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Sample records for non-migrating tides generated

  1. Non-migrating diurnal tides as measured by the TIMED Doppler interferometer: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberheide, J.; Wu, Q.; Ortland, D. A.; Killeen, T. L.; Hagan, M. E.; Roble, R. G.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Skinner, W. R.

    Preliminary meridional wind data from the TIMED Doppler interferometer (TIDI) onboard the TIMED satellite are analyzed for non-migrating diurnal tides. Tidal definitions are given for the most pronounced westward, eastward and standing oscillations ( w2, e3, s0). The analysis interval is March 2002 to June 2004 and covers the altitude range 85-105 km. Monthly tidal wind fields from 40°S to 40°N are presented. TIDI tides compare favorably with previously reported 95 km HRDI results. Non-migrating diurnal tidal wind speeds larger than 30 m/s are observed thus emphasizing the important role of non-migrating tides in middle atmosphere coupling. A comparative analysis with the global scale wave model (GSWM) and the thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) indicates that both latent heat release in the tropical troposphere and non-linear planetary wave/migrating tide interaction are important sources of non-migrating tides in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  2. Internal Tide Generation by Steep Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    acting on the barotropic tide ( Foda and Hill 1998) was incomplete. Kunze will put this work in the context of recent internal tide research and...Topographically generated internal waves in the open ocean. J. Geophys. Res., 80, 320-327. Foda , M.A., and D.F. Hill, 1998: Nonlinear energy

  3. Hydroxyl radical generation by red tide algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, T; Akaike, T; Sato, K; Ishimatsu, A; Takeshita, S; Muramatsu, T; Maeda, H

    1992-04-01

    The unicellular marine phytoplankton Chattonella marina is known to have toxic effects against various living marine organisms, especially fishes. However, details of the mechanism of the toxicity of this plankton remain obscure. Here we demonstrate the generation of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals from a red tide unicellular organism, C. marina, by using ESR spectroscopy with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and N-t-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN), and by using the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence response. The spin-trapping assay revealed productions of spin adduct of superoxide anion (O2-) (DMPO-OOH) and that of hydroxyl radical (.OH) (DMPO-OH) in the algal suspension, which was not observed in the ultrasonic-ruptured suspension. The addition of superoxide dismutase (500 U/ml) almost completely inhibited the formation of both DMPO-OOH and DMPO-OH, and carbon-centered radicals were generated with the disappearance of DMPO-OH after addition of 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) and 5% ethanol. Furthermore, the generation of methyl and methoxyl radicals, which are thought to be produced by the reaction of hydroxyl radical and Me2SO under aerobic condition, was identified using spin trapping with a combination of PBN and Me2SO. Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay also supported the above observations. These results clearly indicate that C. marina generates and releases the superoxide radical followed by the production of hydroxyl radical to the surrounding environment. The velocity of superoxide generation by C. marina was about 100 times faster than that by mammalian phagocytes per cell basis. The generation of oxygen radical is suggested to be a pathogenic principle in the toxication of red tide to susceptible aquaculture fishes and may be directly correlated with the coastal pollution by red tide.

  4. Internal Tide Generation by Tall Ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    plays a minimal role for most ocean generation problems, except near-critical latitudes where the parametric 91 subharmonic instability may be a first...88] Y. K. Tsang W. R. Young and N. J. Balmforth. Near-inertial parametric subharmonic instability. J. Fluid Mech., 607:25–49, 2008. [89] H. P

  5. Modeling the Ocean Tide for Tidal Power Generation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, M.; Gedney, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in the ocean tide as a source of energy for electrical power generation. Unlike in the 1960s, when the tidal barrage was the predominant method of power extraction considered and implemented, the current methodology favors operation of a free-stream turbine or an array of them in strong tidal currents. As tidal power generation moves from pilot-scale projects to actual array implementations, numerical modeling of tidal currents is expected to play an increasing role in site selection, resource assessment, array design, and environmental impact assessment. In this presentation, a simple, coupled ocean/estuary model designed for research into fundamental aspects of tidal power generation is described. The model consists of a Pacific Ocean-size rectangular basin and a connected fjord-like embayment with dimensions similar to that of Puget Sound, Washington, one of the potential power generation sites in the United States. The model is forced by an idealized lunar tide-generating potential. The study focuses on the energetics of a tidal system including tidal power extraction at both global and regional scales. The hyperbolic nature of the governing shallow water equations means consequence of tidal power extraction cannot be limited to the local waters, but is global in extent. Modeling power extraction with a regional model with standard boundary conditions introduces uncertainties of 3 ~ 25% in the power extraction estimate depending on the level of extraction. Power extraction in the model has a well-defined maximum (~800 MW in a standard case) that is in agreement with previous theoretical studies. Natural energy dissipation and tidal power extraction strongly interact; for a turbine array of a given capacity, the higher the level of natural dissipation the lower the power the array can extract. Conversely, power extraction leads to a decrease in the level of natural dissipation (Figure) as well as the tidal range and the

  6. An Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System for Sea Level Prediction Considering Tide-Generating Forces and Oceanic Thermal Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ching Lin Hsien-Kuo Chang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system for predicting sea level considering tide-generating forces and oceanic thermal expansion assuming a model of sea level dependence on sea surface temperature. The proposed model named TGFT-FN (Tide-Generating Forces considering sea surface Temperature and Fuzzy Neuro-network system is applied to predict tides at five tide gauge sites located in Taiwan and has the root mean square of error of about 7.3 - 15.0 cm. The capability of TGFT-FN model is superior in sea level prediction than the previous TGF-NN model developed by Chang and Lin (2006 that considers the tide-generating forces only. The TGFT-FN model is employed to train and predict the sea level of Hua-Lien station, and is also appropriate for the same prediction at the tide gauge sites next to Hua-Lien station.

  7. Generation of weakly nonlinear nonhydrostatic internal tides over large topography: a multi-modal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maugé

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A set of evolution equations is derived for the modal coefficients in a weakly nonlinear nonhydrostatic internal-tide generation problem. The equations allow for the presence of large-amplitude topography, e.g. a continental slope, which is formally assumed to have a length scale much larger than that of the internal tide. However, comparison with results from more sophisticated numerical models show that this restriction can in practice be relaxed. It is shown that a topographically induced coupling between modes occurs that is distinct from nonlinear coupling. Nonlinear effects include the generation of higher harmonics by reflection from boundaries, i.e. steeper tidal beams at frequencies that are multiples of the basic tidal frequency. With a seasonal thermocline included, the model is capable of reproducing the phenomenon of local generation of internal solitary waves by a tidal beam impinging on the seasonal thermocline.

  8. Large-scale, realistic laboratory modeling of M2 internal tide generation at the Luzon Strait

    CERN Document Server

    Mercier, Matthieu J; Helfrich, Karl; Sommeria, Joël; Viboud, Samuel; Didelle, Henri; Saidi, Sasan; Dauxois, Thierry; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The complex double-ridge system in the Luzon Strait in the South China Sea (SCS) is one of the strongest sources of internal tides in the oceans, associated with which are some of the largest amplitude internal solitary waves on record. An issue of debate, however, has been the specific nature of their generation mechanism. To provide insight, we present the results of a large-scale laboratory experiment performed at the Coriolis platform. The experiment was carefully designed so that the relevant dimensionless parameters, which include the excursion parameter, criticality, Rossby, and Froude numbers, closely matched the ocean scenario. The results advocate that a broad and coherent weakly nonlinear, three-dimensional, M2 internal tide that is shaped by the overall geometry of the double-ridge system is radiated into the South China Sea and subsequently steepens, as opposed to being generated by a particular feature or localized region within the ridge system.

  9. Reduction of ocean tide aliasing in the context of a next generation gravity field mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, Markus; Daras, Ilias; Pail, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Ocean tide aliasing is currently one of the main limiting factors for temporal gravity field determination and the derivation of mass transport processes in the Earth system. This will be true even more for future gravity field missions with improved measurement technology, which cannot be fully exploited due to this dominant systematic error source. In several previous studies it has been shown that temporal aliasing, related to tidal and non-tidal sources, can be significantly reduced by double-pair formations, e.g., in a so-called Bender configuration, and its effects can be migrated to higher frequencies by an optimum orbit choice, especially the orbit altitude (Murböck et al. 2013). Improved processing strategies and extended parameter models should be able to further reduce the problem. Concerning non-tidal aliasing, it could be shown that the parameterization of short-period long-wavelength gravity field signals, the so-called Wiese approach, is a powerful method for aliasing reduction (Wiese et al. 2013), but it does not really work for the very short-period signals of ocean tides with mainly semi-diurnal and diurnal periods (Daras 2015). In this contribution, several methods dealing with the reduction of ocean tide aliasing are investigated both from a methodological and a numerical point of view. One of the promising strategies is the co-estimation of selected tidal constituents over long time periods, also considering the basic orbit frequencies of the satellites. These improved estimates for ocean tide signals can then be used in a second step as an enhanced de-aliasing product for the computation of short-period temporal gravity fields. From a number of theoretical considerations and numerical case-studies, recommendations for an optimum orbit selection with respect to reduction of ocean tide aliasing shall be derived for two main mission scenarios. The first one is a classical Bender configuration being composed of a (near-) polar and an inclined in

  10. Generation of secondary waves arising from nonlinear interaction between the quasi 2 day wave and the migrating diurnal tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu A.; Palo, Scott E.; Lieberman, Ruth S.; Forbes, Jeffrey M.; Ortland, David A.; Siskind, David E.

    2016-07-01

    Theory and past observations have provided evidence that atmospheric tides and other global-scale waves interact nonlinearly to produce additional secondary waves throughout the space-atmosphere interaction region. However, few studies have investigated the generation region of nonlinearly generated secondary waves, and as a result, the manifestation and impacts of these waves are still poorly understood. This study focuses on the nonlinear interaction between the quasi 2 day wave (2dayW3) and the migrating diurnal tide (DW1), two of the largest global-scale waves in the atmosphere. The fundamental goals of this effort are to characterize the forcing region of the secondary waves and to understand how it relates to their manifestation on a global scale. First, the Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping method is applied to Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics-Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry satellite observations to provide new evidence of secondary waves. These results show that secondary waves are only significant above 80 km. The nonlinear forcing for each secondary wave is then computed by extracting short-term primary wave information from a reanalysis model. The estimated nonlinear forcing quantities are used to force a linearized tidal model in order to calculate numerical secondary wave responses. Model results show that the secondary waves are significant from the upper mesosphere to the middle thermosphere, highlighting the implications for the atmosphere-space weather coupling. The study also concludes that the secondary wave response is most sensitive to the nonlinear forcing occurring in the lower and middle mesosphere and not coincident with the regions of strongest nonlinear forcing.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Internal Tide Generation at a Continental Shelf Break

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Laura K; Brucker, Kyle A; Dommermuth, Douglas G

    2014-01-01

    A fully nonlinear, three-dimensional numerical model is developed for the simulation of tidal flow over arbitrary bottom topography in an ocean with realistic stratification. The model is capable of simulating accurately the generation of fine-scale internal wave tidal beams, their interaction with an ocean thermocline and the subsequent generation of solitary internal waves that propagate on this thermocline. Several preliminary simulation results are shown for uniform and non-uniform flow over an idealized two-dimensional ridge, which are compared with linear theory, and for flow over an idealized two-dimensional continental shelf.

  12. Dynamical tides in coalescing superfluid neutron star binaries with hyperon cores and their detectability with third-generation gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang; Weinberg, Nevin N.

    2017-09-01

    The dynamical tide in a coalescing neutron star binary induces phase shifts in the gravitational waveform as the orbit sweeps through resonances with individual g-modes. Unlike the phase shift due to the equilibrium tide, the phase shifts due to the dynamical tide are sensitive to the stratification, composition and superfluid state of the core. We extend our previous study of the dynamical tide in superfluid neutron stars by allowing for hyperons in the core. Hyperon gradients give rise to a new type of composition g-mode. Compared to g-modes due to muon-to-electron gradients, those due to hyperon gradients are concentrated much deeper in the core and therefore probe higher density regions. We find that the phase shifts due to resonantly excited hyperonic modes are ˜10-3 rad, an order of magnitude smaller than those due to muonic modes. We show that by stacking events, third-generation gravitational-wave detectors should be able to detect the phase shifts due to muonic modes. Those due to hyperonic modes will, however, be difficult to detect due to their smaller magnitude.

  13. Tide generating forces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    stream_size 3 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Trg_Calculat_Water_Depth_Chart_Datum_1991_3.pdf.txt stream_source_info Trg_Calculat_Water_Depth_Chart_Datum_1991_3.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  14. Bodily Tides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardling Rosemary.A.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium tide model in the weak friction approximation is used by the binary star and exoplanet communities to study the tidal evolution of short-period systems. However, each uses a slightly different approach which potentially leads to different conclusions about the timescales on which various processes occur. Here we present an overview of these two approaches, and show that for short-period planets the circularization timescales they predict differ by at most a factor of a few. A discussion of the timescales for orbital decay, spin-orbit synchronization and spin-oribt alignment is also presented.

  15. The killer tides

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devassy, V.P.; Bhat, S.R.

    Toxic red tide is a disastrous phenomenon causEd. by sudden blooming of certain killer microorganisms often encountered in the seas. Certain killer red tides have caused wide-spread losses to human life and to the fishing industry at several places...

  16. Internal tide oceanic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2016-09-01

    A concept of internal tide oceanic tomography (ITOT) is proposed to monitor ocean warming on a global scale. ITOT is similar to acoustic tomography, but that work waves are internal tides. ITOT detects ocean temperature changes by precisely measuring travel time changes of long-range propagating internal tides. The underlying principle is that upper ocean warming strengthens ocean stratification and thus increases the propagation speed of internal tides. This concept is inspired by recent advances in observing internal tides by satellite altimetry. In particular, a plane wave fit method can separately resolve multiple internal tidal waves and thus accurately determines the phase of each wave. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of ITOT. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the yearly time series of travel time changes of the M2 internal tide is closely correlated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation index. In the North Atlantic, significant interannual variations and bidecadal trends are observed and consistent with the changes in ocean heat content measured by Argo floats. ITOT offers a long-term, cost-effective, environmentally friendly technique for monitoring global ocean warming. Future work is needed to quantify the accuracy of this technique.

  17. TIDE-TSUNAMI INTERACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Kowalik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate important dynamics defining tsunami enhancement in the coastal regions and related to interaction with tides. Observations and computations of the Indian Ocean Tsunami usually show amplifications of the tsunami in the near-shore regions due to water shoaling. Additionally, numerous observations depicted quite long ringing of tsunami oscillations in the coastal regions, suggesting either local resonance or the local trapping of the tsunami energy. In the real ocean, the short-period tsunami wave rides on the longer-period tides. The question is whether these two waves can be superposed linearly for the purpose of determining the resulting sea surface height (SSH or rather in the shallow water they interact nonlinearly, enhancing/reducing the total sea level and currents. Since the near–shore bathymetry is important for the run-up computation, Weisz and Winter (2005 demonstrated that the changes of depth caused by tides should not be neglected in tsunami run-up considerations. On the other hand, we hypothesize that much more significant effect of the tsunami-tide interaction should be observed through the tidal and tsunami currents. In order to test this hypothesis we apply a simple set of 1-D equations of motion and continuity to demonstrate the dynamics of tsunami and tide interaction in the vicinity of the shelf break for two coastal domains: shallow waters of an elongated inlet and narrow shelf typical for deep waters of the Gulf of Alaska.

  18. Thermal Tides in Short Period Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Arras, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent insolation in a planetary atmosphere induces a mass quadrupole upon which the stellar tidal acceleration can exert a force. This "thermal tide" force can give rise to secular torques on the planet and orbit as well as radial forces causing eccentricity evolution. We apply this idea to the close-in gas giant exoplanets ("hot Jupiters"). The response of radiative atmospheres is computed in a hydrostatic model which treats the insolation as a time-dependent heat source, and solves for thermal radiation using flux-limited diffusion. Fully nonlinear numerical simulations are compared to solutions of the linearized equations, as well as analytic approximations, all of which are in good agreement. We find generically that thermal tide density perturbations {\\it lead} the semi-diurnal forcing. As a result thermal tides can generate asynchronous spin and eccentricity. Our results are as follows: (1) Departure from synchronous spin is significant for hot Jupiters, and increases with orbital period. (2) O...

  19. King Tide floods in Tuvalu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.-C.; Ho, C.-R.; Cheng, Y.-H.

    2013-05-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of sea level rise present regional floods in some certain areas. The low-lying island countries are obviously the spots affected severely. Tuvalu, an atoll island country located in the south-west Pacific Ocean, is suffering the devastating effects of losing life, property, and intending migration caused by floods. They blame the regional flooding to King Tide, a term used but not clearly identified by Pacific islanders. In this study, we clarify what King Tide is first. By the tide gauge and topography data, we estimated the reasonable value of 3.2 m as the threshold of King Tide. This definition also fits to the statement by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of King Tide occurring once or twice a year. In addition, We cross validate the 19 yr data of tide gauge and satellite altimeter (1993-2012), the correlation coefficient indicates King Tide phenomenon is considerable connected to warm water mass. The 28 King Tide events revealed the fact that flooding can be referenced against spring tide levels, so can it be turned up by warm water mass. The warm water mass pushes up sea level; once spring tide, storm surge, or other climate variability overlaps it, the rising sea level might overflow and so has been called "King Tide" for the floods in Tuvalu. This study provides more understanding of the signals of King Tide and an island country case study of regional sea level rise.

  20. Century Tide Nicotine Patch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Century Tide Nicotine Patch, a hi-tech smoking control therapy, is designed in accordance with the scientific principle of nicotine replacement. The therapy is promoted by the World Health Organization. Meanwhile, it also integrates traditional Chinese medical therapy and adopts advanced TTS technology.

  1. Energy deposition of thermal tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, E.

    2015-12-01

    The main role of vertically propagating waves in the general circulation is to transfer pseudo momentum from the region of generation to the region of wave breaking. The most prominent examples in atmospheric dynamics are planetary Rossby waves forced in the troposphere, which drive a poleward residual circulation in the winter stratosphere, and mesoscale gravity waves with tropospheric origin, which drive a summer-to-winter-pole circulation in the mesopasue region. In addition, the role of energy deposition by gravity waves has long been recognized to contribute substantially to the energy budget above the stratopause. In atmospheric circulation models, gravity waves are usually parameterized. Their energy deposition can be computed along with the momentum deposition and the turbulent diffusivity associated with wave breaking. In particular, the energy deposition is expressed in terms of secondary moments of the parameterized waves. Therefore, one is tempted to assume that the energy deposition of waves that are resolved in circulation models, e.g., Rossby waves and thermal tides, is automatically taken into account. This assumption is, however, flawed. We show that the energy deposition by resolved waves corresponds to the shear production (frictional heating) of the subgrid-scale turbulence model by which these waves are damped. Computational results from an atmospheric circulation model with energetically consistent treatment of momentum diffusion and frictional heating show that the energy deposition of thermal tides is substantial above the mesopause. This effect is either incomplete or even ignored in conventional atmospheric models that resolve the mesopause region. An idealized sensitivity experiment furthermore shows that thermal tides lead to a significant downward shift of gravity-wave breaking in the upper mesosphere.

  2. Tides and deltaic morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plink-Bjorklund, Piret

    2016-04-01

    Tide-dominated and tide-influenced deltas are not widely recognized in the ancient record, despite the numerous modern and Holocene examples, including eight of the twelve modern largest deltas in the world, like the Ganges-Brahmaputra, Amazon, Chang Jiang, and Irrawadi. Furthermore, tide-dominated or tide-influenced deltas are suggested to be more common in inner-shelf or embayment settings rather than close to or at a shelf edge, primarily because wave energy is expected to be higher and tidal energy lower in outer shelf and shelf-edge areas. Thus, most shelf-edge deltas are suggested to be fluvial or wave dominated. However, there are ancient examples of tide-influenced shelf-edge deltas, indicating that the controls on tidal morphodynamics in deltas are not yet well understood. This paper asks the following questions: (1) How do tides influence delta deposition, beyond creating recognizable tidal facies? (2) Does tidal reworking create specific geometries in delta clinoforms? (3) Does tidal reworking change progradation rates of deltas? (4) Is significant tidal reworking of deltas restricted to inner-shelf deltas only? (5) What are the conditions at which deltas may be tidally influenced or tide-dominated in outer-shelf areas or at the shelf edge? (6) What are the main morphodynamic controls on the degree of tidal reworking of deltas? The paper utilizes a dataset of multiple ancient and modern deltas, situated both on the shelf and shelf edge. We show that beyond the commonly recognized shore-perpendicular morphological features and the recognizable tidal facies, the main effects of tidal reworking of deltas are associated with delta clinoform morphology, morphodynamics of delta lobe switching, delta front progradation rates, and the nature of the delta plain. Strong tidal influence is here documented to promote subaqueous, rapid progradation of deltas, by efficiently removing sediment from river mouth and thus reducing mouth bar aggradation and fluvial delta

  3. Internal tide convergence and mixing in a submarine canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Amy

    2016-11-01

    Observations from Eel Canyon, located on the north coast of California, show that elevated turbulence in the full water column arises from the convergence of remotely-generated internal wave energy. The incoming semidiurnal and bottom-trapped diurnal internal tides generate complex interference patterns. The semidiurnal internal tide sets up a partly standing wave within the canyon due to reflection at the canyon head, dissipating all of its energy within the canyon. Dissipation in the near-bottom is associated with the diurnal trapped tide, while midwater isopycnal shear and strain is associated with the semidiurnal tide. Dissipation is elevated up to 600 m off the bottom, in contrast to observations over flat continental shelf where dissipation occurs closer to the topography. Slope canyons are sinks for internal wave energy and may have important influences on the global distribution of tidally-driven mixing.

  4. Using airborne LIDAR to measure tides and river slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talke, S. A.; Hudson, A.; Chickadel, C. C.; Farquharson, G.; Jessup, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial variability of tides and the tidally-averaged water-level is often poorly resolved in shallow waters, despite its importance in validating models and interpreting dynamics. In this contribution we explore using airborne LIDAR to remotely observe tides and along-river slope in the Columbia River estuary (CRE). Using an airplane equipped with LIDAR, differential GPS, and an infra-red camera, we flew 8 longitudinal transects over a 50km stretch of the CRE over a 14 hour period in June 2013. After correcting for airplane elevation, pitch and roll and median filtering over 1km blocks, a spatially-resolved data set of relative water level was generated. Results show the tide (amplitude 2m) propagating upstream at the expected phase velocity. A sinusoid with 2 periods (12.4 and 24 hours) was next fit to data to produce a smooth tide and extract the mean slope. Comparison with 4 tide gauges indicates first order agreement with measured tides (rms error 0.1m), and confirms that a substantial sub-tidal gradient exists in the CRE. This proof-of-concept experiment indicates that remote sensing of tides in coastal areas is feasible, with possible applications such as improving bathymetric surveys or inferring water depths.

  5. Nonlinear interactions between gravity waves and tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao; XU JiYao; MA RuiPing

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present the nonlinear interactions between gravity waves (GWs) and tides by using the 2D numerical model for the nonlinear propagation of GWs in the compressible atmosphere. During the propagation in the tidal background, GWs become instable in three regions, that is z = 75-85 km, z =90-110 km and z= 115-130 km. The vertical wavelength firstly varies gradually from the initial 12 km to 27 km. Then the newly generated longer waves are gradually compressed. The longer and shorter waves occur in the regions where GWs propagate in the reverse and the same direction of the horizontal mean wind respectively. In addition, GWs can propagate above the main breaking region (90-110 km). During GWs propagation, not only the mean wind is accelerated, but also the amplitude of tide is amplified. Especially, after GWs become instable, this amplified effect to the tidal amplitude is much obvious.

  6. Nonlinear interactions between gravity waves and tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present the nonlinear interactions between gravity waves (GWs) and tides by using the 2D numerical model for the nonlinear propagation of GWs in the compressible atmosphere. During the propagation in the tidal background, GWs become instable in three regions, that is z = 75―85 km, z = 90―110 km and z = 115―130 km. The vertical wavelength firstly varies gradually from the initial 12 km to 27 km. Then the newly generated longer waves are gradually compressed. The longer and shorter waves occur in the regions where GWs propagate in the reverse and the same direction of the hori-zontal mean wind respectively. In addition, GWs can propagate above the main breaking region (90—110 km). During GWs propagation, not only the mean wind is accelerated, but also the amplitude of tide is amplified. Especially, after GWs become instable, this amplified effect to the tidal amplitude is much obvious.

  7. Dynamical Tides Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Kushnir, Doron; Kollmeier, Juna A; Waldman, Roni

    2016-01-01

    Zahn (1975) first put forward and calculated in detail the torque experienced by stars in close binary systems due to dynamical tides. His widely used formula for stars with radiative envelopes and convective cores is expressed in terms of the stellar radius, even though the torque is actually being applied to the convective core at the core radius. This results in a large prefactor, which is very sensitive to the global properties of the star, that multiplies the torque. This large factor is compensated by a very small multiplicative factor, $E_{2}$. Although this is mathematically accurate, depending on the application this can lead to significant errors. The problem is even more severe, since the calculation of $E_{2}$ itself is non-trivial, and different authors have obtained inconsistent values of $E_{2}$. Moreover, many codes (e.g. BSE, StarTrack, MESA) interpolate (and sometimes extrapolate) a fit of $E_{2}$ values to the stellar mass, often in regimes where this is not sound practice. We review previo...

  8. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  9. Limiting amplitudes of fully nonlinear interfacial tides and solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2016-08-01

    A new two-fluid layer model consisting of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations is derived for studying tidally generated fully nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves. This set is a generalization of the Choi-Camassa equations, extended here with forcing terms and Coriolis effects. The forcing is represented by a horizontally oscillating sill, mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography. Solitons are generated by a disintegration of the interfacial tide. Because of strong nonlinearity, solitons may attain a limiting table-shaped form, in accordance with soliton theory. In addition, we use a quasi-linear version of the model (i.e. including barotropic advection but linear in the baroclinic fields) to investigate the role of the initial stages of the internal tide prior to its nonlinear disintegration. Numerical solutions reveal that the internal tide then reaches a limiting amplitude under increasing barotropic forcing. In the fully nonlinear regime, numerical experiments suggest that this limiting amplitude in the underlying internal tide extends to the nonlinear case in that internal solitons formed by a disintegration of the internal tide may not reach their table-shaped form with increased forcing, but appear limited well below that state.

  10. Internal Tide Generation by Steep Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    mixing in order to understand their impact on larger scales. This includes phenomena ranging from the mesoscale (10-100 km) to the microscale (1 cm...condition, then is integrated through multiple surface and bottom reflections until arriving at (x0, z0). This solution method is novel and...These problems are not a concern for the ridge bathymetries and data sets we are considering. Preliminary comparisons of the method with data from

  11. 2004 Program of Study: Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    34, and the tidal potential will therefore have asymmetrical components. From spherical trigonometry cos 6 = sin 0 sin 6 + cos 0 cos J cos H. 9 North Pole...There are many possible directions for research in internal tides: 1. Theoretical and numerical models for three-dimensional obstacle of finite slope

  12. Lunar tides in the Mesosphere over Ascension Island (8° S, 14.4° W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Mitchell

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A meteor radar has been used to measure the horizontal winds in the equatorial mesosphere and lower thermosphere over Ascension Island (8.0° S, 14.4° W. A 5-year data set covering the interval 2001–2005 over the height range 78–100 km is considered. The lunar M2 tide is clearly evident in the data and reaches amplitudes as large as 11 ms−1 in the meridional component and 6 ms−1 in the zonal component. These are the first observations of the lunar tide made over the equatorial Atlantic sector. Comparisons of the observed seasonal behaviour with the model of Vial and Forbes (1994 reveals good agreement, but the observed amplitudes are generally larger and there is a systematic phase difference of ~2 h with the observed phases lagging the model. Comparisons with observations made at other equatorial sites suggest the presence of non-migrating lunar M2 tides and/or significant inter-annual variability.

  13. Permanent components of the crust, geoid and ocean depth tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenke; Sjöberg, Lars E.

    2001-04-01

    The tidal deformation caused by the luni-solar potential includes not only a periodic part, but also a time-independent part, called the permanent tide. How to deal with the tidal correction in gravimetric observations, especially the treatment of the permanent tide, has been discussed for a long time, since some practical and physical problems exist anyhow. A resolution adopted by IAG (1983) was that the permanent tidal attraction of the Moon and the Sun should be eliminated, but the permanent tidal deformation of the Earth be maintained. This is called zero gravity, and the geoid associated with it is the zero geoid. As to the crust deformation, Poutanen et al. (Poutanen, M., Vermeer, M., Mäkinen, J., 1996. The permanent tide in GPS positioning. Journal of Geodesy 70, 499-504.) suggested that co-ordinates should be reduced to the zero crust, i.e. the crust that includes the effect of the permanent tide. This research shows that horizontal components of the permanent earth tides, which are not considered in recent studies, are also important in GPS positioning and geoid determination. Since the tide-generating potential can be expanded into harmonics and divided into two parts (geodetic coefficients and the group of harmonic waves), the permanent earth tides can be easily obtained by multiplying the amplitude of the zero-frequency wavelength by the corresponding geoid geodetic coefficient. Formulas for both elastic and fluid cases are presented. Numerical results for the elastic case show that he vertical permanent crust (zero crust), geoid and ocean depth tides reach -12.0, -5.8 and 6.1 cm at the poles, and 5.9, 2.9 and -3.0 cm at the equator, respectively. The horizontal permanent crust, geoid and ocean depth tide components reach as much as 2.5, 8.7 and 6.3 cm, respectively. According to the solution of IAG (1983), the permanent vertical components are kept in GPS positioning and geoid computation. Thus, it is natural to include the horizontal components

  14. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF WAVES AND TIDE- SURGE INTERACTION ON TIDE-SURGES IN THE BOHAI SEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The author's combined numerical model consisting of a third generation shallow water wave model and a 3-D tide-surge model with wave-dependent surface wind stress were used to study the influence of waves on tide-surge motion. For the typical weather case, in this study, the magnitude and mechanism of the influence of waves on tide-surges in the Bohai Sea were revealed for the first time. The results showed that although consideration of the wave-dependent surface wind stresses raise slightly the traditional surface wind stress, due to the accumulated effects, the computed results are improved on the whole. Storm level maximum modulation can reach 0.4 m. The results computed by the combined model agreed well with the measured data.

  15. Effects of thermal tides on the Venus atmospheric superrotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, M.; Matsuda, Y.

    2007-08-01

    A nonlinear dynamical model on the sphere has been constructed to investigate a generation mechanism of the Venus atmospheric superrotation by the thermal tides. By using the solar heating exciting the diurnal and semidiurnal tides, the atmospheric superrotation extending from the ground to 80 km is generated. The vertical distributions of the mean zonal flow obtained in our numerical experiments are similar to the observations. The maximum velocity of the mean zonal flow reaches about 60-100 m/s near the cloud top level. A linear theory proposed by Takagi and Matsuda (2006) suggests that the atmospheric superrotation obtained in the present study is generated and maintained by the momentum transport associated with the thermal tides. Namely, the downward transport of zonal momentum associated with the downward propagating semidiurnal tide excited in the cloud layer induces the mean zonal flow opposite to the Venus rotation in the lowest layer adjacent to the ground. Surface friction acting on this counter flow provides the atmosphere with the net angular momentum from the solid part of Venus.

  16. Lunar nodal tide in the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Wróblewski

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The nodal tide in the Baltic Sea was studied on the basis of the Stockholm tide-gauge readings for 1825-1984; data from the tide gauge at Swinoujscie for the same period provided comparative material. The Stockholm readings are highly accurate and are considered representative of sea levels in the whole Baltic; hence, the final computations were performed for the readings from this particular tide gauge for the period 1888-1980. The tidal amplitude obtained from measurements uncorrected for atmospheric pressure or wind field was compared with that forced only by atmospheric effects. The amplitude of the recorded nodal tide was the same as the equilibrium tide amplitude calculated for Stockholm. Calculations for equilibrium tide amplitudes were also performed for the extreme latitudes of the Baltic basin.

  17. The variability of SE2 tide extracted from TIMED/SABER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Wan, Weixing; Ren, Zhipeng; Yu, You

    2017-04-01

    Based on the temperature observations of the SABER/TIMED, the variability of the non-migrating tide SE2 with high resolution (one-day) is analyzed, using the method from Li et al., [2015]. From the temperature observation data measured in the mesosphere and lower atmosphere region (MLT, 70-110 km altitudes) and at the low- and mid -latitudes (45S - 45N) from2002 to 2012), we obtained the non-migrating tide SE2 and further studied it in detail. It is found that the climatological features (large time scale variability and spatial distribution) of the SE2 tidal component are similar with the results from the previous researches, which are picked up from the interpolated data with 60-day resolution. The climatological features are that the SE2 tidal component manifests mainly at the low-mid latitudes around 30. The northern hemisphere tidal amplitudes below 110 km are larger than the southern hemisphere tide, at the same time, its peaks below 110 km mainly present between 100 and 110 km altitude; the tidal amplitudes below 110 km occur a north-south asymmetry about the equator in the annual variation: in the southern hemisphere, SE2 occurs with an obvious annual variation with a maximum of tidal amplitudes in December; while, in the northern one, the semi-annual variations with maximum at the equinoxes are stronger than that in the southern one. Herein, owing to the high-resolution tidal data (one day), we could research the short term (day-to-day) variations of the SE2 tide. We found that: (1) the day-to-day variations manifests mainly at the altitudes range between 100 and 110 km; (2) it increases gradually with latitudes and it is stronger at the low-mid latitudes; (3) it is relatively slightly stronger around solstices than equinoxes; (4) it does not present a remarkably inter-annual variation. Finally, the SE2 day-to-day variations may be composed by the absolute amplitudes' variance and the impact of the wave phases. In addition, the variations of

  18. Tide and skew surge independence: New insights for flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joanne; Horsburgh, Kevin J.; Williams, Jane A.; Proctor, Robert N. F.

    2016-06-01

    Storm surges are a significant hazard to coastal communities around the world, putting lives at risk and costing billions of dollars in damage. Understanding how storm surges and high tides interact is crucial for estimating extreme water levels so that we can protect coastal communities. We demonstrate that in a tidal regime the best measure of a storm surge is the skew surge, the difference between the observed and predicted high water within a tidal cycle. Based on tide gauge records spanning decades from the UK, U.S., Netherlands, and Ireland we show that the magnitude of high water exerts no influence on the size of the most extreme skew surges. This is the first systematic proof that any storm surge can occur on any tide, which is essential for understanding worst-case scenarios. The lack of surge generation dependency on water depth emphasizes the dominant natural variability of weather systems in an observation-based analysis. Weak seasonal relationships between skew surges and high waters were identified at a minority of locations where long-period changes to the tidal cycle interact with the storm season. Our results allow advances to be made in methods for estimating the joint probabilities of storm surges and tides.

  19. Barometric tides from ECMWF operational analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Ray

    Full Text Available The solar diurnal and semidiurnal tidal oscillations in surface pressure are extracted from the operational analysis product of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF. For the semidiurnal tide this involves a special temporal interpolation, following Van den Dool et al. (1997. The resulting tides are compared with a "ground truth" tide data set, a compilation of well-determined tide estimates deduced from many long time series of station barometer measurements. These comparisons show that the ECMWF (analysis tides are significantly more accurate than the tides deduced from two other widely available reanalysis products. Spectral analysis of ECMWF pressure series shows that the tides consist of sharp central peaks with modulating sidelines at integer multiples of 1 cycle/year, superimposed on a broad cusp of stochastic energy. The integrated energy in the cusp dominates that of the side-lines. This complicates the development of a simple empirical model that can characterize the full temporal variability of the tides.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (waves and tides

  20. Ocean Tides. Part 1. Global Ocean Tidal Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    tidal loading found by Estes (1977). Following Thomson (1868), Darwin (1883), Doodson (1921), and Cartwright and Taylor (1971), the primary...Prandtl Number Fluid. Journal of Fluid Mechan- ics, 47, p. 305. Cartwright , D. E., and Tayler, R. J., 1971, New Computations of the Tide-Generating...Potential. Geophys. J. Roy. Astr. Soc., 23, p. 45. Cox, M. D., 1970. A Mathematical Model of the Indian Ocean. Deep- Sea Research, 17, p. 45. Darwin , G

  1. Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of "Green Tide" Seaweed Blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L; Nelson, Timothy A; Ridgway, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Green tides are large growths or accumulations of green seaweeds that have been increasing in magnitude and frequency around the world. Because green tides consist of vast biomasses of algae in a limited area and are often seasonal or episodic, they go through periods of rapid growth in which they take up large amounts of nutrients and dissolved gases and generate bioactive natural products that may be stored in the plants, released into the environment, or broken down during decomposition. As a result of the use and production of inorganic and organic compounds, the algae in these blooms can have detrimental impacts on other organisms. Here, we review some of the effects that green tides have on the chemistry of seawater and the effects of the natural products that they produce. As blooms are developing and expanding, algae in green tides take up inorganic nutrients, such as nitrate and ortho-phosphate, which can limit their availability to other photosynthetic organisms. Their uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon for use in photosynthesis can cause localized spikes in the pH of seawater during the day with concomitant drops in the pH at night when the algae are respiring. Many of the algae that form green-tide blooms produce allelopathic compounds, which are metabolites that affect other species. The best documented allelopathic compounds include dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), dopamine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their breakdown products. DMSP and dopamine are involved in defenses against herbivores. Dopamine and ROS are released into seawater where they can be allelopathic or toxic to other organisms. Thus, these macroalgal blooms can have harmful effects on nearby organisms by altering concentrations of nutrients and dissolved gas in seawater and by producing and releasing allelopathic or toxic compounds.

  2. Numerical Study of the Interaction Between an Internal Tide and Mesoscale/Submesoscale Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, P.; Ponte, A.

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between internal tides and mesoscale eddies are believed to be responsible for the incoherency of internal tides observed globally. This incoherency complicates the analysis of future high resolution altimetric missions (SWOT, COMPIRA). Attempts at quantifying the product of these interactions have been achieved with models of the ocean global circulation. These models resolve however the first few vertical modes of internal tide and their ability to represent interactions between internal tides and balanced circulation has to be tested against controlled high resolution numerical simulations. We present here first attempts in order to study such interactions in a controlled idealized setting. High resolution (1 km horizontal grid size) numerical simulations of mesoscale/submesoscale turbulence are produced by destabilizing a baroclinic jet in a zonally-periodic channel. An plane wave internal tide is generated inside the domain thanks to a localized wave-maker and propagates through the mesoscale/submesoscale turbulence. We quantify the level of incoherency of the internal tide and study how this level depends on the modal structure of the internal tide and the intensity of the mesoscale/submesoscale turbulence.

  3. The Art of Red Tide Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emily R; Nierenberg, Kate; Boyes, Anamari J; Heil, Cynthia A; Flewelling, Leanne J; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2012-05-01

    Over the years, numerous outreach strategies by the science community, such as FAQ cards and website information, have been used to explain blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis that occur annually off the west coast of Florida to the impacted communities. Many state and federal agencies have turned to funded research groups for assistance in the development and testing of environmental outreach products. In the case of Florida red tide, the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/Mote Marine Laboratory (MML) Cooperative Red Tide Agreement allowed MML to initiate a project aimed at developing innovative outreach products about Florida red tide. This project, which we coined "The Art of Red Tide Science," consisted of a team effort between scientists from MML and students from Ringling College of Art and Design. This successful outreach project focused on Florida red tide can be used as a model to develop similar outreach projects for equally complex ecological issues.

  4. Application of the Convolution Formalism to the Ocean Tide Potential: Results from the Gravity and Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S. D.; Yuan, D. -N.

    2006-01-01

    A computationally efficient approach to reducing omission errors in ocean tide potential models is derived and evaluated using data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Ocean tide height models are usually explicitly available at a few frequencies, and a smooth unit response is assumed to infer the response across the tidal spectrum. The convolution formalism of Munk and Cartwright (1966) models this response function with a Fourier series. This allows the total ocean tide height, and therefore the total ocean tide potential, to be modeled as a weighted sum of past, present, and future values of the tide-generating potential. Previous applications of the convolution formalism have usually been limited to tide height models, but we extend it to ocean tide potential models. We use luni-solar ephemerides to derive the required tide-generating potential so that the complete spectrum of the ocean tide potential is efficiently represented. In contrast, the traditionally adopted harmonic model of the ocean tide potential requires the explicit sum of the contributions from individual tidal frequencies. It is therefore subject to omission errors from neglected frequencies and is computationally more intensive. Intersatellite range rate data from the GRACE mission are used to compare convolution and harmonic models of the ocean tide potential. The monthly range rate residual variance is smaller by 4-5%, and the daily residual variance is smaller by as much as 15% when using the convolution model than when using a harmonic model that is defined by twice the number of parameters.

  5. The lunar tide in sporadic E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Stening

    Full Text Available It seems that the wind shear theory is accepted for the explanation of sporadic E at mid and low latitudes. Some examples from Arecibo are displayed to show this. The effect of lunar tides should then modify the wind-shear theory in a manner that yields the observed features of the lunar tide in the critical frequency foEs and the height h'Es of the sporadic E. This is shown to imply that the phase of the lunar tide in h'Es should be the same as the phase of the lunar tide in the eastward wind and that the phase of the lunar tide in foEs is three hours later. Hourly values of foEs, f bEs (the blanketing critical frequency and h'Es from several observatories are analysed for the lunar semidiurnal tide. It is found that the phase of the tide in foEs is often about 3 hours later than for h'Es in agreement with the theory. Seasonal variations in the tide are also examined with the statistically most significant results (largest amplitudes usually occurring in summer. After reviewing the many difficulties associated with determining the lunar tide in Es, both experimentally and theoretically, the analysed phase results are compared with what might be expected from Hagan's global scale wave model. Agreement is only fair (a success rate of 69% among the cases examined but probably as good as might be expected.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere – atmosphere interactions – ionospheric irregularities, Meteorology and atmosphere dynamics (waves and tides

  6. The interaction between tide and salinity barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchanok Srivihok

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Presently, there is a number of salinity barrier utilization and this kind of structure becomes more common in estuarine areas. However, the construction of barrier at the river mouth or inside the river results in amplification of tide due to creation of standing tide at the barrier. This standing tide creates two major problems, namely, the overspill of salinewater during high water and bank erosion during low water along the tidal reach downstream of the barrier. In this study, the analytical model is developed to determine the river hydraulic behaviors which affects by tide, river flow and barrier structure of the Bang Pakong River, Thailand. The analytical model of tide and river flow of the Chao Phraya River is adopted and adjusted to determine the tide characteristics modified by river flow. Moreover, the analytical model of tide and salinity barrier would then be developed by cooperating of the analytical model of tide and river flow interaction together with tidal flow cooscillating tide theory. It is found from this study that the analytical model of the Chao Phraya River which is suitable for high freshwater discharge underestimates damping modulus and friction slope which requires adjustment for low freshwater discharge of the Bang Pakong River. The analytical model of tide and salinity barrier can be finally used to predict the water level downstream of the barrier. The model overestimated the water level fluctuation during the unsteady flow from upstream which may be because of the assumption of steady flow condition in the model development due to limited data available after the construction.

  7. The Effect of Tide on the Global Climate Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xuexiang; CHEN Zhen; CHEN Dianyou; Qiao Qiyuan

    2002-01-01

    The differential rotation between the solid and fluid spheres caused by tidal force could explain the 1500 to 1800-year cycle of the world's temperature. Strong tide increases the vertical and horizontal mixing of water in the oceans, drawing the cold Pacific water from the depths to the surface and the warm water from the west to the east, where it cools or warms the atmosphere above, absorbs or releases CO2 to decrease or increase greenhouse effect and to make La Nina or El Nino occur in the global. The moon's declination and obliquity of the ecliptic affect the tidal intensity. The exchange of tidal energy and tide-generating force caused by the sun, moon and major planets makes the earth's layers rotate in different speeds. The differenti-al rotation between solid and fluid of the earth is the basic reason for El Nino and global climate change.

  8. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF WAVES AND TIDE-SURGE INTERACTION ON TIDE-SURGES IN THE BOHAI SEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹宝树; 侯一筠; 程明华; 苏京志; 林明祥; 李明悝; M.I.El-Sabh

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The author's combined numerical model consisting of a third generation shallow water wave model and a 3-D tide-surge model with wave-dependent surface wind stress were used to study the influence of waves on fide-surge motion. For the typical weather case, in this study, the magnitude and mechanism of the influence of waves on tide-surges in the Bohai Sea were revealed for the first time. The results showed that although consideration of the wave-dependent surface wind stresses raise slightly the traditional surface wind stress, due to the accumulated effects, the computed results are improved on the whole. Storm level maximum modulation can reach 0.4 m. The results computed by the combined model agreed well with the measured data.

  9. Stratospheric sudden warming and lunar tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A stratospheric sudden warming is a large-scale disturbance in the middle atmosphere. Recent studies have shown that the effect of stratospheric sudden warnings extends well into the upper atmosphere. A stratospheric sudden warming is often accompanied by an amplification of lunar tides in the ionosphere/theremosphere. However, there are occasionally winters when a stratospheric sudden warming occurs without an enhancement of the lunar tide in the upper atmosphere, and other winters when large lunar tides are observed without a strong stratospheric sudden warming. We examine the winters when the correlation breaks down and discuss possible causes.

  10. Using an Altimeter-Derived Internal Tide Model to Remove Tides from in Situ Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaron, Edward D.; Ray, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Internal waves at tidal frequencies, i.e., the internal tides, are a prominent source of variability in the ocean associated with significant vertical isopycnal displacements and currents. Because the isopycnal displacements are caused by ageostrophic dynamics, they contribute uncertainty to geostrophic transport inferred from vertical profiles in the ocean. Here it is demonstrated that a newly developed model of the main semidiurnal (M2) internal tide derived from satellite altimetry may be used to partially remove the tide from vertical profile data, as measured by the reduction of steric height variance inferred from the profiles. It is further demonstrated that the internal tide model can account for a component of the near-surface velocity as measured by drogued drifters. These comparisons represent a validation of the internal tide model using independent data and highlight its potential use in removing internal tide signals from in situ observations.

  11. Motional Induction by Tsunamis and Ocean Tides: 10 Years of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Takuto

    2017-06-01

    Motional induction is the process by which the motion of conductive seawater in the ambient geomagnetic main field generates electromagnetic (EM) variations, which are observable on land, at the seafloor, and sometimes at satellite altitudes. Recent years have seen notable progress in our understanding of motional induction associated with tsunamis and with ocean tides. New studies of tsunami motional induction were triggered by the 2004 Sumatra earthquake tsunami and further promoted by subsequent events, such as the 2010 Chile earthquake and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. These events yielded observations of tsunami-generated EM variations from land and seafloor stations. Studies of magnetic fields generated by ocean tides attracted interest when the Swarm satellite constellation enabled researchers to monitor tide-generated magnetic variations from low Earth orbit. Both avenues of research benefited from the advent of sophisticated seafloor instruments, by which we may exploit motional induction for novel applications. For example, seafloor EM measurements can serve as detectors of vector properties of tsunamis, and seafloor EM data related to ocean tides have proved useful for sounding Earth's deep interior. This paper reviews and discusses the progress made in motional induction studies associated with tsunamis and ocean tides during the last decade.

  12. Red Tide Frequency Analysis Using the Extreme Value Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the red tide erupted frequently, and caused a great economic loss. At present, most literatures emphasize the academic research on the growth mechanism of red tide alga. In order to find out the characters of red tide in detail and improve the precision of forecast, this paper gives some new approaches to dealing with the red tide. By the extreme values, we deal with the red tide frequency analysis and get the estimation of T-times red tide level U(T), which is the level once the consistence of red tide alga exceeds on the average in a period of T times.

  13. Tides and tidal harmonics at Umbharat, Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryanarayana, A.; Swamy, G.N.

    A part of the data on tides recorded at Machiwada near Umbharat, Gulf of Cambay during April 1978 was subjected to harmonic analysis following the Admiralty procedure. The general tidal characteristics and the value of four major harmonic...

  14. Fully compressive tides in galaxy mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent; Naab, Thorsten; Theis, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The disruptive effect of galactic tides is a textbook example of gravitational dynamics. However, depending on the shape of the potential, tides can also become fully compressive. When that is the case, they might trigger or strengthen the formation of galactic substructures (star clusters, tidal dwarf galaxies), instead of destroying them. We perform N-body simulations of interacting galaxies to quantify this effect. We demonstrate that tidal compression occurs repeatedly during a galaxy merger, independently of the specific choice of parameterization. With a model tailored to the Antennae galaxies, we show that the distribution of compressive tides matches the locations and timescales of observed substructures. After extending our study to a broad range of parameters, we conclude that neither the importance of the compressive tides (~15% of the stellar mass) nor their duration (~ 10 Myr) are strongly affected by changes in the progenitors' configurations and orbits. Moreover, we show that individual clumps ...

  15. NOAA NCCOS: New England Red Tide Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Alexandrium blooms are one of several algal bloom types often called "red tides," but more correctly referred to as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). Alexandrium produces...

  16. Modeling the tides of Massachusetts and Cape Cod bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenter, H.L.; Signell, R.P.; Blumberg, A.F.; ,

    1993-01-01

    A time-dependent, three-dimensional numerical modeling study of the tides of Massachusetts and Cape Code Bays, motivated by construction of a new sewage treatment plant and ocean outfall for the city of Boston, has been undertaken by the authors. The numerical model being used is a hybrid version of the Blumberg and Mellor ECOM3D model, modified to include a semi-implicit time-stepping scheme and transport of a non-reactive dissolved constituent. Tides in the bays are dominated by the semi-diurnal frequencies, in particular by the M2 tide, due to the resonance of these frequencies in the Gulf of Maine. The numerical model reproduces, well, measured tidal ellipses in unstratified wintertime conditions. Stratified conditions present more of a problem because tidal-frequency internal wave generation and propagation significantly complicates the structure of the resulting tidal field. Nonetheless, the numerical model reproduces qualitative aspects of the stratified tidal flow that are consistent with observations in the bays.

  17. Diurnal tides in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Z.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D numerical model with a space grid of about 14 km is applied to calculate diurnal tidal constituents K(1) and O(1) in the Arctic Ocean. Calculated corange and cotidal charts show that along the continental slope, local regions of increased sea level amplitude, highly variable phase and enhanced currents occur. It is shown that in these local regions, shelf waves (topographic waves) of tidal origin are generated. In the Arctic Ocean and Northern Atlantic Ocean more than 30 regions of enhanced currents are identified. To prove the near-resonant interaction of the diurnal tides with the local bottom topography, the natural periods of oscillations for all regions have been calculated. The flux of energy averaged over the tidal period depicts the gyres of semitrapped energy, suggesting that the shelf waves are partially trapped over the irregularities of the bottom topography. It is shown that the occurrence of near-resonance phenomenon changes the energy flow in the tidal waves. First, the flux of energy from the astronomical sources is amplified in the shelf wave regions, and afterwards the tidal energy is strongly dissipated in the same regions.

  18. Estimates of global M2 internal tide energy fluxes using TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yanwei; LIANG Xinfeng; TIAN Jiwei; YANG Lifen

    2009-01-01

    TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data from October 1992 to June 2002 are used to calculate the global barotropic M2 tidal currents using long-term tidal harmonic analysis. The tides calculated agree well with ADCP data obtained from the South China Sea (SCS). The maximum tide velocities along the semi-major axis and semi-minor axis can be computed from the tidal ellipse. The global distribution of M2 internal tide vertical energy flux from the sea bottom is calculated based on a linear internal wave generation model. The global vertical energy flux of M2 internal tide is 0.96 TW, with 0.36 TW in the Pacific, 0.31 TW in the Atlantic and 0.29 TW in the Indian Ocean, obtained in this study. The total horizontal energy flux of M2 internal tide radiating into the open ocean from the lateral boundaries is 0.13 TW, with 0.06 TW in the Pacific, 0.04TW in the Atlantic, and 0.03 TW in the Indian Ocean. The result shows that the principal lunar semi-diurnal tide M2 provides enough energy to maintain the large-scale thermohaline circulation of the ocean.

  19. Synthesis and testing of ZnO nanoparticles for photo-initiation: experimental observation of two different non-migration initiators for bulk polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M.

    2015-05-01

    The migration and transport of polymerization initiators are problematic for commercially used polymerization procedures. For example, UV printing of packaging generates products with potentially harmful components that come in contact with food. Enlarging the size of the initiator is the only way to prevent contamination, e.g., by gas phase transport. In this manuscript, the synthesis and advanced and full analyses of novel nanoparticle-based types of non-migration, fragmenting and non-fragmenting photo-initiators will be presented in detail. This study introduces non-fragmenting/``Norrish type II'' and fragmenting/``Norrish type I'' ZnO nanoparticle-based initiators and compares them with two commercial products, a ``Norrish type I'' initiator and a ``Norrish type II'' initiator. Therefore, inter alia, the recently developed analysis involves examining the solidification by UV-vis and the double bond content by Raman. Irradiation is performed using absolute and spectrally calibrated xenon flash lights. A novel procedure for absolute and spectral calibration of such light sources is also presented. The non-optimized ``Norrish type II'' particle-based initiator is already many times faster than benzophenone, which is a molecular initiator of the same non-fragmenting type. This experimentally observed difference in reactive particle-based systems without co-initiators is unexpected. Co-initiators are normally an additional molecular species, which leads to migration problems. The discovery of significant initiation potential resulting in a very well-dispersed organic-inorganic hybrid material suggests a new field of research opportunities at the interface of physical chemistry, polymer chemistry and engineering science, with enormous value for human health.The migration and transport of polymerization initiators are problematic for commercially used polymerization procedures. For example, UV printing of packaging generates products with potentially harmful

  20. Mapping Hurricane Rita inland storm tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenbrock, Charles; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Blanchard, Stephen F.; Simonovic, Slobodan P.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of effected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems (GIS) provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-hour intervals from midnight (0000 hour) through noon (1200 hour) on September 24, 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared to the extent of flood-inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks.

  1. Temperature tides determined with meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, W. K.; Hocking, A.

    2002-09-01

    A new analysis method for producing tidal temperature parameters using meteor radar measurements is presented, and is demonstrated with data from one polar and two mid-latitude sites. The technique further develops the temperature algorithm originally introduced by Hocking (1999). That earlier method was used to produce temperature measurements over time scales of days and months, but required an empirical model for the mean temperature gradient in the mesopause region. However, when tides are present, this temperature gradient is modulated by the presence of the tides, complicating extraction of diurnal variations. Nevertheless, if the vertical wavelengths of the tides are known from wind measurements, the effects of the gradient variations can be compensated for, permitting determination of temperature tidal amplitudes and phases by meteor techniques. The basic theory is described, and results from meteor radars at Resolute Bay (Canada), London (Canada) and Albuquerque (New Mexico, USA) are shown. Our results are compared with other lidar data, computer models, fundamental tidal theory and rocket data. Phase measurements at two mid-latitude sites (Albuquerque, New Mexico, and London, Canada) show times of maximum for the diurnal temperature tide to change modestly throughout most of the year, varying generally between 0 h and 6 h, with an excursion to 12 h in June at London. The semidiurnal tide shows a larger annual variation in time of maximum, being at 2 4 h in the winter months but increasing to 9 h during the late summer and early fall. We also find that, at least at mid-latitudes, the phase of the temperature tide matches closely the phase of the meridional tide, and theoretical justification for this statement is given. We also demonstrate that this is true using the Global Scale Wave Model (Hagan et al., 1999). Median values for the temperature amplitudes for each site are in the range 5 to 6 Kelvin. Results from a more northern site (Resolute Bay) show

  2. Semidiurnal internal tides in a Patagonian fjord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, L.; Pérez-Santos, I.; Valle-Levinson, A.; Schneider, W.

    2014-12-01

    The fjords of central Chilean Patagonia (47°S) receive fresh water from both precipitation and the Baker River. This buoyancy input generates a two layer hydrographic system characterized by strong salinity stratification (∼30 g kg-1 over a depth range of 7-15 m), which favors baroclinic conditions in the fjord. Hourly current velocity profiles were collected with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) moored at a depth of 40 m during March-April 2009, and complemented by 11 CTD profiles and hourly sea level time series. These data allowed the detection of semidiurnal internal tidal waves for the first time in this region. Wavelength and horizontal phase speeds were determined by the dynamical mode 1 for internal waves. Maximum wavelength was 52 km, travelling at a horizontal phase speed of ∼1.16 m s-1. Wavelet, spectral and empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis techniques applied to the echo anomaly signal and to the baroclinic velocity showed largest semidiurnal amplitudes near the pycnocline. Out of three modes obtained from the EOF analysis, two modes displayed a two- or three-layer flow structure with flow direction reversing at the pycnocline. The semidiurnal internal waves were found as fluctuations near the pycnocline in sporadic packets correlated to high discharge pulses of the Baker River (r2 = 0.77). Additionally, internal Froude number calculations at the mouth of the Baker River indicated critical flow conditions, which allowed for generation of internal waves at the plume front. These waves are separated from the river plume after internal wave phase speeds surpassed frontal speeds. This suggests that the internal waves were modulated by pulses in high river discharge rather than the interaction of barotropic tide with bathymetry (a sill). An implication of these internal waves would be to increase vertical mixing of nutrients toward the surface, through shear instabilities, which would favor primary production.

  3. On resonant properties of tides in the Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Igor; Vilibić, Ivica; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The long-term hourly data (record lengths of 8 - 58 years) from five tide gauges (Trieste, Rovinj, Zadar, Split, and Dubrovnik) were used to examine the resonant origin of tidal oscillations in the Adriatic Sea. The diurnal and semidiurnal tidal peaks and their overtones are well-defined in the sea level spectra. High-resolution spectra revealed the fine structure of discrete peaks at tidal frequencies. Furthermore, a wide spectral "hump" with a central frequency of about 21.9 h was found in all examined spectra, associated with the fundamental eigen mode of the Adriatic Sea. The spectral energy of this "hump" increases northward toward the head of the sea (from Dubrovnik to Trieste). Harmonic analysis of the tides for individual yearly series, with subsequent vector averaging over the entire observational period, was applied to estimate mean amplitudes and phases of tidal constituents for the five stations. In addition to the major tidal harmonics (M2, S2, K1, and O1), significant amplitudes were also detected for other diurnal tidal harmonics (P1, J1, and OO1). This particularly applies to Zadar, where the amplitude of diurnal harmonic OO1 (3.8 cm) exceeds the amplitudes of harmonics O1, Q1, S2, N2 and K2, although the theoretical equilibrium amplitude of OO1 is significantly smaller. To examine the generation properties of tides in the Adriatic Sea, the equilibrium response was estimated and found to rise sharply with increasing frequency, i.e. when approaching the fundamental Adriatic eigen mode period of 21.9 h: from Q1 (26.87 h) to J1 (23.10 h) and OO1 (22.31 h). The resonant amplification of the OO1 and J1 amplitudes increases toward the head of the sea. These results indicate that the diurnal tides in the Adriatic Sea have a resonant character and that the significant relative amplification of harmonics OO1 and J1 are caused by the influence of the corresponding eigen mode. In the semidiurnal tidal band, the equilibrium response also amplifies slightly with

  4. TIDE TOOL: Open-Source Sea-Level Monitoring Software for Tsunami Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S. A.; Kong, L. S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    A tsunami warning center (TWC) typically decides to issue a tsunami warning bulletin when initial estimates of earthquake source parameters suggest it may be capable of generating a tsunami. A TWC, however, relies on sea-level data to provide prima facie evidence for the existence or non-existence of destructive tsunami waves and to constrain tsunami wave height forecast models. In the aftermath of the 2004 Sumatra disaster, the International Tsunami Information Center asked the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) to develop a platform-independent, easy-to-use software package to give nascent TWCs the ability to process WMO Global Telecommunications System (GTS) sea-level messages and to analyze the resulting sea-level curves (marigrams). In response PTWC developed TIDE TOOL that has since steadily grown in sophistication to become PTWC's operational sea-level processing system. TIDE TOOL has two main parts: a decoder that reads GTS sea-level message logs, and a graphical user interface (GUI) written in the open-source platform-independent graphical toolkit scripting language Tcl/Tk. This GUI consists of dynamic map-based clients that allow the user to select and analyze a single station or groups of stations by displaying their marigams in strip-chart or screen-tiled forms. TIDE TOOL also includes detail maps of each station to show each station's geographical context and reverse tsunami travel time contours to each station. TIDE TOOL can also be coupled to the GEOWARE™ TTT program to plot tsunami travel times and to indicate the expected tsunami arrival time on the marigrams. Because sea-level messages are structured in a rich variety of formats TIDE TOOL includes a metadata file, COMP_META, that contains all of the information needed by TIDE TOOL to decode sea-level data as well as basic information such as the geographical coordinates of each station. TIDE TOOL can therefore continuously decode theses sea-level messages in real-time and display the time

  5. Substructures formation induced by gravitational tides?

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, F; Naab, T; Boily, C M

    2009-01-01

    Physics lectures always refer to the tides as a disruptive effect. However, tides can also be compressive. When the potential of two galaxies overlap, as happens during a merger, fully compressive tides can develop and have a strong impact on the dynamics of substructures such as star clusters or tidal dwarf galaxies. Using N-body simulations of a large set of mergers, we noticed the importance of these tidal modes at cluster scale. With a model of the Antennae galaxies, we conclude that the positions and timescales of these tidal modes match the actual distribution of young clusters. A detailed study of the statistics of the compressive tides shows a stunning correlation between this purely gravitational effect and the observed properties of the star clusters. In this contribution, we introduce the concept of compressive tide and show its relevance in the special case of the Antennae galaxies. We extend our conclusions to a broad range of parameters and discuss their implications on several critical points s...

  6. Atmospheric tides in Earth-like planets

    CERN Document Server

    Auclair-Desrotour, Pierre; Mathis, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric tides can strongly affect the rotational dynamics of planets. In the family of Earth-like planets, such as Venus, this physical mechanism coupled with solid tides makes the angular velocity evolve over long timescales and determines the equilibrium configurations of their spin. Contrary to the solid core, the atmosphere is submitted to both tidal gravitational potential and insolation flux coming from the star. The complex response of the gas is intrinsically linked to its physical properties. This dependence has to be characterized and quantified to study the large variety of extrasolar planetary systems. We develop a theoretical global model where radiative losses, which are predominant in slowly rotating atmospheres, are taken into account. We analytically compute the tidal perturbation of pressure, density, temperature and velocity field from which we deduce the expressions of atmospheric Love numbers and tidal torque exerted by the star. The dynamics of atmospheric tides depends on the freque...

  7. Thermal Tides in Fluid Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Arras, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Asynchronous rotation and orbital eccentricity lead to time-dependent irradiation of the close-in gas giant exoplanets -- the hot Jupiters. This time-dependent surface heating gives rise to fluid motions which propagate throughout the planet. We investigate the ability of this "thermal tide" to produce a quadrupole moment which can couple to the stellar gravitational tidal force. While previous investigations discussed planets with solid surfaces, here we focus on entirely fluid planets in order to understand gas giants with small cores. The Coriolis force, thermal diffusion and self-gravity of the perturbations are ignored for simplicity. First, we examine the response to thermal forcing through analytic solutions of the fluid equations which treat the forcing frequency as a small parameter. In the "equilibrium tide" limit of zero frequency, fluid motion is present but does not induce a quadrupole moment. In the next approximation, finite frequency corrections to the equilibrium tide do lead to a nonzero qua...

  8. Temporal variations of groundwater salinity and temperature in a tidal flat in front of a tide pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashita, Shinya; Hibino, Tadashi; Komai, Katsuaki; Narong, Touch

    2016-07-01

    A tidal flat in an estuary is a complex hydrological system, which is characterized by interactions between surface water in river and groundwater and is particularly driven by tides. Small-scale variability in the discharge or inflow could lead to variable results of surface groundwater salinity and temperature. In particular, there is a high possibility that a hydraulic head difference due to the presence of a tide pool, lagoon, or seep would cause the generation of small-scale spatial submarine groundwater discharge. This study investigates the spatio-temporal variations in surface groundwater salinity and temperature (0-50 cm depth) and the groundwater table in a tidal flat in the presence and absence of a tide pool. A tide pool formed in the Ota River diversion channel at the study observation site following the construction of a masonry revetment in the intertidal zone. We established observation sites at three locations to consider the effects of the presence or absence of a tide pool. Specifically, we measured the surface water in river and groundwater salinity, temperature, and level in the presence and absence of a tide pool in 2007 and 2009. Reviewing the past data based on these results, we found the characteristic variation of groundwater salinity around the tide pool during flood event in 2004. Groundwater salinity and temperature were directly measured by setting conductivity-temperature meters in the tidal flat. We conclude that the groundwater table in the presence of the tide pool was 20 cm higher than in areas where no tide pool existed. The temporal variation of groundwater salinity in the presence of the tide pool was 5 psu lower than those where a tide pool was absent. Moreover, we confirmed the increase in groundwater salinity up to 8 psu in the tidal flat during flood, when river water salinity was at 0 psu and groundwater salinity in the tide pool was at 10 psu. We consider that the high groundwater table, the low salinity, and the increase

  9. Late Devonian red tide and mass extinction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Molecular stratigraphical, carbonate carbon isotopic, stratigraphical and paleontological data show that algal booming, eutrophication, anoxia, hypersalinity, positive ( 13C excursion and biomass decreasing occurred in the offshore carbonate environments of the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) transition, which hints that red tide might frequently take place in the F-F transition of Guangxi, South China. We suggest that the mass extinction of the reef ecosystems and the shallow-water marine organisms in the F-F transition of the lower-middle latitudes may be related to the frequent occurrence of red tide in that time.

  10. Arctic tides from GPS on sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    The presence of sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean plays a significant role in the Arctic climate. Sea ice dampens the ocean tide amplitude with the result that global tidal models which use only astronomical data perform less accurately in the polar regions. This study presents a kinematic processing...... of Global Positioning System (GPS) buoys placed on sea-ice at five different sites north of Greenland for the study of sea level height and tidal analysis to improve tidal models in the Central Arctic. The GPS measurements are compared with the Arctic tidal model AOTIM-5, which assimilates tide...

  11. Tides and sea-level variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Suresh, I.; Sundar, D.

    condition of no net flow (i.e., the dry season condition). The most useful characteristic of a model of this kind is that it provides a useful conceptual framework to understand the observed distribution of amplitude and phase in the estuaries in terms...:39 RPS rpb001ch02 30 S. R. SHETYE ET AL. describes tides using a three-year record at Mormugao located at the mouth of the Zuari estuary (Map A). In 1993, tide-pole measurements were carried out at 15 locations in the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries for three...

  12. Concerning thermal tides on hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    By analogy with a mechanism proposed by Gold and Soter to explain the retrograde rotation of Venus, Arras and Socrates suggest that thermal tides may excite hot jovian exoplanets into nonsynchronous rotation, and perhaps also noncircular orbits. It is shown here that because of the absence of a solid surface above the convective core of a jovian planet, the coupling of the gravitational and thermal tides vanishes to zeroth order in the ratio of the atmospheric scale height to the planetary radius. At the next order, the effect probably has the sign opposite to that claimed by the latter authors, hence reinforcing synchronous and circular orbits.

  13. Tides in the Gulf of Khambhat, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, R.K.; Shetye, S.R.

    Semi-diurnal tides in the Gulf of Khambhat (Cambay), west coast of India, amplify about threefold from mouth to head. In contrast, the amplification of diurnal tides is much smaller. A one-dimensional barotropic model with channel geometry...

  14. Tidal asymmetry in a funnel-shaped estuary with mixed semidiurnal tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenping; Schuttelaars, Henk; Zhang, Heng

    2016-05-01

    Different types of tidal asymmetry (see review of de Swart and Zimmerman Annu Rev Fluid Mech 41: 203-229, 2009) are examined in this study. We distinguish three types of tidal asymmetry: duration and magnitude differences between flood and ebb tidal flow, duration difference between the rising and falling tides. For waterborne substance transport, the first two asymmetries are important while the last one is not. In this study, we take the Huangmaohai Estuary (HE), Pearl River Delta, China as an example to examine the spatio-temporal variations of the tidal asymmetry in a mixed semidiurnal tidal regime and to explain them by investigating the associated mechanisms. The methodology defining the tidal duration asymmetry and velocity skewness, proposed by Nidzieko (J Geophys Res 115: C08006. doi: 10.1029/2009JC005864 , 2010) and synthesized by Song et al. (J Geophys Res 116: C12007. doi: 10.1029/2011JC007270 , 2011), is utilized here and referred to as tidal duration asymmetry (TDA) and flow velocity asymmetry (FVA), respectively. The methodology is further used to quantify the flow duration asymmetry (FDA). A positive asymmetry means a shorter duration of low water slack for FDA, a shorter duration of the rising tide for TDA, and a flood dominance for FVA and vice versa. The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model is used to provide relatively long-term water elevation and velocity data and to conduct diagnostic experiments. In the HE, the main tidal constituents are diurnal tides K 1, O 1 and semidiurnal tides M 2 and S 2. The interaction among the diurnal and semidiurnal tides generates a negative tidal asymmetry, while the interactions among semidiurnal tides and their overtides or compound tides result in a positive tidal asymmetry. The competition among the above interactions determines the FDA and TDA, whereas for the FVA, aside from the interaction among different tidal constituents, an extra component, the residual flow, plays an important role. The

  15. A laboratory study of low-mode internal tide scattering by finite-amplitude topography

    CERN Document Server

    Peacock, Thomas; Didelle, Henri; Viboud, Samuel; Dauxois, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    We present the first laboratory experimental results concerning the scattering of a low-mode internal tide by a gaussian topography. Experiments performed at the Coriolis Platform in Grenoble used a recently-conceived internal wave generator as a means of producing a high-quality mode-1 wave field. The evolution of the wave field in the absence and presence of a supercritical Gaussian was studied by performing spatiotemporal modal decompositions of velocity field data obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The results support predictions that large-amplitude supercritical topography produces significant reflection of the internal tide and transfer of energy from low to high modes.

  16. Instability properties under a model mode-1 internal tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, S.; Peter, D.

    2016-11-01

    The instability properties of the bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a model mode-1 internal tide in linearly stratified finite-depth water are studied, using 2-D direct numerical simulations (DNS) based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. This model internal tide is a proxy for its lower-mode oceanic counterpart which is generated when stratified water is forced over topography by barotropic tidal currents. Such low-mode internal tidal waves tend to propagate long distances from the point of generation, carrying with them large amounts of energy. One mechanism through which this energy is dissipated is through wave-BBL interactions, where strong shear layers develop along the bed, leading to focused instabilities which are precursors for localized turbulent events. Such events in the BBL can cause sediment resuspension and drive benthic nutrient fluxes, playing a crucial role in ecosystem balances. In the model problem, the stability response of the time-dependent BBL is examined by introducing low-amplitude perturbations near the bed. The corresponding time-evolving BBL-integrated perturbation energy growth rates are then computed, by comparing both the perturbed and unperturbed cases. When an instability actually occurs, its vorticity structure and preferred location is identified. Ultimately, a stability boundary is constructed as a function of perturbation amplitude and internal wave steepness, aspect ration and Reynolds number.

  17. Dynamical tides in general relativity: Effective action and effective-one-body Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Jan; Hinderer, Tanja; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Tidal effects have an important impact on the late inspiral of compact binary systems containing neutron stars. Most current models of tidal deformations of neutron stars assume that the tidal bulge is directly related to the tidal field generated by the companion, with a constant response coefficient. However, if the orbital motion approaches a resonance with one of the internal modes of the neutron star, this adiabatic description of tidal effects starts to break down, and the tides become dynamical. In this paper, we consider dynamical tides in general relativity due to the quadrupolar fundamental oscillation mode of a neutron star. We devise a description of the effects of the neutron star's finite size on the orbital dynamics based on an effective point-particle action augmented by dynamical quadrupolar degrees of freedom. We analyze the post-Newtonian and test-particle approximations of this model and incorporate the results into an effective-one-body Hamiltonian. This enables us to extend the description of dynamical tides over the entire inspiral. We demonstrate that dynamical tides give a significant enhancement of matter effects compared to adiabatic tides, at least for neutron stars with large radii and for low mass-ratio systems, and should therefore be included in accurate models for gravitational-wave data analysis.

  18. Accuracy assessment of global barotropic ocean tide models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammer, D.; Ray, R. D.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of state-of-the-art global barotropic tide models is assessed using bottom pressure data, coastal tide gauges, satellite altimetry, various geodetic data on Antarctic ice shelves, and independent tracked satellite orbit perturbations. Tide models under review include empirical, purel...

  19. Shallow-water loading tides in Japan from superconducting gravimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Hoyer, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Gravity observations from superconducting gravimeters are used to observe loading effects from shallow-water tides on the Japanese cast and west coasts. Non-linear third-diurnal and higher-frequency shallow-water tides are identified in the tide-gauge observations from these coastal areas. The most...

  20. Shallow-water loading tides in Japan from superconducting gravimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Hoyer, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Gravity observations from superconducting gravimeters are used to observe loading effects from shallow-water tides on the Japanese cast and west coasts. Non-linear third-diurnal and higher-frequency shallow-water tides are identified in the tide-gauge observations from these coastal areas. The mo...

  1. Tide Pods made its debut%Tide Pods洗涤剂闪亮登场

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董青霞; 刘斌

    2012-01-01

    宝洁公司(P&G)多效洗涤剂Tide Pods的推出使洗涤剂行业发生了重大革新,改变了人们洗衣的方式,从而使洗衣这一过程发生了质的变化。Tide Pods采用一次投入式内分3格的包装,省去了用量杯计量、注入洗涤剂和预处理衣物等琐事,并能达到最好的清洗效果。%PG insisted that the rollout of Tide Pods was the biggest innovation to hit the laundry category.With Tide Pods,a kind of three-chamber packaging,there is no need to measure,pour and pre-treating,you can get the excellent results.

  2. Parents Who Moved against the Tide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perske, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This article recounts the historical discrimination against children with mental retardation and the extraordinary efforts made by parents of children with disabilities to speak out against the tide that dehumanized their children. The growth of national, state, and local Arcs and parent advocacy efforts are discussed. (Contains 5 references.) (CR)

  3. The Contribution of Io-Raised Tides to Europa's Diurnally-Varying Surface Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A,; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Europa's icy surface records a rich history of geologic activity, Several features appear to be tectonic in origin and may have formed in response to Europa's daily-varying tidal stress [I]. Strike-slip faults and arcuate features called cycloids have both been linked to the patterns of stress change caused by eccentricity and obliquity [2J[3]. In fact, as Europa's obliquity has not been directly measured, observed tectonic patterns arc currently the best indicators of a theoretically supported [4] non-negligible obliquity. The diurnal tidal stress due to eccentricity is calculated by subtracting the average (or static) tidal shape of Europa generated by Jupiter's gravitational field from the instantaneous shape, which varies as Europa moves through its eccentric orbit [5]. In other words, it is the change of shape away from average that generates tidal stress. One might expect tidal contributions from the other large moons of Jupiter to be negligible given their size and the height of the tides they raise on Europa versus Jupiter's mass and the height of the tide it raises on Europa, However, what matters for tidally-induced stress is not how large the lo-raised bulge is compared to the Jupiter-raised bulge but rather the differences bet\\Veen the instantaneous and static bulges in each case. For example, when Europa is at apocenter, Jupiter raises a tide 30m lower than its static tide. At the same time, 10 raises a tide about 0.5m higher than its static tide. Hence, the change in Io's tidal distortion is about 2% of the change in the Jovian distortion when Europa is at apocenter

  4. A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory mesocosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke P. Miller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental mesocosm studies of rocky shore and estuarine intertidal systems may benefit from the application of natural tide cycles to better replicate variation in immersion time, water depth, and attendant fluctuations in abiotic and edaphic conditions. Here we describe a stand-alone microcontroller tide prediction open-source software program, coupled with a mechanical tidal elevation control system, which allows continuous adjustment of aquarium water depths in synchrony with local tide cycles. We used this system to monitor the growth of Spartina foliosa marsh cordgrass and scale insect herbivores at three simulated shore elevations in laboratory mesocosms. Plant growth decreased with increasing shore elevation, while scale insect population growth on the plants was not strongly affected by immersion time. This system shows promise for a range of laboratory mesocosm studies where natural tide cycling could impact organism performance or behavior, while the tide prediction system could additionally be utilized in field experiments where treatments need to be applied at certain stages of the tide cycle.

  5. Environmental Forcing of Red Tides in the Southern Benguela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Jury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Southern Benguela cape upwelling plumes have inshore wind shadows prone to red tides in late summer. Their intensity and coverage are estimated by satellite fluorescence measurements in the period 1997–2012 and qualified by in situ reports. High satellite fluorescence cases are identified at daily to seasonal time scales, and characteristics of the upper ocean and lower atmosphere are studied using third generation reanalyses. A dominant feature is easterly winds over the Cape Peninsula (34°S, 18°E induced by a ridging anticyclone-coastal low weather pattern. Over Cape Columbine (33°S, there is a wind shadow with cyclonic wind and current shear. Composite atmospheric profiles reveal a 4°C temperature inversion near 500 m that traps a coastal wind jet >6 m/s below 200 m. The composite shelf oceanography shows a relic upwelling plume below 10 m overtopped by warmer water near the coast, providing the thermal stratification needed for biotic aggregation. Data from the IPSL5 coupled climate model over the period 1980–2080 indicates that environmental conditions favoring red tides may become more frequent.

  6. Study on Operation Optimization of Pumping Station's 24 Hours Operation under Influences of Tides and Peak-Valley Electricity Prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Gong; Jilin, Cheng; Lihua, Zhang; Rentian, Zhang

    2010-06-01

    According to different processes of tides and peak-valley electricity prices, this paper determines the optimal start up time in pumping station's 24 hours operation between the rating state and adjusting blade angle state respectively based on the optimization objective function and optimization model for single-unit pump's 24 hours operation taking JiangDu No.4 Pumping Station for example. In the meantime, this paper proposes the following regularities between optimal start up time of pumping station and the process of tides and peak-valley electricity prices each day within a month: (1) In the rating and adjusting blade angle state, the optimal start up time in pumping station's 24 hours operation which depends on the tide generation at the same day varies with the process of tides. There are mainly two kinds of optimal start up time which include the time at tide generation and 12 hours after it. (2) In the rating state, the optimal start up time on each day in a month exhibits a rule of symmetry from 29 to 28 of next month in the lunar calendar. The time of tide generation usually exists in the period of peak electricity price or the valley one. The higher electricity price corresponds to the higher minimum cost of water pumping at unit, which means that the minimum cost of water pumping at unit depends on the peak-valley electricity price at the time of tide generation on the same day. (3) In the adjusting blade angle state, the minimum cost of water pumping at unit in pumping station's 24 hour operation depends on the process of peak-valley electricity prices. And in the adjusting blade angle state, 4.85%˜5.37% of the minimum cost of water pumping at unit will be saved than that of in the rating state.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Barotropic Tides around Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Kai Hu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 1/12°, 2-D barotropic tide model was used to examine the characteristics of barotropic tides and to improve the accuracy of predicting tidal sea levels and currents in the seas around Taiwan. The form ratio suggests that tides are predominantly semidiurnal in the northern reaches of the Taiwan Strait and mixed of diurnal and semidiurnal elsewhere around Taiwan. When the dominant M2 wave enters the Strait from the north, its amplitude is magnified to ~2 m in the middle, and then decreases rapidly toward the south end of the Strait. The predominance of diurnal tides along the southwest to the south coast of Taiwan is attributed to the quasi-resonance of diurnal waves in the South China Sea. The tidal range is small and tidal currents are weak off the east coast of Taiwan. Barotropic tidal energy is mostly dissipated on the shallow banks of the southwestern Strait. Results summarized from sensitivity tests on the bottom drag coefficient (CD and horizontal eddy viscosity (AM indicate that CD = 0.0015 - 0.00175 and AM = 150 m2 s-1 lead to the best model-data fit when compared to the observed tidal sea levels at ten reference tide-gauge stations around Taiwan. The averaged root-mean-squared (RMS differences of the simulated tidal sea level for the six principal constituents of O1, P1, K1, N2, M2, and S2 are significantly reduced to 1.3, 0.7, 2.0, 1.6, 5.1, and 3.1 cm, respectively, compared to that calculated from a 0.5° resolution global tide harmonic constant database, NAO.99b (Matsumoto et al. 2000. The averaged RMS differences of barotropic tidal currents (U, V for O1, K1, M2, and S2 are (0.92, 1.64, (1.17, 0.61, (3.88, 2.37, and (1.52, 1.20 cm s-1. A database of tidal sea levels and current harmonic constants, TWTIDE08, for Q1, O1, P1, K1, J1, OO1, 2N2, μ2, N2, ν2, M2, L2, T2, S2, and K2 is established with this study.

  8. Tides, main lunar phases and babies

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Fernando Lang da; UFRGS - Rio Grande do Sul

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the tides are discussed, using mathematics that is accessible to secondary school students; we show that both the Moon and the Sun are responsible for the tidal effects on the oceans. Despite the gravitational pull of the Sun on the Earth being approximately 200 times greater than that of the Moon, solar tidal effects are approximately half those of the lunar effects. We present a study of 104,616 dates of birth, with the intention of identi...

  9. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  10. Earthquake, strong tide and global low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    "La Madre" is a kind of upper atmospheric air current, and occurs as "warm phase" and "cold phase" in the sky of Pacific Ocean alternately. There exists this phenomenon, called "Oscillation Decade in the Pacific" (ODP), for 20~30years. It is concerned with 60 year cycle of the tides. Lunar oscillations explain an intriguing 60-year cycle in the world's temperature. Strong tides increase the vertical mixing of water in the oceans, drawing cold ocean water from the depths to surface, where it cools the atmosphere above. The first strong seismic episode in China was from 1897 to 1912; the second to the fifth was the in1920-1937, 1946-1957, 1966-1980, 1991-2002, tsrectruely. The alternative boundaries of"La Madre" warm phase and cold phase were in 1890, 1924, 1946 and 2000, which were near the boundaries of four strong earthquakes. It indicated the strong earthquakes closedly related with the substances' motion of atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere, the change of gravity potential, and the exchange of angular momentum. The strong earthquakes in the ocean bottom can bring the cool waters at the deep ocean up to the ocean surface and make the global climate cold. the earthquake, strong tide and global low temperature are close inrelntion for each othen.

  11. Strong Tides in 1964 and 1982

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dianyou Chen; Xuexiang Yang; Qiyuan Qiao

    2003-01-01

    The differential rotation between solid and fluid caused by tidal force can explain a 1500 to 1800-year cycle of the climate change. Strong tide increases the vertical and horizontal mixing of water in ocean by drawing the cold Pacific water from the depths to the surface (or by making the warm water flow from the West Pacific to the East as well as from the North to the South). It cools or warms the atmosphere above and makes La Nina or El Nino occur in the whole world. Astronomical data have shown that strong tide is often associated with El Nino events. Volcanic activities at submarine are also controlled by strong tide. Volcanic activities can also draw warm water from the depths to the surface in the Pacific and volcanic ash can keep out sunlight, which is the most important external forcing factor for El Nino. If volcanic ash reaches into the stratosphere, finer aerosols will spread throughout the globe during a few months and will float in it for one to three years to weaken the sun's direct radiation to the areas. It is one of the factors to postpone EI Nino just like the process of solar eclipse.

  12. Atmospheric tides in Earth-like planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair-Desrotour, P.; Laskar, J.; Mathis, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Atmospheric tides can strongly affect the rotational dynamics of planets. In the family of Earth-like planets, which includes Venus, this physical mechanism coupled with solid tides makes the angular velocity evolve over long timescales and determines the equilibrium configurations of their spin. Aims: Unlike the solid core, the atmosphere of a planet is subject to both tidal gravitational potential and insolation flux coming from the star. The complex response of the gas is intrinsically linked to its physical properties. This dependence has to be characterized and quantified for application to the wide variety of extrasolar planetary systems. Methods: We develop a theoretical global model where radiative losses, which are predominant in slowly rotating atmospheres, are taken into account. We analytically compute the perturbation of pressure, density, temperature, and velocity field caused by a thermogravitational tidal perturbation. From these quantities, we deduce the expressions of atmospheric Love numbers and tidal torque exerted on the fluid shell by the star. The equations are written for the general case of a thick envelope and the simplified one of a thin isothermal atmosphere. Results: The dynamics of atmospheric tides depends on the frequency regime of the tidal perturbation: the thermal regime near synchronization and the dynamical regime characterizing fast-rotating planets. Gravitational and thermal perturbations imply different responses of the fluid, i.e. gravitational tides and thermal tides, which are clearly identified. The dependence of the torque on the tidal frequency is quantified using the analytic expressions of the model for Earth-like and Venus-like exoplanets and is in good agreement with the results given by global climate models (GCM) simulations.Introducing dissipative processes such as radiation regularizes the tidal response of the atmosphere, otherwise it is singular at synchronization. Conclusions: We demonstrate the

  13. Electricity from wave and tide an introduction to marine energy

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    This is a concise yet technically authoritative overview of modern marine energy devices with the goal of sustainable electricity generation. With 165 full-colour illustrations and photographs of devices at an advanced stage, the book provides inspiring case studies of today's most promising marine energy devices and developments, including full-scale grid-connected prototypes tested in sea conditions. It also covers the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) in Orkney, Scotland, where many of the devices are assessed. Topics discussed: global resources - drawing energy from the World's waves and tides history of wave and tidal stream systems theoretical background to modern developments conversion of marine energy into grid electricity modern wave energy converters and tidal stream energy converters. This book is aimed at a wide readership including professionals, policy makers and employees in the energy sector needing an introduction to marine energy. Its descriptive style and technical level will also appea...

  14. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of M2 internal tides in the Luzon Strait

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bingtian; CAO Anzhou; LV Xianqing

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional isopycnic-coordinate internal tidal model is employed to investigate the generation, propagation, vertical structure and energy conversion of M2 internal tides in the Luzon Strait (LS) with mooring observations. Simulated results, especially the tidal current amplitudes, agree well with observations, demonstrating the reasonability and accuracy of the model. Results indicate that M2 internal tides mainly propagate into three directions horizontally, i.e., eastward towards the western Pacific Ocean, westward towards the Dongsha Island and southwestward towards the South China Sea Basin. In the horizontal direction, tidal current amplitudes decrease as distance increases away from the LS; in the vertical direction, they show an obvious decreasing tendency with depth. Between the double ridges of the LS, a clockwise gyre of M2 baroclinic energy flux appears, which is caused by reflections of M2 internal tides at supercritical topographies, and resonance of M2 internal tides happens along 19.5° and 21.5°N due to the heights and separation distance of the double ridges. The total energy conversion in the LS is about 14.20 GW.

  15. Antarctic tides from GRACE satellite accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, D. N.; Killett, B.; Watkins, M. M.; Yuan, D.-N.

    2016-05-01

    The extended length of the GRACE data time series (now 13.5 years) provides the unique opportunity to estimate global mass variations due to ocean tides at large (˜300 km) spatial scales. State-of-the-art global tide models rely heavily on satellite altimetry data, which are sparse for latitudes higher than 66°. Thus, the performance of the models is typically worse at higher latitudes. GRACE data, alternately, extend to polar latitudes and therefore provide information for both model validation and improvement at the higher latitudes. In this work, 11 years of GRACE inter-satellite range-acceleration measurements are inverted to solve for corrections to the amplitudes and phases of the major solar and lunar ocean tidal constituents (M2, K1, S2, and O1) from the GOT4.7 ocean tide model at latitudes south of 50°S. Two independent inversion and regularization methods are employed and compared against one another. Uncertainty estimates are derived by subtracting two independent solutions, each spanning a unique 5.5 years of data. Features above the noise floor in the derived solutions likely represent errors in GOT4.7. We find the GOT4.7 amplitudes to be generally too small for M2 and K1, and too large for S2 and O1, and to spatially correlate with geographic regions where GOT4.7 predicts the largest tidal amplitudes. In particular, we find GOT4.7 errors to be dominant over the Patagonia shelf (M2), the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (M2 and S2), the Ross Ice Shelf (S2), and the Weddell and Ross Seas (K1 and O1).

  16. Winter warmings, tides and planetary waves: comparisions between CMAM (with interactive chemistry) and MFR-MetO observations and data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C.; Chshyolkova, T.; Mclandress, C.; Avery, S. K.; Fritts, D. C.; Hall, C. M.; Hocking, W. K.; Igarashi, K.; Macdougall, J. W.; Murayama, Y.; Riggin, D. C.; Thorsen, D.; Vincent, R. A.

    2006-10-01

    Following earlier comparisons using the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM, without interactive chemistry), the dynamical characteristics of the model are assessed with interactive chemistry activated. Time-sequences of temperatures and winds at Tromsø (70° N) show that the model has more frequent and earlier stratospheric winter warmings than typically observed. Wavelets at mesospheric heights (76, 85 km) and from equator to polar regions show that CMAM tides are generally larger, but planetary waves (PW) smaller, than medium frequency (MF) radar-derived values. Tides modelled for eight geographic locations during the four seasons are not strikingly different from the earlier CMAM experiment; although monthly data now allow these detailed seasonal variations (local combinations of migrating and non-migrating components) within the mesosphere (circa 50-80 km) to be demonstrated for the first time. The dominant semi-diurnal tide of middle latitudes is, as in the earlier papers, quite well realized in CMAM. Regarding the diurnal tide, it is shown here and in an earlier study by one of the authors, that the main characteristics of the diurnal tide at low latitudes (where the S (1,1) mode dominates) are well captured by the model. However, in this experiment there are some other unobserved features for the diurnal tide, which are quite similar to those noted in the earlier CMAM experiment: low latitude amplitudes are larger than observed at 82 km, and middle latitudes feature an unobserved low altitude (73 km) summer maximum. Phases, especially at low and middle (circa 42° N) latitudes, do not match observations well. Mesospheric seasonal tidal variations available from the CUJO (Canada U.S. Japan Opportunity) radar (MFR) network (sites 40-45° N) reveal interesting longitudinal differences between the CMAM and the MFR observations. In addition, model and observations differ in the character of the vertical phase variations at each network-location. Finally, the

  17. Computation of Wave, Tide and Wind Current for the South China Sea Under Tropical Cyclones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱良生; 宋运法; 邱章; 陈秀华; 麦波强; 丘耀文; 宋丽莉

    2003-01-01

    Based on the third-generation oceanic wave prediction model (WAVEWATCH Ⅲ),the third-generation nearshore wave calculation model (SWAN) and the mathematical tide, tidal current and cyclone current model, which have been improved, interconnected and expanded, a coupled model of offshore wave, tide and sea current under tropical cyclone surges in the South China Sea has been established. The coupled model is driven by the tropical cyclone field containing the background wind field. In order to test the hindcasting effect of the mathematical model, a comparison has been made between the calculated results and the observational results of waves of 15 cyclone cases, water levels and current velocities of the of 7 cyclones. The results of verification indicate that the calculated and observed results are basically identical.

  18. Simulation of barotropic and baroclinic tides in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ziku; LU Xianqing; TIAN Jiwei

    2005-01-01

    The four leading tidal constituents M2, S2, K1 and O1 in the South China Sea are simulated by using POM. The model is forced with tide-generating potential and four leading tidal constituents at the open boundary. In order to simulate more exactly, TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data are assimilated into the model and the open boundary is optimized. The computed co-tidal charts for M2 and K1 constituents are generally consistent with previous results in this region. The numerical simulation shows that energetic internal tides are generated over the bottom topography such as the Dongsha Islands, the Xisha Islands, the Zhongsha Islands, the Nansha Islands and the Luzon Strait.

  19. Hydropower at High Tide:Unprecedented Input and Appeal for Top Closing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Peng; Chu Xue

    2006-01-01

    @@ After four years' extensively scrambling rivers' exploitation rights by power companies, the countable hydropower resources are almost shared up. In water-abundant southwestern region, five large generation groups delimited their own spheres on large rivers. Sharp private enterprises availed themselves of every opportunity to grasp the targets on small and medium rivers. As numerous investors swarmed, hydropower construction entered a real high tide period.

  20. Determination of the Ocean Tide Constituents Loading Based on GPS Measurements in the Chinese Offshore Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Wu, Z.; He, X.; Peng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean tide loading largely affects the accuracy of GPS positioning. In turn, GPS measurements could be used to monitor the ocean tide loading effect. In this paper, 67-days GPS observations from two island GPS stations, respectively located in the East China Sea and the South China Sea, were collected and calculated in 30s sampling rate using the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) algorithm. The variation of GPS observed position time series are 2cm in the horizontal and 7cm in the vertical generated by the ocean tide loading effect and other error sources. With the power spectra analysis by the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), the eigenvalues of the semidiurnal constituents and the diurnal constituents are obtained from the GPS estimates time series. The calculated frequencies are well agreements to the known within the error less than 1.5% for K1,Q1, O1, K2,S2, M2,N2, but P1 within 4.2%. The calculated amplitudes are also well consistent with the results from the global tide models FES2004,NAO.99 and GOT4.7. Their difference in the amplitude are mostly less than 5mm in the horizontal and the vertical direction, except K1 and M2. The maximum amplitude difference occurs in K1 and M2 up to 1.5cm in the vertical direction. In additional, two islands locate at the different transmission Channel, but they give the same calculated frequency in the horizontal and the vertical directional, respectively for 8 tidal constituents. This exhibits they belongs to the same tide wave system as in fact.

  1. Effect of tides and source location on nearshore tsunami-induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayca, Aykut; Lynett, Patrick J.

    2016-12-01

    Here we present the results of a numerical modeling study that investigates how event-maximum tsunami-induced currents vary due to the dynamic effects of tides and wave directivity. First, analyses of tide-tsunami interaction are presented in three harbors by coupling the tsunami with the tide, and allowing the initial tsunami wave to arrive at various tidal phases. We find that tsunami-tide interaction can change the event-maximum current speed experienced in a harbor by up to 25% for the events and harbors studied, and we note that this effect is highly site-specific. Second, to evaluate the effect of wave directionality on event-maximum currents, earthquakes sources were placed throughout the Pacific, with magnitudes tuned to create the same maximum near-coast amplitude at the harbor of study. Our analysis also shows that, for the harbor and sources examined, the effect of offshore directionality and tsunami frequency content has a weak effect on the event-maximum currents experienced in the harbor. The more important dependency of event-maximum currents is the near-harbor amplitude of the wave, indicating that event-maximum currents in a harbor from a tsunami generated by a large far-field earthquake may be reasonably well predicted with only information about the predicted local maximum tsunami amplitude. This study was motivated by the hope of constructing a basis for understanding the dynamic effects of tides and wave directivity on current-based tsunami hazards in a coastal zone. The consideration of these aspects is crucial and yet challenging in the modeling of tsunami currents.

  2. Surface Pressure Measurements of Atmospheric Tides Using Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin; Maor, Ron

    2017-04-01

    Similar to the oceans, the atmosphere also has tides that are measured in variations of atmospheric pressure. However, unlike the gravitational tides in the oceans, the atmospheric tides are caused primarily in the troposphere and stratosphere when the atmosphere is periodically heated by the sun, due to tropospheric absorption by water vapor and stratospheric absorption by ozone. Due to the forcing being always on the day side of the globe, the tides migrate around the globe following the sun (migrating tides) with a dominant periodicity of 12 hours (and less so at 24 hours). In recent years smartphones have been equipped with sensitive, cheap and reliable pressure sensors that can easily detect these atmospheric tides. By 2020 it is expected that there will be more than 6 billion smartphones globally, each measuring continuously atmospheric pressure at 1Hz temporal resolution. In this presentation we will present some control experiments we have performed with smartphones to monitor atmospheric tides, while also using random pressure data from more than 50,000 daily users via the WeatherSignal application. We conclude that smartphones are a useful tool for studying atmospheric tides on local and global scales.

  3. Prediction Research of Red Tide Based on Improved FCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Red tides are caused by the combination effects of many marine elements. The complexity of the marine ecosystem makes it hard to find the relationship between marine elements and red tides. The algorithm of fuzzy c-means (FCM can get clear classification of things and expresses the fuzzy state among different things. Therefore, a prediction algorithm of red tide based on improved FCM is proposed. In order to overcome the defect of FCM which is overdependent on the initial cluster centers and the objective function, this paper gains the initial cluster centers through the principle of regional minimum data density and the minimum mean distance. The feature weighted cluster center is added to the objective function. Finally, the improved FCM algorithm is applied in the prediction research of red tide, and the results show that the improved FCM algorithm has good denoising ability and high accuracy in the prediction of red tides.

  4. Prediction of Tide Height Using the Discrete Fourier Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Towhiduzzaman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, I have investigated some aspects of astronomical tide and predicted tide time and height by different methods. This thesis deals with the prediction of height and time for both high and low waters of the ports set up in several places by discrete Fourier transform. I computed the tide height using Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT. The results are found to be in an agreement with the predicted data of others. By this work, we can predict the tide height of overall stations if the sample observed data are available for any kind of stations. I think that my work could be helpful to predict the tides over all stations where the observed data are available.

  5. Arctic Tides from GPS on sea-ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    2013-01-01

    The presence of sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean plays a significant role in the Arctic climate. Sea-ice dampens the ocean tide amplitude with the result that global tidal models perform less accurately in the polar regions. This paper presents, a kinematic processing of global positioning system (GPS......) placed on sea-ice, at six different sites north of Greenland for the preliminary study of sea surface height (SSH), and tidal analysis to improve tide models in the Central Arctic. The GPS measurements are compared with the Arctic tide model AOTIM-5, which assimilates tide-gauges and altimetry data....... The results show coherence between the GPS buoy measurements, and the tide model. Furthermore, we have proved that the reference ellipsoid of WGS84, can be interpolated to the tidal defined zero level by applying geophysical corrections to the GPS data....

  6. Temperature variability caused by internal tides in the coral reef ecosystem of Hanauma bay, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katharine A.; Rocheleau, Greg; Merrifield, Mark A.; Jaramillo, Sergio; Pawlak, Geno

    2016-03-01

    Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve is a shallow bay (15 m depth) become dominated by large semidiurnal variations (up to 2.7 °C) that are attributed to the internal tide. These temperature drops caused by the internal tide occur consistently twice a day under summer stratification at depths as shallow as 15 m, while smaller temperature drops (up to 1.8 °C) occur occasionally at 5 m. Although semidiurnal band temperatures vary seasonally, semidiurnal band currents exhibit similar magnitudes in spring and summer. This suggests that the weak temperature fluctuations in spring are due to the bay residing entirely in the upper mixed layer at this time of year, while internal tide energy continues to influence currents. Observations made along a cross-shore/vertical transect at the center of the bay with an autonomous underwater vehicle highlight the structure of cold intrusions that fill a large portion of the bay as well as the relationship between temperature, salinity, chlorophyll, and backscatter. Near-bottom, advective heat flux estimates at the mouth of the bay indicate that the internal tide tends to advect cold water into the bay primarily on the northeast side of the bay entrance, with cold water outflow on the opposite side. The observations highlight the role of the internal tide along with seasonal changes in stratification in temperature variability in shallow ecosystems, particularly those close to generation sites.

  7. Analytical model of interaction of tide and river flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phairot Chatanantavet

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic characteristics of a river resulting from interaction of tide and river flow are important since problems regarding flood, salinity intrusion, water quality and sedimentation are ubiquitous. The lower reach of the river strongly influenced by tides from the sea, when interacting with river flows, results in a complicated pattern which is simplified to its interaction with four main constituents of tides obtained from harmonic analysis. An analytical model is developed in this study for simulating the hydrodynamic processes in estuarine waters, with the emphasis being given to the interaction between tides and river flows. The perturbation method is used to derive the analytical solution, in which the estuarine flow is separated into steady and unsteady components. Thus the analytical solutions derived consist of two distinct parts; one represents the influence of river flows and the other represents the influence of tides. The application of the model to a case study, the Chao Phraya river, which requires a time series of discharges and loadings at the river mouth to model water quality in the Gulf of Thailand, shows that the model can beautifully and completely simulate the hydrodynamic features of tide and river flow interaction especially in the rainy season when the river discharge is high. Data of tidal discharges are scarce because of high cost of measurement especially in the lower reach of the river strongly influenced by tides from the sea. From this study of relation between tidal discharges and tides, the analytical model can compute tidal discharges from tides correctly. The results of tides and tidal flow can subsequently be used to calculate eddy viscosity and dispersion coefficient for describing salinity and water quality profiles.

  8. Longitudinal and Seasonal Variation of Lunar tide strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Pacheco, E. E.; Valladares, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    It has been known since many decades that lunar tide, which manifests itself as a semi-diurnal wave that precesses through all local times within one lunar month, has been identified as a significant force that can produce a notable influence on the longitudinal equatorial density distribution and equatorial electrojet (EEJ). However, there has never been a comprehensive study, except some statistical analysis using the satellite based in-situ observations, of the lunar tide effect on a global scale. This left several questions, like the longitudinal and solar flux dependence of the lunar tide, the tidal wave strength difference between new and full moon phases, remained unanswered. The proximity of the Earth/Moon system to the Sun, proximity of a New/Full Moon to one of the nodes of the lunar orbit, and the proximity of a New/Full Moon to the perigee of the lunar orbit are among the main factors that can affect the seasonal variability of lunar tide strength. With the indications of lunar tide influence on the strength of dayside EEJ, enhancing EEJ's strength shortly after new and full moon, we utilize the ground-based magnetometer fourteen years (1998 - 2012) data and investigate the various aspects of lunar tide effects on the EEJ at three different longitudinal sectors. The equatorial magnetometers located at Jicamarca for American sector, Addis Ababa for African sector, and Tirunelveli for Indian sector are used for this comprehensive study. Simultaneously, using the GPS TEC data, we examined the lunar tide impacts on the equatorial density irregularities and bubble formations at different longitudinal sectors. We found surprising strong longitudinal dependence in the lunar tide strength and its influence on EEJ and density bubble formation. Significant solar flux and seasonal dependences in lunar tide strength have also been observed at all longitudinal sectors. Finally, we investigated the lunar tide strength difference between new moon and full moon phases.

  9. Lake-level variations and tides in Lago Argentino, Patagonia: insights from pressure tide gauge records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Richter

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on precise pressure tide gauge observations lake-level records are derived for two sites in Lago Argentino, southern Patagonia, of 2.5 and 1 years of duration. Applying the tools of time series analysis, the principal processes affecting the lake level are identified and quantified. Lake-level changes reflecting variations in lake volume are dominated by a seasonal cycle of 1.2 m in amplitude. Lake-volume changes occur in addition with a daily period in response to melt water influx from surrounding glaciers. Sporadic lake-volume jumps are caused by bursting of the ice dam of Perito Moreno glacier. Water movements in Lago Argentino are dominated by surface seiches reaching 20 cm in amplitude. Lake tides reach a maximum amplitude of 3 mm. The comparison of the tidal signal extracted from the lake-level observations with a model composed of the contributions of body tide and ocean tidal loading indicates a phase shift of 23° which is most likely explained by an 1 hour phase lag of global ocean tide models in the region of the highly fragmented Pacific coast. The comparison of the obtained results with those of a previous study of Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego, allows to relate differences in the hydrological and hydrodynamic processes between both lakes to morphological properties. This leads to a tentative prediction of the lake-level variability to be expected from other great Patagonian lakes. The presented geodetic results shall serve as a starting point for a detailed limnological investigation of these aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Diurnal internal tides detected in the Adriatic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihanovic, H. [Hydrographic Inst. of the Republic of Croatia, Split (Croatia); Orlic, M.; Pasaric, Z. [Andrija Mohorovicic Geophysical Inst., Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Strong diurnal oscillations, documented by temperature data that were collected along a submarine cliff on the Lastovo Island (southern Adriatic), are studied and compared with sea level and wind measurements at Dubrovnik and Komiza (island of Vis). Three thermistors were deployed at the depths of 15, 22 and 36 m between March 2001 and March 2002. Pronounced diurnal temperature oscillations were detected at 15 and 22 m during the stratified season. The correlation between the sea surface and thermocline displacements was highest in June 2001, when diurnal wind changes were not significant, while diurnal sea level oscillations achieved annual maxima. Thermocline oscillations were in phase with sea level changes. The range of diurnal sea surface variability was close to 19 cm, while the range of corresponding thermocline variability was about 5.4 m. The findings summarize the outcome of the first dedicated study of internal tides in the Adriatic. (orig.)

  11. The anelastic equilibrium tide in exoplanetary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Remus, F; Zahn, J -P; Lainey, V

    2012-01-01

    Earth-like planets have anelastic mantles, whereas giant planets may have anelastic cores. As for the fluid parts of a body, the tidal dissipation of such solid regions, gravitationally perturbed by a companion body, highly depends on its internal friction, and thus on its internal structure. Therefore, modelling this kind of interaction presents a high interest to provide constraints on planet interiors, whose properties are still quite uncertain. Here, we examine the equilibrium tide in the solid central region of a planet, taking into account the presence of a fluid envelope. We first present the equations governing the problem, and show how to obtain the different Love numbers that describe its deformation. We discuss how the quality factor Q depends on the rheological parameters, and the size of the core. Taking plausible values for the anelastic parameters, and examinig the frequency-dependence of the solid dissipation, we show how this mechanism may compete with the dissipation in fluid layers, when ap...

  12. Earth tides in MacDonald's model

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraz-Mello, S

    2013-01-01

    We expand the equations used in MacDonald's 1964 theory and Fourier analyze the tidal variations of the height at one point on the Earth surface, and also the tidal potential at such point. It is shown that no intrinsic law is relating the lag of the tide components to their frequencies. In other words, no simple rheology is being intrinsically fixed by MacDonald's equations. The same is true of the modification proposed by Singer(1968). At variance with these two cases, the modification proposed by Williams and Efroimsky (2012) fix the standard Darwin rheology in which the lags are proportional to the frequencies and their model is, in this sense, equivalent to Mignard's 1979 formulation of Darwin's theory.

  13. Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  14. Response to "Concerning Thermal Tides on Hot Jupiters" (Goodman 2009; arXiv: 0901.3279)

    CERN Document Server

    Arras, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the comments of Goodman (2009) on our paper concerning thermal tides (Arras and Socrates 2009a), we have studied an idealized problem to understand the global response of a completely fluid gas giant planet to thermal forcing at the surface (Arras and Socrates 2009b). Our findings disagree with the main claims in Goodman (2009). We find that significant quadrupole moments can indeed be induced as a result of thermal forcing. Furthermore, we find that it is possible for the orientation of the quadrupoles to be such that the planet is torqued away from synchronous rotation. Given these results, we believe our proposed thermal tide mechanism (Arras and Socrates 2009a) provides a viable scenario for generating steady-state asychronous rotation, inflated radii and possibly eccentric orbits of the hot Jupiters.

  15. On the Simulation of Shallow Water Tides in the Vicinity of the Taiwan Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Da Chiou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Taiwan Banks (Formosa Shoals, a large NE-SW oriented bathymetric feature near the southern end (23°N, 118 - 119°E of the Taiwan Strait, is a region of extremely shallow water that exerts a profound effect on the propagation of tidal waves. As such waves propagate over the Taiwan Banks, they become distorted and asymmetric due to bottom friction and contribute to the generation of shallow water tides. The POM model was used in present study to simulate the tides in the Taiwan Strait region. Shallow water tidal dynamics in the area of Taiwan Banks are focused. The numerical model was validated against sea level observations from 34 tidal stations located on the coast of Mainland China and Taiwan. Trajectory records from two SVP drifters are used to be compared with the simulations using wavelet-based rotary spectral analysis.

  16. Mapping the nonstationary internal tide with satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaron, Edward D.

    2017-01-01

    Temporal variability of the internal tide has been inferred from the 23 year long combined records of the TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and Jason-2 satellite altimeters by combining harmonic analysis with an analysis of along-track wavenumber spectra of sea-surface height (SSH). Conventional harmonic analysis is first applied to estimate and remove the stationary components of the tide at each point along the reference ground tracks. The wavenumber spectrum of the residual SSH is then computed, and the variance in a neighborhood around the wavenumber of the mode-1 baroclinic M2 tide is interpreted as the sum of noise, broadband nontidal processes, and the nonstationary tide. At many sites a bump in the spectrum associated with the internal tide is noted, and an empirical model for the noise and nontidal processes is used to estimate the nonstationary semidiurnal tidal variance. The results indicate a spatially inhomogeneous pattern of tidal variability. Nonstationary tides are larger than stationary tides throughout much of the equatorial Pacific and Indian Oceans.

  17. Spectral characteristics analysis of red tide water in mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tingwei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Hongliang; Ma, Yi; Gao, Xuemin

    2003-05-01

    Mesocosm ecosystem experiment with seawater enclosed of the red tide was carried out from July to September 2001. We got four species of biology whose quantities of bion are dominant in the red tide. During the whole process from the beginning to their dying out for every specie, in situ spectral measurements were carried out. After data processing, characteristic spectra of red tide of different dominant species are got. Via comparison and analysis of characteristics of different spectra, we find that in the band region between 685 and 735 nanometers, spectral characteristics of red tide is apparently different from that of normal water. Compared to spectra of normal water, spectra of red tide have a strong reflectance peak in the above band region. As to spectra of red tide dominated by different species, the situations of reflectance peaks are also different: the second peak of Mesodinium rubrum spectrum lies between 726~732 nm, which is more than 21nm away from the other dominant species spectra"s Leptocylindrus danicus"s second spectral peak covers 686~694nm; that of Skeletonema costatum lies between 691~693 nm. Chattonella marina"s second spectral peak lies about 703~705 nm. Thus we can try to determine whether red tide has occurred according to its spectral data. In order to monitor the event of red tide and identify the dominant species by the application of the technology of hyperspectral remote sensing, acquiring spectral data of different dominant species of red tide as much as possible becomes a basic work to be achieved for spectral matching, information extraction and so on based on hyperspectral data.

  18. Modelling of Storm Tide Flooding Along the Southern Coast of Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningsih, Nining Sari; Hadi, Safwan; Utami, Marthina Dian; Rudiawan, Amanda Putri

    2011-07-01

    A storm tide event (the sum of the astronomical tide and the storm surge) along the southern coast of Java has been simulated by using a two-dimensional (2D) ocean model (barotropic version of Mike 21). In this study, we simulated the storm surge generated by the Cyclone Jacob during 2-12 March 2007 and Cyclone George during 3-9 March 2007 in northwestern coastal waters of Australia. The applied model based on an unstructured grid approach employs finite volume method to solve the governing equations. The applied model allows for a highly flexible discretization of the model domain. This is demonstrated by grid sizes, which vary from 50km in the deep ocean to a considerably higher resolution of about 150m in the coastal area. To simulate water run-up and inundation processes, flooding and drying (FAD) capabilities of the model were enabled. The model domain covers the northeastern part of the Indian Ocean and the coastal areas of the southern part of Java. The storm tide event was simulated by imposing tidal elevations at the open boundaries, 6-hourly wind and air pressure data. Tidal elevation data was derived from the tide model driver (TMD), while wind and air pressure data were obtained from NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction). The weekly TOPEX Poseidon Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) was used to validate the model results of surge height. The simulation results show that the storm tides had attacked and inundated coastal areas of the southern part of Java. Nusa Kambangan (a part of Cilacap Regency) experienced the highest surge among the other stations, about 0.19m, at 17:00 UTC on 7 March 2007. Maximum distance of storm tide flooding occurred at Telereng Cape (about 500.4m), Penanjung Bay (about 835.2m), and Pelindu Cape (about 710.6m) in which each of those areas representing the western, central, and eastern part of the the southern coast of Java, respectively. Meanwhile, water run-up heights at the locations where the maximum distance of flooding

  19. Mechanical Extraction of Power From Ocean Currents and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Chao, Yi

    2010-01-01

    A proposed scheme for generating electric power from rivers and from ocean currents, tides, and waves is intended to offer economic and environmental advantages over prior such schemes, some of which are at various stages of implementation, others of which have not yet advanced beyond the concept stage. This scheme would be less environmentally objectionable than are prior schemes that involve the use of dams to block rivers and tidal flows. This scheme would also not entail the high maintenance costs of other proposed schemes that call for submerged electric generators and cables, which would be subject to degradation by marine growth and corrosion. A basic power-generation system according to the scheme now proposed would not include any submerged electrical equipment. The submerged portion of the system would include an all-mechanical turbine/pump unit that would superficially resemble a large land-based wind turbine (see figure). The turbine axis would turn slowly as it captured energy from the local river flow, ocean current, tidal flow, or flow from an ocean-wave device. The turbine axis would drive a pump through a gearbox to generate an enclosed flow of water, hydraulic fluid, or other suitable fluid at a relatively high pressure [typically approx.500 psi (approx.3.4 MPa)]. The pressurized fluid could be piped to an onshore or offshore facility, above the ocean surface, where it would be used to drive a turbine that, in turn, would drive an electric generator. The fluid could be recirculated between the submerged unit and the power-generation facility in a closed flow system; alternatively, if the fluid were seawater, it could be taken in from the ocean at the submerged turbine/pump unit and discharged back into the ocean from the power-generation facility. Another alternative would be to use the pressurized flow to charge an elevated reservoir or other pumped-storage facility, from whence fluid could later be released to drive a turbine/generator unit at a

  20. Studies offer insight into the formative mechanism of "red tides"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in coastal waters, popularly known as "red tides" in China, have become a serious marine environmental problem and an ecological disaster, arousing grave concern of governments, the public and scientists worldwide.

  1. Correcting GRACE gravity fields for ocean tide effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2002-01-01

    subtle climate signals which GRACE aims at. The difference between two existing ocean tide models can be used as an estimate of current tidal model error for the M-2,S-2,K-1, and O-1 constituents. When compared with the expected accuracy of the GRACE system, both expressed as spherical harmonic degree...... variances, we find that the current ocean tide models are not accurate enough to correct GRACE data at harmonic degrees lower that 35. The accumulated tidal errors may affect the GRACE data up to harmonic degree 56. Furthermore, the atmospheric (radiation) tides may cause significant errors in the ocean......[1] The GRACE mission will be launch in early 2002 and will map the Earth's gravity fields and its variations with unprecedented accuracy during its 5-year lifetime. Unless ocean tide signals and their load upon the solid earth are removed from the GRACE data, their long period aliases obscure more...

  2. Influence analysis of Arctic tide gauges using leverages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructions of historical sea level in the Arctic Ocean are fraught with difficulties related to lack of data, uneven distribution of tide gauges and seasonal ice cover. Considering the period from 1950 to the present, we attempt to identify conspicuous tide gauges in an automated way, using...... the statistical leverage of each individual gauge. This may be of help in determining appropriate procedures for data preprocessing, of particular importance for the Arctic area as the GIA is hard to constrain and many gauges are located on rivers. We use a model based on empirical orthogonal functions from...... a calibration period, in this preliminary case Drakkar ocean model data, which are forced using historical tide gauge data from the PSMSL database. The resulting leverage for each tide gauge may indicate that it represents a distinct mode of variability, or that its time series is perturbed in a way...

  3. Influence analysis of Arctic tide gauges using leverages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    Reconstructions of historical sea level in the Arctic Ocean are fraught with difficulties related to lack of data, uneven distribution of tide gauges and seasonal ice cover. Considering the period from 1950 to the present, we attempt to identify conspicuous tide gauges in an automated way, using...... the statistical leverage of each individual gauge. This may be of help in determining appropriate procedures for data preprocessing, of particular importance for the Arctic area as the GIA is hard to constrain and many gauges are located on rivers. We use a model based on empirical orthogonal functions from...... a calibration period, in this preliminary case Drakkar ocean model data, which are forced using historical tide gauge data from the PSMSL database. The resulting leverage for each tide gauge may indicate that it represents a distinct mode of variability, or that its time series is perturbed in a way...

  4. Prediction of tides using back-propagation neural networks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.

    Prediction of tides is very much essential for human activities and to reduce the construction cost in marine environment. This paper presents an application of the artificial neural network with back-propagation procedures for accurate prediction...

  5. Red tide discolouration and its impact on fisheries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devassy, V.P.

    months. Although the earlier two red tides did not provide any direct evidence of fish mortality, the 1987 one was followed by a substantial fall in fish catch. The prevailing environmental conditions and the probable impact on the fisheries during...

  6. Comparison of calculated energy flux of internal tides with microstructure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Falahat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical mixing caused by breaking of internal tides plays a major role in maintaining the deep-ocean stratification. This study compares observations of dissipation from microstructure measurements to calculations of the vertical energy flux from barotropic to internal tides, taking into account the temporal variation due to the spring-neap tidal cycle. The dissipation data originate from two surveys in the Brazil Basin Tracer Release Experiment (BBTRE, and one over the LArval Dispersal along the Deep East Pacific Rise (LADDER3, supplemented with a few stations above the North-Atlantic Ridge (GRAVILUCK and in the western Pacific (IZU. A good correlation is found between logarithmic values of energy flux and local dissipation in BBTRE, suggesting that the theory is able to predict energy fluxes. For the LADDER3, the local dissipation is much smaller than the calculated energy flux, which is very likely due to the different topographic features of BBTRE and LADDER3. The East Pacific Rise consists of a few isolated seamounts, so that most of the internal wave energy can radiate away from the generation site, whereas the Brazil Basin is characterised by extended rough bathymetry, leading to a more local dissipation. The results from all four field surveys support the general conclusion that the fraction of the internal-tide energy flux that is dissipated locally is very different in different regions.

  7. Structure and Variability of Internal Tides in Luzon Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Sponsor ON R. (I) .2- 2,6— approval obtained yes X no Title of Parer or Presentation Structure and Variability of Internal Tides in Luzon Strait...ision, Div v Author, Code HQ-NRL 55118 (Rev. 12-98) (e) THIS FORM CANCELS AND SUPERSEDES ALL PREVIOUS VERSIONS Structure and Variability of Internal ... internal tides that radiate westward into the South China Sea and eastward into the western Pacific. Intrusions of the Kuroshio and strong mesoscale

  8. Wavelet approach to the determination of gravity tide parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳林涛; 许摩泽; 孙和平; 郝兴华

    2000-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for the determination of gravity tide parameters. Three pairs of compactly supported wavelet filters are introduced in the approach. They can efficiently extract the objective tides from the gravity observation series. The new approach guarantees a direct and precise analysis on the tidal gravity records of any sampling length. The new approach is applied to the harmonic analysis on Wuhan superconducting gravimeter records. The results clearly show the resonant effects of the Earth Nearly Diurnal Free Wobble (NDFW).

  9. Florida Red Tides, Manatee Brevetoxicosis, and Lung Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Colbert, Debborah E.; Dalpra, Dana; Newton, Elizabeth A. C.; Gaspard, Joseph; Littlefield, Brandi; Manire, Charles

    2004-01-01

    In 1996, 149 Florida manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris, died along the southwest coast of Florida. Necropsy pathology results of these animals indicated that brevetoxin from the Florida red tide, Karenia brevis, caused their death. A red tide bloom had been previously documented in the area where these animals stranded. The necropsy data suggested the mortality occurred from chronic inhalation and/or ingestion. Inhalation theories include high doses of brevetoxin deposited/stored in th...

  10. Lake-level variations and tides in Lago Argentino, Patagonia: insights from pressure tide gauge records

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Based on precise pressure tide gauge observations lake-level records are derived for two sites in Lago Argentino, southern Patagonia, of 2.5 and 1 years of duration. Applying the tools of time series analysis, the principal processes affecting the lake level are identified and quantified. Lake-level changes reflecting variations in lake volume are dominated by a seasonal cycle of 1.2 m in amplitude. Lake-volume changes occur in addition with a daily period in response to melt water influx fro...

  11. Dynamical Tides in Rotating Planets and Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Tidal dissipation may be important for the internal evolution as well as the orbits of short-period massive planets--hot Jupiters. We revisit a mechanism proposed by Ogilvie and Lin for tidal forcing of inertial waves, which are short-wavelength, low-frequency disturbances restored primarily by Coriolis rather than buoyancy forces. This mechanism is of particular interest for hot Jupiters because it relies upon a rocky core, and because these bodies are otherwise largely convective. Compared to waves excited at the base of the stratified, externally heated atmosphere, waves excited at the core are more likely to deposit heat in the convective region and thereby affect the planetary radius. However, Ogilvie and Lin's results were numerical, and the manner of the wave excitation was not clear. Using WKB methods, we demonstrate the production of short waves by scattering of the equilibrium tide off the core at critical latitudes. The tidal dissipation rate associated with these waves scales as the fifth power of...

  12. Galactic tide and orbital evolution of comets

    CERN Document Server

    Komar, L; Pastor, P

    2009-01-01

    Equation of motion for a comet in the Oort cloud is numerically solved. Orbital evolution of the comet under the action of the gravity of the Sun and the Galaxy is presented for various initial conditions. Oscillations of the Sun with respect to the galactic equatorial plane are taken into account. Real values of physical quantities concerning the gravitational action of the galactic neighbourhood of the Sun are important. The results are compared with currently used more simple models of the galactic tide. It turns out that physically improved models yield results which significantly differ from the results obtained on the basis of the conventional models. E.g., the number of returns of the comets into the inner part of the Solar System are about two times greater than it is in the conventional models. It seems that a comet from the Oort cloud can be a source of the dinosaurs extinction at about 65 Myr ago. A close encounter of a star or an interstellar cloud disturbed a comet of the Oort cloud in the way th...

  13. Analysis of Tide Variation Monitored by GNSS-MR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Shuangcheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise monitoring of tide variation is the most of issues in the fields of Global Sea-level Observation System, ocean circulation and global climate change research. With the deepening research and rapid application of GNSS, GNSS-MR based on multipath has gradually become a new means of remote sensing for ground environment (vegetation, soil moisture, snow depth, sea level, volcano and so on with geodetic GNSS station. By analyzing the characteristics of the onshore GNSS SNR data which is caused by multipath, the inversion principle of GNSS-MR technology based on the SNR data to detect tide variation is given in this paper. The onshore GNSS station of SC02 which is located in Friday Harbor, Washington state of United States, are used to retrieve tide variation. The retrieval result is consistent with the tide gauge which is only 359m to the GNSS station. The bias is about 10cm, and the correlation coefficient is better than 0.98. Preliminary results show that GNSS-MR technology based on onshore CORS station to some extent could be real-time and continuously used to monitor the tide variation. What's more, onshore GNSS stations could be a powerful supplement for tide gauge and be used to extend GNSS application in marine remote sensing field.

  14. Differences between mean tide level and mean sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, P. L.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses the differences between mean tide level (MTL) and mean sea level (MSL) as demonstrated using information from a global tide gauge data set. The roles of the two main contributors to differences between MTL and MSL (the M4 harmonic of the M2 semidiurnal tide, and the combination of the diurnal tides K1 and O1) are described, with a particular focus on the spatial scales of variation in MTL-MSL due to each contributor. Findings from the tide gauge data set are contrasted with those from a state-of-the-art global tide model. The study is of interest within tidal science, but also has practical importance regarding the type of mean level used to define land survey datums. In addition, an appreciation of MTL-MSL difference is important in the use of the historical sea level data used in climate change research, with implications for some of the data stored in international databanks. Particular studies are made of how MTL and MSL might differ through the year, and if MTL is measured in daylight hours only, as has been the practice of some national geodetic agencies on occasions in the past.

  15. Geodynamic Effects of Ocean Tides: Progress and Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Ray

    1999-01-01

    Satellite altimetry, particularly Topex/Poseidon, has markedly improved our knowledge of global tides, thereby allowing significant progress on some longstanding problems in geodynamics. This paper reviews some of that progress. Emphasis is given to global-scale problems, particularly those falling within the mandate of the new IERS Special Bureau for Tides: angular momentum, gravitational field, geocenter motion. For this discussion I use primarily the new ocean tide solutions GOT99.2, CSR4.0, and TPXO.4 (for which G. Egbert has computed inverse-theoretic error estimates), and I concentrate on new results in angular momentum and gravity and their solid-earth implications. One example is a new estimate of the effective tidal Q at the M_2 frequency, based on combining these ocean models with tidal estimates from satellite laser ranging. Three especially intractable problems are also addressed: (1) determining long-period tides in the Arctic [large unknown effect on the inertia tensor, particularly for Mf]; (2) determining the global psi_l tide [large unknown effect on interpretations of gravimetry for the near-diurnal free wobble]; and (3) determining radiational tides [large unknown temporal variations at important frequencies]. Problems (2) and (3) are related.

  16. Differences between mean tide level and mean sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, P. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the differences between mean tide level (MTL) and mean sea level (MSL) as demonstrated using information from a global tide gauge data set. The roles of the two main contributors to differences between MTL and MSL (the M4 harmonic of the M2 semidiurnal tide, and the combination of the diurnal tides K1 and O1) are described, with a particular focus on the spatial scales of variation in MTL-MSL due to each contributor. Findings from the tide gauge data set are contrasted with those from a state-of-the-art global tide model. The study is of interest within tidal science, but also has practical importance regarding the type of mean level used to define land survey datums. In addition, an appreciation of MTL-MSL difference is important in the use of the historical sea level data used in climate change research, with implications for some of the data stored in international databanks. Particular studies are made of how MTL and MSL might differ through the year, and if MTL is measured in daylight hours only, as has been the practice of some national geodetic agencies on occasions in the past.

  17. Influence of fortnightly earth tides at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, D.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of 52 historic eruptions confirms the premise that fortnightly earth tides play a significant role in triggering activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Since January 1832, nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum (34 vs. 18). A straightforward significance test indicates that the likelihood of a fortnightly tidal influence on Kilauea eruptions is roughly 90%. This is not the case for Mauna Loa Volcano, where 37 historic eruptions have been distributed randomly with respect to the fortnightly tide. At Kilauea, stresses induced by fortnightly earth tides presumably act in concert with volcanic and tectonic stresses to trigger shallow magma movements along preexisting zones of weakness. Differences in structure or internal plumbing may limit the effectiveness of this mechanism at Mauna Loa. Tidal effects seem to be less marked at shields than at some island-arc volcanoes, possibly because higher average volcanic stress rates in Hawaii more often override the effects of tidal stresses.-Author

  18. TideWatch: Fingerprinting the cyclicality of big data workloads

    KAUST Repository

    Williams, Daniel W.

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsic to \\'big data\\' processing workloads (e.g., iterative MapReduce, Pregel, etc.) are cyclical resource utilization patterns that are highly synchronized across different resource types as well as the workers in a cluster. In Infrastructure as a Service settings, cloud providers do not exploit this characteristic to better manage VMs because they view VMs as \\'black boxes.\\' We present TideWatch, a system that automatically identifies cyclicality and similarity in running VMs. TideWatch predicts period lengths of most VMs in Hadoop workloads within 9% of actual iteration boundaries and successfully classifies up to 95% of running VMs as participating in the appropriate Hadoop cluster. Furthermore, we show how TideWatch can be used to improve the timing of VM migrations, reducing both migration time and network impact by over 50% when compared to a random approach. © 2014 IEEE.

  19. The Effect of Warming Oceans at a Tide Gauge Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâki Iz, H.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a new paradigm for assessing thermosteric effects of warming oceans at a tide gauge station. For demonstration, the trend due to the global thermosteric sea level at the Key West, FL tide gauge station was estimated using the tide gauge measurements and the global sea surface temperature anomalies that were represented by yearly distributed lags. A comparison of the estimate with the trend estimate from a descriptive model revealed that 0.7±0.1 mm/yr, (pglobal warming of the oceans during the last century at this station. The remaining 1.5±0.1 mm/yr, 70 percent of the total trend, is the lump sum estimate of the secular changes due to the eustatic, halosteric, and various local isostatic contributions.

  20. Ocean tides in GRACE monthly averaged gravity fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per

    2003-01-01

    aims at. In this analysis the results of Knudsen and Andersen (2002) have been verified using actual post-launch orbit parameter of the GRACE mission. The current ocean tide models are not accurate enough to correct GRACE data at harmonic degrees lower than 47. The accumulated tidal errors may affect......The GRACE mission will map the Earth's gravity fields and its variations with unprecedented accuracy during its 5-year lifetime. Unless ocean tide signals and their load upon the solid earth are removed from the GRACE data, their long period aliases obscure more subtle climate signals which GRACE...... the GRACE data up to harmonic degree 60. A study of the revised alias frequencies confirm that the ocean tide errors will not cancel in the GRACE monthly averaged temporal gravity fields. The S-2 and the K-2 terms have alias frequencies much longer than 30 days, so they remain almost unreduced...

  1. Insertion, Validation, and Application of Barotropic and Baroclinic Tides in 1/12 and 1/25 Degree Global HYCOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    anticipated departure for permanent employment in the United Kingdom. Müller worked on two projects with us. First, he utilized the methods of Maik Thomas...Müller’s second and main project with us has been to compute spectra, spectral transfers, and spectral fluxes in frequency-wavenumber space, as a method ...Mitchum, 1996. Surface manifestation of internal tides generated near Hawai’i. Geophysical Reseach Letters 23, 2101-2104. Ray, R.D., and G.T. Mitchum

  2. Tide-surge historical assessment of extreme water levels for the St. Johns River: 1928-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacopoulos, Peter

    2017-10-01

    An historical storm population is developed for the St. Johns River, located in northeast Florida-US east coast, via extreme value assessment of an 89-year-long record of hourly water-level data. Storm surge extrema and the corresponding (independent) storm systems are extracted from the historical record as well as the linear and nonlinear trends of mean sea level. Peaks-over-threshold analysis reveals the top 16 most-impactful (storm surge) systems in the general return-period range of 1-100 years. Hurricane Matthew (2016) broke the record with a new absolute maximum water level of 1.56 m, although the peak surge occurred during slack tide level (0.00 m). Hurricanes and tropical systems contribute to return periods of 10-100 years with water levels in the approximate range of 1.3-1.55 m. Extratropical systems and nor'easters contribute to the historical storm population (in the general return-period range of 1-10 years) and are capable of producing extreme storm surges (in the approximate range of 1.15-1.3 m) on par with those generated by hurricanes and tropical systems. The highest astronomical tide is 1.02 m, which by evaluation of the historical record can contribute as much as 94% to the total storm-tide water level. Statically, a hypothetical scenario of Hurricane Matthew's peak surge coinciding with the highest astronomical tide would yield an overall storm-tide water level of 2.58 m, corresponding to an approximate 1000-year return period by historical comparison. Sea-level trends (linear and nonlinear) impact water-level return periods and constitute additional risk hazard for coastal engineering designs.

  3. Testing ocean tide models using GGP superconducting gravimeter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, T.; Bos, M.

    2003-04-01

    Observations from the global network of superconducting gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) are used to test 10 ocean tide models (SCHW; FES94.1, 95.2, 98, 99; CSR3.0, 4.0; TPXO.5; GOT99.2b; and NAO.99b). In addition, observations are used from selected sites with LaCoste and Romberg gravimeters with electrostatic feedback, where special attention has been given to achieving a calibration accuracy of 0.1%. In Europe, there are several superconducting gravimeter stations in a relatively small area and this can be used to advantage in testing the ocean (and body) tide models and in identifying sites with anomalous observations. At some of the superconducting gravimeter sites there are anomalies in the in-phase components of the main tidal harmonics, which are due to calibration errors of up to 0.3%. It is shown that the recent ocean tide models are in better agreement with the tidal gravity observations than were the earlier models of Schwiderski and FES94.1. However, no single ocean tide model gives completely satisfactory results in all areas of the world. For example, for M2 the TPXO.5 and NAO99b models give anomalous results in Europe, whereas the FES95.2, FES98 and FES99 models give anomalous results in China and Japan. It is shown that the observations from this improved set of tidal gravity stations will provide an important test of the new ocean tide models that will be developed in the next few years. For further details see Baker, T.F. and Bos, M.S. (2003). "Validating Earth and ocean tide models using tidal gravity measurements", Geophysical Journal International, 152.

  4. Characteristics of Arctic tides at CANDAC-PEARL (80 N, 86 W) and Svalbard (78 N, 16 E) for 2006-2009. Radar observations and comparisons with the model CMAM-DAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manson, A.H.; Meek, C.E.; Xu, X. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon (Canada). Inst. of Space and Atmospheric Studies; Aso, T.; Tsutsumi, M. [National Institute for Polar Research, Tokyo (Japan); Drummond, J.R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax (Canada). Physics and Atmospheric Science Dept.; Hall, C.M. [Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Tromsoe Geophysical Observatory; Hocking, W.K. [Western Onatario Univ., London (Canada). Physics and Astronomy Dept.; Ward, W.E. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton (Canada). Physics and Astronomy Dept.

    2011-07-01

    Operation of a Meteor Radar (MWR) at Eureka, Ellesmere Island (80 N, 86 W) began in February 2006: this is the location of the Polar Environmental and Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), operated by the ''Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change'' (CANDAC). The first 36 months of tidal wind data (82-97 km) are here combined with contemporaneous tides from the Meteor Radar (MWR) at Adventdalen, Svalbard (78 N, 16 E), to provide the first significant evidence for interannual variability (IAV) of the High Arctic's diurnal and semidiurnal migrating (MT) and non-migrating tides (NMT). The three-year monthly means for both diurnal (DT) and semi-diurnal (SDT) winds demonstrate significantly different amplitudes and phases at Eureka and Svalbard. Typically the summer-maximizing DT is much larger ({proportional_to}24ms{sup -1} at 97 km) at Eureka, while the Svalbard tide (5-24ms{sup -1} at 97 km) is almost linear (north-south) rather than circular. Interannual variations are smallest in the summer and autumn months. The High Arctic SDT has maxima centred on August/September, followed in size by the winter features; and is much larger at Svalbard (24ms{sup -1} at 97 km, versus 14-18ms{sup -1} in central Canada). Depending on the location, the IAV are largest in spring/winter (Eureka) and summer/autumn (Svalbard). Fitting of wave-numbers for the migrating and nonmigrating tides (MT, NMT) determines dominant tides for each month and height. Existence of NMT is consistent with nonlinear interactions between migrating tides and (quasi) stationary planetary wave (SPW) S =1 (SPW1). For the diurnal oscillation, NMT s = 0 for the east-west (EW) wind component dominates (largest tide) in the late autumn and winter (November-February); and s =+2 is frequently seen in the north-south (NS) wind component for the same months. The semi-diurnal oscillation's NMT s =+1 dominates from March to June/July. There are patches of s =+3 and +1, in

  5. A coupled oscillator model of shelf and ocean tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbic, Brian K.; Garrett, Chris

    2010-04-01

    The resonances of tides in the coupled open ocean and shelf are modeled by a mechanical analogue consisting of a damped driven larger mass and spring (the open-ocean) connected to a damped smaller mass and spring (the shelf). When both masses are near resonance, the addition of even a very small mass can significantly affect the oscillations of the larger mass. The influence of the shelf is largest if the shelf is resonant with weak friction. In particular, an increase of friction on a near-resonant shelf can, perhaps surprisingly, lead to an increase in ocean tides. On the other hand, a shelf with large friction has little effect on ocean tides. Comparison of the model predictions with results from numerical models of tides during the ice ages, when lower sea levels led to a much reduced areal extent of shelves, suggests that the predicted larger tidal dissipation then is related to the ocean basins being close to resonance. New numerical simulations with a forward global tide model are used to test expectations from the mechanical analogue. Setting friction to unrealistically large values in Hudson Strait yields larger North Atlantic M2 amplitudes, very similar to those seen in a simulation with the Hudson Strait blocked off. Thus, as anticipated, a shelf with very large friction is nearly equivalent in its effect on the open ocean to the removal of the shelf altogether. Setting friction in shallow waters throughout the globe to unrealistically large values yields even larger open ocean tidal amplitudes, similar to those found in simulations of ice-age tides. It thus appears that larger modeled tides during the ice ages can be a consequence of enhanced friction in shallower water on the shelf in glacial times as well as a reduced shelf area then. Single oscillator and coupled oscillator models for global tides show that the maximum extractable power for human use is a fraction of the present dissipation rate, which is itself a fraction of global human power

  6. Encystment and excystment of Gonyaulax polyedra during a red tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasović, Ivona

    1989-01-01

    As part of long term research program on red tide phenomena in the Kaštela Bay (Adriatic Sea), the formation of temporary cysts of Gonyaulax polyedra Stein was investigated. These cysts formed only when ambient conditions changed dramatically (O 2 depletion, pH decrease), coinciding in time with the occurrence of mass mortalities of marine fauna. The data suggest that temporary cysts act as a protective mechanism for this organism, which, by reducing its metabolic activity, is able to survive in a latent state during unfavourable conditions. It appears, that this mechanism is important in relation to the persistence and recurrence of red tides in this area throughout the summer.

  7. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Tide Prediction, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has High Low Tide Predictions from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). The official Tide and Tidal Current...

  8. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, High Low Tide Prediction

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has High Low Tide Predictions from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). The official Tide and Tidal Current...

  9. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Tide Prediction, 60-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has High Low Tide Predictions from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). The official Tide and Tidal Current...

  10. Variation of physico-chemical characteristics with tide in Visakhapatnam harbour waters, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RamaRaju, V.S.; Rao, T.V.N.; Rathod, V.

    are presented. In general, tidal variations in these parameters in surface waters show increasing trend during flood tide and decreasing trend during ebb tide. However, the nutrient concentrations at st C (entrance channel) show the reverse trend. The wide...

  11. Investigating TIME-GCM Atmospheric Tides for Different Lower Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Lu, G.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been recently established that atmospheric tides generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the geospace environment. In order to extend our knowledge of the various coupling mechanisms between the different atmospheric layers, we rely on model simulations. Currently there exist two versions of the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM), i.e. GSWM02 and GSWM09, which are used as a lower boundary (ca. 30 km) condition for the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) and account for the upward propagating atmospheric tides that are generated in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this paper we explore the various TIME-GCM upper atmospheric tidal responses for different lower boundary conditions and compare the model diagnostics with tidal results from satellite missions such as TIMED, CHAMP, and GOCE. We also quantify the differences between results associated with GSWM02 and GSWM09 forcing and results of TIMEGCM simulations using Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) data as a lower boundary condition.

  12. Waves and currents in tide-dominated location off Dahej, Gulf of Khambhat, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; AshokKumar, K.

    was found to be around 4.5 times stronger than that of the major diurnal constituent K1. Currents were predominantly tide induced with speeds up to 3.3 m/s and were north-northwest during flood tide and south-southeast during ebb tide. Residual cross...

  13. Characteristics of Tides in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sindhu, B.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    , respectively) in the Gulf of Martaban while amplitudes of diurnal tides (K1, O1) reaches maximum (20, 12 cm, respectively) in the Malacca Strait. The continental shelf in the head bay and along the southern coast of Myanmar is about 200 km wide...

  14. INTERNAL TIDES, SOLITARY WAVES AND BORES IN SHALLOW SEAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 高天赋

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing and in situ observations of internal tides, solitary waves and bores in shallow water are briefly reviewed in this paper. The emphasis is laid on interpreting SAR images based on oceanographic measurements, and analyzing characteristics of internal waves in the China Seas. Direc-tions for future research are discussed.

  15. INTERNAL TIDES, SOLITARY WAVES AND BORES IN SHALLOW SEAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing and in situ observations of internal tides, solitary waves and bores in shallow water are briefly reviewed in this paper. The emphasis is laid on interpreting SAR images based on oceanographic measurements, and analyzing characteristics of internal waves in the China Seas. Directions for future research are discussed.

  16. The BlueTides Simulation: First Galaxies and Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yu; Croft, Rupert A; Bird, Simeon; Battaglia, Nicholas; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the BlueTides simulation and report initial results for the luminosity functions of the first galaxies and AGN, and their contribution to reionization. BlueTides was run on the BlueWaters cluster at NCSA from $z=99$ to $z=8.0$ and includes 2$\\times$7040$^3$ particles in a $400$Mpc/h per side box, making it the largest hydrodynamic simulation ever performed at high redshift. BlueTides includes a pressure-entropy formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics, gas cooling, star formation (including molecular hydrogen), black hole growth and models for stellar and AGN feedback processes. The star formation rate density in the simulation is a good match to current observational data at $z\\sim 8-10$. We find good agreement between observations and the predicted galaxy luminosity function in the currently observable range $-18\\le M_{\\mathrm UV} \\le -22.5$ with some dust extinction required to match the abundance of brighter objects. BlueTides implements a patchy reionization model that produces a fluct...

  17. Light Tides and the Kennedy-Thorndike experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Bel, Ll.

    2004-01-01

    We model the system Earth-Moon-Sun from the point of view of a frame of reference co-moving with the Earth and we derive a detailed prediction of the outcome of future Kennedy-Thorndike's type experiments to be seen as light tides.

  18. Devonian tides: a driver for the evolution of terrestrial vertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Hannah; Green, Mattias

    2017-04-01

    The Devonian era saw one of the biggest evolutionary phases for Vertebrates, branching off from lobed-finned fish (sarcopterygians) to develop limbs enabling the transition from a marine to a terrestrial life. It has recently been suggested that the evolutionary pressure came from unusually large semidiurnal tides at the time, leaving individuals stranded in rock pools for up to a fortnight. It was therefore advantageous if the organism had some form of mechanism to transition between these pools, and so brought about the development of limbs. Here, we simulate the tides from the Devonian using the dedicated tidal model OTIS and a series of Devonian plate reconstructions. The reconstructions span the entire Devonian era (410 Mya - 340 Mya) and comprise of Classic and Alternative models of the Devonian. The results shows that as Gondwana and Laurasia collided, the ocean basin between them did go through several resonances, indeed producing unusually large local tides and associated spring-neap cycles. This not only support the idea that tides produced the pressure for the evolution of tetrapods, but can also have contributed to the vast areas of anoxia implied by the sediments from the period which led to mass extinction events during the late Devonian.

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF 1998 RED TIDE OF THE BOHAI SEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongsheng WU; Zhao-Yin WANG

    2002-01-01

    Algal bloom,known as red tide,has occurred frequently in the Bohai Sea in recent decades causing great economic losses to fisheries as well as having significant adverse impact on the environment. A 3-D Eco-Hydraulic model is developed to simulate the explosive propagation of diatom and dinoflagellate as a function of the concentration of various nutrients,river inflow,tide,temperature,wind,sunshine and rainfall. The model is intended to answer the questions ofhow the 1998 Bohai Sea red tide occurred,and to investigate how environmental factors,such as temperature,wind,rainfall,solar radiance,sea currents and nutrients,affect the algal bloom process. The parameters employed in the model are calibrated with the data collected in the periods 1982-1983 and 1992-1993. Results from the model indicate that eutrophication of the seawater is the basic condition for algal bloom,and that the 1998 red tide was triggered by the abnormal warm weather in August and September.

  20. Wind Stress Forcing of the North Sea "Pole Tide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    OConnor, William P.; Chao, Benjamin Fong; Zheng, Dawei; Au, Andrew Y.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted numerical simulations of the wind-forcing of the sea level variations in the North Sea using a barotropic ocean model with realistic geography, bathymetry, and boundary conditions, to examine the forcing of the 14-month "pole tide" which is known to be strong along the Denmark- Netherlands coast. The simulation input is the monthly-mean surface wind stress field from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis for the 40-year period 1958-1997. The output sea level response was then compared with 10 coastal tide gauge records from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). Besides the strong seasonal variations, several prominent quasi-periodicities exist at around 7 years, 3 years, 14 months, 9 months, and 6.5 months. Correlation and spectral analyses show remarkable agreement between the model output and the observations, particularly in the 14-month, or Chandler period band. The latter indicates that the enhanced pole tide found in the North Sea along the Denmark-Netherlands coast is actually the coastal setup response to wind stress forcing with a periodicity of 14 months. We find no need to invoke a geophysical explanation involving resonance-enhancement of pole tide in the North Sea to explain the observations.

  1. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  2. The quasi-6 day wave and its interactions with solar tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jeffrey M.; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2017-04-01

    Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (TIMED/SABER) temperature measurements between 20 and 110 km altitude and ±50° latitude during 2002-2015 are employed to reveal the climatological characteristics of the quasi-6 day wave (Q6DW) and evidence for secondary waves (SW) resulting from its nonlinear interactions with solar tides. The mean period is 6.14d with a standard deviation (σ) of 0.26d. Multiyear-mean maximum amplitudes (3-5 K, σ ˜ 4 K) occur within the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) region between 75 and 100 km during day of year (DOY) 60-120 and 180-300 in the Northern Hemisphere and DOY 0-110 and 200-300 in the Southern Hemisphere. Amplitudes approach 10 K in some individual years. At midlatitudes downward phase progression exists from 100 to 35 km with a mean vertical wavelength of about 70 km. Signatures of SW due to Q6DW-tide interactions appear at distinct space-based zonal wave numbers (ks) in temperature spectra constructed in the reference frame of the TIMED orbit. However, SW produced by several different tides can collapse onto the same (ks) value, rendering their relative contributions indistinguishable. Nevertheless, by determining the space-based wave amplitudes attached to these values of (ks), and demonstrating that they are a large fraction of the interacting wave amplitudes, we conclude that the aggregate contributions of the SW to the overall wave spectrum must be significant. Because the SW have periods, zonal wave numbers, and latitude-height structures different from those of the primary waves, they contribute additionally to the complexity of the wave spectrum. This complexity is communicated to the ionosphere through collisions or through the dynamo electric fields generated by the total wave spectrum.

  3. Earth tides of an ellipsoidal, inelastic, and laterally heterogeneous Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Shibuya, K.

    2012-12-01

    We used five stations covering a range of latitudes from 60°N to 70°S: METSÄHOVI, STRASBOURG, SUTHERLAND, CANBERRA, and SYOWA with Superconducting Gravimeter with sufficiently high-resolution data available for durations of at least five years to validate theoretical estimation based on an existing method. For the Earth model, we selected the model of Dehant et al. (1999) to validate the latitude dependency and inelasticity of gravimetric factor. We also used the model of Métivier and Conrad (2008) to validate the lateral heterogeneity of gravity observation. For the correction of ocean loading effect, we tested recent four global ocean tide models (TPXO7-atlas, EOT11a, DTU10, and HAMTIDE11a) as well as old ocean tide models. We estimated the misfit between the observed loading effect and the modeled ocean loading effect for the three main waves (O1, K1, and M2) at each station. Anomalous discrepancies at METSÄHOVI and SYOWA based on old ocean tide models were diminished by the use of recent ocean tide models. Gravimetric factors for K1, corrected using optimum recent ocean tide models, showed the possibility of obtaining parameters conforming to the prediction curve of model of inelastic non-hydrostatic Earth. Gravimetric factors corrected using optimum ocean tide models at METSÄHOVI, STRASBOURG, and CANBERRA showed tendencies towards the theoretical values for latitude dependence. However, at SUTHERLAND and SYOWA, large offsets from theoretical values were observed. These stations show the remaining misfits, 0.0733 and 0.0847 microGal, respectively. We think the portion of the anomaly could not be explained by the perturbation from the mantle convection, because the amplitude of gravity perturbation at these stations is very small. For example, at SUTHERLAND, the final residual for K1 band is 85 nanoGal but gravity perturbation by lateral heterogeneity is just ~0.81 nanoGal: Gravity perturbations up to 120 nanoGal for all bands come from mostly in Indonesia

  4. Tsunami source of the 2016 Muisne, Ecuador Earthquake inferred from tide gauge and DART records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriano, B.; Fujii, Y.; Koshimura, S.

    2016-12-01

    On April 16, 2016 an earthquake occurred in the central coast of Ecuador (0.382°N 79.922°W, Mw=7.8 at 23:58:36.980 UTC according to U.S. Geological Service). It was reported that widespread damage occurred at several towns of Monabi coastal province. According to reports from the Ecuador Government, more than 15,000 buildings were damaged. This earthquake generated a relatively small tsunami that was detected at several tide gauge station as well as offshore DARTs (Deep Ocean Tsunami Detection Buoys). This study aims to investigate the tsunami source of the 2016 Muisne Earthquake using inversion of recorded tsunami waveform signals. The INOCAR (Instituto Oceanográfico de la Armada in Spanish) of the Ecuador provided the tide records of Esmeraldas, Manta, and La Libertad ports. In addition, the DIMAR (Dirección General Marítima in Spanish) of Colombia provided the tide record of Tumaco port. Finally, waveform signal from two DARTs were also employed. These waveform records usually include ocean tides, which we removed by applying a high-pass filter. To estimate the extent of the tsunami source and the slip distribution, we divide the tsunami source into 4 subfaults that covers the aftershock area during one month after the mainshock. The subfault size is 30 km x 60 km with a top depth of 10 km. The focal mechanisms for all the subfaults were taken form the USGS solution of the mainshock. The inversion result showed that the largest slip was located around the epicenter with a maximum value of 3.1 m. The estimated moment magnitude was calculated as Mw=7.78 (5.89E+20 N-m), which is slightly smaller than the proposed by USGS (Mw7.8, moment 7.05E+20 N-m). The estimated slip distribution suggested that the fault rupture started near the epicenter and propagated from north to south. This evidence is supported by the aftershock distribution, which is higher to the south of the epicenter with a main aftershock of Mw=6.0 on April 22.

  5. Relationship between variability of the semidiurnal tide in the Northern Hemisphere mesosphere and quasi-stationary planetary waves throughout the global middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate possible couplings between planetary waves and the semidiurnal tide (SDT, this work examines the statistical correlations between the SDT amplitudes observed in the Northern Hemisphere (NH mesosphere and stationary planetary wave (SPW with wavenumber S=1 (SPW1 amplitudes throughout the global stratosphere and mesosphere. The latter are derived from the Aura-MLS temperature measurements. During NH summer-fall (July–October, the mesospheric SDT amplitudes observed at Svalbard (78° N and Eureka (80° N usually do not show persistent correlations with the SPW1 amplitudes in the opposite hemisphere. Although the SDT amplitudes observed at lower latitudes (~50–70° N, especially at Saskatoon (52° N, are often shown to be highly and positively correlated with the SPW1 amplitudes in high southern latitudes, these correlations cannot be sufficiently explained as evidence for a direct physical link between the Southern Hemisphere (SH winter-early spring SPW and NH summer-early fall mesospheric SDT. This is because the migrating tide's contribution is usually dominant in the mid-high latitude (~50–70° N NH mesosphere during the local late summer-early fall (July–September. The numerical correlation is dominated by similar low-frequency variability or trends between the amplitudes of the NH SDT and SH SPW1 during the respective equinoctial transitions. In contradistinction, during NH winter (November–February, the mesospheric SDT amplitudes at northern mid-high latitudes (~50–80° N are observed to be significantly and positively correlated with the SPW1 amplitudes in the same hemisphere in most cases. Because both the SPW and migrating SDT are large in the NH during the local winter, a non-linear interaction between SPW and migrating SDT probably occurs, thus providing a global non-migrating SDT. This is consistent with observations of SDT in Antarctica that are large in summer than in winter. It is suggested that

  6. The recognition of ocean red tide with hyper-spectral-image based on EMD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wencang; WEI Hongli; SHI Changjiang; JI Guangrong

    2008-01-01

    A new technique is introduced in this paper regarding red tide recognition with remotely sensed hyper-spectral images based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD),from an artificial red tide experiment in the East China Sea in 2002.A set of characteristic parameters that describe absorbing crest and reflecting crest of the red tide and its recognition methods are put forward based on general picture data,with which the spectral information of certain non-dominant alga species of a red tide occurrence is analyzed for establishing the foundation to estimate the species.Comparative experiments have proved that the method is effective.Meanwhile,the transitional area between red-tide zone and non-red-tide zone can be detected with the information of thickness of algae influence,with which a red tide can be forecast.

  7. Statistical selection of tide gauges for Arctic sea-level reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2015-01-01

    and the use of an ocean circulation model to provide gridded time series of sea level. As a surrogate for satellite altimetry, we have used the Drakkar ocean model to yield the EOFs. We initially evaluate the tide gauges through empirical criteria to reject obvious outlier gauges. Subsequently, we evaluate......In this paper, we seek an appropriate selection of tide gauges for Arctic Ocean sea-level reconstruction based on a combination of empirical criteria and statistical properties (leverages). Tide gauges provide the only in situ observations of sea level prior to the altimetry era. However, tide...... for the period 1950-2010 for the Arctic Ocean, constrained by tide gauge records, using the basic approach of Church et al. (2004). A major challenge is the sparsity of both satellite and tide gauge data beyond what can be covered with interpolation, necessitating a time-variable selection of tide gauges...

  8. Importance of tides for periastron precession in eccentric neutron star-white dwarf binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sravan, N.; Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Althaus, L. G., E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com [Grupo de Evolución Estelar y Pulsaciones, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina Instituto de Astrofísica La Plata, CONICET-UNLP, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    2014-09-10

    Although not nearly as numerous as binaries with two white dwarfs, eccentric neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries are important gravitational-wave (GW) sources for the next generation of space-based detectors sensitive to low frequency waves. Here we investigate periastron precession in these sources as a result of general relativistic, tidal, and rotational effects; such precession is expected to be detectable for at least some of the detected binaries of this type. Currently, two eccentric NS-WD binaries are known in the galactic field, PSR J1141–6545 and PSR B2303+46, both of which have orbits too wide to be relevant in their current state to GW observations. However, population synthesis studies predict the existence of a significant Galactic population of such systems. Though small in most of these systems, we find that tidally induced periastron precession becomes important when tides contribute to more than 3% of the total precession rate. For these systems, accounting for tides when analyzing periastron precession rate measurements can improve estimates of the inferred WD component mass and, in some cases, will prevent us from misclassifying the object. However, such systems are rare, due to rapid orbital decay. To aid the inclusion of tidal effects when using periastron precession as a mass measurement tool, we derive a function that relates the WD radius and periastron precession constant to the WD mass.

  9. Dynamical Tides in General Relativity: Effective Action and Effective-One-Body Hamiltonian

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhoff, Jan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Tidal effects have an important impact on the late inspiral of compact binary systems containing neutron stars. Most current models of tidal deformations of neutron stars assume that the tidal bulge is directly related to the tidal field generated by the companion, with a constant response coefficient. However, if the orbital motion approaches a resonance with one of the internal modes of the neutron star, this adiabatic description of tidal effects starts to break down, and the tides become dynamical. In this paper, we consider dynamical tides in general relativity due to the quadrupolar fundamental oscillation mode of a neutron star. We devise a description of the effects of the neutron star's finite size on the orbital dynamics based on an effective point-particle action augmented by dynamical quadrupolar degrees of freedom. We analyze the post-Newtonian and test-particle approximations of this model and incorporate the results into an effective-one-body Hamiltonian. This enables us to extend the descripti...

  10. Importance of Tides for Periastron Precession in Eccentric Neutron Star - White Dwarf Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Sravan, Niharika; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Althaus, Leandro G

    2014-01-01

    Although not nearly as numerous as binaries with two white dwarfs, eccentric neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries are important gravitational wave sources for the next generation of space-based detectors sensitive to low frequency waves. Here we investigate periastron precession in these sources as a result of general relativistic, tidal, and rotational effects; such precession is expected to be detectable for at least some of the detected binaries of this type. Currently, two eccentric NS-WD binaries are known in the galactic field, PSR J1141-6545 and PSR B2303+46, both of which have orbits too wide to be relevant in their current state to gravitational-wave observations. However, population synthesis studies predict the existence of a significant Galactic population of such systems. We find that the contribution from tides should not be neglected when analyzing periastron precession signatures in gravitational-wave signals: not accounting for tides can produce errors as high as a factor of 80 in the WD...

  11. STUDY OF RED TIDE PREDICTION MODEL FOR THE CHANGJIANG ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper based on field data (on red tide water quality monitoring at the Changjiang River mouth and Hutoudu mariculture area in Zhejiang Province from May to August in 1995, and May to September in 1996) presents an effective model for short term prediction of red tide in the Changjiang Estuary. The measured parameters include: depth, temperature, color diaphaneity, density, DO, COD and nutrients (PO4-P, NO2-N, NO3-N, NH4-N). The model was checked by field-test data, and compared with other related models.The model: Z=SAL-3.95 DO-2.974 PH-5.421 PO4-P is suitable for application to the Shengsi aquiculture area near the Changjiang Estuary.

  12. Just how much do the planets affect the tides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregg, P. J.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the planets, and planetary alignment on the Earth’s tides is addressed. Starting from Newton’s law of gravitation, the tidal influence of any celestial body is expressed in terms of its apparent size and its density. From this, planetary alignment can be seen to contribute at most tenths of a millimetre to a tide and so is unlikely to be a significant contributor to exceptional tidal events. The likely causes of extreme tidal events are outlined: when the Sun and Moon are each closest to Earth, equinox, and weather—in particular extreme air pressure, rainfall, and wind. We conclude with the long-term influence of the planets on the Earth’s orbit and thus on the Sun’s tidal effect (with timescales of the order of 100 000 years), and planetary influence on the Moon’s orbit.

  13. Bispectra of Internal Tides and Parametric Subharmonic Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; MacKinnon, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Bispectral analysis of the nonlinear resonant interaction known as parametric subharmonic instability (PSI) for a coherence semidiurnal internal tide demonstrates the ability of the bispectrum to identify and quantify the transfer rate. Assuming that the interaction is confined to a vertical plane, energy equations transform in such a way that nonlinear terms become the third-moment spectral quantity known as the bispectrum. Bispectral transfer rates computed on PSI in an idealized, fully-nonlinear, non-hydrostatic Boussinesq model compare well to model growth rates of daughter waves. Bispectra also identify the nonlinear terms responsible for energy transfer. Using resonance conditions for an M2 tide, the locus of PSI wavenumber triads is determined as a function of parent-wave frequency and wavenumbers, latitude and range of daughter-wave frequencies. The locus is used to determine the expected bispectral signal of PSI in wavenumber space. Bispectra computed using velocity profiles from the HOME experiment ...

  14. Does lunisolar gravitational tide affect the activity of animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshcherevskii, A. V.; Sidorin, A. Ya.

    2010-12-01

    Multiyear time series obtained by the continuous instrumental monitoring of the electrical activity (EA) of weakly electric fish Gnathonemus leopoldianus and the motor activity (MA) of the freshwater catfish Hoplosternum thoracatum and the cockroach Blaberus craniifer are compared to the parameters of the lunisolar gravitational tide. These curves are observed to be very similar for a large number of time intervals. However, a more detailed analysis shows this to be only a superficial resemblance caused by the closeness of the periods of diurnal and semidiurnal rhythms of bioindicator activity (the dominant rhythms in EA and MA patterns) and the periods of main gravitational tidal waves. It is concluded that the lunisolar gravitational tide has no significant effect on animal behavior in our experiment.

  15. Spherical pattern of tide-isostasy model and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Dong-hong; WANG Ye; YANG Xue-xiang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a calculation formula on spherical pattern of tide-isostasy model is established. The calculation indicated that for the oceanic crust plate which central angle is over 90°, a huge value (its equivalence is 108 N) of accumulative force moment in the crustal isostatic movement caused by tide can trigger off relative motion of plate,resulting in earthquake and volcanic eruption. The seismic wave features during the year 2001-2004 is an obvious example. The paracycles, i.e. 4, 12, 60, 36, 243, 372 and 396 years of tidal fluctuation can provide an explanation for some respective natural disasters. For example, La Madre paracycle about 60 years corresponds to the global disasters,earthquake and typhoon disasters.

  16. Characterizing the semidiurnal internal tide off Tasmania using glider data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Daniel; Robertson, Robin; Rainville, Luc

    2015-05-01

    The spatial structure of the semidiurnal internal tide in the vicinity of Tasmania is characterized using temperature and salinity data from Seaglider and Slocum glider deployments. Wavelet analysis of isopycnal displacements measured by the gliders was used to isolate the semidiurnal internal tide, with a solid signal observed both to the east and to the south of Tasmania. The signal south of Tasmania was attributed to local forcing, while that to the east of Tasmania was found to have propagated from the south east to the north west—a result which supports previous studies indicating the presence of an internal tidal beam originating over the Macquarie Ridge, south of New Zealand. Displacement amplitudes were observed to be amplified in the vicinity of the continental slope, with the incoming tidal beam shown to be both reflected and scattered on the continental slope and shelf, and energy transferred to higher modes.

  17. Sea level reconstruction from satellite altimetry and tide gauge data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2012-01-01

    transformations such as maximum autocorrelation factors (MAF), which better take into account the spatio-temporal structure of the variation. Rather than trying to maximize the amount of variance explained, the MAF transform considers noise to be uncorrelated with a spatially or temporally shifted version...... of itself, whereas the desired signal will exhibit autocorrelation. This will be applied to a global dataset, necessitating wrap-around consideration of spatial shifts. Our focus is a timescale going back approximately 50 years, allowing reasonable global availability of tide gauge data. This allows......Ocean satellite altimetry has provided global sets of sea level data for the last two decades, allowing determination of spatial patterns in global sea level. For reconstructions going back further than this period, tide gauge data can be used as a proxy. We examine different methods of combining...

  18. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the enumeration of brown tide algae Aureococcusanophagefferens in coastal waters of Qinhuangdao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hao; LIU Yongjian; ZHANG Qi; YUAN Xiutang; ZHANG Weiwei; ZHANG Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Aureococcus anophagefferens, a small pelagophyte algae, has caused brown tide blooms in coastal waters of Qinhua-ngdao in recent years, presenting significant negative impacts on the shellfish mariculture industry. Under standard light microscopy, it is visually indistinguishable from other small algae in field samples due to its extremely small size. In this study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based on 18S rDNA sequences was developed and used to detect and enumerate A. anophagefferens. A linear regression (R2=0.91) was generated based on cycle thr-esholds value (Ct) versus known concentrations of A. anophagefferens. Twenty-two field samples collected in coastal waters of Qinhuangdao were subjected to DNA extraction and then analyzed using qPCR. Results showed that A. anophagefferens had a wide distribution in coastal waters along Qinhuangdao. Elevated A. anophagefferens abun-dance, category 3 brown tide blooms (>200 000 cells/mL) occurred at Dongshan Beach and Tiger-stone Beach in August in 2013. In shellfish mariculture areas along coastal waters of Qinhuangdao, 4 stations had category 3 blooms, and 6 stations had category 2 blooms (35 000–200 000 cells/mL) in August and all stations had category 1 blooms (>0 to ≤35 000 cells/mL) in October. Quantitative PCR allows for detection of A. anophagefferens cells at low levels in filed samples, which is essential to effective management and prediction of brown tide blooms.

  19. Time-Frequency Analyses of Tide-Gauge Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Erol

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The real world phenomena being observed by sensors are generally non-stationary in nature. The classical linear techniques for analysis and modeling natural time-series observations are inefficient and should be replaced by non-linear techniques of whose theoretical aspects and performances are varied. In this manner adopting the most appropriate technique and strategy is essential in evaluating sensors’ data. In this study, two different time-series analysis approaches, namely least squares spectral analysis (LSSA and wavelet analysis (continuous wavelet transform, cross wavelet transform and wavelet coherence algorithms as extensions of wavelet analysis, are applied to sea-level observations recorded by tide-gauge sensors, and the advantages and drawbacks of these methods are reviewed. The analyses were carried out using sea-level observations recorded at the Antalya-II and Erdek tide-gauge stations of the Turkish National Sea-Level Monitoring System. In the analyses, the useful information hidden in the noisy signals was detected, and the common features between the two sea-level time series were clarified. The tide-gauge records have data gaps in time because of issues such as instrumental shortcomings and power outages. Concerning the difficulties of the time-frequency analysis of data with voids, the sea-level observations were preprocessed, and the missing parts were predicted using the neural network method prior to the analysis. In conclusion the merits and limitations of the techniques in evaluating non-stationary observations by means of tide-gauge sensors records were documented and an analysis strategy for the sequential sensors observations was presented.

  20. Time-frequency analyses of tide-gauge sensor data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Serdar

    2011-01-01

    The real world phenomena being observed by sensors are generally non-stationary in nature. The classical linear techniques for analysis and modeling natural time-series observations are inefficient and should be replaced by non-linear techniques of whose theoretical aspects and performances are varied. In this manner adopting the most appropriate technique and strategy is essential in evaluating sensors' data. In this study, two different time-series analysis approaches, namely least squares spectral analysis (LSSA) and wavelet analysis (continuous wavelet transform, cross wavelet transform and wavelet coherence algorithms as extensions of wavelet analysis), are applied to sea-level observations recorded by tide-gauge sensors, and the advantages and drawbacks of these methods are reviewed. The analyses were carried out using sea-level observations recorded at the Antalya-II and Erdek tide-gauge stations of the Turkish National Sea-Level Monitoring System. In the analyses, the useful information hidden in the noisy signals was detected, and the common features between the two sea-level time series were clarified. The tide-gauge records have data gaps in time because of issues such as instrumental shortcomings and power outages. Concerning the difficulties of the time-frequency analysis of data with voids, the sea-level observations were preprocessed, and the missing parts were predicted using the neural network method prior to the analysis. In conclusion the merits and limitations of the techniques in evaluating non-stationary observations by means of tide-gauge sensors records were documented and an analysis strategy for the sequential sensors observations was presented.

  1. Bottom friction optimization for a better barotropic tide modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Martial; Lathuilière, Cyril; Son Hoang, Hong; Baraille, Rémy

    2015-04-01

    At a regional scale, barotropic tides are the dominant source of variability of currents and water heights. A precise representation of these processes is essential because of their great impacts on human activities (submersion risks, marine renewable energies, ...). Identified sources of error for tide modelling at a regional scale are the followings: bathymetry, boundary forcing and dissipation due to bottom friction. Nevertheless, bathymetric databases are nowadays known with a good accuracy, especially over shelves, and global tide models performances are better than ever. The most promising improvement is thus the bottom friction representation. The method used to estimate bottom friction is the simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (SPSA) which consists in the approximation of the gradient based on a fixed number of cost function measurements, regardless of the dimension of the vector to be estimated. Indeed, each cost function measurement is obtained by randomly perturbing every component of the parameter vector. An important feature of SPSA is its relative ease of implementation. In particular, the method does not require the development of tangent linear and adjoint version of the circulation model. Experiments are carried out to estimate bottom friction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) in barotropic mode (one isopycnal layer). The study area is the Northeastern Atlantic margin which is characterized by strong currents and an intense dissipation. Bottom friction is parameterized with a quadratic term and friction coefficient is computed with the water height and the bottom roughness. The latter parameter is the one to be estimated. Assimilated data are the available tide gauge observations. First, the bottom roughness is estimated taking into account bottom sediment natures and bathymetric ranges. Then, it is estimated with geographical degrees of freedom. Finally, the impact of the estimation of a mixed quadratic/linear friction

  2. Land Movement Studies at Tide Gauge using Continuous GPS Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemnil, Sommart

    From land movement studies using Continuous GPS (CGPS) Technique at tide gauge station in Phrachunlachomklao Fort, Samutprakan province, Thailand results that this station clearly subsides 2 - 3 mm./yr which is higher than CGPS Permanent station at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. The preliminary horizontal land motion in north, east direction and vertical movement results are -0.28 ± 3.63, 27.87 ± 4.35 and -27.89 ± 5.59, mm./yr respectively.

  3. Multi-satellite ocean tide modelling - the K-1 constituent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    1997-01-01

    All major ocean tide constituents are aliased into signals with periods less than 90 days from TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry, except the K-1 constituent. The aliased K-1 has a period of 173 days. Consequently, it might be confounded with height variations caused by the semiannual cycle having a period......, where the presence of crossing tracks cannot separate K-1 from the semiannual signal from TOPEX/POSEIDON, the importance of including ERS-1 and GEOSAT observations was demonstrated. A comparison with 29 pelagic and coastal tide gauges in the Southern Ocean south of 50 degrees S gave 5.59 (M-2), 2.27 (S......-2) and 5.04 (K-1) cm RMS agreement for FES95.1 ocean tide model. The same comparison for the best empirical estimated constituents based on TOPEX/POSEIDON + ERS-1 + GEOSAT gave 4.32, 2.21, and 4.29 cm for M-2, S-2 and K-1, respectively....

  4. The Fundamental Experiments of Red Tide Chemical Forecast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang ZhengBin; Liu Chunying; Li Peifeng; Wu Zhenzhen; Lin Cai; Huang Huawei; Xing Lei; Liu Liansheng

    2006-01-01

    Many food algae and red tide algae were cultivated in the f/2 medium,and the nitric oxide(NO)concentration of the medium and the cell density were determined.The experiments on algae were conducted when different concentrations of NO were added into the medium using two methods.The results show that low concentrations of NO were self-produced by marine algae during the exponential growth period and were about nmol/L level.But at the end of the period,i.e.,2 or 3 days before the cell density reaches the maximum,an NO peak appeared,with the NO concentration reaching 10 umol/L.The NO threshold concentration exists according to the influence of exogenous NO on the marine phytoplankton growth.One type is the threshold concentration that can promote algae growth,and its value is between 10 and 1 nmol level,or even lower.The other type can inhibit the phytoplankton growth,which is about μmol level or higher.The results indicate that red tide algae are far more sensitive to NO than are food algae.The fundamental experimental outcome above may provide a new clue for red tide chemical forecast by inspecting the NO change.

  5. Hurricanes, submarine groundwater discharge, and Florida's red tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanmin; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2006-06-01

    A Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Bloom affected coastal waters shallower than 50 m off west-central Florida from January 2005 through January 2006, showing a sustained anomaly of ~1 mg chlorophyll m-3 over an area of up to 67,500 km2. Red tides occur in the same area (approximately 26-29°N, 82-83°W) almost every year, but the intense 2005 bloom led to a widespread hypoxic zone (dissolved oxygen marine mammals. Runoff alone provided insufficient nitrogen to support this bloom. We pose the hypothesis that submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) provides the missing nutrients, and indeed can trigger and support the recurrent red tides off west-central Florida. SGD inputs of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in Tampa Bay alone are ~35% of that discharged by all central Florida rivers draining west combined. We propose that the unusual number of hurricanes in 2004 resulted in high runoff, and in higher than normal SGD emerging along the west Florida coast throughout 2005, initiating and fueling the persistent HAB. This mechanism may also explain recurrent red tides in other coastal regions of the Gulf of Mexico.

  6. Using satellite altimetry and tide gauges for storm surge warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O. B.; Cheng, Y.; Deng, X.; Steward, M.; Gharineiat, Z.

    2015-03-01

    The combination of the coarse temporal sampling by satellite altimeters in the deep ocean with the high temporal sampling at sparsely located tide gauges along the coast has been used to improve the forecast of high water for the North Sea along the Danish Coast and for the northeast coast of Australia. For both locations we have tried to investigate the possibilities and limitations of the use of satellite altimetry to capture high frequency signals (surges) using data from the past 20 years. The two regions are chosen to represent extra-tropical and tropical storm surge conditions. We have selected several representative high water events on the two continents based on tide gauge recordings and investigated the capability of satellite altimetry to capture these events in the sea surface height data. Due to the lack of recent surges in the North Sea we focused on general high water level and found that in the presence of two or more satellites we could capture more than 90% of the high water sea level events. In the Great Barrier Reef section of the northeast Australian coast, we have investigated several large tropical cyclones; one of these being Cyclone Larry, which hit the Queensland coast in March 2006 and caused both loss of lives as well as huge devastation. Here we demonstrate the importance of integrating tide gauges with satellite altimetry for forecasting high water at the city of Townsville in northeast Australia.

  7. The effect of tides on dense water formation in Arctic shelf seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Postlethwaite

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean tides are not explicitly included in many ocean general circulation models, which will therefore omit any interactions between tides and the cryosphere. We present model simulations of the wind and buoyancy driven circulation and tides of the Barents and Kara Seas, using a 25 km × 25 km 3-D ocean circulation model coupled to a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model. The modeled tidal amplitudes are compared with tide gauge data and sea ice extent is compared with satellite data. Including tides in the model is found to have little impact on overall sea ice extent but is found to delay freeze up and hasten the onset of melting in tidally active coastal regions. The impact that including tides in the model has on the salt budget is investigated and found to be regionally dependent. The vertically integrated salt budget is dominated by lateral advection. This increases significantly when tides are included in the model in the Pechora Sea and around Svalbard where tides are strong. Tides increase the salt flux from sea ice by 50% in the Pechora and White Seas but have little impact elsewhere. This study suggests that the interaction between ocean tides and sea ice should not be neglected when modeling the Arctic.

  8. The effect of tides on dense water formation in Arctic shelf seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Postlethwaite

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean tides are not explicitly included in many ocean general circulation models, which will therefore omit any interactions between tides and the cryosphere. We present model simulations of the wind and buoyancy driven circulation and tides of the Barents and Kara Seas, using a 25 km × 25 km 3-D ocean circulation model coupled to a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model. The modeled tidal amplitudes are compared with tide gauge data and sea ice extent is compared with satellite data. Including tides in the model is found to have little impact on overall sea ice extent but is found to delay freeze up and hasten the onset of melting in tidally active coastal regions. The impact that including tides in the model has on the salt budget is investigated and found to be regionally dependent. The vertically integrated salt budget is dominated by lateral advection. This increases significantly when tides are included in the model in the Pechora Sea and around Svalbard where tides are strong. Tides increase the salt flux from sea ice by 50% in the Pechora and White Seas but have little impact elsewhere. This study suggests that the interaction between ocean tides and sea ice should not be neglected when modeling the Arctic.

  9. Sea Level Rise and Land Subsidence Contributions to the Signals from the Tide Gauges of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Albert

    2016-06-01

    The tide gauges measure the local oscillations of the sea level vs. the tide gauge instrument. The tide gauge instrument is generally subjected to the general subsidence or uplift of the nearby inland, plus some additional subsidence for land compaction and other localised phenomena. The paper proposes a non-linear model of the relative sea level oscillations including a long term trend for the absolute sea level rise, another term for the subsidence of the instrument, and finally a sinusoidal approximation for the cyclic oscillations of periodicities up to decades. This non-linear model is applied to the tide gauges of China. The paper shows that the limited information available for China does not permit to infer any proper trend for the relative rates of rise, as the tide gauge records are all short or incomplete and the vertical movement of the tide gauge instruments is unassessed. The only tide gauge record of sufficient length that may be assembled for China is obtained by combining the North Point and Quarry Bay tide gauges in Hong Kong (NPQB). This NQPB composite tide gauge record is shown to have similarities with the tide gauge records of Sydney, equally in the West pacific, and San Diego, in the east Pacific, oscillating about the longer term trend mostly determined by the local subsidence. As it is very well known that China generally suffers of land subsidence, and the tide gauge installations may suffer of additional subsidence vs. the inland, it may be concluded from the analysis of the other worldwide tide gauges that the sea levels of China are very likely rising about the same amount of the subsidence of the tide gauges, with the sea level acceleration component still negligible.

  10. Organizational Analysis of the TIDES Project and the STAR-TIDES Network Using the 7-S Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    standard advertisement . The Director also considers people who have indicated interest via the website. Those hired to work in TIDES typically have...the work. Because the advertisement for RA positions is generic, and preparing more specific ones takes considerable time and effort, applicants do not...Additionally, they must be skilled at using so- cial networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, as this is a key method of spreading their mis- sion

  11. Vertical Motion Determined Using Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yen Kuo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust method to estimate vertical crustal motions by combining geocentric sea level measurements from decadal (1992 - 2003 TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite altimetry and long-term (> 40 years relative sea level records from tide gauges using a novel Gauss-Markov stochastic adjustment model is presented. These results represent an improvement over a prior study (Kuo et al. 2004 in Fennoscandia, where the observed vertical motions are primarily attributed to the incomplete Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA in the region since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. The stochastic adjustment algorithm and results include a fully-populated a priori covariance matrix. The algorithm was extended to estimate vertical motion at tide gauge locations near open seas and around semi-enclosed seas and lakes. Estimation of nonlinear vertical motions, which could result from co- and postseismic deformations, has also been incorporated. The estimated uncertainties for the vertical motion solutions in coastal regions of the Baltic Sea and around the Great Lakes are in general < 0.5 mm yr-1, which is a significant improvement over existing studies. In the Baltic Sea, the comparisons of the vertical motion solution with 10 collocated GPS radial rates and with the BIFROST GIA model show differences of 0.2 ¡_ 0.9 and 1.6 ¡_ 1.8 mm yr-1, respectively. For the Great Lakes region, the comparisons with the ICE-3G model and with the relative vertical motion estimated using tide gauges only (Mainville and Craymer 2005 show differences of -0.2 ¡_ 0.6 and -0.1 ¡_ 0.5 mm yr-1, respectively. The Alaskan vertical motion solutions (linear and nonlinear models have an estimated uncertainty of ~1.2 - 1.6 mm yr-1, which agree qualitatively with GPS velocity and tide gauge-only solutions (Larsen et al. 2003. This innovative technique could potentially provide improved estimates of the vertical motion globally where long-term tide gauge records exist.

  12. Source of the July 2006 West Java Tsunami Estimated from Tide Gauge Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Y.; Satake, K.

    2006-12-01

    The tsunami source of the July 2006 West Java Earthquake (8:19:28, 17 July, 2006, UTC) were estimated from the tsunami waveforms recorded on tide gauges around the Indian Ocean. The inversion reveals that the tsunami source was about 200 km long. The largest slip, about 2.5 m, was located about 150 km east of the epicenter. Most of the slip occurred on shallow parts of the fault, indicating that this earthquake shares the same characteristics with "tsunami earthquakes" that generates abnormally large tsunamis than expected from seismic waves. The slip distribution yields a total seismic moment of 7.0 × 1020 Nm (Mw = 7.8). The July earthquake generated a tsunami that left more than 800 persons dead or missing in western Java. The long duration and slow rupture velocity inferred from seismic waves [Ammon et al., preprint], and slight ground shaking would indicate that this earthquake was a "tsunami earthquakes." The tsunami was instrumentally recorded and provides us an opportunity to analyze tsunami waveforms to estimate the tsunami source. We use the tide gauge data collected by Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS) and those operated by Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). Since the phase velocity of shallow- water waves depends only on the water depth, accurate bathymetric data is essential for the tsunami numerical computation. We used the GEBCO data, gridded bathymetry data digitized from contour map. We first estimate the tsunami source area from the observed tsunami travel times, by calculating the initial wavefronts through back projection of tsunamis from tide gauge stations toward the source. The tsunami travel times poorly constrain the source area, probably because shallow bathymetry near these gauges is not well known. We then perform tsunami waveform inversion by dividing the source area into 10 subfaults. Tsunami propagation from each subfault to stations or Greens functions were calculated for a rise time of 1 min, numerically solving the

  13. Tide and tidal current observation in the Karimata Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zexun; Fang, Guohong; Sulistiyo, Budi; Dwi Susanto, R.; Setiawan, Agus; Rameyo Adi, Tukul; Qiao, Fangli; Fan, Bin; Li, Shujiang

    2013-04-01

    It is believed that the water exchanges between the South China Sea and the Indonesian Seas are significant, and play an important role in the water mass formation and air-sea interactions of both the South China Sea and Indonesian Seas. It has also been found that the current in Sunda Strait has been obvious seasonal variation, which indicates the water exchange between West Indonesian Seas and India Ocean. In order to make quantitative evaluation of the magnitudes of the exchange, the First Institute of Oceanography (FIO), China, the Agency for Marine and Fisheries Research, Indonesia, and the Lamont-Doheries Earth Observatory, USA established a collaborative program, "The South-China Sea-Indonesian Seas Transport/Exchange (SITE) and Impacts on Seasonal Fish Migration" in 2006. And, they extend and expand the cooperation to Sunda Strait in 2008, the title of the collaborative program was changed to "The South China Sea - Indonesian Seas Transport/Exchange (SITE) and Dynamics of Sunda and Lombok Straits, and Their Impacts on Seasonal Fish Migration". Till now, 12 joint cruises have been conducted since December, 2007. Ten Trawl-Resistant Bottom Mounts (TRBM) have been deployed in the Karimata and Sunda Straits. The TRBMs are equipped with ADCPs and tide gauges for measuring current profiles and sea levels, respectively. The temperature-salinity profiles were measured with ship-board CTD during the cruises. Data obtained in Karimata Strait revealed that a significant water mass transport. This indicates that the Karimata Strait throughflow can greatly impacts the circulation of both the South China Sea and the Indonesian Seas. The data obtained at the 5 stations alone the two sections in the Karimata Strait were used to study the tide and tidal currents in the Karimata Strait. 2 TRBMs were deployed at Section A, as well as 3 at Section B, which lies at the southeast of Section A. Station B1 is in the Gaspar Strait between Bangka Island and Belitung Island, Stations

  14. Trade-offs, geography, and limits to thermal adaptation in a tide pool copepod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Morgan W; Grosberg, Richard K; Sanford, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Antagonistic correlations among traits may slow the rate of adaptation to a changing environment. The tide pool copepod Tigriopus californicus is locally adapted to temperature, but within populations, the response to selection for increased heat tolerance plateaus rapidly, suggesting either limited variation within populations or costs of increased tolerance. To measure possible costs of thermal tolerance, we selected for increased upper lethal limits for 10 generations in 22 lines of T. californicus from six populations. Then, for each line, we measured six fitness-related traits. Selected lines showed an overall increase in male and female body sizes, fecundity, and starvation resistance, suggesting a small benefit from (rather than costs of) increased tolerance. The effect of selection on correlated traits also varied significantly by population for five traits, indicating that the genetic basis for the selection response differed among populations. Our results suggest that adaptation was limited by the presence of variation within isolated populations rather than by costs of increased tolerance.

  15. Statistical selection of tide gauges for Arctic sea-level reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we seek an appropriate selection of tide gauges for Arctic Ocean sea-level reconstruction based on a combination of empirical criteria and statistical properties (leverages). Tide gauges provide the only in situ observations of sea level prior to the altimetry era. However, tide gauges are sparse, of questionable quality, and occasionally contradictory in their sea-level estimates. Therefore, it is essential to select the gauges very carefully. In this study, we have established a reconstruction based on empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of sea-level variations for the period 1950-2010 for the Arctic Ocean, constrained by tide gauge records, using the basic approach of Church et al. (2004). A major challenge is the sparsity of both satellite and tide gauge data beyond what can be covered with interpolation, necessitating a time-variable selection of tide gauges and the use of an ocean circulation model to provide gridded time series of sea level. As a surrogate for satellite altimetry, we have used the Drakkar ocean model to yield the EOFs. We initially evaluate the tide gauges through empirical criteria to reject obvious outlier gauges. Subsequently, we evaluate the "influence" of each Arctic tide gauge on the EOF-based reconstruction through the use of statistical leverage and use this as an indication in selecting appropriate tide gauges, in order to procedurally identify poor-quality data while still including as much data as possible. To accommodate sparse or contradictory tide gauge data, careful preprocessing and regularization of the reconstruction model are found to make a substantial difference to the quality of the reconstruction and the ability to select appropriate tide gauges for a reliable reconstruction. This is an especially important consideration for the Arctic, given the limited amount of data available. Thus, such a tide gauge selection study can be considered a precondition for further studies of Arctic sea

  16. Red tide detection by means of peak shift of remote sensing reflectance and possibility of red tide detection with polarized radiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kohei; Terayama, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    A method for detection of red tide by means of remote sensing reflectance peak shift is proposed together with suspended solid influence eliminations. Although remote sensing reflectance peak is situated at around 550nm for sea water without suffered from red tide, the peak is shifted to the longer wavelength when sea water is suffered from red tide. Based on this fact, it is capable to detect red tide using high wavelength resolution of spectral-radiometers. The proposed system uses web camera with band-pass filter on the optics surface. Acquired imagery data can be transmitted through wireless LAN to Internet terminal and can be archived in server through Internet. Validity of the proposed method is confirmed with the system deployed in Ariake Sea which is situated in northern Kyushu, Japan. Also a method for red tide detection with satellite imagery data is attempted with suspended solid influence eliminations. Furthermore, a possibility of red tide detection with polarized radiance measurements is discussed through polarization camera derived sue surface imagery data, in particular, for non-spherical shape of red tide.

  17. Monitoring storm tide and flooding from Hurricane Sandy along the Atlantic coast of the United States, October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Brian E.; Wicklein, Shaun M.; Reiser, Robert G.; Busciolano, Ronald J.; Morrison, Jonathan; Verdi, Richard J.; Painter, Jaime A.; Frantz, Eric R.; Gotvald, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a temporary monitoring network of water-level and barometric pressure sensors at 224 locations along the Atlantic coast from Virginia to Maine to continuously record the timing, areal extent, and magnitude of hurricane storm tide and coastal flooding generated by Hurricane Sandy. These records were greatly supplemented by an extensive post-flood high-water mark (HWM) flagging and surveying campaign from November to December 2012 involving more than 950 HWMs. Both efforts were undertaken as part of a coordinated federal emergency response as outlined by the Stafford Act under a directed mission assignment by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  18. The Global S_1 Tide in Earth's Nutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Einšpigel, David; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Diurnal S_1 tidal oscillations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system induce small perturbations of Earth's prograde annual nutation, but matching geophysical model estimates of this Sun-synchronous rotation signal with the observed effect in geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data has thus far been elusive. The present study assesses the problem from a geophysical model perspective, using four modern-day atmospheric assimilation systems and a consistently forced barotropic ocean model that dissipates its energy excess in the global abyssal ocean through a parameterized tidal conversion scheme. The use of contemporary meteorological data does, however, not guarantee accurate nutation estimates per se; two of the probed datasets produce atmosphere-ocean-driven S_1 terms that deviate by more than 30 μ as (microarcseconds) from the VLBI-observed harmonic of -16.2+i113.4 μ as. Partial deficiencies of these models in the diurnal band are also borne out by a validation of the air pressure tide against barometric in situ estimates as well as comparisons of simulated sea surface elevations with a global network of S_1 tide gauge determinations. Credence is lent to the global S_1 tide derived from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the operational model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). When averaged over a temporal range of 2004 to 2013, their nutation contributions are estimated to be -8.0+i106.0 μ as (MERRA) and -9.4+i121.8 μ as (ECMWF operational), thus being virtually equivalent with the VLBI estimate. This remarkably close agreement will likely aid forthcoming nutation theories in their unambiguous a priori account of Earth's prograde annual celestial motion.

  19. The oceanic tides in the South Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Genco

    Full Text Available The finite element ocean tide model of Le Provost and Vincent (1986 has been applied to the simulation of the M2 and K1 components over the South Atlantic Ocean. The discretisation of the domain, of the order of 200 km over the deep ocean, is refined down to 15 km along the coasts, such refinement enables wave propagation and damping over the continental shelves to be correctly solved. The marine boundary conditions, from Dakar to Natal, through the Drake passage and from South Africa to Antarctica, are deduced from in situ data and from Schwiderski's solution and then optimised following a procedure previously developed by the authors. The solutions presented are in very good agreement with in situ data: the root mean square deviations from a standard subset of 13 pelagic stations are 1.4 cm for M2 and 0.45 cm for K1, which is significantly better overall than solutions published to date in the literature. Zooms of the M2 solution are presented for the Falkland Archipelago, the Weddell Sea and the Patagonian Shelf. The first zoom allows detailing of the tidal structure around the Falklands and its interpretation in terms of a stationary trapped Kelvin wave system. The second zoom, over the Weddell Sea, reveals for the first time what must be the tidal signal under the permanent ice shelf and gives a solution over that sea which is generally in agreement with observations. The third zoom is over the complex Patagonian Shelf. This zoom illustrates the ability of the model to simulate the tides, even over this area, with a surprising level of realism, following purely hydrodynamic modelling procedures, within a global ocean tide model. Maps of maximum associated tidal currents are also given, as a first illustration of a by-product of these simulations.

  20. Observation of deep water microseisms in the North Atlantic Ocean using tide modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucler, Éric; Mocquet, Antoine; Schimmel, Martin; Chevrot, Sébastien; Quillard, Olivier; Vergne, Jérôme; Sylvander, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Ocean activity produces continuous and ubiquitous seismic energy mostly in the 2-20 s period band, known as microseismic noise. Between 2 and 10 s period, secondary microseisms (SM) are generated by swell reflections close to the shores and/or by opposing swells in the deep ocean. However, unique conditions are required in order for surface waves generated by deep-ocean microseisms to be observed on land. By comparing short-duration power spectral densities at both Atlantic shoreline and inland seismic stations, we show that ocean tides strongly modulate the seismic energy in a wide period band except between 2.5 and 5 s. This tidal proxy reveals the existence of an ex situ short-period contribution of the SM peak. Comparison with swell spectra at surrounding buoys suggests that the largest part of this extra energy comes from deep ocean-generated microseisms. The energy modulation might be also used in numerical models of microseismic generation to constrain coastal reflection coefficients.

  1. Internal tides affect benthic community structure in an energetic submarine canyon off SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jian-Xiang; Chen, Guan-Ming; Chiou, Ming-Da; Jan, Sen; Wei, Chih-Lin

    2017-07-01

    Submarine canyons are major conduits of terrestrial and shelf organic matter, potentially benefiting the seafloor communities in the food-deprived deep sea; however, strong bottom currents driven by internal tides and the potentially frequent turbidity currents triggered by storm surges, river flooding, and earthquakes may negatively impact the benthos. In this study, we investigated the upper Gaoping Submarine Canyon (GPSC), a high-sediment-yield canyon connected to a small mountain river (SMR) off southwest (SW) Taiwan. By contrasting the benthic meiofaunal and macrofaunal communities within and outside the GPSC, we examined how food supplies and disturbance influenced the benthic community assemblages. The benthic communities in the upper GPSC were mainly a nested subset of the adjacent slope assemblages. Several meiofaunal (e.g. ostracods) and macrofaunal taxa (e.g. peracarid crustaceans and mollusks) that typically occurred on the slope were lost from the canyon. The polychaete families switched from diverse feeding guilds on the slope to motile subsurface deposit feeders dominant in the canyon. The diminishing of epibenthic peracarids and proliferation of deep burrowing polychaetes in the GPSC resulted in macrofauna occurring largely within deeper sediment horizons in the canyon than on the slope. The densities and numbers of taxa were depressed with distinct and more variable composition in the canyon than on the adjacent slope. Both the densities and numbers of taxa were negatively influenced by internal tide flushing and positively influenced by food availability; however, the internal tides also negatively influenced the food supplies. While the meiofauna and macrofauna densities were both depressed by the extreme physical conditions in the GPSC, only the macrofaunal densities increased with depth in the canyon, presumably related to increased frequency and intensity of disturbance toward the canyon head. The population densities of meiofauna, on the

  2. Earth tides can trigger shallow thrust fault earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Elizabeth S; Vidale, John E; Tanaka, Sachiko

    2004-11-12

    We show a correlation between the occurrence of shallow thrust earthquakes and the occurrence of the strongest tides. The rate of earthquakes varies from the background rate by a factor of 3 with the tidal stress. The highest correlation is found when we assume a coefficient of friction of mu = 0.4 for the crust, although we see good correlation for mu between 0.2 and 0.6. Our results quantify the effect of applied stress on earthquake triggering, a key factor in understanding earthquake nucleation and cascades whereby one earthquake triggers others.

  3. Perturbation of regional ocean tides due to coastal dikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, B. H.; Kim, K. O.; Lee, H. S.; Yuk, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    The tidal regime modeling system for ocean tides in the seas bordering the Korean Peninsula is designed to cover an area that is broad in scope and size, yet provide a high degree of resolution in coastal development areas, including the Saemangeum area in the eastern Yellow Sea and the Ariake Sea in Japan, where serious environmental problems have occurred after the completion of interior tidal dikes. With this simulation system, we have estimated the changes in tidal regime due to barriers at Saemangeum and Isahaya Bay in the Ariake Sea. Some results in terms of perturbations in tidal elevations due to the construction of coastal dikes are presented and discussed.

  4. Green and golden seaweed tides on the rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetacek, Victor; Zingone, Adriana

    2013-12-05

    Sudden beaching of huge seaweed masses smother the coastline and form rotting piles on the shore. The number of reports of these events in previously unaffected areas has increased worldwide in recent years. These 'seaweed tides' can harm tourism-based economies, smother aquaculture operations or disrupt traditional artisanal fisheries. Coastal eutrophication is the obvious, ultimate explanation for the increase in seaweed biomass, but the proximate processes that are responsible for individual beaching events are complex and require dedicated study to develop effective mitigation strategies. Harvesting the macroalgae, a valuable raw material, before they beach could well be developed into an effective solution.

  5. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling due to Atmospheric Tides (Julius Bartels Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jeffrey M.

    2016-04-01

    Within the last decade, a new realization has arrived on the scene of ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) science: terrestrial weather significantly influences space weather. The aspect of space weather referred to here consists of electron density variability that translates to uncertainties in navigation and communications systems, and neutral density variability that translates to uncertainties in orbital and reentry predictions. In the present context "terrestrial weather" primarily refers to the meteorological conditions that determine the spatial-temporal distribution of tropospheric water vapor and latent heating associated with tropical convection, and the middle atmosphere disturbances associated with sudden stratosphere warmings. The net effect of these processes is a spatially- and temporally-evolving spectrum of waves (gravity waves, tides, planetary waves, Kelvin waves) that grows in amplitude with height and enters the IT system near ~100 km. Some members of the wave spectrum penetrate all the way to the base of the exosphere (ca. 500 km). Along the way, nonlinear interactions between different wave components occur, modifying the interacting waves and giving rise to secondary waves. Finally, the IT wind perturbations carried by the waves can redistribute ionospheric plasma, either through the electric fields generated via the dynamo mechanism between 100 and 150 km, or directly by moving plasma along magnetic field lines at higher levels. Additionally, the signatures of wave-driven dynamo currents are reflected in magnetic perturbations observed at the ground. This is how terrestrial atmospheric variability, through the spectrum of vertically- propagating waves that it produces, can effectively drive IT space weather. The primary objective of this Julius Bartels Lecture is to provide an overview of the global observational evidence for the IT consequences of these upward-propagating waves. In honor of Julius Bartels, who performed much research (including

  6. EUTROPHICATION AND RED TIDES AS CONSEQUENCES OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoYin WANG; Yongsheng WU; Guangqian WANG

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the phenomena of eutrophication and red tides correlated with human activities,especially economic development. The fertilizer production in China has been accelerated since the 1970s and has approximately doubled the rate of nitrogen input into the terrestrial N cycle. While the rate of the total population growth of China maintains relatively stable the rate of population growth in cities and towns in the 1980s and 1990s was 10 times higher than ever before. As a result, the urban sewage discharge increased by 400%, which carries 1 million tons of nitrogen into the environmental waters per year. The mining of P minerals and application of P-containing fertilizers greatly enhanced the input of P into the waters. Harmful algal blooms are consequence of the eutrophication. The high frequency of algal bloom is related to the quick economic development since the 1970s and the eutrophication of environmental waters. Analysis indicates that the number of the red tide events in the China Seas roughly follows the curve of the growth rate of GDP with a time lag of about 5-6 years. The time lag is explained as the period of the cycle of accumulation, denitrification and release of the nutrients with transportation and resuspension of the sediment.

  7. Florida Red Tides, Manatee Brevetoxicosis, and Lung Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Colbert, Debborah E.; Dalpra, Dana; Newton, Elizabeth A. C.; Gaspard, Joseph; Littlefield, Brandi; Manire, Charles

    2010-01-01

    In 1996, 149 Florida manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris, died along the southwest coast of Florida. Necropsy pathology results of these animals indicated that brevetoxin from the Florida red tide, Karenia brevis, caused their death. A red tide bloom had been previously documented in the area where these animals stranded. The necropsy data suggested the mortality occurred from chronic inhalation and/or ingestion. Inhalation theories include high doses of brevetoxin deposited/stored in the manatee lung or significant manatee sensitivity to the brevetoxin. Laboratory models of the manatee lungs can be constructed from casts of necropsied animals for further studies; however, it is necessary to define the breathing pattern in the manatee, specifically the volumes and flow rates per breath to estimate toxin deposition in the lung. To obtain this information, two captive-born Florida manatees, previously trained for husbandry and research behaviors, were trained to breathe into a plastic mask placed over their nares. The mask was connected to a spirometer that measured volumes and flows in situ. Results reveal high volumes, short inspiratory and expiratory times and high flow rates, all consistent with observed breathing patterns. PMID:26448968

  8. Tide at the eastern section of the Strait of Gibraltar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Jesús Garcia; Vargas, Juan Miguel; Plaza, Francisco; Sarhan, Tarek; Candela, Julio; Bascheck, Burkard

    2000-06-01

    From October 1995 to April 1996, three mooring lines were deployed at the eastern entrance of the Strait of Gibraltar. The spatial coverage of the mooring array allows for a good description of the tides. They exhibit a dominant semidiurnal nature and a noticeable baroclinic structure that matches the one of the mean exchange. Tidal currents in the upper layer are irregular and usually too weak to reverse the mean upper layer flow that keeps on flowing east. Lower layer flow reverses with semidiurnal periodicity because of the smallness of the mean flow and the appreciable amplitude of the regular semidiurnal oscillation of tidal currents in this layer. Tidal transports can be satisfactorily compared with previous estimates of Bryden et al. [1994] if we allow for strong internal divergences associated with the internal tide. No significant eddy flux of water transport (tidal rectification) is observed at the eastern section, contrary to the almost 50% of the total layer transport found by Bryden et al. [1994] in Camarinal Sill section. Time-dependent hydraulic theory provides a good scenario for interpreting these two independent sets of observations despite the fact that the composite Froude number does not reach the critical values predicted in the hydraulic models most of the time.

  9. Interaction of tide and salinity barrier: Limitation of numerical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphat Vongvisessomjai1

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the study of interaction of the tide and the salinity barrier in an estuarine area is usually accomplished vianumerical modeling, due to the speed and convenience of modern computers. However, numerical models provide littleinsight with respect to the fundamental physical mechanisms involved. In this study, it is found that all existing numericalmodels work satisfactorily when the barrier is located at some distance far from upstream and downstream boundary conditions.Results are considerably underestimate reality when the barrier is located near the downstream boundary, usually theriver mouth. Meanwhile, this analytical model provides satisfactory output for all scenarios. The main problem of thenumerical model is that the effects of barrier construction in creation of reflected tide are neglected when specifying thedownstream boundary conditions; the use of the boundary condition before construction of the barrier which are significantlydifferent from those after the barrier construction would result in an error outputs. Future numerical models shouldattempt to account for this deficiency; otherwise, using this analytical model is another choice.

  10. RESEARCH ON RED TIDE OCCURRENCES USING ENCLOSED EXPERIMENTAL ECOSYSTEMS IN WEST XIAMEN HARBOR, CHINA--RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VARIOUS FACTORS AND RED TIDE OCCURRENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of enclosed ecosystem experiments were conducted in a land-based tank near the seaside of West Xiamen Harbor. The results of experiments conducted in different seasons and years showed a repeatable phytoplankton succession. In this relatively stable ecosystem with added nutrients and trace metals, diatoms dominated initially, dinoflagellates dominated in the later stage, and dinoflagellate red tides eventually occurred. Vitamin B12 enrichment may speed up this succession process. Stirring the water column could stop this process. Soluble Mn at a level of 3-4 μg/L in seawater, which also is the existing concentration of soluble Mn in Xiamen Harbor seawater, is sufficient for the multiplication of algae and occurrence of red tide. The present study showed that excessive soluble Mn in Xiamen Harbor cannot cause red tide, and that Fe was one of the important factors causing diatom red tide in this present study.

  11. Earth tide effects on kinematic/static GPS positioning in Denmark and Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.C.; Knudsen, Per

    2000-01-01

    and the position of reference station. With a baseline less than 80 km, the difference of the Earth tide effects could reach more than 5 mm. So, in precise applications of GPS positioning, the Earth tide effect has to be taken into account even for a relative small local GPS network. Several examples are given...

  12. Observation of 18.6-year modulation tide at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydelek, P. A.; Knopoff, L.; Zürn, W.

    1982-07-01

    We have observed long-period variations in the amplitudes of the diurnal and semidiurnal gravity tides at the South Pole which we attribute to the tidal effects of the 18.6-year regression of the nodes of the lunar orbit. The observations are in agreement with theoretical values of the 18.6-year amplitude modulation of these tides.

  13. Surfzone wave characteristics during flood tide on the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Jishad, M.; Yadhunath, E.M.; Rajasekaran, C.; Gowthaman, R.; Pednekar, P.S.; Luis, R.; Mehra, P.

    waves by wave method show that surfzone wave-height increased with time during a flood tide and the mean wave period decreased with time up to mid tide and then increased during the rest of the measurement period at Keri and Miramar beaches. At Candolim...

  14. Risk in Daily Newspaper Coverage of Red Tide Blooms in Southwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongchao; Garrison, Bruce; Ullmann, Steven G.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E.; Hoagland, Porter

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated newspaper coverage of Florida red tide blooms in four metropolitan areas of Southwest Florida during a 25-year period, 1987-2012. We focused on how journalists framed red tide stories with respect to environmental risk, health risk, and economic risk. We determined risk to be a key factor in this news coverage, being an…

  15. GOCE++ Dynamical Coastal Topography and tide gauge unification using altimetry and GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Nielsen, Karina

    Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT) of the ocean along a coastline which contributes/requires reconciling altimetry, tide gauge and vertical land motion. The fundamental use of the MDT computed using altimetry, ocean models or through the use of tide gauges has values of between -2 and +1 meters at different...

  16. Estimating decadal variability in sea level from tide gauge records: An application to the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederikse, Thomas; Riva, R.E.M.; Slobbe, Cornelis; Broerse, D.B.T.; Verlaan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary observational data sets of sea level is represented by the tide gauge record. We propose a new method to estimate variability on decadal time scales from tide gauge data by using a state space formulation, which couples the direct observations to a predefined state space model by

  17. Minutes of TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team Meeting and Ocean Tides Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This third TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team meeting was held on December 4, 1994 to review progress in defining ocean tide models, precision Earth orbits, and various science algorithms. A related workshop on ocean tides convened to select the best models to be used by scientists in the Geophysical Data Records.

  18. Risk in Daily Newspaper Coverage of Red Tide Blooms in Southwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongchao; Garrison, Bruce; Ullmann, Steven G.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E.; Hoagland, Porter

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated newspaper coverage of Florida red tide blooms in four metropolitan areas of Southwest Florida during a 25-year period, 1987-2012. We focused on how journalists framed red tide stories with respect to environmental risk, health risk, and economic risk. We determined risk to be a key factor in this news coverage, being an…

  19. TIDE: Lightweight Device Composition for Enhancing Tabletop Environments with Smartphone Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicard, Leo; Tabard, Aurelien; Ramos, Juan David Hincapie

    2013-01-01

    , maintaining privacy by limiting content transfer between devices, and enhancing the usefulness of tabletops with already existing smart- phone applications and software developers. We present the design and imple- mentation of TIDE, the study of different interaction techniques to manipulate TIDE...

  20. The DTU15 MSS (Mean Sea Surface) and DTU15LAT (Lowest Astronomical Tide) reference surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars; Piccioni, Gaia;

    in the Arctic Ocean for DTU10MSS and DTU13MSS.A new reference surface for off-shore vertical referencing is introduced. This is called the DTU15LAT.The surface is derived from the DTU15MSS and the DTU10 Global ocean tide to give a 19 year Lowest Astronomical Tide referenced to either the Mean sea surface...

  1. Mapping nonlinear shallow-water tides: a look at the past and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Egbert, G.D.; Erofeeva, S.Y.;

    2006-01-01

    these two interests. After a brief review, we describe initial steps toward the assimilation of altimetry into models of nonlinear tides via generalized inverse methods. A series of barotropic inverse solutions is computed for the M-4 tide over the northwest European Shelf. Future applications of altimetry...

  2. Review of research in internal-wave and internal-tide deposits of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Zhenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of internal-wave and internal-tide deposits is a very young research field in deep-water sedimentology. It has been just twenty years since the first example of internal-wave and internal-tide deposits was identified in the stratigraphic record. Since that time, Chinese scholars have made unremitting efforts and gained some significant research achievements in this field. This paper briefly outlines the history and main achievements of research of internal-wave and internal-tide deposits in China, describes depositional characteristics, sedimentary successions, types of lithofacies, and depositional models of internal-wave and internal-tide deposits identified mainly from ancient strata, and summarizes the existing problems in this research field. New advances in marine physics should be applied to research of the subject of internal-wave and internal-tide deposition, whereas the sedimentary characteristics of internal-wave and internal-tide deposits may be used to deduce the physical processes of their creation. Flume experiments on internal-wave and internal-tide deposition should also be put in practice as often as possible, so that the mechanisms of internal-wave and internal-tide deposition can be explored.

  3. Deformation of erosive and accretive forearcs during subduction of migrating and non-migrating aseismic ridges: Results from 3-D finite element models and application to the Central American, Peruvian, and Ryukyu margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges causes considerable uplift and deformation of the upper plate and may lead, for example, to the indentation of the forearc, the formation of marine terraces, or distinct fault patterns in the upper plate. Depending on the orientation of the ridge relative to the plate convergence direction, the ridge may either be stationary or migrate along the margin. Here we use three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the tectonic evolution of forearcs affected by ridge subduction. In different experiments, we distinguish between migrating/non-migrating ridges and accretive/erosive margins, respectively. Our results reveal that displacement and strain fields above migrating and non-migrating ridges are asymmetric with respect to the ridge axis unless both ridge and plate convergence direction are perpendicular to the trench. As the asymmetric deformation pattern shifts along the margin through time, uplift caused by the underthrusting ridge is followed by subsidence when the ridge crest passed by, and regions initially experiencing shortening may subsequently undergo extension and vice versa. If the forearc comprises an accretionary prism, the ridge-induced reentrant is larger than those in models with erosive forearcs and strain localizes in the frontal part of the wedge. Additional models with a setup adjusted to the Cocos and Gagua Ridges provide constraints on the onset of their subduction at the Central American and Ryukyu margins at ~2 Ma and 1 Ma, respectively. Displacement and strain fields from a model for the Nazca Ridge collision zone show good agreement with geological data from marine terraces and Quaternary faulting.

  4. A new algorithm based on the background field for red tide monitoring in the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaohui; PAN Delu; MAO Zhihua; TAO Bangyi

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing has been proven to be an effective means of monitoring red tides. The spectral information is an important basis for establishing a model to monitor red tides. The spectral curves of red tide events are analyzed and compared with multiyear monthly averaged spectral curves based on MODIS data from July 2002 to June 2012, as well as spectral differences at the same location during red tide presence and ab-sence. A red tide monitoring algorithm is developed based on the background field to extract the red tide information of the East China Sea (ECS). With the application of the algorithm in the ECS, the results reveal that the developed model can effectively determine the location of red tides, with good correspondence to the results from an official bulletin. This demonstrates that the algorithm can effectively extract the red tide information.

  5. Morphodynamic modeling of low energy beaches under waves, tides and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, G.; Marino-Tapia, I.

    2013-05-01

    Natural processes such as coastal erosion or sediment accretion on beaches are produced by the interaction of physical forces in the littoral zone; these coastal processes can attain equilibrium states in the mid- and long term at beaches. Elements that contribute to such behaviour are the cumulative effects of waves, tides and shelf currents, which generate flow, sediment and wave patterns that shape the beach. However, over recent decades, coastal erosion has been intensified by the accelerated growth of the human population, urbanization and land development on coastal boundaries, which modify natural processes. This study shows the results of hydro-morphological numerical modeling of the northern beaches of Yucatán, Mexico, in which erosion problems are identified. The 2D-numerical simulations were carried out using the WAVE, FLOW and MOR models of DELFT 3D. The forcing elements which were used in the simulations, such as wave, tide and wind data were determined from oceanographical equipment and meteorological instruments that were located at the Yucatan coast. A nested model was used in the simulations in order to incorporate a detailed grid with a spatial resolution of 3 m within an overall larger grid. The detailed grid had 27,000 cells and covered a littoral cell of 800 x 200 m. Subsequently, an analysis of kinetic energy was performed to evaluate the grid and WAVE+ FLOW model stability. On the other hand, the calibration and validation tests were carried out through the comparison of computed and measured volumetric changes; the measured data were obtained from two field surveys where the change in the volume sediments was calculated from the evolution of a beach profile, over a span of 55 days. As a result of the validation test, the error between data and model was of ±3%. In order to identify which forcing is the most relevant for the coastal processes of these beaches, various scenarios were tested. Furthermore, an arrangement of six control volume

  6. Study of Vertical Movements of the European Crust Using Tide Gauge and Gnss Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tretyak Kornyliy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This research is devoted to the study of vertical movements of the European crust on the basis of two independent methods, namely tide gauge and GNSS observations results. The description and classification of factors affecting sea level change has been made. The precision with which the movement of the earth's crust according to the results of tide gauge observations can be explored has been calculated . A methodology to identify the duration of tide gauge observations required for studies of vertical movements of the earth 's crust has been presented. Approximation of tide gauge time series with the help of Fourier series has been implemented, the need for long-term observations in certain areas has been explained. The diagram of the velocities of the vertical movements of the European crust on the basis of the tide gauge data and GNSS observations has been built and the anomalous areas where the observations do not coincide have been identified.

  7. Optical Remote Sensing Method to Estimate Green Tide Biomass Based on Floating Algae Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lianbo; Hu, Chuanmin; He, Mingxia

    2014-11-01

    Floating Algae Index (FAI) has been developed to detect various floating algae in open ocean environments using the medium-resolution (250- and 500-m) data from operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instruments. FAI method has been routinely used to identify and calculate the covering area of green tide in the Yellow Sea (YS) since 2009. In addition to green tide covering area, knowledge of the biomass is also important in studying green tide recycling, nutrient load, carbon cycling and for government management. In this study, in situ experiments were conducted to simultaneously measure the biomass and reflectance spectra of green tide on the sea surface in coastal waters off Qingdao on 9 and 11 June 2013. The in situ measurements showed high correlation between green tide biomass and FAI, from which an empirical method to estimate biomass using FAI could be developed.

  8. New way of detecting solid tides - analysis of pulsar's p and p˙.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Jianxiang; Xiao, Naiyuan; Zhao, Ming

    1996-11-01

    One of the most important tasks of modern geodynamical research lies in the precise determination of solid tide motions. Studies of the effects of solid tide motions of an astronomical station on observational data of pulsar have shown that the change of pulse period (p) and its change rate (p˙) caused by the solid tides are not negligible. A numerical analysis for Arecibo Observatory as an example indicates that this kind of effects overlapped on the period and its rate enters directly into the observational results. Based on this investigation a new method of solid tide research and determination by means of the analysis of p and p˙ of pulsars is put forward. The successful implement of this method will open up a new area of solid tide research and provide some results comparable eith those given by other contemporary methods and some special ones.

  9. Tide forecasting method based on dynamic weight distribution for operational evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-wei QIU; Zeng-chuan DONG; Fen XU; Li SUN; Sheng CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Through analysis of operational evaluation factors for tide forecasting, the relationship between the evaluation factors and the weights of forecasters was examined. A tide forecasting method based on dynamic weight distribution for operational evaluation was developed, and multiple-forecaster synchronous forecasting was realized while avoiding the instability cased by only one forecaster. Weights were distributed to the forecasters according to each one's forecast precision. An evaluation criterion for the professional level of the forecasters was also built. The eligibility rates of forecast results demonstrate the skill of the forecasters and the stability of their forecasts. With the developed tide forecasting method, the precision and reasonableness of tide forecasting are improved. The application of the present method to tide forecasting at the Huangpu Park tidal station demonstrates the validity of the method.

  10. Effect of river discharge and geometry on tides and net water transport in an estuarine network, an idealized model applied to the Yangtze Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebregtse, N. C.; de Swart, H. E.

    2016-07-01

    Tidal propagation in, and division of net water transport over different channels in an estuarine network are analyzed using a newly developed idealized model. The water motion in this model is governed by the cross-sectionally averaged shallow water equations and is forced by tides at the seaward boundaries and by river discharge. Approximate analytical solutions are constructed by means of a harmonic truncation and a perturbation expansion in a small parameter, being the ratio of tidal amplitude and depth. The net water transport results from an imposed river discharge and from residual water transport generated by nonlinear tidal rectification. Two new drivers are identified that contribute to the net water transport in tidal estuarine networks, viz. the generation of residual water transport due to gradients in dynamic pressure and due to a coupling between the tidally averaged and quarter diurnal currents through the quadratic bottom stress. The model is applied in a case study on the Yangtze Estuary, to investigate tides and division of net water transport over its multiple channels during the wet and dry season, as well as before and after the construction of the Deepwater Navigation Channel. Model results agree fairly well with observations. Process analysis reveals that the decrease in tides from dry to wet season is due to enhanced bottom stress generated by river-tide interactions. Also, the seasonal variations in net water transport are explained. It is furthermore shown and explained that due to the Deepwater Navigation Channel tidal currents have increased and net water transport has decreased in the North Passage. These changes have profound implications for net sediment transport and salinity intrusion.

  11. Analysis of the most recent data of Cascais Tide Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Carlos; Taborda, Rui; Mendes, Virgílio B.

    2010-05-01

    In order to meet international standards and to integrate sea level changes and tsunami monitoring networks, Cascais tide gauge, one of the oldest in the world, has been upgraded in 2003 with new acoustic equipment with digital data acquisition, temperature and air-pressure sensors, and internet connection for real time data. The new tide gauge is located very close to the old analogical gauge, which is still working. Datum links between both gauges and the permanent GPS station of Cascais were made and height differences between gauges and the GPS station have been monitored to verify site stability and to estimate the absolute vertical velocity of the site, and therefore, the absolute sea level changes. Tide gauge data from 2000 to 2009 has been analyzed and relative and absolute sea level rise rates have been estimated. The estimation of sea level rise rate with the short baseline of 10 years is made with the daily mean sea level data corrected from the inverse barometric effect. The relative sea level trend is obtained from a 60-day moving average run over the corrected daily mean sea level. The estimated rate has shown greater stability in contrast to the analysis of daily mean sea level raw data, which shows greater variability and uncertainty. Our results show a sea level rise rate of 2.6 mm/year (± 0.3 mm/year), higher than previous rates (2.1 mm/year for 1990 decade and 1.6 mm/year from 1920 to 2000), which is compatible with a sea level rise acceleration scenario. From the analysis of Cascais GPS data, for the period 1990.0 to 2010.0 we obtain an uplift rate of 0.3 mm/year leading to an absolute sea level rise of 2.9 mm/year for Cascais, under the assumption, as predicted by the ICE-5G model, that Cascais has no vertical displacement caused by the post-glacial isostatic adjustment.

  12. The effect of filtering on the determination of lunar tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, A.; Mazzarella, A.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of lunar tides obtained by combination of a filtering process and the fixed lunar age technique is proposed. It is shown that such a method allows a reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio without altering the amplitude and the phase angle of the signal. It consequently allows the significant determination of the lunar semidiurnal component M2 from the series of data shorter than those required by other methods and the deduction of other interesting lunisolar components which have not previously been significantly determined in surface pressure and temperature data. The analysis of the data for Gan, Vesuvian Observatory and the Eiffel Tower have provided new determinations of L2(p) and have allowed comparison between the results obtained by the present and other methods.

  13. Dynamical Tides in Compact White Dwarf Binaries: Influence of Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Tidal interactions play an important role in the evolution and ultimate fate of compact white dwarf (WD) binaries. Not only do tides affect the pre-merger state (such as temperature and rotation rate) of the WDs, but they may also determine which systems merge and which undergo stable mass transfer. In this paper, we attempt to quantify the effects of rotation on tidal angular momentum transport in binary stars, with specific calculations applied to WD stellar models. We incorporate the effect of rotation using the traditional approximation, in which the dynamically excited gravity waves within the WDs are transformed into gravito-inertial Hough waves. The Coriolis force has only a minor effect on prograde gravity waves, and previous results predicting the tidal spin-up and heating of inspiraling WDs are not significantly modified. However, rotation strongly alters retrograde gravity waves and inertial waves, with important consequences for the tidal spin-down of accreting WDs. We identify new dynamical tidal...

  14. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlemiss, R. P.; Samarelli, A.; Paul, D. J.; Hough, J.; Rowan, S.; Hammond, G. D.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz1/2): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth’s crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz1/2 only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers—found in most smart phones—can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays.

  15. Wave-Tide-Surge Coupled Simulation for Typhoon Maemi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung Ho Choi; Byung Il Min; Kyeong Ok Kim; Jin Hee Yuk

    2013-01-01

    The main task of this study focuses on studying the effect of wave-current interaction on currents,storm surge and wind wave as well as effects of current induced wave refraction and current on waves by using numerical models which consider the bottom boundary layer and sea surface roughness parameter for shallow and smooth bed area around Korean Peninsula.The coupled system (unstructured-mesh SWAN wave and ADCIRC) run on the same unstructured mesh.This identical and homogeneous mesh allows the physics of wave-circulation interactions to be correctly resolved in both models.The unstructured mesh can be applied to a large domain allowing all energy from deep to shallow waters to be seamlessly followed.There is no nesting or overlapping of structured wave meshes,and no interpolation is required.In response to typhoon Maemi (2003),all model components were validated independently,and shown to provide a faithful representation of the system's response to this storm.The waves and storm surge were allowed to develop on the continental shelf and interact with the complex nearshore environment.The resulting modeling system can be used extensively for prediction of the typhoon surge.The result show that it is important to incorporate the wave-current interaction effect into coastal area in the wave-tide-surge coupled model.At the same time,it should consider effects of depth-induced wave breaking,wind field,currents and sea surface elevation in prediction of waves.Specially,we found that:(1) wave radiation stress enhanced the current and surge elevation otherwise wave enhanced nonlinear bottom boundary layer decreased that,(2) wind wave was significantly controlled by sea surface roughness thus we cautiously took the experimental expression.The resulting modeling system can be used for hindcasting (prediction) the wave-tide-surge coupled environments at complex coastline,shallow water and fine sediment area like areas around Korean Peninsula.

  16. Suffocating phytoplankton, suffocating waters - red tides and anoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Colborne Pitcher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of O2 depletion in exceptional dinoflagellate blooms, often referred to as red tides or harmful algal blooms (HABs, was investigated in St Helena Bay in the southern Benguela upwelling system in 2013. The transition to bloom decay and anoxia was examined through determination of O2-based productivity and respiration rates. Changes in O2 concentrations in relation to bloom metabolism were tracked by fast response optical sensors following incubation of red tide waters in large volume light-and-dark polycarbonate carboys. Concurrent measurements of nutrients and nutrient uptake rates served to assess the role of nutrient stressors in community metabolism and bloom mortality. The estimates of community productivity and respiration are among the highest values recorded. Nutrient concentrations were found to be low and were unlikely to meet the demands of the bloom as dictated by the rates of nutrient uptake. Ratios of community respiration to gross production were particularly high ranging from 0.6 – 0.73 and are considered to be a function of the inherently high cellular respiration rates of dinoflagellates. Nighttime community respiration was shown to be capable of removing as much as 17.34 ml O2 l-1 from surface waters. These exceptional rates of O2 utilization are likely in some cases to exceed the rate of O2 replenishment via air-water exchange thereby leading overnight to conditions of anoxia. These conditions of nighttime anoxia and nutrient starvation are likely triggers of cell death and bloom mortality further fueling the microbial foodweb and consumption of O2.

  17. Application of ProTide technology to gemcitabine: a successful approach to overcome the key cancer resistance mechanisms leads to a new agent (NUC-1031) in clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Lopez, Monica Huerta; Balzarini, Jan; Mason, Malcolm; Jiang, Wen G; Blagden, Sarah; Thompson, Emely; Ghazaly, Essam; McGuigan, Christopher

    2014-02-27

    Gemcitabine is a nucleoside analogue commonly used in cancer therapy but with limited efficacy due to a high susceptibility to cancer cell resistance. The addition of a phosphoramidate motif to the gemcitabine can protect it against many of the key cancer resistance mechanisms. We have synthesized a series of gemcitabine phosphoramidate prodrugs and screened for cytostatic activity in a range of different tumor cell lines. Among the synthesized compounds, one in particular (NUC-1031, 6f) was shown to be potent in vitro. Importantly, compared with gemcitabine, 6f activation was significantly less dependent on deoxycytidine kinase and on nucleoside transporters, and it was resistant to cytidine deaminase-mediated degradation. Moreover, 6f showed a significant reduction in tumor volumes in vivo in pancreatic cancer xenografts. The ProTide 6f is now in clinical development with encouraging efficacy signals in a Phase I/II study, which strongly supports the ProTide approach to generate promising new anticancer agents.

  18. A relationship between red tide outbreaks and urban development along the coasts of Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXiaonan; WANGWei

    2004-01-01

    Red tides are one of the main coastal catastrophic events in Guangdong Province of southern China. The comparison between the number of red tide events and the development indexes of cities along the coasts of the province shows that the regional differences in red tide outbreaks has close relations with the coastal urban developments. The cause for an initiation of red tide blooms may be natural factors, while wastewater caused by the fast development of population, industry and aquiculture of the coastal cities enhanced the blooms. It may explain why the two periods of frequent outbreaks of the red tides over the last two decades matched the urban developments in the coastal areas of Guangdong not only spatially but also temporally. The red tides in the first period were restricted only to the coasts of middle Guangdong, where urbanization process was at a higher speed than the other coastal areas of the province. In the second period, fast development of the coastal cities in eastern Guangdong led to an increase in the occurrence of red tides in local sea areas of the same coasts.

  19. Maltivariate Analysis of the Occurring Process of Skeletonema costatum Red Tide in the Changjiang Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄秀清; 蒋晓山; 陶然; 洪君超

    2001-01-01

    Using the SAS software, the data of environmental factors vs. red tide biomass were analysed during the process of Skeletonema costatum red tide which broke out in the Changjiang Estuary on June 9~15, 1990. The results of the multivariate statistical analysis show that the environmental factors are similar in their developing and maintenance periods and that the values of environmental factors begin to be restored to normal levels during the disappearing period.The results obtained from using the methods of correlation, variable cluster and main component analyses are basically identical. The important factors contributing to the occurrence of this red tide are atmospherical pressure, water temperature, salinity, pH, No3-, -N, Po43--P and Fe, among which,salinity, Fe and PO43--P are the leading factors which have triggered the occurrence of the red tide as determined by the step-by-step regression analysis. Meanwhile, the linear discrimination functions have been established for the red tide. The environmental factor data of another occurring process of Skeletonema costatum red tide in the Changjiang Estuary have been chosen for red tide discrimination with satisfactory results.

  20. Temporal variations in internal tide multimodal structure on the continental shelf, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dalu; Jin, Guangzhen; Lü, Xianqing

    2017-01-01

    Temporal variations in multimodal structures of diurnal ( D 1) and semidiurnal ( D 2) internal tides were investigated on the continental slope of the Dongsha Plateau, based on 2-month moored acoustic Doppler current profiler observations. Harmonic analysis indicated that the D 1 components ( K 1 and O 1) dominated the internal tide field. The vertical structure of the K 1 constituent presented a first-mode structure while the M 2 constituent seemed to exhibit a high-mode structure. Amplitude spectra analysis of the current data revealed differences in baroclinic current amplitudes between different water depths. Temporal variations in modal structures ware analyzed, based on the D 1 and D 2 baroclinic tides extracted from the baroclinic velocity field with band-pass filters. Analysis showed that the magnitude of the D 1 internal tide current was much larger than the D 2 current, and temporal variations in the modal structure of the D 1 internal tide occurred on an approximately fortnightly cycle. The EOF analyses revealed temporal transformation of multimodal structures for D 1 and D 2 internal tides. The enhancement of the D 1 internal tide was mainly due to the superposition of K 1 and O 1, according to the temporal variation of coherent kinetic energy.

  1. Partly standing internal tides in a dendritic submarine canyon observed by an ocean glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rob A.; Aslam, Tahmeena; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.

    2017-08-01

    An autonomous ocean glider is used to make the first direct measurements of internal tides within Whittard Canyon, a large, dendritic submarine canyon system that incises the Celtic Sea continental slope and a site of high benthic biodiversity. This is the first time a glider has been used for targeted observations of internal tides in a submarine canyon. Vertical isopycnal displacement observations at different stations fit a one-dimensional model of partly standing semidiurnal internal tides - comprised of a major, incident wave propagating up the canyon limbs and a minor wave reflected back down-canyon by steep, supercritical bathymetry near the canyon heads. The up-canyon internal tide energy flux in the primary study limb decreases from 9.2 to 2.0 kW m-1 over 28 km (a dissipation rate of 1 - 2.5 ×10-7 Wkg-1), comparable to elevated energy fluxes and internal tide driven mixing measured in other canyon systems. Within Whittard Canyon, enhanced mixing is inferred from collapsed temperature-salinity curves and weakened dissolved oxygen concentration gradients near the canyon heads. It has previously been hypothesised that internal tides impact benthic fauna through elevated near-bottom current velocities and particle resuspension. In support of this, we infer order 20 cm s-1 near-bottom current velocities in the canyon and observe high concentrations of suspended particulate matter. The glider observations are also used to estimate a 1 °C temperature range and 12 μmol kg-1 dissolved oxygen concentration range, experienced twice a day by organisms on the canyon walls, due to the presence of internal tides. This study highlights how a well-designed glider mission, incorporating a series of tide-resolving stations at key locations, can be used to understand internal tide dynamics in a region of complex topography, a sampling strategy that is applicable to continental shelves and slopes worldwide.

  2. Impact of seasonal tide variation on saltwater intrusion in the Changjiang River estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Cheng; ZHU Jianrong; GU Yuliang

    2012-01-01

    An improved 3-D ECOM-si model was used to study the impact of seasonal tide variation on saltwater intrusion into the Changjiang River estuary,especially at the bifurcation of the North Branch (NB) and the South Branch (SB).The study assumes that the river discharge and wind are constant.The model successfully reproduced the saltwater intrusion.During spring tide,there is water and salt spillover (WSO and SSO) from the NB into the SB,and tidally averaged (net) water and salt fluxes are 985 m3/s and 24.8 ton/s,respectively.During neap tide,the WSO disappears and its net water flux is 122 m3/s.Meanwhile,the SSO continues,with net salt flux of 1.01 ton/s,much smaller than during spring tide.Because the tidal range during spring tide is smaller in June than in March,overall saltwater intrusion is weaker in June than in March during that tidal period.However,the WSO and SSO still exist in June.Net water and salt fluxes in that month are 622 m3/s and 15.35 ton/s,respectively,decreasing by 363 m3/s and 9.45 ton/s over those in March.Because tidal range during neap tide is greater in June than in March,saltwater intrusion in June is stronger than in March during that tidal period.The WSO and SSO appear in June,with net water and salt fluxes of 280 m3/s and 8.55 ton/s,respectively,increasing by 402 m3/s and 7.54 ton/s over those in March.Saltwater intrusion in the estuary is controlled by the river discharge,semi-diurnal flood-ebb tide,semi-monthly spring or neap tide,and seasonal tide variation.

  3. USING A SATELLITE TELEPHONE TO RETRIEVE TSUNAMI DATA FROM TIDE SITES IN THE PACIFIC BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.J.Sokolowski

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The tsunami warning centers require accurate, timely and reliable tide data during a large potentially tsunamigenic earthquake. At the present time tide gauge data in remote parts of the Pacific Basin are often not availableto view during a potential tsunami event or the data may be transmitted hours after the expected tsunami arrival time. This delay can adversely affect state and local emergency officials who require lead times for placing their areas in awarning status.The West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center conduct eda feasibility study, which showed that a satellite telephone link can be used to collect tide gauge data from remote sites in a timely manner.

  4. Numerical modelling of tides and storm surges in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sindhu, B.

    of the head bay and in the Gulf of Martaban region. The continental shelf in the head bay is wide enough to cause significant amplification of semi-diurnal tides which is in agreement with the Clarke and Battisti [1981] Summary 148 theory. In the north... wide and the amplitudes of semi-diurnal tides are doubled in this region while the diurnal tides amplify only marginally, which is in consistent with Clarke and Battisti [1981] theory. In the Malacca Strait, the amplitudes of both semi...

  5. The Monitoring of Red Tides Based on Modular Neural Networks Using Airborne Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Guangrong; SUN Jie; ZHAO Wencang; ZHANG Hande

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a red tide monitoring method based on clustering and modular neural networks. To obtain the features of red tide from a mass of aerial remote sensing hyperspectral data, first the Log Residual Correction (LRC) is used to normalize the data, and then clustering analysis is adopted to select and form the training samples for the neural networks. For rapid monitoring, the discriminator is composed of modular neural networks, whose structure and learning parameters are determined by an Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA). The experiments showed that this method can monitor red tide rapidly and effectively.

  6. TIDE: Lightweight Device Composition for Enhancing Tabletop Environments with Smartphone Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicard, Leo; Tabard, Aurelien; Ramos, Juan David Hincapie

    2013-01-01

    platforms have to be re-developed. At the same time, smartphones are pervasive computers that users carry around and with a large pool of applications. This paper presents TIDE, a lightweight device composition middleware to bring existing smartphone applica- tions onto the tabletop. Through TIDE......, applications running on the smartphone are displayed on the tabletop computer, and users can interact with them through the tabletop’s interactive surface. TIDE contributes to the areas of device compo- sition and tabletops by providing an OS-level middleware that is transparent to the smartphone applications...

  7. A New Analytical Solution for Tide-Induced Groundwater Fluctuations in An Unconfined Aquifer with A Sloping Beach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Jun; SONG Zhi-yao; XIN Pei; SHEN Cheng-ji

    2011-01-01

    Deriving analytical solutions for tide-induced groundwater fluctuations in unconfined aquifers confronts two problems:(1) As the Boussinesq equation itself contains nonlinear terms,the “secular term” would be generated in derivation,thus making perturbation solution unable to be deduced to higher order; (2) for aquifers with sloping beaches,the perturbation parameter in existing analytical solution integrating the beach slope and hydrogeological property would be sometimes larger than 1.So the application of perturbation solutions is relatively limited.Furthermore,as the beach slope decreases,the error of analytical solution would gradually increase.Given that water table over-height would increase the aquifer thickness and speed up wave propagation,this paper integrates over-height into the perturbation parameter and adjusts boundary conditions to settle the problem of “secular term” and to derive a new high-order analytical solution for nonlinear Boussinesq equation in terms of sloping beaches.Results show that the new analytical solution is more reasonable,and the analytical accuracy is obviously improved in comparison with the existing analytical solution for a gentle slope.The new analytical solution provides a theoretical basis for analyzing the propagation characteristics (e.g.,wave length and over-height variation) of tide-induced groundwater wave in unconfined aquifers,particularly those with sloping beaches.

  8. RESEARCH ON RED TIDE OCCURRENCES USING ENCLOSED EXPERIMENTAL ECOSYSTEM IN WEST XIAMEN HARBOR, CHINA RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NUTRIENTS AND RED TIDE OCCURRENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This study on the distribution of phosphate and its relation to phytoplankton biomass in Western Xiamen Harbor using marine ecosystem enclosures to isolate the culture water from the tidal currents and salinity changes outside indicated that the phytoplankton biomass variation closely related to dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in the seawater as described by the equation: [Chl-a]=A×e-B[PO4]. The biomass changes lagged by about two days the corresponding DIP. The research also dealt with the minimal DIP concentration for stopping diatom bloom and the possible maximal diatom biomass was estimated from the DIP external concentration in the seawater. The threshold of DIP initiating Skeletonema costatum red tide was calculated for use as an index to forecast its red tides. In addition, the relationships between a dinoflagellate red tide and nutrients are discussed. The results showed that the multiplication of dinoflagellate was not entirely dependent on the nutrients in the seawater.

  9. A description of the tides in the Eastern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul, Enrique Alvarez; Gómez, Begoña Pérez; Sánchez-Arévalo, Ignacio Rodríguez

    A description of the Eastern North Atlantic tidal dynamics (in a region spanning from 20°N to 48°N in latitude and from 34°W to 0° in longitude) is obtained by means of new in situ measurements and numerical modelling based on TOPEX/POSEIDON-derived data sets. The main source of measurements is the tide gauge network REDMAR (RED de MAReógrafos de Puertos del Estado), operative since July 1992 and managed by Clima Marítimo (Puertos del Estado). Results derived from the harmonic analysis of the first years of measurements are presented and compared with model results. In order to obtain a global picture of the tides in the region, a large compilation of harmonic constants obtained from other institutes is included. The availability of new TOPEX/POSEIDON-derived harmonic constants data sets provides a chance to include the benefits derived from satellite altimetry in high resolution regional applications of numerical models. Richard Ray's tidal model (Ray et al., 1994), based on a response type tidal analysis of TOPEX/POSEIDON data, was employed within a model of the studied area. The numerical model employed is HAMSOM, a 3-D finite difference code developed both by the Institut für Meereskunde (Hamburg University) and Clima Marítimo. Results from simulations of seven major harmonics are presented, providing a comprehensive view of tidal dynamics, including current information. The results of tidal simulations show good agreement between semidiurnal harmonic components and the values measured by both coastal and pelagic tidal gauges and by current meters. The modelled diurnal constituents show larger relative differences with measurements than semidiurnal harmonics, especially concerning the phase lags. The non-linear transfer of energy from semidiurnal to higher order harmonics, such as M 4 and M 6, was mapped. Those transfers were found to be important only in two areas: the French continental shelf in the Bay of Biscay and the widest part of the African

  10. Data logger database - Physical and biological effects of fish-friendly tide gates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this one-time stand-alone study is to evaluate how effective "fish-friendly" or self-regulating tide gates (SRTs) are at increasing connectivity for...

  11. Vertical crustal motion determined by satellite altimetry and tide gauge data in Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. Y.; Shum, C. K.; Braun, A.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new method of combining satellite altimetry and tide gauge data to obtain improved estimates of absolute (or geocentric) vertical crustal motion at tide gauges within a semi-enclosed sea. As an illustration, we combine TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry data (1992-2001) and 25 long-term (>40 years) tide gauge records around the Baltic Sea region of Fennoscandia, an area where crustal deformation is dominated by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). A comparison of the estimated vertical motion, at 1-11 mm/yr, with independent solutions from 10 collocated BIFROST GPS sites, shows a difference of 0.2 +/- 0.9 mm/yr, thus verifying the accuracy and robustness of the procedure. The solution uncertainty is estimated at 0.4 mm/yr, which is significantly lower than previous analyses of this type. We conclude that our technique can potentially provide accurate vertical motion observations globally where long-term tide gauge records exist.

  12. Astronomical High Tide Line, Geographic NAD83, NWRC (1995) [hightide_line_NWRC_1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The astronomical high tide line was compiled from National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) 1:24,000-scale habitat maps that were photo-interpreted from color-infrared...

  13. Evaluation of Ocean Tide Models Used for Jason-2 Altimetry Corrections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fok, H.S.; Baki Iz, H.; Shum, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    –3 cm RMS (root-mean-square) level. The Gulf of Mexico and Northwest Atlantic regions present the least reduction of altimetry sea surface height variability after ocean tides are removed, primarily because of large oceanic variability associated with loop currents in the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf......It has been more than a decade since the last comprehensive accuracy assessment of global ocean tide models. Here, we conduct an evaluation of the barotropic ocean tide corrections, which were computed using FES2004 and GOT00.2, and other models on the Jason-2 altimetry Geophysical Data Record (GDR......), with a focus on selected coastal regions with energetic ocean dynamics. We compared nine historical and contemporary ocean tide models with pelagic tidal constants and with multiple satellite altimetry mission (T/P, ERS-1/-2, Envisat, GFO, Jason-1/-2) sea level anomalies using variance reduction studies...

  14. MF radar observations of the diurnal tide over Syowa, Antarctica (69° S, 40° E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tomikawa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the diurnal tide in the Antarctic mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT are investigated using 10 years of medium frequency (MF radar data from Syowa Station (69° S, 39.6° E. Seasonal variations and height dependence of the diurnal amplitude and phase of zonal and meridional winds are mostly consistent with previous studies using the other Antarctic station data. The meridional momentum flux due to the diurnal tide shows a seasonal variation clearly different between above and below 90 km, which has never been reported in the literature. Finally, a cause of some discrepancy in the characteristics of the diurnal tide between the observation and simulation (i.e., GSWM-02 is discussed. It implies that the realistic representation of gravity waves in the simulation is crucial for realistic modeling of the diurnal tide.

  15. Fish and logger summaries - Physical and biological effects of fish-friendly tide gates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this one-time stand-alone study is to evaluate how effective "fish-friendly" or self-regulating tide gates (SRTs) are at increasing connectivity for...

  16. Effect of tide on the variability of zooplankton in the nearshore waters of Thal, Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Krishnakumari, L.; Desai, B.N.

    Quantitative and qualitative difference in zooplankton in relation to the tide were studied along 3 transects located off Thal, Maharashtra, India during Feb. 1980 to Jan. 1981. Variation in zooplankton biomass for the flood and ebb period were 2...

  17. Severe fish mortality associated with 'red tide' observed in the sea off Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; George, M.D.; Narvekar, P.V.; Jayakumar, D.A.; Shailaja, M.S.; Sardessai, S.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Shenoy, D.M.; Naik, H.; Maheswaran, P.A.; KrishnaKumari, L.; Rajesh, G.; Sudhir, A.K.; Binu, M.S.

    Severe fish mortality associated with the "red tide" phenomenon caused by Noctiluca blooms was observed in the sea off Cochin, Kerala, India at depths less than 40 m. The dead fish, almost entirely comprised of the threadfin bream (Nemipterus...

  18. Assessment of height variations by GPS at Mediterranean and Black Sea coast tide gauges from the SELF projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Zerbini, S.; Baker, T.; Bürki, B.; Galanis, J.; Garate, J.; Georgiev, I.; Kahle, H.-G.; Kotzev, V.; Lobazov, V.; Marson, I.; Negusini, M.; Richter, B.; Veis, G.; Yuzefovich, P.

    2002-09-01

    In the framework of the European Union SEa Level Fluctuations (SELF) I and the SELF II Projects designed to study sea level variations around the Mediterranean and Black Seas, the Global Positioning System (GPS) technique was adopted to measure the ongoing crustal movements at tide gauge stations. Tide gauges measure sea-level variations with respect to a ground benchmark. In order to determine true sea-level variations of a few millimeters per year, it is necessary to estimate the ground vertical movement to a high degree of accuracy. Countries involved in the projects were Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Bulgaria and Russia. In the period from 1993 to 1998 repeated observations at more than 28 tide gauges and at a number of reference and intermediate stations were conducted. GPS measurements were complemented by Water Vapor Radiometers (WVR) at selected sites. Individual campaigns were evaluated and analyzed and showed height variations in the millimeter-centimeter range. All data were processed following common standards using the Bernese Software in a unified analysis to generate a combined solution. Based on the normal equations of all of the campaigns, a combined solution for the SELF Projects sites was generated. In the analysis of multi-technique anchor sites to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame ITRF97, it is shown that vertical rates of different techniques may be of different sign with respect to each other and also with respect to the ITRF97 combination. Vertical rates are not reliable in general and even the restriction to the use of long the long-time series sites KOSG, ONSA, WTZR, MADR, GRAZ and MATE did not ensure significant and unique vertical rates. Nevertheless, they had to be used for the reference frame definition. The results of repeated gravity observations and the continuous GPS observations at Porto Corsini and Medicina were compared to the epoch-wise GPS campaigns and revealed that the vertical rates are in conformance with each

  19. Seasonal and Day-to-day Variations of Thermospheric Tides and Dynamo Fields Studied with a Long-term Whole Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupled Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, H.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Shinagawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    Day-to-day and longer variations of ionospheric electron density, which affect various space weather applications, are caused originally from the solar activity variations and the rotation of the sun as well as the lower atmospheric activity. For the latter source, atmospheric waves such as tides and planetary waves are generated in the moist convection, which propagate through the middle atmosphere affected by various dynamical processes such as their interactions with the mean zonal wind and other waves, and reach the lower thermosphere where they induce dynamo electric fields. According to the recent satellite and ground-based observations, the characteristics of tides and planetary waves in the lower thermosphere are becoming known more clearly, such as the seasonal and latitude variations of major tides, planetary wave-like oscillations, and irregular variations during stratospheric sudden warming, and so on. In this paper, we use a whole atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model called GAIA, and have carried out a simulation from 1996 to 2013 with realistic forcing from the lower atmosphere by nudging the meteorological reanalysis (JRA) into the model. By analyzing the long-term model data, we investigate how the tidal variability and planetary waves in the lower thermosphere produce the seasonal and day-to-day variations in the dynamo electric field as well as the origin of the variations in the lower and middle atmospheres.

  20. A Plan to Develop a Red Tide Warning System for Seawater Desalination Process Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Yun, Hong Sik

    2017-04-01

    The holt of the seawater desalination process for fifty five days due to the eight-month long red tide in 2008 in the Persian Gulf, the Middle East, had lost about 10 billion KRW. The POSCO Seawater Desalination facility, located in Gwangyang Bay Area in the Southern Sea, has produced 30,000 tons of fresh water per day since 2014. Since there has been an incident of red time in the area for three months in August, 2012, it is necessary to establish a warning system for red tide that threatens the stable operation of the seawater desalination facility. A red tide warning system can offer the seawater desalination facility manager customized services on red tide information and potential red tide inflow to the water intake. This study aimed to develop a red tide warning system in Gwangyang Bay Area by combining RS, modeling and monitoring technologies, which provides red tide forecasting information with which to effectively control the seawater desalination process. Using the proposed system, the seawater desalination facility manager can take phased measures to cope with the inflow of red tide. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was supported by a grant(16IFIP-C088924-03) from Industrial Facilities & Infrastructure Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport(MOLIT) of the Korea government and the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA). This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education(NRF-2014R1A1A2054975).

  1. Triggering of Aftershocks of the Japan 2011 Earthquake by Earth Tides

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, Arjun

    2011-01-01

    The aftershock sequence of the devastating Japan earthquake of March 2011 is analyzed for the presence of periodicities at the Earth tide periods. We use spectral analysis as well as a time-domain method KORRECT developed earlier to detect presence of diurnal and semi-diurnal periodicities in the sequence of aftershocks (M \\geq 4). This suggests that large aftershocks in the fault zone of the Japan 2011 earthquake were strongly influenced by Earth tides.

  2. Measurement and forecasting of tides of Mumbai High. Sponsored by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Joseph, A.; Sundar, D.; Mehra, P.; VijayKumar, K.; Michael, G.S.

    developed a mathematical model for simulating tides and tidal currents in the Mumbai High, Gulf of Khambhat and surrounding regions (Unnikrishnan et al., 1999). The model domain covers the locations of the ONGC platforms. The numerical grid has a resolution... level into tides and residuals. This was done by a procedure called ‘Harmonic analysis’. We used the Tidal Analysis Software Package (TASK), developed by the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory, U.K. for the analysis of data. This procedure helps...

  3. Fish community responses to green tides in shallow estuarine and coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Luherne, E.; Réveillac, E.; Ponsero, A.; Sturbois, A.; Ballu, S.; Perdriau, M.; Le Pape, O.

    2016-06-01

    All over the world, numerous bays and estuarine systems that are known to shelter essential fish habitats are experiencing proliferations of green macroalgae known as green tides. Although the processes that enhance green tides in response to nutrient enrichment are well known, their consequences for ecological communities -especially for ichthyofauna- remain poorly studied. To estimate these consequences, this analysis focused on the two types of shallow systems that are experiencing green tides: sandy beaches and estuarine mudflats. In these two systems, macroalgae proliferation and fish community were surveyed along seasonal cycles at control and impacted sites that shared similar physico-chemical parameters and sediment structure. To analyse the consequences of green tides on the fish community, a Before-After Control-Impact approach was used. This approach reveals no difference between fish communities at the control and impacted sites before the macroalgal bloom. Then, it underlines an influence of green tides on the fish community, and this influence varies according to the composition, density and duration of the macroalgal bloom. Indeed, when intertidal systems experienced short proliferation and/or weak density, green tides did not seem to impact the fish community. However, when green macroalgae proliferated in large quantities and/or when the proliferation lasted for long periods, the fish community was significantly affected. These modifications in the fish community led to a significant decrease in fish species diversity and density until fish disappeared from impacted sites at high proliferations. Furthermore, the response of fish species to green tides differed according to their functional guilds. Negative consequences for benthic and marine juvenile fish species were beginning at low proliferations, whereas for pelagic fish species they occurred only at high proliferations. Thus, green tides significantly affect fish habitat suitability because

  4. Study on the detection of red-tide outbreaks using big satellite database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young Baek; Eun, Yoon Joo; Park, Kyongseok; Lee, Sanghwan; Lee, Ryong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Yoo, Sinjae

    2014-11-01

    Satellite remote sensing has been successfully employed to monitor and detect the increasing incidence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) under various water conditions. In this study, to establish a comprehensive monitoring system of HAB outbreaks (particularly Cochlodinium polykrikoides blooms) in the southern coast of Korea (SCK), we tested the several proposed red-tide detection methods using SeaWiFS and MODIS ocean color data. Temporal and spatial information of red tide events from 2002 to 2013 were obtained from the National Fisheries Research and Development of Korea (NFRDI), which were matched with synchronously obtained satellite-derived ocean color data. The spectral characteristics of C. polykrikoides red tides were that increased phytoplankton absorption at 443 nm and pigment backscattering 555 nm resulted in a steeper slope between 488 and 555 nm with a hinge point at 488 (or 490) nm. On the other hand, non-red tide water, typically were presented by broader radiance spectra between the blue and green bands were associated with reduced pigment absorption and backscattering. The analysis of ocean color imageries that captured C. polykrikoides red tide blooms showed discolored waters with enhanced pigment concentrations, high chlorophyll, fluorescence, absorption at 443 nm. However, most red tide detection algorithms found a large number of false positive but only a small number of true positive areas. These proposed algorithms are not useful to distinguish true red tide water from complex non-red tide water. Our proposed method substantially reduces the false signal rate (false positive) from strong absorption at short wavelengths and provide a more reliable and robust detection of C. polykrikoides blooms in the SCK from the space.

  5. Observed internal tides and near-inertial waves on the continental shelf and slope off Jaigarh, central west coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subeesh, M. P.; Unnikrishnan, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of internal tides (ITs) and near-inertial waves (NIWs) on the continental shelf and slope off Jaigarh (17∘N), central west coast of India were studied. Eight-month (March-October) long Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements made in the year 2008 were used in the present study. Analysis of sea surface heights from satellite altimeter data, where the tracks of the satellites are oriented nearly in the direction of the semimajor axis of barotropic tides, reveals the presence of diurnal and semidiurnal internal tides with surface amplitudes of about 2 cm. Baroclinic current spectra of horizontal velocities show peaks in IT frequencies of M2, S2, K1 and O1 and in inertial frequency (f). The observed current spectra show higher energies than those in Garrett-Munk reference spectra by about 2-3 times. Based on the estimates of "critical topography" (where the topographic slope is equal to the slope of IT) and computed barotropic body force (Baines, 1982), the shelf-edge, mid-slope and deep part of the slope region are found to be the possible generation sites of internal tides in the region. Over the period of observation, the IT on the slope is found to be energetic, with a strong IT during March to mid-April (pre-monsoon period). Whereas, on the shelf, IT is weak during the pre-monsoon and found to be strong in the southwest monsoon. The available hydrographic data and model simulated hydrography suggest that this difference is linked with the stratification changes on the shelf and slope during these seasons, where the stratification is found to be weak on the shelf and strong on the slope during pre-monsoon. Strong low-mode NIW is observed on the shelf associated with the storm events while the NIW is found to be less energetic on the slope.

  6. Artificial Neural Network forecasting of storm surge water levels at major estuarine ports to supplement national tide-surge models and improve port resilience planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jon; Mawdsley, Robert; Fujiyama, Taku; Achuthan, Kamal

    2017-04-01

    Effective prediction of tidal storm surge is of considerable importance for operators of major ports, since much of their infrastructure is necessarily located close to sea level. Storm surge inundation can damage critical elements of this infrastructure and significantly disrupt port operations and downstream supply chains. The risk of surge inundation is typically approached using extreme value analysis, while short-term forecasting generally relies on coastal shelf-scale tide and surge models. However, extreme value analysis does not provide information on the duration of a surge event and can be sensitive to the assumptions made and the historic data available. Also, whilst regional tide and surge models perform well along open coasts, their fairly coarse spatial resolution means that they do not always provide accurate predictions for estuarine ports. As part of a NERC Environmental Risks to Infrastructure Innovation Programme project, we have developed a tool that is specifically designed to forecast the North Sea storm surges on major ports along the east coast of the UK. Of particular interest is the Port of Immingham, Humber estuary, which handles the largest volume of bulk cargo in the UK including major flows of coal and biomass for power generation. A tidal surge in December 2013, with an estimated return period of 760 years, partly flooded the port, damaged infrastructure and disrupted operations for several weeks. This and other recent surge events highlight the need for additional tools to supplement the national UK Storm Tide Warning Service. Port operators are also keen to have access to less computationally expensive forecasting tools for scenario planning and to improve their resilience to actual events. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of machine learning methods based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to generate accurate short-term forecasts of extreme water levels at estuarine North Sea ports such as Immingham. An ANN is

  7. Joint probability analysis of extreme precipitation and storm tide in a coastal city under changing environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Xu

    Full Text Available Catastrophic flooding resulting from extreme meteorological events has occurred more frequently and drawn great attention in recent years in China. In coastal areas, extreme precipitation and storm tide are both inducing factors of flooding and therefore their joint probability would be critical to determine the flooding risk. The impact of storm tide or changing environment on flooding is ignored or underestimated in the design of drainage systems of today in coastal areas in China. This paper investigates the joint probability of extreme precipitation and storm tide and its change using copula-based models in Fuzhou City. The change point at the year of 1984 detected by Mann-Kendall and Pettitt's tests divides the extreme precipitation series into two subsequences. For each subsequence the probability of the joint behavior of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated by the optimal copula. Results show that the joint probability has increased by more than 300% on average after 1984 (α = 0.05. The design joint return period (RP of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated to propose a design standard for future flooding preparedness. For a combination of extreme precipitation and storm tide, the design joint RP has become smaller than before. It implies that flooding would happen more often after 1984, which corresponds with the observation. The study would facilitate understanding the change of flood risk and proposing the adaption measures for coastal areas under a changing environment.

  8. Joint probability analysis of extreme precipitation and storm tide in a coastal city under changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Ma, Chao; Lian, Jijian; Bin, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophic flooding resulting from extreme meteorological events has occurred more frequently and drawn great attention in recent years in China. In coastal areas, extreme precipitation and storm tide are both inducing factors of flooding and therefore their joint probability would be critical to determine the flooding risk. The impact of storm tide or changing environment on flooding is ignored or underestimated in the design of drainage systems of today in coastal areas in China. This paper investigates the joint probability of extreme precipitation and storm tide and its change using copula-based models in Fuzhou City. The change point at the year of 1984 detected by Mann-Kendall and Pettitt's tests divides the extreme precipitation series into two subsequences. For each subsequence the probability of the joint behavior of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated by the optimal copula. Results show that the joint probability has increased by more than 300% on average after 1984 (α = 0.05). The design joint return period (RP) of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated to propose a design standard for future flooding preparedness. For a combination of extreme precipitation and storm tide, the design joint RP has become smaller than before. It implies that flooding would happen more often after 1984, which corresponds with the observation. The study would facilitate understanding the change of flood risk and proposing the adaption measures for coastal areas under a changing environment.

  9. [Removal efficiency of red tide organisms by modified clay and its impacts on cultured organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xi-hua; Song, Xiu-xian; Yu, Zhi-ming

    2004-09-01

    Removal efficiencies of Prorocentrum donghaiense (Prorocentrum dentatum) by Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) bromide and organo-clay modified by HDTMA were identified. Moreover the toxicity of the unbound HDTMA and HDTMA plus clay to aquacultural organisms, Penaeus japonicus, was also tested. The results suggested that (1) The unbound HDTMA had an excellent ability to remove the red tide organisms. However, its strong toxicity to Penaeus japonicus would restrict its practical use in red tide control. (2) The toxicity of HDTMA could be remarkably decreased by addition of clay and the organo-clay complex had a good ability to removal red tide organisms. At the same time the availability of organo-clay to remove the red tide of P. donghaiense and Heterosigma akashiwo in the lab-imitated cultures were studied. The results indicated that the organo-clay complex could remove 100% P. donghaiense at the dosage of 0.03 g/L and effectively control H. akashiwo at 0.09 g/L while the survival rate of Penaeus japonicus larvae, which were cultured in the red tide seawater, is kept 100%. According to the results in laboratory, the mesocosm tests (CEPEX) in East China Sea were conducted in April and May of 2003. The removal efficiencies of original clay, organic clay and inorganic clay were compared during the CEPEX tests. The results revealed that both inorganic clay and organic clay could remove red tide organisms more effectively than the original clay.

  10. Study of freshwater red tide control measures; Tansui akashio taisaku ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, M.; Hatamochi, K. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-09-30

    Basic research of biological measures for which the accumulation of basic findings is mandatory and the applied research of chemical and physical measures that are higher in feasibility are conducted for the establishment of measures to counter freshwater red tides. In the basic research, natural enemies, algaecidal microbes, conjugation inhibiting substances, and allelopathy are studied, but none of them is found feasible at the current stage. In the basic research, however, factors are discovered that inhibit the multiplication of Peridinium bipes or perish the same. In the applied research, chemical algaecidal methods, UV-aided algaecidal methods, and various red-tide constituent collection methods are studied. Collection methods are compared, and it is concluded that a method of Toray Industries, Inc., efficiently collects red-tide constituents. In this method, red-tide constituents are screened by and condensed on a cloth filter provided on the internal wall of a drum, and are dehydrated and then transferred. The applied research further involves the prediction of red tide outbreak and the raising of fish on a food containing substances extracted from red tides, and it is suggested that these are feasible. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. EFFECTS OF OCEAN TIDE MODELS ON GNSS-ESTIMATED ZTD AND PWV IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gurbuz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS observations can precisely estimate the total zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD and precipitable water vapour (PWV for weather prediction and atmospheric research as a continuous and all-weather technique. However, apart from GNSS technique itself, estimations of ZTD and PWV are subject to effects of geophysical models with large uncertainties, particularly imprecise ocean tide models in Turkey. In this paper, GNSS data from Jan. 1st to Dec. 31st of 2014 are processed at 4 co-located GNSS stations (GISM, DIYB, GANM, and ADAN with radiosonde from Turkish Met-Office along with several nearby IGS stations. The GAMIT/GLOBK software has been used to process GNSS data of 30-second sample using the Vienna Mapping Function and 10° elevation cut-off angle. Also tidal and non-tidal atmospheric pressure loadings (ATML at the observation level are also applied in GAMIT/GLOBK. Several widely used ocean tide models are used to evaluate their effects on GNSS-estimated ZTD and PWV estimation, such as IERS recommended FES2004, NAO99b from a barotropic hydrodynamic model, CSR4.0 obtained from TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry with the model FES94.1 as the reference model and GOT00 which is again long wavelength adjustments of FES94.1 using TOPEX/Poseidon data at 0.5 by 0.5 degree grid. The ZTD and PWV computed from radiosonde profile observations are regarded as reference values for the comparison and validation. In the processing phase, five different strategies are taken without ocean tide model and with four aforementioned ocean tide models, respectively, which are used to evaluate ocean tide models effects on GNSS-estimated ZTD and PWV estimation through comparing with co-located Radiosonde. Results showed that ocean tide models have greatly affected the estimation of the ZTD in centimeter level and thus the precipitable water vapour in millimeter level, respectively at stations near coasts. The ocean tide model FES2004 that is

  12. Nonhydrostatic Numerical Investigations of Oscillating Flow Over Sills: Generation of Internal Tides and Solitary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    northern South China Sea in idealized settings, and 3) to provide information on wave characteristics to principal investigators in NLIWI (Nonlinear...Solitary Waves in the Northern South China Sea : a Nonhydrostatic Numerical Investigation.” The study of waves in a two-ridge system emphasizes the...Solitary Waves in the Northern South China Sea : a Nonhydrostatic Numerical Investigation.” IMPLICATION/APPLICATIONS See the report for

  13. Influence of the modified global ocean tide model with local tides of East and South China Seas on load gravity in China and its neighbor area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jiang-cun; SUN He-ping

    2005-01-01

    By using 11 global ocean tide models and tidal gauge data obtained in the East China Sea and South China Sea, the influence of the ocean loading on gravity field in China and its neighbor area is calculated in this paper. Furthermore, the differences between the results from original global models and modified models with local tides are discussed based on above calculation. The comparison shows that the differences at the position near the sea are so large that the local tides must be taken into account in the calculation. When the global ocean tide models of CSR4.0, FES02, GOT00, NAO99 and ORI96 are chosen, the local effect for M2 is less than 0.10×10-8 m·s-2 over the area far away from sea. And the local effect for O1 is less than 0.05 ×10-8 m·s-2 over that area when choosing AG95 or CSR3.0 models. This numerical result demonstrates that the choice of model is a complex problem because of the inconsistent accuracy of the models over the areas of East and South China Seas.

  14. Assessing change of environmental dynamics by legislation in Japan, using red tide occurrence in Ise Bay as an indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Chika

    2016-01-30

    Tokyo Bay, Ise Bay, and the Seto Inland Sea are the total pollutant load control target areas in Japan. A significant correlation between the incidence of red tides and water quality has been observed in the Seto Inland Sea (Honjo, 1991). However, while red tides also occur in Ise Bay and Tokyo Bay, similar correlations have not been observed. Hence, it is necessary to understand what factors cause red tides to effectively manage these semi-closed systems. This study aims to investigate the relationship between the dynamics of the Red Tide Index and nitrogen regulation as well as phosphorus regulation, even in Ise Bay where, unlike Tokyo Bay, there are few observation items, by selecting a suitable objective variable. The introduction of a new technique that uses the Red Tide Index has revealed a possibility that the total pollution load control has influenced the dynamics of red tide blooms in Ise Bay.

  15. Sea ice growth rates from tide-driven visible banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kate E.; Smith, Inga J.; Tison, Jean-Louis; Verbeke, Véronique; McGuinness, Mark; Ingham, Malcolm; Vennell, Ross; Trodahl, Joe

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, periodic tide-current-driven banding in a sea-ice core is demonstrated as a measure of the growth rate of first-year sea ice at congelation-ice depths. The study was performed on a core from the eastern McMurdo Sound, exploiting the well-characterized tidal pattern at the site. It points the way to a technique for determining early-season ice growth rates from late-season cores, in areas where under ice currents are known to be tidally dominated and the ice is landfast, thus providing data for a time of year when thin ice prevents direct thickness (and therefore growth rate) measurements. The measured results were compared to the growth-versus-depth predicted by a thermodynamic model.Plain Language SummaryIt is currently very difficult to measure sea-ice growth rates, due to the danger of traveling on thin ice early in the growing season. This paper introduces the use of tidal patterns to determine sea-ice growth rates at the end of the growing season, when ice cores can be taken. The technique utilizes the visible light and dark bands that are often present in sea ice near land, and are driven by changes in the tidal current beneath the ice. As well as being important for climate research, this method could contribute to the understanding biological ecosystems within the ice, by providing a method to date depths in an ice core where particular organisms are observed or samples taken.

  16. Observations of the migrating semidiurnal and quaddiurnal tides from the RAIDS/NIRS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Irfan; Walterscheid, Richard L.; Crowley, Geoff; Bishop, Rebecca L.; Christensen, Andrew B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we analyze temperature data from the Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS) instrument on Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System experiment on the International Space Station and the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics satellite during June and July 2010 to investigate structures of the migrating semidiurnal (12 h) and quaddiurnal (6 h) tides in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Temperature measurements from the NIRS and SABER instruments allow us to examine the tides from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere. We find that the amplitude of the migrating 6 h tide grows from ~5 K near 100 km altitude to ~30 K near 130 km. The amplitudes of the tide at altitudes accessible by NIRS are much larger than those previously reported at lower altitudes from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder and the SABER instruments. The amplitude of the 12 h tide in the NIRS data shows two peaks in the lower thermosphere (between 95 and 130 km) with a maximum around 60 K occurring in the winter hemisphere near 20° latitude and a second maximum around 40 K occurring in the summer hemisphere near 30° latitude. The structure of the migrating terdiurnal (8 h) tide is also investigated in the NIRS data and shows increasing amplitude with altitude over a broad range of latitudes, roughly between 50°N and 30°S. Altitudinal variations seen in the 6, 8, and 12 h tides suggest an evolving mix of various Hough modes.

  17. Comparative Study on Discrimination Methods for Identifying Dangerous Red Tide Species Based on Wavelet Utilized Classification Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Comparative study on discrimination methods for identifying dangerous red tide species based on wavelet utilized classification methods is conducted. Through experiments, it is found that classification performance with the proposed wavelet derived shape information extracted from the microscopic view of the phytoplankton is effective for identifying dangerous red tide species among the other red tide species rather than the other conventional texture, color information.

  18. Recruitment of fish larvae and juveniles into two estuarine nursery areas with evidence of ebb tide use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattrick, Paula; Strydom, Nadine

    2014-08-01

    Recruitment of larvae and early juveniles, against the ebb tide in the shallower, slower-flowing marginal areas of two permanently open estuaries in the Eastern Cape, South Africa was observed. To determine tidal, diel and seasonal variations of larval and juvenile fish recruitment, fyke nets were used during a 24-hour cycle over two years from December 2010 to October 2012. On either side of each estuary bank, two fyke nets with mouth openings facing opposite directions (i.e. one net facing the incoming or outgoing tide and the other facing the opposing direction) were used to sample fishes. The aims of this study were to determine if 1) on the flood tide, were the nets facing the incoming tide collecting more larvae and early juveniles recruiting into the estuarine nursery area, than the nets facing the opposing direction and 2) on the ebb tide, were the nets facing the sea, and hence the opposing direction of the outgoing ebb tide, collecting more fishes recruiting into the nursery against the ebb tide, than the nets facing the outgoing ebb tide? Larval and juvenile fish CPUE, species diversity and richness varied seasonally between estuarine systems and between diel and tidal conditions. Highest catches were recorded on the flood tide, which coincided with sunrise in the Swartkops Estuary. Greatest catches of larvae and early juveniles were observed during the ebb tide at night in the Sundays Estuary. On the ebb tide, higher catches of several dominant species and several commercially important fishery species, occurred in the fyke nets which faced the sea, indicating the early developmental stages of these fish species are not necessarily being lost from the nursery. These larvae and juveniles are actively swimming against the ebb tide in the shallower, slower-flowing marginal areas facilitating recruitment against ebb flow.

  19. The lunar-tide cycle viewed by crustacean and mollusc gatherers in the State of Paraíba, Northeast Brazil and their influence in collection attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Rômulo RN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional human communities have a wide knowledge of their environment. Collection of animals in estuarine and coastal areas are directly influenced by tidal cycles. The aim of this study is to evaluate the understanding of the tides associated with the lunar cycle held by people who gather crustaceans and molluscs in the State of Paraiba. The empirical knowledge of 20 crab gatherers and 30 mollusc gatherers was recorded through open interviews and structured questionnaires. The results showed that the gatherers have an accurate comprehension of tidal phenomenon based on their exploitation of natural resources, which perpetuates through generations.

  20. Numerical study of water age influenced by tide and runoff in Daliaohe Estuary in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-cheng; ZHANG Xue-qing; ZHAO Qian; SHI Ming-zhu

    2013-01-01

    Based on the concept of the age,the water transport characteristics as the response to the runoff and the tide in Daliaohe Estuary in China are studied under different hydrodynamic conditions using a three-dimensional convection-diffusion model.The results show that the relationship between the average age at a specific position and the runoff could be expressed by a power function approximately.In the river channel,the runoff controls the water transport:it might take about 52 d,27 d and 15 d for the water parcel to be transported from Sanchahe to the mouth during the dry,normal and rainy seasons,respectively.Outside the mouth,the tide is dominant even though the difference between the spring tide and the neap tide is less than 5 d,and the water parcel transports mainly along the northwest direction through the West Waterway and the southeast direction through the East Waterway.A significant age stratification emerges in the vicinity of the mouth,in which there exists a strong interaction between the tide and the runoff,and the age differences between the surface and the bottom could reach 7 d.

  1. A Global Map of Coherent M2 Internal Tide Surface Elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite altimetry reveals small surface waves, with elevations of order 1 cm or smaller, associated with internal tides in the deep ocean. The global satellite data provide an unprecedented picture of such waves, potentially yielding much information about the ocean interior. Accurate knowledge of these waves is also needed for de-tiding altimetry in certain sensitive applications, including the future SWOT mission. Several approaches have been initiated recently to map these tiny waves, usually with some reliance on hydrographic information (e.g., recent work by Dushaw et al., 2011). Here we explore the feasibility of a purely empirical approach which avoids assumptions about stratification or modal wavelengths. A global elevation map is constructed based on tidal analysis of Topex/Poseidon, Jason, ERS-2, Envisat and GFO data. Small (order 5 mm) residuals, with wavelengths much longer than the baroclinic tide, appear unless now-standard along-track high-pass filters are applied, but filtering is shown to cause serious loss of information for east-west propagating waves (given typical track patterns). The technique is probably infeasible for S2 because of Envisat's and ERS's sun-synchronous orbits. Independent data from Cryosat-2 is used to validate the results. Applying our internal-tide 'correction' to Cryosat-2 data confirms a small reduction in variance in expected locations of significant internal tides.

  2. Seagrass responses to and recovery (?) from seven years of brown tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuf, C.P.

    2000-01-01

    Most harmful algal blooms are relatively short, violent paroxysms to aquatic systems. The Texas brown tide was unique in its 7-year domination of upper Laguna Madre wherein it reduced light penetrating 1 m from 31 to 63% on an annual basis between June 1990 and May 1997. In response, seagrasses declined in biomass in deep areas for two years. Over the next three years, bare areas opened up in the deepest areas of the seagrass meadow and the outer seagrass boundary retreated landward. In the last two years of the brown tide, regression of the dominant species, Halodule wrightii, slowed and stopped, and Halophila engelmanni, a previously minor species, revegetated some areas. Subsequent to cessation of meadow retreat, water clarity improved to pre-brown tide levels, consistent with the hypothesis that regeneration of nutrients from retreating seagrass meadow may have been the source of the nutrient subsidy required to sustain the brown tide at high concentration. However, after a short interlude of clear water and Halodule recovery, a resurgence of the bloom occurred and areas of regrowth succumbed. Although human activities did not seem to be involved in initiation or persistence of the brown tide, nutrients brought in by runoff from agricultural lands may have contributed to the return of bloom conditions.

  3. Development of an operational national storm tide forecasting system for Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S. C.; Colberg, F.; Freeman, J.; Sims, H.; Greenslade, D. J.; Taylor, A.

    2016-12-01

    A high proportion of the Australian population live near the coast and many are vulnerable to impacts from extreme sea levels. Extreme sea levels can be due to a number of physical processes, such as tides, storms, inter-annual variability and sea level rise. Here, we focus on changes of coastal sea levels due to wind stress, atmospheric pressure effects, astronomical tides and wave action. These are commonly known as storm tides. A modeling system is currently being developed to provide routine deterministic forecasts of weather-induced sea level variability for the Australian coastline. These forecasts can provide guidance as to whether alerts need to be issued for extreme sea level events. This system will serve as a separate and contrasting system to an event-driven ensemble-based tropical storm surge system that is also currently under development at the Bureau of Meteorology. This presentation will outline the research and development undertaken to produce the national storm tide system. This paper will outline model configuration, forcing and outputs. The effects of wave set-up are included in post processing. Interaction with tides is also examined. Details of testing and verification are included through simulation of past events. Lastly, there will be a brief description of how it is intended to be run operationally.

  4. The change in mutagenicity:study on surface water of Qiantang River due to tide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuNX; YangYM

    2002-01-01

    The Qiangtang River lies in Zhejiang Province of China.In this study,the genotoxicity of surface water samples from five sites along the river were detected using Ames test(TA98,TA100±S9),comet(SCGE) test and cytokinesis-block micronucleus(CBMN) tesdt(-S9) in the human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro.The results indicated that in upstream samples (first site) during falling-tide was found slight mutagenicity in TA98 strain with S9 and without S9.The mutagenicity of samples from the second to the fifth site was gradually stronger.Except the first site sample,the micronucleated cell rates of the other four samples during falling-tide significantly increased in CBMN test,and the extent of migration of DNA fragments of the four samples was found to be significantly different from control group.In the upstream(first site) samples during flow-tide were found no mutagen by three short-term tests.But the other four samples were found more stronger mutagenicity in TA98 strain with S9 than that during falling-tide.The micronucleated cell rates and the extent of migration of DNA fragments of the samples were sdignificantly high than that during falling-tide too.

  5. On the Temporal Variability of Low-Mode Internal Tides in the Deep Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurements of internal tides are typically characterized by high temporal variability, with strong dependence on stratification, mesoscale eddies, and background currents commonly observed. Thus, it is surprising to find phase-locked internal tides detectable by satellite altimetry. An important question is how much tidal variability is missed by altimetry. We address this question in several ways. We subset the altimetry by season and find only very small changes -- an important exception being internal tides in the South China Sea where we observe strong seasonal dependence. A wavenumber-domain analysis confirms that throughout most of the global ocean there is little temporal variability in altimetric internal-tide signals, at least in the first baroclinic mode, which is the mode that dominates surface elevation. The analysis shows higher order modes to be significantly more variable. The results of this study have important practical implications for the anticipated SWOT wide-swath altimeter mission, for which removal of internal tide signals is critical for observing non-tidal submesoscale phenomena.

  6. Development and Use of Tide Models in Alaska Supporting VDatum and Hydrographic Surveying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Shi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Ocean Service uses observations, hydrodynamic models and interpolation techniques to develop many of its products and services. We examine how two projects, computation of tidal datums for vertical datum transformation and the estimation of tidal characteristics for hydrographic surveys, are being developed in Alaska and how they may be more seamlessly integrated. Preliminary VDatum development for Alaska is in progress for the Alaska Panhandle through the setup of a high resolution tide model that will be used to compute spatially varying tidal datums. Tide models such as these can be used for other projects that traditionally rely on estimation of tides in between data locations, such as the planning for hydrographic surveys that need correctors to adjust bathymetry to the chart datum. We therefore also examine how an existing model in western Alaska can be used for better supporting hydrographic survey planning. The results show that integration of tide models with nearshore observations can provide improved information for these correctors and future work will further evaluate this methodology with existing VDatum tide models.

  7. The CAWSES Global Observing Campaign on Tides: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W. E.; Gerding, M.; Goncharenko, L.; Keckhut, P.; Marsh, D.; Oberheide, J.; Rao, D. N.; Scheer, .; Singer, W.

    2007-05-01

    The CAWSES Global Tidal Campaign was initiated to encourage collaboration between satellite and ground based observations and to identify features in various observation types consistent with specific components. This project is one of several sponsored under Theme 3, Atmospheric Coupling Processes, of the international Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System program (CAWSES, a SCOSTEP sponsored program). The overall goal of the campaign is to provide global data sets for several concentrated time periods over the next few years which includes coordinated ground-based and satellite measurements and modeling efforts. To unambiguously resolve the tidal components present in the Earth's atmosphere requires spatial and temporal sampling sufficient to resolve wavenumbers up to at least 5 and periods down to 4.8 hours every two to three days. Neither satellite or ground based observations on their own are capable of achieving these goals. Interpretation of tidal signatures in different observables (for example wind and temperature) is complicated by the fact the the associated latitudinal structures are typically different. A global network is required to allow these structures to be examined. Three campaign periods have been sceduled to date. The first tidal campaign took place from September 1 to October 31, 2005 and this year two campaigns, March 1 to April 31, and June 1 to August 15 are planned. The first of these latter campaigns will concentrate on the global tidal structures during equinox and their evolution and variability during this time period. The second of these campaigns will address the tidal structures during solstice conditions. Strong hemispheric asymmetries are know to develop in the structure of the migrating diurnal tide and it is of interest to determine the form of other components. These campaigns will allow the characterization of the heating sources, tidal components (migrating and nonmigrating), and tidal effects from the surface of the

  8. Possible effect of solar tides on radon signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, G; Piatibratova, O; Kotlarsky, P

    2011-08-01

    Large temporal variations of radon ((222)Rn) are often encountered in air in the geologic environment, at time scales from diurnal to annual. Interpretations as to the nature of these variations, unique to (222)Rn, often invoke either above surface atmospheric variations, or the influence of subtle active geodynamic processes. So far the eventual geophysical drivers of the variation of (222)Rn as well as its specific qualities enabling this temporal variation are not known. New insight on the temporal variation of (222)Rn is gained by experimental simulation in confined air. Two short laboratory experiments, and one external experiment lasting over 3 years, were performed inside closed canisters and using natural and commercial (222)Rn sources. Internal and external gamma and alpha detectors recorded variations of the radiation, up to around 20% of the equilibrium level. Radon signals of different time scale occurred with: a) periodic annual and semi-annual signals; b) non-periodic multi-day signals; c) periodic daily signals. Similar, related, inversely-related and dissimilar temporal patterns were manifested in the measured time series of the different sensors. Diurnal periodicity was dominated by the solar tide components S1, S2 and S3, exhibiting unlike relative amplitudes and different phases at the different sensors. A compound association occurs among the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and seasonal periodicities of the daily (222)Rn signal, linking the periodic phenomena to the rotation of earth around its axis and around the sun. (222)Rn variation patterns in the frequency-time domain cannot be driven by the corresponding atmospheric variation patterns. These results, obtained under static and isolated conditions, are in disagreement with the expected radioactive equilibrium and its spatially uniform expression within and around the experimental volume. The external influence which drives the daily signals evolving from (222)Rn inside the canister is

  9. Green tide deactivation with layered-structure cuboids of Ag/CaTiO{sub 3} under UV light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo-Wohn [Global Research Laboratory, Sun Moon University, Galsan-Ri, Tangjung-Myon, Asan Chungnam 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Lozano-Sánchez, L.M. [División de Materiales Avanzados, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa San José 2055 Col. Lomas 4a sección, C.P. 78216 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Rodríguez-González, V., E-mail: vicente.rdz@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Materiales Avanzados, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa San José 2055 Col. Lomas 4a sección, C.P. 78216 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Synergic reasons such as mass transfer, morphology, biocide properties, UV-A photoresponse, and electron trapping that reduce recombination on Ag/CaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposites, have the potential for the generation of reactive radicals that promote the fatal irreversible deactivation of Tetraselmis suecica algae in 12 min under UV-A irradiation. -- Highlights: • An alternative to deactivate harmful green tide is proposed by employing Ag/CaTiO{sub 3}. • Particles of perovskite-like have rectangular prisms morphology with AgNPs ∼13 nm. • The cuboids achieve complete inactivation of Tetraselmis suecica algae in 12 min. • AgNPs functionalization induce fatal irreversible damages on the algae surface. -- Abstract: In this work, an alternative to deactivate noxious green tide Tetraselmis suecica in the short-term is proposed by employing Perovskite-like cube-shaped, crystalline CaTiO{sub 3} semiconductors functionalized with atomic silver nanoparticles. CaTiO{sub 3} was prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method and then Ag{sup 0}NPs (1 wt% of CaTiO{sub 3}), were added by the photoreduction method. The XRD results show that crystalline CaTiO{sub 3} has an orthorhombic unit cell with a Perovskite-like structure. Images obtained by FESEM and HRTEM microscopies show well-faceted CaTiO{sub 3} rectangular prismatic morphology functionalizated with silver nanoparticles ∼13.5 nm. XPS and EDS-FESEM has confirmed the composition of CaTiO{sub 3} and silver occurring mainly as reduced metal. The UV inactivation of noxious T. suecica with Ag/CaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposites formed on bare materials results in complete deactivation of the algae in 12 min. The direct contact between harmful algae and Ag/CaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposite is necessary to deactivate the algae and inhibits algae viability.

  10. Mass stranding of marine birds caused by a surfactant-producing red tide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Jessup

    Full Text Available In November-December 2007 a widespread seabird mortality event occurred in Monterey Bay, California, USA, coincident with a massive red tide caused by the dinoflagellate Akashiwo sanguinea. Affected birds had a slimy yellow-green material on their feathers, which were saturated with water, and they were severely hypothermic. We determined that foam containing surfactant-like proteins, derived from organic matter of the red tide, coated their feathers and neutralized natural water repellency and insulation. No evidence of exposure to petroleum or other oils or biotoxins were found. This is the first documented case of its kind, but previous similar events may have gone undetected. The frequency and amplitude of red tides have increased in Monterey Bay since 2004, suggesting that impacts on wintering marine birds may continue or increase.

  11. Head-of-tide bottleneck of particulate material transport from watersheds to estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory; Hupp, Cliff R.; Skalak, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    We measured rates of sediment, C, N, and P accumulation at four floodplain sites spanning the nontidal through oligohaline Choptank and Pocomoke Rivers, Maryland, USA. Ceramic tiles were used to collect sediment for a year and sediment cores were collected to derive decadal sedimentation rates using 137Cs. The results showed highest rates of short- and long-term sediment, C, N, and P accumulation occurred in tidal freshwater forests at the head of tide on the Choptank and the oligohaline marsh of the Pocomoke River, and lowest rates occurred in the downstream tidal freshwater forests in both rivers. Presumably, watershed material was mostly trapped at the head of tide, and estuarine material was trapped in oligohaline marshes. This hydrologic transport bottleneck at the head of tide stores most available watershed sediment, C, N, and P creating a sediment shadow in lower tidal freshwater forests potentially limiting their resilience to sea level rise.

  12. An objective frequency domain method for quantifying confined aquifer compressible storage using Earth and atmospheric tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Halloran, Landon J. S.; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Bernardi, Tony L.

    2016-11-01

    The groundwater hydraulic head response to the worldwide and ubiquitous atmospheric tide at 2 cycles per day (cpd) is a direct function of confined aquifer compressible storage. The ratio of the responses of hydraulic head to the atmospheric pressure change is a measure of aquifer barometric efficiency, from which formation compressibility and aquifer specific storage can be determined in situ rather than resorting to laboratory or aquifer pumping tests. The Earth tide also impacts the hydraulic head response at the same frequency, and a method is developed here to quantify and remove this interference. As a result, the barometric efficiency can be routinely calculated from 6-hourly hydraulic head, atmospheric pressure, and modeled Earth tide records where available for a minimum of 15 days duration. This new approach will be of critical importance in assessing worldwide problems of land subsidence or groundwater resource evaluation that both occur due to groundwater abstraction.

  13. Linear and nonlinear interactions between the earth tide and a tectonically stressed earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, C.

    1978-01-01

    In the vincinity of earthquake focal regions, conditions may not be equal. Crustal rocks stressed to more than approximately 0.6 of their failure strength exhibit material properties over and above that of linear elasticity. Interactions between the earth tide and crustal rocks that are under high tectonic stress are discussed in terms of simple phenomenological models. In particular, the difference between a nonlinear elastic model of dilatancy and a dilatancy model that exhibits hysteresis is noted. It is concluded that the small changes in stress produced by the earth tide act as a probe of the properties of crustal rocks. Observations of earth tide tilts and strains in such high stress zones may, therefore, provide keys to the constitutive properties and the tectonic stress rate tensor of these zones.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TIDES AND CURRENTS IN FUSHAN BAY, QINGDAO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-kui; HOU Yi-jun; WEI Ze-xun

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional Princeton Ocean Model(POM)was employed to simulate the tide and current simultanuously for the first time in the Fushan Bay,Qingdao,China.By adopting the elevation condition that was combined with the tides M2,S2,K1 and O1 at the open boundary and by choosing the proper value of bottom roughness,the horizontal and vertical distributions of the tidal current and water level variations in the bay were computed.The results agree well with the field observation data,indicating that this model can be used to predict accurately the variation of tides and currents in the Fushan Bay and other costal regions in the future.Our study also provides useful information and a data base for the Olympic Projects that will be conducted in the Fushan Bay in 2008.

  15. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke; Carter, Brett A.

    2017-04-01

    It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998-2014) of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian) have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (Kp>3) have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  16. Correlations between solid tides and worldwide earthquakes MS ≥ 7.0 since 1900

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. H. Xu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Most studies on the correlations between earthquakes and solid tides mainly concluded the syzygies (i.e. new or full moons of each lunar cycle have more earthquakes than other days in the month. We show a correlation between the aftershock sequence of the ML = 6.3 Christchurch, New Zealand, earthquake and the diurnal solid tide. Ms ≥ 7 earthquakes worldwide since 1900 are more likely to occur during the 0°, 90°, 180° or 270° phases (i.e. earthquake-prone phases of the semidiurnal solid earth tidal curve (M2. Thus, the semidiurnal solid tides triggers earthquakes. However, the long-term triggering effect of the lunar periodicity is uncertain. This proposal is helpful in defining possible origin times of aftershocks several days after a mainshock and can be used for warning of subsequent larger shocks.

  17. Atmospheric Pressure Corrections in Geodesy and Oceanography: a Strategy for Handling Air Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Rui M.; Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Global pressure data are often needed for processing or interpreting modern geodetic and oceanographic measurements. The most common source of these data is the analysis or reanalysis products of various meteorological centers. Tidal signals in these products can be problematic for several reasons, including potentially aliased sampling of the semidiurnal solar tide as well as the presence of various modeling or timing errors. Building on the work of Van den Dool and colleagues, we lay out a strategy for handling atmospheric tides in (re)analysis data. The procedure also offers a method to account for ocean loading corrections in satellite altimeter data that are consistent with standard ocean-tide corrections. The proposed strategy has immediate application to the on-going Jason-1 and GRACE satellite missions.

  18. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Inst. for Scientific Research; Carter, Brett A. [RMIT Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia). SPACE Research Centre

    2017-07-01

    It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998-2014) of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian) have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (K{sub p}>3) have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  19. Climatology and temporal evolution of the atmospheric semidiurnal tide in present-day reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Argandoña, J.; Ezcurra, A.; Sáenz, J.; Ibarra-Berastegi, G.; Errasti, I.

    2016-05-01

    The solar semidiurnal atmospheric tide (S2) was extracted from seven reanalysis data sets, including current data sets, such as CFSR (Climate Forecast System Reanalysis), MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications), ERA-Interim (ECMWF Reanalysis), and 20CR (Twentieth Century Reanalysis), and older frozen products, such as NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research), ERA-40 (ECMWF Reanalysis), and JRA-25 (Japanese 25 year Reanalysis). In this calculation, we emphasized the temporal variation of the tide. We also calculated the tidal error, which was sizable at high latitudes and over short averaging periods and large for 20CR at all latitudes. Because of the four standard daily samples, the interpolation scheme of van den Dool et al. (1997) was used when necessary. We found this method to be accurate for zonally averaged tides only. Comparing the climatology from the MERRA and CFSR S2 with a recent empirical tide model showed that MERRA better represented the geographical structure of the tide, especially its phase. We found a bias in the phase in all of the reanalysis data sets except for MERRA. The temporal evolution of the tide was inconsistent between the different data sets, although similar seasonal variations were observed. The seasonal cycle was also better depicted in MERRA. The S2 calculated from MERRA and satellite precipitation measurements from TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) presented results that were inconsistent with the hypothesis in which rainfall latent heat release represents S2 forcing and functions as a source of S2 seasonal variability.

  20. New ERP predictions based on (sub-)daily ocean tides from satellite altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Sigrid; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    A new model for Earth rotation variations based on ocean tide models is highly desirable in order to close the gap between geophysical Earth rotation models and geodetic observations. We have started a project, SPOT (Short Period Ocean Tidal variations in Earth Rotation), with the goal to develop a new model of short period Earth rotation variations based on one of the best currently available empirical ocean tide models obtained from satellite altimetry. We employ the EOT11a model which is an upgrade of EOT08a, developed at DGFI, Munich. As EOT11a does not provide the tidal current velocities which are fundamental contributors to Earth rotation excitation, the calculation of current velocities from the tidal elevations is one of three main areas of research in project SPOT. The second key aspect is the conversion from ocean tidal angular momentum to the corresponding ERP variations using state-of-the-art transfer functions. A peculiar innovation at this step will be to consider the Earth's response to ocean tidal loading based on a realistic Earth model, including an anelastic mantle. The third part of the project deals with the introduction of the effect of minor tides. Ocean tide models usually only provide major semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal terms and the minor tides have to be inferred through admittance assumptions. Within the proposed project, selected minor tidal terms and the corresponding ERP variations shall be derived directly from satellite altimetry data. We determine ocean tidal angular momentum of four diurnal and five sub-daily tides from EOT11a and apply the angular momentum approach to derive a new model of ocean tidal Earth rotation variations. This poster gives a detailed description of project SPOT as well as the status of work progress. First results are presented as well.

  1. Red Tide Information Extraction Based on Multi-source Remote Sensing Data in Haizhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to extract red tide information in Haizhou Bay on the basis of multi-source remote sensing data.[Method] Red tide in Haizhou Bay was studied based on multi-source remote sensing data,such as IRS-P6 data on October 8,2005,Landsat 5-TM data on May 20,2006,MODIS 1B data on October 6,2006 and HY-1B second-grade data on April 22,2009,which were firstly preprocessed through geometric correction,atmospheric correction,image resizing and so on.At the same time,the synchronous environment mon...

  2. Nonlinear interaction between the diurnal and semidiurnal tides: Terdiurnal and diurnal secondary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, H.; Vial, F.; Manson, A. H.; Giraldez, R.; Masseboeuf, M.

    1989-01-01

    Many years of measurements obtained using French meteor radars at Garchy (latitude 47 N) and Montpazier (latitude 44 N) are used to show the existence of an 8 hour oscillation. Some examples of the structure of this wave are displayed and compared with measurements performed at Saskatoon (latitude 52 N) and Budrio (latitude 45 N). This wave can be interpreted as the solar driven terdiurnal tide, or as the result of the nonlinear interaction between the diurnal and semidiurnal tides. Both hypotheses are tested with numerical models. Incidentally, the possible existence of a 24 hour wave resulting from this interaction is also studied.

  3. Design, history and results of the Thiazolidinedione Intervention with vitamin D Evaluation (TIDE) randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Punthakee, Z; Bosch, J; Dagenais, G

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/OBJECTIVE: Conflicting data regarding cardiovascular effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and extra-skeletal effects of vitamin D supported the need for a definitive trial. The Thiazolidinedione Intervention with vitamin D Evaluation (TIDE) trial aimed to assess the effects of TZDs (rosiglit...... (rosiglitazone and pioglitazone) on cardiovascular outcomes and the effects of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) on cancers and mortality.......AIMS/OBJECTIVE: Conflicting data regarding cardiovascular effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and extra-skeletal effects of vitamin D supported the need for a definitive trial. The Thiazolidinedione Intervention with vitamin D Evaluation (TIDE) trial aimed to assess the effects of TZDs...

  4. The impact of future sea-level rise on the European Shelf tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, M. D.; Wells, N. C.; Horsburgh, K. J.; Green, J. A. M.

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of future sea-level rise (SLR) on the tides of the northwest European Continental Shelf. The European shelf tide is dominated by semidiurnal constituents. This study therefore focuses primarily on the changes in the M2 tidal constituent and the spring and neap tidal conditions. The validated operational Dutch Continental Shelf Model is run for the present day sea-level as well as 2 and 10 m SLR scenarios. The M2 tidal amplitude responds to SLR in a spatially non-uniform manner, with substantial amplitude increases and decreases in both scenarios. The M2 tidal response is non-linear between 2 and 10 m with respect to SLR, particularly in the North Sea. Under the 2 m SLR scenario the M2 constituent is particularly responsive in the resonant areas of the Bristol Channel and Gulf of St. Malo (with large amplitude decreases) and in the southeastern German Bight and Dutch Wadden Sea (with large amplitude increases). Changes in the spring tide are generally greater still than those in the M2 or neap tides. With 2 m SLR the spring tidal range increases up to 35 cm at Cuxhaven and decreases up to -49 cm at St. Malo. Additionally the changes in the shallow water tides are larger than expected. With SLR the depth, wave speed and wave length (tidal resonance characteristics) are increased causing changes in near resonant areas. In expansive shallow areas SLR causes reduced energy dissipation by bottom friction. Combined these mechanisms result in the migration of the amphidromes and complex patterns of non-linear change in the tide with SLR. Despite the significant uncertainty associated with the rate of SLR over the next century, substantial alterations to tidal characteristics can be expected under a high end SLR scenario. Contrary to existing studies this paper highlights the importance of considering the modification of the tides by future SLR. These substantial future changes in the tides could have wide reaching implications; including

  5. New perspectives on neutron star and black hole spectroscopy and dynamic tides

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Sayan; Steinhoff, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We elaborate on a powerful tidal interaction formalism where the multipole dynamics is kept generic and encoded in a linear response function. This response function is the gravitational counterpart of the atomic spectrum and can become of similar importance with the rise of gravitational wave astronomy. We find that the internal dynamics of nonrotating neutron stars admit a harmonic oscillator formulation yielding a simple interpretation of tides. A preliminary investigation of the black holes case is given. Our results fill the gap between Love numbers and dynamic tides.

  6. Influence of tides and winds on fishing techniques and strategies in the Mamanguape River Estuary, Paraíba State, NE Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Dandara M M; Nascimento, Douglas M; Ferreira, Emmanoela N; Rocha, Pollyana D; Mourão, José S

    2012-09-01

    This work was carried out in two small fishing communities, Barra de Mamanguape and Tramataia, Northeastern Brazil. The aim was to study these traditional fishermen's knowledge and perception about tide and wind classifications, as well as their fishing strategies and techniques. Our research methodology involved various techniques: free interviews and semi-structured ones, guided tours and direct observations. The results obtained show the fishermen's classification of the tides according to the phases of the moon: 'breaking tide', 'flushing tide', 'dead tide' and 'big tide' designated technically these last as neap tide and spring tide, respectively. Wind is also an essential factor for the fishermen to make successful catches, and they classify it according to direction: North, South, East, Southeast, Southwest, Northeast and Northwest. The data show that fishermen's knowledge can also be useful in devising plans for management and conservation studies for this estuary.

  7. High tides and rising seas: potential effects on estuarine waterbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, R.M.; Sanders, G.M.; Prosser, D.J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Greenberg, Russell; Maldonado, Jesus; Droege, Sam; McDonald, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    Coastal waterbirds are vulnerable to water-level changes especially under predictions of accelerating sea-level rise and increased storm frequency in the next century. Tidal and wind-driven fluctuations in water levels affecting marshes, their invertebrate communities, and their dependent waterbirds are manifested in daily, monthly, seasonal, annual, and supra-annual (e.g., decadal or 18.6-yr) periodicities. Superimposed on these cyclic patterns is a long-term (50?80 yr) increase in relative sea-level rise that varies from about 2?4 + mm/yr along the Atlantic coastline. At five study sites selected on marsh islands from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to coastal Virginia, we monitored marsh elevation changes and flooding, tide variations over time, and waterbird use. We found from longterm marsh core data that marsh elevations at three of five sites may not be sufficient to maintain pace with current sea-level rise. Results of the short-term (3?4 yr) measures using surface elevation tables suggest a more dramatic difference, with marsh elevation change at four of five sites falling below relative sea-level rise. In addition, we have found a significant increase (in three of four cases) in the rate of surface marsh flooding in New Jersey and Virginia over the past 70?80 yr during May?July when waterbirds are nesting on or near the marsh surface. Short-term, immediate effects of flooding will jeopardize annual fecundity of many species of concern to federal and state agencies, most notably American Black Duck (Anas rubripes), Nelson?s Sharp-tailed Sparrow (Ammodramus nelsoni), Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow (A. caudacutus), Seaside Sparrow (A. maritima), Coastal Plain Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana nigrescens), Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis), Forster?s Tern (Sterna forsteri), Gull-billed Tern (S. nilotica), Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger), and American Oystercatcher (Haemotopus palliatus). Forster?s Terns are probably most at risk given the large proportion of their

  8. On the generation and evolution of internal solitary waves in the southern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Daquan

    2015-04-01

    Satellite observations recently revealed the existence of trains of internal solitary waves in the southern Red Sea between 16.0°N and 16.5°N, propagating from the centre of the domain toward the continental shelf [Da silva et al., 2012]. Given the relatively weak tidal velocity in this area and their generation in the central of the domain, Da Silva suggested three possible mechanisms behind the generation of the waves, namely Resonance and disintegration of interfacial tides, Generation of interfacial tides by impinging, remotely generated internal tidal beams and for geometrically focused and amplified internal tidal beams. Tide analysis based on tide stations data and barotropic tide model in the Red Sea shows that tide is indeed very weak in the centre part of the Red Sea, but it is relatively strong in the northern and southern parts (reaching up to 66 cm/s). Together with extreme steep slopes along the deep trench, it provides favourable conditions for the generation of internal solitary in the southern Red Sea. To investigate the generation mechanisms and study the evolution of the internal waves in the off-shelf region of the southern Red Sea we have implemented a 2-D, high-resolution and non-hydrostatic configuration of the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). Our simulations reproduce well that the generation process of the internal solitary waves. Analysis of the model\\'s output suggests that the interaction between the topography and tidal flow with the nonlinear effect is the main mechanism behind the generation of the internal solitary waves. Sensitivity experiments suggest that neither tidal beam nor the resonance effect of the topography is important factor in this process.

  9. Differential responses of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide to light and temperature between spring and neap tides in subtropical mangrove forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Lu, Weizhi; Chen, Hui; Luo, Yiqi; Lin, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios.

  10. Differential Responses of Net Ecosystem Exchange of Carbon Dioxide to Light and Temperature between Spring and Neap Tides in Subtropical Mangrove Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios.

  11. Chattonella and Fibrocapsa (Raphidophyceae) : First Observation of, Potentially Harmful, Red Tide Organisms in Dutch Coastal Waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, E.G.; Koeman, R.P.T.; Nagasaki, K.; Ishida, Y.; Peperzak, L.; Gieskes, W.W.C.; Veenhuis, M.

    1995-01-01

    Species of the potentially toxic and red-tide-forming marine-phytoplankton genera Chattonella and Fibrocapsa (Raphidophyceae) were observed for the first time in 1991 in samples taken in Dutch coastal waters; they were again recorded and enumerated in the following years. Chattonella spp. cell numbe

  12. A Semianalytical Model Using MODIS Data to Estimate Cell Density of Red Tide Algae (Aureococcus anophagefferens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiband and a single-band semianalytical model were developed to predict algae cell density distribution. The models were based on cell density (N dependent parameterizations of the spectral backscattering coefficients, bb(λ, obtained from in situ measurements. There was a strong relationship between bb(λ and N, with a minimum regression coefficient of 0.97 at 488 nm and a maximum value of 0.98 at other bands. The cell density calculated by the multiband inversion model was similar to the field measurements of the coastal waters (the average relative error was only 8.9%, but it could not accurately discern the red tide from mixed pixels, and this led to overestimation of the area affected by the red tide. While the single-band inversion model is less precise than the former model in the high chlorophyll water, it could eliminate the impact of the suspended sediments and make more accurate estimates of the red tide area. We concluded that the two models both have advantages and disadvantages; these methods lay the foundation for developing a remote sensing forecasting system for red tides.

  13. High-tide habitat choice : insights from modelling roost selection by shorebirds around a tropical bay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, Danny I.; Battley, Phil F.; Piersma, Theunis; Van Gils, Jan A.; Rogers, Ken G.

    2006-01-01

    High tides force shorebirds from intertidal feeding areas to sites known as roosts. We investigated the roost selection of great knots, Calidris tenuirostris, and red knots, Calidris canutus, on a tropical coastline in northwestern Australia, assessing several roost attributes and recording the freq

  14. The M-2 ocean tide loading wave in Alaska: vertical and horizontal displacements, modelled and observed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Scherneck, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    Crustal deformations caused by surface load due to ocean tides are strongly dependent on the surface load closest to the observing site. In order to correctly model this ocean loading effect near irregular coastal areas, a high-resolution coastline is required. A test is carried out using two GPS...

  15. TOXICITY OF CLAY FLOCCULATION OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS ON BENTHIC ORGANISMS ERF 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity of Clay Flocculation of Red Tide Organisms on Benthic Organisms (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R854). We have eva...

  16. Pole tide Love number - an important parameter for polar motion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, S.; Schmidt, M. G.; Seitz, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Euler-Liouville equation is the basic physical model to describe Earth rotation. It is based on the balance of angular momentum in the Earth system. The pole tide Love number is needed to characterize the rotational deformation effect, which depends on the internal structure and rheology of the Earth. There is a direct dependency between the pole tide Love number and the period and damping of the Chandler oscillation. Here we estimate the pole tide Love number on the basis of an inversion of the Euler-Liouville equation. The Earth orientation parameters are used as input parameters. They have been observed precisely over several decades by geodetic methods (C01 and C04 time series). It will be shown that the estimated pole tide Love number leads to significantly better results for polar motion compared to the original value taken from the Conventions of the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (IERS). Nevertheless the estimation is dependent on the input models for the subsystems (e.g. atmosphere and ocean models), applied estimation approach and time frame. These aspects are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  17. Tide-modulated seismicity in the vicinity of a calving front (Bowdoin Glacier, Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolskiy, Evgeny A.; Sugiyama, Shin; Funk, Martin; Walter, Fabian; Genco, Riccardo; Tsutaki, Shun; Minowa, Masahiro; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    For cryogenic microseismicity to be used as an indicator of climate-induced dynamic change, it must have a clear connection with glacier dynamics (including calving, basal sliding, strain, and melt). There is currently much speculation and disagreement about these connections, particularly, with respect to the relationship between tide-modulated seismicity and dynamics of calving glaciers. Here we analyze records from an on-ice seismometer placed 250 m from the calving front of Bowdoin Glacier, northwestern Greenland. We find that the overall microseismic activity of this glacier is at least an order of magnitude larger than previously reported (more than 100,000 events within 2 weeks and up to 600 events per hour) and that it is positively correlated with falling tide velocity. Using high-resolution surface displacement measurements, we show for the first time that the correlation is relayed through strain-rate variations. The strain-rate corresponds with longitudinal stretching of the glacial surface, in response to higher melt rates and falling tide, both of which accelerate glacier movement and enhance the stretching flow regime. Previous proposals to use icequakes as a proxy for grounding line migration need to be reconsidered because Bowdoin Glacier is grounded, with no tide-induced vertical bending of the near-floating tongue, which always exhibits microseismic activity due to continuous longitudinal stretching.

  18. Growth and grazing on the 'Texas brown tide' alga Aureoumbra lagunensis by the tintinnid Amphorides quadrilineata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Hyatt, C.; Buskey, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    Growth and ingestion by the loricate ciliate Amphorides quadrilineata exposed to increasing dietary doses of the Texas brown tide alga Aureoumbra lagunensis were investigated. The ciliate grew at a maximum rate of 0.38 d(-1), ingesting 0.032 ppm (similar to6.4 x 10(2) cells) prey d(-1) on a diet...

  19. The Variability of Internal Tides in the Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    yields a difference of about 15 % (Fig. 3a). The difference for the baroclinic D1 HKE is about 10 % (Fig. 3b). The temporal variations in baro - tropic...variability of internal tides 629 123 Ko DS, Martin PJ, Rowley CD, Preller RH (2008) A real-time coastal ocean prediction experiment for MREA04. J Mar Syst

  20. Tides in the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries, Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    Mandovi and Zuari are two estuaries located in Goa, west coast of India. Variation of water level in the estuaries was monitored for a month at 13 locations using tide-poles during March–April 2003. Analysis of this data has provided for the first...

  1. Effects of Tide Stage on the Use of Salt Marshes by Wading Birds in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine how tide stage affects wading bird abundance, behavior, and foraging in three Narragansett Bay salt marshes (RI), we conducted surveys at 10-min intervals—across the full tidal range—during six days at each marsh in July/September of 2006. The wading bird community ...

  2. Numerical modelling of tides and tidal currents in the Gulf of Kutch

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    An application of a two-dimensional tidal model to study the tidal regime in the Gulf of Kutch is made. This is with a view to synthesise various information on tides and currents that are available in the Gulf. A comparison of surface elevations...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS ON BENTHIC ORGANISMS FROM CLAY FLOCCULATION OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluating the feasibility of controlling red tide using clay flocculation is part of an ECOHAB-funded project. One aspect for the feasibility and future application of clays is the determination of potential negative environmental impacts. The removal of toxin-containing dinofl...

  4. Observations of enhanced nonlinear instability in the surface reflection of internal tides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, X.; Shang, X.; van Haren, H.; Chen, G.

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced vertically standing waves formed by the superposition of two upward and downward going near-diurnal (D1) waves are observed during one semidiurnal (D2) spring tide in an approximately 75day long velocity record from the northeastern South China Sea. Bicoherence estimates suggest that the

  5. Creep and stick-slip in subglacial granular beds forced by ocean tides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Beem, Lucas H.

    rearrangements of load-bearing force chains within the granular sediments drive the mechanical transitions. Cyclic variations in driving stresses or pore-water pressure, caused by ocean tides, give rise to strain-rate dependent creeping motion at stress levels below the point of failure, while disruption...

  6. Effects of winds, tides and storm surges on ocean surface waves in the Sea of Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; TIAN Jiwei; LI Peiliang; HOU Yijun

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surface waves are strongly forced by high wind conditions associated with winter storms in the Sea of Japan. They are also modulated by tides and storm surges. The effects of the variability in surface wind forcing, tides and storm surges on the waves are investigated using a wave model, a high-resolution atmospheric mesoscale model and a hydrodynamic ocean circulation model. Five month-long wave model simulations are inducted to examine the sensitivity of ocean waves to various wind forcing fields, tides and storm surges during January 1997. Compared with observed mean wave parameters, results indicate that the high frequency variability in the surface wind filed has very great effect on wave simulation. Tides and storm surges have a significant impact on the waves in nearshores of the Tsushima-kaihyō, but not for other regions in the Sea of Japan. High spatial and temporal resolution and good quality surface wind products will be crucial for the prediction of surface waves in the JES and other marginal seas, especially near the coastal regions.

  7. Use of nucleoside (tide) analogues in patients with hepatitis B-related acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Doan Y; Seremba, Emmanuel; Ajmera, Veeral;

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of nucleoside(tide) analogues (NA) in the treatment of acute liver failure due to hepatitis B virus (HBV-ALF) remains controversial. We determined retrospectively the impact of NAs in a large cohort of patients with HBV-ALF....

  8. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961–2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.; Van de Wal, R.S.W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the 20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sea-level change on a regional scale is still limited. In this study we compare observations from tide gauges to regional patterns from various contributions to sea-level change to see how much of

  9. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961–2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sealevelchange on a regional scale is still limited. In this studywe compare observations from tide gauges to regional patternsfrom various contributions to sea-level change to seehow much of the re

  10. Comparing tide gauge observations to regional patterns of sea-level change (1961-2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A. B. A.; van de Wal, R. S. W.; Wada, Y.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2014-01-01

    Although the global mean sea-level budget for the 20th century can now be closed, the understanding of sea-level change on a regional scale is still limited. In this study we compare observations from tide gauges to regional patterns from various contributions to sea-level change to see how much of

  11. Antioxidant system responses in two co-occurring green-tide algae under stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-01-01

    Green tides have occurred every year from 2007 to 2014 in the Yellow Sea. Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh has been identified as the bloom-forming alga, co-occurring with U. intestinalis. We observed distinct strategies for both algal species during green tides. U. prolifera exhibited a high abundance initially and then decreased dramatically, while U. intestinalis persisted throughout. The antioxidant system responses of these two macroalgae were compared in the late phase of a green tide (in-situ) and after laboratory acclimation. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system responses differed significantly between the two. Malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide contents increased significantly in-situ in U. prolifera, but not in U. intestinalis. In U. prolifera, we observed a significant decrease in total antioxidant ability (T-AOC), antioxidant enzymes (SOD and Apx), and non-enzyme antioxidants (GSH and AsA) in-situ. U. intestinalis showed the same pattern of T-AOC and SOD, but its Gpx, Apx, and GSH responses did not differ significantly. The results suggest that U. prolifera was more susceptible than U. intestinalis to the harsh environmental changes during the late phase of a Yellow Sea green tide. The boom and bust strategy exhibited by U. prolifera and the persistence of U. intestinalis can be explained by differences in enzyme activity and antioxidant systems.

  12. Estimating absolute sea level variations by combining GNSS and Tide gauge data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bos, M.S.; Fernandes, R.M.S; Vethamony, P.; Mehra, P.

    database, we have computed new sea level rise estimates for seven Indian tide gauges with realistic error bars. Thes e error bars should be combined with the uncertainty of the vertical land motion to obtain the error bar of the absolute sea level rise...

  13. The coupled effect of tides and stellar winds on the evolution of compact binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Repetto, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We follow the evolution of compact binaries under the coupled effect of tides and stellar winds until the onset of Roche-lobe overflow. These binaries contain a compact object (either a black-hole, a neutron-star, or a planet) and a stellar component. We integrate the full set of tidal equations, which are based on Hut's model for tidal evolution, and we couple them with the angular momentum loss in a stellar wind. Our aim is twofold. Firstly, we wish to highlight some interesting evolutionary outcomes of the coupling. When tides are coupled with a non-massive stellar wind, one interesting outcome is that in certain types of binaries, the stellar spin tends to reach a quasi-equilibrium state, where the effect of tides and wind are counteracting each other. When tides are coupled with a massive wind, we parametrize the evolution in terms of the decoupling radius, at which the wind decouples from the star. Even for small decoupling radii this \\emph{wind braking} can drive systems on the main sequence to Roche-l...

  14. Red tide optical index: in situ optics and remote sensing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinic, I.; Karp-Boss, L.; Boss, E.; Ragan, M. A.; Jones, B. H.

    2007-05-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are recurring events in the coastal ocean, and local economies that depend on beach and coastal use are often adversely affected by these events. Inherent optical properties (absorption and backscattering) of the HAB dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum were measured in order to develop specific index that would enable easier detection of this HAB organism in the field. It has been noticed that red to blue and red to green ratio of absorption in this species is much lower then other measured species. A red tide ratio was tested in the field during a red tide episode in the San Pedro Channel, using a Wetlabs acS flow-through system. The red tide index gave a distinguishable signal in areas where L.polyedrum was present. Remote sensing reflectance was calculated from field and laboratory IOP measurements, using reverse Quasi-Analythical Alghoritm and Hydrolight to evaluate if the red tide index can be detected in the remote sensing ocean color measurements.

  15. Chattonella and Fibrocapsa (Raphidophyceae) : First Observation of, Potentially Harmful, Red Tide Organisms in Dutch Coastal Waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, E.G.; Koeman, R.P.T.; Nagasaki, K.; Ishida, Y.; Peperzak, L.; Gieskes, W.W.C.; Veenhuis, M.

    Species of the potentially toxic and red-tide-forming marine-phytoplankton genera Chattonella and Fibrocapsa (Raphidophyceae) were observed for the first time in 1991 in samples taken in Dutch coastal waters; they were again recorded and enumerated in the following years. Chattonella spp. cell

  16. TOXICITY OF CLAY FLOCCULATION OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS ON BENTHIC ORGANISMS ERF 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity of Clay Flocculation of Red Tide Organisms on Benthic Organisms (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R854). We have eva...

  17. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS ON BENTHIC ORGANISMS FROM CLAY FLOCCULATION OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluating the feasibility of controlling red tide using clay flocculation is part of an ECOHAB-funded project. One aspect for the feasibility and future application of clays is the determination of potential negative environmental impacts. The removal of toxin-containing dinofl...

  18. [Removal of different species of red tide organisms with an effective clay-complex system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiuxian; Yu, Zhiming; Gao, Yonghui

    2003-07-01

    An effective clay-complex system was composed on the base of clay by added other two components A and B. Different red tide species, such as Scrippsiella trochoidea, Amphidinium carterae and Heterosigma akashiwo, were coagulated by this clay-complex system, and the optimum conditions for removal red tide organisms were obtained by means of orthogonal test. The results showed that clay was the most important factors in this complex system to coagulate these three organisms. The removal efficiency on three species was in order of Scrippsiella trochoidea > Amphidinium carterae > Heterosigma akashiwo. At the same time, a preliminary study of mortality rate on Penaeus japonicus (length between 1.0 to 1.5 cm) was conducted with this system, and the result of toxic test revealed that the mortality of aquaculture shrimp in control group (nothing added) reached to 80% after 96 h, however, while that of other three groups which added clay and other two components A and B, was below 40%. Thus, it implied that the addition of clay would be harmless to Penaeus japonicas. Furthermore, suitable concentration of components A and B was not harmful for the aquaculture shrimp, but increased the removal efficiency of red tide organisms. The preliminary results showed that this clay-complex system would be available in the removal of red tide organisms in filed.

  19. GOCE++ Dynamical Coastal Topography and tide gauge unification using altimetry and GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Knudsen, Per; Nielsen, Karina; Hughes, Christopher; Kern, Michael; Gravelle, Mederic; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Bingham, rory; Woppelmann, guy

    2017-04-01

    Within GOCE ++ the use of ocean levelling is taken as a novel approach to the study of height system unification across the oceans taking the recent development in geoid accuracy through GOCE data into account. The suggested investigation involves the use of measurements and modelling to estimate Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT) of the ocean along a coastline, which contributes/requires reconciling altimetry, tide gauge and vertical land motion. Close to the coast the determination of the MDT is problematic due to i.e., the altimeter footprint, land motion or parameterization/modelling of coastal currents. The objective of this activity is to perform a consolidated and improved understanding and modelling of coastal processes and physics responsible for sea level changes on various temporal/spatial scales. The study presents the following elements Develop an approach to estimate a consistent DT at tide gauges, coastal areas, and open ocean; Validate the approach in well-surveyed areas where DT can be determined at tide gauges; Determine a consistent MDT using GOCE with consistent error covariance fields; improving altimetry (SAR) along the coast for MSS/MDT improvement and finally connecting the global set of tide gauges and investigate trends

  20. Golden Tides: Problem or Golden Opportunity? The Valorisation of Sargassum from Beach Inundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Milledge

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there have been massive inundations of pelagic Sargassum, known as golden tides, on the beaches of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and West Africa, causing considerable damage to the local economy and environment. Commercial exploration of this biomass for food, fuel, and pharmaceutical products could fund clean-up and offset the economic impact of these golden tides. This paper reviews the potential uses and obstacles for exploitation of pelagic Sargassum. Although Sargassum has considerable potential as a source of biochemicals, feed, food, fertiliser, and fuel, variable and undefined composition together with the possible presence of marine pollutants may make golden tides unsuitable for food, nutraceuticals, and pharmaceuticals and limit their use in feed and fertilisers. Discontinuous and unreliable supply of Sargassum also presents considerable challenges. Low-cost methods of preservation such as solar drying and ensiling may address the problem of discontinuity. The use of processes that can handle a variety of biological and waste feedstocks in addition to Sargassum is a solution to unreliable supply, and anaerobic digestion for the production of biogas is one such process. More research is needed to characterise golden tides and identify and develop commercial products and processes.

  1. A technique to circumvent lower density water trapping by tide-wells

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, E.S.; Desa, E.; Peshwe, V.B.

    (MSL) was 11.3 mm. The limitation of the conventional tide-well could be minimized by arrays of performations on its entire submerged portion, that serve the dual purposes of (1) good mixing between well and external waters, and (2) minimizing...

  2. Structure and dynamical effects of the thermal tide in the Venus atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Ando, Hiroki; Matsuda, Yoshihisa

    2016-10-01

    We investigate structure and dynamical effects of the thermal tide in the Venus atmosphere by using a general circulation model (GCM). The thermal tide is important for the Venus atmospheric dynamics (Fels and Lindzen, 1974; Plumb, 1975; Newman and Leovy, 1992; Takagi and Matsuda, 2007). However, its three-dimensional structure has not been fully investigated so far. It is expected that detailed wind distributions of the thermal tide will be obtained by the Venus Climate Orbiter Akatsuki in the near future. It is necessary to investigate its structure so that the observational results can be interpreted in terms of dynamics. The GCM used in the present study is AFES for Venus (Sugimoto et al., 2014a, b). The resolution is set to T64L120. The model atmosphere extends from the ground to ~120 km. The infrared radiative transfer process is simplified by the Newtonian cooling approximation. See Sugimoto et al. (2014a, b) for more model details. The initial state is an idealized superrotating flow in solid body rotation. The GCM is integrated for 5 Earth years. The result shows that the semidiurnal and diurnal tides are predominant in low and high latitudes poleward of 60 degrees, respectively. The diurnal tide is trapped at 55-75 km levels; the phase is almost unchanged in the vertical direction. This result indicates that the subsolar-antisolar (SS-AS) circulation is predominant at these levels. The strong upward wind is located at early afternoon and near the morning and evening terminators. The vertical velocity of the SS-AS circulation is 0.04 m/s, which is ~10 times as fast as that of the mean meridional circulation (MMC). Titov et al. (2012) pointed out that dark regions are observed in the evening region, suggesting that the dark material is transported from below. These results suggest that the SS-AS circulation is quite important to the material transport at the cloud levels in the Venus atmosphere. The preliminary analysis also shows that the MMC at 50-90 km

  3. Dynamical tides in exoplanetary systems containing hot Jupiters: confronting theory and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, S. V.; Ivanov, P. B.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2017-09-01

    We study the effect of dynamical tides associated with the excitation of gravity waves in an interior radiative region of the central star on orbital evolution in observed systems containing hot Jupiters. We consider WASP-43, OGLE-TR-113, WASP-12 and WASP-18 that contain stars on the main sequence (MS). For these systems there are observational estimates regarding the rate of change of the orbital period. We also investigate Kepler-91 that contains an evolved giant star. We adopt the formalism of Ivanov et al. for calculating the orbital evolution. For the MS stars we determine expected rates of orbital evolution under different assumptions about the amount of dissipation acting on the tides, estimate the effect of stellar rotation for the two most rapidly rotating stars and compare results with observations. All cases apart from possibly WASP-43 are consistent with a regime in which gravity waves are damped during their propagation over the star. However, at present this is not definitive as observational errors are large. We find that although it is expected to apply to Kepler-91, linear radiative damping cannot explain this dissipation regime applying to MS stars. Thus, a non-linear mechanism may be needed. Kepler-91 is found to be such that the time-scale for evolution of the star is comparable to that for the orbit. This implies that significant orbital circularization may have occurred through tides acting on the star. Quasi-static tides, stellar winds, hydrodynamic drag and tides acting on the planet have likely played a minor role.

  4. Introducing CAFein, a New Computational Tool for Stellar Pulsations and Dynamic Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, F.; Farr, W. M.; Willems, B.; Rasio, F. A.; Kalogera, V.

    2013-08-01

    Here we present CAFein, a new computational tool for investigating radiative dissipation of dynamic tides in close binaries and of non-adiabatic, non-radial stellar oscillations in isolated stars in the linear regime. For the latter, CAFein computes the non-adiabatic eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of detailed stellar models. The code is based on the so-called Riccati method, a numerical algorithm that has been successfully applied to a variety of stellar pulsators, and which does not suffer from the major drawbacks of commonly used shooting and relaxation schemes. Here we present an extension of the Riccati method to investigate dynamic tides in close binaries. We demonstrate CAFein's capabilities as a stellar pulsation code both in the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes, by reproducing previously published eigenfrequencies of a polytrope, and by successfully identifying the unstable modes of a stellar model in the β Cephei/SPB region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Finally, we verify CAFein's behavior in the dynamic tides regime by investigating the effects of dynamic tides on the eigenfunctions and orbital and spin evolution of massive main sequence stars in eccentric binaries, and of hot Jupiter host stars. The plethora of asteroseismic data provided by NASA's Kepler satellite, some of which include the direct detection of tidally excited stellar oscillations, make CAFein quite timely. Furthermore, the increasing number of observed short-period detached double white dwarfs (WDs) and the observed orbital decay in the tightest of such binaries open up a new possibility of investigating WD interiors through the effects of tides on their orbital evolution.

  5. Evolution of wave and tide over vegetation region in nearshore waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Zhang, Hongxing; Zhao, Kaibin; Tang, Jun; Qin, Huifa

    2017-08-01

    Coastal wetlands are an important ecosystem in nearshore regions, where complex flow characteristics occur because of the interactions among tides, waves, and plants, especially in the discontinuous flow of the intertidal zone. In order to simulate the wave and wave-induced current in coastal waters, in this study, an explicit depth-averaged hydrodynamic (HD) model has been dynamically coupled with a wave spectral model (CMS-Wave) by sharing the tide and wave data. The hydrodynamic model is based on the finite volume method; the intercell flux is computed using the Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL) approximate Riemann solver for computing the dry-to-wet interface; the drag force of vegetation is modeled as the sink terms in the momentum equations. An empirical wave energy dissipation term with plant effect has been derived from the wave action balance equation to account for the resistance induced by aquatic vegetation in the CMS-Wave model. The results of the coupling model have been verified using the measured data for the case with wave-tide-vegetation interactions. The results show that the wave height decreases significantly along the wave propagation direction in the presence of vegetation. In the rip channel system, the oblique waves drive a meandering longshore current; it moves from left to right past the cusps with oscillations. In the vegetated region, the wave height is greatly attenuated due to the presence of vegetation, and the radiation stresses are noticeably changed as compared to the region without vegetation. Further, vegetation can affect the spatial distribution of mean velocity in a rip channel system. In the co-exiting environment of tides, waves, and vegetation, the locations of wave breaking and wave-induced radiation stress also vary with the water level of flooding or ebb tide in wetland water, which can also affect the development and evolution of wave-induced current.

  6. INTRODUCING CAFein, A NEW COMPUTATIONAL TOOL FOR STELLAR PULSATIONS AND DYNAMIC TIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valsecchi, F.; Farr, W. M.; Willems, B.; Rasio, F. A.; Kalogera, V., E-mail: francesca@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    Here we present CAFein, a new computational tool for investigating radiative dissipation of dynamic tides in close binaries and of non-adiabatic, non-radial stellar oscillations in isolated stars in the linear regime. For the latter, CAFein computes the non-adiabatic eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of detailed stellar models. The code is based on the so-called Riccati method, a numerical algorithm that has been successfully applied to a variety of stellar pulsators, and which does not suffer from the major drawbacks of commonly used shooting and relaxation schemes. Here we present an extension of the Riccati method to investigate dynamic tides in close binaries. We demonstrate CAFein's capabilities as a stellar pulsation code both in the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes, by reproducing previously published eigenfrequencies of a polytrope, and by successfully identifying the unstable modes of a stellar model in the {beta} Cephei/SPB region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Finally, we verify CAFein's behavior in the dynamic tides regime by investigating the effects of dynamic tides on the eigenfunctions and orbital and spin evolution of massive main sequence stars in eccentric binaries, and of hot Jupiter host stars. The plethora of asteroseismic data provided by NASA's Kepler satellite, some of which include the direct detection of tidally excited stellar oscillations, make CAFein quite timely. Furthermore, the increasing number of observed short-period detached double white dwarfs (WDs) and the observed orbital decay in the tightest of such binaries open up a new possibility of investigating WD interiors through the effects of tides on their orbital evolution.

  7. Quantifying the Effects of Combined Waves and Tides on Deltas: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paola, C.; Baumgardner, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The classical Galloway diagram captures qualitatively the dramatic effect waves and tides have on reshaping river deltas. Here we investigate these controls in a series of laboratory experiments in which the relative energetics of river, wave, and tidal forcing could be controlled and systematically varied. The delta is fed from a single source of water and low-density, sand-size sediment in one corner of a 5m x 5m basin. Experimental tides are produced by transferring water back and forth between the main experimental basin and an auxiliary holding basin. The tidal period is 60 s and a typical tidal range is 30 mm. Waves are produced using a floating, oscillating paddle placed opposite the sediment feed location. They typically have a period of 1 s and an amplitude of 10 mm. The total energy flux associated with waves and tides is controlled by varying the temporal intermittency of each process, while river energy and sediment fluxes are held steady. The experiments show a variation in delta morphology as a function of wave and tidal forcing that parallels that observed in the field: increasing wave strength redistributes sediment and flattens the shoreline; increasing tidal strength creates well defined tidal channels as well as inlets through the wave-worked shoreline. Both waves and tides reduce the mobility of the main fluvial channel. Quantitative morphologic measures of these effects vary systematically as a function of dimensionless relative wave and tidal strength. The image below shows typical experimental delta morphology associated with mixed wave-tide forcing.

  8. Human responses to Florida red tides: policy awareness and adherence to local fertilizer ordinances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kohler, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Scheller, Karen; Reich, Andrew; Hitchcock, Gary; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Ullmann, Steven; Hoagland, Porter

    2014-09-15

    To mitigate the damages of natural hazards, policy responses can be beneficial only if they are effective. Using a self-administered survey approach, this paper focuses on the adherence to local fertilizer ordinances (i.e., county or municipal rules regulating the application of fertilizer to private lawns or facilities such as golf courses) implemented in jurisdictions along the Southwest Florida coast in response to hazardous blooms of Florida red tides (Karenia brevis). These ordinances play a role in the context of evolving programs of water pollution control at federal, state, water basin, and local levels. With respect to policy effectiveness, while the strength of physical linkages is of critical importance, the extent to which humans affected are aware of and adhere to the relevant rules, is equally critical. We sought to understand the public's depth of understanding about the rationales for local fertilizer ordinances. Respondents in Sarasota, Florida, were asked about their fertilizer practices in an area that has experienced several major blooms of Florida red tides over the past two decades. A highly educated, older population of 305 residents and "snowbirds" reported relatively little knowledge about a local fertilizer ordinance, its purpose, or whether it would change the frequency, size, or duration of red tides. This finding held true even among subpopulations that were expected to have more interest in or to be more knowledgeable about harmful algal blooms. In the face of uncertain science and environmental outcomes, and with individual motivations at odds with evolving public policies, the effectiveness of local community efforts to decrease the impacts of red tides may be compromised. Targeted social-science research on human perceptions about the risks of Florida red tides and education about the rationales for potential policy responses are warranted.

  9. COST Action ES1401 TIDES: a European network on TIme DEpendent Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Using the full-length records of seismic events and background ambient noise, today seismology is going beyond still-life snapshots of the interior of the Earth, and look into time-dependent changes of its properties. Data availability has grown dramatically with the expansion of seismographic networks and data centers, so as to enable much more detailed and accurate analyses. COST Action ES1401 TIDES (TIme DEpendent Seismology; http://tides-cost.eu) aims at structuring the EU seismological community to enable development of data-intensive, time-dependent techniques for monitoring Earth active processes (e.g., earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, glacial earthquakes) as well as oil/gas reservoirs. The main structure of TIDES is organised around working groups on: Workflow integration of data and computing resources; Seismic interferometry and ambient noise; Forward problems and High-performance computing applications; Seismic tomography, full waveform inversion and uncertainties; Applications in the natural environment and industry. TIDES is an open network of European laboratories with complementary skills, and is organising a series of events - workshops and advanced training schools - as well as supporting short-duration scientific stays. The first advanced training school was held in Bertinoro (Italy) on June 2015, with attendance of about 100 participants from 20 European countries, was devoted to how to manage and model seismic data with modern tools. The next school, devoted to ambient noise, will be held in 2016 Portugal: the program will be announced at the time of this conference. TIDES will strengthen Europe's role in a critical field for natural hazards and natural resource management.

  10. High-frequency Earth rotation variations deduced from altimetry-based ocean tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Matthias; Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Hagedoorn, Jan

    2016-06-01

    A model of diurnal and semi-diurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERP) is constructed based on altimetry-measured tidal heights from a multi-mission empirical ocean tide solution. Barotropic currents contributing to relative angular momentum changes are estimated for nine major tides in a global inversion algorithm that solves the two-dimensional momentum equations on a regular 0.5° grid with a heavily weighted continuity constraint. The influence of 19 minor tides is accounted for by linear admittance interpolation of ocean tidal angular momentum, although the assumption of smooth admittance variations with frequency appears to be a doubtful concept for semi-diurnal mass terms in particular. A validation of the newly derived model based on post-fit corrections to polar motion and universal time (Δ UT1) from the analysis of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations shows a variance reduction for semi-diurnal Δ UT1 residuals that is significant at the 0.05 level with respect to the conventional ERP model. Improvements are also evident for the explicitly modeled K_1 , Q_1 , and K_2 tides in individual ERP components, but large residuals of more than 15 μ as remain at the principal lunar frequencies of O_1 and M_2 . We attribute these shortcomings to uncertainties in the inverted relative angular momentum changes and, to a minor extent, to violation of mass conservation in the empirical ocean tide solution. Further dedicated hydrodynamic modeling efforts of these anomalous constituents are required to meet the accuracy standards of modern space geodesy.

  11. High-frequency Earth rotation variations deduced from altimetry-based ocean tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Matthias; Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Hagedoorn, Jan

    2016-11-01

    A model of diurnal and semi-diurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERP) is constructed based on altimetry-measured tidal heights from a multi-mission empirical ocean tide solution. Barotropic currents contributing to relative angular momentum changes are estimated for nine major tides in a global inversion algorithm that solves the two-dimensional momentum equations on a regular 0.5° grid with a heavily weighted continuity constraint. The influence of 19 minor tides is accounted for by linear admittance interpolation of ocean tidal angular momentum, although the assumption of smooth admittance variations with frequency appears to be a doubtful concept for semi-diurnal mass terms in particular. A validation of the newly derived model based on post-fit corrections to polar motion and universal time (Δ UT1) from the analysis of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations shows a variance reduction for semi-diurnal Δ UT1 residuals that is significant at the 0.05 level with respect to the conventional ERP model. Improvements are also evident for the explicitly modeled K_1, Q_1, and K_2 tides in individual ERP components, but large residuals of more than 15 μ as remain at the principal lunar frequencies of O_1 and M_2. We attribute these shortcomings to uncertainties in the inverted relative angular momentum changes and, to a minor extent, to violation of mass conservation in the empirical ocean tide solution. Further dedicated hydrodynamic modeling efforts of these anomalous constituents are required to meet the accuracy standards of modern space geodesy.

  12. Bacterial diversity in surface water of the Yellow Sea during and after a green alga tide in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Cong; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Zhaopu; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    From May to August 2008, a large "green tide", consisting of the alga Ulva ( Enteromorpha) prolifera, occurred in the Yellow Sea, China, affecting the local marine ecosystem and human activities. We investigated the influence of the green tide on the microbial community in the surface seawater, at four sites from July to August 2008, using bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. We sequenced 228 clones of unique patterns identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques. The results show that 228 sequenced clones fell into six bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, and Planctomycetes. Alphaproteobacteria (33%), Gammaproteobacteria (25%), Bacteroidetes (23%) and Cyanobacteria (9%) dominated the assemblage. Comparison between samples collected in July (during the tide) and those collected in August (after the tide) showed that, in the microbial community, diversities of Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria increased after the tide, while those of Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. These results indicate that the green tide influenced the growth of some bacteria, and provide information for further studies on the interactions and relationships between U. prolifera and the bacterial community. This study suggests that microbial community analysis is a good approach to monitoring green tides.

  13. Bacterial diversity in surface water of the Yellow Sea duringand after a green alga tide in 2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Cong; LI Fuchao; JIANG Peng; LIU Zhaopu; QIN Song

    2011-01-01

    From May to August 2008,a large "green tide",consisting of the alga Ulva (Enteromorpha) prolifera,occurred in the Yellow Sea,China,affecting the local marine ecosystem and human activities.We investigated the influence of the green tide on the microbial community in the surface seawater,at four sites from July to August 2008,using bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries.We sequenced 228clones of unique patterns identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques.The results show that 228 sequenced clones fell into six bacterial phyla:Proteobacteria,Bacteroidetes,Cyanobacteria,Verrucomicrobia,Actinobacteria,and Planctomycetes.Alphaproteobacteria (33%),Gammaproteobacteria (25%),Bacteroidetes (23%) and Cyanobacteria (9%) dominated the assemblage.Comparison between samples collected in July (during the tide) and those collected in August (after the tide) showed that,in the microbial community,diversities of Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria increased after the tide,while those of Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased.These results indicate that the green tide influenced the growth of some bacteria,and provide information for further studies on the interactions and relationships between U.prolifera and the bacterial community.This study suggests that microbial community analysis is a good approach to monitoring green tides.

  14. Vertical distribution of Aurelia labiata (Scyphozoa) jellyfish in Roscoe Bay is similar during flood and ebb tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David J.

    2010-10-01

    The vertical distribution of the jellyfish, Aurelia labiata, was assessed during flood and ebb tides in April, May, June, and August 2009 in Roscoe Bay (British Columbia, Canada). Assessments were made at locations along the entire length of the bay. The average tide change was 3.7 m. The vertical position of medusae (in 2 m intervals) did not differ significantly during ebb ( N = 17) and flood tides ( N = 18) in 6 and 8 m water columns. These results indicate that A. labiata do not use tidally synchronized vertical migration to maintain their location or presence in Roscoe Bay.

  15. Feeding by the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina on the red-tide raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo: a potential biological method to control red tides using mass-cultured grazers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Kim, Jae Seong; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Seong Taek; Kim, Tae Hoon; Park, Myung Gil; Lee, Chang Hoon; Seong, Kyeong Ah; Kang, Nam Seon; Shim, Jae Hyung

    2003-01-01

    As part of the development of a method to control the outbreak and persistence of red tides using mass-cultured heterotrophic protist grazers, we measured the growth and ingestion rates of cultured Oxyrrhis marina (a heterotrophic dinoflagellate) on cultured Heterosigma akashiwo (a raphidophyte) in bottles in the laboratory and in mesocosms (ca. 60 liter) in nature, and those of the cultured grazer on natural populations of the red-tide organism in mesocosms set up in nature. In the bottle incubation, specific growth rates of O. marina increased rapidly with increasing concentration of cultured prey up to ca. 950 ng C ml(-1) (equivalent to 9,500 cells ml(-1)), but were saturated at higher concentrations. Maximum specific growth rate (mumax), KGR (prey concentration sustaining 0.5 mumax) and threshold prey concentration of O. marina on H. akashiwo were 1.43 d(-1), 104 ng C ml(-1), and 8.0 ng C ml(-1), respectively. Maximum ingestion and clearance rates of O. marina were 1.27 ng C grazer(-1) d(-1) and 0.3 microl grazer(-1) h(-1), respectively. Cultured O. marina grew well effectively reducing cultured and natural populations of H. akashiwo down to a very low concentration within 3 d in the mesocosms. The growth and ingestion rates of cultured O. marina on natural populations of H. akashiwo in the mesocosms were 39% and 40%, respectively, of those calculated based on the results from the bottle incubation in the laboratory, while growth and ingestion rates of cultured O. marina on cultured H. akashiwo in the mesocosms were 55% and 36%, respectively. Calculated grazing impact by O. marina on natural populations of H. akashiwo suggests that O. marina cultured on a large scale could be used for controlling red tides by H. akashiwo near aquaculture farms that are located in small ponds, lagoons, semi-enclosed bays, and large land-aqua tanks to which fresh seawater should be frequently supplied.

  16. The operational forecast system on red tide drift based on the C/S System Structure%基于C/S架构的业务化赤潮漂移扩散预报

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静; 蔡文博; 李海

    2013-01-01

    以风场、三维海流场数值预报结果作为输入强迫,建立了赤潮漂移扩散数值预报模型,并开发了相应的软件模块.模块基于C/S(客户端/服务器端)架构,通过数值模拟技术以及GIS、Web Services等信息技术,实现“提交预报请求—数值模式计算—预报结果可视化—预报产品生成”自动化赤潮漂移与扩散预报工作流程.该预报模块具备数据预处理、人机交互参数输入、数值模式计算、预报结果可视化和预报产品制作功能.以长江口附近海域历史赤潮为例进行后报试验,预测了赤潮藻团在风与流场共同作用下的漂移路径变化,结果与实际监测情况一致.该模块的业务化应用能进一步完善现有的赤潮预报系统,将成为赤潮防灾减灾的有力工具.%Forced by numerical forecast results of Wind field and three-dimensional current, a red tide drift prediction model was established. The development of appropriate software modules, which is based on C/S (client /server) architecture, unifies the "forecast request - numerical simulation - results of visualization - the forecast products generated "automated red tide drift and spread forecasting process by the numerical technology GIS and Web Services. The forecast module is provided by data preprocessing, the input of human-computer interaction parameters, numerical calculations, results visualization and forecasting production function, Hindcast test of the history red tide near the Yangtze Delta is conducted to predict the drift path of the red tide algae group under the joint action of the wind and water current. The results are consistent with the actual monitoring data. The operational application of the module can further improve the existing red tide forecasting system, and will become a powerful tool for the red tide disaster prevention and mitigation.

  17. Tsunami runup and tide-gauge observations from the 14 November 2016 M7.8 Kaikōura earthquake, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, William; Clark, Kate; King, Darren N.; Borrero, Jose; Howarth, Jamie; Lane, Emily M.; Goring, Derek; Goff, James; Chagué-Goff, Catherine; Williams, James; Reid, Catherine; Whittaker, Colin; Mueller, Christof; Williams, Shaun; Hughes, Matthew W.; Hoyle, Jo; Bind, Jochen; Strong, Delia; Litchfield, Nicola; Benson, Adrian

    2017-07-01

    The 2016 M w 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake was one of the largest earthquakes in New Zealand's historical record, and it generated the most significant local source tsunami to affect New Zealand since 1947. There are many unusual features of this earthquake from a tsunami perspective: the epicentre was well inland of the coast, multiple faults were involved in the rupture, and the greatest tsunami damage to residential property was far from the source. In this paper, we summarise the tectonic setting and the historical and geological evidence for past tsunamis on this coast, then present tsunami tide gauge and runup field observations of the tsunami that followed the Kaikōura earthquake. For the size of the tsunami, as inferred from the measured heights, the impact of this event was relatively modest, and we discuss the reasons for this which include: the state of the tide at the time of the earthquake, the degree of co-seismic uplift, and the nature of the coastal environment in the tsunami source region.

  18. Tsunami hazard assessment in the Hudson River Estuary based on dynamic tsunami-tide simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Michael; Grilli, Stéphan T.; Grilli, Annette R.

    2016-12-01

    This work is part of a tsunami inundation mapping activity carried out along the US East Coast since 2010, under the auspice of the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation program (NTHMP). The US East Coast features two main estuaries with significant tidal forcing, which are bordered by numerous critical facilities (power plants, major harbors,...) as well as densely built low-level areas: Chesapeake Bay and the Hudson River Estuary (HRE). HRE is the object of this work, with specific focus on assessing tsunami hazard in Manhattan, the Hudson and East River areas. In the NTHMP work, inundation maps are computed as envelopes of maximum surface elevation along the coast and inland, by simulating the impact of selected probable maximum tsunamis (PMT) in the Atlantic ocean margin and basin. At present, such simulations assume a static reference level near shore equal to the local mean high water (MHW) level. Here, instead we simulate maximum inundation in the HRE resulting from dynamic interactions between the incident PMTs and a tide, which is calibrated to achieve MHW at its maximum level. To identify conditions leading to maximum tsunami inundation, each PMT is simulated for four different phases of the tide and results are compared to those obtained for a static reference level. We first separately simulate the tide and the three PMTs that were found to be most significant for the HRE. These are caused by: (1) a flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV) in the Canary Islands (with a 80 km3 volume representing the most likely extreme scenario); (2) an M9 coseismic source in the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT); and (3) a large submarine mass failure (SMF) in the Hudson River canyon of parameters similar to the 165 km3 historical Currituck slide, which is used as a local proxy for the maximum possible SMF. Simulations are performed with the nonlinear and dispersive long wave model FUNWAVE-TVD, in a series of nested grids of increasing resolution towards the coast, by one

  19. Vertical migratory rhythms of benthic diatoms in a tropical intertidal sand flat: Influence of irradiance and tides

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C.

    Vertical migratory behavior of benthic diatoms is one of the adaptive strategies employed for a life in intertidal habitats. Irradiance and tides are considered to be the key factors governing vertical migration. Experiments were carried out...

  20. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NOS Extratropical Surge and Tide Operational Forecast System (ESTOFS) Forecast Guidance (Time Enabled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-enabled map service provides maps of the latest nowcasts and forecast guidance of combined (tides + wind driven) water level and...

  1. Contributions to the Understanding of the Bloom Dynamics of Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum: A Toxic Red Tide Causative Organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodora Azanza

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum has been the primary organism responsible for the toxic red tide episodes which have been recurring in Manila Bay, Philippines since 1988. The life history of the species has been elucidated through encystment-excystment studies in vitro, from which its obligatory dormancy has been demonstrated. Cyst-mapping studies have shown that this life stage of the organism occurs relatively higher in the Bataan and Cavite areas where the greater number of red tide occurrences have also been reported. A cyst-based model has been developed as an initial step in understanding the role of physical processes in the development, occurrence/recurrence, and ultimately, advancement of Pyrodinium red tides in Manila Bay.To help mitigate or prevent the negative impacts of toxic red tides, particularly in Manila Bay, regular closure of shellfish harvest in areas affected by Pyrodinium bloom should be considered, based on long term monitoring and research data sets.

  2. Numerical study on the influences of Nanliu River runoff and tides on water age in Lianzhou Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Zhang, Xueqing; Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Rui; Wang, Xing

    2016-09-01

    The concept of water age is applied to calculate the timescales of the transport processes of freshwater in Lianzhou Bay, using a model based on ECOMSED. In this study, water age is defined as the time that has elapsed since the water parcel enters the Nanliu River. The results show that the mean age at a specified position and the runoff of the Nanliu River are well correlated and can be approximately expressed by a natural logarithmic function. During the neap tide, it takes 70, 60 and 40 days in the dry, normal and rainy seasons for water to travel from the mouth of the Nanliu River to the northeast of Lianzhou Bay, respectively, which is not beneficial to water exchange in the bay. Tides significantly influence the model results; it takes five less days for the tracer to be transported from the mouth of the Nanliu River to the north of Guantouling during the spring tide than during the neap tide.

  3. Allelopathic interactions between the red-tide causative dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoping Cai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the red-tide causing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense and the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum were investigated using a co-culture experiment and an enriched culture filtrate experiment. The results showed that when the two microalgae were cultured together with different initial cell densities, the growth of one species was basically suppressed by the other one. In addition, the enriched culture filtrates of one species had generally inhibitory effects on the other one. Our result inferred that P. donghaiense and P. tricornutum would interfere with each other mainly by releasing allelochemicals into the culture medium, and that the degree of allelopathic effects was dependent on the initial cell densities and growth phases. The allelopathic interactions between microalgal species may contribute to the formation and succession of red tides.

  4. On the choice of orbits for an altimetric satellite to study ocean circulation and tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Michael E.; Stewart, Robert H.; Farless, David L.; Cartwright, David E.

    1987-01-01

    The choice of an orbit for satellite altimetric studies of the ocean's circulation and tides requires an understanding of the orbital characteristics that influence the accuracy of the satellite's measurements of sea level and the temporal and spatial distribution of the measurements. The orbital characteristics that influence accurate calculations of the satellite's position as a function of time are examined, and the pattern of ground tracks laid down on the ocean's surface as a function of the satellite's altitude and inclination is studied. The results are used to examine the aliases in the measurements of surface geostrophic currents and tides. Finally, these considerations are used to specify possible orbits that may be useful for the upcoming Topex/Poseidon mission.

  5. On stratification, barotropic tides, and secular changes in surface tidal elevations: Two-layer analytical models

    CERN Document Server

    Wetzel, Alfredo N; Cerovecki, Ivana; Hendershott, Myrl C; Karsten, Richard H; Miller, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    In this study the influence of stratification on surface tidal elevations in a two-layer analytical model is examined. The model assumes linearized, non-rotating, shallow-water dynamics in one dimension with astronomical forcing and allows for arbitrary topography. Both large scale (barotropic) and small scale (baroclinic) components of the surface tidal elevation are shown to be affected by stratification. It is also shown that the topography and basin boundaries affect the sensitivity of the barotropic surface tide to stratification significantly. In a companion paper it is shown that the barotropic tide in two-layer numerical models run in realistic global domains differs from its value in one-layer numerical models by amounts qualitatively consistent with analytic predictions from this paper. The analytical model also roughly predicts the sensitivity to perturbations in stratification in the two-layer domain model. Taken together, this paper and the companion paper therefore provide a framework to underst...

  6. Effects of tides on Riverine and Glacial freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luneva, Maria; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Harle, James; Holt, Jason

    2016-04-01

    In this study we use a novel pan-Arctic sea NENO-shelf ice-ocean coupled model, to examine the effects of tides, river runoff and vertical mixing schemes on sea ice and the mixing of water masses. Several 20-year long (1990-2010) simulations were performed: with explicitly resolved tides and without any tidal dynamics, with climatology river runoff, Dai et al. ,2009 database and freshwater source from melting Greenland glaciers. We examine also three different turbulent closures structural functions, based on the k-epsilon version of the Generic Length Scale Model: by Canuto group (2001) and two by Kantha and Clayson (1994, 2004). The results have been compared with sea ice volume and concentration trends and temperature and salinity profiles from World Ocean Database . We compared the following characteristics: potential energy anomalies, depth of halocline, mixed layer depth , salinity at the subsurface layer.

  7. Calculating rotating hydrodynamic and magneto-hydrodynamic waves to understand magnetic effects on dynamical tides

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2016-01-01

    For understanding magnetic effects on dynamical tides, we study the rotating magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) flow driven by harmonic forcing. The linear responses are analytically derived in a periodic box under the local WKB approximation. Both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are calculated and the various parameters are investigated. Although magnetic pressure may be negligible compared to thermal pressure, magnetic field can be important for the first-order perturbation, e.g. dynamical tides. It is found that magnetic field splits the resonant frequency, namely the rotating hydrodynamic flow has only one resonant frequency but the rotating MHD flow has two, one positive and the other negative. In the weak field regime the dissipations are asymmetric around the two resonant frequencies and this asymmetry is more striking with a weaker magnetic field. It is also found that both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are inversely proportional to the Ekman num...

  8. GOCE++ Dynamical Coastal Topography and tide gauge unification using altimetry and GOCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Nielsen, Karina

    points in the ocean. However, close to the coast the determination of the MDT is problematic due to i.e., the altimeter footprint, land motion or parameterization/modelling of coastal currents. The objective of this activity is to perform a consolidated and improved understanding and modelling of coastal......ESA has recently released a study on the potential of ocean levelling as a novel approach to the study of height system unification taking the recent development in geoid accuracy trough GOCE data into account. The suggested investigation involves the use of measurements and modelling to estimate...... Mean Dynamic Topography (MDT) of the ocean along a coastline which contributes/requires reconciling altimetry, tide gauge and vertical land motion. The fundamental use of the MDT computed using altimetry, ocean models or through the use of tide gauges has values of between -2 and +1 meters at different...

  9. Observations of internal tides and associated turbulent mixing in a shallow estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, E.; Matsuno, T.

    2016-02-01

    Observations of turbulent mixing and tidal currents in a highly stratified estuary, Ariake Sea in the western Japan are presented. Direct measurements of turbulent dissipation rate using a micro-structure profiler reveals frequent occurrence of strong turbulent mixing around the pycnocline (ɛ = 10-7 - 10-6 Wkg-1), implying internal wave-induced shear instability. A set of current field measurement using bottom-mounted ADCPs during summer to early autumn shows vertical shear peaks at diurnal and semi-diurnal frequency bands. Separation tidal current profiles into barotropic and baroclinic components are made by CEOF analysis because the barotropic current in the sea is highly depth-dependent due to thick bottom boundary layer. The estimated baroclinic velocity exhibits a nature of diurnal internal tide. A comparison of divergence of the internal wave energy flux and dissipation rate indicates the diurnal internal tide is responsible for the strong turbulent mixing around the pycnocline.

  10. Galileo and Descartes on Copernicanism and the cause of the tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaltz, Tad M

    2015-06-01

    Galileo and Descartes were on the front lines of the defense of Copernicanism against theological objections that took on special importance during the seventeenth century. Galileo attempted to overcome opposition to Copernicanism within the Catholic Church by offering a demonstration of this theory that appeals to the fact that the double motion of the earth is necessary as a cause of the tides. It turns out, however, that the details of Galileo's tidal theory compromise his demonstration. Far from attempting to provide a demonstration of the earth's motion, Descartes ultimately argued that his system is compatible with the determination of the Church that the earth is at rest. Nonetheless, Descartes's account of the cause of the tides creates difficulty for this argument.

  11. Rising sea levels will reduce extreme temperature variations in tide-dominated reef habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Ryan Joseph; Pivan, Xavier; Falter, James; Symonds, Graham; Gruber, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Temperatures within shallow reefs often differ substantially from those in the surrounding ocean; therefore, predicting future patterns of thermal stresses and bleaching at the scale of reefs depends on accurately predicting reef heat budgets. We present a new framework for quantifying how tidal and solar heating cycles interact with reef morphology to control diurnal temperature extremes within shallow, tidally forced reefs. Using data from northwestern Australia, we construct a heat budget model to investigate how frequency differences between the dominant lunar semidiurnal tide and diurnal solar cycle drive ~15-day modulations in diurnal temperature extremes. The model is extended to show how reefs with tidal amplitudes comparable to their depth, relative to mean sea level, tend to experience the largest temperature extremes globally. As a consequence, we reveal how even a modest sea level rise can substantially reduce temperature extremes within tide-dominated reefs, thereby partially offsetting the local effects of future ocean warming. PMID:27540589

  12. Study of Wave and Tide Influence on Slope Stability of the Navigation Channel of Tianjin Port

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Tianjin Port is the largest man-made port in China. Since the navigation channel of the Tianjin Port is constructed by dredging, a very important problem, as many people concerned, is the submarine slope stability. As the environment on land is different from that in submarine, it is necessary to evaluate the influence of the environmental loading, such as wave and tide, on the stability of navigation channel slope. In the present study, based on the observed results, the characteristics of the navigation channel slope are summarized, and the causes of creating the special slope shape are analyzed. The roles of waves and tides are evaluated, and failure mechanics are discussed to helq us predict what will happen in the future.

  13. Three-dimensional numerical simulations on wind- and tide-induced currents: The case of Augusta Harbour (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Mauro; Freni, Gabriele; Napoli, Enrico

    2014-11-01

    The hydrodynamic circulation in the coastal area of the Augusta Bay (Italy), located in the eastern part of Sicily, is analysed. Due to the heavy contamination generated by the several chemical and petrochemical industries active in the zone, the harbour was declared a Contaminated Site of National Interest. To mitigate the risks connected with the industrial activities located near the harbour, it is important to analyse the hydrodynamic circulation in the coastal area. To perform such analysis, a parallel 3D numerical model is used to solve the Reynolds-averaged momentum and mass balance, employing the k-ε turbulence model for the Reynolds stresses. The numerical model is parallelized using the programing technology - Message Passing Interface (MPI) and applying the domain decomposition procedure. The Augusta Bay circulation is mainly due to the relative contribution of the wind force acting over the free surface and the tidal motion through the mouths. Due to the geometric complexity of the domain and the presence of several piers along the coast, a curvilinear boundary-fitted computational grid was used, where cells corresponding to land areas or to wharfs were excluded from the computation. Comparisons between numerical results and field measurements were performed. Three different simulations were performed to selectively isolate the effect of each force, wind and tide, acting in the considered domain. The current in the basin was successfully estimated on the basis of the numerical results, demonstrating the specific role of wind and tidal oscillation in the hydrodynamic circulation inside the harbour.

  14. Turning the tide: effects of river inflow and tidal amplitude on sandy estuaries in laboratory landscape experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Maarten; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper; Baar, Anne; van der Vegt, Maarten; van Maarseveen, Marcel; Markies, Henk; Roosendaal, Chris; van Eijk, Arjan

    2016-04-01

    Many estuaries formed over the Holocene through a combination of fluvial and coastal influxes, but how estuary planform shape and size depend on tides, wave climate and river influxes remains unclear. Here we use a novel tidal flume setup of 20 m length by 3 m width, the Metronome (http://www.uu.nl/metronome), to create estuaries and explore a parameter space for the simple initial condition of a straight river in sandy substrate. Tidal currents capable of transporting sediment in both the ebb and flood phase because they are caused by periodic tilting of the flume rather than the classic method of water level fluctuation. Particle imaging velocimetry and a 1D shallow flow model demonstrate that this principle leads to similar sediment mobility as in nature. Ten landscape experiments recorded by timelapse overhead imaging and AGIsoft DEMs of the final bed elevation show that absence of river inflow leads to short tidal basins whereas even a minor discharge leads to long convergent estuaries. Estuary width and length as well as morphological time scale over thousands of tidal cycles strongly depend on tidal current amplitude. Paddle-generated waves subdue the ebb delta causing stronger tidal currents in the basin. Bar length-width ratios in estuaries are slightly larger to those in braided rivers in experiments and nature. Mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels are ubiquitous and appear to be formed by an instability mechanism with growing bar and bifurcation asymmetry. Future experiments will include mud flats and live vegetation.

  15. Florida Red Tide: Inhalation Toxicity of Karenia brevis Extract in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, J M; Hahn, F F; Tibbetts, B.M.; Bowen, L.E.; March, T.F.; Langley, R. J.; Murray, T.F.; Bourdelais, A.J.; Naar, J.; Zaias, J.; Baden, D. G.

    2004-01-01

    Brevetoxins are neurotoxins produced by the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. Histopathologic examination of marine mammals dying following repeated exposure of brevetoxins during red tide events suggests that the respiratory tract, nervous, hematopoietic, and immune systems are potential targets for toxicity in repeatedly exposed individuals. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of repeated inhalation of K. brevis extract on these potential target systems in rats. M...

  16. Hyperbolic partial differential equations populations, reactors, tides and waves theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Matthew

    1983-01-01

    Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations, Volume 1: Population, Reactors, Tides and Waves: Theory and Applications covers three general areas of hyperbolic partial differential equation applications. These areas include problems related to the McKendrick/Von Foerster population equations, other hyperbolic form equations, and the numerical solution.This text is composed of 15 chapters and begins with surveys of age specific population interactions, populations models of diffusion, nonlinear age dependent population growth with harvesting, local and global stability for the nonlinear renewal eq

  17. Are Tide Gauges Useful Recorders of Relative Sea-Level Rise in Large Deltaic Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornqvist, T. E.; Keogh, M.; Jankowski, K. L.; Fernandes, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    It has long been recognized that the world's largest deltas that often host major population centers are particularly vulnerable to accelerating rates of relative sea-level rise (RSLR). Traditionally, tide-gauge records are used to obtain quantitative data on rates of RSLR, given that they are perceived to capture the rise of the sea surface as well as land subsidence which is often substantial in deltaic settings. We argue here that tide gauges in such settings often provide ambiguous data because they ultimately measure RSLR with respect to a benchmark that is typically anchored tens of meters below the land surface. This is problematic because the prime target of interest is usually the rate of RSLR with respect to the delta top. We illustrate this problem with newly obtained rod surface elevation table - marker horizon (RSET-MH) data from the Mississippi Delta (n=185) that show that total subsidence is dominated by shallow subsidence in the uppermost 5-10 m. Since benchmarks in this region are anchored at 20 m depth on average, tide-gauge records by definition do not capture this important (and often even dominant) component of total subsidence, and thus underestimate RSLR by a considerable amount. We show how RSET-MH data, combined with GPS and satellite altimetry data, enable us to bypass this problem. Present-day rates of RSLR in the Mississippi Delta are 13±9 mm/yr, considerably higher than numbers reported in recent studies based on tide-gauge analysis. It seems unlikely that this problem is unique to the Mississippi Delta, so we argue that the approach to RSLR measurements in large deltas across the planet needs rethinking.

  18. Introducing CAFein, a New Computational Tool for Stellar Pulsations and Dynamic Tides

    OpenAIRE

    Valsecchi, Francesca; Farr, Will M.; Willems, Bart; Rasio, Frederic A.; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2013-01-01

    Here we present CAFein, a new computational tool for investigating radiative dissipation of dynamic tides in close binaries and of non-adiabatic, non-radial stellar oscillations in isolated stars in the linear regime. For the latter, CAFein computes the non-adiabatic eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of detailed stellar models. The code is based on the so-called Riccati method, a numerical algorithm that has been successfully applied to a variety of stellar pulsators, and which doesn't suff...

  19. Tides and Their Dynamics over the Sunda Shelf of the Southern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, See Hai; Abu Samah, Azizan; Akbari, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional Regional Ocean Modelling System is used to study the tidal characteristics and their dynamics in the Sunda Shelf of the southern South China Sea. In this model, the outer domain is set with a 25 km resolution and the inner one, with a 9 km resolution. Calculations are performed on the inner domain. The model is forced at the sea surface by climatological monthly mean wind stress, freshwater (evaporation minus precipitation), and heat fluxes. Momentum and tracers (such as temperature and salinity) are prescribed in addition to the tidal heights and currents extracted from the Oregon State University TOPEX/Poseidon Global Inverse Solution (TPXO7.2) at the open boundaries. The results are validated against observed tidal amplitudes and phases at 19 locations. Results show that the mean average power energy spectrum (in unit m2/s/cph) for diurnal tides at the southern end of the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia is approximately 43% greater than that in the East Malaysia region located in northern Borneo. In contrast, for the region of northern Borneo the semidiurnal power energy spectrum is approximately 25% greater than that in the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. This implies that diurnal tides are dominant along the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia while both diurnal and semidiurnal tides dominate almost equally in coastal East Malaysia. Furthermore, the diurnal tidal energy flux is found to be 60% greater than that of the semidiurnal tides in the southern South China Sea. Based on these model analyses, the significant tidal mixing frontal areas are located primarily off Sarawak coast as indicated by high chlorophyll-a concentrations in the area. PMID:27622552

  20. Weather Variability, Tides, and Barmah Forest Virus Disease in the Gladstone Region, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Naish, Suchithra; Hu, Wenbiao; Nicholls, Neville; Mackenzie, John S.; McMichael, Anthony J.; Dale, Pat; Tong, Shilu

    2005-01-01

    In this study we examined the impact of weather variability and tides on the transmission of Barmah Forest virus (BFV) disease and developed a weather-based forecasting model for BFV disease in the Gladstone region, Australia. We used seasonal autoregressive integrated moving-average (SARIMA) models to determine the contribution of weather variables to BFV transmission after the time-series data of response and explanatory variables were made stationary through seasonal differencing. We obtai...

  1. 27.3-day and 13.6-day atmospheric tide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of time variations in the earth's length of day (LOD) for 25 years (1973-1998) versus atmospheric circulation changes and lunar phase is presented. It is found that, on the average, there is a 27.3-day and 13.6-day period oscillation in global zonal wind speed, atmospheric geopotential height, and LOD following alternating changes in lunar phase. Every 5-9 days (6.8 days on average), the fields of global atmospheric zonal wind and geopotential height and LOD undergo a sudden change in relation to a change in lunar declination. The observed atmospheric oscillation with this time period may be viewed as a type of atmospheric tide.Ten atmospheric tidal cases have been analyzed by comparing changes in LOD, global zonal wind speed and atmospheric geopotential height versus change in lunar declination. Taken together these cases reveal prominent 27.3-day and 13.6-day tides. The lunar forcing on the earth's atmosphere is great and obvious changes occur in global fields of zonal wind speed and atmospheric geopotential height over the equatorial and low latitude areas.The driving force for the 27.3-day and 13.6-day atmospheric tides is the periodic change in lunar forcing during the moon's revolution around the earth. When the moon is located on the celestial equator the lunar declination equals zero and the lunar tidal forcing on the atmosphere reaches its maximum, at this time the global zonal wind speed increases and the earth's rotation rate decreases and LOD increases. Conversely, when the moon reaches its most northern or southern positions the lunar declination is maximized, lunar tidal forcing decreases, global zonal wind speed decreases, earth's rotation rate increases and LOD decreases.27.3-day and 13.6-day period atmospheric tides deserve deeper study. Lunar tidal forcing should be considered in models of atmospheric circulation and in short and medium range weather forecasting.

  2. Indirect evidence for substantial damping of low-mode internal tides in the open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-12

    scenarios (a)–(e) are not an exhaustive list of potential low-mode internal tide damping mechanisms. Damp- ing by upper- ocean wave - wave interactions...simulations with bottom wave drag (especially simulation E051) compare reasonably well with TPXO8. Scenarios without a wave drag in the open ocean ... ocean circulation model forced by atmospheric fields and the M2 tidal constituent is used to explore plausible scenarios for the damping of low-mode

  3. The Influence of the Shallow Water Internal Tide on the Properties of Acoustic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    LONG-TERM GOAL Quantitatively relate the temporal and spatial properties of shallow water acoustic signals to the physical processes that cause the... quantitative measure of the tidally controlled water column variability on acoustic systems the response of a Bartlett matched field processor (vertical array...moved from shallow water (~ 35 m) to deeper water (~ 60 m). Shipboard ADCP data indicated the flow conditions to be caused by an ebb barotropic tide

  4. Morphology and Molecular Identification of Ulva Forming Green Tides in Qingdao, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Fanna; MAO Yunxiang; CUI Fujun; ZHANG Xingkui; GAO Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Green tides are caused by the proliferation ofchlorophytes under suitable hydrographic conditions.These blooms lead to environmental degradation and negatively impact the waters and seagrass beds,as well as fishing and other recreational activities in the bay.A comprehensive ecological understanding of the bloom dynamics,including the origin and persistence,is needed to foster management decisions.The algae in the great majority of green tide blooms usually belong to two genera of Ulvophyceae,Ulva and Enteromorpha.Ulva has been observed more often in recent years.In China,green tides occurred for the first time in the middle area of the Yellow Sea in 2007,and a large-scale algae blooming broke out in the middle and southern areas of the Yellow Sea in late May 2008.We identified them as Ulva prolifera by comparative analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1(ITS1),5.8S and ITS2 sequences in combination with microscopic observation.Morphological differences were found between the free-floating algae and the attached thalli.Various reproduction patterns of the free-floating algae include sexual,asexual and vegetative propagations,which played important roles in the long-term green tide persistence in China.The ITS sequences of the blooming algae were identical to those of the samples from the Lianyungang sea area but were different from the attached samples from the Qingdao sea area.The results infer that the blooms are originated from other sea areas rather than from the local attached populations.

  5. Inferring Dynamics from the Wavenumber Spectra of an Eddying Global Ocean Model with Embedded Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    contaminate the signals in those campaigns, which will not run long enough to extract tides via harmonic analysis (E. Rodriguez, personal com...2012), SWOT : The Surface Water and Ocean Topography Mission: Wide-Swath Altimetric Measurement of Water Elevation on Earth, JPL- Publication 12...Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a

  6. Tomographic mapping of a coastal upwelling and the associated diurnal internal tides in Hiroshima Bay, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanzheng; Kaneko, Arata; Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Gohda, Noriaki

    2015-06-01

    Temperature variations caused by a typhoon were measured in the northern part of Hiroshima Bay by four coastal acoustic tomography (CAT) systems. The horizontal distributions of depth-averaged temperature from 0 to 8 m were mapped at 10 min intervals between the 11 and 25 September 2013. The horizontal distributions of a coastal upwelling and the associated diurnal internal tides were reconstructed well by regularized inversion based on the grid segmented method, using one-way travel time data along five successful sound transmission lines. Station-to-station ranges were corrected in such a way that sound speed (determined from one-way travel time data) was equal to sound speed calculated from a couple of CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) data sets on each transmission line. In addition, all station positions were adjusted to make focal points at the geographical positions of the transducers. The corrections increased the accuracy of temperature measurements to make temperature errors as small as 0.073-0.079°C. The high accuracy made it possible to map the temperature structure with a variation range of less than 0.5°C. An upwelling grew from 16 to 17 September, due to a typhoon-derived northerly wind. The diurnal internal tide resonated with the semidiurnal external tide, which was pronounced after the upwelling decayed (18 September), around the time the spring tide occurred. The upwelling and mixing fractions were formulated. These fractions increased continuously as the upwelling grew. Complete mixing was observed during the upwelling's mature phase.

  7. Influence of tides on melting and freezing beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Makinson, Keith; Holland, Paul R.; Jenkins, Adrian; Nicholls, Keith W.; Holland, David M.

    2011-01-01

    An isopycnic coordinate ocean circulation model is applied to the ocean cavity beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, investigating the role of tides on sub-ice shelf circulation and ice shelf basal mass balance. Including tidal forcing causes a significant intensification in the sub-ice shelf circulation, with an increase in melting (3-fold) and refreezing (6-fold); the net melt rate and seawater flux through the cavity approximately doubles. With tidal forcing, the spatial pattern and magnitude ...

  8. Model simulation of tide-induced currents in Gauthami-Godavari estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sridevi, B.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sadhuram, Y.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Naidu, V.S.; Prasad, K.V.S.R.

    controlled by Low Dam at Dowleiswaram, where it bifurcates into two channels as Vasishta and Gauthami Godavari estuary (Figure 1)18,19. Discharge was maximal in August, and virtually no or negligible discharge between January and May19. Mixing... to a wide spec- trum of circulation patterns and estuarine mixing. Virtually no discharge during the dry season made the estuary turn into well-mixed type and circulation is domi- nated by tides. Several investigators studied the seasonal variations...

  9. 赤潮研究现状与动向%State and Prospect of Red Tide Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李桂娇; 尹华; 彭辉

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarized the state of red tide research,analyzed thecause and hazard,summed up the prevention and treatment,and monitoring techniques.It also prospected the trend of red tide research.%综述了赤潮研究现状,分析了发生原因、危害,总结了防治措施、监测预报技术,展望了今后的研究动向。

  10. Integrating Non-Tidal Sea Level data from altimetry and tide gauges for coastal sea level prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to integrate Non-Tidal Sea Level (NSL) from the joint TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2 satellite altimetry with tide gauge data at the west and north coast of the United Kingdom for coastal sea level prediction. The temporal correlation coefficient between altimetric...... frequency NSL variation (i.e., every 15min) during a storm surge event at an independent tide gauge station at the Northeast of the UK (Aberdeen)....

  11. The effects of spring-neap tide on the phytoplankton community development in the Jiaozhou Bay,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dongyan; SUN Jun; LIU Zhe; CHEN Hongtao; WEI Hao; ZHANG Jing

    2004-01-01

    The development of the phytoplankton community was studied in the Jiaozhou Bay during the spring to neap tide in August 2001, through three cruises and a 15 d continuous observation. This investigation indicates that diatom cell abundance increased sharply following the end of a spring tide, from 9 cells/cm3 to a peak of 94 cells/cm3. The dominant species composition and abundance show a quick species sequence from spring to neap tide, and the dominant species at the start phase is Skeletomena costatum, then changes to Chaetoceros curvisetus, finally it changes to Eucampia zodiacus. Silicate concentration increases during spring tide, as a result of nutrient replenishment from the water-sediment interface, its initial average concentration in neap tide is 1.39 μmol/dm3 and reached the peak average concentration of 8.40 μmol/dm3 in spring tide. But the nitrogen concentration dropped due to dilution by the low nitrogen seawater from the Huanghai Sea, its initial average concentration in neap tide is 67 μmol/dm3 and decreased to the average concentration of 54 μmol/dm3 in spring tide. The degree of silicon limitation was decreased and phytoplankton, especially diatoms, responds immediately after nutrient replenishment in the water column. Skeletonmea costatum, as one of the dominant species in the Jiaozhou Bay, shows a quicker response to nutrient availability than Eucampia zodiacus and Chaetoceros curvisetus. It is proposed that dominant species composition and water column stability synchronously determine the development of phytoplankton summer blooms in the Jiaozhou bay.

  12. Contributions to the Understanding of the Bloom Dynamics of Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum: A Toxic Red Tide Causative Organism

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodora Azanza

    1997-01-01

    Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum has been the primary organism responsible for the toxic red tide episodes which have been recurring in Manila Bay, Philippines since 1988. The life history of the species has been elucidated through encystment-excystment studies in vitro, from which its obligatory dormancy has been demonstrated. Cyst-mapping studies have shown that this life stage of the organism occurs relatively higher in the Bataan and Cavite areas where the greater number of red tide o...

  13. Vertical groundwater storage properties and changes in confinement determined using hydraulic head response to atmospheric tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Rau, Gabriel C.; Halloran, Landon J. S.; Timms, Wendy A.

    2017-04-01

    Accurate determination of groundwater state of confinement and compressible storage properties at vertical resolution over depth is notoriously difficult. We use the hydraulic head response to atmospheric tides at 2 cpd frequency as a tracer to quantify barometric efficiency (BE) and specific storage (Ss) over depth. Records of synthesized Earth tides, atmospheric pressure, and hydraulic heads measured in nine piezometers completed at depths between 5 and 55 m into unconsolidated smectitic clay and silt, sand and gravel were examined in the frequency domain. The barometric efficiency increased over depth from ˜0.05 in silty clay to ˜0.15 in sands and gravels. BE for silty clay was confirmed by calculating the loading efficiency as 0.95 using rainfall at the surface. Specific storage was calculated using effective rather than total moisture. The differences in phase between atmospheric pressure and hydraulic heads at 2 cpd were ˜180° below 10 m indicating confined conditions despite the low BE. Heads in the sediment above a fine sand and silt layer at 12 m exhibited a time variable phase difference between 0° and 180° indicating varying confinement. Our results illustrate that the atmospheric tide at 2 cpd is a powerful natural tracer for quantifying groundwater state of confinement and compressible storage properties in layered formations from hydraulic heads and atmospheric pressure records without the need for externally induced hydraulic stress. This approach could significantly improve the development of conceptual hydrogeological model used for groundwater resource development and management.

  14. The rotation of planets hosting atmospheric tides: from Venus to habitable super-earths

    CERN Document Server

    Auclair-Desrotour, Pierre; Mathis, Stéphane; Correia, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The competition between the torques induced by solid and thermal tides drives the rotational dynamics of Venus-like planets and super-Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of low-mass stars. The tidal responses of the atmosphere and telluric core are related to their respective physical properties and strongly depend on the tidal frequency. The resulting torque determines the possible equilibrium states of the planet's spin. We compute here an analytic expression for the total tidal torque exerted on a Venus-like planet. This expression is used to characterize the equilibrium rotation of the body. Close to the star, the solid tide dominates. Far from it, the thermal tide drives the rotational dynamics of the planet. The transition regime corresponds to the habitable zone, where prograde and retrograde equilibrium states appear. We demonstrate the strong impact of the atmospheric properties and of the rheology of the solid part on the rotational dynamics of Venus-like planets, highlighting the key role played ...

  15. Crustal control of dissipative ocean tides in Enceladus and other icy moons

    CERN Document Server

    Beuthe, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Could tidal dissipation within Enceladus' subsurface ocean account for the observed heat flow? Earthlike models of dynamical tides give no definitive answer because they neglect the influence of the crust. I propose here the first model of dissipative tides in a subsurface ocean, by combining the Laplace Tidal Equations with the membrane approach. For the first time, it is possible to compute tidal dissipation rates within the crust, ocean, and mantle in one go. I show that oceanic dissipation is strongly reduced by the crustal constraint, and thus contributes little to Enceladus' present heat budget. Tidal resonances could have played a role in a forming or freezing ocean less than 100 m deep. The model is general: it applies to all icy satellites with a thin crust and a shallow ocean. Scaling rules relate the resonances and dissipation rate of a subsurface ocean to the ones of a surface ocean. If the ocean has low viscosity, the westward obliquity tide does not move the crust. Therefore, crustal dissipation...

  16. Seasonal and daily fluctuation of diatoms during spring tide periods in Kerkennah Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Ben brahim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study seasonal and the daily distribution of diatoms in the three tidal periods (flood, slack and ebb period during the spring tide. Methods: Water samples were taken and environmental variables were measured three times in each tidal period during 10 days of spring tide. Sampling was done in 2007 in Cercina station located in the western coast of Kerkennah (34°41'27'' N; 11°07'45'' E (Southern Tunisia. Results: Nutrients showed significant variation between seasons, increasing in spring and decreasing noticeably in autumn and winter. About 36 diatom species were found. Results revealed a remarkable abundance increase in spring and summer. Irregular differences in diatom abundances were revealed over the tidal periods, with the highest rates being detected during the flood and the ebb period, while the abundance rate was lowest during the slack period. This could presumably be attributed to the increase of nutrient supply of suspended particulate matter during water motion. The results revealed a correlation between diatom abundance and temperature, NO2 - , NO3 - , Si(OH4 and PO4 3 . Temperature seemed to be the most important factors which may influence the distribution and diatom abundance. Conclusions: Tide has various effects on the nutrients status and diatoms community (in terms of species composition, succession and abundance between different tidal periods. Fluctuation of diatoms was correlated with changes in the circulation of water bodies and changes in nutrient regime.

  17. Seasonal and daily lfuctuation of diatoms during spring tide periods in Kerkennah Islands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mounir Ben brahim; Wafa Feki-Sahnouna; Morsi Feki; Mabrouka Mahfoudi; Asma Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study seasonal and the daily distribution of diatoms in the three tidal periods (flood, slack and ebb period) during the spring tide. Methods:Water samples were taken and environmental variables were measured three times in each tidal period during 10 days of spring tide. Sampling was done in 2 007 in Cercina station located in the western coast of Kerkennah (34°41'27' N;11°07'45' E) (Southern Tunisia). Results:Nutrients showed significant variation between seasons, increasing in spring and decreasing noticeably in autumn and winter. About 36 diatom species were found. Results revealed a remarkable abundance increase in spring and summer. Irregular differences in diatom abundances were revealed over the tidal periods, with the highest rates being detected during the flood and the ebb period, while the abundance rate was lowest during the slack period. This could presumably be attributed to the increase of nutrient supply of suspended particulate matter during water motion. The results revealed a correlation between diatom abundance and temperature, NO2-, NO3-, Si(OH)4 and PO43. Temperature seemed to be the most important factors which may influence the distribution and diatom abundance. Conclusions:Tide has various effects on the nutrients status and diatoms community (in terms of species composition, succession and abundance) between different tidal periods. Fluctuation of diatoms was correlated with changes in the circulation of water bodies and changes in nutrient regime.

  18. Weather variability, tides, and Barmah Forest virus disease in the Gladstone region, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, Suchithra; Hu, Wenbiao; Nicholls, Neville; Mackenzie, John S; McMichael, Anthony J; Dale, Pat; Tong, Shilu

    2006-05-01

    In this study we examined the impact of weather variability and tides on the transmission of Barmah Forest virus (BFV) disease and developed a weather-based forecasting model for BFV disease in the Gladstone region, Australia. We used seasonal autoregressive integrated moving-average (SARIMA) models to determine the contribution of weather variables to BFV transmission after the time-series data of response and explanatory variables were made stationary through seasonal differencing. We obtained data on the monthly counts of BFV cases, weather variables (e.g., mean minimum and maximum temperature, total rainfall, and mean relative humidity), high and low tides, and the population size in the Gladstone region between January 1992 and December 2001 from the Queensland Department of Health, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Queensland Department of Transport, and Australian Bureau of Statistics, respectively. The SARIMA model shows that the 5-month moving average of minimum temperature (b=0.15, p-value<0.001) was statistically significantly and positively associated with BFV disease, whereas high tide in the current month (b=-1.03, p-value=0.04) was statistically significantly and inversely associated with it. However, no significant association was found for other variables. These results may be applied to forecast the occurrence of BFV disease and to use public health resources in BFV control and prevention.

  19. Between tide and wave marks: a unifying model of physical zonation on littoral shores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E. Bird

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tides on littoral marine habitats are so ubiquitous that shorelines are commonly described as ‘intertidal’, whereas waves are considered a secondary factor that simply modifies the intertidal habitat. However mean significant wave height exceeds tidal range at many locations worldwide. Here we construct a simple sinusoidal model of coastal water level based on both tidal range and wave height. From the patterns of emergence and submergence predicted by the model, we derive four vertical shoreline benchmarks which bracket up to three novel, spatially distinct, and physically defined zones. The (1 emergent tidal zone is characterized by tidally driven emergence in air; the (2 wave zone is characterized by constant (not periodic wave wash; and the (3 submergent tidal zone is characterized by tidally driven submergence. The decoupling of tidally driven emergence and submergence made possible by wave action is a critical prediction of the model. On wave-dominated shores (wave height ≫ tidal range, all three zones are predicted to exist separately, but on tide-dominated shores (tidal range ≫ wave height the wave zone is absent and the emergent and submergent tidal zones overlap substantially, forming the traditional “intertidal zone”. We conclude by incorporating time and space in the model to illustrate variability in the physical conditions and zonation on littoral shores. The wave:tide physical zonation model is a unifying framework that can facilitate our understanding of physical conditions on littoral shores whether tropical or temperate, marine or lentic.

  20. Between tide and wave marks: a unifying model of physical zonation on littoral shores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Christopher E; Franklin, Erik C; Smith, Celia M; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The effects of tides on littoral marine habitats are so ubiquitous that shorelines are commonly described as 'intertidal', whereas waves are considered a secondary factor that simply modifies the intertidal habitat. However mean significant wave height exceeds tidal range at many locations worldwide. Here we construct a simple sinusoidal model of coastal water level based on both tidal range and wave height. From the patterns of emergence and submergence predicted by the model, we derive four vertical shoreline benchmarks which bracket up to three novel, spatially distinct, and physically defined zones. The (1) emergent tidal zone is characterized by tidally driven emergence in air; the (2) wave zone is characterized by constant (not periodic) wave wash; and the (3) submergent tidal zone is characterized by tidally driven submergence. The decoupling of tidally driven emergence and submergence made possible by wave action is a critical prediction of the model. On wave-dominated shores (wave height ≫ tidal range), all three zones are predicted to exist separately, but on tide-dominated shores (tidal range ≫ wave height) the wave zone is absent and the emergent and submergent tidal zones overlap substantially, forming the traditional "intertidal zone". We conclude by incorporating time and space in the model to illustrate variability in the physical conditions and zonation on littoral shores. The wave:tide physical zonation model is a unifying framework that can facilitate our understanding of physical conditions on littoral shores whether tropical or temperate, marine or lentic.

  1. Apparent Relations Between Solar Activity and Solar Tides Caused by the Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    2007-01-01

    A solar storm is a storm of ions and electrons from the Sun. Large solar storms are usually preceded by solar flares, phenomena that can be characterized quantitatively from Earth. Twenty-five of the thirty-eight largest known solar flares were observed to start when one or more tide-producing planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Jupiter) were either nearly above the event positions (less than 10 deg. longitude) or at the opposing side of the Sun. The probability for this to happen at random is 0.039 percent. This supports the hypothesis that the force or momentum balance (between the solar atmospheric pressure, the gravity field, and magnetic field) on plasma in the looping magnetic field lines in solar corona could be disturbed by tides, resulting in magnetic field reconnection, solar flares, and solar storms. Separately, from the daily position data of Venus, Earth, and Jupiter, an 11-year planet alignment cycle is observed to approximately match the sunspot cycle. This observation supports the hypothesis that the resonance and beat between the solar tide cycle and nontidal solar activity cycle influences the sunspot cycle and its varying magnitudes. The above relations between the unpredictable solar flares and the predictable solar tidal effects could be used and further developed to forecast the dangerous space weather and therefore reduce its destructive power against the humans in space and satellites controlling mobile phones and global positioning satellite (GPS) systems.

  2. Global Structures and Multi-Temporal Variabilities of MLT Migrating Diurnal Tide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ze-Yu; LU Da-Ren

    2008-01-01

    @@ Migrating diurnal tide in the MLT region is examined by the application of Hough mode decomposition with the tide delineated from the SABER/TIMED temperatures over 2002-2006. The decomposition results show that in the height range 60-100 km, the (1, 1) mode is the most predominant among eight leading Hough modes including four propagating and four trapped modes. It exhibits a sustained maximum at 97kin and significant semi-annual oscillation. Additionally, a novel feature of inter-annual variation with period of about two years is clearly seen in the (1, 1) mode, e.g., repeated maxima are seen at the March equinox of 2002, 2004 and 2006,respectively. This feature is further manifested by the tidal amplitudes in the height range 70-100 km in the height-time cross-section at the equator. It is likely of the QBO as the height range just coincides to where the zonal mean zonal winds derived by using the UARS data exhibiting the QBO. The other results show that the (1,2) mode is important at < 80 km exhibiting comparable amplitude to that of the (1, 1) mode, and in particular the nearly anti-correlation with the (1, 1) mode. The tide at about 85 km is suggested of rather complex as the four trapped modes exhibit maximum at these heights, which indicates the presence of local excitations or sources at below.

  3. Reading the Postcolonial Island in Amitav Ghosh’s The Hungry Tide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Fletcher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that literature has much to contribute to the theoretical work of island studies, and not just because literary texts provide evidence of the ways islands are conceptualized in different historical and cultural contexts. To this end, it discusses Amitav Ghosh’s The Hungry Tide (2004, a novel which actively theorizes key concepts in island studies. The Hungry Tide is set in the Sundarbans, an “immense archipelago” in the Ganges delta, and tells the largely forgotten history of the forced evacuation of refugees from the island of Morichjhãpi in 1979. The liminal space of the Sundarbans, the “tide country”, is an extraordinary setting for a literary exploration of the relationship between postcolonial island geographies and identities. Ghosh’s depiction of the “watery labyrinth” (Ghosh, 2004: 72 and “storm-tossed islands” (Ghosh, 2004: 164 of the Sundarbans raises and addresses questions, which should be at the heart of the critical meta-discourse of island studies.

  4. The lunar nodal tide and the distance to tne Moon during the Precambrian era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Zahnle, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    The origin and early evolution of life on Earth occurred under physical and chemical conditions distinctly different from those of the present day. The broad goal of this research program is to characterize these conditions. One aspect involves the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system, the distance of the Moon from the Earth, and the length of the day. These have evolved during the course of Earth history as a result of the dissipation of tidal energy. As the moon has receded the amplitude of oceanic tides has decreased while the increasing length of the day should have influenced climate and the circulation of atmosphere and ocean. A 23.3 year periodicity preserved in a 2500 million year old banded iron-formation was interpreted as reflecting the climatic influence of the lunar nodal tide. The corresponding lunar distance would then have been approx. 52 Earth radii. The influence of the lunar nodal tide is also apparent in rocks with an age of 680 million years B.P. The derived value for lunar distance 2500 million years ago is the only datum on the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system during the Precambrian era of Earth history. The implied development of Precambrian tidal friction is in accord with more recent paleontological evidence as well as the long term stability of the lunar orbit.

  5. Thermal tides and studies to tune the mechanistic tidal model using UARS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Yudin

    Full Text Available Monthly simulations of the thermal diurnal and semidiurnal tides are compared to High-Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI and Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII wind and temperature measurements on the Upper-Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS. There is encouraging agreement between the observations and the linear global mechanistic tidal model results both for the diurnal and semidiurnal components in the equatorial and mid-latitude regions. This gives us the confidence to outline the first steps of an assimilative analysis/interpretation for tides, dissipation, and mean flow using a combination of model results and the global measurements from HRDI and WINDII. The sensitivity of the proposed technique to the initial guess employed to obtain a best fit to the data by tuning model parameters is discussed for the January and March 1993 cases, when the WINDII day and night measurements of the meridional winds between 90 and 110 km are used along with the daytime HRDI measurements. Several examples for the derivation of the tidal variables and decomposition of the measured winds into tidal and mean flow components using this approach are compared with previous tidal estimates and modeling results for the migrating tides. The seasonal cycle of the derived diurnal tidal amplitudes are discussed and compared with radar observation between 80 and 100 km and 40°S and 40°N.

  6. Sedimentary characteristics of tide-dominated estuary in Donghetang Formation(Upper Devonian), central Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The Donghetang Formation (Upper Devonian) in central Tarim Basin has been thought an important oil and gas reservoir since the abundant oil and gas resources were found in the wells W16, W20, W34, and other fields. However, the sedimentary environment of the Donghetang Formation has been disputed because it suffered from both tidal and fluvial actions and there were not rich fossils in the sandstone. After the authors analyzed sedimentary features by means of drill cores, well logging data, paleosols, and with SEM obseruations, three kinds of sedimentary environments were distinguished: alluvial fan, tide-dominated estuary, and shelf. Particularly, the sedimentary features of tide-dominated estuary were studied in detail. Besides, the authors discussed sedimentary characteristics of the Donghetang Formation which was divided into two fourth-order sequences and five system tracts. At the same time, according to the forming process of five system tracts, the whole vertical evolution and lateral transition of tide-dominated estuary were illustrated clearly. Finally, the reservoir quality was evaluated based on porosity and permeability.

  7. Integrating disparate lidar datasets for a regional storm tide inundation analysis of Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, J.M.; Tyler, D.J.; Turnipseed, D.P.; Van Wilson, Jr.; Oimoen, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the largest natural disasters in U.S. history. Due to the sheer size of the affected areas, an unprecedented regional analysis at very high resolution and accuracy was needed to properly quantify and understand the effects of the hurricane and the storm tide. Many disparate sources of lidar data were acquired and processed for varying environmental reasons by pre- and post-Katrina projects. The datasets were in several formats and projections and were processed to varying phases of completion, and as a result the task of producing a seamless digital elevation dataset required a high level of coordination, research, and revision. To create a seamless digital elevation dataset, many technical issues had to be resolved before producing the desired 1/9-arc-second (3meter) grid needed as the map base for projecting the Katrina peak storm tide throughout the affected coastal region. This report presents the methodology that was developed to construct seamless digital elevation datasets from multipurpose, multi-use, and disparate lidar datasets, and describes an easily accessible Web application for viewing the maximum storm tide caused by Hurricane Katrina in southeastern Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.

  8. A general analytical solution for groundwater fluctuations due to dual tide in long but narrow islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Sheng; Yeh, Hund-Der; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2012-05-01

    This paper develops a general mathematical model for describing head fluctuations in an aquifer of long but narrow islands subject to a dual tide effect. The upper boundary condition of the aquifer is represented by an equation combining the simplified free surface equation with a leakage term. Such an equation is considered as a general expression representing the upper boundary condition of a confined, unconfined, or leaky confined aquifer. The closed-form solution of the model represented by two series terms is developed by the direct Fourier method and finite Fourier sine transform. One of the series can reduce to a closed-form expression by means of contour integral and residue theorem. If the width of the island is very large, this solution gives the predicted head almost the same as that of the solution for an aquifer subject to a single tide effect. It is found that the presence of an upper aquitard produces significant vertical flow in the lower leaky confined aquifer even if the aquitard permeability is low. Neglecting such vertical flow may result in an overestimate of hydraulic head in the leaky confined aquifer. The attenuation factor and phase lag predicted from the present solution subject to the dual tide effect agree well with those estimated from 57 day head fluctuation data observed at Garden Island, Australia.

  9. Subsurface Tiltmeter Observations of Solid Earth Tides and Rock Excavation in Northeastern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancelle, C.; Volk, J.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.

    2013-12-01

    Tiltmeter arrays in the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) Near Detector Hall at Fermilab and the Lafarge - Conco Mine record solid earth tides and mechanical unloading due to excavation. The arrays are located approximately 100 meters underground in the Galena-Platteville dolomite in Northeastern Illinois. Just off of the MINOS Near Detector Hall a new cavern was excavated to house the Off-axis Neutrino Appearance Experiment (NOvA) program near detector. The recorded excavation response in the MINOS Near Detector Hall due to the NOvA cavern excavation is approximately thirteen times a point-load estimated response calculated using laboratory-determined properties. This discrepancy is likely due to variations in Young's Modulus in the rock in a field versus laboratory scale, although seasonal effects causing long term trends in the data could be part of this response. Amplitudes of measured solid earth tides differ from the amplitudes of theoretical solid earth tides by up to 40 percent for both arrays. This is likely due to a local heterogeneity or discontinuity.

  10. Dynamics of pore-water and salt in estuarine marshes subjected to tide and evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Shen, C.; Li, L.; Lockington, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Salt dynamics in estuarine tidal marshes are strongly associated with their intrinsic hydrological processes and ecological behaviors, which are not well understood. Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the transport and distribution of pore water and salt in a vertical cross section perpendicular to the tidal creek that subjects to spring-neap tide and evaporation. Vaporizing pore water from unsaturated soil surface with salt left in soils, the time-variant actual evaporation is affected by aerodynamic factors as well as soil conditions, including pore-water saturation, solute concentration and the thickness of salt precipitation above the soil surface (efflorescence). Different simulation cases were performed by adjusting the tidal signal, marsh platform slope and soil properties. The simulation analysis indicates that, the tide-averaged soil salinity increases with the reduction of inundation period in a spring-neap tide cycle. As the salt accumulated by evaporation could leave soil from seepage back to seawater during ebbtide, the pore-water salinity at the surface within the tidal range remains close to that of seawater. With the presence of hyper-saline soil and efflorescence, salt flat develops only in the area where capillary connection between evaporating surface and water-saturated soil is maintained while tidal inundation absent. On the contrary, the sandy supratidal marsh where hydrological connections are disrupted keeps a relatively low soil salinity (40-60 ppt) and pore-water saturation as evaporation remains low throughout the tidal cycles.

  11. A Hybrid Remote Sensing Approach for Detecting the Florida Red Tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, G. A.; Minnett, P. J.; Banzon, V.; Baringer, W.

    2008-12-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have caused major worldwide economic losses commonly linked with health problems for humans and wildlife. In the Eastern Gulf of Mexico the toxic marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis is responsible for nearly annual, massive red tides causing fish kills, shellfish poisoning, and acute respiratory irritation in humans: the so-called Florida Red Tide. Near real-time satellite measurements could be an effective method for identifying HABs. The use of space-borne data would be a highly desired, low-cost technique offering the remote and accurate detection of K. brevis blooms over the West Florida Shelf, bringing tremendous societal benefits to the general public, scientific community, resource managers and medical health practitioners. An extensive in situ database provided by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Research Institute was used to examine the long-term accuracy of two satellite- based algorithms at detecting the Florida Red Tide. Using MODIS data from 2002 to 2006, the two algorithms are optimized and their accuracy assessed. It has been found that the sequential application of the algorithms results in improved predictability characteristics, correctly identifying ~80% of the cases (for both sensitivity and specificity, as well as overall accuracy), and exhibiting strong positive (70%) and negative (86%) predictive values.

  12. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems. PMID:19785754

  13. Effect of internal tides in the distribution and abundance of microzooplankton in Todos Santos Bay (Ensenada, B.C.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, A.; Ibañez Tejero, L.; Ladah, L. B.; Sanchez Velasco, L.; Barton, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    Microzooplankton trophically connects phytoplankton and zooplanktonic adults. Their distribution and abundance can be directly related to the inherent physical processes in the marine environment. In coastal waters, the distribution and transport of zooplankton, including microzooplankton, can be influenced by high frequency effects such as internal tides. To date, most of the work on planktonic organisms and their interaction with the internal tide has been focused on a few species, such as barnacles, bryozoans and crabs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of internal tide on the vertical distribution and abundance of microzooplankton, with an emphasis on copepod nauplii, during the evolution of the internal tide in a summer period of strong thermal stratification. Samples were obtained by vertical plankton net (150 micron mesh) hauls at three depth strata (surface, mid-water and bottom in 25 m depth), independently, with a sampling frequency of every hour. The internal tide was detected by rapid changes in temperature and currents observed with thermistor chains and a bottom-mounted upward looking ADCP. Preliminary results shows a strong mode-1 baroclinic tidal signal. The highest abundance of copepod nauplii and microzooplankton biomass occurred at depth, associated with a strong tidal current. The abundance of copepod nauplii and the abundance of microzooplankton biomass in the surface and intermediate strata showed strong vertical displacements between both strata. Data suggest the vertical distribution of microzooplankton can be dependent on the internal tide.

  14. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Louise E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA. Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems.

  15. A numerical study on the impact of nonlinear interactions on the amplitude of the migrating semidiurnal tide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Huang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available To quantitatively study the effects of nonlinear interactions on tide structure, a nonlinear numerical tidal model is developed, and the reliability and convergence of the adopted algorithm and coding are checked by numerical experiments. Under the same conditions as those employed by the GSWM-00 (Global Scale Wave Model 2000, our model provides the nonlinear quasi-steady solution of the migrating semidiurnal tide, which differs from the GSWM-00 result (the linear steady solution in the MLT region, especially above 100 km. Additionally, their amplitude difference displays a remarkable month-to-month variation, and its significant magnitudes occur during the month with strong semidiurnal tide. A quantitative analysis suggests that the main cause for the amplitude difference is that the initial migrating 12-h tide will interact with the mean flow as well as the nonlinearity-excited 6-h tide, and subsequently yield a new 12-h tidal part. Furthermore, our simulations also show that the mean flow/tidal interaction will significantly alter the background wind and temperature fields. The large magnitudes of the tidal amplitude difference and the background alteration indicate that the nonlinear processes involved in tidal propagations should be comprehensively considered in the description of global atmospheric dynamics in the MLT region. The comparisons among our simulations, the GSWMs and some observations of tides suggest that the nonlinearity-induced tidal structure variation could be a possible mechanism to account for some discrepancies between the GSWMs and the observations.

  16. Sea Level, Land Motion, and the Anomalous Tide at Churchill, Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of the tide gauge at Churchill, Manitoba, cannot be overstated. It is the only permanently operating tide gauge in the central Canadian Arctic, and it sits on a prime spot for monitoring the mantle's rebound from the Laurentide ice loss. Yet interpretation of the sea-level time series at Churchill has long been problematic, going back even to early work by Gutenberg in the 1940s. The long-term relative sea-level rates are inconsistent: approximately -4, -19, -5 ± 1 mm/y for the periods 1940-1970, 1970-1990, 1990-2014 respectively. Annual mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW) reflect these trends until around 1990, after which MLW leveled off and is now nearly unchanging. Slightly later, around 2000, the semidiurnal tides became very anomalous, with falling amplitudes and slightly increasing phase lags. The amplitude of M2 was approximately 154 cm before 2000; it dropped to about 146 cm by 2010 and reached an all-time low of 142 cm in 2014. Satellite altimeter estimates of the tide in this region, although challenging because of seasonal ice cover, show no comparable M2 changes, so the tidal changes must be localized to the near vicinity of the gauge (or to the gauge itself if caused by a malfunction). On the other hand, altimetry confirms the post-1992 Churchill measurements of mean sea level, thanks to the long time series of land motion measurements obtained at GPS station CHUR, which gives a vertical uplift of 10.1 mm/y. Combining satellite altimeter data with the Churchill tide-gauge data gives an implied vertical crustal rate of about 9.0 ± 0.8 mm/y, in reasonable agreement with the GPS. In summary, we have still anomalous MSL measurements at the Churchill gauge for the intermediate 1970-1990 era, and very anomalous tidal measurements since 2000, but we have apparently quite reliable MSL rates since 1990.

  17. Bottom friction optimization for barotropic tide modelling using the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Martial; Lathuilière, Cyril; Baraille, Rémy; Son Hoang, Hong; Morel, Yves

    2014-05-01

    We can list several ways to improve tide modelling at a regional or coastal scale: a more precise and refined bathymetry, better boundary conditions (the way they are implemented and the precision of global tide atlases used) and the representation of the dissipation linked to the bottom friction. Nevertheless, the most promising improvement is the bottom friction representation. Indeed, bathymetric databases, especially in coastal areas, are more and more precise and global tide models performances are better than ever (mean discrepancy between models and tide gauges is about 1 cm for M2 tide). Bottom friction is often parameterized with a quadratic term and a constant coefficient generally taken between 2.5 10-3 and 3.0 10-3. Consequently, we need a more physically consistent approach to improve bottom friction in coastal areas. The first improvement is to enable the computation of a time- and space-dependent friction coefficient. It is obtained by vertical integration of a turbulent horizontal velocity profile. The new parameter to be prescribed for the computation is the bottom roughness, z0, that depends on a large panel of physical properties and processes (sediment properties, existence of ripples and dunes, wave-current interactions, ...). The context of increasing computer resources and data availability enables the possibility to use new methods of data assimilation and optimization. The method used for this study is the simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (SPSA) which consists in the approximation of the gradient based on a fixed number of cost function measurements, regardless of the dimension of the vector to be estimated. Indeed, each cost function measurement is obtained by randomly perturbing every component of the parameter vector. An important feature of SPSA is its relative ease of implementation. In particular, the method does not require the development of linear and adjoint version of the circulation model. The algorithm is

  18. Mean Tide Level Data in the PSMSL Mean Sea Level Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Andrew; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Gordon, Kathy; Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Rickards, Lesley; Tamisiea, Mark; Williams, Simon; Woodworth, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) is the internationally recognised global sea level data bank for long term sea level change information from tide gauges. Established in 1933, the PSMSL continues to be responsible for the collection, publication, analysis and interpretation of sea level data. The PSMSL operates under the auspices of the International Council for Science (ICSU), is a regular member of the ICSU World Data System and is associated with the International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Oceans (IAPSO) and the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). The PSMSL continues to work closely with other members of the sea level community through the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission's Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS). Currently, the PSMSL data bank holds over 67,000 station-years of monthly and annual mean sea level data from over 2250 tide gauge stations. Data from each site are quality controlled and, wherever possible, reduced to a common datum, whose stability is monitored through a network of geodetic benchmarks. PSMSL also distributes a data bank of measurements taken from in-situ ocean bottom pressure recorders. Most of the records in the main PSMSL dataset indicate mean sea level (MSL), derived from high-frequency tide gauge data, with sampling typically once per hour or higher. However, some of the older data is based on mean tide level (MTL), which is obtained from measurements taken at high and low tide only. While usually very close, MSL and MTL can occasionally differ by many centimetres, particularly in shallow water locations. As a result, care must be taken when using long sea level records that contain periods of MTL data. Previously, periods during which the values indicated MTL rather than MSL were noted in the documentation, and sometimes suggested corrections were supplied. However, these comments were easy to miss, particularly in large scale studies that used multiple stations from across

  19. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Red Tide in Yangtze River Estuary and Adjacent Waters%长江口及其邻近海域赤潮时空分布研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘录三; 李子成; 周娟; 郑丙辉; 唐静亮

    2011-01-01

    The events of red tide were collected in Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters from 1972 to 2009.Based on geographic information system(GIS) analysis on the temporal and spatial distribution of red tide,the distribution map was generated accordingly.The results show: ① There are three red tide-prone areas,which are outside the Yangtze River estuary and the eastern of Sheshan,Huaniaoshan-Shengshan-Gouqi,Zhoushan and the eastern of Zhujiajian.The red tide occurred 174 times in total,in which there were 25 times covered the area was larger than 1 000 km2.After 2000,the frequency of red tide were significantly increasing;② The frequent occurrence of red tide was in May(51% of total occurrence) and June(20% of total occurrence);③ In all of the red tide plankton,the dominant species were Prorocentrum danghaiense,Skeletonema costatum,Prorocentrum dantatum,Nactiluca scientillans.The red tides caused by these species were 38,35,15,10 times separately.%收集了1972~2009年长江口及其邻近海域(29°25'~32°00'N、124°00'E以西)所记载的赤潮事件,基于GIS软件平台,系统分析赤潮的时空分布规律,并绘制长江口及邻近海域赤潮分布图.分析表明:①近40年来,长江口及邻近海域赤潮发生多达174次,暴发面积〉1 000 km2的有25次.赤潮发生核心区集中在长江口外佘山附近、花鸟山-嵊山-枸杞附近、舟山附近及朱家尖东部海域,其发生频率呈明显上升趋势,2000年后尤为显著;②从发生月份看,该区域赤潮多发期集中在5、6月,其中5月发生次数占总次数的51%,6月占20%;③长江口及邻近海域的赤潮生物中,东海原甲藻、中肋骨条藻、具齿原甲藻及夜光藻占优势地位,发生次数分别为38次、35次、15次、10次,可以认为这4种藻类是该海域赤潮暴发的关键种.

  20. Estimating Hydraulic Properties of the Floridan Aquifer System by Analysis of Earth-Tide, Ocean-Tide, and Barometric Effects, Collier and Hendry Counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Aquifers are subjected to mechanical stresses from natural, non-anthropogenic, processes such as pressure loading or mechanical forcing of the aquifer by ocean tides, earth tides, and pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere. The resulting head fluctuations are evident even in deep confined aquifers. The present study was conducted for the purpose of reviewing the research that has been done on the use of these phenomena for estimating the values of aquifer properties, and determining which of the analytical techniques might be useful for estimating hydraulic properties in the dissolved-carbonate hydrologic environment of southern Florida. Fifteen techniques are discussed in this report, of which four were applied. An analytical solution for head oscillations in a well near enough to the ocean to be influenced by ocean tides was applied to data from monitor zones in a well near Naples, Florida. The solution assumes a completely non-leaky confining unit of infinite extent. Resulting values of transmissivity are in general agreement with the results of aquifer performance tests performed by the South Florida Water Management District. There seems to be an inconsistency between results of the amplitude ratio analysis and independent estimates of loading efficiency. A more general analytical solution that takes leakage through the confining layer into account yielded estimates that were lower than those obtained using the non-leaky method, and closer to the South Florida Water Management District estimates. A numerical model with a cross-sectional grid design was applied to explore additional aspects of the problem. A relation between specific storage and the head oscillation observed in a well provided estimates of specific storage that were considered reasonable. Porosity estimates based on the specific storage estimates were consistent with values obtained from measurements on core samples. Methods are described for determining aquifer diffusivity by comparing the

  1. Development of a model to simulate groundwater inundation induced by sea-level rise and high tides in Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Shellie; Fletcher, Charles H; Rotzoll, Kolja; El-Kadi, Aly I

    2017-05-01

    Many of the world's largest cities face risk of sea-level rise (SLR) induced flooding owing to their limited elevations and proximities to the coastline. Within this century, global mean sea level is expected to reach magnitudes that will exceed the ground elevation of some built infrastructure. The concurrent rise of coastal groundwater will produce additional sources of inundation resulting from narrowing and loss of the vertical unsaturated subsurface space. This has implications for the dense network of buried and low-lying infrastructure that exists across urban coastal zones. Here, we describe a modeling approach that simulates narrowing of the unsaturated space and groundwater inundation (GWI) generated by SLR-induced lifting of coastal groundwater. The methodology combines terrain modeling, groundwater monitoring, estimation of tidal influence, and numerical groundwater-flow modeling to simulate future flood scenarios considering user-specified tide stages and magnitudes of SLR. We illustrate the value of the methodology by applying it to the heavily urbanized and low-lying Waikiki area of Honolulu, Hawaii. Results indicate that SLR of nearly 1 m generates GWI across 23% of the 13 km(2) study area, threatening $5 billion of taxable real estate and 48 km of roadway. Analysis of current conditions reveals that 86% of 259 active cesspool sites in the study area are likely inundated. This suggests that cesspool effluent is currently entering coastal groundwater, which not only leads to degradation of coastal environments, but also presents a future threat to public health as GWI would introduce effluent at the ground surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of surge levels inside of the Seine Bay : interactions between tide and surge levels during Johanna and Xynthia storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborie, Vanessya; Sergent, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Within the Technical Commission for the Study and the Evaluation of Maritime Submersions in the Seine Estuary (CTeeSMES), which aim is to improve the collective knowledge on physical processes related to maritime surge levels, a numerical model of the Atlantic French Coast based on TELEMAC2D was used to study the evolution of surge levels from the ocean to the harbour area of Le Havre and evaluate the interactions between tide and surge levels in the Seine Bay. The numerical model was specifically calibrated on JOHANNA and XYNTHIA storm events, which respectively occurred in March 2008 and in February 2010. To calibrate the global signal (tide + surge levels), measurements available on 18 outputs of the Atlantic coast were used to optimize the coefficient for wind influence and for bottom friction. Maritime boundary conditions were provided by the North East Atlantic Atlas (LEGOS). Winds and pressure fields were CFSR data. Once the numerical model had been calibrated both for tide and surge levels, it has been possible to draw the evolution of surge levels from the ocean to Le Havre (quai Meunier) and then to compare the signal obtained at each point of the Seine Bay with that obtained without taking into consideration tide for each event. That also allowed to evaluate the contribution of interactions between tide and surge levels inside of the Seine Bay for Xynthia and Johanna events, but also for other events in the slice [1979-2010] and considering climate change towards 2100 with IPCC5 scenarios. It appears that instantaneous interactions between tide and surge levels nearly reach 50 % of the global surge levels and can sharply influence the evolution of surge levels in the Seine Bay depending of the moment (high tide or low water) at which the storm occurs.

  3. Tides and lake-level variations in the great Patagonian lakes: Observations, modelling and geophysical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marderwald, Eric; Richter, Andreas; Horwath, Martin; Hormaechea, Jose Luis; Groh, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Patagonia, the glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA) to past ice-mass changes (Ivins & James 2004; Klemann et al. 2007) is of particular interest in the context of the determination of the complex regional rheology related to plate subduction in a triple-junction constellation. To further complicate the situation, GIA is overlaid with load deformation not only due to present ice mass changes but also due to water-level changes in the lakes surrounding the icefields and the ocean surrounding Patagonia. These elastic deformations affect the determination of glacial-isostatic uplift rates from GPS observations (Dietrich et al. 2010; Lange et al. 2014). Observations of lake tides and their comparison with the theoretical tidal signal have been used previously to validate predictions of ocean tidal loading and have revealed regional deviations from conventional global elastic earth models (Richter et al. 2009). In this work we investigate the tides and lake-level variations in Lago Argentino, Lago Viedma, Lago San Martín/O'Higgins and Lago Buenos Aires/General Carrera. This allows us to test, among other things, the validity of tidal loading models. We present pressure tide-gauge records from two sites in Lago Argentino extending over 2.5 years (Richter et al. 2015). These observations are complemented by lake-level records provided by the Argentine National Hydrometeorological Network. Based on these lake-level time series the principal processes affecting the lake level are identified and quantified. Lake-level changes reflecting variations in lake volume are dominated by a seasonal cycle exceeding 1 m in amplitude. Lake-volume changes occur in addition with a daily period in response to melt water influx from surrounding glaciers. In Lago Argentino sporadic lake-volume jumps are caused by bursting of the ice dam of Perito Moreno glacier. Water movements in these lakes are dominated by surface seiches reaching 20 cm in amplitude. A harmonic tidal analysis of the lake

  4. Gravity waves, Tides and Planetary wave characteristics revealed by network of MLT radars over Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.; Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Ramanjaneyulu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) mean winds, gravity waves, tidal and planetary wave characteristics are investigated using two years (2013-2015) of advanced meteor radar installed at Tirupathi (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India. The observations reveal the presence of high frequency gravity waves (30-120 minutes), atmospheric tides (diurnal, semi-diurnal and terr-diurnal) along with long period oscillations in both zonal and meridional winds. Background mean zonal winds show clear semi-annual oscillation in the mesosphere, whereas meridional winds are characterized by annual oscillation as expected. Diurnal tide amplitudes are significantly larger (60-80 m/s) than semi-diurnal (10-20 m/s) and terr-diurnal (5-8 m/s) tides and larger in meridional than zonal winds. The measured meridional components are in good agreement with Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM-09) predictions than zonal up to ~90 km in all the seasons, except fall equinox. Diurnal tidal phase matches well than the amplitudes between observations and model predictions. However, no similarity is being found in the semi-diurnal tides between observations and model. The measurements are further compared with nearby Thumba meteor radar (8.5oN, 77oE) observations. Some differences do exist between the measurements from Tirupati and Thumba meteor radar and model outputs at greater heights and the possible reasons are discussed. SVU meteor radar observations clearly showed the dominance of well-known ultra-fast kelvin waves (3.5 days), 5-8 day, 16 day, 27 day, and 30-40 day oscillations. Due to higher meteor count extending up to 110 km, we could investigate the variability of these PWs and oscillations covering wider range (70-110 km) for the first time. Significant change above 100 km is noticed in all the above mentioned PW activity and oscillations. We also used ERA-Interim reanalysis data sets available at 0.125x0.125 degree grids for investigating the characteristics of these PW right from surface to 1 h

  5. Estimating decadal variability in sea level from tide gauge records: An application to the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederikse, Thomas; Riva, Riccardo; Slobbe, Cornelis; Broerse, Taco; Verlaan, Martin

    2016-03-01

    One of the primary observational data sets of sea level is represented by the tide gauge record. We propose a new method to estimate variability on decadal time scales from tide gauge data by using a state space formulation, which couples the direct observations to a predefined state space model by using a Kalman filter. The model consists of a time-varying trend and seasonal cycle, and variability induced by several physical processes, such as wind, atmospheric pressure changes and teleconnection patterns. This model has two advantages over the classical least-squares method that uses regression to explain variations due to known processes: a seasonal cycle with time-varying phase and amplitude can be estimated, and the trend is allowed to vary over time. This time-varying trend consists of a secular trend and low-frequency variability that is not explained by any other term in the model. As a test case, we have used tide gauge data from stations around the North Sea over the period 1980-2013. We compare a model that only estimates a trend with two models that also remove intra-annual variability: one by means of time series of wind stress and sea level pressure, and one by using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The last two models explain a large part of the variability, which significantly improves the accuracy of the estimated time-varying trend. The best results are obtained with the hydrodynamic model. We find a consistent low-frequency sea level signal in the North Sea, which can be linked to a steric signal over the northeastern part of the Atlantic.

  6. Automatic cell object extraction of red tide algae in microscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun; Ji, Guangrong; Zheng, Haiyong

    2017-03-01

    Extracting the cell objects of red tide algae is the most important step in the construction of an automatic microscopic image recognition system for harmful algal blooms. This paper describes a set of composite methods for the automatic segmentation of cells of red tide algae from microscopic images. Depending on the existence of setae, we classify the common marine red tide algae into non-setae algae species and Chaetoceros, and design segmentation strategies for these two categories according to their morphological characteristics. In view of the varied forms and fuzzy edges of non-setae algae, we propose a new multi-scale detection algorithm for algal cell regions based on border- correlation, and further combine this with morphological operations and an improved GrabCut algorithm to segment single-cell and multicell objects. In this process, similarity detection is introduced to eliminate the pseudo cellular regions. For Chaetoceros, owing to the weak grayscale information of their setae and the low contrast between the setae and background, we propose a cell extraction method based on a gray surface orientation angle model. This method constructs a gray surface vector model, and executes the gray mapping of the orientation angles. The obtained gray values are then reconstructed and linearly stretched. Finally, appropriate morphological processing is conducted to preserve the orientation information and tiny features of the setae. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove noise and accurately extract both categories of algae cell objects possessing a complete shape, regular contour, and clear edge. Compared with other advanced segmentation techniques, our methods are more robust when considering images with different appearances and achieve more satisfactory segmentation effects.

  7. Influence of tides and planetary waves on E sporadic layer at mid latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzopane, Michael; Pignalberi, Alessio; Zuccheretti, Enrico

    This paper describes the influence that tides and planetary waves have on the variability shown by the main characteristics of the E sporadic (Es) layer, that is the top frequency (ftEs) and the lowest virtual height (h’Es). The study is based on ionograms recorded during the summertime of 2013, a year falling in the maximum of solar activity of cycle 24, and precisely in June, July, August and September, by the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (AIS-INGV) ionosondes installed at Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E) and Gibilmanna (37.9°N, 14.0°E), Italy. We applied the height-time-intensity (HTI) methodology proposed by Haldoupis et al. (2006) to investigate how tides control the Es dynamics. As a whole, the HTI analysis showed that a well-defined semidiurnal periodicity characterizes the Es layer descent and occurrence for all the considered months, although in September some cases which showed a prevailing diurnal periodicity were recorded. Through the application of the wavelet analysis it was also found that the tidal oscillations shown by ftEs and h’Es are affected by a strong amplitude modulation with periods of several days but with important differences between the two parameters. This amplitude modulation is a proof that Es layers are indirectly affected by planetary waves through their nonlinear interaction with tides at lower altitudes; this nonlinear interaction produces the presence of secondary waves with frequencies that are the sum and difference of the primary waves frequencies involved in the interaction as proposed by Teitelbaum and Vial [1991]. This work adds to those that were already done by Haldoupis et al. (2004, 2006), and confirms that ionosonde data, especially those registered in summertime, can be used as a powerful tool for studying tidal and planetary waves properties, as well as their climatology, in the mesosphere-low-termosphere region.

  8. The impact of future sea-level rise on the global tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, M. D.; Horsburgh, K. J.; Blundell, J. R.; Hirschi, J. J.-M.; Nicholls, R. J.; Verlaan, M.; Wells, N. C.

    2017-06-01

    Tides are a key component in coastal extreme water levels. Possible changes in the tides caused by mean sea-level rise (SLR) are therefore of importance in the analysis of coastal flooding, as well as many other applications. We investigate the effect of future SLR on the tides globally using a fully global forward tidal model: OTISmpi. Statistical comparisons of the modelled and observed tidal solutions demonstrate the skill of the refined model setup with no reliance on data assimilation. We simulate the response of the four primary tidal constituents to various SLR scenarios. Particular attention is paid to future changes at the largest 136 coastal cities, where changes in water level would have the greatest impact. Spatially uniform SLR scenarios ranging from 0.5 to 10 m with fixed coastlines show that the tidal amplitudes in shelf seas globally respond strongly to SLR with spatially coherent areas of increase and decrease. Changes in the M2 and S2 constituents occur globally in most shelf seas, whereas changes in K1 and O1 are confined to Asian shelves. With higher SLR tidal changes are often not proportional to the SLR imposed and larger portions of mean high water (MHW) changes are above proportional. Changes in MHW exceed ±10% of the SLR at 10% of coastal cities. SLR scenarios allowing for coastal recession tend increasingly to result in a reduction in tidal range. The fact that the fixed and recession shoreline scenarios result mainly in changes of opposing sign is explained by the effect of the perturbations on the natural period of oscillation of the basin. Our results suggest that coastal management strategies could influence the sign of the tidal amplitude change. The effect of a spatially varying SLR, in this case fingerprints of the initial elastic response to ice mass loss, modestly alters the tidal response with the largest differences at high latitudes.

  9. Nitrate uptake varies with tide height and nutrient availability in the intertidal seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Kylla M; Bracken, Matthew E S

    2016-10-01

    Intertidal seaweeds must cope with a suite of stressors imposed by aerial exposure at low tide, including nutrient limitation due to emersion. Seaweeds can access nutrients only when submerged, so individuals living higher compared to lower on the shore may have adaptations allowing them to acquire sufficient amounts of nutrients to survive and maintain growth. Using a combination of observations and experiments, we aimed to identify intraspecific variation in nitrate uptake rates across the intertidal distribution of F. vesiculosus, as well as test for acclimation in response to a change in tide height. We replicated our study at sites spanning nearly the entire Gulf of Maine coastline, to examine how local environmental variability may alter intraspecific variation in nitrate uptake. We found that average nitrate uptake rates were ~18% higher in upper compared to lower intertidal Fucus vesiculosus. Furthermore, we found evidence for both acclimation and adaptation to tide height during a transplant experiment. F. vesiculosus transplanted from the lower to the upper intertidal zone was characterized by increased nitrate uptake, but individuals transplanted from the upper to the lower intertidal zone retained high uptake rates. Our observations differed among Gulf of Maine regions and among time points of our study. Importantly, these differences may reflect associations between nitrate uptake rates and abiotic environmental conditions and seaweed nutrient status. Our study highlights the importance of long-term variation in ambient nutrient supply in driving intraspecific variation of seaweeds across the intertidal gradient and local and seasonal variation in ambient nutrient levels in mediating intraspecific differences.

  10. Effect of spring-neap tide and evaporation on the salt dynamics in estuarine marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenming; Shen, Chengji; Xin, Pei; Li, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Salt dynamics in estuarine tidal marshes are strongly associated with their intrinsic hydrological processes and ecological behaviors, which are not well understood. Numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the transport and distribution of pore-water and salt in a vertical cross section perpendicular to a tidal creek that subjects to spring-neap tide and evaporation. Vaporizing pore-water from the unsaturated soil surface with salt left in, the time-variant actual evaporation is affected by aerodynamic factors as well as soil conditions, including pore-water saturation, salinity and the thickness of salt precipitation above the soil surface (efflorescence). Different simulation cases were performed by adjusting the potential evaporation rate, tidal signals, marsh platform slope and soil properties. The simulation analysis indicates that, the tide-averaged soil salinity increases with the reduction of inundation period under a spring-neap tide cycle. As the salt accumulated by evaporation could leave soil from seepage back to seawater during ebbtide, the pore-water salinity at the surface within the tidal range remains below solubility. Coarse soils tend to have more intensified seepage flow and hence less pore-water salinity than fine soils. With the presence of hyper-saline soil and efflorescence, salt flat develops only in the area where capillary connection between evaporating surface and water table is maintained while tidal inundation absent. On the contrary, the supratidal marsh where hydrological connections are disrupted keeps a relatively low soil salinity (40-60 ppt) and pore-water saturation as evaporation remains low throughout the tidal cycles.

  11. Climatology of northern polar latitude MLT dynamics: mean winds and tides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kishore Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mean winds and tides in the northern polar Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT have been studied using meteor radars located at Resolute Bay (75° N, 95° W and Yellowknife (62.5° N, 114.3° W. The measurements for Resolute Bay span almost 12 years from July 1997 to February 2009 and the Yellowknife data cover 7 years from June 2002 to October 2008. The analysis reveals similar wind flow over both sites with a difference in magnitude. The summer zonal flow is westward at lower heights, eastward at upper heights and the winter zonal flow is eastward at all heights. The winter meridional flow is poleward and sometimes weakly equatorward, while non winter months show equatorward flow, with a strong equatorward jet during mid-summer months. The zonal and meridional winds show strong interannual variation with a dominant annual variation as well as significant latitudinal variation. Year to year variability in both zonal and meridional winds exists, with a possible solar cycle dependence. The diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal tides also show large interannual variability and latitudinal variation. The diurnal amplitudes are dominated by an annual variation. The climatological monthly mean winds are compared with CIRA 86, GEWM and HWM07 and the climatological monthly mean amplitudes and phases of diurnal and semidiurnal tides are compared with GSWM00 predictions. The GEWM shows better agreement with observations than the CIRA 86 and HWM07. The GSWM00 model predictions need to be modified above 90 km. The agreements and disagreements between observations and models are discussed.

  12. Nutrient and chlorophyll a anomaly in red-tide periods of 2003-2008 in Sishili Bay, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Yanju; TANG Danling; YU Long; XING Qianguo

    2011-01-01

    Sishili Bay is the most important aquiculture and tourism area for the city of Yantai, China; however, red tides occurred frequently and have caused huge economic losses in this bay in recent years. To gain a better understanding of the local ecological environments in the bay, we conducted this research between 2003 and 2008 to analyze variations in nutrients and chlorophyll (chl-α) during high frequency red tide period (May to September). The results show that the chl-α concentration increased from 2.70 in 2003 to 7.26 mg/m3 in 2008, while the concentration of total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) and silicate (SiO3-Si) increased lineally from 5.18 and 1.45μmol/L in 2003 to 18.57 and 9.52 μmol/L in 2008, respectively, and the annual phosphate (PO4-P) varied between 0.15 and 0.46 μmol/L. Special attention was given to a red tide in August 2007 occurred when water temperature was high and nutrient concentrations increased sharply because of a heavy rainfall. Overall, the results show the P limitation in Sishili Bay, and reveal that red tides were caused by eutrophication from terrestrial inputs and local warm weather, particularly during rainy periods. Therefore, to control red tide, greater efforts should be made to reduce sewage discharges into Sishili Bay, particularly during rainfall seasons.

  13. [Ecology of Glossina palpalis VANDERPLANK, 1949 (Diptera: Glossinidae) in mangrove area of Guinea: influence of tides on tsetse densities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagbadouno, S M; Salou, E; Rayaisse, J B; Courtin, F; Sanon, A; Solano, P; Camara, M

    2016-05-01

    The mangrove area on the Guinea littoral constitutes a favourable habitat for transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiens, the parasite causing sleeping sickness also called Human African Trypanosmosis (HAT), due the simultaneous presence of the vector (tsetse flies) and the human hosts. In order to assess the influence of the sea tides on the densities of Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Gpg), major vector of HAT in the mangrove, entomological surveys were performed using two transects, according to tides coefficient (great and small) and tide daily fluctuations (high and low). On each transect, 12 biconical traps were deployed through the mangrove to the continent. In total, up to 612 Gpg were caught, giving a density of 2.13 flies/trap/day (f/t/d). Highest captures were recorded during small tides and more tsetse were caught during the dry season than in the wet season. There were significant differences between captures when considering the different biotopes, and highest tsetse densities were recorded at the junction of the river and the channel of the mangrove (6.17±5.24); and in the channels of mangrove (3.50±3.76), during high tides of small coefficients. The results of this study may be used to improve vector control methods.

  14. Three-dimensional structures of tropical nonmigrating tides in a high-vertical-resolution general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Sato, Kaoru; Kawatani, Yoshio; Watanabe, Shingo

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates nonmigrating tides from the ground to the lower mesosphere using data from a high-resolution general circulation model (KANTO GCM), as well as observational data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument on board the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite and from GPS radio occultation measurements obtained with the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 mission. We extract nonmigrating tides using a composite as a function of universal time in physical space, without performing a zonal wave number decomposition. The KANTO GCM clearly demonstrates that tropical nonmigrating tides are regarded as gravity waves excited by diabatic heating enhanced over two major continents, specifically Africa and South America. They propagate zonally, in a direction away from their sources; that is, west and eastward propagating waves are dominant on the western and eastern sides of the continents, respectively. These characteristics are observed in two satellite data sets as well, except that the amplitudes in the KANTO GCM are larger than those in the observations. Seasonal variations of nonmigrating tides are also investigated. It is suggested that filtering owing to the stratopause semiannual oscillation, as well as diabatic heating in the troposphere, is important for the seasonal variations of nonmigrating tides in the stratosphere and the lower mesosphere.

  15. A numerical study on nonlinear propagation and short-term variability of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Chunming; ZHANG Shaodong; YI Fan

    2005-01-01

    By using a three-dimensional fully nonlinear numerical model in spherical coordinates and taking the linear steady solutions of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides in January from the Global-Scale Wave Model (GSWM) as the initial values, we simulate the linear and nonlinear propagations of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides in the atmosphere from the ground to the lower thermosphere. A comparison of our simulations with the results of GSWM is also presented. The simulation results show that affected by the nonlinearity, the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides propagating in the middle and upper atmosphere exhibit evident short-term variability. The nonlinear interactions between the migrating tides and the background atmosphere can obviously alter the background wind and temperature fields, which suggests that the nonlinear propagations of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides impact significantly on the transient dynamical and thermal structures of the background middle and upper atmosphere and the nonlinear effect is an important cause of the difference between the results of GSWM and observations.

  16. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; Hagigi, Fred; Parker, Louise E; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Kirchner, JoAnn E

    2009-09-28

    Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems.

  17. A 10-Year Comparison of Water Levels Measured with a Geodetic GPS Receiver Versus a Conventional Tide Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Ray, Richard D.; Williams, Simon D. P.

    2017-01-01

    A standard geodetic GPS receiver and a conventional Aquatrak tide gauge, collocated at Friday Harbor, Washington, are used to assess the quality of 10 years of water levels estimated from GPS sea surface reflections.The GPS results are improved by accounting for (tidal) motion of the reflecting sea surface and for signal propagation delay by the troposphere. The RMS error of individual GPS water level estimates is about 12 cm. Lower water levels are measured slightly more accurately than higher water levels. Forming daily mean sea levels reduces the RMS difference with the tide gauge data to approximately 2 cm. For monthly means, the RMS difference is 1.3 cm. The GPS elevations, of course, can be automatically placed into a well-defined terrestrial reference frame. Ocean tide coefficients, determined from both the GPS and tide gauge data, are in good agreement, with absolute differences below 1 cm for all constituents save K1 and S1. The latter constituent is especially anomalous, probably owing to daily temperature-induced errors in the Aquatrak tide gauge

  18. Skill Testing a Three-Dimensional Global Tide Model to Historical Current Meter Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    Uehara et al., 2006; Griffiths and Peltier , 2008, 2009; Green, 2010]. The model-data validation in these papers focuses on sea sur- face elevations rather...Ocean tides and resonance, Ocean Dyn., 60, 1243– 1253, doi:10.1007/s10236-010-0331-1. Griffiths, S. D., and W. R. Peltier (2008), Megatides in the Arctic...Ocean under glacial conditions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L08605, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL033263. Griffiths, S. D., and W. R. Peltier (2009), Modeling of

  19. Anomalous ocean load tide signal observed in lake-level variations in Tierra del Fuego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Dietrich, R.; Perdomo, R.; Fritsche, M.; Del Cogliano, D.; Liebsch, G.; Mendoza, L.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the application of a 100 km long lake as a sensor for studying the tidal effects on Tierra del Fuego main island. The lake-level variations observed in Lago Fagnano reflect both the direct response to the tidal potential and the indirect effect of the ocean tidal loading. Modeling both contributions explains the observed tidal signal in the lake to about 70%. Underestimated model load tide amplitudes are found to be probably responsible for the remaining difference. We interpret this discrepancy as a hint for regional elastic lithosphere properties differing substantially from those represented by currently available global models.

  20. Study on the Characteristic Organic Compounds in Red Tide by Factor Analysis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明桥; 李攻科; 张展霞

    2004-01-01

    Factor analysis is used to study the organic compounds that have high degree of correlation with biomass in algal blooming. Based on this correlation, they are named characteristic organic compounds. The compounds found are sequalene (SQU), cedrol (CED), 2, 5-cyclohexadiene-1, 4-dione, 2, 6-bis(1, 1-dimthylethyl )(PBQ), phenol, 2, 6-bis (1, 1-dimethylethy-4-methyl) (BHT), 3-t-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole ( BHA ), 1, 2-benzenedicarboxylie acid, bis-( 2-methyl propyl ) ester (DIBP), dibutyl phthalate (DNBP), respectively. Monitoring the variations of concentration of these characteristic organic compounds in seawater may provide scientific basis for studying and forecasting red tides.

  1. Improving modeling of tides on the continental shelf off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Testut, L.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    shows RMS misfit around 11 cm). Compared to all others bathymetries, the unmodified versions of ETOPO (5’, 2’ and 1’) gave relatively poor results in the northern part of the shelf with up to 23 cm RMS error for ETOPO5.This gives an indicationof... of semi-diurnal tides off the central west coast of India. In these regions, the error in M2 tidal correction reachs upto 15 cm, which is too large to derive accurate sea level anomalies from altimetric data. In this paper, we propose a simple approach...

  2. Tide dependent seasonal changes in water quality and assimilative capacity of anthropogenically influenced Mormugao harbour water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Deepthi, M.; Vethamony, P.; Mesquita, A.M.; Pradhan, U.K.; Babu, M.T.; Verlecar, X.N.; Haldankar, S.R.

    and riverine inputs. The low and high tide have a large effect on the amount of nutrients and other water characteristics that affect the flora and fauna of the estuary. In Zuari estuary, the water from the coastal Arabian Sea enters more then 10 km... of nitrate and BOD and weak positive loading of Pb, with weak negative loadings of phaeophytin and pH. The positive correlations of nutrients with each other and with Pb and BOD and negative with DO suggested a common source and their regeneration from...

  3. On the variability of Pacific Ocean tides at seasonal to decadal time scales: Observed vs modelled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Adam Thomas

    Ocean tides worldwide have exhibited secular changes in the past century, simultaneous with a global secular rise in mean sea level (MSL). The combination of these two factors contributes to higher water levels, and may increase threats to coastal regions and populations over the next century. Equally as important as these long-term changes are the short-term fluctuations in sea levels and tidal properties. These fluctuations may interact to yield locally extreme water level events, especially when combined with storm surge. This study, presented in three parts, examines the relationships between tidal anomalies and MSL anomalies on yearly and monthly timescales, with a goal of diagnosing dynamical factors that may influence the long-term evolution of tides in the Pacific Ocean. Correlations between yearly averaged properties are denoted tidal anomaly trends (TATs), and will be used to explore interannual behavior. Correlations of monthly averaged properties are denoted seasonal tidal anomaly trends (STATs), and are used to examine seasonal behavior. Four tidal constituents are analyzed: the two largest semidiurnal (twice daily) constituents, M2 and S2, and the two largest diurnal (once daily) constituents, K1 and O1. Part I surveys TATs and STATs at 153 Pacific Ocean tide gauges, and discusses regional patterns within the entire Pacific Ocean. TATs with statistically significant relations between MSL and amplitudes (A-TATs) are seen at 89% of all gauges; 92 gauges for M2, 66 for S2, 82 for K1, and 59 for O1. TATs with statistically significant relations between tidal phase (the relative timing of high water of the tide) and MSL (P-TATs) are observed at 55 gauges for M2, 47 for S2, 42 for K1, and 61 for O1. Significant seasonal variations (STATs) are observed at about a third of all gauges, with the largest concentration in Southeast Asia. The effect of combined A-TATs was also considered. At selected stations, observed tidal sensitivity with MSL was extrapolated

  4. The Postglacial Rebound Signal of Fennoscandia Observed by Absolute Gravimetry, GPS, and Tide Gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Ragnvald Pettersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have compiled time derivatives of gravity and vertical motion for a dozen sites in Fennoscandia. Time series of absolute gravimetry and permanent GPS cover a time span of about a decade. Tide gauges have operated for many decades near seven of the sites. Linear relations are found to range from −0.17 to −0.22 for the slope between gravity and vertical uplift rates. An eustatic sea level rate of 1.2 mm/year is derived from these data. This compares well with results for North America and with theoretical predictions for viscoelastic Earth models.

  5. Studies on Biquaternary Ammonium Salt Algaecide for Removing Red Tide Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洁生; 张珩; 杨维东; 高洁; 柯琼

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the removal and control of red tide algae, Phaeoecystis globosa and Alexandrium tamarense by biquaternary ammonium salt algaecide. The results show that the efficient concentration of biquaternary ammonium salt to control the two algaes in 96 h is 0.8 mg · L-1 and 0.4 mg · L-1, respectively. It is found that biquaternary ammonium salt has high efficiency and longer duration of action in the removal and control of algae.Biquaternary ammonium salt might be an excellent algaecide to control HAB.

  6. Numerical modeling of tide-induced currents in Thane Creek, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, V.S.; Sarma, R.V.

    . lows, Versova, Note. Discussion date one month, of Journals. review and 2000. This Coastal, and qASCE, Technical FIG. 1. Location Map Showing Stations at Which Tides and Currents Were Measured sewerage also enters, mostly from the western is estimated... The shallow funnel-shaped Thane Creek is a semienclosed water body open to the Arabian Sea at its southwest approach. Its northern extremity is connected to the Ulhas River through a narrow channel (Fig. 1). The creek has become a busy wa- terway due...

  7. Justice Tides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, Line Engbo

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates how involvement by the International Criminal Court (ICC) in situations of ongoing conflict affects peace processes. It argues that the level of ICC involvement is crucial for the Court’s impact on peace settlements and that this impact takes the form of delegating...... politico-legal and discursive authority away from peace process actors. To make this argument, the article disaggregates the processes of ICC involvement and peacemaking into component parts and conceptualizes a broad notion of judicialization. This analytical framework is applied to two cases...

  8. Tide gauge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.S.

    stream_size 1 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Trg_Calculat_Water_Depth_Chart_Datum_1991_30.pdf.txt stream_source_info Trg_Calculat_Water_Depth_Chart_Datum_1991_30.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  9. Detection of Solid Tides on Europa Through Ground-Tracking of a Low-Altitude, Altimeter- Equipped Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casotto, S.; Padovan, S.; Bardella, M.

    2007-12-01

    The possibility of detecting a global liquid ocean beneath the icy crust of Europa without the use of landers or ice penetrators rests on the measurement of the Love numbers h2 and k2. These are respectively related to the radial deformation of the surface and the consequent tidally-induced variation of the gravitational field of this icy satellite. Depending on the rigidity of the icy crust, the response of the Europan surface to the tidal forces gives an indication of the depth of a possible subsurface ocean. Previous studies in this area have addressed the detection of tidal surface deformations through the analysis of the tidally induced orbital perturbations of a Europan orbiter. As a preliminary study in preparation for future missions to Europa, as in the LAPLACE proposal to the European Space Agency, the approach followed here is to introduce the presence of an onboard altimeter. In this study we then generate synthetic measurements taken from an altimeter-equipped, low-altitude orbiter, supplemented with Earth-based tracking of the orbiter. For simplicity, ground-tracking is simulated as a range data-type. Altimeter measurements are simulated using parameters based on available models for the interior of Europa derived from Galileo mission data. Reference orbits were obtained by numerical investigations of the dynamically unstable near-Europa environment. Orbits were found to be stable over periods of approximately one to three months at altitudes of 100 km and inclinations varying from 75 degrees to 105 degrees. The measurements are consequently simulated over a period of one to two months. Under the hypothesis that Europan gravity field information of sufficient accuracy has been obtained in the first phase of the mission, the simulations address the detection of the solid tide related Love parameters h2 and k2. Results of this sensitivity study will be presented for a variety of orbital configurations with the aim to help in the design of future Europa

  10. The origin of the most massive black holes at high-z: BlueTides and the next quasar frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Feng, Yu; Waters, Dacen; Wilkins, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    The growth of the most massive black holes in the early Universe, consistent with the detection of highly luminous quasars at z > 6 implies sustained, critical accretion of material to grow and power them. Given a black hole (BH) seed scenario, it is still uncertain which conditions in the early Universe allow the fastest BH growth. Large-scale hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of structure formation allow us to explore the conditions conducive to the growth of the earliest supermassive BHs. We use the cosmological hydrodynamic simulation BlueTides, which incorporates a variety of baryon physics in a (400 h-1Mpc)3 volume with 0.7 trillion particles to follow the earliest phases of BH critical growth. At z = 8 the most massive BHs (a handful) approach masses of 108 M_{⊙} with the most massive (with M_BH = 4 × 10^8 M_{⊙}) being found in an extremely compact (compared to present day) spheroid-dominated host galaxy. Examining the large-scale environment of hosts, we find that the initial tidal field is more important than overdensity in setting the conditions for early BH growth. In regions of low tidal fields gas accretes 'cold' on to the BH and falls along thin, radial filaments straight into the centre forming the most compact galaxies and most massive BHs at the earliest times. Regions of high tidal fields instead induce larger coherent angular momenta and influence the formation of the first population of massive compact discs. The extreme early growth depends on the early interplay of high gas densities and the tidal field that shapes the mode of accretion. Mergers may play a minor role in the formation of the first generation, rare massive BHs.

  11. Research on the Concentration Prediction of Nitrogen in Red Tide Based on an Optimal Grey Verhulst Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the harm of red tide to marine ecological balance, marine fisheries, aquatic resources, and human health, an optimal Grey Verhulst model is proposed to predict the concentration of nitrogen in seawater, which is the key factor in red tide. The Grey Verhulst model is established according to the existing concentration data series of nitrogen in seawater, which is then optimized based on background value and time response formula to predict the future changes in the nitrogen concentration in seawater. Finally, the accuracy of the model is tested by the posterior test. The results show that the prediction value based on the optimal Grey Verhulst model is in good agreement with the measured nitrogen concentration in seawater, which proves the effectiveness of the optimal Grey Verhulst model in the forecast of red tide.

  12. 3-D observations of a red tide event in the offshore water along the western Guangdong coast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Lingling; QI Yiquan; CHEN Qingxiang; HU Jianyu; ZHANG Shuwen; YI Xiaofei; CHEN Fajin; DENG Rui; DENG Xiaodong; WANG Jing

    2015-01-01

    From November 24 to 26, 2014, a red tide event occurred in the offshore water off the Hailing Island located at the western Guangdong coast. The red tide appeared as pink strips distributed within 3 km in the offshore water and extended for about 10 km along the shoreline. During the flood tide, the pink seawater rushed to the beach with breaking waves, forming foam strips on the beach. Guangdong Province Key Laboratory for Coastal Ocean Variation and Disaster Prediction Technologies, Guangdong Ocean University, emergently responded to the event and organized three-dimensional observations from the air, onboard and on beach. The preliminary analyses of the cruise data and water samples indicate that the event was induced by non-toxicNoctiluca scintillans, of which the concentration reaches as high as 4 200 cells/L near the surface and 2 600 cells/L at the bottom.

  13. Establishment of earth tides effect on water level fluctuations in an unconfined hard rock aquifer using spectral analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Ahmed, Shakeel; Lachassagne, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Short-interval water level measurements using automatic water level recorder in a deep well in an unconfined crystalline rock aquifer at the campus of NGRI, near Hyderabad shows a cyclic fluctuation in the water levels. The observed values clearly show the principal trend due to rainfall recharge. Spectral analysis was carried out to evaluate correlation of the cyclic fluctuation to the synthetic earth tides as well as groundwater withdrawal time series in the surrounding. It was found that these fluctuations have considerably high correlation with earth tides whereas groundwater pumping does not show any significant correlation with water table fluctuations. It is concluded that earth tides cause the fluctuation in the water table. These fluctuations were hitherto unobserved during manual observations made over larger time intervals. It indicates that the unconfined aquifer is characterised by a low porosity.

  14. Abiotic factors influencing biomass accumulation of green tide causing Ulva spp. on Pyropia culture rafts in the Yellow Sea, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesing, John K; Liu, Dongyan; Shi, Yajun; Wang, Yujue

    2016-04-15

    Annually recurrent green-tides in the Yellow Sea have been shown to result from direct disposal into the sea of fouling Ulva from Pyropia aquaculture. The role abiotic factors play in Ulva biomass accumulation on rafts was studied to find ways to mitigate this problem. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) was very high at all sites, but the highest Ulva biomass was associated with the lowest DIN and anthropogenic N. Under luxuriant background nutrient conditions, variability in temperature and periods of emersion, rather than pH, light and salinity determined Ulva biomass. Two dominant species of Ulva displayed differing tolerances to temperature and desiccation which helped explain why Ulva prolifera dominates floating green-tides. Rather than trying to mitigate green-tides only by reducing nutrient pollution, an earlier harvest of Pyropia in southern Jiangsu Province especially before temperatures increase greatly above 10°C during April, could reduce the biomass of U. prolifera disposed from rafts.

  15. SGOTL: A Computer Program for Modeling High-Resolution, Height-Dependent Gravity Effect of Ocean Tide Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheinway Hwang Jiu-Fu Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SGOTL, a computer package coded in FORTRAN, has been developed to model the gravity effect due to ocean tide loading (OTL, especially for a coastal station with large ocean tides. SGOTL uses a regional and a global tide model to account separately for near (inner and far (outer zone contributions, and optimizes an inner-zone region and grid interval for numerical convolution. Height dependent Green¡¦s functions for Newtonian and elastic effects are developed. The coastline is defined by the full-resolution GMT shoreline, and optionally a digital elevation model (DEM. A case study using gravity observations at the Hsinchu superconducting gravity station and some offshore islands around the Taiwan Strait suggests that SGOTL outperforms some selected global OTL programs and achieves an accuracy of 0.1 μGal for 8 leading tidal constituents.

  16. Tide-corrected strain rate and crevasses of Campbell Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica measured by SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H.; Lee, H.

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of flow velocity strain rate of a floating glacier is critical to the investigation of detailed flow regime and crevassing mechanism. We measured the surface deformation of Campbell Glacier Tongue (CGT) in East Antarctica from the 14 COSMO-SkyMed one-day tandem differential interferometric SAR (DInSAR) image pairs obtained in 2011. By removing the vertical tidal deflection obtained from the double-differential InSAR (DDInSAR) signals, we derived the tide-corrected ice-flow velocity and strain rate of CGT. The vertical tidal deflection of CGT was estimated by multiplying the tidal variations corresponding to the DInSAR images by the DDInSAR-derived tide deflection ratio, which was removed from the DInSAR signals to extract ice velocity only. The orientation of crevasses in CGT was nearly perpendicular to the direction of the most tensile strain rate calculated from the tide-corrected ice velocity. This demonstrates that the crevasses form by ice flow in respect of the DInSAR accuracy, not by tidal deflection. The tide correction of DInSAR signals over floating glaciers by using the DDInSAR-derived tide deflection ratio is useful for estimating accurate ice velocity and strain rate for analyzing crevasses. The tide-corrected ice velocity and strain rate will thus be of great value in a better understating of ice dynamics of floating glaciers. This research was funded by National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF-2016R1D1A1A09916630).

  17. Combined effects of tides, evaporation and rainfall on the soil conditions in an intertidal creek-marsh system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Pei; Zhou, Tingzhang; Lu, Chunhui; Shen, Chengji; Zhang, Chenming; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Li, Ling

    2017-05-01

    Salt marshes, distributed globally at the land-ocean interface, are a highly productive eco-system with valuable ecological functions. While salt marshes are affected by various eco-geo-hydrological processes and factors, soil moisture and salinity affect plant growth and play a key role in determining the structure and functions of the marsh ecosystem. To examine the variations of both soil parameters, we simulated pore-water flow and salt transport in a creek-marsh system subjected to spring-neap tides, evaporation and rainfall. The results demonstrated that within a sandy-loam marsh, the tide-induced pore-water circulation averted salt build-up due to evaporation in the near-creek area. In the marsh interior where the horizontal drainage was weak, density-driven flow was responsible for dissipating salt accumulation in the shallow soil layer. In the sandy-loam marsh, the combined influences of spring-neap tides, rainfall and evaporation led to the formation of three characteristic zones, c.f., a near-creek zone with low soil water saturation (i.e., well-aerated) and low pore-water salinity as affected by the semi-diurnal spring tides, a less well-aerated zone with increased salinity where drainage occurred during the neap tides, and an interior zone where evaporation and rainfall infiltration regulated the soil conditions. These characteristics, however, varied with the soil type. In low-permeability silt-loam and clay-loam marshes, the tide-induced drainage weakened and the soil conditions over a large area became dominated by evaporation and rainfall. Sea level rise was found to worsen the soil aeration condition but inhibit salt accumulation due to evaporation. These findings shed lights on the soil conditions underpinned by various hydrogeological processes, and have important implications for further investigations on marsh plant growth and ecosystem functions.

  18. Allelopathic inhibition on red tide microalgae Skeletonema costatum by five macroalgal extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen AN; Zhenyu WANG; Fengmin LI; Zhijia TIAN; Hongying HU

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to identify effective antialgal allelochemicals from marine macroalgae that inhibit the growth of red tide-,microalgae. Practically, new algicidal agents were developed to control red tide. The growth inhibitory effects of 5 marinemacroalgae Porphyra tenera, Laminaria japonica, Ulva pertusa, Enteromorpha cla- thrata, and Undaria pinnatifida on Skeletonema costatum were evaluated by adding crude seawater extracts of macroalgal dry tissue into the culture medium containing S. costatum. The half-effective concentrations at 120 h (EC50, 120h) of the seawater extracts were 0.6, 0.9, 1.0, 1.0, and 4.7 g/L for the five macroalgae above, respect-ively. E. clathrata, L. japonica and U. pertusa showed strong allelopathic effect on the growth of S. costatum. There have been no previous reports with regard to the allelopathic effects of the former two macroalgae so far. The possible allelochemicals of 21 compounds of the E. clathrata were detected using Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Unsaturated fatty acids, acrylic acid (C3H4O2), and linolenic acid (C18H30O2) were the most likely allelochemicals in E. clathrata.

  19. Influence of mantle anelasticity on the phase and amplitude of earth tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodri, B.; Pedersen, G. P. H.

    1980-05-01

    The effect of the anelasticity of the mantle on the phase and amplitude of earth tides is calculated for recent models of the internal structure of the earth and its rheological characteristics. The anelastic properties of the mantle are modeled by the Maxwell and Knopoff-Lomnitz rheological bodies. For numerical calculations two different methods of solution are used. Results indicate that the effect of mantle anelasticity on tidal amplitudes is practically zero. For both types of rheological models the phase shifts of the functions characterizing solid tides are small, none of them exceeding values of some minutes of arc. These phase shifts have a very weak dependence on the variation of attenuation and viscosity within the mantle. The present study is closely related to an important problem: what proportion of the observed tidal friction arises not in the ocean but is due to the anelasticity of the mantle. The results suggest that dissipation by solid friction at present is an insignificant, almost negligible component of tidal energy sink.

  20. Observing Red Tide Algal Blooms From Satellite Ocean Color Imagery: West Florida Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, E. T.; Jose, F.

    2016-12-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) from Karenia brevis occur along the west Florida shelf (WFS) almost every year, producing a brevetoxin that is harmful to birds, fish, marine mammals, shellfish, and humans. These HABs are commonly known as "red tide" from the reddish discoloration in the water, but color can vary from yellow to deep brown depending on other parameters. Ocean color data is a viable tool for monitoring the outbreak and persistence of these ecological phenomena. Also, the spatial extend of this outbreak could be evaluated effectively from satellite imagery. Chlorophyll (Chl) and sea surface temperature (SST) data from four satellites during the period from 2010 to 2013 were analyzed, and compared the monthly composite data with in situ observation on K. brevis cell counts collected by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Remote sensing data were extracted from the NASA Ocean Color data servers and were processed using WimSoft, a Windows-based remote sensing data analysis program. Based on the comparison of data from 26 transects from the WFS, which were extended from nearshore to 400 km offshore, highest Chl concentrations were observed in the sector from St. Petersburg to Sanibel Island. FWC data also showed that highest K. brevis cell counts were concentrated in this region during the 2011 to 2012 period. Additionally, a high Chl concentration was observed for the Big Bend region, particularly during the spring and early summer. The inter-annual variability of Chl, SST, and red tide occurrence are also discussed in this study.

  1. Trophic cascades in rocky shore tide pools: distinguishing lethal and nonlethal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, Geoffrey C; Ewanchuk, Patrick J; Bertness, Mark D; Silliman, Brian R

    2004-05-01

    The effects of predators on the density of their prey can have positive indirect effects on the abundance of the prey's resource via a trophic cascade. This concept has strongly influenced contemporary views of how communities are structured. However, predators also can transmit indirect effects by inducing changes in prey traits. We show that the mere presence of predator risk cues can initiate a trophic cascade in rocky shore tide pools. In large (mean surface area =9 m2), natural tide pools, we manipulated crab density and their foraging ability to examine the relative importance of lethal (density-mediated) and non-lethal (trait-mediated) predator effects to algal community development. We found that perceived predation risk reduced snail density as much as the direct predation treatment, showing that green crab predation was not an important factor regulating local snail density. Instead, snail emigration away from resident crabs appears to be the most important factor regulating local snail density. As a result, the abundance of ephemeral green algae was similar in the predation risk and direct predation treatments, suggesting that the consumption of snails by crabs plays a minimal role in mediating the trophic cascade. Increased attention to trait-mediated effects that are transmitted by predator-induced changes in prey behavior may change our view of how predators exert their strong influence on community structure.

  2. Storm tide monitoring during the blizzard of January 26-28, 2015, in eastern Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Andrew J.; Verdi, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a temporary monitoring network of six storm surge sensors and four barometric pressure sensors along the Atlantic coast in eastern Massachusetts, from Plymouth to Newburyport, before the blizzard of January 26–28, 2015 (Blizzard of January 2015), to record the timing and magnitude of storm tide at select locations where forecasters had predicted the potential for coastal flooding. Additionally, water-level data were recorded and transmitted in near real-time from four permanent USGS tidal stations—three on Cape Cod and one near the mouth of the Merrimack River in Newburyport. The storm surge sensors were deployed at previously established fixed sites outfitted with presurveyed mounting brackets. The mounting brackets were installed in 2014 as part of the USGS Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamic (SWaTH) Network (https://water.usgs.gov/floods/STN/), which was funded through congressional supplemental appropriations for the U.S. Department of the Interior after the devastating landfall of Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012 (Simmons and others, 2014). The USGS received this funding to enable better understanding of coastal flooding hazards in the region, to improve preparedness for future coastal storms, and to increase the resilience of coastal cities, infrastructure, and natural systems in the region (Buxton and others, 2013). The USGS established 163 monitoring locations along the New England coast for the SWaTH Network, including 70 sites in Massachusetts.

  3. Enhanced production of green tide algal biomass through additional carbon supply.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro H de Paula Silva

    Full Text Available Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2 enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3 (- as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3 (- affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7-9.9, and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3 (- utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%, Chaetomorpha linum (24% and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%, compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3 (-.

  4. Modeling the Circulation of Manila Bay: Assessing the Relative Magnitudes of Wind and Tide Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Villanoy

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional circulation model of Manila Bay was used to determine the relative importance of wind and tide forcing. Tidal forcing was prescribed using tidal curves based on two diurnal (O1 and K1 and two semidiurnal (M2 and S2 components on both sides of the bay mouth. A slight amplitude increase towards the head of the bay was obtained, presumably due to shoaling effects. The high correlation between sea level variations at selected coastal tide stations and model results suggests the dependence on tidal forcing at the mouth. Strongest tidal velocities were found at the mouth and decreased towards the head of the bay. The wind-driven component of the flow using mean September 1995 wind forcing shows the presence of two asymmetrical, counter-rotating gyres. Comparison of wind and tidal kinetic energies indicates the dominance of the wind-driven component of the flow only in selected shallow areas adjacent to the coast.

  5. Monitoring Sea Level in the Coastal Zone with Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Paolo; Calafat, Francisco M.; Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Melet, Angelique; Prandi, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We examine the issue of sustained measurements of sea level in the coastal zone, first by summarizing the long-term observations from tide gauges, then showing how those are now complemented by improved satellite altimetry products in the coastal ocean. We present some of the progresses in coastal altimetry, both from dedicated reprocessing of the radar waveforms and from the development of improved corrections for the atmospheric effects. This trend towards better altimetric data at the coast comes also from technological innovations such as Ka-band altimetry and SAR altimetry, and we discuss the advantages deriving from the AltiKa Ka-band altimeter and the SIRAL altimeter on CryoSat-2 that can be operated in SAR mode. A case study along the UK coast demonstrates the good agreement between coastal altimetry and tide gauge observations, with root mean square differences as low as 4 cm at many stations, allowing the characterization of the annual cycle of sea level along the UK coasts. Finally, we examine the evolution of the sea level trend from the open to the coastal ocean along the western coast of Africa, comparing standard and coastally improved products. Different products give different sea level trend profiles, so the recommendation is that additional efforts are needed to study sea level trends in the coastal zone from past and present satellite altimeters. Further improvements are expected from more refined processing and screening of data, but in particular from the constant improvements in the geophysical corrections.

  6. On the Imminent Regional Seismic Activity Forecasting Using INTERMAGNET and Sun-Moon Tide Code Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, Strachimir Cht; Kikuashvili, Giorgi; Botev, Emil; Getsov, Petar; Mardirossian, Garo; Sotirov, Georgi; Teodossiev, Dimitar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach for forecasting the imminent regional seismic activity by using geomagnetic data and Earth tide data. The time periods of seismic activity are the time periods around the Sun-Moon extreme of the diurnal average value of the tide vector module. For analyzing the geomagnetic data behaviour we use diurnal standard deviation of geomagnetic vector components F for calculating the time variance Geomag Signal. The Sun storm influence is avoided by using data for daily A-indexes (published by NOAA). The precursor signal for forecasting the incoming regional seismic activity is a simple function of the present and previous day Geomag Signal and A-indexes values. The reliability of the geomagnetic when, regional precursor is demonstrated by using statistical analysis of day difference between the times of predicted and occurred earthquakes. The base of the analysis is a natural hypothesis that the predicted earthquake is the one whose surface energy density in the monitoring point i...

  7. Introducing CAFein, a New Computational Tool for Stellar Pulsations and Dynamic Tides

    CERN Document Server

    Valsecchi, Francesca; Willems, Bart; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2013-01-01

    Here we present CAFein, a new computational tool for investigating radiative dissipation of dynamic tides in close binaries and of non-adiabatic, non-radial stellar oscillations in isolated stars in the linear regime. For the latter, CAFein computes the non-adiabatic eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of detailed stellar models. The code is based on the so-called Riccati method, a numerical algorithm that has been successfully applied to a variety of stellar pulsators, and which doesn't suffer of the major drawbacks of commonly used shooting and relaxation schemes. Here we present an extension of the Riccati method to investigate dynamic tides in close binaries. We demonstrate CAFein's capabilities as a stellar pulsation code both in the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regime, by reproducing previously published eigenfrequencies of a polytrope, and by successfully identifying the unstable modes of a stellar model in the beta Cephei/SPB region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Finally, we verify CAFein's behavi...

  8. Analysis of data characterizing tide and current fluxes in coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenio, Elvira; De Serio, Francesca; Mossa, Michele

    2017-07-01

    Many coastal monitoring programmes have been carried out to investigate in situ hydrodynamic patterns and correlated physical processes, such as sediment transport or spreading of pollutants. The key point is the necessity to transform this growing amount of data provided by marine sensors into information for users. The present paper aims to outline that it is possible to recognize the recurring and typical hydrodynamic processes of a coastal basin, by conveniently processing some selected marine field data. The illustrated framework is made up of two steps. Firstly, a sequence of analysis with classic methods characterized by low computational cost was executed in both time and frequency domains on detailed field measurements of waves, tides, and currents. After this, some indicators of the hydrodynamic state of the basin were identified and evaluated. Namely, the assessment of the net flow through a connecting channel, the time delay of current peaks between upper and bottom layers, the ratio of peak ebb and peak flood currents and the tidal asymmetry factor exemplify results on the vertical structure of the flow, on the correlation between currents and tide and flood/ebb dominance. To demonstrate how this simple and generic framework could be applied, a case study is presented, referring to Mar Piccolo, a shallow water basin located in the inner part of the Ionian Sea (southern Italy).

  9. The effect of earth tides as observed in seismo-electromagnetic precursory signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the effect of earth tides in triggering earthquakes (EQs had a great progress in recent years, which has provided convincing evidence of earth tides in EQ triggering. On the other hand, there have been accumulated a lot of evidences on the presence of seismogenic electromagnetic effects (such as ULF electromagnetic emissions from the lithosphere, ionospheric perturbations as detected by subionospheric VLF/LF propagation, etc.. Since the initial agent of these seismogenic electromagnetic effects is obviously due to some mechanical action around the EQ focal zone, the tidal effect as seen in EQ sequence should appear also in seismo-electromagnetic phenomena. Based on this expectation we have studied the tidal effect in different seismogenic phenomena, and have found that lithospheric ULF emissions exhibit a clear maximum-minimum-maximum pattern synchronized with the lunar phase of the EQ during several months before the EQ. As for VLF/LF propagation anomaly representing the lower ionospheric perturbation, we have found the tidal modulation very similar to ULF emissions, but less clear, and also there are some differences from the ULF case (such as occasional shift with respect to the lunar phase and/or the presence of higher frequency modulation, etc.. These findings are indicative that those electromagnetic phenomena reported to be in possible association with an EQ are really related with any preparatory phase of an EQ. This kind of study would be a bridge between the seismology and our seismo-electromagnetic study.

  10. Pollutant advective spreading in beach sand exposed to high-energy tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itugha, Okuroghoboye D.; Chen, Daoyi; Guo, Yakun

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents field measurements in which dye solute was injected into coastal sand to investigate contaminant advection in intertidal beach sand. The measurements show the pathways of a contaminated plume in the unsaturated zone during both the flood and ebb tides. A prescribed amount of dye tracer solution was directly injected through the topsoil, with average porosity 0.3521 ± 0.01, at predetermined locations of the River Mersey's outer estuarial beach during ebb-tide. The injected dye was monitored, sampled and photographed over several tidal cycles. The distinctive features of the plume (full two dimensional cross-sections), sediments and water-table depth were sampled in-situ, close to the injection point (differing from previous contaminant monitoring tests in aquifers). The advective movement is attributed to tidal impact which is different from contaminant transport in aquifers. The experimental results show that plumes have significantly large spatial variability, diverging upwards and converging downwards, with a conical geometric shape which is different from the usual spherical/elliptical shape reported in literature. The mean vertical motion of the plume reaches three times the top-width within ten tidal cycles, exceeding the narrow bottom-width by a factor of order 2. The observed transport features of the plume within the beach sand have significant relevance to saltwater intrusion, surface water and groundwater quality. The field observations are unique and can serve as a valuable benchmark database for relevant numerical studies.

  11. On the effect of ocean tides and tesseral harmonics on spacecraft flybys of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Acedo, L

    2016-01-01

    The so-called flyby anomaly has encouraged several authors to analyze in detail the minor perturbative contributions to the trajectory of spacecraft performing a flyby manoeuvre. This anomaly consist of an unexplained increase or decrease of the asymptotic velocity of the spacecraft after a flyby of the Earth in the range of a few mm per second. Some order of magnitude estimations have been performed in recent years to dismiss many possible conventional effects as the source of such an anomaly but no explanation has been found yet. In this paper we perform a study of the perturbation induced by ocean tides in a flybying spacecraft by considering the time dependence of the location of the high tide as the Moon follows its orbit. We show that this effect implies a change of the spacecraft velocity of a few micrometers per second. We also consider the coupling of tesseral harmonics inhomogeneities and the rotation of the Earth and its impact of the spacecraft outgoing velocity. Significant corrections to the obs...

  12. Monitoring Sea Level in the Coastal Zone with Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Paolo; Calafat, Francisco M.; Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Melet, Angelique; Prandi, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    We examine the issue of sustained measurements of sea level in the coastal zone, first by summarizing the long-term observations from tide gauges, then showing how those are now complemented by improved satellite altimetry products in the coastal ocean. We present some of the progresses in coastal altimetry, both from dedicated reprocessing of the radar waveforms and from the development of improved corrections for the atmospheric effects. This trend towards better altimetric data at the coast comes also from technological innovations such as Ka-band altimetry and SAR altimetry, and we discuss the advantages deriving from the AltiKa Ka-band altimeter and the SIRAL altimeter on CryoSat-2 that can be operated in SAR mode. A case study along the UK coast demonstrates the good agreement between coastal altimetry and tide gauge observations, with root mean square differences as low as 4 cm at many stations, allowing the characterization of the annual cycle of sea level along the UK coasts. Finally, we examine the evolution of the sea level trend from the open to the coastal ocean along the western coast of Africa, comparing standard and coastally improved products. Different products give different sea level trend profiles, so the recommendation is that additional efforts are needed to study sea level trends in the coastal zone from past and present satellite altimeters. Further improvements are expected from more refined processing and screening of data, but in particular from the constant improvements in the geophysical corrections.

  13. The prewarning value of Alexandrium tamarense PSP in an area with frequent outburst of red tide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Weidong; HUANG Deqiang; LI Yang; ZHOU Qiulin; HUO Wenmian; CHEN Weifen; LIN Hui; HE Qing; CHEN Baohong; LIANG Junrong; GAO Yahui

    2007-01-01

    The PSP toxicity of Alexandrium tamarense (Lebour) Balech on the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) from the western waters of Xiamen in China was studied by following the standard method of PSP mouse bioassay developed by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). The results showed that the mice survived when the density of A. tamarense cells was lower than 1×105 cells per cubic decimetre and died when the density was higher than 1×106 cells per cubic decimetre. The past record of red tide events in the western waters of Xiamen showed a general trend of starting from the bloom of non-toxic planktonic diatoms in local waters and resulting in a harmful algal bloom due to the fade of planktonic diatoms which failed in the survival competition in the unfavorable and deteriorated eco-environment. On the basis of experimental results and natural environment of Xiamen waters and by making reference to the critical criteria of shellfish toxins in various states, a prewarning value 1×105 cells per cubic decimetre of A. tamarense PSP toxicity was proposed for the areas in South China where red tides frequently occur.

  14. Long term Combination of Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Analysis Center Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teferle, F. N.; Hunegnaw, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International GNSS Service (IGS) Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group (WG) has recently finallized their reprocessing campaign, using all relevant Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from 1995 to 2014. This re-processed dataset will provide high quality estimates of land motions, enabling regional and global high-precision geophysical/geodeticstudies. Several of the individual TIGA Analysis Centers (TACs) have completed processing the full history of GPS observations recorded by the IGS global network, as well as, many other GPS stationsat or close to tide gauges, which are available from the TIGA data centre at the University of La Rochelle (www.sonel.org). The TAC solutions contain a total of over 700 stations. Following the recentimprovements in processing models and strategies, this is the first complete reprocessing attempt by the TIGA WG to provide homogeneous position time series. The TIGA Combination Centre (TCC) atthe University of Luxembourg (UL) has computed a first multi-year weekly combined solution using two independent combination software packages: CATREF and GLOBK. These combinations allow anevaluation of any effects from the combination software and of the individual TAC contributions and their influences on the combined solution. In this study we will present the first UL TIGA multi-yearcombination results and discuss these in terms of geocentric sea level changes.

  15. Absence of earthquake correlation with Earth tides: An indication of high preseismic fault stress rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, J.E.; Agnew, D.C.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Oppenheimer, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    Because the rate of stress change from the Earth tides exceeds that from tectonic stress accumulation, tidal triggering of earthquakes would be expected if the final hours of loading of the fault were at the tectonic rate and if rupture began soon after the achievement of a critical stress level. We analyze the tidal stresses and stress rates on the fault planes and at the times of 13,042 earthquakes which are so close to the San Andreas and Calaveras faults in California that we may take the fault plane to be known. We find that the stresses and stress rates from Earth tides at the times of earthquakes are distributed in the same way as tidal stresses and stress rates at random times. While the rate of earthquakes when the tidal stress promotes failure is 2% higher than when the stress does not, this difference in rate is not statistically significant. This lack of tidal triggering implies that preseismic stress rates in the nucleation zones of earthquakes are at least 0.15 bar/h just preceding seismic failure, much above the long-term tectonic stress rate of 10-4 bar/h.

  16. Energy Dissipation through Quasi-Static Tides in White Dwarf Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Willems, B; Kalogera, V

    2009-01-01

    We study tidal interactions in white dwarf binaries in the limiting case of quasi-static tides. The formalism is valid for arbitrary orbital eccentricities and therefore applicable to white dwarf binaries in the Galactic disk as well as globular clusters. In the quasi-static limit, the total perturbation of the gravitational potential shows a phase shift with respect to the position of the companion, the magnitude of which is determined primarily by the efficiency of energy dissipation through convective damping. We determine rates of secular evolution of the orbital elements and white dwarf rotational angular velocity for a 0.3 solar mass helium white dwarf in binaries with orbital frequencies in the LISA gravitational wave frequency band and companion masses ranging from 0.3 to 10^5 solar masses. The resulting tidal evolution time scales for the orbital semi-major axis are longer than a Hubble time, so that convective damping of quasi-static tides need not be considered in the construction of gravitational ...

  17. Dynamical Tides in Compact White Dwarf Binaries: Tidal Synchronization and Dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim

    2011-01-01

    In compact white dwarf (WD) binary systems (with periods ranging from minutes to hours), dynamical tides involving the excitation and dissipation of gravity waves play a dominant role in determining the physical conditions of the WDs prior to mass transfer or binary merger. We calculate the amplitude of the tidally excited gravity waves as a function of the tidal forcing frequency \\omega=2(\\Omega-\\Omega_s) (where \\Omega is the orbital frequency and \\Omega_s is the spin frequency) for several realistic carbon-oxygen WD models, assuming that the waves are efficiently dissipated in the outer layer of the star by nonlinear effects or radiative damping. The mechanism of wave excitation in WDs is complex due to the sharp features associated with composition changes inside the WD, and in our WD models gravity waves are launched just below the helium-carbon boundary. We find that the tidal torque on the WD and the related tidal energy transfer rate, \\dot E_{\\rm tide}, depend on \\omega in an erratic way. On average, \\...

  18. Simulation of the Great Bay Estuarine System: Tides with tidal flats wetting and drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Ş. N.; Bilgili, A.; Swift, M. R.; Brown, W. S.; Çelikkol, B.; Ip, J. T. C.; Lynch, D. R.

    2002-05-01

    Realistic lunar tides of the Great Bay Estuarine System have been simulated using a fixed boundary finite element numerical model as described by Ip et al. [1998]. It is a two-dimensional, nonlinear, time-stepping model with a groundwater component coupled to a kinematic force balance to facilitate the realistic drainage and filling of elements during ebb and flood, respectively. The numerical model reproduces the observed M2 tides as described by Swift and Brown [1983], and it successfully captures qualitatively correct residual currents and transports, realistic mass-conserving flooding and dewatering of the tidal flats, and current asymmetry between flood and ebb. The simulation results were sensitive to local bathymetry and the implemented friction law. The accuracy of the model is demonstrated by comparison with the 1975 Great Bay study [Swift and Brown, 1983] in terms of tidal elevations at 14 tidal stations and 4 cross-sectionally averaged current measurements in the estuary. Quantitatively, the model results show good agreement with observations, displaying correlation coefficients of >=0.96 in surface elevation and >=0.95 in averaged current, with average RMS errors of 0.12 m and 0.26 m s-1, respectively. In addition, tidal flat hydrodynamics, characteristic distributions of residual current, sediment bed load transport, and influence of topography on the overall circulation in the region are also discussed.

  19. Overflow dynamics and bottom water formation in the western Ross Sea: Influence of tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Danilov, S.; Hellmer, H. H.; SchröTer, J.

    2010-10-01

    The tidal impact on overflow dynamics and bottom water production in the western Ross Sea is studied with the Finite Element Ocean Model, which allows embedding a mesh with 0.5 km resolution in a coarse resolution (30 km) setup without nesting. The simulated overflow properties inside and downstream of the western Ross Sea are described. The overflow exhibits pronounced variability at both daily and spring-neap tidal time scales in the western Ross Sea. Tides increase mixing over both the outer shelf and upper slope there. Plume jets are shaped by tidal currents at a bathymetric bend west of the Drygalski Trough mouth, descending rapidly and supplying the bottom water. A fraction of shelf water remains over the shelf and propagates westward from the Ross Sea, but it does not contribute significantly to bottom water formation because of energetic mixing over the upper slope. Compared to a simulation without tidal forcing, tides (with the major K1 and O1 constituents) increase the outflow rate over the continental slope off Cape Adare by about 70%. A set of sensitivity experiments show that the rate of bottom water production is not a monotonic function of the tidal currents amplitude. Tidal forcing with intermediate strength leads to the most efficient bottom water formation.

  20. [Study on the kinetics of organo-clay removing red tide organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Yu, Zhi-ming

    2007-07-01

    The kinetics of red tide organisms (Heterosigma akashiwo and Scrippsiella trochoidea) coagulation with clays modified by dialkyl-polyoxyethenyl quaternary ammonium compound (DPQAC) was studied using spectrophotometer and fluorometry, and the effects of different kinds and concentrations of clays, the second component DPQAC added in clays and pH on the coagulation rate were examined. When using spectrophotometer, the coagulation kinetics of red tide organism coagulation with organo-clays is well fit for the bimolecular reaction model; while using fluorometry, it is fit for the hyperbola model much better. Moreover, the results also prove that using fluorometry can avoid the great change of permeance efficiency caused by clays' sedimentation when using spectrophotometer, which has availably avoided the influence of clays' sedimentation and reflected the essential of algal coagulation and sedimentation well and truly. The results of two studying methods show that the coagulation rate is more rapid in the system of kaolin than in that of bentonite; increasing the concentration of clays and DPQAC and increasing pH all can accelerate coagulation, and among those increasing the concentration of DPQAC is the most efficient way of increasing the removal efficiency and coagulation rate.

  1. On the effect of ocean tides and tesseral harmonics on spacecraft flybys of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo, L.

    2016-12-01

    The so-called flyby anomaly has encouraged several authors to analyse in detail the minor perturbative contributions to the trajectory of spacecraft performing a flyby manoeuvre. This anomaly consist of an unexplained increase or decrease of the asymptotic velocity of the spacecraft after a flyby of the Earth in the range of a few mm per second. Some order of magnitude estimations have been performed in recent years to dismiss many possible conventional effects as the source of such an anomaly but no explanation has been found yet. In this paper we perform a study of the perturbation induced by ocean tides in a flybying spacecraft by considering the time dependence of the location of the high tide as the Moon follows its orbit. We show that this effect implies a change of the spacecraft velocity of a few micrometres per second. We also consider the coupling of tesseral harmonics inhomogeneities and the rotation of the Earth and its impact on the spacecraft outgoing velocity. Significant corrections to the observed asymptotic velocities are found in this case but neither their sign nor their magnitude coincide with the anomalies. So, we can also rule this out as a conventional explanation.

  2. Optimizing the Performance of Solo Duck Wave Energy Converter in Tide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The high efficiency performance of the Edinburgh Duck wave energy converter (WEC in 2D regular wave tests makes it a promising wave energy conversion scheme. A solo Duck WEC will be able to apply the point absorber effect to further enhance its performance. Since released degree of freedom will decrease the efficiency, a Duck WEC with fixed pitching axis will be a better option. However, for fixed supported WECs, tide is a non-ignorable consideration. In this paper, a movable mass method is utilized in the whole tidal range to not only balance the Duck to appropriate beak angles, but also follow the variation of hydrodynamic coefficients to keep cancelling the reactance of the system impedance so that complex conjugate control can be realized to optimize the power capture performance of the Duck WEC in tide. Results show that the beak angle should be adjusted to as large a value as possible so that the response amplitude of the Duck at maximum relative capture width will be reasonable small, and the lowest weight of the movable mass is found when its designed position locates at the center of the Duck profile.

  3. Numerical simulation of short period Earth rotation variations induced by ocean tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Andreas; Schindelegger, Michael; Seitz, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamic Model for Earth Rotation and Gravity (DyMEG) has been used in several previous studies for the numerical simulation of Earth rotation (polar motion and length-of-day) on time scales from seasons to decades. Our current activities aim at the extension of the model and its application for the simulation of high frequency Earth rotation signals with periods of a few hours up to several days. This requires several model adaptations, such as the incorporation of additional excitation mechanisms as well as the identification and implementation of an appropriate numerical integrator. Here we particularly focus on the effect of ocean tides as they - due to their strictly periodic signal characteristics - provide a good possibility to evaluate the performance of the model and to detect potential computational problems. Secondary effects due to atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic influences are incorporated as well. We validate the simulated polar motion and length-of-day time series against hourly GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) data and conventional ocean tide routines of the IERS (International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service).

  4. Theoretic analysis on phase delay phenomena of well water level tide in the double medium aquifer model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of double medium aquifer is briefly introduced in this paper, a partial differential equation about seepage motion derived by the tidal stress in the model layer is deduced. Compared this equation with Boulton equation used in the unconfined aquifer, a new lagging supply water term is obtained, which establish the physical basis for interpreting the phase delay phenomena of well water level caused by the solid tide. By analyzing the partial dif-ferential equation, it is found that this lagging supply term is related with the fluctuation of tide occurred in the deep aquifer.

  5. The effects of the solid inner core and nonhydrostatic structure on the earth's forced nutations and earth tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Dan; Wahr, John M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper computes the effects of the solid inner core (IC) on the forced nutations and earth tides, and on certain of the earth's rotational normal modes. The theoretical results are extended to include the effects of a solid IC and of nonhydrostatic structure. The presence of the IC is responsible for a new, almost diurnal, prograde normal mode which involves a relative rotation between the IC and fluid outer core about an equatorial axis. It is shown that the small size of the IC's effects on both nutations and tides is a consequence of the fact that the IC's moments of inertia are less than 1/1000 of the entire earth's.

  6. Temperature and other data collected using tide gauge from the Pacific Ocean as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment (IDOE/NORPAX) project from 01 January 1977 to 01 January 1978 (NODC Accession 8100451)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, pressure, salinity, wind direction, and tide height data were collected using tide gauge in the Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from January 1, 1977...

  7. 南极国际GPS跟踪站的海潮位移改正%Ocean Loading Tides Corrections of GPS Stations in Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘友文; 姜卫平; 周晓慧

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the ocean loading tides corrections of GPS stations in Antarctica, such as the Great Wall station and Zhongshan station. Based on the theory of ocean loading tides, the displacement corrections of ocean loading tides on GPS stations in Antarctica are calculated by using the CRS 4.0 ocean loading tides model. These corrections are also applied to GPS data processing. The GPS data are analyzed by the GAMIT software with and without these corrections. We compared and analyzed the GPS baseline components to get the differences. The results show that the ocean tidal displacement corrections have obvious effects upon GPS baseline components. Therefore, we should not ignore the ocean loading tides corrections of GPS stations in Antarctica to obtain precise and reliable results.

  8. A computer software system for the generation of global ocean tides including self-gravitation and crustal loading effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A computer software system is described which computes global numerical solutions of the integro-differential Laplace tidal equations, including dissipation terms and ocean loading and self-gravitation effects, for arbitrary diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents. The integration algorithm features a successive approximation scheme for the integro-differential system, with time stepping forward differences in the time variable and central differences in spatial variables. Solutions for M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1 tidal constituents neglecting the effects of ocean loading and self-gravitation and a converged M2, solution including ocean loading and self-gravitation effects are presented in the form of cotidal and corange maps.

  9. Upper mesospheric lunar tides over middle and high latitudes during sudden stratospheric warming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. L.; Hoffmann, P.; Pedatella, N. M.; Matthias, V.; Stober, G.

    2015-04-01

    In recent years there have been a series of reported ground- and satellite-based observations of lunar tide signatures in the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere/thermosphere around sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events. This lower atmosphere/ionosphere coupling has been suggested to be via the E region dynamo. In this work we present the results of analyzing 6 years of hourly upper mesospheric winds from specular meteor radars over a midlatitude (54°N) station and a high latitude (69°N) station. Instead of correlating our results with typical definitions of SSWs, we use the definition of polar vortex weaking (PVW) used by Zhang and Forbes. This definition provides a better representation of the strength in middle atmospheric dynamics that should be responsible for the waves propagating to the E region. We have performed a wave decomposition on hourly wind data in 21 day segments, shifted by 1 day. In addition to the radar wind data, the analysis has been applied to simulations from Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model Extended version and the thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model. Our results indicate that the semidiurnal lunar tide (M2) enhances in northern hemispheric winter months, over both middle and high latitudes. The time and magnitude of M2 are highly correlated with the time and associated zonal wind of PVW. At middle/high latitudes, M2 in the upper mesosphere occurs after/before the PVW. At both latitudes, the maximum amplitude of M2 is directly proportional to the strength of PVW westward wind. We have found that M2 amplitudes could be comparable to semidiurnal solar tide amplitudes, particularly around PVW and equinoxes. Besides these general results, we have also found peculiarities in some events, particularly at high latitudes. These peculiarities point to the need of considering the longitudinal features of the polar stratosphere and the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere regions. For

  10. Monsters in the Dark: Predictions for Luminous Galaxies in the Early Universe from the BlueTides Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Waters, Dacen; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Feng, Yu; Croft, Ruper; Nagai, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Using deep Hubble and Spitzer observations Oesch et al. (2016) have identified a bright ($M_{\\rm UV}\\approx -22$) star forming galaxy candidate at $z \\approx 11$. The presence of GN-$z11$ implies a number density $\\sim 10^{-6}\\,{\\rm Mpc^{-3}}$, roughly an order of magnitude higher than the expected value based on extrapolations from lower redshift. Using the unprecedented volume and high resolution of the BlueTides cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, we study the population of luminous rare objects at $z > 10$. The luminosity function in BlueTides implies an enhanced number of massive galaxies, consistent with the observation of GN-$z11$. We find about 30 galaxies at $M_{\\rm UV}\\approx -22$ at $z = 11$ in the BlueTides volume, including a few objects about 1.5 magnitudes brighter. The probability of observing GN-$z11$ in the volume probed by Oesch et al. (2016) is $\\sim 13$ per cent. The predicted properties of the rare bright galaxies at $z = 11$ in BlueTides closely match those inferred from the observa...

  11. Spatial variation in extreme water levels in the Baltic Sea – North Sea transition from tide gauge records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    events.Knowledge about extremes is essential for climate adaptation, design, and planning purposes. In an ongoing research project we seek to develop more robust and objective statistics for Denmark. This includes a revisit to all tide gauge stations’ (TG) data and exploring methods for extreme value...

  12. Sea level differences between Topex/Poseidon altimetry and tide gauges: observed trends and vertical land motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, A.; Dominh, K.; Cazenave, A.; Calmant, S.; Cretaux, J.

    2002-12-01

    Nine year-long (1993-2001) sea level difference time series have been constructed by comparing sea level recorded by tide gauges and Topex/Poseidon altimetry. Although the primary goal of such an analysis is to define a sub network of good quality tide gauges for calibration of satellite altimetry systems, in particular Jason-1. The difference time series displaying large positive or negative trends may give evidence of vertical land motion at the tide gauge site. We have analyzed 98 tide gauge records from the UHSLC. Among them, 42 sites mainly located on open ocean islands, give very good agreement (better than 2 mm/year) with Topex/Poseidon-derived sea level trends. 22 other sites, mainly located along the continental coastlines of the Pacific Ocean, present sea level trends differing by more than 5 mm/year with Topex/Poseidon. Many of these sites are located in active tectonic areas (either in the vicinity of subduction zones or in active volcanic areas), where vertical land motions (either transient or long-term) are expected. For example, this is the case at Kushimoto, Ofunato, Kushiro (Japan), Kodiak Island and Yakutat (Alaska), La Libertad, Callao, Caldera (western south America), and Rabaul (western Pacific). When possible, we compare these observed trends in sea level differences with GPS and/or DORIS observations.

  13. Uncertainties in shoreline position analysis: the role of run-up and tide in a gentle slope beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Giorgio; Lo Re, Carlo; Ciraolo, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    In recent decades in the Mediterranean Sea, high anthropic pressure from increasing economic and touristic development has affected several coastal areas. Today the erosion phenomena threaten human activities and existing structures, and interdisciplinary studies are needed to better understand actual coastal dynamics. Beach evolution analysis can be conducted using GIS methodologies, such as the well-known Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS), in which error assessment based on shoreline positioning plays a significant role. In this study, a new approach is proposed to estimate the positioning errors due to tide and wave run-up influence. To improve the assessment of the wave run-up uncertainty, a spectral numerical model was used to propagate waves from deep to intermediate water and a Boussinesq-type model for intermediate water up to the swash zone. Tide effects on the uncertainty of shoreline position were evaluated using data collected by a nearby tide gauge. The proposed methodology was applied to an unprotected, dissipative Sicilian beach far from harbors and subjected to intense human activities over the last 20 years. The results show wave run-up and tide errors ranging from 0.12 to 4.5 m and from 1.20 to 1.39 m, respectively.

  14. A simple morphodynamic model for sand banks and large-scale sand pits subject to asymetrical tides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, P.C.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Peters, B.G.T.M.; Nemeth, A.A.; Ikeda, S.

    2001-01-01

    We extend existing knowledge on theoretical growth characteristics of tidal sand banks by including asymmetrical tides with an M0, M2 and M4-constituent, thus allowing for migration. Furthermore, in the context of the continuously increasing demand on the Dutch sand market, we show that creating a l

  15. Development and Evaluation of Real-time Acoustic Detection System of Harmful Red-tide Using Ultrasonic Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donhyug Kang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxic, Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs caused by the Cochlodinium polykrikoides have a serious impact on the coastal waters of Korea. In this study, the acoustic detection system was developed for rapid HABs detection, based on the acoustic backscattering properties of the C. polykrikoides. The developed system was mainly composed of a pulser-receiver board, a signal processor board, a control board, a network board, a power board, ultrasonic sensors (3.5 and 5.0 MHz, an environmental sensor, GPS, and a land-based control unit. To evaluate the performance of the system, a trail was done at a laboratory, and two in situ trials were conducted: (1 when there was no red tide, and (2 when there was red tide. In the laboratory evaluation, the system performed well in accordance with the number of C. polykrikoides in the received level. Second, under the condition when there was no red tide in the field, there was a good correlation between the acoustic data and sampling data. Finally, under the condition when there was red tide in the field, the system successfully worked at various densities in accordance with the number of C. polykrikoides, and the results corresponded with the sampling data and monitoring result of NFRDI (National Fisheries Research & Development Institute. From the laboratory and field evaluations, the developed acoustic detection system for early detecting HABs has demonstrated that it could be a significant system to monitor the occurrence of HABs in coastal regions.

  16. Sea level during storm surges as seen in tide-gauge records along the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundar, D.; Shankar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    Analysis of hourly sea level recorded by tide gauges of the Survey of India (SOI) at Paradip, Vishakhapatnam, and Chennai provides a record of non-tidal sea level during three periods, 6-10 August 1979, 6-10 August 1981, and 24-27 September 1981...

  17. Biomass loss and nutrient redistribution in an Indonesian Thalassia hemprichii seagrass bed following seasonal low tide exposure during daylight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stapel, J.; Manuntun, R.; Hemminga, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The intertidal reef flat of Barang Lompo Island, Indonesia, is exposed to air for several hours per day on the days around spring tides. The time of exposure shows a seasonal pattern. In the period January-June, the reef flat only runs dry at night, whereas in the period July-December, exposure only

  18. How Do Chaplains in the United States Army Work to Assist in Stemming the Tide of Suicide Cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    homes perplexed. In its quest for answers the Army is leaving no stone unturned to stem this tide that is sweeping through the ranks. Suicide continues...surpassed the average for the national population. In order to address this problem the Army is leaving no stone unturned to arrest this decaying

  19. Tides, tidal currents and their effects on the intertidal ecosystem of the southern bay, Inhaca Island, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de W.F.; Rydberg, L.; Saide, V.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment characteristics and tidal currents were studied in the 1500 ha intertidal area south of Inhaca Island, Mozambique. The tide is semi-diurnal with a range at spring of about 3 m. The area connects directly to the ocean through the Ponta Torres Strait and (indirectly) through several narrow ti

  20. Tides, tidal currents and their effects on the intertidal ecosystem of the southern bay, Inhaca Island, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de W.F.; Rydberg, L.; Saide, V.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment characteristics and tidal currents were studied in the 1500 ha intertidal area south of Inhaca Island, Mozambique. The tide is semi-diurnal with a range at spring of about 3 m. The area connects directly to the ocean through the Ponta Torres Strait and (indirectly) through several narrow