mathematics is a subject which is often taught using abstract methods and processes. These methods by their very nature may for students alienate the relationship between Mathematics and real life situations. Further, these abstract methods and processes may disenfranchise students from becoming self-directed learners of Mathematics. A solution to…

  20. The Collaboration of Cooperative Learning and Conceptual Change: Enhancing the Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymur, Gülüzar; Geban, Ömer

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cooperative learning based on conceptual change approach instruction on ninth-grade students' understanding in chemical bonding concepts compared to traditional instruction. Seventy-two ninth-grade students from two intact chemistry classes taught by the same teacher in a public high…

  1. A Cursive Handwriting Skills Program for LD Students To Be Used by Regular and LD Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Ida L.

    Many learning disabled students attending Avocado Elementary School in Homestead, Florida, were unable to write legibly when taught with available cursive handwriting programs. To redress the problem, a complete, sequential cursive handwriting program was devised for use with learning disabled and other students. The program combined tracing and…

  2. Do US Medical Students Report More Training on Evidence-Based Prevention Topics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Erica; Schlair, Sheira; Elon, Lisa; Saraiya, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which evidence-based prevention topics are taught in medical school. All class of 2003 medical students (n = 2316) at 16 US schools were eligible to complete three questionnaires: at the beginning of first and third years and in their senior year, with 80.3% responding. We queried these students about 21…

  3. Students' Interpretations of Mechanistic Language in Organic Chemistry before Learning Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Stoyanovich, Carlee; Flynn, Alison B.

    2017-01-01

    Research on mechanistic thinking in organic chemistry has shown that students attribute little meaning to the electron-pushing (i.e., curved arrow) formalism. At the University of Ottawa, a new curriculum has been developed in which students are taught the electron-pushing formalism prior to instruction on specific reactions--this formalism is…

  4. The Teacher as One of the Factors Influencing Students' Perception of Biology as a School Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan; Torkar, Gregor; Rovnanova, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of our research was to determine whether the teacher is one of the factors influencing students' perception of biology as a school subject. The study also aimed to identify the influence of certain other factors in this regard, specifically: students' gender and place of residence, the number of biology teachers who have taught the…

  5. Student Perception of Metacognitive Activities in Entry-Level Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandall, Leah; Mamo, Martha; Speth, Carol; Lee, Don; Kettler, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perception of the use of metacognitive activities in the classroom. The courses were large enrollment (n greater than 100) introductory Plant and Soil Sciences courses taught in the fall semester. The courses implemented activities such as concept sketches or conceptual modeling to help students develop their…

  6. Macbeth in the Resource Room: Students with Learning Disabilities Study Shakespeare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Sue

    1995-01-01

    A Shakespearean play was taught in a resource room with students with learning disabilities in grades 10 through 12, in a manner that took advantage of the students' learning differences. Questions about "Macbeth" were developed and investigated before reading the play. The experience increased self-esteem and academic motivation. (SW)

  7. Self-Management of Social Initiations by Kindergarten Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brooke M.; Gast, David L.; Luscre, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a self-management intervention on social interaction behaviors was evaluated for students with disabilities and social deficits. Four students enrolled in a general education kindergarten classroom were taught to self-monitor social initiations during nonstructured social time via a digital wrist counter. The number of social…

  8. Enhancing Secondary Stage Students' Writing: Effects of Context of Songs in Teaching Grammar Implicitly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Rhim, Azza Ashraf Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    The study reported in this article investigated the effect of context of songs in teaching grammar implicitly on students writing. The study was conducted on sixty students who were assigned to an experimental group and a control one. The control group was taught grammar explicitly with an explanation of grammatical rules; however, the…

  9. Improving Student Confidence in Using Group Work Standards: A Controlled Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgowan, Mark J.; Wong, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This is a replication of a study that examined the effects of teaching foundation competencies in group work to social work students and assessed their self-confidence in applying these skills. This study improves on the first by utilizing a controlled design. Method: Twenty-six master of social work students were taught group work…

  10. Teaching Web Making as a Guided Planning Tool to Improve Student Narrative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipprich, Mary Ann

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen intermediate-level students with learning disabilities and poor writing ability were taught how to use a prestructured story web to improve their narrative story writing ability. Students improved in the primary target behaviors of planning time and holistic (quality) score but showed inconsistent results for other target behaviors such…

  11. Identifying Students' Reasons for Selecting a Computer-Mediated or Lecture Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, D. Patrick; Robertson, Douglas F.

    2005-01-01

    Students in this study were enrolled in either an Introductory Algebra or Intermediate Algebra class taught through computer-mediated instruction or lecture. In the first year of the study, students were asked what they believed helped them learn mathematics in the instructional format in which they were enrolled. They were also asked what they…

  12. An Inquiry-Based Chemistry Laboratory Promoting Student Discovery of Gas Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2007-01-01

    Gas laws are taught in most undergraduate general chemistry courses and even in some high school chemistry courses. This article describes the author's experience of using the laboratory to allow students to "discover" gas laws instead of the conventional approach of using the lecture to teach this concept. Students collected data using Vernier…

  13. An Introduction to Online Bibliographic Searching for High School Students: A Successful Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.; Ounanian, Lee Allison

    1984-01-01

    Describes how high school students were introduced to online bibliographic searching, taught to formulate search strategies, and observed their execution. The course objectives, methods employed, the students' achievement level responses, test results on course completion, and observations of the course are also examined. (MBR)

  14. Mindsets That Promote Resilience: When Students Believe that Personal Characteristics Can Be Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, David Scott; Dweck, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    Because challenges are ubiquitous, resilience is essential for success in school and in life. In this article we review research demonstrating the impact of students' mindsets on their resilience in the face of academic and social challenges. We show that students who believe (or are taught) that intellectual abilities are qualities that can be…

  15. Student-Centred Learning in Mathematics--Constructivism in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Sharifah Fauziah Hanim Syed; Rasidi, Farah Eliza Mohd; Abidin, Ismin Izwani Zainol

    2012-01-01

    Various techniques have been introduced among educators to relate concepts to application, from inductive learning, discovery learning, and student-centred learning (SCL). Mathematics has always been taught the traditional way--teacher is the main person to teach through lectures and activities, with students mostly in the passive receiver mode…

  16. The Use of Information from Wrong Responses in Measuring Students’ Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    implications in the context of instructional design. Do zero test scores imply that all such students are " tabula rasa ," and therefore can be taught the topic...are measuring an outcome of a treatment (i.e., instruction). Their main role is to provide the teacher and the student with constructive feedback

  17. Effects of Spectrum Teaching Styles on College Students' Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Self-Determined Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephanie; Byra, Mark; Readdy, Tucker; Wallhead, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of two landmark spectrum styles, practice and inclusion, on students' basic psychological needs satisfaction and self-determined motivation. Twelve classes of college-aged students (n = 149) participated in two badminton lessons taught under the conditions of the practice and inclusion styles.…

  18. Student Perception of Metacognitive Activities in Entry-Level Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandall, Leah; Mamo, Martha; Speth, Carol; Lee, Don; Kettler, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perception of the use of metacognitive activities in the classroom. The courses were large enrollment (n greater than 100) introductory Plant and Soil Sciences courses taught in the fall semester. The courses implemented activities such as concept sketches or conceptual modeling to help students develop their…

  19. Between Idealism and Pragmatism: A Case Study of Student Teachers' Pedagogical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkedi, A.; Laron, D.

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the pedagogical-professional development of student teachers in a teacher-training program, and focuses particularly on a description and analysis of the practicum in the first and second years of a 4-year training program. In the first year, the student teachers taught six seminars of 3 days each to seventh grade classes and…

  20. Improving Student Understanding of Operations Management Techniques through a Rolling Reinforcement Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arup

    2002-01-01

    Operations management problems were taught to 41 students with same-day reinforcement and to 67 with rolling reinforcement (a day after teaching). Rolling reinforcement resulted in 71.4% mean score compared to 55.4%. Use of two reinforcements had a positive but not significant impact. More reinforcement helped significantly more students achieve…

  1. The Effect of Supervisory Structure on Pre-Practicum Counseling Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Erin E.

    2010-01-01

    When students first enter counseling programs, they are required to take a prepracticum counseling skills course, which they must successfully pass before being allowed to work with clients. This course is taught using many different methods, the most common of which is through a practical experience where students practice counseling skills while…

  2. Critical Multimodal Literacy: How Nigerian Female Students Critique Texts and Reconstruct Unequal Social Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates how three female Nigerian high school students were taught to deploy critical multimodal literacy to interrogate texts and reconstruct unequal social structures. A class of ninth-grade students in an all-women school was given instruction through the analysis of how multiple modes were used to represent meanings in…

  3. Picturing Life in Japan. For Students in Grades Three through Five. Instructional Materials about Japan (IMAJ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Sherry L.; Labbo, Linda D.

    This manual provides accurate, up-to-date information about contemporary life in Japan and provides opportunities for students to develop cross-cultural awareness. The content of the lessons includes concepts traditionally taught in elementary school social studies programs. Lessons provide multiple opportunities for students to develop a variety…

  4. Blending Community Service and Teaching to Open Vision Care and Eye Health Awareness to University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Chi-wai; Chan, Lily Y. L.; Wong, Horace H. Y.; Chu, Geoffrey; Yu, Wing Yan; Pang, Peter C. K.; Cheong, Allen M. Y.; Ting, Patrick Wai-ki; Lam, Thomas Chuen; Kee, Chea-su; Lam, Andrew; Chan, Henry H. L.

    2016-01-01

    A vision care-based community service subject is offered to general university students for fulfillment of a service-learning compulsory credit requirement. Here, a professional health subject is taught in a way that caters to generalist learners. Students gain basic skills they can apply to provide vision screenings for the needy population. All…

  5. Comparing Number Lines and Touch Points to Teach Addition Facts to Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihak, David F.; Foust, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Three elementary students with autism were taught single-digit addition problem-solving skills using number and touch-point strategies. Prior to the study, all students were unable to correctly calculate single-digit addition problems. An alternating-treatments design was used to compare the acquisition performance of single-digit addition…

  6. Thinking Maps: An innovative way to increase sixth-grade student achievement in social studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Tamita

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the effect of Thinking Maps on the achievement of 6th-grade social studies students in order to determine its effectiveness. The population of this study came from a suburban middle school in the state of Georgia. The quantitative data included a pretest and posttest. The study was designed to find (a) whether there is a significant difference between the mean posttest scores on the benchmark test of 6th-grade students who are taught with either Thinking Maps or traditional social studies methods, (b) whether there is a significant difference between the mean posttest scores on the benchmark test of 6th-grade male versus female social studies students, and (c) whether there is a significant interaction between 6th-grade students' type of social studies class and gender as to differentially affect their mean posttest scores on the benchmark test. To answer these questions, students' pretest and posttest were compared to determine if there was a statistically significant difference after Thinking Maps were implemented with the treatment group for 9 weeks. The results indicate that there was no significant difference in the test scores between the students who were taught with Thinking Maps and the students who were taught without Thinking Maps. However, the students taught with Thinking Maps had the higher adjusted posttest scores.

  7. The Critical Policy Discourse Analysis Frame: Helping Doctoral Students Engage with the Educational Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses an issue of increasing significance in the context of taught educational doctorates and argues that this may have wider applicability for doctoral students across a range of social science disciplines. It identifies the need to engage with policy analysis as a key element of such programmes and attempts to address students'…

  8. Using a Service Audit Project for Improving Student Learning in a Service-Marketing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Padron, Tracy; Ferguson, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    Service-marketing education provides students customer service skills sought by employers who recognize the relationship between service and profit. Students in service marketing benefit from active-learning activities with actual organizations to apply customer service frameworks taught in the course. The purpose of this paper is to describe an…

  9. Student Learning of Basis, Span and Linear Independence in Linear Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sepideh; Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the earlier, more challenging concepts in linear algebra at university is that of basis. Students are often taught procedurally how to find a basis for a subspace using matrix manipulation, but may struggle with understanding the construct of basis, making further progress harder. We believe one reason for this is because students have…

  10. Improving Students' Chemical Literacy Levels on Thermochemical and Thermodynamics Concepts through a Context-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigdemoglu, Ceyhan; Geban, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to delve into the effect of context-based approach (CBA) over traditional instruction (TI) on students' chemical literacy level related to thermochemical and thermodynamics concepts. Four eleventh-grade classes with 118 students in total taught by two teachers from a public high school in 2012 fall semester were enrolled…

  11. Improving Students' Chemical Literacy Levels on Thermochemical and Thermodynamics Concepts through a Context-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigdemoglu, Ceyhan; Geban, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to delve into the effect of context-based approach (CBA) over traditional instruction (TI) on students' chemical literacy level related to thermochemical and thermodynamics concepts. Four eleventh-grade classes with 118 students in total taught by two teachers from a public high school in 2012 fall semester were enrolled…

  12. Effects of Spectrum Teaching Styles on College Students' Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Self-Determined Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephanie; Byra, Mark; Readdy, Tucker; Wallhead, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of two landmark spectrum styles, practice and inclusion, on students' basic psychological needs satisfaction and self-determined motivation. Twelve classes of college-aged students (n = 149) participated in two badminton lessons taught under the conditions of the practice and inclusion styles.…

  13. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Strategies on Elementary Students' Science Achievement and Social Skills in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the effects of two methods of teaching--teacher-centered and cooperative learning--on students' science achievement and use of social skills. The sample consists of 163 female elementary science students in 8 intact grade 5 classes who were assigned to 2 instructional methods and were taught an identical science unit by 4…

  14. College Students' Opinions of Engaging Approaches in a Physical Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Physical science courses have historically been taught from a variety of perspectives or emphases. In many cases, the instructor decides on the perspective and textbook for nonscience majors, so students rarely have a voice in the decision. This top-down approach and a potential gap between what instructors and students expect from a general…

  15. A Globalization Simulation to Teach Corporate Social Responsibility: Design Features and Analysis of Student Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Nathan D.; Shami, N. Sadat; Naab, Sara

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing need for business students to be taught the ability to think through ethical dilemmas faced by corporations conducting business on a global scale. This article describes a multiplayer online simulation game, ISLAND TELECOM, that exposes students to ethical dilemmas in international business. Through role playing and…

  16. The Influence of Documentary Films on 8th Grade Students' Views about Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckin Kapucu, Munise; Cakmakci, Gultekin; Aydogdu, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study aims to investigate the documentary films' influence on 8th grade students' nature of science views. The study's participants were 113 8th grade students from two different schools taught by two different teachers. The study was completed over a 6-week period, during which topics related to "Cell Division and…

  17. Seventh Grade Students' Perceptions of Using Concept Cartoons in Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ören, Fatma Sasmaz; Meriç, Gülçin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficiency of use of concept cartoons in elementary school 7th grade students Science and Technology course according to students' perceptions. In terms of this aim, the unit of "Force and Motion" has been taught by concept cartoons and at the end of this period, semi-structured interviews were…

  18. Simultaneous and Delayed Video Modeling: An Examination of System Effectiveness and Student Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber-Doughyt, Teresa; Patton, Scott E.; Brennan, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of simultaneous and delayed video modeling when used by three middle-school students with moderate intellectual disabilities was examined. Alternating between modeling systems, students were taught to use the public library computer to locate specific book call numbers and use the Dewey Decimal Classification System to locate…

  19. The Critical Policy Discourse Analysis Frame: Helping Doctoral Students Engage with the Educational Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses an issue of increasing significance in the context of taught educational doctorates and argues that this may have wider applicability for doctoral students across a range of social science disciplines. It identifies the need to engage with policy analysis as a key element of such programmes and attempts to address students'…

  20. Using a Service Audit Project for Improving Student Learning in a Service-Marketing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Padron, Tracy; Ferguson, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    Service-marketing education provides students customer service skills sought by employers who recognize the relationship between service and profit. Students in service marketing benefit from active-learning activities with actual organizations to apply customer service frameworks taught in the course. The purpose of this paper is to describe an…

  1. The Effects of Communicative Grammar Teaching on Students' Achievement of Grammatical Knowledge and Oral Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pham Vu Phi; The Binh, Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    So far the students of Le Hong Phong Junior High School have been taught grammar with GTM (Grammar-Translation Method), which just prepares learners for conventional grammar-paper tests. Despite their considerable knowledge of grammar, the students fail to use the language they have learnt to communicate in real-life situations. The purpose of…

  2. Teaching Free Speech Values to High School Students: Keys to Persevering Despite the Obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveslage, Thomas

    To examine why citizens today do not understand the U.S. Constitution and its provisions, a survey was conducted among 153 high school social studies, journalism, and English teachers to examine, among other things, how they taught about constitutional rights and how they rated their students' knowledge of the subject compared to students'…

  3. Constructivist-Based Teaching in Second Life from a Student's Perspective: A Model Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Scott; Harmeyer, Dave

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides qualitative student-centered research from an online Research Methodology course taught partly within the immersive, 3-D environment of Second Life with fifty-eight graduate psychology students for the purpose of suggesting a constructivist-based instruction model for immersive environments. A qualitative method approach was…

  4. Enhanced Podcasts for Teaching Biochemistry to Veterinary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of biochemistry within medical disciplines presents certain challenges; firstly to relay a large body of complex facts and abstract concepts, and secondly to motivate students that this relatively difficult topic is worth their time to study. Here, nutrient biochemistry was taught within a multidisciplinary module as part of an…

  5. Student Ratings of Instruction at Teachers College in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Te-Sheng

    This study examined the effects of course level, class size, and instructor gender on student ratings of teacher performance at the National Hualien Teachers College in Taiwan. A total of 9,843 usable evaluation forms were completed for 440 courses (96 freshmen-level, 142 sophomore-level, 119 junior-level, and 83 senior-level) taught by 132…

  6. Enhanced Podcasts for Teaching Biochemistry to Veterinary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of biochemistry within medical disciplines presents certain challenges; firstly to relay a large body of complex facts and abstract concepts, and secondly to motivate students that this relatively difficult topic is worth their time to study. Here, nutrient biochemistry was taught within a multidisciplinary module as part of an…

  7. Effects of Continuing Professional Development on Urban Elementary Students' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; McCaughtry, Nathan; Martin, Jeffrey; Cothran, Donetta

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine one urban school district's attempt to revise their elementary school physical education offerings to promote student gains in healthy living knowledge. Specifically, the authors sought to determine if children's physical activity/fitness knowledge increased when taught by teachers engaged in a…

  8. A General Chemistry Laboratory Course Designed for Student Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Kincaid, Kristi; Hutchinson, John S.

    2014-01-01

    We report a study of the general chemistry laboratory course at one university over four years. We found that when taught as a traditional laboratory course, lab experiences do not encourage students to deepen their understanding of chemical concepts. Although the lab instructor emphasized that the lab experiences were designed to enhance…

  9. Communications Through Media: A Career Program for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Norman H.

    The Brookline, Massachusetts, Public School System's career education program includes a Communications Through Media curriculum. The four-year sequence is designed primarily for students oriented to media careers, but is also open to others with media interests. The program's core course is taught in the 9th grade and seeks to acquaint students…

  10. Feminism and Factoral Analyses: Alleviating Students' Statistics Anxieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Linda

    1979-01-01

    Describes female math underachievement and counseling or teaching techniques being implemented on college campuses to alleviate math anxiety. Students derive unique benefits from being taught research and statistics courses by female professors. To be effective, female professors must embody distinct feminist roles and perspectives. Specific…

  11. Designing GeoGebra Applets to Maximize Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Teo; Monahan, Ceire; Vishnubhotla, Madhavi

    2017-01-01

    GeoGebra is a free tool that has the potential to change both how and what is taught in mathematics. GeoGebra allows teachers and students to explore various mathematical ideas either through the full applet (https://www.geogebra.org/graphing) or by sharing applets via GeoGebra's Materials site (https://www.geogebra. org/materials/). It has many…

  12. The Nature of Primary Students' Conversation in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Turnbull, Wendy H.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom conversations are core to establishing successful learning for students. This research explores the nature of conversation in technology education in the primary classroom and the implications for teaching and learning. Over a year, two units of work in technology were taught in two primary classrooms. Most data was gathered in Round 2…

  13. Using Story to Help Student Understanding of Gas Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Rick; Stinner, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Students tend to have a poor understanding of the concept of gas pressure. Usually, gas pressure is taught in terms of the various formulaic gas laws. The development of the concept of gas pressure according to the early Greeks did not include the concept of a vacuum. It was not for another 2000 years that Torricelli proposed that a vacuum can…

  14. Teachers' and Students' Negotiation Moves When Teachers Scaffold Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    Group work has been a main activity recommended by mathematics education reform. We aim at describing the patterns of interaction between teachers and students during group work. We ask: How do teachers scaffold group work during a problem-based lesson? We use data from a problem-based lesson taught in six geometry class periods by two teachers…

  15. Diagnosing and Dealing with Student Misconceptions: Floating and Sinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue; Tomita, Miki K.; Shavelson, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    When students enter the classroom, they often hold prior knowledge or conceptions about the natural world. These conceptions will influence how they come to understand what they are taught in school. Some of their existing knowledge provides good foundation for formal schooling, but other prior conceptions, however, are incompatible with currently…

  16. Using Clickers to Enhance Student Learning in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Chung, Chia-Jung; Yang, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how to integrate technology into mathematics classes using clickers in the high school setting. The ability to integrate technology into instruction is a current requirement for mathematics teachers in the United States; however, students have been traditionally taught to solve equations using pencils and…

  17. A General Chemistry Laboratory Course Designed for Student Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Kincaid, Kristi; Hutchinson, John S.

    2014-01-01

    We report a study of the general chemistry laboratory course at one university over four years. We found that when taught as a traditional laboratory course, lab experiences do not encourage students to deepen their understanding of chemical concepts. Although the lab instructor emphasized that the lab experiences were designed to enhance…

  18. Introducing Gyroscopes Quantitatively without Putting Students into a Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Enda

    2007-01-01

    The uniform precession of a simple form of gyroscope is analysed via a direct application of Newton's laws, using only concepts generally taught to physics and engineering students in the first two years of an undergraduate programme, with an emphasis on understanding the forces and torques acting on the system. This type of approach, in the…

  19. Facilitating Students' Attitude in the Concept of Heat Energy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    help of a resource person. They are real ... Students learn better and faster when they are taught with adequate visual aids ... poor academic performance in Physics examination. Hence ... Physics Attitude Scale (PAS) was the instrument used for data ... psychologists and two Physics experts ascertained the validity of PAS.

  20. Sporting Equipment and Students' Academic Performance in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    students academic performance in the concept of projectile in. Nigerian senior ... Nigeria has been a source of concern to various people and government of ... would lend itself to better understanding if taught as an activity (Udoh ... as a way of improving learning situation, the learner must be ... reliability of the instrument.

  1. Teaching Oral Hygiene Skills to Elementary Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yeng-Hung; Chang, Chien-Huey Sophie

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a program that taught oral hygiene skills to students with visual impairments using group instruction and individual coaching. The results showed that the program enhanced the oral hygiene skills of the three participants significantly, and its effectiveness lasted for at least two months after the…

  2. Teaching Students to Read the Primary Literature Using POGIL Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The ability to read, interpret, and evaluate articles in the primary literature are important skills that science majors will use in graduate school and professional life. Because of this, it is important that students are not only exposed to the primary literature in undergraduate education, but also taught how to read and interpret these…

  3. Taking Care of Business: Equipping Students to Become Business Journalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannis, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Informed, critical business journalism is vital to a well-functioning society. But students are typically reluctant to study business journalism, often finding the topic intimidating. This article outlines how the author has taught a business journalism course in New Zealand and the United States. The course uses a variety of methods to help the…

  4. Student Feedback or ‘Students Hit Back’: in Search of Quality Feedback for Quality Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Rahman Abdalla Salih

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Universities and colleges often administer student feedback surveys on teaching to elicit students’ views of how a particular course is taught and learned in order to improve teaching quality by helping tutors increase opportunities for better learning. This paper reports the views of (40 English teachers and (124 General Foundation Programme (GFP students on student feedback in institutions of higher education in the Sultanate of Oman, and the implications of such perceptions on the quality of teaching and learning English language. Findings reveal variation in the views held by both teachers and students about student feedback on teaching and learning experience. The study confirms the need for consistency between the perceptions of teachers and students on student feedback, and for training students on quality feedback and reflective learning. Keywords: Quality assurance, student feedback, teacher response, quality teaching, transformative reflection, teacher perception

  5. Nursing care at the end of life: a service learning course for undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Stephanie; Ferry, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    An elective course titled "Nursing Care at the End of Life" was designed for fourth-year nursing students in a baccalaureate nursing program. This course, taught by the authors, was designed to teach students about caring for the dying patient. Students were required to complete service learning with patients in a hospice or hospital setting. Students reported having a positive learning experience and gaining new knowledge and a deeper understanding of the needs of dying patients and their families.

  6. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SMALL GROUP TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ ENGLISH SPEAKING (A CLASSROOM ACTION RESEARCH IN THE SIXTH GRADE STUDENTS OF ISLAMIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MIFTAHUL MUBTADIIEN ISLAMIYAH BANYAKAN KEDIRI IN THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2013/2014

    OpenAIRE

    Vitasmoro, Pamadya

    2015-01-01

    Speaking is one of the English skills which are taught at school. It means that English can be taught at Elementary school based on the needs of the school. In Elementary school, teacher teaches four language skills such as: listening, speaking, reading and writing to make students to be competence in English by mastering those four skills.The students of Islamic Elementary School Miftahul Mubtadiien Islamiyah Banyakan faced some problems of speaking, such as they are afraid of making mistake...

  7. WWC Review of the Report "The Effects of Cognitive Strategy Instruction on Math Problem Solving of Middle School Students of Varying Ability." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    A recent study, "The Effects of Cognitive Strategy Instruction on Math Problem Solving of Middle School Students of Varying Ability," examined the effectiveness of "Solve It!," a program intended to improve the problem-solving skills of seventh-grade math students. During the program, students are taught cognitive strategies of…

  8. Influence of a Highly Focused Case on the Effect of Small-Group Facilitators' Content Expertise on Students' Learning and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Wayne K.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 211 medical students in small-group classes taught by both subject-area experts and non-experts found that the facilitator's content expertise alone did not determine the amount of teacher-directed behavior in a group, student learning, or student satisfaction. Case focus and case training were also significant factors. (Author/MSE)

  9. Effect of Cooperative Learning and Traditional Methods on Students' Achievements and Identifications of Laboratory Equipments in Science-Technology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2011-01-01

    Science lessons taught via experiments motivate the students, and make them more insistent on learning science. This study aims to examine the effects of cooperative learning on students' academic achievements and their skills in identifying laboratory equipments. The sample for the study consisted of a total of 43 sophomore students in primary…

  10. Effects of Problem-Based Learning Model versus Expository Model and Motivation to Achieve for Student's Physic Learning Result of Senior High School at Class XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayekti

    2016-01-01

    "Problem-based learning" (PBL) is one of an innovative learning model which can provide an active learning to student, include the motivation to achieve showed by student when the learning is in progress. This research is aimed to know: (1) differences of physic learning result for student group which taught by PBL versus expository…

  11. Research-Informed Online Language Course Design and Development for Least Commonly Taught LTCLs: The case of Introductory Dari, Pashto, and Uyghur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öner Özçelik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Online language teaching is continuing to grow in importance both in the academic world and the public sector as language learners desire to increase their language skills within the framework of an increasingly digital landscape both in academia and the corporate world. While the current landscape of the online language learning community is still highly saturated with more commonly taught languages like Spanish, French, Chinese, etc., members of the less commonly taught languages (LCTL community are looking to take advantage of the same benefits of providing online courses, such as increasing marketability to a larger learner audience, supporting selfpaced learning, increasing learner autonomy, and increasing individual interactivity, as well as additional LCTL-specific benefits,such as helping sustain LCTLS with low enrollment. In this paper, we seek to describe one program’s experience designing and developing three introductory online courses in Dari, Pashto, and Uyghur, detailing our process from research and inception to the prototype development phase.

  12. The Effect of Co-Teaching on Student Achievement in Ninth Grade Physical Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFever, Karen M.

    Co-teaching is a method that is increasing within schools across the US as educators strive to leave no child behind. It is a costly method, having two paid instructors in one classroom, with an average of 24 students shared between them. If it significantly increases the achievement of all students, it is well worth the costs involved. However, few studies have analyzed the effectiveness of this method on student achievement. This research follows the academic accomplishments of students in a ninth grade physical science course. Nine sections of the course "Force and Motion" were taught with a single teacher, and two additional sections were co-taught, one led by a science-certified and special educator, and another co-taught by two science certified teachers. Subgroup achievement performance was analyzed to determine whether significant differences exist between students with or without IEPs, as well as other factors such as free and reduced lunch status or gender. The results show significance with the presence of a co-teacher, while there is minimal effect size of co-teaching in this study for students with IEPs. The benefactors in these ninth grade co-taught classes were the students without IEPs, an unintended result of co-teaching.

  13. Today's students, tomorrow's practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heape, Chris

    2015-01-01

    There is an inherent dilemma that some research indicates ways and means of doing design practice, in particular how practitioners bring what this paper identifies as informal resources into play, that are seldom reflected in how and what design students are taught or learn. The question is posed...... as to whether today’s design students are in fact equipped to be tomorrow’s practitioners. This paper introduces a range of literature and empirical observations that describe a number of different appreciations of process and practice, from both design and non-design perspectives. This in order to draw up...... an alternative understanding of collaborative design practice as participatory inquiry. The paper suggests that participatory inquiry, as it more fully takes into account the learning driven and relational nature of design practice, could help inform alternative design educational strategies....

  14. Motivations, interests and retention of female minority engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Naila

    In an effort to potentially increase low enrollment of females, particularly minorities, in Engineering programs, this study used a survey to determine motivations, interests and retention of current female Engineering students. A total of 82 participants from varied ethnic (non-Hispanic white, Euro-American, African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, South Asian, Arab American, and Native American participants) and education (high school senior, undergraduate, graduate, and in-service Engineers) backgrounds filled out the survey. With approximately half of the participants being non-minorities (non-Hispanic white or Euro-American), they served as the `control' group for the data, and the comparison group was the minority participants. Notable differences between the two groups were: student participation in female community groups, and extra-curricular activities like sports and arts (writing, drama and band) clubs. Increasing female-minority participation in these clubs and other extra-curricular activities may potentially increase their enrollment numbers in Engineering programs.

  15. NITARP: Changing Perceptions of Science Among Secondary Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrs, Russell; Kilts, Kelly; Urbanowski, Vincent; Rutherford, Thomas; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2017-01-01

    The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archival Research Program (NITARP) provides secondary teachers and their students with an authentic, high-level research experience. NITARP participants work alongside one another as colleagues, allowing both teachers and students to experience the challenges of actual research. Teachers and students learn that science doesn’t always follow the prescriptive methodology taught in most high schools. Current NITARP students and teachers were interviewed on how their perceptions of the methods by which science is really conducted changed over the course of the program. Following participation in the NITARP program, both teacher and student perceptions of how science operates were found to have changed in many ways.

  16. Understanding Student Computational Thinking with Computational Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Aiken, John M; Douglas, Scott S; Burk, John B; Scanlon, Erin M; Thoms, Brian D; Schatz, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the National Research Council's framework for next generation science standards highlighted "computational thinking" as one of its "fundamental practices". Students taking a physics course that employed the Arizona State University's Modeling Instruction curriculum were taught to construct computational models of physical systems. Student computational thinking was assessed using a proctored programming assignment, written essay, and a series of think-aloud interviews, where the students produced and discussed a computational model of a baseball in motion via a high-level programming environment (VPython). Roughly a third of the students in the study were successful in completing the programming assignment. Student success on this assessment was tied to how students synthesized their knowledge of physics and computation. On the essay and interview assessments, students displayed unique views of the relationship between force and motion; those who spoke of this relationship in causal (rather than obs...

  17. Instructional multimedia: An investigation of student and instructor attitudes and student study behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavanaugh Cathy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Educators in allied health and medical education programs utilize instructional multimedia to facilitate psychomotor skill acquisition in students. This study examines the effects of instructional multimedia on student and instructor attitudes and student study behavior. Methods Subjects consisted of 45 student physical therapists from two universities. Two skill sets were taught during the course of the study. Skill set one consisted of knee examination techniques and skill set two consisted of ankle/foot examination techniques. For each skill set, subjects were randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental group. The control group was taught with live demonstration of the examination skills, while the experimental group was taught using multimedia. A cross-over design was utilized so that subjects in the control group for skill set one served as the experimental group for skill set two, and vice versa. During the last week of the study, students and instructors completed written questionnaires to assess attitude toward teaching methods, and students answered questions regarding study behavior. Results There were no differences between the two instructional groups in attitudes, but students in the experimental group for skill set two reported greater study time alone compared to other groups. Conclusions Multimedia provides an efficient method to teach psychomotor skills to students entering the health professions. Both students and instructors identified advantages and disadvantages for both instructional techniques. Reponses relative to instructional multimedia emphasized efficiency, processing level, autonomy, and detail of instruction compared to live presentation. Students and instructors identified conflicting views of instructional detail and control of the content.

  18. Pilot Course or Flying University? A University Course on Hungarian Language and History Taught in Wellington, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Koller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors, a historian and a language-learning expert, recently devised an introduction to Hungarian history, language and culture for students in Wellington, New Zealand. We describe the origin and circumstances of New Zealand’s Hungarian community, why we thought to develop a Hungarian language course, and how the course relates to the interests of New Zealand students. After explaining our approach to historical and linguistic components of the course, we consider the future of Hungarian studies in New Zealand.

  19. Teaching clinical reasoning to medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Gay, S; Bartlett, M; McKinley, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Keele Medical School's new curriculum includes a 5-week course to extend medical students' consultation skills beyond those historically required for competent inductive diagnosis. CONTEXT: Clinical reasoning is a core skill for the practice of medicine, and is known to have implications for patient safety, yet historically it has not been explicitly taught. Rather, it has been assumed that these skills will be learned by accumulating a body of knowledge and by observing expert cl...

  20. World of Wordcraft: Foreign Language Grammar and Composition Taught as a Term-Long Role-Playing Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellar-Goad, T. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines an innovative approach to the instruction of foreign languages: a term-long role-playing game in the style of tabletop role-playing games such as "Dungeons & Dragons." Students adopt personas, avatars, or "player characters" and take them through adventures, exploration, puzzles, and fights with…

  1. On the development of competence in solving clinical problems; Can it be taught? Or can it only be learned?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, S.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    For students, the transition from preclinical to clinical learning can be both exciting and worrying. Prior research into the ‘shock of practice’ has shown that many of the students’ difficulties relate to their organisation of knowledge and result from a lack of experience in applying knowledge in

  2. Dialogues in Performance: A Team-Taught Course on the Afterlife in the Classical and Italian Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosetti-Murrayjohn, Angela; Schneider, Federico

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a reflection on a team-teaching experience in which performative dialogues between co-instructors and among students provided a pedagogical framework within which comparative analysis of textual traditions within the classical tradition could be optimized. Performative dialogues thus provided a model for and enactment of…

  3. On the importance of educating egineering students in environmental consciousness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, A.

    1990-04-01

    Qualified engineers are a key group in the design of new industrial plants and the technical management of established ones. Thus students of engineering are an important group to influence if the aim is to reduce environmental pollution due to industry. At Linkoeping University courses in environmental consciousness and environmental protection technology have been taught to students of engineering for ca ten years. In the present paper experiences from and results of these activities are discussed and some interesting conclusions are presented. (author).

  4. Method to study student engagement uniformity in a classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, George C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method to study engagement level uniformity in a class of students. We validate our method by comparing two semesters taught using different methods in a physics and mathematics course. The first semester used conventional methods while the second semester used graphic spreadsheets-based laboratories and homework before the introduction of formal methods. We found that engagement of the students that were below the median at the beginning of the semester improved by an order of m...

  5. Campus Climate and the Underrepresented Minority Engineering Student Experience: A Critical Race Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Terrance

    In the current technological era, the number of minorities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a crucial factor in predetermining the economic growth of the United States. Since the minority population is growing at much faster rates than the non-minority population, the lack of proportionate production of minority engineers poses a threat to the United States' ability to remain a global competitor in technological innovation. Sixty-three per cent (63%) of undergraduate students who enter engineering majors continue on to graduate in that major. The graduation rate, however, for African-American, Hispanic, and Native-American students in engineering is significantly lower at 39%. As this group represents only a small fraction of the annual student enrollment, engineering programs are graduating these minority groups at rates that are greatly disproportionate to United States demographics. Therefore, researchers are thoroughly investigating certain initiatives that promote academic success among underrepresented minority students in engineering. Colleges and universities have attempted to address the growing achievement gap between underrepresented minority and non-minority engineering students, predominately through various deficit-based interventions, focusing on the student's flaws and problems. As the pipeline for minorities in engineering continues to narrow, it begs the question of whether institutions are focusing on the right solutions to the problem. Critical Race Theory scholars argue that colleges and universities must address institutional climate issues around students, such as racism, microaggressions, and marginalization, before members of oppressed groups can truly succeed. This dissertation explored the unique experiences of underrepresented minority engineering students in a predominately White and Asian campus.

  6. The Impact of Employing Brainstorming Strategy on Improving Writing Performance of English Major Students at Balqa Applied University in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoush, Kholoud Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at identifying the impact of employing brainstorming strategy on improving writing performance of English Major Students at Balqa Applied University in Jordan. The sample of the study which consisted of 80 male and female university students was distributed into two groups; experimental (taught by brainstorming strategy) and…

  7. Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities to Operate an iPod Touch[R] to Listen to Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagohara, Debora M.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Achmadi, Donna; van der Meer, Larah; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated an intervention procedure for teaching three students with developmental disabilities to independently operate a portable multimedia device (i.e., an iPod Touch[R]) to listen to music. The intervention procedure included the use of video modeling, which was presented on the same iPod Touch[R] that the students were taught to operate…

  8. Japanese Language as an Organizational Barrier for International Students to Access to University Services: A Case of Aoyama Gakuin University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, Aoyama Gakuin University (AGU) started a government-funded degree program (taught in English) to accept international students with limited or no Japanese language proficiency. However, the students faced obstacles in accessing all of the university resources provided. In this article, I investigated Japanese language as an organizational…

  9. Self-Monitoring Checklists for Inquiry Problem-Solving: Functional Problem-Solving Methods for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bridget; Taber-Doughty, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Three students with mild to moderate intellectual and multiple disability, enrolled in a self-contained functional curriculum class were taught to use a self-monitoring checklist and science notebook to increase independence in inquiry problem-solving skills. Using a single-subject multiple-probe design, all students acquired inquiry…

  10. Effectiveness of Science-Technology-Society (STS) Instruction on Student Understanding of the Nature of Science and Attitudes toward Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Behiye; Akcay, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    The study reports on an investigation about the impact of science-technology-society (STS) instruction on middle school student understanding of the nature of science (NOS) and attitudes toward science compared to students taught by the same teacher using traditional textbook-oriented instruction. Eight lead teachers used STS instruction an…

  11. Impact of Hands-On Research Experience on Students' Learning in an Introductory Management Information System Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Sankar, Chetan S.

    2013-01-01

    Although students in Introductory Information Systems courses are taught new technology concepts, the complexity and constantly changing nature of these technologies makes it challenging to deliver the concepts effectively. Aiming to improve students' learning experiences, this research utilized the five phases of design science methodology to…

  12. An Electromagnetic Spectrum for Millennial Students: Teaching Light, Color, Energy, and Frequency Using the Electronic Devices of Our Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Maureen Kendrick

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a comparison of student learning outcomes is made in sophomore-level physical science classes using a "traditional" pedagogical approach versus a "modern" approach. Specifically, when students were taught the electromagnetic spectrum using diagrams and examples that incorporate technological advances and electronic devices of our…

  13. Impact of Adaptive Materials on Teachers and Their Students with Visual Impairments in Secondary Science and Mathematics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Audrey C.; Stefanich, Greg P.; Boody, Robert M.; Peiffer, Belinda

    2011-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, important in today's world, are underrepresented by students with disabilities. Students with visual impairments, although cognitively similar to sighted peers, face challenges as STEM subjects are often taught using visuals. They need alternative forms of access such as enlarged or…

  14. Students' Perceptions of Patient Safety during the Transition from Undergraduate to Postgraduate Training: An Activity Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Feijter, Jeantine M.; de Grave, Willem S.; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Richard P.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence that medical error can cause harm to patients has raised the attention of the health care community towards patient safety and influenced how and what medical students learn about it. Patient safety is best taught when students are participating in clinical practice where they actually encounter patients at risk. This type of learning is…

  15. Instructor's Scaffolding in Support of Student's Metacognition through a Teacher Education Online Course--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingold, Roni; Rimor, Rikki; Kalay, Anat

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the relationship between the instructor's feedback and students' metacognitive processes in an online course on democracy and multiculturalism, which was taught as part of a teacher education program. 700 postings, written by 68 students, were content analyzed along with 66 postings by the instructor, using tools designed for…

  16. Toward the Development of a Self-Management Intervention to Promote Pro-Social Behaviors for Students with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, Sarah E.; Lather, Amanda B.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Wehby, Joseph H.

    2016-01-01

    Students with visual impairment (VI) lack access to the same models and reinforcers as students with sight. Consequentially, behaviors that children with sight acquire through observation must be explicitly taught to children with VI. In addition, children with VI have difficulty maintaining such behaviors. Therefore, interventions that promote…

  17. Two-Year Community: The Use of Journaling to Assess Student Learning and Acceptance of Evolutionary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharmann, Lawrence C.; Butler, Wilbert, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Journal writing was introduced as a means to assess student learning and acceptance of evolutionary science in a nonmajors' biology course taught at a community college. Fourteen weeks of instruction were performed, each initiated by student-centered, in-class activities and culminated by a discussion, to elucidate tentative conclusions based on…

  18. Resistance and Assent: How Racial Socialization Shapes Black Students' Experience Learning African American History in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Theodore E.

    2016-01-01

    African American history is often taught poorly in high school U.S. history courses. However, we know little about how Black students perceive and experience this situation. I use a refined racial socialization framework and interview data with 32 Black college students in the Northeast to investigate how familial racial socialization shapes their…

  19. The "Chugakuryoko" and Hogan's Heroes: The Experience Gap between U.S. and Japanese Students' Knowledge of World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwell, Russ

    2011-01-01

    Based on his own teaching experiences and findings, the author discusses the experience gap between U.S. and Japanese students' knowledge of World War II. He compares and contrasts how the subject of World War II is taught in the United States versus Japan. While it takes teacher effort to enrich the history experiences of U.S. students, the…

  20. Children in Japan at Home and at School. For Students in Kindergarten-Second Grade. Instructional Materials about Japan (IMAJ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Sherry L.; Labbo, Linda D.

    This manual provides accurate, up-to-date information about contemporary life in Japan and provides opportunities for students to develop cross-cultural awareness. The content of the lessons includes concepts traditionally taught in elementary school social studies programs. Lessons provide multiple opportunities for students to develop a variety…

  1. Effectiveness of Podcasts Delivered on Mobile Devices as a Support for Student Learning during General Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Cynthia B.; Mason, Diana S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry instructors in teaching laboratories provide expert modeling of techniques and cognitive processes and provide assistance to enrolled students that may be described as scaffolding interaction. Such student support is particularly essential in laboratories taught with an inquiry-based curriculum. In a teaching laboratory with a high…

  2. The Feedback Process: Perspectives of First and Second Year Undergraduate Students in the Disciplines of Education, Health Science and Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Tracy; Salter, Susan; Iglesias, Miguel; Dowlman, Michele; Eri, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current perspectives of feedback from first and second year undergraduate students enrolled in blended units of study which incorporated both face-to-face and online components. Students enrolled in a unit of study taught by the School of Health Sciences at the University of Tasmania were surveyed to…

  3. High-School Students' Conceptual Difficulties and Attempts at Conceptual Change: The Case of Basic Quantum Chemical Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Papaphotis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    This study tested for deep understanding and critical thinking about basic quantum chemical concepts taught at 12th grade (age 17-18). Our aim was to achieve conceptual change in students. A quantitative study was conducted first (n = 125), and following this 23 selected students took part in semi-structured interviews either individually or in…

  4. Self-Monitoring Checklists for Inquiry Problem-Solving: Functional Problem-Solving Methods for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bridget; Taber-Doughty, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Three students with mild to moderate intellectual and multiple disability, enrolled in a self-contained functional curriculum class were taught to use a self-monitoring checklist and science notebook to increase independence in inquiry problem-solving skills. Using a single-subject multiple-probe design, all students acquired inquiry…

  5. Do Student-Centred Learning Activities Improve Learning Outcomes on a BTEC Applied Science Course in FE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, Denise V.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides quantitative evidence on the effect on learning outcomes of contrasting teaching styles applied to a class of Level 3 final-year students on a BTEC Applied Science course within a further education college in the UK. Two topics within a unit were taught using either a student-centred or teacher-centric (instructional)…

  6. Toward the Development of a Self-Management Intervention to Promote Pro-Social Behaviors for Students with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, Sarah E.; Lather, Amanda B.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Wehby, Joseph H.

    2016-01-01

    Students with visual impairment (VI) lack access to the same models and reinforcers as students with sight. Consequentially, behaviors that children with sight acquire through observation must be explicitly taught to children with VI. In addition, children with VI have difficulty maintaining such behaviors. Therefore, interventions that promote…

  7. The "Chugakuryoko" and Hogan's Heroes: The Experience Gap between U.S. and Japanese Students' Knowledge of World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwell, Russ

    2011-01-01

    Based on his own teaching experiences and findings, the author discusses the experience gap between U.S. and Japanese students' knowledge of World War II. He compares and contrasts how the subject of World War II is taught in the United States versus Japan. While it takes teacher effort to enrich the history experiences of U.S. students, the…

  8. The Results of Teaching Middle School Students Two Relaxation Techniques as Part of a Conflict Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, John S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Boston College Conflict Prevention Program techniques for relaxation and self-control were taught to middle-school students in two Boston schools. Preliminary results from teacher interviews revealed that students spontaneously used these methods to calm their "fight-or-flight" reactions in real conflicts. Results also indicated that…

  9. On the Improvement of Teaching Quality of Full-time Classes for Self-taught Examination%有效提高自考助学质量的若干思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄卫军

    2012-01-01

    Full-time classes for self-taught examination run by the social education units is the "patron saint" of the self-taught examination. It is a way indispensable to improve the quality of the self-taught examination and is now an important means to purify the exam environment, maintain the reputation of the self-taught examination and lower the pressure on exam management. Therefore, it' s crucial issue for management agencies of the self-taught examination and the universities which run the full-time classes for self-taught examination to improve its teaching quality. The paper puts forward useful strategies to ensure the teaching quality of full-time classes for self-taught examination through the development of teaching and management activities for full-time classes for self-taught examination and exploration on the problems exposed in the activities in order to achieve healthy development for full-time classes for self-taught examination.%助学是自考的“守护神”。它既是提高个人自学质量不可或缺的途径。更是净化考试环境,维护自考信誉,降低考务管理压力的重要手段。因此,提高自考助学质量成为自考管理机构和助学单位的重要课题。本文试着通过开展自考助学活动,探寻助学过程中存在的主要问题,进而提出确保自考助学质量的有益途径,以期实现高校自考助学活动的健康开展。

  10. EL ESTILO DOCENTE UNIVERSITARIO EN RELACIÓN AL TIPO DE CLASE Y A LA DISCIPLINA ENSEÑADA/ TEACHING STYLES AT UNIVERSITY: QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS IN TWO DISCIPLINES TAUGHT AND TWO CLASSES’ TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Roselli***

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEl presente artículo aborda los resultados obtenidos a partir de la utilización de una planilla de observación de clases endos casos paradigmáticos: una cátedra de Ciencias Humanas y otra de Ciencias Exactas. El instrumento permitió registrar, apartir de las verbalizaciones públicas emitidas y los recursos didácticos utilizados, el estilo docente de los profesoresobservados (Jefe de Cátedra y Auxiliar, en cada caso. El análisis de los datos se hizo en dos direcciones: relacionando elestilo docente con los tipos de clases (teóricas y prácticas y las disciplinas que enseñan (Ciencias Humanas o Exactas. Losresultados muestran que existen diferencias en el estilo docente según el tipo de clase y según la disciplina enseñada. Lasprimeras tienen que ver con clases más magistrales o participativas, según que las clases sean teóricas o prácticas; lassegundas conciernen al carácter más discursivo de la enseñanza de asignatura humanística y, más ligada a imágenes, en elcaso de epistemes exactas.ABSTRACTThis paper shows the results obtained from a class observation instrument in two different cases: One in a HumanScience class and the other in an Exact Science class. The tool registered, from the oral verbal expressions and the learningresources used as well, the teaching styles of the professors observed (chief of class and auxiliary in each case. The dataanalysis was done in two ways: by relating the teaching style to the types of classes (theoretical and practical and thesubjects taught (Human Sciences or Exact Sciences. Results show differences between the teaching style according to thetype of class and according to the subject taught. The first ones deal with classical lectures or based on students activitieseither theoretical or practical; the other ones are concerned to the discursive teaching of the Humanistic subject and closerto images, as in the case of exact epistemes.

  11. Evaluation of E T pilot course, excavation, trenching and shoring taught in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 12, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handwerk, E.C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety and Health Training course, Excavation, Trenching and Shoring which was conducted on June 12, 1992 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees met most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  12. Comparisons between the attitudes of medical and dental students toward the clinical importance of gross anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowo-Ofayoku, Anthony; Moxham, Bernard John

    2014-10-01

    Marked changes are occurring within both the medical and dental curricula and new ways of teaching the basic sciences have been devised and traditional methods (e.g., dissection for gross anatomy and of bench-based animal preparations for physiology) are increasingly no longer the norm. Although there is much anecdotal evidence that students are not in favor of such changes, there is little evidence for this based on quantitative analyses of students' attitudes. Using Thurstone and Chave attitude analyses, we assessed the attitudes of first year medical and dental students at Cardiff University toward gross anatomy and physiology in terms of their perceived clinical importance. In addition, we investigated the appropriateness ("fitness for purpose") of teaching methodologies used for anatomy and physiology. The hypotheses tested recognized the possibility that medical and dental students differed in their opinions, but that they had a preference to being taught gross anatomy through the use of dissection and had no preference for physiology teaching. It was found that both medical and dental students displayed positive attitudes toward the clinical relevance of gross anatomy and that they preferred to be taught by means of dissection. Although both medical and dental students displayed positives attitudes toward the clinical relevance of physiology, this was greater for the medical students. Both medical and dental students showed a preference for being taught physiology through didactic teaching in small groups but the medical students also appreciated being taught by means of practicals. Overall, this study highlights the expectations that students have for the basic science foundation teaching within their professional training and signals a preference for being taught experientially/practically. Differences were discerned between medical and dental students that might reflect the direct association between systems physiology and pathophysiology and the

  13. The Choice Made from no Choice: Insight into how Writing Skill is Taught in the Libyan Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameda Hussein Almrabett Suwaed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the EFL contexts, while much research is conducted towards investigating the problems that students face in writing and their writing strategies, studies on how EFL writing teacher teach and adopt the writing approaches to their students' needs and levels are few and far between. Such an inbalance needs to be addressed since how teachers teach, and the approaches that they opt to use, might have a direct impact on how students learn to write. In this respect, this research offers an insight into the strategies adopted by the EFL writing skill teachers at the Sabratha College of Arts, Libya. The findings of the study reveal that the Libyan EFL writing skill teachers opten resort to teaching through grammatical structures. Rather than assisting EFL learners to write extended pieces of writing, the teachers are predominantly concerned about the teaching of correct forms and developing writing at the paragraph level. The possible reasons for teachers over reliant on such strategies can be traced to their over workloads, time contraints to finish the course which often results in ignoring individual attention to the EFL learners’ writing. However, signs of recent writing pedagogies, such as pre-writing activities, are identified in classroom practice and textbook selection, which indicate the possibility of successful adaptations of the recent writing pedagogies in the Libyan context.

  14. Student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Gustafsson, Amandus; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2007-01-01

    ' knowledge and skills. Participants evaluate satisfaction with teaching on nine statements immediately after the teaching. RESULTS: In total 59 first year medical students are included as participants in the experiment. The students taught by student teachers perform just as well as the students taught...... by associate professors and in one skill--catheterization--they perform even better, mean post- minus pre-test scores 65.5 (SD 12.9) vs. 35.0 (SD 23.3), One-way ANOVA, p Student teachers receive significantly more positive evaluations than associate professors on several statements......AIM: The aim of this study is to compare student teachers and clinical associate professors regarding the quality of procedural skills teaching in terms of participants' technical skills, knowledge and satisfaction with the teaching. METHODS: This is an experimental, randomized, controlled study...

  15. How criticality affects student's creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, I analyse if there is an inherent paradox between creativity and criticality. With critical thinking being among the core values in higher education, can we then also foster creative thinking? In answering this question, I use the masters degree LAICS (Leadership And Innovation...... in Complex Systems) as a case study. Interviews with students are used to shed light on creative teaching and learning. It is shown that creativity can be taught by teaching creatively. I conclude that creativity and criticality are not entirely different ways of thinking and both are important in academia......, but creativity can be hampered by our norms, rules, and structures....

  16. Self-taught Examination in the Construction of“Learning-society”%“学习型社会”建设中的自学考试

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贠新; 高洪军; 高军

    2013-01-01

      “学习型社会”是一个以终身教育为基础,以学习者为中心,人人都能终身学习的社会。自学考试是国家从公民接受高等教育的公平性角度,为实现社会成员继续教育的要求,从制度、环境和组织等方面提供的保证。自学考试是基本符合“学习型社会”特征的高等教育形式。本文从考试管理机构的视角,探讨适应“学习型社会”建设的自学考试定位和改革。%“Learning-society”is a lifelong education society which takes lifelong education as the foundation, learners as the centre, and everyone can learn lifelong. Self taught examination is a guarantee from the system, environment,organization and other aspects of the provision to receive higher education equity and achieve the social members’continuing education requirements. Self-taught examination is basically consistent with the“learning-society”features in the form of higher education. This article from the perspective of the examination management mechanism, discuss the self-taught exam orientation and reform which adapt to " learning-society"construction.

  17. Individual and Instructional Determinants of Student Engagement in Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Katherine; Fitzpatrick, Leslie-Anne; Sanchez, Betty; Forrest, Christopher B

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted to identify student characteristics and instructional factors that impact student engagement in physical education (PE). Data were derived from the systematic observation of 124 sessions taught by 31 physical educators and the administration of health and PE engagement questionnaires to 2,018 students in grades 5-8. Physical activity was directly affected by student engagement and perceived competence in PE and indirectly affected by students' body image through its association with PE engagement. Multilevel analyses revealed that the proportion of class time devoted to game play was negatively associated with student engagement in PE. Although less frequently used during PE sessions, skill practice was positively associated with student engagement and inactive instruction was negatively associated with student engagement. These effects were particularly pronounced among students with poor competence beliefs. Implications for PE instructional practice and future research are presented.

  18. Which basic communication skills in medicine are learnt spontaneously and which need to be taught and trained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspegren, Knut; Lønberg-Madsen, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Students in the last semester of medical school and experienced junior doctors with no or little training in communication skills were observed while interviewing or informing simulated patients. There was a remarkable similarity in behaviour between the two categories. Communication skills characteristic of common social conversation were learnt spontaneously, while important professional basic communication skills were not learnt despite 10 or more years of clinical work. These discrepancies and subsequent gaps should be the focus of future training courses at both pre- and postgraduate level.

  19. Strategies to Engage Online Students and Reduce Attrition Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frankie Keels Williams

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Attrition continues to be a major issue in higher education. Attrition rates for classes taught through distance education are 10 – 20% higher than classes taught in a face-to-face setting. Educators should engage students early and often, using different learning strategies customized to the class content and the students’ pre-existing knowledge. The goal for the professor is to develop relationships with the students such that they feel comfortable in the environment. The professor should facilitate learner-learner integration and collaboration so that they will learn from one another and expand their knowledge base together. Through an integrative literature review, this article presents key concepts in online learning and a review of different methods of engaging students with the goals of enhancing the learning process and reducing attrition rates.

  20. The Impact Of Using Computer Software On Vocabulary Learning Of Iranian EFL University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Pahlavanpoorfard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, using computer is common in all fields. Education is not an exception. In fact, this approach of technology has been using increasingly in language classrooms. We have witnessed there are more and more language teachers are using computers in their classrooms. This research study investigates the impact of using computer   on vocabulary learning of Iranian EFL university students. To this end, a sample of 40 university students in Islamic Azad University, Larestan branch were randomly assigned into the experimental and control groups. Prior the treatment and to catch the initial deferences between the participants, all the students sat for a pre-test that was an Oxford Placement Test. Then the students were received the treatment for 10 weeks. The students in the experimental group were taught by computer software for vocabulary learning while the students in the control group were taught through traditional method for vocabulary learning. After the treatment, all the students sat for a post-test. The statistical analysis through running Independent-Sample T-tests revealed thatthe students in the experimental group who used the computer software for vocabulary learning performed better than the students in the control group were taught through traditional method for vocabulary learning.

  1. When Students Struggle with Gross Anatomy and Histology: A Strategy for Monitoring, Reviewing, and Promoting Student Academic Success in an Integrated Preclinical Medical Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortsch, Michael; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Gross anatomy and histology are now often taught as parts of an integrated medical or dental curriculum. Although this puts these foundational basic sciences into a wider educational context, students may not fully appreciate their importance as essential components of their medical education and may not develop a sufficient level of competency,…

  2. When Students Struggle with Gross Anatomy and Histology: A Strategy for Monitoring, Reviewing, and Promoting Student Academic Success in an Integrated Preclinical Medical Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortsch, Michael; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Gross anatomy and histology are now often taught as parts of an integrated medical or dental curriculum. Although this puts these foundational basic sciences into a wider educational context, students may not fully appreciate their importance as essential components of their medical education and may not develop a sufficient level of competency,…

  3. EFFECTS OF 5E LEARNING CYCLE ON STUDENTS ACHIEVEMENT IN BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Osawaru Ajaja,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of this study was to determine the effects of learning cycle as an instructional strategy on biology andchemistry students achievement. To guide this study, six research hypotheses were stated and tested at 0.05 level ofsignificance. The design of this study was 2x2x3x6 Pre-test Post-test non-equivalent control group quasi experimental design.These included two instructional groups (experimental and control groups, sex (male and female, repeated testing (Pre,Post and follow-up tests, and six weeks of experience. The samples of the study included six senior secondary schools, 112science students, and 12 biology and chemistry teachers. The instruments used for this study were: teacher’s questionnaireon knowledge and use of learning cycle (KULC; and Biology and Chemistry Achievement Test (BCAT. The data collected wereanalyzed with simple percentage, Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA and student t-test statistics. The major findings of thestudy included that only 30.43% and 26.31% of biology and chemistry teachers have the knowledge that learning cycle is aninstructional method; all the biology and chemistry teachers sampled have never used learning cycle as an instructionalmethod; learning cycle had a significant effect on students achievement in biology and chemistry; students taught withlearning cycle significantly achieved better in biology/chemistry Post-test than those taught with lecture method; the posttestscores of students in the learning cycle group increased over the period of experience; non-significant difference in Posttestscores between males and females taught with learning cycle; non-significant interaction effect between method andsex on achievement; and a significant higher retention of biology and chemistry knowledge by students taught with learningcycle than those taught with lecture method. It was concluded that the method seems an appropriate instructional modelthat could be used to solve the problems of

  4. ORGANIZATIONAL SOURCES OF STRESS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHER AND THEIR RELACIONSHIP TO THE NUMBER OF PUPILS TAUGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Madrigal Olivas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research are: Identify sources of organizational stressors on teachers and establish the relationship between the level of organizational stress and the number of students attending teachers. To achieve these objectives, a non-experimental, cross-sectional correlational study was conducted through the application of the Organizational Sources of Stress Teachers Scale (EFOED to 59 teachers of School District No. 5 of the Ministry of State Education Durango, Mexico. Their main results suggest that uncertainty by the new educational reforms and their impact on labor rights is a situation that creates instability in the educational work of teachers, coupled with this lack of information on it and the constant rumors that generated around it.

  5. Inverted Classroom by Topic - A Study in Mathematics for Electrical Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Braun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The inverted classroom is a teaching model, where the students prepare for classroom by watching video lectures. The classroom time is then dedicated to individual practice. We evaluated a mathematics course for electrical engineering students throughout three semesters, where 20% of the topics were taught using the inverted classroom model. The aim was to find out whether the model can help to better address groups with large differences in prior knowledge in mathematics. We report mainly positive feedback from the students, although the opinions vary greatly between the groups. The students appreciate the increased amount of practice in the classroom as well as the possibility to learn at their own pace. Exam performance remained constant in the topics taught using the inverted classroom compared to previous semesters. The exam performance of weaker students also remained constant.

  6. Refined Characterization of Student Perspectives on Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Baily, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of physics concepts, and to inform how we might teach traditional content. Our previous investigations of student perspectives on quantum physics have indicated they can be highly nuanced, and may vary both within and across contexts. In order to better understand the contextual and often seemingly contradictory stances of students on matters of interpretation, we interviewed 19 students from four introductory modern physics courses taught at the University of Colorado. We find that students have attitudes and opinions that often parallel the stances of expert physicists when arguing for their favored interpretations of quantum mechanics, allowing for more nuanced characteriz...

  7. What's in a Word? Elementary Students Learn a Lesson in the Language of Respect. Los Estudiantes de Primaria Aprenden una Leccion en el Lenguaje del Respeto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalozzo, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Describes how one elementary teacher helped students in her class and in the entire school see through ethnic biases and feel proud of being bilingual or having bilingual friends. Her efforts taught the children that bilingual students are very much like their non-bilingual classmates in being unique people with talents that should be respected.…

  8. Using Standardized Clients in the Classroom: An Evaluation of a Training Module to Teach Active Listening Skills to Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Anissa; Welch, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a module that utilizes drama students to teach social work students how to use active listening skills in an interview environment. The module was implemented during a semester-long micro skills practice course taught to 13 undergraduate social work seniors in a western liberal arts university. Four…

  9. Using clickers in nonmajors- and majors-level biology courses: student opinion, learning, and long-term retention of course material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossgrove, Kirsten; Curran, Kristen L

    2008-01-01

    Student response systems (clickers) are viewed positively by students and instructors in numerous studies. Evidence that clickers enhance student learning is more variable. After becoming comfortable with the technology during fall 2005-spring 2006, we compared student opinion and student achievement in two different courses taught with clickers in fall 2006. One course was an introductory biology class for nonmajors, and the other course was a 200 level genetics class for biology majors. Students in both courses had positive opinions of the clickers, although we observed some interesting differences between the two groups of students. Student performance was significantly higher on exam questions covering material taught with clickers, although the differences were more dramatic for the nonmajors biology course than the genetics course. We also compared retention of information 4 mo after the course ended, and we saw increased retention of material taught with clickers for the nonmajors course, but not for the genetics course. We discuss the implications of our results in light of differences in how the two courses were taught and differences between science majors and nonmajors.

  10. What's in a Word? Elementary Students Learn a Lesson in the Language of Respect. Los Estudiantes de Primaria Aprenden una Leccion en el Lenguaje del Respeto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalozzo, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Describes how one elementary teacher helped students in her class and in the entire school see through ethnic biases and feel proud of being bilingual or having bilingual friends. Her efforts taught the children that bilingual students are very much like their non-bilingual classmates in being unique people with talents that should be respected.…

  11. Socio-Economic, Environmental and Personal Factors in the Choice of Country and Higher Education Institution for Studying Abroad among International Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand the pull factors that influenced international students' choice of country and institution for their Master's education. Design/Methodology/ Approach: This qualitative study relied upon focus group interviews with 70 international students registered in taught Master programmes at a higher…

  12. Socio-Economic, Environmental and Personal Factors in the Choice of Country and Higher Education Institution for Studying Abroad among International Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand the pull factors that influenced international students' choice of country and institution for their Master's education. Design/Methodology/ Approach: This qualitative study relied upon focus group interviews with 70 international students registered in taught Master programmes at a higher…

  13. Learning the Cell Structures with Three-Dimensional Models: Students' Achievement by Methods, Type of School and Questions' Cognitive Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Naim, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The cell topic was taught to 9th-grade students in three modes of instruction: (a) students "hands-on," who constructed three-dimensional cell organelles and macromolecules during the learning process; (b) teacher demonstration of the three-dimensional model of the cell structures; and (c) teaching the cell topic with the regular…

  14. Is Value-Added Accurate for Teachers of Students with Disabilities? What We Know Series: Value-Added Methods and Applications. Knowledge Brief 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Buzick, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Under laws providing for equal access to quality education, most American students with disabilities are taught largely in general education classrooms. And along with all other students, they are included in standards-based reforms--policies that hold their schools and teachers accountable for what they do or do not learn. In more and more cases,…

  15. Does Ontario Have an Achievement Gap? The Challenge of Comparing the Performance of Students in French- and English-Language Schools on National and International Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ruth; Denomme, Francine

    2008-01-01

    On national and international assessments, students attending French-language schools in Ontario usually perform worse than students attending English-language schools. Interpreting these results is challenging because the French- and English-language schools differ both in prescribed curriculum and in how the curriculum is taught. In addition,…

  16. A Comparative Study of the Use of Persian vs. English in Teaching English Grammar to Iranian Students in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrseresht, Kowsar; Gowhary, Habib; Azizifar, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the relationship between the use of Persian vs. English in teaching English grammar to Iranian students and their achievement in learning English grammar. The participants of this study include 50 female students from a junior high school in Mehran. The researcher randomly selected 2 groups, one group was taught through the…

  17. The Effect of Arabism of Romanic Alphabets on the Development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language Students' Writing Skills at Secondary School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhair, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the effect of Arabization of Romanic Alphabets on the development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language students' composition writing skills at secondary school level. This experimental study includes 25 secondary school students in their 9th Grade in which English is taught as a foreign language at…

  18. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  19. One output function: a misconception of students studying digital systems - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotskovsky, E.; Sabag, N.

    2015-05-01

    Background:Learning processes are usually characterized by students' misunderstandings and misconceptions. Engineering educators intend to help their students overcome their misconceptions and achieve correct understanding of the concept. This paper describes a misconception in digital systems held by many students who believe that combinational logic circuits should have only one output. Purpose:The current study aims to investigate the roots of the misconception about one-output function and the pedagogical methods that can help students overcome the misconception. Sample:Three hundred and eighty-one students in the Departments of Electrical and Electronics and Mechanical Engineering at an academic engineering college, who learned the same topics of a digital combinational system, participated in the research. Design and method:In the initial research stage, students were taught according to traditional method - first to design a one-output combinational logic system, and then to implement a system with a number of output functions. In the main stage, an experimental group was taught using a new method whereby they were shown how to implement a system with several output functions, prior to learning about one-output systems. A control group was taught using the traditional method. In the replication stage (the third stage), an experimental group was taught using the new method. A mixed research methodology was used to examine the results of the new learning method. Results:Quantitative research showed that the new teaching approach resulted in a statistically significant decrease in student errors, and qualitative research revealed students' erroneous thinking patterns. Conclusions:It can be assumed that the traditional teaching method generates an incorrect mental model of the one-output function among students. The new pedagogical approach prevented the creation of an erroneous mental model and helped students develop the correct conceptual understanding.

  20. The Whole Point of the Thing: How Nominalisation Might Develop Students' Written Causal Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, James Edward

    2016-01-01

    Frustrated that previously taught writing frames seemed to impede his A-level students' historical arguments, James Edward Carroll theorised that the inadequacies he identified in their writing were as much disciplinary as stylistic. Drawing on two discourses that are often largely isolated from each other--genre theory and the work of the history…

  1. Critical Appraisal of Information on the Web in Practice: Undergraduate Students' Knowledge, Reported Use, and Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Neil; Varnhagen, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduates use a wide range of information resources for academic and nonacademic purposes, including web sites that range from credible, peer reviewed, online journal sites, to biased and inaccurate promotional web sites. Students are taught basic critical appraisal skills, but do they apply these skills to make decisions about information in…

  2. Written Feedback, Student Writing, and Institutional Policies: Implications for Novice Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerherm, Emily

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the methods that teachers employ in written feedback to student writing and how the policies of the program and the teachers' embodied histories influence the strategies used. Data were gathered from 2 novice teachers as they taught their first graduate-level ESL writing course and consist of the teachers' feedback in addition…

  3. Pilot Study: Impact of Computer Simulation on Students' Economic Policy Performance. Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazlicky, Bruce; France, Judith

    Fiscal and monetary policies taught in macroeconomic principles courses are concepts that might require both lecture and simulation methods. The simulation models, which apply the principles gleened from comparative statistics to a dynamic world, may give students an appreciation for the problems facing policy makers. This paper is a report of a…

  4. Neuroscience Workshops for Fifth-Grade School Children by Undergraduate Students: A University-School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Judith G.; Feldman, Marissa; Lin, Edward; Mahoney, Margaret; Sjoblom, Chelsea

    2006-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards recommend that science be taught using inquiry-based approaches. Inspired by the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, we examined whether undergraduate students could learn how to conduct field research by teaching elementary school children basic neuroscience concepts in interactive workshops. In an…

  5. The Irony and the Ecstasy: How Holden Caulfield Helped My Advanced Composition Students Find Their Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Linda

    An instructor of an advanced composition course (adapted from one taught by James Seitz at the University of Pittsburgh) at the University of California Riverside took her students through a series of reading and writing assignments that asked them to "engage in a wide variety of prose styles and...consider what style suggests about language,…

  6. Student Enrollment in a Supplement Course for Anatomy and Physiology Results in Improved Retention and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Mari

    2011-01-01

    Anatomy and Physiology I (A&P 1) has one of the highest failure and withdrawal rates on campus. To increase academic success, a course to supplement A&P 1 (Supplement) was developed and taught by anatomy and physiology faculty. Primary goals for the Supplement included (1) early identification of students at risk for failing or withdrawal;…

  7. Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

    2012-01-01

    The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

  8. Just-in-Time Teaching Techniques through Web Technologies for Vocational Students' Reading and Writing Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantoem, Rewadee; Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2016-01-01

    This research compares the English language achievements of vocational students, their reading and writing abilities, and their attitudes towards learning English taught with just-in-time teaching techniques through web technologies and conventional methods. The experimental and control groups were formed, a randomized true control group…

  9. In Search of Our Past: Units in Women's History. World History Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Suzanne, Ed.; And Others

    This junior high school level student manual contains three units on the role of women in world history. The units, designed to supplement what is customarily taught in world history courses at this level, are entitled Women Under Feudalism: Western Europe and China, Women in the Industrial Revolution, and Women in Change: 20th Century Women in…

  10. Assessing the Impact of a Race-Based Course on Counseling Students: A Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paone, Tina R.; Malott, Krista M.; Barr, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine changes in 121 White counseling students following their participation in an experiential, race-based course taught in a group format. Pre- and postoutcomes were reported based on instruments that measured White racial identity development, White privilege, color blindness, and the costs of racism. Findings indicated…

  11. English Language Needs Analysis of Qur'anic Sciences and Tradition Students in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hadi; Davari, Ameneh; Yunus, Melor Md

    2015-01-01

    Needs analysis is fundamental to determine what students need to achieve through the medium of English accurately analysis. In this regard, the present study seeks to evaluate the ESP course book entitled "The ESP Course of Qur'anic Sciences and Tradition" taught at some universities in Iran. More specifically, the study aims to identify…

  12. Preparedness of Chinese Students for American Culture and Communicating in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Melody; Sue, Edna

    2013-01-01

    What Chinese students learn about American culture and the English language in the classrooms of China does not adequately prepare them for the reality of American culture and communication in English. In this study, the constructs of American culture and models of English language taught in Chinese classrooms are compared with the reality of…

  13. Leading and Thriving: How Leadership Education Can Improve First-Year Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Clinton M.; Beatty, Cameron C.

    2015-01-01

    Leadership development transforms the lives of many students and leadership educators regularly witness these changes. But little research has articulated what is being taught that facilitates this change, how we can make it happen more often, or how we can measure this change. These transformations contribute to desirable outcomes including…

  14. Student Strategies Suggesting Emergence of Mental Structures Supporting Logical and Abstract Thinking: Multiplicative Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Jim

    2014-01-01

    For many students, developing mathematical reasoning can prove to be challenging. Such difficulty may be explained by a deficit in the core understanding of many arithmetical concepts taught in early school years. Multiplicative reasoning is one such concept that produces an essential foundation upon which higher-level mathematical thinking skills…

  15. Effects of Teaching Approach on Problem Solving Ability of Agricultural Education Students with Varying Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, James E.; Osborne, Edward W.

    1996-01-01

    One group of Illinois secondary agriculture students was taught using a problem-solving approach (PSA), the other with a subject-matter approach (SMA). A problem-solving posttest and Group Embedded Figures Test showed significantly higher problem-solving ability in the PSA group. Field independent learners in the PSA group significantly increased…

  16. Effects of Teaching Approach on Achievement of Agricultural Education Students with Varying Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, James E.; Osborne, Edward

    1996-01-01

    Illinois secondary agriculture students were taught 2 units; 1 group using a problem-solving approach (n=72) and the other a subject-matter approach (n=61). Neither approach nor cognitive style were related to achievement. Field-neutral learners scored significantly higher using problem solving when relevant and meaningful problems were used. (SK)

  17. Teachers' and Students' Negotiation Moves When Teachers Scaffold Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    Group work has been a main activity recommended by mathematics education reform. We aim at describing the patterns of interaction between teachers and students during group work. We ask: How do teachers scaffold group work during a problem-based lesson? We use data from a problem-based lesson taught in six geometry class periods by two teachers…

  18. Using Original Methods in Teaching English Language to Foreign Students (Chinese) in Indian Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devimeenakshi, K.; Maheswari, C. N. Baby

    2012-01-01

    The article gives information on English language teaching schemes in Indian classrooms for foreign students. The teacher monitors as facilitator and instructor. The trainees were trained in the four macro skills, LSRW. I taught some topics in three skills, namely, writing, listening and reading (just three, not speaking skills) to Chinese…

  19. Using Self-Directed Video Prompting to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I.; Brooks, David G.; Tullis, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of self-directed video prompting presented via an iPod Touch on teaching four adolescents with moderate-to-severe intellectual and developmental disabilities two daily living tasks. Students were taught to wash a table using instructor-delivered video prompts. After reaching 80% correct for at least three…

  20. Learning through Teaching: Exploring What Conservatoire Students Learn from Teaching Beginner Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Rosie; Aufegger, Lisa; Williamon, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Music is increasingly recognised as important in facilitating healthy ageing, yet little is known of what musicians themselves learn when they teach older adults. This article reports the practices of the "Rhythm for Life" project at the Royal College of Music in the UK, in which conservatoire students taught 10-week programmes of group…