WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-mental health professionals

  1. Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

  2. Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life and Utility Scores in People with Mental Disorders: A Comparison with the Non-Mentally Ill General Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Prigent

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of comparable health-related quality of life (HRQoL and utility data across all mental disorders and all inpatient and outpatient settings. Our objective was to investigate the HRQoL and utility scores of people with mental disorders in France, treated in outpatient and inpatient settings, and to identify the HRQoL and utility score losses attributable to mental disorders compared to the non-mentally ill general population. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess HRQoL (SF-12 and utility scores of patients with mental disorders and followed in four psychiatric sectors in France. Scores were described by demographic and clinical characteristics and were then adjusted on age and gender and compared with those of the non-mentally ill general population. Median HRQoL and utility scores were significantly lower in patients with mental disorders than in the non-mentally ill general population; median differences amounted to 5.4 for the HRQoL physical score, to 11.8 for the HRQoL mental score and to 0.125 for the utility score. Our findings underscore the negative impact of mental disorders on HRQoL in France and provide a baseline to assess the global impact of current and future organizational changes in the mental health care system.

  4. Designated Health Professional Shortage Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs) Data Download makes data and information concerning Designated HPSAs readily available to our users in a one-stop...

  5. Professional Disruption in Health Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    How do professions respond to fast-moving technological changes? Disruptive innovations overturn expectations about how markets function and develop, and they often raise moral, legal and scientific concerns among professionals. Sudden technological changes can result in a state of professional...... recent revision to the Tobacco Products Directive. Medical and public health professionals that control tobacco issues were challenged by a coalition of e-cigarette industry representatives, e-cigarette users, and liberal politicians. The challengers drew on the contending norm of harm reduction...

  6. Assessing health professional education: workshop summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cuff, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing health professional education is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health...

  7. Mental health problems in health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koinis Ar.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For the vast majority of nurses and doctors, the choice of their profession, represents a successful career, even though this isn’t a fact for everyone. For some of them reflects a journey into despair. A significant number of doctors and nurses, suffers from serious mental illness.Materials and Methods: It is conducted literature review of published journals from scientific databases such as Medline, Pub Med, Scholar Google, for the period 1985-2010, using keywords and combination of them: "health professionals", "psychiatric morbidity", "effects of stress on mental health "," mental disorders " Literature Review: There are researches in population health professionals, more often to doctors and nurses / only three, referred to mental illnesses mainly burnout, depression, anxiety disorders, alcoholism, and suicide and the effect thereof on the quality of life. Total of 215 studies were found and 48 of the were reviewed for this study.Conclusions: It is obvious from the literature, that mental health problems of the health professionals are not treated promptly or with the appropriate efficiency. The reasons associated with the stigma of mental illness by illness, the subsequent denial, the misconceived professional solidarity, culture of " medical omnipotence " for physicians. Τhe timeless trend of occupational health and diagnoses to self treated their health problems , even if the knowledge on specific issues are almost non-existent.

  8. Teaching and Teacher Education for Health Professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Musumali

    Health Professionals Education in Zambia. Sekelani S. Banda ... teaching health professionals is now being confronted. .... (medical school, general nursing schools and schools ... dental, and radiography training) (Figure 2). Figure 2: ...

  9. Educational games for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Kairouz, Victor F; Sackett, Kay M; Erdley, William S; Mustafa, Reem A; Fiander, Michelle; Gabriel, Carolynne; Schünemann, Holger

    2013-03-28

    The use of games as an educational strategy has the potential to improve health professionals' performance (e.g. adherence to standards of care) through improving their knowledge, skills and attitudes. The objective was to assess the effect of educational games on health professionals' performance, knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction, and on patient outcomes. We searched the following databases in January 2012: MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Database of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, EPOC Register, ERIC, Proquest Dissertations & Theses Database, and PsycINFO. Related reviews were sought in DARE and the above named databases. Database searches identified 1546 citations. We also screened the reference lists of included studies in relevant reviews, contacted authors of relevant papers and reviews, and searched ISI Web of Science for papers citing studies included in the review. These search methods identified an additional 62 unique citations for a total of 1608 for this update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled clinical trials (CCT), controlled before and after (CBA) and interrupted time-series analysis (ITS). Study participants were qualified health professionals or in postgraduate training. The intervention was an educational game with "a form of competitive activity or sport played according to rules". Using a standardized data form we extracted data on methodological quality, participants, interventions and outcomes of interest that included patient outcomes, professional behavior (process of care outcomes), and professional's knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction. The search strategy identified a total of 2079 unique citations. Out of 84 potentially eligible citations, we included two RCTs. The game evaluated in the first study used as a reinforcement technique, was based on the television game show "Family Feud" and focused on infection control. The study did not assess any patient or process of care outcomes. The

  10. Assessing Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing Health Professional Education" is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health professional education. At the event, Forum members shared personal experiences and learned from patients, students, educators, and…

  11. 42 CFR 5.3 - Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for designation of health professional(s) shortage areas. 5.3 Section 5.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS DESIGNATION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONAL(S) SHORTAGE AREAS § 5.3 Procedures for designation of health professional(s)...

  12. Spirituality and the health professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Richard

    2013-09-01

    The inclusion of spirituality in addictions recovery began with the 12-steps program of Alcoholics Anonymous. Cofounded by Bill Wilson, the 12-steps' spiritual orientation is based on Wilson's own recovery from alcoholism that was associated with a spiritual experience. His correspondence with Carl Jung, who verified the importance of Wilson's experience, empowered Wilson to make spirituality central to the 12 steps. Spirituality remains a source of misunderstanding between the scientific, empirically informed mental health community, and the 12-step recovery movement. This article offers an outline of spiritual development, based on neuroscience, which the professional can utilize in the spiritual aspect of a patient's recovery.

  13. Danish health professionals' experiences of being coached

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne I; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze he...... health professionals' experiences from coaching-what coaching meant to them and how it influenced different aspects of their lives....

  14. Allied health professionals with 2020 vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas W; Gallicchio, Vincent S

    2007-01-01

    Allied health professionals in all disciplines must be visionary as they address education, training, and health care delivery in the next decade. Examined herein are forces of change in education, training, health care, the recognition of essential leadership styles, and the paradigm shifts facing the allied health profession in the health care arena. Some visionary directions are offered for allied health professionals to consider as health policy and clinical agendas emerge toward the year 2020.

  15. Health Professionals' Explanations of Suicidal Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothes, Inês Areal; Henriques, Margarida Rangel

    2017-01-01

    In a help relation with a suicidal person, the theoretical models of suicidality can be essential to guide the health professional's comprehension of the client/patient. The objectives of this study were to identify health professionals' explanations of suicidal behaviors and to study the effects of professional group, theoretical intervention models, and patient suicide experience in professionals' representations. Two hundred and forty-two health professionals filled out a self-report questionnaire. Exploratory principal components analysis was used. Five explanatory models were identified: psychological suffering, affective cognitive, sociocommunicational, adverse life events, and psychopathological. Results indicated that the psychological suffering and psychopathological models were the most valued by the professionals, while the sociocommunicational was seen as the least likely to explain suicidal behavior. Differences between professional groups were found. We concluded that training and reflection on theoretical models in general and in communicative issues in particular are needed in the education of health professionals.

  16. Recertification of primary health care professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeringa, F.H.; Sluijs, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    This bibliography contains literature about certification- and recertification of health care professionals. Certification and recertification are increasingly being used as quality assurance systems for professionals. As such (re)certification does fit in with the current developments towards quali

  17. Education and Training for Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Classroom Series is a collection of webinars that highlights topics that provide the educational content, tools, and resources necessary for health professionals, especially those working in public health, to address cancer as a public health problem.

  18. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an effective first step in identifying candidates ...

  19. Training health professionals in smoking cessation (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carson, K.V.; Verbiest, M.E.; Crone, M.R.; Brinn, M.P.; Esterman, A.J.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Smith, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death world wide. There is good evidence that brief interventions from health professionals can increase smoking cessation attempts. A number of trials have examined whether skills training for health professionals can lead

  20. Training health professionals in smoking cessation (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carson, K.V.; Verbiest, M.E.; Crone, M.R.; Brinn, M.P.; Esterman, A.J.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Smith, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death world wide. There is good evidence that brief interventions from health professionals can increase smoking cessation attempts. A number of trials have examined whether skills training for health professionals can lead th

  1. Cautioning Health-Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Henk; Boerner, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Science and practice seem deeply stuck in the so-called stage theory of grief. Health-care professionals continue to “prescribe” stages. Basically, this perspective endorses the idea that bereaved people go through a set pattern of specific reactions over time following the death of a loved one. It has frequently been interpreted prescriptively, as a progression that bereaved persons must follow in order to adapt to loss. It is of paramount importance to assess stage theory, not least in view of the current status of the maladaptive “persistent complex bereavement-related disorder” as a category for further research in DSM-5. We therefore review the status and value of this approach. It has remained hugely influential among researchers as well as practitioners across recent decades, but there has also been forceful opposition. Major concerns include the absence of sound empirical evidence, conceptual clarity, or explanatory potential. It lacks practical utility for the design or allocation of treatment services, and it does not help identification of those at risk or with complications in the grieving process. Most disturbingly, the expectation that bereaved persons will, even should, go through stages of grieving can be harmful to those who do not. Following such lines of reasoning, we argue that stage theory should be discarded by all concerned (including bereaved persons themselves); at best, it should be relegated to the realms of history. There are alternative models that better represent grieving processes. We develop guidelines to enhance such a move beyond the stage approach in both theory and practice. PMID:28355991

  2. The burnout syndrome on health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Polikandrioti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Burnout syndrome is referred to the experience of exhaustion and diminished interest, that is manifested by the professionals usually in the work context. Health care proffesionals are often at high risk of burnout syndrome and job dissatisfaction. Burn-out syndrome consists a serious multidimensional phenomenon, because it can lead the professionals of health to psychosomatic problems, work-associated withdrawal behaviour and a lower quality of care. The aim of this review was to study the burn out syndrome of health care professionals. The method of this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research international literature, as well as to Greece and was referred to the "burn out syndrome". Results: Most studies focus on the role of work environment of health care professionals, as the main factor for the development of burn out syndrome, in combination with other factors such as personality, critically ill patients, and organizational structure and staff relationships. Furthermore, the results of this study showed the need for referral to an expert, who deals with emotional problems triggered by the daily contacts with patients and the staff nurse, in order to control the professional stress. Conclusively: Early recognition of burnout phenomenon contributes to better professional behaviour and better health care quality for patients. Health care professionals need knowledge and education about how to beat burnout syndrome.

  3. Professional Empowerment and Teaching Sociology to Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iphofen, Ron; Poland, Fiona

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the design, implementation, and evaluation of sociology courses in health-care-professional education in England. Discusses the policy changes that led to the inclusion of these courses into medical, nursing, midwifery, and radiography curricula. Examines pedagogical and logistical issues as well as course content. (MJP)

  4. A Message to Health Care Professionals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-11

    This podcast features teens who urge US health care professionals to talk to teen patients about pregnancy and contraception.  Created: 10/11/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Reproductive Health (DRH).   Date Released: 10/11/2011.

  5. Occupational balance in health professionals in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagman, Petra; Lindmark, Ulrika; Rolander, Bo; Wåhlin, Charlotte; Håkansson, Carita

    2017-01-01

    Health care employees are often women, a group that has high degrees of sick leave and perhaps problems attaining occupational balance. However, people think differently about their everyday activities and it is therefore important to take their perceptions into account but occupational balance has not yet been measured in health professionals. The aim was to describe occupational balance in three different samples of health professionals in Sweden. A further aim was to investigate whether occupational therapists (OTs) rate their occupational balance differently from other health professionals. Four hundred and eighty-two health professionals, employees in public dentistry, mental health care and OTs, aged 21-70 years participated. The participants' occupational balance was measured using the occupational balance questionnaire (OBQ). The ratings of occupational balance were similar to earlier studies and did not differ significantly between the samples. The OTs' occupational balance was also similar to that of the other health professionals. The similarities in occupational balance indicate the same difficulties in attaining it. The result highlights the possibility that working people face similar difficulties in achieving occupational balance. Further research is warranted about how to attain it.

  6. Professional Preparation in Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles E.; Fisher, Shirley P.

    1992-01-01

    Colleges and universities must develop curricula to prepare health promotion specialists to work with persons of all ages. Program core should include self-care, consumer awareness, nutrition, weight control, stress management, and substance abuse. Health and physical educators should learn to facilitate change of negative health behaviors into…

  7. Exploring professionalization among Brazilian oral health technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanglard-Oliveira Carla

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Professional dental auxiliaries emerged in the early 20th century in the United States of America and quickly spread to Europe and other regions of the world. In Brazil, however, oral health technicians (OHTs, who occupy a similar role as dental hygienists, had a long journey before the occupation achieved legal recognition: Brazilian Law 11.889, which regulates this occupation in the country, was only enacted in 2008. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the professionalization of OHTs, highlighting the triggering, limiting and conflicting aspects that exerted an influence on the historical progress of these professionals in Brazil. We have tested Abbott’s and Larson’s theory on professionalization, against the history of OHTs. A number of different dental corporative interests exerted an influence over professionalization, especially in discussions regarding the permissible activities of these professionals in the oral cavity of patients. With primary health care advances in Brazil, the importance of these professionals has once again come to the forefront. This seems to be a key point in the consolidation of OHTs in the area of human resources for health in Brazil.

  8. 76 FR 68198 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage... designated as primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as... seven health professional types (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care,...

  9. School Health Promotion and Teacher Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Didier; Simar, Carine; Deasy, Christine; Carvalho, Graça S.; McNamara, Patricia Mannix

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Health and education are inextricably linked. Health promotion sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools, often remaining a marginal aspect of teachers' work. The purpose of this paper is to examine the compatibility of an HP-initiative with teacher professional identity. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research design was…

  10. Professional values, technology and future health care: The view of health care professionals in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, M.E.; van Hoof, J.; van Hout, A.M.; Aarts, S.; Wouters, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Nieboer, M.E., van Hoof, J., van Hout, A.M., Aarts, S., Wouters, E.J.M. (2014) Professional values, technology and future health care: The view of health care professionals in The Netherlands. Technology in Society 39:10-17 doi: 10.1016/j.techsoc.2014.05.003

  11. Teaching health professionals to teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J P

    1989-01-01

    One of the most pressing problems in the health system is the lag between modern knowledge and its use in the community. This is caused by the inadequate scientific study of methods to apply this knowledge to society, and the poor training of health personnel to apply these methods. These failures are illustrated every day by the death of 50,000 people, mostly children under 5 years, from causes that are preventable at low costs. The medical education system is primarily responsible for what is taught and how it is taught, and yet less than 1% of the this education is related to community health and broad health education. Social organization is the key to efficiency of health protection and use of medical knowledge. The mass media and increasing communications development with modern marketing have allowed social organization at reasonable cost. Changes in human behavior can prevent most health problems and premature deaths. There are examples of how growth monitoring, oral rehydration therapy, breast feeding promotion, immunization, family planning, and female literacy have saved millions of children. There is now a global recognition that healthy children and healthy families are the foundation for national development. International goals are to reduce mortality rates for children under 5 to 70/1000, eliminate polio, have universal primary education, have less than 1% malnutrition, and promote water supply expansion and sanitation. There is also a need for better recordings of births and deaths and, especially in developing countries, low cost methods of collecting data are needed. Medical education needs to use the full range of resources, and students need to learn to promote health as well as treat diseases. Medical schools in consideration of primary health care must revise curricula to achieve a balanced education in the community, and students should be taught in a variety of environments from rural health areas to urban institutions.

  12. Health professionals' migration: the Portuguese case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira Gonçalves, Catia

    2010-01-01

    Migration of health professionals has been an important issue on the agenda of governments in recent years. The European Union directive on the recognition of professional qualifications coupled with labour shortages in the health sector has led to a growing mobility of physicians from both European countries and non-European Economic Area (EEA) countries. This study takes a deeper look at these migration phenomena in the Portuguese case. A significantly convergent dual pattern of migration is shown to emerge, in which the growth of intra-European migration has broadly continued to coexist with the maintenance of traditional overseas immigration channels.

  13. Breastfeeding. COTALMA: training health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, M C

    1994-01-01

    The Comite Tecnico de Apoyo a la Lactancia Materna (COTALMA), the Technical Breastfeeding Support Committee, was founded in Bolivia in 1989. It is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It is administered in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MOH). MOH and UNICEF choose the hospitals, who send teams that include a pediatrician, a gynecologist, a nurse, and a nutritionist. The first phase of the course (5.5 days) covers the scientific background of breastfeeding. A baseline study is then planned and conducted at each hospital. 2 to 3 months later, the second phase takes place during which data is presented and breast feeding programs are developed for each hospital. Communication, training, counseling, and planning and evaluation are covered. Practicums are conducted at hospitals. Trainers are usually members of COTALMA. The person in charge of maternal and child health services at MOH lectures on national health policies concerning mothers and children. Training includes use of the national health card, breastfeeding and child survival, and breastfeeding as a family planning method. Culturally appropriate course materials, which are in Spanish, are adapted from those developed by Wellstart International. Articles by COTALMA members and others are added. Participants are encouraged to train all staff at their institutions.

  14. [Primary health care product defined by health professionals and users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol Ribera, Enriqueta; Gené Badia, Joan; Sans Corrales, Mireia; Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Pasarín Rua, María Isabel; Iglesias-Pérez, Begoña; Casajuana-Brunet, Josep; Escaramis-Babiano, Georgia

    2006-01-01

    To identify the components of the primary health care (PHC) product defined by health professionals and users in order to establish indicators for evaluation. Qualitative methodology was used with group techniques: a nominal group (health professionals) and focus groups (users). The study was performed in PHC centers in Catalonia (Spain). There were 7 groups: a) family physicians and pediatricians; b) nurses and social workers; c) staff from admissions units and customer services; d) other medical specialists; e) users; f) managers, pharmacists, pharmacologists, and technicians. Participants responded to the question: "Which features should be evaluated in the services that should be provided by PHC?". A content analysis was performed. Textual data were broken down into units and then grouped into categories, following analogy criteria. The interpretative context of the research team was taken into account. Health professionals and users identified 4 dimensions of the PHC product, coinciding with its basic attributes: a) access to services; b) coordination and continuity of the PHC teams with other levels of healthcare; c) relationship between health professionals and users, and d) scientific-technical quality of the PHC teams and the portfolio of services. Equity, satisfaction and efficiency appeared as keystones in all the components of the product identified. There was broad agreement in the product definition among health professionals and users. The relationship between health professionals and patients was a key element in all groups. The four dimensions should be included in the evaluation of PHC teams.

  15. Radiologic Professionalism in Modern Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Hanneman, Kate; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Meyer, Elaine C; Brown, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Modern radiology is at the forefront of technological progress in medicine, a position that often places unique challenges on its professional character. This article uses "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," a document published in 2002 and endorsed by several major radiology organizations, as a lens for exploring professional challenges in modern radiology. The three main tenets of the Charter emphasize patient welfare, patient autonomy, and the reduction of disparities in health care distribution. This article reviews the ways in which modern technology and financial structures potentially create stressors on professionalism in radiology, while highlighting the opportunities they provide for radiologists seeking to fulfill the professional goals articulated in the Charter. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and voice recognition systems have transformed the speed of radiology and enhanced the ability of radiologists to improve patient care but also have brought new tensions to the workplace. Although teleradiology may improve global access to radiologists, it may also promote the commoditization of radiology, which diminishes the professional stature of radiologists. Social media and patient portals provide radiologists with new forums for interacting with the public and patients, potentially promoting patient welfare. However, patient privacy and autonomy are important considerations. Finally, modern financial structures provide radiologists with both entrepreneurial opportunities as well as the temptation for unprofessional conduct. Each of these advances carries the potential for professional growth while testing the professional stature of radiology. By considering the risks and benefits of emerging technologies in the modern radiology world, radiologists can chart an ethical and professional future path.

  16. Professional competences in school health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Monica Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to critically explore the formulations of competencies and standards in the European project “Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion Capacity Building in Europe”, and to discuss them in relation to school health promotion. The analysis...... shows that ‘a production logic’ and economic values are emphasized in the motivation of the project and in the knowledge base underpinning the competency-framework. The discussion of the responsiveness of the formulations in relation to school health promotion points out that there are matches between...... and approaches in school health promotion, and the usefulness of the formulations impaired for professionals in this field. Issues related to the use of competency-based standards within the field of education, are addressed in a concluding discussion....

  17. Mental health professionals' acceptance of online counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Lazuras, Lambros; Dokou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The development of online counseling services has followed the advent on information and communication technologies. The present study assessed mental health professionals' perspectives of online counseling by using an extended version of the technology acceptance model. Participants completed anonymous structured questionnaires assessing technology acceptance-related variables, including perceived usefulness and ease of use, usage intentions, job relevance, social norms, attitudes, computer ...

  18. Child Health Booklet: experiences of professionals in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Nepomuceno de Andrade

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Understanding the experiences of health professionals in primary care with the Child Health Booklet in child health care. Method: A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach, in which participated nurses and doctors from six teams of the Family Health Strategy (FHS in Belo Horizonte, MG. In total, were carried out 12 non-directive interviews, using two guiding questions. Results: A comprehensive analysis of the speeches enabled the construction of three categories that signal the experiences of the professionals with the booklet. The experiments revealed difficulties arising from the limitations of knowledge about the instrument; incomplete filling out of the booklet by many professionals that care for children; the daily confrontations of the process and the organization of work teams; disinterest of families with the instrument. Conclusion: The research points possible and necessary ways to improve the use of booklets as an instrument of full child health surveillance.

  19. Perspective of health professionals on hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Daniel; Andrade, Otília; Silva, Ernestina

    2014-11-01

    To identify the practices reported by health professionals on hand hygiene; To determine how the practices of hand hygiene are related to socio-demographic and professional variables and variables in the context of practice. A descriptive-correlational and cross-sectional study conducted in a hospital in central Portugal, in May and June, 2012. 71 health professionals participated, with 23.9% physicians, 64.8% nurses and 11.3% operating assistants, in paediatrics, neonatology and paediatric emergencies. The majority was female (91.5%) and 32.4% are between the ages of 31 and 40 years. A questionnaire developed from DGS (General Health Directorate) recommendations was applied with questions on socio-demographic and professional characteristics as well as on the context of practice. The professionals are motivated to perform hand hygiene (98.6%). In self-assessment, they practice hand hygiene appropriately, however the results revealed that 43.7% of subjects reported little knowledge concerning the interference of ornaments on the practice of hand hygiene, 38% of the sample reported the steps of the hand washing technique improperly, and approximately 43% of the sample does not practice hygiene at the correct times. The majority of the participants who use a proper technique are nurses, with significant differences with regards to doctors and operating assistants (P=.001). Most have knowledge about the practice of hand hygiene; however, some professional groups need to improve their practice of proper technique and the correct time to do so. Approximately a third did not attend specific training, leading us to reflect on the need to invest in training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Raman

    2013-01-01

    The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health. PMID:23863132

  1. Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Preet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health.

  2. Support System for Mental Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Dandekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper talks of support systems for mental health professionals wherein the Bombay Psychiatric Society (BPS should devote some meetings exclusively to problems pertaining to the profession, e.g., long and odd working hours leading to potentially hazardous practice schedules, unhealthy competitive attitudes and culture. A crash course in self-defence against potentially psychotic patients and drug addicts is advocated as also awareness of the potential hazards in dealing with the litigious paranoid patients, erotomaniacs and some of the difficult hysterical patients. Potential medicolegal problems arise in treating an uncooperative patient without his knowledge and consent on an outpatient department basis, admitting such an uncooperative patient to a nursing home or a hospital, administering electroconvulsive therapies, maintaining detailed clinical records of patients, and legal issues involving smaller psychiatric private nursing homes. This paper stresses on the use of Yoga as a recognised psycho-physiological therapy. Furthermore, it suggests on the need for BPS, as a professional body, to have a cell to guide and help aspiring young professionals in setting up private practice. It points out the need to evolve some concrete programmes that in the long run should help alleviate stresses and strains and promote positive comprehensive health amongst mental health professionals.

  3. Psychological Distress Among Young Norwegian Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Nerdrum

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present longitudinal data on psychological distress among 169 young Norwegian health professionals. Psychological distress was measured at the end of their studies, and three years later on, when being professional nurses, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ 12. Twenty-seven percent of the nursing students scored higher than the GHQ 12 case score at the end of the study, but as nurses, they became significantly less distressed three years later (13 percent. The other two professions showed relatively small and non-significant reductions in psychological distress during the first three years as a professional. Hierarchical multiple analyses showed that the level of psychological distress when finishing the study, the young professionals’ experience of personal support from colleagues, the experience of work-home conflicts and the experience of methodological coping at work were significant predictors of psychological distress three years after working as young health professionals. These four predictors explained together 29 percent in the variance in GHQ 12 three years after graduation. Belonging to any of the three professions did not contribute to the explained variance in psychological distress three years after graduation.

  4. Section 1--The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The education of nurses, midwives and allied health care professionals in the UK is guided by professional bodies and the over arching Health Professionals Council (HPC)/Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). Each of these professional bodies provides regulatory frameworks and guidance notes on the educational content of the degree level programmes…

  5. Work readiness of graduate health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Arlene; Yong, Mellissa; Pang, Lisa; Fullarton, Christie; Costa, Beth; Dunning, A M Trisha

    2013-02-01

    The current exploratory study investigated work readiness among graduate health professionals. A critical incident technique was used to elicit perceptions regarding: strategies and skills that constitute work readiness among health professionals and the work readiness factors that help or hinder health graduates' transition and integration into the workplace. Fifteen medical graduates, 26 nursing graduates and five organisational representatives from a regional hospital in Victoria, Australia participated. Data were collected via qualitative interviews. Participants discussed a total of 92 critical incidents; 52 related to helping and 40 to hindering work readiness factors that impacted graduates' transition and integration experiences. A follow-up thematic analysis indentified four critical work readiness factors: social intelligence, organisational acumen, work competence and personal characteristics. While graduates and organisational representatives considered each factor important, some differences between the groups emerged. Organisational representative's perceived social intelligence and clinical skills critical graduate competencies, yet graduates were unprepared in these areas. The identified work readiness factors were consistent with past research and warrant further investigation of work readiness among a larger group of graduate health professionals in a range of contexts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Burnout syndrome in primary health care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Leonardo Fernandes; Laport, Tamires Jordão; Menezes, Vinicius de Paula; Medeiros, Priscila Bonfante; Ronzani, Telmo Mota

    2014-12-01

    Burnout is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low occupational performance, which may occur among health professionals. This article evaluates burnout among workers in Primary Health Care (PHC) in three small towns in the Zona da Mata Mineira. The study analyzes associations by logistic regression between burnout, socioeconomic, and demographic aspects of work. A total of 149 professionals were selected, 107 of these responded to all questionnaires. To measure burnout, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used and to characterize the professional, a questionnaire assessing three different issues - namely individual and sociodemographic aspects and team area coverage - was used. 101 professionals were classified with positive indication for burnout. The variables present in the backward stepwise logistic regression model positively associated with indicative of burnout were: being younger than the population average (> 29.5 years) and use of drugs, including sedatives, tranquilizers and sleeping pills. The results contribute to the identification of factors associated with burnout and therefore highlight the need for more detailed investigation.

  7. Attitudes and characteristics of health professionals working in Aboriginal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Annabelle M; Magarey, Anthea M; Jones, Michelle; O'Donnell, Kim; Kelly, Janet

    2015-01-01

    There is an unacceptable gap in health status between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Australia. Linked to social inequalities in health and political and historical marginalisation, this health gap must be urgently addressed. It is important that health professionals, the majority of whom in Australia are non-Aboriginal, are confident and equipped to work in Aboriginal health in order to contribute towards closing the health gap. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and characteristics of non-Aboriginal health professionals working in Aboriginal health. The research was guided and informed by a social constructionist epistemology and a critical theoretical approach. It was set within a larger healthy eating and physical activity program delivered in one rural and one metropolitan community in South Australia from 2005 to 2010. Non-Aboriginal staff working in the health services where the program was delivered and who had some experience or an interest working in Aboriginal health were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Dietitians working across South Australia (rural and metropolitan locations) were also invited to participate in an interview. Data were coded into themes that recurred throughout the interview and this process was guided by critical social research. Thirty-five non-Aboriginal health professionals participated in a semi-structured interview about their experiences working in Aboriginal health. The general attitudes and characteristics of non-Aboriginal health professionals were classified using four main groupings, ranging from a lack of practical knowledge ('don't know how'), a fear of practice ('too scared'), the area of Aboriginal health perceived as too difficult ('too hard') and learning to practice regardless ('barrier breaker'). Workers in each group had different characteristics including various levels of willingness to work in the area; various understandings of Australia's historical

  8. Spiritual Care Education of Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nurses and health care professionals should have an active role in meeting the spiritual needs of patients in collaboration with the family and the chaplain. Literature criticizes the impaired holistic care because the spiritual dimension is often overlooked by health care professionals. This could be due to feelings of incompetence due to lack of education on spiritual care; lack of inter-professional education (IPE; work overload; lack of time; different cultures; lack of attention to personal spirituality; ethical issues and unwillingness to deliver spiritual care. Literature defines spiritual care as recognizing, respecting, and meeting patients’ spiritual needs; facilitating participation in religious rituals; communicating through listening and talking with clients; being with the patient by caring, supporting, and showing empathy; promoting a sense of well-being by helping them to find meaning and purpose in their illness and overall life; and referring them to other professionals, including the chaplain/pastor. This paper outlines the systematic mode of intra-professional theoretical education on spiritual care and its integration into their clinical practice; supported by role modeling. Examples will be given from the author’s creative and innovative ways of teaching spiritual care to undergraduate and post-graduate students. The essence of spiritual care is being in doing whereby personal spirituality and therapeutic use of self contribute towards effective holistic care. While taking into consideration the factors that may inhibit and enhance the delivery of spiritual care, recommendations are proposed to the education, clinical, and management sectors for further research and personal spirituality to ameliorate patient holistic care.

  9. Cultural competence education for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Lidia; Horey, Dell; Romios, Panayiota; Kis-Rigo, John

    2014-05-05

    Cultural competence education for health professionals aims to ensure all people receive equitable, effective health care, particularly those from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. It has emerged as a strategy in high-income English-speaking countries in response to evidence of health disparities, structural inequalities, and poorer quality health care and outcomes among people from minority CALD backgrounds. However there is a paucity of evidence to link cultural competence education with patient, professional and organisational outcomes. To assess efficacy, for this review we developed a four-dimensional conceptual framework comprising educational content, pedagogical approach, structure of the intervention, and participant characteristics to provide consistency in describing and assessing interventions. We use the term 'CALD participants' when referring to minority CALD populations as a whole. When referring to participants in included studies we describe them in terms used by study authors. To assess the effects of cultural competence education interventions for health professionals on patient-related outcomes, health professional outcomes, and healthcare organisation outcomes. We searched: MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1946 to June 2012); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library) (June 2012); EMBASE (OvidSP) (1988 to June 2012); CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1981 to June 2012); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1806 to June 2012); Proquest Dissertations and Theses database (1861 to October 2011); ERIC (CSA) (1966 to October 2011); LILACS (1982 to March 2012); and Current Contents (OvidSP) (1993 Week 27 to June 2012).Searches in MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, ERIC and Current Contents were updated in February 2014. Searches in CINAHL were updated in March 2014.There were no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs, and controlled clinical trials of

  10. Relevant aspects of tuberculosis for health professionals

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    Alexandre Daronco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease with broad clinical spectrum, of which causative agent is the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Koch’s bacillus, a strictly aerobic mycobacteria. Although it is an ancient disease that has affected humans for centuries, being a major cause of death worldwide, different studies of the Ministry of Health shows worrying fi gures with regard to new cases. Materials and Methods: This review article aims to objectively and clearly explain the main aspects of interest for health professionals regarding tuberculosis. The article is divided into the following topics: Defi nition, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Multidrug resistance, Prophylaxis, Forms of Infection and Prevention Methods. We used current references on the subject, including Manuals, Guidelines and several scientifi c databases such as Up to Date and Science Direct. Discussion: Signs and symptoms of the disease increase the degree of suspicion, which makes it necessary to use tests to confi rm infection in time to establish appropriate therapy. As well as diagnostic and treatment, measures to prevent infection in health services, crowded places and residences, are essential when fi ghting tuberculosis. Health professionals should pay attention to possible cases of drug resistance and indications for prophylaxis, because these variables are extremely important in controlling disease dissemination. Conclusion: As it is an infectious disease that can affect all social classes, as well as having different forms of involvement, the basic knowledge about TB is indeed essential in health services, from primary care to high-technology health centers. KEYWORDS: tuberculosis. infections. transmition . diseases control.

  11. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  12. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  13. Occupational and environmental health nursing: ethics and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie

    2012-04-01

    This article provides an overview of ethical issues related to the practice of occupational and environmental health nursing and possible strategies for resolution. Also, professionalism related to professional growth and advancing the specialty is discussed. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. 78 FR 44459 - Designation of Health Professional(s) Shortage Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service 42 CFR Part 5 Designation of Health Professional(s) Shortage Areas CFR Correction 0 In Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 to 399, revised as of October 1, 2012, on page 80, in Appendix C to Part...

  15. Oral health knowledge, attitude and practices among health professionals in King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Baseer

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Oral health knowledge among the health professionals working in KFMC, Riyadh was lower than what would be expected of these groups, which had higher literacy levels in health care, but they showed a positive attitude toward professional dental care.

  16. Smoking health professional student: an attitudinal challenge for health promotion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Daniel; Mamo, Julian

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco is a major preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Health professionals are uniquely positioned to provide targeted interventions and should be empowered to provide cessation counselling that influence patient smoking. A cross-sectional national survey was administered to all third year students in four disciplines at the University of Malta. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS) questionnaire was distributed to collect standardised demographic, smoking prevalence, behavioural, and attitudinal data. 81.9% completed the questionnaire (n = 173/211). A positive significant association between tobacco smoke exposure at home and current smoking status was identified. Non-smokers regarded anti-tobacco policies more favourably than smokers, being more likely to agree with banning of tobacco sales to adolescents (OR 3.6; 95% CI: 2.5-5.3; p ≤ 0.001); and with a smoking ban in all public places (OR 8.9; 95% CI: 6.1-13.1; p ≤ 0.001). Non-smokers favoured a role for health professionals in promoting smoking cessation (OR 5.1; 95% CI: 3.1-8.5; p ≤ 0.001). Knowledge of antidepressants as tools for smoking cessation was also associated with a perceived role for skilled health professionals in cessation counselling (OR 4.9; 95% CI: 1.8-13.3; p = 0.002). Smoking negatively influences beliefs and attitudes of students toward tobacco control. There is a need to adopt a standard undergraduate curriculum containing comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation training to improve their effectiveness as role models.

  17. Smoking Health Professional Student: An Attitudinal Challenge for Health Promotion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cauchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is a major preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Health professionals are uniquely positioned to provide targeted interventions and should be empowered to provide cessation counselling that influence patient smoking. A cross-sectional national survey was administered to all third year students in four disciplines at the University of Malta. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS questionnaire was distributed to collect standardised demographic, smoking prevalence, behavioural, and attitudinal data. 81.9% completed the questionnaire (n = 173/211. A positive significant association between tobacco smoke exposure at home and current smoking status was identified. Non-smokers regarded anti-tobacco policies more favourably than smokers, being more likely to agree with banning of tobacco sales to adolescents (OR 3.6; 95% CI: 2.5–5.3; p ≤ 0.001; and with a smoking ban in all public places (OR 8.9; 95% CI: 6.1–13.1; p ≤ 0.001. Non-smokers favoured a role for health professionals in promoting smoking cessation (OR 5.1; 95% CI: 3.1–8.5; p ≤ 0.001. Knowledge of antidepressants as tools for smoking cessation was also associated with a perceived role for skilled health professionals in cessation counselling (OR 4.9; 95% CI: 1.8–13.3; p = 0.002. Smoking negatively influences beliefs and attitudes of students toward tobacco control. There is a need to adopt a standard undergraduate curriculum containing comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation training to improve their effectiveness as role models.

  18. [Agrochemicals and human health: contributions of healthcare professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Siqueira, Soraia Lemos; Kruse, Maria Henriqueta Luce

    2008-09-01

    This paper focuses on the scientific production of health professionals, especially nurses, about agrochemicals and human health. The essay combines and presents information by means of literature review, with a view to acknowledge the contribution of each author and their use for the human health field. Thirty-two research articles, published in Brazilian journals, were located. The analysis of these articles highlights that healthcare professionals' contributions focus on human health, especially, workers' health and food quality. With a view to minimize the effects from agrochemicals on human and environmental health, the authors exposes action suggestions both for health professionals and for the institutions associated.

  19. Update on Validity of Required Competencies for Worksite Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Craig; Rager, Robin C.; Wright, Fred Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Background: To improve global health, the workforce capacity of health promotion professionals must be strengthened through the provision of competencies necessary to deliver effective programs. Purpose: This study provides an updated analysis of the validity of the worksite health promotion (WHP) professional competencies developed in 2000 by the…

  20. Educational games for mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoopathi, P S; Sheoran, R

    2006-04-19

    In traditional didactic teaching, the learner has a passive role, digesting the knowledge presented by the teacher. Stimulating and active teaching processes may be better at instilling information than more pedestrian approaches. Games involving repetition, reinforcement, association and use of multiple senses have been proposed as part of experiential learning. To assess the effects of educational games on the knowledge and clinical skill of mental health professionals compared to the effects of standard teaching approaches. We performed electronic searches of AMED (1998 - November 2005), British Nursing Index (November 2005), Cochrane Library (Issue 3, 2005), Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (November 2005), CINAHL (November 2005) EMBASE (November 2005), Educational Resources Information Centre on CSA (1966 - November 2005), MEDLINE (November 2005), PsycINFO (November 2005). We also searched references of all selected articles and contacted authors of included trials for more information. Randomised controlled trials comparing any educational game aiming at increasing knowledge and/or skills with a standard educational approach for mental health professionals. We extracted data independently and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. We analysed the individual person data using fixed effect Peto Odds Ratio (OR) calculated the 95% confidence intervals (CI). If appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) or number needed to harm (NNH) was estimated. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences. We identified one trial (n=34) of an educational game for mental health nursing students of only a few hours follow up. For an outcome we arbitrarily defined ('no academically important improvement [a 10% improvement in scores]') those allocated to educational games fared considerably better than students in the standard education techniques group (OR 0.06 CI 0.01 to 0.27, NNT 3 CI 2 to 4). On average those in the games group scored six more

  1. (Dissatisfaction of health professionals who work with oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Bordignon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: identify sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction at work for health professionals who work with oncology. Methods: Qualitative research conducted with 31 professionals from a multidisciplinary health team who worked in an Oncology Inpatient Unit of a public hospital in the south of Brazil, using a semi-structured interview, analyzed according to Bardin’s proposal. Results: the main sources of job satisfaction emerged from the relationship between patients and health professionals. The dissatisfaction sources were connected to the working environment and conditions. Conclusion:. A humanized look to health professionals who work with oncology, with changes in their work environment seems to be relevant in the context investigated.

  2. BOOK REVIEW - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VARIOUS AUTHORS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This compendium of essays by 30 authors is a contribution to the Malaysian ever growing storehouse of medical publications. It is a worthwhile project for the Malaysian Medical Association to have undertaken to publish this long awaited book, because the content of the book involves the care of its own members. The health of the healthcare providers is often taken for granted while carrying out their duties of a doctor. They forget their own health and they expose themselves to the risk of disease every day of their lives. This book, with twenty-two chapters, covers in detail the occupational concerns of health care professionals. The chapters outline the common pitfalls in the healthcare system into which the professionals may fall into. All health care facilities are high risk venues for which not sufficient preventive systems are in place. The various risk factors are highlighted by the different authors both from the point of view of the professional and the patient. In support of preventive efforts the authors refer to the various statutory requirements in place. In spite of the provisions, the authors cite many instances of diseases and disasters the professional suffer from and are exposed to daily. This book will be of use both not only to the student of occupational health but also to every healthcare professional. It raises the awareness of personal protection and prevention since the chance of disaster awaits every morning. The dictum of “Physician, heal thyself” may come too late if this book does not evoke caution every day. It is well written with cases documenting poor infrastructure requirements to carry out their duties in a safe and efficient manner. References are well documented by all the authors to inspire further work in this area. Associate Professor Dr Jayakumar comes from the backgrounds of both academic and corporate sectors and therefore contributes his wealth of knowledge and experience while Associate Professor

  3. 77 FR 38838 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ..., Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of April 1... National Health Service Corps (NHSC) personnel to provide primary care, dental, or mental health...

  4. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  5. Health regulation: knowledge of Family Health Strategy professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Roney Mota Lima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive and qualitative study that aimed to verify the knowledge of nurses, doctors and dentists of the Family Health Strategy in the municipality of Bela Cruz, Ceará, Brazil, about health regulation. Data collection happened from November to December 2008 by applying a questionnaire. Data were organized according to content analysis of Bardin. The results show that the participants have knowledge about the referral flow of patients referred from the primary care to specialized care, the mechanisms used for this purpose, as well as the reference and counter-reference system; they also reported difficulties in the return of patients with the counter-reference form properly filled, thus jeopardizing the continuity of assistance. For these professionals, the regulation is an important management tool for SUS, guaranteeing the right to health.

  6. Complexity or Meaning in Health Professional Education and Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Wendy Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Discourses of complexity have entered health professional education. This paper explores the meaning of complexity by asking how health professionals are educated and some of the consequences of that education. Design: A qualitative study was carried out drawing on reflexivity, discourse analysis and grounded methodology. Setting: Two…

  7. Complexity or Meaning in Health Professional Education and Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Wendy Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Discourses of complexity have entered health professional education. This paper explores the meaning of complexity by asking how health professionals are educated and some of the consequences of that education. Design: A qualitative study was carried out drawing on reflexivity, discourse analysis and grounded methodology. Setting: Two…

  8. 78 FR 38718 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ..., Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of May 11, 2013, available on the Health Resources... assignment of National Health Service Corps (NHSC) personnel to provide primary care, ] dental, or...

  9. Lessons from a Transgender Patient for Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallans, Ryan K

    2016-11-01

    It is not uncommon for transgender patients to avoid sharing information about their identity and medical history with health care professionals, due to past negative experiences within health care settings. Professionals who show sensitivity to the topic and express care about health record documentation can increase a transgender patient's trust. There are many opportunities to increase transgender health literacy, including consultation, conferences, webinars, books, and articles focused on transgender health care. It's critical for professionals to listen closely to individual patients' stated needs. This article shares one transgender patient's encounters and experiences within health care settings and offers lessons on how health care professionals can be more inclusive, respectful, and responsive to the needs of transgender patients.

  10. Introspection as intra-professionalism in social and health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Dybbroe, Betina

    2017-01-01

    or patient. As a phenomenon at the core of professional practice, it will be argued that introspection needs to recognize and encompass the intra- and inter-psychic responses and understandings of professionals and their clients and patients. The first case places supervision as a learning space, where......This article analyses two cases from health and social care, adopting a psychosocietal approach. The analysis highlights how professionalism evolves and develops through an introspection of the relational and scenic processes between professionals, as well as between the professional and the client...

  11. Physical violence against women from the perspective of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Simone da Nóbrega Tomaz; Galvão, Lílian Lira Lisboa Fagundes; Melo, Carmen Oliveira Medeiros; de Azevedo, George Dantas

    2008-12-01

    To comprehend the perception of health professionals regarding physical violence against women by an intimate partner. This is a qualitative study performed in 2006 on 30 health professionals from three National Health System units in the city of Natal, Northeastern Brazil. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on three thematic topics: ideas associated to physical violence suffered by women; action of the health professional; and the role of health services. The series of interviews included questions on the perception of professionals about gender relations, physical violence, action as a health professional, and the role of health services. Categories were formed from these topics using the thematic content analysis. Health professionals pointed several factors that influence domestic violence situations, among which are machismo, poor economic conditions, alcoholism, and previous experiences of violence in the family environment. The study group reported they did not feel qualified to discuss the subject with the population and stressed the need that health services promote educational activities with this aim. The results suggest the need for systematized and effective actions aimed at humanizing health care for the battered woman.

  12. Social networks of professionals in health care organizations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasselli, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of social network research in health care, with a focus on social interactions between professionals in organizations. We begin by introducing key concepts defining the social network approach, including network density, centrality, and brokerage. We then review past and current research on the antecedents of health care professionals' social networks-including demographic attributes, professional groups, and organizational arrangements-and their consequences-including satisfaction at work, leadership, behaviors, knowledge transfer, diffusion of innovation, and performance. Finally, we examine future directions for social network research in health care, focusing on micro-macro linkages and network dynamics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Transformations of Professional Work in Psychiatric Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    In psychiatry in Denmark health and social care is being replaced by diagnostic categorisations and a more consumerized relation between the health professionals and patients as self- responsible citizens. Increasing medicalization and New Public Management reforms and standardization for cost......- effectiveness intertwine with a neo-liberal health policy of a “user- focus and user involvement”,that transforms psychiatric practice. Through the micro-sociological study of professionals working with patients in psychiatry, it is illuminated how patients/clients are objectified and left to care...... for themselves, and how professionalism is transformed into manualisation of practice, and test technologies replace meeting “significant others”....

  14. The importance of good communication between patient and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markides, Markos

    2011-10-01

    This article emphasizes the importance of a good communication between patients and health professionals. It focuses on how patients feels during the cancer journey and how professionals should behave to them. It also go through the different dilemmas and conflicts health professionals may come across in their interaction with patients and it suggests different ways about how those dilemmas can be resolved. The main idea of this article is the fact that health professionals-whether physicians, nurses or psychologists-need to focus on and improve, if necessary, their communication with patients; basically, learn how to unite the humanistic side of care with the technical side; how to be professionals without losing their humanistic identity.

  15. How are health professionals earning their living in Malawi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maseko Fresier C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The migration of health professionals from southern Africa to developed nations is negatively affecting the delivery of health care services in the source countries. Oftentimes however, it is the reasons for the out-migration that have been described in the literature. The work and domestic situations of those health professionals continuing to serve in their posts have not been adequately studied. Methods The present study utilized a qualitative data collection and analysis method. This was achieved through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with health professionals and administrators to determine the challenges they face and the coping systems they resort to and the perceptions towards those coping methods. Results Health professionals identified the following as some of the challenges there faced: inequitable and poor remuneration, overwhelming responsibilities with limited resources, lack of a stimulating work environment, inadequate supervision, poor access to continued professionals training, limited career progression, lack of transparent recruitment and discriminatory remuneration. When asked what kept them still working in Malawi when the pressures to emigrate were there, the following were some of the ways the health professionals mentioned as useful for earning extra income to support their families: working in rural areas where life was perceived to be cheaper, working closer to home village so as to run farms, stealing drugs from health facilities, having more than one job, running small to medium scale businesses. Health professionals would also minimize expenditure by missing meals and walking to work. Conclusion Many health professionals in Malawi experience overly challenging environments. In order to survive some are involved in ethically and legally questionable activities such as receiving "gifts" from patients and pilfering drugs. The efforts by the Malawi government and the international

  16. Changing Our Ways of Thinking: Health Professionals and Nuclear Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Outlines the issues raised by health professionals concerned about the threat of nuclear weapons and nuclear war, including epidemics, civil defense, arms costs, psychosocial aspects, and ethical responsibility. Appendixes include lists of antinuclear organizations, medical professional associations, and 160 references. (SK)

  17. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: Motives, barriers and expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; Tates, K.; Nieboer, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals

  18. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: Motives, barriers and expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; Tates, K.; Nieboer, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals

  19. The role of emotions in health professional ethics teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Lynn; Delany, Clare; Guillemin, Marilys; Warmington, Sally

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we put forward the view that emotions have a legitimate and important role in health professional ethics education. This paper draws upon our experience of running a narrative ethics education programme for ethics educators from a range of healthcare disciplines. It describes the way in which emotions may be elicited in narrative ethics teaching and considers the appropriate role of emotions in ethics education for health professionals. We argue there is a need for a pedagogical framework to productively incorporate the role of emotions in health professional ethics teaching. We suggest a theoretical basis for an ethics pedagogy that integrates health professional emotions in both the experience and the analysis of ethical practice, and identify a range of strategies to support the educator to incorporate emotion within their ethics teaching.

  20. REGIONAL IMBALANCES IN DISTRIBUTION OF BULGARIAN HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rohova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many factors influencing health inequities; health workforce availability and skill mix are among them. Regional distribution of health workers determines access to health services. The aim of this study is to analyse and to assess the distribution of health professionals among the statistical regions and districts in Bulgaria. Methods and materials: The current study uses health professionals to population ratio, Gini index and Lorenz curve to measure and assess the proportionality of health workers distribution. Data are provided from the National Statistical Institute and European Health for All databases. Results and discussion: In Bulgaria, health professionals per population ratio are comparable with the EU average except for the nurses. Beside the shortage of nursing professionals, geographically uneven distribution of health workers is among the main challenges in human resource management.Regional imbalances are significant among the districts in the country. More than half of the physicians are concentrated in 6 districts. The analysis shows an upward trend in imbalances, expressed as absolute or relative differences.The distribution of dentists is much more variant and diverse than this of physicians. The values of Gini index for specialised medical care also reveal considerable imbalances. Conclusions: Differet coefficients have proved the unequal distribution of health workers among the districts.Regional imbalances are not the only reason for health inequities in Bulgaria but they have significant influence in rural and remote areas and in regions with high unemployment, low incomes and ageing population.

  1. The health care professional as a modern abolitionist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    Health care professionals are in a unique position to identify and to assist victims of human trafficking. Human trafficking today occurs both domestically and globally. It manifests in many forms, including adult and child forced labor, involuntary domestic servitude, adult and child sexual slavery, involuntary servitude, debt bondage, and child soldiers. This article offers insight into modern human trafficking and ways health care professionals can be activists.

  2. Awareness of nutrition problems among Vietnamese health and education professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thi Hai Quynh; Worsley, Anthony; Lawrence, Mark; Marshall, Bernie

    2016-03-22

    Professionals who provide nutrition education and consulting to the public are encouraged to take into account the health, environmental and social contexts that influence health-related attitudes and behaviours in the population. This paper examined the awareness of shifts in population health outcomes associated with the nutrition transition in Vietnam among university nutrition lecturers, health professionals and school education professionals. Most of these professionals held accurate views of the current population health issues in Vietnam. However, they differed in their awareness of the seriousness of overweight and obesity. Although the majority indicated that the prevalence of obesity and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) had increased, nearly half believed that the government should complete its attempts to control undernutrition before trying to control obesity. More health professionals believed that food marketing was responsible for the growing prevalence of children's obesity, and more of them disapproved of the marketing of less healthy food to children. In contrast, the university nutrition lecturers were least aware of food marketing and the seriousness of obesity. Of the three groups, the university nutrition lecturers held less accurate perceptions of nutrition transition problems and their likely drivers. There is an urgent need for greater provision of public nutrition education for all three groups of professionals.

  3. [The social representation of nurse's professional autonomy in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Antônio Marcos Tosoli; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina

    2005-01-01

    The object of this study was the nurse's professional autonomy and had the following specific objectives: describe and analyze the social representations of the nurses 'professional role and analyze the professional autonomy-dependence binomial. As theoretical methodological reference it was chose the Social Representations Theory It was proceeded in-depth interviews with 30 nurses of the basic health system from a county in Rio de Janeiro state. To the data analysis it was used the Alceste 4.5 software. The software generated five classes, two express the professional formation/absorption and three the professional. Practice. The analytical categories were constituted from the dimensions in which the social representations express themselves: the conceptions, the positions and the professional practices autonomy.

  4. Developing health science students into integrated health professionals: a practical tool for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Madeleine

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An integrated sense of professionalism enables health professionals to draw on relevant knowledge in context and to apply a set of professional responsibilities and ethical principles in the midst of changing work environments 12. Inculcating professionalism is therefore a critical goal of health professional education. Two multi-professional courses for first year Health Science students at the University of Cape Town, South Africa aim to lay the foundation for becoming an integrated health professional 3. In these courses a diagram depicting the domains of the integrated health professional is used to focus the content of small group experiential exercises towards an appreciation of professionalism. The diagram serves as an organising framework for conceptualising an emerging professional identity and for directing learning towards the domains of 'self as professional' 45. Objective This paper describes how a diagrammatic representation of the core elements of an integrated health professional is used as a template for framing course content and for organising student learning. Based on the assumption that all health care professionals should be knowledgeable, empathic and reflective, the diagram provides students and educators with a visual tool for investigating the subjective and objective dimensions of professionalism. The use of the diagram as an integrating point of reference for individual and small group learning is described and substantiated with relevant literature. Conclusion The authors have applied the diagram with positive impact for the past six years with students and educators reporting that "it just makes sense". The article includes plans for formal evaluation. Evaluation to date is based on preliminary, informal feedback on the value of the diagram as a tool for capturing the domains of professionalism at an early stage in the undergraduate education of health professional students.

  5. Personality traits and career satisfaction of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John D; Lounsbury, John W; Bhaskar, Tripti; Gibson, Lucy W; Drost, Adam W

    2009-01-01

    Based on Holland's theorizing that vocational satisfaction arises from a good match between one's personality and career choice, one purpose of the study was to examine broad and narrow personality traits that characterize health care workers in comparison with professionals from other occupations. Also investigated were ways in which characteristic traits of health care workers were related to career satisfaction. Professionals utilizing the services of eCareerfit.com responded to online surveys that have been demonstrated to produce reliable and valid measures of broad and narrow personality traits and levels of career satisfaction. An independent sample t test was used to compare means of health care workers with those from other occupations. Pearson product-moment correlations were then computed to assess relationships between the traits and career satisfaction of health care professionals. Two traits that were particularly strong among health care workers were also significantly correlated with career satisfaction: work drive and conscientiousness. Other traits were found to be significantly related to career satisfaction in health care but were not uniquely high in the sample of health care professionals. To increase career satisfaction of health care professionals and thus to improve retention rates, administrators should consider focusing on recruiting and selecting individuals with higher levels of key personality traits.

  6. Critical Review of Dual Diagnosis Training for Mental Health Professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinderup, Pernille; Thylstrup, Birgitte; Hesse, Morten

    2016-01-01

    To review evidence on the effects of training programs in dual diagnosis treatment for mental health professionals. Three databases were searched. Included studies were evaluated by an adapted version of Kirkpatrick’s Training Evaluation Model, which evaluates participant perception of training...... level showed mixed results. Training mental health professionals in dual diagnosis treatment may have a positive effect on professional competencies and clinical practice. Any conclusion regarding the overall training effect is premature due to limitations in study designs. Future studies on the effects...

  7. Exploring educational interventions to facilitate health professional students' professionally safe online presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Marcus A; Hawken, Susan; MacDonald, Joanna; McKimm, Judy; Brown, Menna; Moriarty, Helen; Gasquoine, Sue; Chan, Kwong; Hilder, Jo; Wilkinson, Tim

    2017-09-01

    To establish the most effective approach and type of educational intervention for health professional students, to enable them to maintain a professionally safe online presence. This was a qualitative, multinational, multi-institutional, multiprofessional study. Practical considerations (availability of participants) led us to use a combination of focus groups and individual interviews, strengthening our findings by triangulating our method of data collection. The study gathered data from 57 nursing, medical and paramedical students across four sites in three countries (Aotearoa/New Zealand, Australia and Wales). A content analysis was conducted to clarify how and why students used Facebook and what strategies they thought might be useful to ensure professional usage. A series of emergent codes were examined and a thematic analysis undertaken from which key themes were crystallized. The results illuminated the ways in which students use social networking sites (SNS). The three key themes to emerge from the data analysis were negotiating identities, distancing and risks. Students expressed the wish to have material about professional safety on SNS taught to them by authoritative figures to explain "the rules" as well as by peers to assist with practicalities. Our interactive research method demonstrated the transformative capacity of the students working in groups. Our study supports the need for an educational intervention to assist health professional students to navigate SNS safely and in a manner appropriate to their future roles as health professionals. Because health professional students develop their professional identity throughout their training, we suggest that the most appropriate intervention incorporate small group interactive sessions from those in authority, and from peers, combined with group work that facilitates and enhances the students' development of a professional identity.

  8. [Current and future competencies for public health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Dolors; Berenguera, Anna; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta; Capella, Jordina; Peray, Josep Lluís de; Roma, Josep

    2013-01-01

    To identify current and future competencies (managers and technicians) for public health professionals in Catalonia (Spain). Qualitative research with a phenomenological approach. Between November 2009 and February 2010, 31 semistructured interviews were completed with public health professionals working in Catalonia. We purposely used a theoretical sample to include the maximum multiplicity of discourses. We conducted a thematic content analysis. We obtained a wide range of current professional competencies, as well as those required for the future, classified according to professional profile. The participants highlighted transversal competencies, such as the importance of sharing a general theoretical framework of the discipline and the institution. Among the most frequently reported competencies were knowledge management, communication skills, teamwork, multidisciplinary and intersectoral orientation, legal knowledge, computer skills and languages, particularly English. It was also important for individual professionals to have specific skills in their areas of activity. In terms of differences between managers and technicians, the study showed that technicians prioritize management skills concerning human and material resources, while managers emphasize organizational and professional public health expertise. There is a need for transversal and specific competencies in distinct areas. Public health is a multidisciplinary field, which collaborates with a wide range of professionals and organizations. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. The views of mental health nurses on continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

    2011-12-01

    To determine clinical mental health nurses' views and preferences about continuing professional development. Participation in continuing professional development is now expected for nurse and midwifery registration. However, it is unclear how clinically based mental health nurses view continuing professional development and its relevance to career intentions. Qualitative. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews with mental health nurses (n=50) drawn from inpatient mental health units. The most prominent factor identified through this research is that the majority of the fifty participants valued continuing professional development and sought more opportunities to participate. They particularly favoured in-house locally based sessions targeting patient-related clinical skills enhancement. Importantly, this interest in continuing professional development was not confined to new graduates needing to consolidate their skills. Work-based flexibility, the types of courses available and opportunities for study leave were also identified as important factors. Of the 50 nurses interviewed, 40% expressed a desire for continuing professional development vis-à-vis remaining in the service; 30% of nurses responded to the same question with an emphasis on the importance of collegial support amongst peers and management; and 30% of the nurses indicated their primary focus for continuing professional development was to further their tertiary studies. These results are not only timely given the requirements around continuing professional development, but are also important to drive improvements in quality continuing professional development where needs are prioritised, discussed and agreed on. Findings from this study highlight the value clinical nurses place on having access to work-based and clinically focussed education and development. Relevant on-the-job professional education has the potential to improve job satisfaction and retention of clinical nurses, thus ultimately

  10. How Health Care Complexity Leads to Cooperation and Affects the Autonomy of Health Care Professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Eric; Broekhuis, Manda; Stoffels, Renee; Jaspers, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Health professionals increasingly face patients with complex health problems and this pressurizes them to cooperate. The authors have analyzed how the complexity of health care problems relates to two types of cooperation: consultation and multidisciplinary teamwork (MTW). Moreover, they have

  11. How adolescents use technology for health information: implications for health professionals from focus group studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skinner, Harvey; Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake; Goldberg, Eudice

    2003-01-01

    .... To describe how adolescents use technology for their health-information needs, identify the challenges they face, and highlight some emerging roles of health professionals regarding eHealth services for adolescents...

  12. Brazilian experiments in Mobile Learning for Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Samáris Ramiro; Loddi, Sueli Aparecida; Larangeira, Valmir Aparecido; Labrada, Luis; Bandiera-Paiva, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    The Distance Education has evolved with the available technology in each new decade. The evolution and spread of mobile technology from year 2000s enabled their migration to this new platform: The Mobile Learning. Making it possible for professionals and students can carry with multimedia tools with Internet access to learning tools or professional references. This new concept fits very well the needs of Health, in which students must absorb and put into practice large amounts of technical knowledge, and also professionals must stay constantly updated. Distance Education in Health has received prominence in Brazil. A country of a geographically dispersed group of professionals, and research & training centers concentrated in the capitals. Updating field teams is a difficult task, but the information has access to modern technologies, which contribute to the teachers who use them. This paper, through the methodology of literature review, presents technology experiments in health environments and their considerations.

  13. [The competencies of health professionals and the ministerial policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Marques, Cláudia Maria; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

    2011-03-01

    In Brazil, nursing professionals are trained based on the perspective of professional competencies. The objective of this exploratory, descriptive study was to identify the critical-emancipator potential of the competency, as described by the Brazilian Ministries of Education and of Health. The sources used for data collection were the regulating documents of technical professional education of the referred Ministries regarding the years 1996 and 2006. Results showed that, for the Ministry of Education, the guiding principles of professional education are the demands of the working market; the idea of competency is supported on the constructivist perspective, highlighting personal features over their social dimension. For the Ministry of Health, professional education is an instrument of citizenship, guided by the political health care paradigm of the national public health system, referred to as the Unique Health System; the idea of competency is founded on the critical-emancipatory perspective. In conclusion, the two Ministries, despite having regulations regarding professional education, are contradictory in terms of their conceptual foundations.

  14. Adolescent friendly health services: perceptions and practice of medical professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujindra E.

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Effectively planning, implementation and also evaluation of health programs in adolescent health is required to change attitude of adolescents, the health providers and also that of the setting where adolescents are addressed. Health professionals have their credibility towards adolescents, and the advice they give may be important for teenage behavior. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(9.000: 2968-2972

  15. Attitudes of mental health professionals towards service user involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Laitila, Minna; Pitkänen, Anneli

    2017-08-22

    Patient-centred care and user involvement in healthcare services are much emphasised globally. This study was the first step in a multicentre research project in Finland to improve service users' and carers' opportunities to be more involved in mental health services. The aim of the study was to assess attitudes of professionals towards service user involvement. The data were collected via an online questionnaire from 1069 mental health professionals in four hospital districts. Altogether, 351 professionals responded. Data were analysed using appropriate statistical methods. According to the results, attitudes of healthcare professionals were more positive towards service users' involvement in their own treatment than in other levels of services. There were also differences in gender, age groups, working places and experiences in the attitudes of professionals concerning service users' involvement in their own treatment. These should be taken into account in the future when planning education for mental health professionals. In spite of governmental guidance on service user involvement and the growing body of knowledge of the benefits associated with it, change in attitudes towards user involvement is slow. Special attention should be paid to the attitudes of professionals working in inpatient care and of those with less working experience. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. Professional and community satisfaction with the Brazilian family health strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian G Perez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the strengths and limitations of the Family Health Strategy from the perspective of health care professionals and the community. METHODS: Between June-August 2009, in the city of Vespasiano, Minas Gerais State, Southeastern Brazil, a questionnaire was used to evaluate the Family Health Strategy (ESF with 77 healthcare professionals and 293 caregivers of children under five. Health care professional training, community access to health care, communication with patients and delivery of health education and pediatric care were the main points of interest in the evaluation. Logistic regression analysis was used to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals as well as to assess the statistical significance of the variables studied. RESULTS: The majority of health care professionals reported their program training was insufficient in quantity, content and method of delivery. Caregivers and professionals identified similar weaknesses (services not accessible to the community, lack of healthcare professionals, poor training for professionals and strengths (community health worker-patient communications, provision of educational information, and pediatric care. Recommendations for improvement included: more doctors and specialists, more and better training, and scheduling improvements. Caregiver satisfaction with the ESF was found to be related to perceived benefits such as community health agent household visits (OR 5.8, 95%CI 2.8;12.1, good professional-patient relationships (OR 4.8, 95%CI 2.5;9.3, and family-focused health (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.6;10.2; and perceived problems such as lack of personnel (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.2;0.6, difficulty with access (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.1;0.4, and poor quality of care (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.1;0.6. Overall, 62% of caregivers reported being generally satisfied with the ESF services. CONCLUSIONS: Identifying the limitations and strengths of the Family Health Strategy from the healthcare professional and

  17. Shared War reality effects on the professional quality of life of mental health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Pruginin, Itay; Segal-Engelchin, Dorit; Isralowitz, Richard; Reznik, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, studies on the outcomes of a shared war reality among mental health professionals (MHPs) in southern Israel have focused only on those residing and working in Otef Gaza. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of different exposure levels to shared trauma on the professional quality of life of MHPs in southern Israel. This study compares the level of secondary traumatic stress, burnout, and compassion satisfaction of social workers from Otef Gaza to social workers...

  18. Viewpoint: professionalism and humanism beyond the academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Herbert M

    2007-11-01

    Medical professionalism and humanism have long been integral to the practice of medicine, and they will continue to shape practice in the 21st century. In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding the nature of medical professionalism and in efforts to teach and assess professional values and behaviors. As more and more teaching of both medical students and residents occurs in settings outside of academic medical centers, it is critically important that community physicians demonstrate behaviors that resonate professionalism and humanism. As teachers, they must be committed to being role models for what physicians should be. Activities that are designed to promote and advance professionalism, then, must take place not only in academic settings but also in clinical practice sites that are beyond the academic health center. The author argues that professionalism and humanism share common values and that each can enrich the other. Because the cauldron of practice threatens to erode traditional values of professionalism, not only for individual physicians but also for the medical profession, practicing physicians must incorporate into practice settings activities that are explicitly designed to exemplify those values, not only with students and patients, but also within their communities. The author cites a number of examples of ways in which professionalism and humanism can be fostered by individual physicians as well as professional organizations.

  19. Information Seeking When Problem Solving: Perspectives of Public Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kristine; Dobbins, Maureen; Yost, Jennifer; Ciliska, Donna

    2017-04-01

    Given the many different types of professionals working in public health and their diverse roles, it is likely that their information needs, information-seeking behaviors, and problem-solving abilities differ. Although public health professionals often work in interdisciplinary teams, few studies have explored their information needs and behaviors within the context of teamwork. This study explored the relationship between Canadian public health professionals' perceptions of their problem-solving abilities and their information-seeking behaviors with a specific focus on the use of evidence in practice settings. It also explored their perceptions of collaborative information seeking and the work contexts in which they sought information. Key Canadian contacts at public health organizations helped recruit study participants through their list-servs. An electronic survey was used to gather data about (a) individual information-seeking behaviors, (b) collaborative information-seeking behaviors, (c) use of evidence in practice environments, (d) perceived problem-solving abilities, and (e) demographic characteristics. Fifty-eight public health professionals were recruited, with different roles and representing most Canadian provinces and one territory. A significant relationship was found between perceived problem-solving abilities and collaborative information-seeking behavior (r = -.44, p information seeking. The results suggested that when public health professionals take a shared, active approach to problem solving, maintain personal control, and have confidence, they are more likely collaborate with others in seeking information to complete a work task. Administrators of public health organizations should promote collaboration by implementing effective communication and information-seeking strategies, and by providing information resources and retrieval tools. Public health professionals' perceived problem-solving abilities can influence how they collaborate in

  20. Marital Status and Occupational Success Among Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, John H.; Spray, S. Lee

    1970-01-01

    Concludes that personal relations, professional experiences and occupational success form a network of relationships which integrate the occupational and nonoccupational roles of highly specialized practitioners. Part of a Study of Careers in the Mental Health Field, supported by National Institute of Mental Health Grant MH-09192 and directed by…

  1. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Mental Health Professionals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-20

    This podcast highlights the role of school mental health professionals in the management of food allergies in schools. It also identifies CDC food allergy resources for schools.  Created: 1/20/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/20/2015.

  2. Training, Communication, and Competence: The Making of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, My-Linh

    2009-01-01

    The role of medical anthropology in tackling the problems and challenges at the intersections of public health, medicine, and technology was addressed during the 2009 Society for Medical Anthropology Conference at Yale University in an interdisciplinary panel session entitled Training, Communication, and Competence: The Making of Health Care Professionals. PMID:20027287

  3. Introspection as intra-professionalism in social and health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Dybbroe, Betina

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses two cases from health and social care, adopting a psychosocietal approach. The analysis highlights how professionalism evolves and develops through an introspection of the relational and scenic processes between professionals, as well as between the professional and the client...... or patient. As a phenomenon at the core of professional practice, it will be argued that introspection needs to recognize and encompass the intra- and inter-psychic responses and understandings of professionals and their clients and patients. The first case places supervision as a learning space, where...... framing and complex exchanges of loss and confirmation, and of denial and displacement take place between a group of social workers and their supervisor. In the second case, it becomes apparent how the research interview opens up an opportunity for processing the emotions and socially critical experiences...

  4. Professional Preparation: Multicultural Health Beliefs in Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Linda Sue

    1982-01-01

    A course dealing with the health beliefs of Hispanics, American Indians, and Anglo Americans was developed at the University of New Mexico. An ethnically diverse class visited different cultural settings in the Southwest to study beliefs about religion, nutrition, folk medicine, and other customs affecting health practices. (PP)

  5. Professional Assistance in Implementing School Health Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Nicole; van Assema, Patricia; Hesdahl, Bert; de Vries, Nanne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of a school health promotion (SHP) advisor in the implementation of the six steps of the Dutch "Schoolbeat" approach, aimed at establishing health promotion policies and activities in secondary schools. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 80 school board members, and 18…

  6. An interventional model to develop health professionals in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanou, Anselme Simeon; Awoyale, Florence Adeola; Diallo, Abdoulaye

    2014-01-01

    The health sector is characterized by a human resource base lacking in numbers, specialized skills, and management skills. West African Health Organization (WAHO) recognizes the need within the West Africa sub-region for bilingual professionals who are skilled in public health, management, leadership, and information technology to build human capacity in public health and developed the Young Professionals Internship Program (YPIP). Our study explores the evolution of the programme. YPIP program has successfully carried out its original aims and objectives to equip young professionals with basic principles of public health, management, and leadership, acquire competence in a second official language (French, English, and Portuguese), information and communication technology. Contributing factors towards this successful evaluation included positive ratings and commentary from previous interns about the relevance, usefulness, and quality of the programme, encouraging feedback from WAHO management, trainers, administrators, and intern employers on the impact of the YPIP program on young professionals, supporting evidence that demonstrates increased knowledge in professional skills and language competency.

  7. Web information retrieval for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S L; See-To, Eric W K; Tse, Y K

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a Web Information Retrieval System (WebIRS), which is designed to assist the healthcare professionals to obtain up-to-date medical knowledge and information via the World Wide Web (WWW). The system leverages the document classification and text summarization techniques to deliver the highly correlated medical information to the physicians. The system architecture of the proposed WebIRS is first discussed, and then a case study on an application of the proposed system in a Hong Kong medical organization is presented to illustrate the adoption process and a questionnaire is administrated to collect feedback on the operation and performance of WebIRS in comparison with conventional information retrieval in the WWW. A prototype system has been constructed and implemented on a trial basis in a medical organization. It has proven to be of benefit to healthcare professionals through its automatic functions in classification and summarizing the medical information that the physicians needed and interested. The results of the case study show that with the use of the proposed WebIRS, significant reduction of searching time and effort, with retrieval of highly relevant materials can be attained.

  8. The meanings of professional life: teaching across the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Maureen

    2002-08-01

    Most of professional ethics is grounded on the assumption that we can speak meaningfully about particular, insulated professions with aims and goals, that conceptually there exists a clear "inside and outside" to any given profession. Professional ethics has also inherited the two-part assumption from mainstream moral philosophy that we can speak meaningfully about agent-relative versus agent-neutral moral perspectives, and further, that it is only from the agent-neutral perspective that we can truly evaluate our professional moral aims, rules, and practices. Several important changes that have occurred, or are currently taking place, in the structure of the health care professions, challenge those assumptions and signal the need for teachers of professional ethics to rethink the content of what we teach as well as our teaching methods. The changes include: influences and critique from other professions and from those who are served by the health professions, and influences and critique from professionals themselves, including increased activism and dissent from within the professions. The discussion focuses on changes that have occurred in the health-related fields, but insofar as similar changes are occurring in other professions such as law and business, these arguments will have broader conceptual implications for the way we ought to think about professional ethics more generally.

  9. [Conscientious objection for health professionals in ethics and deontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez León, Mercedes; Rabadán Jiménez, José

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to highlight the numerous conflicts enters the consciousness and the laws are becoming more frequent health professionals in daily clinical practice. Clarify and define concepts such as ″conscientious objection for health professionals, to avoid confusion with other terms. This is work that aims to address the objection of conscience, not from the law but from the ethics and deontology, reviewing existing regulations both internationally and nationally. In addition to complete the studio, in a last part we discuss the state of the ″conscientious objection″ tars the recent passage of the organic law 2 / 2010, 3 march, sexual and reproductive health and the interruption of pregnancy. As a final conclusion we can say that ″conscientious objection″ is recognized in international declarations and even in the european constitution. in spain, the code of ethics and medical ethics, is one of the places where the objection of conscience of health professionals has great development for years, states that the doctor can refrain from the practice of certain professional acts such as abortion, in vitro fertilization or sterilization, if they are in contradiction with its ethical and scientific beliefs. Also recently, the general assembly of october 24, 2009, the central committee of ethics has made a declaration on ″conscientious objection″, insisting on its recognition. Finally, the organic law 2 / 2010, 3 march, sexual and reproductive health and the interruption of pregnancy, seems to be recognized ″the right to exercise conscientious objection″ of health professionals directly involved in the voluntary termination of pregnancy, after much discussion, but it is still early to assess the implementation of this right because, until july 5, 2010, will come into force this law, what will the future that we clarify the development of this important right for health professionals.

  10. Practices Internship and Professional Orientation in Health Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ertaş, Abdulaziz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was designed to demonstrate the importance of compulsory training course implementation and make developing suggestions. The study population included the students who attended the compulsory training course and internship implementation organized by Health Institutions Management Department of Afyon Health College in Afyon Kocatepe University. There has been an effort to increase university students', who are prospective health managers, professional manners by...

  11. Transforming health professionals' education in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    present the contribution of a Social and Community Medicine program at the University of Rwanda to this new era ... Internationally, there is a movement to transform health ... fessional values and preparing students for future chal- lenges.

  12. Allied health professionals and cardiometabolic disease risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... cardiometabolic risk factors (body mass index, circumferences, blood pressure, lipoproteins ... threshold for increased chronic disease risk was as high as 50% for selected risk factors.

  13. Conceptualizations of professional competencies in school health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Monica Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the conceptualization and discussion of professional competencies needed for supporting the development of the whole-school approach in school health promotion (SHP). Design: The paper is based a conceptual synthesis of literature, guided...... by a theoretical perspective on health promotion agency and professional competencies to identify core competency domains and elements. This is followed by a discussion of focus, gaps, and links in conceptualizations of competency domains and elements. Findings: The synthesis identifies five core competency...... domains: 1) policy-development, 2) organizational development, 3) professional development, 4) development of students’ learning, and 5) development of health promotion activities. Three critical gaps in the conceptualizations of competency domains and elements are identified and discussed: 1...

  14. Cognitive schemas among mental health professionals: Adaptive or maladaptive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Saddichha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Maladaptive cognitive schemas can lead to biases during clinical assessment or psychotherapeutic interventions. This study aimed to explore the cognitive schemas among mental health professionals. Materials and Methods: 100 mental health professionals, of both genders, equally divided between psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and psychiatric nurses, were approached and administered the Young Schema Questionnaire - Short Form after written informed consent. Results: Males had higher maladaptive schemas than female respondents across all schema domains, viz., disconnection/rejection, impaired autonomy, impaired limits, other-directedness, and overvigilance (P ≤ 0.05. Psychiatrists had higher maladaptive schemas than psychologists (P ≤ 0.05. Age was weakly but positively corelated with the schemas of self-sacrifice (P = 0.038 and unrelenting standards (P = 0.002 . Conclusions: Mental health professionals also may have maladaptive schemas, which needs to be addressed through schema therapy.

  15. Education strategies to foster health professional students' clinical reasoning skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochmawati, Erna; Wiechula, Rick

    2010-06-01

    Clinical reasoning is an important skill for health professionals that should be developed to achieve high levels of expertise. Several education strategies have been suggested for implementation by health professional educators to foster their students' clinical reasoning skills. The strategies have included the following: problem-based learning, the integrative curriculum, reflection, and concept mapping. This review assesses which is the most effective education strategy for developing the clinical reasoning skills of health professional students. Four publications, from a total of 692 identified records, were included. Overall, this review was not able to make a final conclusion to answer the question. Therefore, there is a need to conduct more studies with larger samples and to undertake research that evaluates the following aspects: more alternate education interventions, variations in the delivery of education interventions, and the cost-effectiveness of implementing education strategies.

  16. [Public health professionals and the Internet: usage patterns and perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orizio, G; Gelatti, U

    2010-01-01

    The internet has deeply changed our way to communicate, transforming society, and the world of health has been consequently influenced by this communicational revolution. Aim of the study was to investigate the web utilization and perception by the Italian health professionals, using an online questionnaire. A sample of 490 health professionals responded to the questionnaire. Almost all the responders use the internet, for work and leisure, and they are aware that this communication tool influences a lot both their knowledge and opinions. Internet is perceived as a useful and positive mean for accessing and spreading information by health professionals and health institutions, even if a worried attitude is expressed regarding to access to online health information by the general population. The broaden access to health information through the web opens new scenarios to future health systems. This evolving communication change poses to public health the challenge to get the benefits that internet can potentially generate, minimising the risks that at the same time can arise.

  17. [Professional communication in long term health care quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Padilla, E; Sarmiento Medina, P; Ramírez Jaramillo, A

    2014-01-01

    To Identify aspects of professional communication that affect the quality of long-term care for patients with chronic illness or disabilities and their families, in the experience of health professionals, as input for the development of an assessment tool. Descriptive qualitative.The data was processed by performing an interpretative analysis from grounded theory. The participants included 12 health professionals (three doctors, three nurses, three therapists and three psychologists), who work at the Hospital of the Universidad de La Sabana, Chia, and other institutions in Bogota, Colombia,with more than five years experience in programs treating chronic disease or disability in hospital therapeutic contexts. Semi-structured interviews and a Delphi survey were used. Validation strategies included, theoretical sampling, script evaluation by judges, triangulation of data collection techniques, and interviewers. We defined specific aspects of professional communication that could optimize the quality of health care, in information management as well as in the relationships with patients and families. From these aspects, an explanatory matrix was designed with axes, categories, and codes as a support for the construction of tools. Health communication, in order to become a therapeutic support element, requires professional training in communication skills to give information in an understandable way, with emotional support and coping possibilities. It should include and involve the family in decision making. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Research experience and research interests of allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Delwyne; Taylor, Nicholas F; Taylor, Nicholas; Leggat, Sandra G

    2009-01-01

    Allied heath professionals are expected to utilize evidence-based practices in their workplaces, and there is an increasing expectation that clinicians will become involved in clinical research. With the aim of establishing the level of interest and experience in clinical research among allied health professionals in Australia, 132 allied health professional in Australia were surveyed to determine their level of interest and their level of experience in clinical research. The Research Spider survey tool was used to examine clinicians' level of research experience and level of research interest across ten core areas. These areas included writing a research proposal, using quantitative methods, publishing research, writing and presenting a research report, analysing and interpreting results, using qualitative research methods, critically reviewing literature, finding relevant literature, generating research ideas and applying for research funding. Overall, allied health professionals rated themselves as having "little research experience." While clinicians' level of interest in research was significantly greater than their level of research experience, clinicians as a whole only had "some interest" in research. Fifteen percent of the sample were very interested in research. The results of this study have implications for the implementation of education and support programs aimed at providing clinical research opportunities for allied health professionals.

  19. [Oral infections and pregnancy: knowledge of health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, L; Le Borgne, H; Samson, M; Boutigny, H; Philippe, H-J; Soueidan, A

    2013-11-01

    The abundance of recent studies on the relationship between oral diseases and complications of pregnancy leads to questions on knowledge of health professionals. This study aims to establish an inventory of knowledge and practice of health professionals in France on this issue. A questionnaire on knowledge of the relationship between oral diseases and complications of pregnancy was referred to gynaecologists and obstetricians, midwives and dentists. This study was conducted at the University Hospital of Nantes and Le Mans General Hospital. Eighty-seven professionals of pregnancy and 259 dentists responded to the survey. Bleeding gums and pregnancy gingivitis are the oral manifestations most cited by all practitioners. There is however a difference concerning the epulis and caries risk. The most cited Pregnancy complications are risk of premature delivery and chorioamniotitis. Only dentists had received initial training on pregnancy complications. Finally, all health professionals point to the lack of continued education on this topic. There is a good knowledge of the pregnancy complications associated with oral disease despite the lack of training of pregnancy, but the attitudes of care are not still in adequacy. It appears necessary to strengthen the training of all practitioners in this field. The design and implementation of a specific questionnaire on oral health status could allow better identification of the patients at risk by the professionals of pregnancy, and optimize so the care of pregnant women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-04-26

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public healthThe landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector.

  1. Training Mental Health Professionals in Child Sexual Abuse: Curricular Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Maureen C; Abreu, Roberto L

    2015-01-01

    Given the incidence of child sexual abuse in the United States, mental health professionals need training to detect, assess, and treat victims and should possess a clear understanding of the process of victimization. However, many mental health professionals who work with children and families have not been exposed to any training in child sexual abuse during their formal education. This article will examine the need for such training, suggest critical components of child sexual abuse training, and describe various methods of training (e.g., in person, Web-based, and community resources).

  2. Teaching statistics to health professionals: the legal analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, E; Ostbye, T

    1992-01-01

    Despite the importance of statistical concepts to health professionals, the teaching of statistics to students from this field has generally been unrewarding. We feel that a few central concepts are crucial to all statistical thinking and that, for most health professionals, the communication of these is more important than learning about complex mathematical models. A device for demonstrating the parallels between a criminal legal trial and statistical hypothesis testing is presented. We feel that it can facilitate the learning of this central statistical concept.

  3. Accessibility of professional health care (PRHC in greater Bloemfontein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. E. J. van Vuuren

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available The health of citizens is usually a priority in any society. In order to prevent/cure disease, people make use of various forms of care, ranging from lay care to professional health care (PRHC. Professional health care, however, is not equally accessible to all members of a society. This article attempts to indicate how factors such as costs, distance, consultation hours, attitude of medical personnel can result in PRHC being less accessible for some members and totally inaccessible for other members of a society. It is imperative that health care planners should once again review this issue in order to ensure that all South Africans are able to exercise their basic right to health care.

  4. Developing a health surveillance strategy for professional footballers in compliance with UK health and safety legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, Colin W; Hawkins, Richard D

    1997-01-01

    The need for health surveillance for professional footballers has been assessed against criteria specified in UK health and safety legislation. As footballers suffer from chronic injuries under normal playing conditions, professional football clubs have a requirement to implement health surveillance programmes to protect their players. A health surveillance programme, based on benchmarking a player's fitness and addressing the issues of pre-recruitment, pre-season, during-season, post-season,...

  5. An Exploration of How Health Professionals Create eHealth and mHealth Education Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, Suha Rahif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how health education professionals create ehealth and mhealth education interventions. Three research questions led this qualitative study. The first research question focused on the use of learning theories, instructional models, and instructional design models. The second research question focused on the…

  6. An Exploration of How Health Professionals Create eHealth and mHealth Education Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, Suha Rahif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how health education professionals create ehealth and mhealth education interventions. Three research questions led this qualitative study. The first research question focused on the use of learning theories, instructional models, and instructional design models. The second research question focused on the…

  7. Patient preference for genders of health professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Bensing, J.M.; Andela, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Preferences for physicians' gender is an obvious and well documented example of considerations of patients' attitudes. But research carried out in this field is rather limited to the domain of family medicine. This article describes preferences for 13 different health professions: surgeons,

  8. Patient preference for genders of health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Bensing, J.; Andela, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Preferences for physicians' gender is an obvious and well documented example of considerations of patients' attitudes. But research carried out in this field is rather limited to the domain of family medicine. This article describes preferences for 13 different health professions: surgeons,

  9. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Myers, MSLIS, AHIP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals’ self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods: A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants’demographic information and their competency attainment. ‘‘Early career’’ health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, ‘‘I have demonstrated this competency.’’ Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results: One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Health Sciences Information Services’’ competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Research, Analysis, and Interpretation’’ competency. Conclusions: These results contribute to the ongoing discussions

  10. Integrating Poverty and Gender into Health Programs: A Sourcebook for Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll-Black, Sarah; Bhushan, Anjana; Fritsch, Kathleen

    2007-12-01

    Evidence increasingly shows that poverty and gender inequalities are important determinants of health and influence the opportunity for timely and appropriate health care. These findings suggest that health professionals need to have a sound understanding of health inequalities and their causes, as well as of how they can be addressed. However, through surveys to health ministries and educational institutions in 2001, the World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific found that awareness of, and capacity to respond to, poverty and gender concerns in health was weak. In response, the Regional Office initiated a project to develop materials to support the integration of poverty and gender concerns into health professional education curricula. The multimodule publication, Integrating Poverty and Gender into Health Programmes: A Sourcebook for Health Professionals, supports evidence-based and participatory learning. The experience to date suggests that the publication might be meeting a long-felt need for such a response.

  11. Domestic violence against women: representations of health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia de Oliveira Gomes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to analyze the representations about domestic violence against women, among health professionals of Family Health Units.Method: qualitative study based on the Theory of Social Representations. Data were collected by means of evocations and interviews, treating them in the Ensemble de Programmes Pemettant L'Analyse des Evocations software - EVOC and content analysis.Results: nurses, physicians, nursing technicians and community health agents participated. The evocations were answered by 201 professionals and, of these, 64 were interviewed. The central core of this representation, comprised by the terms "aggression", "physical-aggression", "cowardice" and "lack of respect", which have negative connotations and were cited by interviewees. In the contrast zone, comprised by the terms "abuse", "abuse-power", "pain", "humiliation", "impunity", "suffering", "sadness" and "violence", two subgroups were identified. The first periphery contains the terms "fear", evoked most often, followed by "revolt", "low self-esteem" and "submission", and in the second periphery "acceptance" and "professional support".Conclusion: this is a structured representation since it contains conceptual, imagetic and attitudinal elements. The subgroups were comprised by professionals working in the rural area and by those who had completed their professional training course in or after 2004. These presented a representation of violence different from the representation of the general group, although all demonstrated a negative connotation of this phenomenon.

  12. Domestic violence against women: representations of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Vera Lúcia de Oliveira; Silva, Camila Daiane; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; Acosta, Daniele Ferreira; Amarijo, Cristiane Lopes

    2015-01-01

    to analyze the representations about domestic violence against women, among health professionals of Family Health Units. qualitative study based on the Theory of Social Representations. Data were collected by means of evocations and interviews, treating them in the Ensemble de Programmes Pemettant L'Analyse des Evocations software - EVOC and content analysis. nurses, physicians, nursing technicians and community health agents participated. The evocations were answered by 201 professionals and, of these, 64 were interviewed. The central core of this representation, comprised by the terms "aggression", "physical-aggression", "cowardice" and "lack of respect", which have negative connotations and were cited by interviewees. In the contrast zone, comprised by the terms "abuse", "abuse-power", "pain", "humiliation", "impunity", "suffering", "sadness" and "violence", two subgroups were identified. The first periphery contains the terms "fear", evoked most often, followed by "revolt", "low self-esteem" and "submission", and in the second periphery "acceptance" and "professional support". this is a structured representation since it contains conceptual, imagetic and attitudinal elements. The subgroups were comprised by professionals working in the rural area and by those who had completed their professional training course in or after 2004. These presented a representation of violence different from the representation of the general group, although all demonstrated a negative connotation of this phenomenon.

  13. Domestic violence against women: representations of health professionals 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Vera Lúcia de Oliveira; Silva, Camila Daiane; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; Acosta, Daniele Ferreira; Amarijo, Cristiane Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the representations about domestic violence against women, among health professionals of Family Health Units. Method: qualitative study based on the Theory of Social Representations. Data were collected by means of evocations and interviews, treating them in the Ensemble de Programmes Pemettant L'Analyse des Evocations software - EVOC and content analysis. Results: nurses, physicians, nursing technicians and community health agents participated. The evocations were answered by 201 professionals and, of these, 64 were interviewed. The central core of this representation, comprised by the terms "aggression", "physical-aggression", "cowardice" and "lack of respect", which have negative connotations and were cited by interviewees. In the contrast zone, comprised by the terms "abuse", "abuse-power", "pain", "humiliation", "impunity", "suffering", "sadness" and "violence", two subgroups were identified. The first periphery contains the terms "fear", evoked most often, followed by "revolt", "low self-esteem" and "submission", and in the second periphery "acceptance" and "professional support". Conclusion: this is a structured representation since it contains conceptual, imagetic and attitudinal elements. The subgroups were comprised by professionals working in the rural area and by those who had completed their professional training course in or after 2004. These presented a representation of violence different from the representation of the general group, although all demonstrated a negative connotation of this phenomenon. PMID:26444175

  14. Evaluation of Online Health and Wellness Resources for Healthcare Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colla Jean Macdonald

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Two online resources, ePhysicianHealth.com and eWorkplaceHealth.com, were developed to help physicians and other healthcare professionals improve their health and well-being by providing them with relevant, up-to-date support and resources at no cost and with anonymous access. ePhysicianHealth.com is the world’s first comprehensive, online physician health and wellness resource designed to help physicians and medical students be resilient in their professional and personal lives. eWorkplaceHealth.com is a new and original resource aimed to increase awareness and understanding of the issues and factors that may affect healthcare professionals’ health at work. ePhysicianHealth.com includes 14 modules in French and English and eWorkplaceHealth.com comprises a four-module program in English. A program evaluation using quantitative and qualitative methods was conducted to obtain evidence regarding the users’ perceptions of the learning resources and their impact on the specified outcomes. Most participants felt they gained new knowledge from ePhysicianHealth.com and eWorkplaceHealth.com. They felt they had access to useful information through the resources, which increased their awareness of the various issues facing physicians today and where they can go to get assistance when in need.

  15. Mental health training for law enforcement professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermette, Heidi S; Pinals, Debra A; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine topics of interest and preferred modalities of training for police officers in their work with persons with mental illness. Police officers across Massachusetts attending in-service mental health training were asked to rate the importance of potential mental health topics and the effectiveness of potential training modalities on a Likert-type scale. Additional data collected included the officer's experience, level of education, motivation for attendance, previous attendance of post-academy mental health training, and preferences for length, frequency, training site, and trainer qualifications. A t test was used to determine if there were significant differences (p attend the training. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used to determine if there were significant differences (p lecture formats and to determine the effect of education and experience on the results. Although all topics suggested were rated, primarily, as fairly important, the topics of Dangerousness, Suicide by Cop, Decreasing Suicide Risk, Mental Health Law, and Your Potential Liability for Bad Outcomes were given the highest ratings. Role-playing was rated significantly lower than other training modalities, while Videos and Small Group Discussion had the highest mean scores. Level of prior education had no significant effect on the ratings, but officers with more experience rated the importance of mental illness as a training topic significantly higher than officers with less experience. This survey suggests that police officers are interested in learning more about working with persons with mental illness and view it as an important aspect of the job.

  16. [Health professionals' opinion of the Catalan Health Plan. Basis for a reflexion on the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugulat, P; Séculi, E; Fusté, J; Juncà, S; Martínez, V; Medina, A; Mercader, M; Sánchez, E

    2003-01-01

    To know health professional's opinion of the Health Plan for Catalonia (Spain) in order to get news elements for the formulation and management of new plans. Combination of quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Postal survey to doctors and nurses (multistage randomised sample). 3.223 questionnaires were obtained (response rate: 34,1%). Interview to a selected sample of 41 health care professionals and managers. 78,8% (IC95%: 1,4) of health professionals are familiar with the Health Plan, and for most of them it is valued as important. 28,9% (IC95%: 1,7) of the professionals who know the Plan consider that it has repercussions in their daily work and 51,8% (IC95%: 1,9) declare that it doesn't have any repercussions. Different issues such as the planning process, the contents, the dissemination strategy, as well as a the poor impact on the health budget are critised. Differences by age group and sex, care setting and type of health professional are observed. The implication of health professionals in the discussion, formulation and implementation of the Health Plan proposals needs to be improved. It will be necessary to make progress in identifying health problems and needs, in setting priorities and in the allocation of resources. To increase the multisectorial involvement and to develop marketing strategies directed to politicians, managers and health professionals will also be needed in order to increase the impact of the Health Plan on both the Health System and the other sectors involved in health. The role to be played by the Health Plan in the health system must be redefined and this will lead to redesigning the planning process and the implementation of health strategies.

  17. Managing workplace depression: an untapped opportunity for occupational health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Kelly; McKibbin, Laura

    2004-03-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and costly health issues affecting the American work force. Despite well established research demonstrating the association between employee depression and reduced on-the-job productivity, increased absenteeism, and higher health care use, most employers remain largely unresponsive to the need for company based depression initiatives. Organizational and individual barriers can prevent companies from effectively managing employee depression. Organizational barriers include information gaps, lack of data to justify increased investment in employee mental health programs, and employers' ambiguous roles in addressing depression. Individual barriers such as an inability to recognize signs and symptoms; stigma; confidentiality and privacy concerns; and unavailability of easily accessible, quality resources can keep employees who are depressed from seeking treatment. Many occupational health professionals may feel ill prepared or uncomfortable taking the lead in creating more aggressive worksite responses to depression, but they are, perhaps, in the best of all possible positions within an organization to succeed. Occupational health professionals have the credentials, credibility, training, and experience necessary to build a strong case for business leaders for why investing in workplace depression programs is so important. Occupational health professionals are the most qualified to design and deliver destigmatized, customer friendly programs and services for employees to access for help with depression, and to integrate their services with other departments such as benefits, health promotion, EAP, and human resources, to create an effective, organization-wide depression initiative.

  18. The Charter on Professionalism for Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egener, Barry E; Mason, Diana J; McDonald, Walter J; Okun, Sally; Gaines, Martha E; Fleming, David A; Rosof, Bernie M; Gullen, David; Andresen, May-Lynn

    2017-08-01

    In 2002, the Physician Charter on Medical Professionalism was published to provide physicians with guidance for decision making in a rapidly changing environment. Feedback from physicians indicated that they were unable to fully live up to the principles in the 2002 charter partly because of their employing or affiliated health care organizations. A multistakeholder group has developed a Charter on Professionalism for Health Care Organizations, which may provide more guidance than charters for individual disciplines, given the current structure of health care delivery systems.This article contains the Charter on Professionalism for Health Care Organizations, as well as the process and rationale for its development. For hospitals and hospital systems to effectively care for patients, maintain a healthy workforce, and improve the health of populations, they must attend to the four domains addressed by the Charter: patient partnerships, organizational culture, community partnerships, and operations and business practices. Impacting the social determinants of health will require collaboration among health care organizations, government, and communities.Transitioning to the model hospital described by the Charter will challenge historical roles and assumptions of both its leadership and staff. While the Charter is aspirational, it also outlines specific institutional behaviors that will benefit both patients and workers. Lastly, this article considers obstacles to implementing the Charter and explores avenues to facilitate its dissemination.

  19. The Charter on Professionalism for Health Care Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Diana J.; McDonald, Walter J.; Okun, Sally; Gaines, Martha E.; Fleming, David A.; Rosof, Bernie M.; Gullen, David; Andresen, May-Lynn

    2017-01-01

    In 2002, the Physician Charter on Medical Professionalism was published to provide physicians with guidance for decision making in a rapidly changing environment. Feedback from physicians indicated that they were unable to fully live up to the principles in the 2002 charter partly because of their employing or affiliated health care organizations. A multistakeholder group has developed a Charter on Professionalism for Health Care Organizations, which may provide more guidance than charters for individual disciplines, given the current structure of health care delivery systems. This article contains the Charter on Professionalism for Health Care Organizations, as well as the process and rationale for its development. For hospitals and hospital systems to effectively care for patients, maintain a healthy workforce, and improve the health of populations, they must attend to the four domains addressed by the Charter: patient partnerships, organizational culture, community partnerships, and operations and business practices. Impacting the social determinants of health will require collaboration among health care organizations, government, and communities. Transitioning to the model hospital described by the Charter will challenge historical roles and assumptions of both its leadership and staff. While the Charter is aspirational, it also outlines specific institutional behaviors that will benefit both patients and workers. Lastly, this article considers obstacles to implementing the Charter and explores avenues to facilitate its dissemination. PMID:28079726

  20. Gamification in Healthcare: Perspectives of Mental Health Service Users and Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopia, Hanna; Raitio, Katja

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to explore the perceptions and experiences that mental health service users (n = 10) and healthcare professionals (n = 32) have regarding the use of gamification in mental health care. Data was gathered by interviews. The mental health service users described promoting and retarding factors in the use of gamification, while professionals described the requirements for using gamification and changes occurring in the work culture. Additional research is needed on how game-playing elements could be integrated as a systematic part of mental health practice and how the digital skills of professionals could be effectively developed.

  1. Making sense of domestic violence intervention in professional health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husso, Marita; Virkki, Tuija; Notko, Marianne; Holma, Juha; Laitila, Aarno; Mäntysaari, Mikko

    2012-07-01

    Intervening in domestic violence in the health care and social service settings is a complex and contested issue. In this qualitative, multidisciplinary study, the barriers to but also the possibilities for health care professionals in encountering victims of violence were scrutinised. The focus was on omissions in service structure and practices. The data consisted of six focus group interviews with nurses, physicians, social workers and psychologists in specialist health care (n = 30) conducted in Finland in 2009. The aim was to explore professionals' processes of making sense of violence interventions and the organisational practices of violence interventions. Four types of framing of the domestic violence issue were identified: (i) practical frame, (ii) medical frame, (iii) individualistic frame and (iv) psychological frame. Each frame consisted of particular features relating to explaining, structuring or dismissing the question of domestic violence in health care settings. The main themes included the division of responsibilities and feasibility of treatment. All four frames underlie the tendency for healthcare professionals to arrive at sense-making practices where it is possible to focus on fixing the injuries and consequences of domestic violence and bypassing the issue of violence as the cause of symptoms and injuries. The results indicate that developing successful practices both in identifying survivors of domestic violence and in preventing further victimisation requires a broad understanding of the effects of domestic violence and the challenges for health care professionals in dealing with it. New perspectives are needed in creating adequate practices both for victims of violence seeking help and for professionals working with this issue. Strong support at the organisational level and established practices throughout the fields of health and social care are the key elements in building a responsible approach to domestic violence.

  2. VA Health Professional Scholarship and Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Programs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its VA Health Professional Scholarship Program (HPSP) regulations. VA is also establishing regulations for a new program, the Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Program (VIOMPSP). These regulations comply with and implement sections 302 and 603 of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 (the 2010 Act). Section 302 of the 2010 Act established the VIOMPSP, which authorizes VA to provide financial assistance to certain students seeking a degree in visual impairment or orientation or mobility, in order to increase the supply of qualified blind rehabilitation specialists for VA and the United States. Section 603 of the 2010 Act reauthorized and modified HPSP, a program that provides scholarships for education or training in certain health care occupations.

  3. Overview of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders for Mental Health Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Margaret E.; Gibbard, W. Benton

    2003-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), including Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and related disorders such as Alcohol Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder (ARND) are the most common form of developmental disability and birth defects in the western world. Early recognition and accurate diagnosis by mental health professionals remains a key issue. This article reviews history, mechanisms of alcohol exposure, epidemiology, diagnosis and management of FASD.

  4. Conceptualizations of Professional Competencies in School Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the conceptualization and discussion of professional competencies needed for supporting the development of the whole-school approach in school health promotion (SHP). Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a conceptual synthesis of literature, guided by a theoretical perspective on…

  5. Implementation of School Health Promotion: Consequences for Professional Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, N. M. W. M.; de Vries, N. K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This case study aimed to examine the factors influencing the implementation of health promotion (HP) policies and programs in secondary schools and the consequences for professional assistance. Design/methodology/approach: Group interviews were held in two schools that represented the best and worst case of implementation of a health…

  6. The Teaching of Psychology on Health Professional Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic; Mansell, Hayley

    2008-01-01

    Psychology is taught on a range of vocational courses including such training for professions as nurses, medics, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and other health care professionals. However, what is uncertain is what psychology is taught, who it is taught by and how it is taught. This project aims to address these unresolved questions…

  7. Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

  8. Teaching Death Management Skills: Health Professionals Confront Patient Avoidance Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanham, Raymond; And Others

    Health professionals tend to view dying patients with two intertwined attitudes. On one hand the patient possesses an irreversible pathological condition and the doctor is obliged to help that patient embrace death with as much dignity as possible. On the other hand, the patient's imminent death is daily testimony to the limits of the doctor's…

  9. Critically reflective work behavior of health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Esther de; Jaarsma, Debbie; Endedijk, Maaike; Mainhard, Tim; Lam, Ineke; Simons, Robert-Jan; Beukelen, Peter van

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Better understanding of critically reflective work behavior (CRWB), an approach for work-related informal learning, is important in order to gain more profound insight in the continuing development of health care professionals. METHODS: A survey, developed to measure CRWB and its predi

  10. [[How to Prevent Emotional Burnout Syndrome in Health Professionals?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfimova, E V; Elfimov, M A; Berezkin, A S

    2016-01-01

    Working in conditions of physical and psychological overload, occupational hazard makes health workers vulnerable to the development of burnout syndrome. Currently, 67.6% of physicians in Russia suffer from emotional burnout syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by a certain symptoms, which have their predictors. Prevention and treatment of emotional burnout syndrome - a complex problem that can be solved with the participation of heads of medical institutions, full- time psychologists and psychotherapists with the direct involvement of health professionals.

  11. Plagiarism and registered health professionals: navigating the borderlands between scholarly and professional misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jon

    2013-12-01

    As access to published materials becomes more readily available, the ability to plagiarise material, deliberately or unwittingly has become easier than ever. This article explores important recent decisions in Australia and the United Kingdom regarding registered health practitioners who have engaged in plagiarism, both related and unrelated to their clinical practice, and explores the ways in which regulatory authorities in these countries have viewed scholarly misconduct committed by registered health professionals. This article also examines the implications of plagiarism for the registered health professions, and makes suggestions for strategies to reduce its influence and incidence in modern clinical practice.

  12. Professionalization and public health: historical legacies, continuing dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Professionalization in public health reflects wider institutional and political forces. Depending on the historical context in different countries, public health has developed as a medical specialty or as an independent field, entirely within the state or in mixed public-private institutions, closely or weakly tied to social movements, and in varying relations to fields such as engineering, nursing, environmental science, and the military. In early 20th-century America, the rise of the medical profession and the biomedical model of disease had a formative influence on public health, leading to a different institutional pattern from Britain. Public health in the United States emerged (1) largely outside the medical profession, but under the sway of the biomedical model; (2) without medicine's command of an exclusive jurisdiction and high status; and (3) with a limited role in healthcare organization and planning. Professionalism in public health continues to be subjected to contradictory pressures and uncertainties. Healthcare reform, bioterrorism, and environmental crises could expand its mandate and access to resources, but conflicts with other institutions are likely to result in limits on the capacity of public health professionals to assert an exclusive jurisdiction.

  13. Learning professional ethics: Student experiences in a health mentor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Sylvia; Lymer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The use of patient centred approaches to healthcare education is evolving, yet the effectiveness of these approaches in relation to professional ethics education is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and learning of health profession students engaged in an ethics module as part of a Health Mentor Program at the University of Toronto. Students were assigned to interprofessional groups representing seven professional programs and matched with a health mentor. The health mentors, individuals living with chronic health conditions, shared their experiences of the healthcare system through 90 minute semi-structured interviews with the students. Following the interviews, students completed self-reflective papers and engaged in facilitated asynchronous online discussions. Thematic analysis of reflections and discussions was used to uncover pertaining to student experiences and learning regarding professional ethics. Five major themes emerged from the data: (1) Patient autonomy and expertise in care; (2) ethical complexity and its inevitable reality in the clinical practice setting; (3) patient advocacy as an essential component of day-to-day practice; (4) qualities of remarkable clinicians that informed personal ideals for future practice; (5) patients' perspectives on clinician error and how they enabled suggestions for improving future practice. The findings of a study in one university context suggest that engagement with the health mentor narratives facilitated students' critical reflection related to their understanding of the principles of healthcare ethics.

  14. Work-related stress among health professionals in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boran, A; Shawaheen, M; Khader, Y; Amarin, Z; Hill Rice, V

    2012-03-01

    Job stress is common in health care professionals in the west. Less is known about its prevalence in Middle Eastern countries. To determine job stress, its sources and its effect on health care professionals in northern Jordan. A simple random sample of 101 physician specialists, 126 dentists, 52 general practitioners and 123 pharmacists in northern Jordan completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire, and addressed structured questions about job stress. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses were used to describe and compare participants, and a binary logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with stress and reported health problems. Of the 402 health care professionals, 27% reported high levels of stress. Prevalence was highest among general practitioners (33%), then dentists (30%) and pharmacists (25%). The lowest stress was among physician specialists (12%). Factors associated with the highest stress were being a general practitioner, being a woman and having long working hours. Dealing with uncooperative patients and heavy workloads were additional stressors. The most frequent problems associated with high stress were irritability (58%), consuming more arousal drinks (e.g. coffee, cola) (56%), difficulty concentrating (51%), headaches (63%), chronic back pain (48%) and common colds (47%). Compared to physician specialists, general practitioners, dentists and pharmacists were significantly more stressed. Reported stress was associated with job title, being a woman and long working hours. Also uncooperative patients and heavy workloads were significant problems. Being irritable and having headaches and common colds were the most frequent health issues.

  15. Injustice in Access to Health Information: The Difference between Health Professionals and Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ashrafi-rizi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of information is undeniable in promoting public health (1-3. “Access to health information for all” was the slogan of the World Health Organization in 2004 (4. The proving of this slogan requires access to health information by beneficiaries (health professionals and patients. Access to health information by specialists as partly been achieved, but access to health information for patients and their families is considered low (5-7, which could have adverse effects. Health professionals have quick and easy access to information through libraries and medical information centers, participation in seminars, exchange of scientific information with other professionals, as well as identifying ways to effectively access to health information, but patients and their families do not have access to such facilities and capabilities. Therefore, patients and their families are faced with a phenomenon known as “inequity in access to health information” and the continuation of the injustice leads to health information poverty. Thus, the main question now is what we should do? It seems that the government needs to develop a national policy in the field of health information and it is the most important step. In the next step, the government should expand the concept production via using potentials of different organizations like public media (TV and Radio, health ministry and press and increase the access of patients to health information in the easy language (level of health information between health professionals and patients is different.

  16. Professional self-assessment of future health basics teachers as professionally important quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radchenko A.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to theoretically substantiate and experimentally test professional self-assessment of future health basics teachers as professionally important quality. Material: 152 students participated in experiment. Results: assessment of images “I am real”, “I am student” and I am future professional” is rather high in most of students. The strength of these three images was assessed also approximately equally. But portion of average marks in indicator of image strength is much higher than in indicator of mark. Activity of three images differs a little and has significant quantity of average and high marks. Analysis of three main images’ wholeness witnesses that students’ self assessment is rather holistic. With it image “I am future professional” is formed on the base of image “I am student”. Dynamic of images’ self assessment witnesses that increasing of assessment and respect to image “I am future professional” depend on year of studying. Besides, assessment of strength and activity of this image also increases. Conclusions: in the process of studying students are oriented on professional formation as well as on formation of professionally important qualities, revelation of potential for self realization in the future. It was found that responsible attitude to professional functioning, future relations with children depend on self-assessment of formation.

  17. Professional development through attending conferences: reflections of a health librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In this article, guest writer Ruth Jenkins from Berkshire Heathcare Foundation Trust reflects on two conferences she attended in 2014, LILAC and SLA. Through the process of reflection, she considers the benefits that attending conferences can have to library and information professionals in the health sector. In particular, she discusses the opportunities and areas for learning and professional development that conferences can offer including evidence-based practice and current awareness, gaining new knowledge and objectivity, and networking and the unexpected benefits of conferences. Ruth also offers some practical hints and tips on ways to facilitate your attendance at conferences, including through awards and funding. H.S.

  18. Leadership training for oral health professionals: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S; Parkinson, Joseph W; Nelson, Bonnie A; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C; Thompson, Joseph F

    2012-02-01

    With dramatic changes in the scope and mode of delivering oral health care on the horizon, a strategic approach to addressing the emerging opportunities and challenges is required. Such an approach will demand new and sustained initiatives to develop leaders with the skills, knowledge, and passion to guide oral health care into the future. The purpose of this position paper is to define the need for leadership training programs for dental and dental hygiene students to become future leaders. Whether these oral health professionals become leaders within a solo or group practice or at the local or national level of their profession, they must be given the mindset and tools to lead. This position paper will describe goals for leadership training and give examples of some programs that currently exist in dental education and other professional settings as the background for a call to action for dental education to provide leadership training opportunities for its students.

  19. Stress, Cognitive Appraisal and Psychological Health: Testing Instruments for Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, A Rui; Teixeira, Pedro M

    2016-04-01

    The job of health professionals, including nurses, is considered inherently stressful, and thus, it is important to improve and develop specific measures that are sensitive to the demands that health professionals face. This study analysed the psychometric properties of three instruments that focus on the professional experiences of nurses in aspects related to occupational stress, cognitive appraisal and mental health issues. The evaluation protocol included the Stress Questionnaire for Health Professionals (SQHP), the Cognitive Appraisal Scale (CAS) and the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12). Validity and reliability issues were considered with statistical analysis (i.e., confirmatory factor analysis, convergent validity and composite reliability) that revealed adequate values for all of the instruments, namely a six-factor structure for the SQHP, a five-factor structure for the CAS and a two-factor structure for the GHQ-12. In conclusion, this study proposes three consistent instruments that may be useful for analysing nurses' adaptation to work contexts.

  20. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsobayel, Hana

    2016-09-12

    Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator's personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development.

  1. [Peculiarities of oral health of organized collectives and professional communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, I M; Avdeenko, O E

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of scientific literature on the peculiarities of the dental status of organized groups and professional associations. After reviewing the literature, it becomes clear that the studies carried out in organized groups and professional societies are very relevant today, because the prevalence of dental diseases among them remains high, fueled by a number of factors: habitat, diet, lifestyle, occupational hazards, particularly hygienic oral care. Nowadays there is no information about the features of the dental status among the clergy, whose professional activity is connected with direct close contact with people. This profession covers a large number of our population. The research of certain groups is of special interest, since a number of different factors affect dental health.

  2. Religion and spirituality: the perspective of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndula, Joelma Ana; Valle, Elizabeth Ranier Martins Do; Bello, Angela Ales

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how health professionals signify the religiosity and faith of patients under cancer treatment and how they themselves experience such phenomena. This is a qualitative-descriptive study, using the phenomenological framework as set out by Stein and Ales Bello, as a way of understanding the human being in its totality - physical, mental and spiritual. Most professionals report they are spiritualists, two are Catholics, one physician is a Buddhist and another is a Spiritist. They believe that religion is inherent to all human beings. Professionals convicted of their religion (less than half) believe in divine protection and recognize religiosity as a support and comfort for patients and their families in coping with illness. They expect patients to live their faith with prudence, never losing sight of reality.

  3. Children’s rights education: An imperative for health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Lake

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The South African government has put in place a range of laws, policies and programmes that are designed to give effect to children’s rights and support children’s survival, health and optimal development. These rights do not just exist on paper. They have the potential to transform professional practice and improve the quality of care across a range of health care services. A child-rights’ approach requires nurses to act in the best interest of children, respect their evolving capacities, think more holistically about a child’s well-being and work with others to address the broader social determinants of health – such as access to food, water and sanitation. This article draws on lessons learned from a short course in children’s rights and child law for health professionals offered by the Children’s Institute, University of Cape Townfrom 2011–2014. It encourages nurses to reflect critically on their current practice and to take action to improve a child’s well-being. It also advocates for the inclusion of children’s rights to be at the heart of education and training, professional codes of conduct and standards of care.

  4. Children's rights education: An imperative for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Lori

    2014-11-28

    The South African government has put in place a range of laws, policies and programmes that are designed to give effect to children's rights and support children's survival, health and optimal development. These rights do not just exist on paper. They have the potential to transform professional practice and improve the quality of care across a range of health care services. A child-rights' approach requires nurses to act in the best interest of children, respect their evolving capacities, think more holistically about a child's well-being and work with others to address the broader social determinants of health--such as access to food, water and sanitation. This article draws on lessons learned from a short course in children's rights and child law for health professionals offered by the Children's Institute, University of Cape Town from 2011-2014. It encourages nurses to reflect critically on their current practice and to take action to improve a child's well-being. It also advocates for the inclusion of children's rights to be at the heart of education and training, professional codes of conduct and standards of care.

  5. Professionalism and Occupational Well-Being: Similarities and Differences Among Latin American Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Context: Empathy, teamwork, and lifelong learning are described as key elements of professionalism. The first recipients of their benefits are professionals themselves. Paradoxically, scarce studies have reported association between professionalism and occupational well-being. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the influence that empathy, teamwork, and lifelong learning, play in the occupational well-being of physicians and nurses working in Latin American healthcare institutions. Materials and Methods: The Jefferson Scale of Empathy, the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration, the Jefferson Scale of Physicians Lifelong Learning, and the Scale of Collateral Effects (somatization, exhaustion, and work alienation), were administered to 522 physicians and nurses working in institutions of Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, and Argentina. Internal reliability was calculated. Gender and discipline were used as explanatory variables in comparison analysis. Two-way analysis of variance was performed to examine differences due to the main effects of the gender, and discipline, and to determine possible combined effects. Correlation analysis was performed to measure associations between collateral effects and age, and between collateral effects and professionalism. Results: A total of 353 (68%) surveys were returned fully completed. Adequate reliability was confirmed in all instruments. No differences were found among countries for collateral effects. Correlation analysis confirmed in physicians an inverse association between empathy and collateral effects (P = -0.16; p teamwork, and lifelong learning have in practitioners' health and welfare, and the role that cultural behaviors, associated to work professional models and social stereotypes, play in the interaction between professionalism and occupational well-being.

  6. Oral health profile of education and health professionals attending handicapped children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomarico Luciana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes toward oral health of education and health professionals working in a children care program for handicapped children from 0 to 6 years of age, run by a public municipal institution in Rio de Janeiro. Using a printed questionnaire, 67 professionals (teachers, attendants and health professionals were interviewed. The results were compared to the children's oral hygiene habits, by directly observing their daily nursery routine. Although 97.0% said that oral health could play a part in general health, only 37.3% of the professionals answered correctly on this matter. As for methods for preventing caries, although 92.5% said that they were aware of them, only 17.9% went to the dentist for preventive treatment. Although the majority (81.3% indicated oral hygiene as a way of preventing caries, observation showed that this practice is not always put into effect in the program's day nursery. Regarding when to start toothbrushing in children, 75.0% of the teachers and 94.4% of the health professionals said that they were aware of the need to begin brushing before one year of age, although this reply was given by only 52.5% of the attendants (chi-square, p = 0.006. In view of these results, it was concluded that attitudes toward oral health were not always coherent with the knowledge that these professionals express.

  7. Professional fighters brain health study: rationale and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernick, Charles; Banks, Sarah; Phillips, Michael; Lowe, Mark; Shin, Wanyong; Obuchowski, Nancy; Jones, Stephen; Modic, Michael

    2013-07-15

    Repetitive head trauma is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and is the primary cause of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. However, little is known about the natural history of, and risk factors for, chronic traumatic encephalopathy or about means of early detection and intervention. The Professional Fighters Brain Health Study is a longitudinal study of active professional fighters (boxers and mixed martial artists), retired professional fighters, and controls matched for age and level of education. The main objective of the Professional Fighters Brain Health Study is to determine the relationships between measures of head trauma exposure and other potential modifiers and changes in brain imaging and neurological and behavioral function over time. The study is designed to extend over 5 years, and we anticipate enrollment of more than 400 boxers and mixed martial artists. Participants will undergo annual evaluations that include 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanning, computerized cognitive assessments, speech analysis, surveys of mood and impulsivity, and blood sampling for genotyping and exploratory biomarker studies. Statistical models will be developed and validated to predict early and progressive changes in brain structure and function. A composite fight exposure index, developed as a summary measure of cumulative traumatic exposure, shows promise as a predictor of brain volumes and cognitive function.

  8. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  9. Predictors of recovery-oriented competencies among mental health professionals in one community mental health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Jennifer; Rocha, Anita; Christian, Ann; Johnson, David

    2014-11-01

    A survey of 813 mental health professionals serving adults with severe mental illness clustered in 25 community mental health centers assessed the extent to which mental health professionals possess clinical competencies that support recovery and the predictors of these competencies. The results suggest there is room for improvement in recovery-oriented competencies. In-depth professional training in recovery, greater job variety, more years practicing in mental health, participation on an intensive case management team, and perceptions of workplace recovery culture were predictors of recovery-oriented competencies. Prioritization of on-going professional, worker retention, and management strategies that incorporate a team approach to treatment and improvements in workplace recovery culture may potentially increase recovery-oriented clinical practice.

  10. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  11. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  12. Health literacy practices and educational competencies for health professionals: a consensus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Clifford A; Hudson, Stan; Maine, Lucinda L

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals often lack adequate knowledge about health literacy and the skills needed to address low health literacy among patients and their caregivers. Many promising practices for mitigating the effects of low health literacy are not used consistently. Improving health literacy training for health care professionals has received increasing emphasis in recent years. The development and evaluation of curricula for health professionals has been limited by the lack of agreed-upon educational competencies in this area. This study aimed to identify a set of health literacy educational competencies and target behaviors, or practices, relevant to the training of all health care professionals. The authors conducted a thorough literature review to identify a comprehensive list of potential health literacy competencies and practices, which they categorized into 1 or more educational domains (i.e., knowledge, skills, attitudes) or a practice domain. The authors stated each item in operationalized language following Bloom's Taxonomy. The authors then used a modified Delphi method to identify consensus among a group of 23 health professions education experts representing 11 fields in the health professions. Participants rated their level of agreement as to whether a competency or practice was both appropriate and important for all health professions students. A predetermined threshold of 70% agreement was used to define consensus. After 4 rounds of ratings and modifications, consensus agreement was reached on 62 out of 64 potential educational competencies (24 knowledge items, 27 skill items, and 11 attitude items), and 32 out of 33 potential practices. This study is the first known attempt to develop consensus on a list of health literacy practices and to translate recommended health literacy practices into an agreed-upon set of measurable educational competencies for health professionals. Further work is needed to prioritize the competencies and practices in

  13. Influences on the choice of health professionals to practise in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influences on the choice of health professionals to practise in rural areas. ... Training health care professionals (HCPs) to work in rural areas is a ... Themes identified included personal, facilitating, contextual, staying and reinforcing factors.

  14. Public perceptions of health care professionals' participation in pharmaceutical marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigger, Nancy J; Courter, Laura; Hayes, Kristen; Shepherd, K

    2009-09-01

    Trust in the nurse-patient relationship is maintained not by how professionals perceive their actions but rather by how the public perceives them. However, little is known about the public's view of nurses and other health care professionals who participate in pharmaceutical marketing. Our study describes public perceptions of health care providers' role in pharmaceutical marketing and compares their responses with those of a random sample of licensed family nurse practitioners. The family nurse practitioners perceived their participation in marketing activities as significantly more ethically appropriate than did the public responders. Further research is warranted before conclusions can be drawn, but these early findings suggest that nurse practitioners should consider a conservative approach to participating in pharmaceutical marketing.

  15. Oral Care during Pregnancy: Attitudes of Brazilian Public Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Martins Paiva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There is little information about health professionals’ behavior regarding oral health care during pregnancy. We evaluated attitudes of obstetricians/gynecologists, nurses, and dentists working at a public community service towards pregnant women’s oral health. Health professionals responded to a self-applied questionnaire. Cluster analysis identified two clusters of respondents; Chi-square, Student’s t test, and logistic regression were used to compare the two clusters in terms of the independent variables. Respondents were categorized into cluster 1 ‘less favorable’ (n = 159 and cluster 2 ‘more favorable’ (n = 124 attitudes. Professionals that had attended a residency or specialization program (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.15–3.77, p = 0.016 and worked exclusively at the public service (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.10–4.20, p = 0.025 presented more favorable attitudes. Obstetricians/gynecologists (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.09–0.54, p = 0.001 and nurses (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.29–0.86, p = 0.013 showed less favorable attitudes than dentists. Health care providers’ attitudes regarding pregnant women’s oral health were related to their occupation, qualification, and dedication to the public service.

  16. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: motives, barriers and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antheunis, Marjolijn L; Tates, Kiek; Nieboer, Theodoor E

    2013-09-01

    To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals in obstetrics and gynecology. In this survey, we asked the respondents about their motives and use of social network sites (SNS: Facebook and Hyves), Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Results showed that patients primarily used Twitter (59.9%), especially for increasing knowledge and exchanging advice and Facebook (52.3%), particularly for social support and exchanging advice. Professionals primarily used LinkedIn (70.7%) and Twitter (51.2%), for communication with their colleagues and marketing reasons. Patients' main barriers for social media use were privacy concerns and unreliability of the information. Professionals' main barriers were inefficiency and lack of skills. Both patients and professionals expected future social media use, provided that they can choose their time of social media usage. The results indicate disconcordance in patients' and professionals' motives and use of social media in health care. Future studies on social media use in health care should not disregard participants' underlying motives, barriers and expectations regarding the (non)use of social media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Innovations in public health education: promoting professional development and a culture of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Marian; Gentry, Daniel; Klesges, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    As the field of public health advances toward addressing complex, systemic problems, future public health professionals must be equipped with leadership and interprofessional skills that support collaboration and a culture of health. The University of Memphis School of Public Health has infused innovative strategies into graduate education via experiential learning opportunities to enhance leadership, collaboration, and professional development. Novel training programs such as Day One, Public Health Interdisciplinary Case Competition, and Memphis Healthy U support Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health cross-cutting competencies and prepare Master of Public Health and Master of Health Administration graduates to function effectively at the outset of their careers and become catalysts for creating a culture of health.

  18. Use of health professionals for obstetric care in northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Samuel; Bertrand, Jane T

    2005-03-01

    This study explores the role of access versus traditional beliefs in the decision to seek obstetric care from health professionals. Eighteen purposively sampled homogenous groups in Kassena-Nankana District of northern Ghana participated in focus-group discussions about traditional beliefs, barriers to the use of health professionals, and ways to improve obstetric care. All the groups were knowledgeable about the life-threatening signs and symptoms of complications of pregnancy and labor. Decisions about place of delivery generally were made after the onset of labor. Accessibility factors (cost, distance, transport, availability of health facilities, and nurses' attitudes) were major barriers, whereas traditional beliefs were reported as less significant. Informants made pertinent recommendations on how to improve obstetric services in the district. These findings demonstrate that even in this district, where African traditional religion is practiced by a third of the population, compared with a national average of 4 percent, lack of access was perceived as the main barrier to seeking professional obstetric care.

  19. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p distance continuing education programs.

  20. Attitude toward mental illness amongst urban nonpsychiatric health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Pande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to examine the attitude of nonpsychiatric health professionals about mental illness in urban multispeciality tertiary care setting. Aim: To assess attitude toward mental illness among urban nonpsychiatric health professionals. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used. A pretested, semistructured questionnaire was administered to 222 medical and paramedical staff at two tertiary care hospitals at Chandigarh. Results: There is an increased awareness of mental illness especially in military subjects. Literacy was associated with a positive attitude toward mental illness. Health care givers commonly fail to ask about the emotional well being of their patients. Many saw referral to psychiatrist as a form of punishment. There is uniform desire for more knowledge about psychiatric disorders in medical and paramedical staff. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the need for educational programs aimed at demystifying mental illness. A better understanding of mental disorders among the nonpsychiatric medical professional would help to allay fear and mistrust about mentally ill persons in the community as well as lessen stigmatization toward such persons.

  1. Professional competencies in health promotion and public health: what is common and what is specific? Review of the European debate and perspectives for professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Alessandra; Sotgiu, Alessandra; Buja, Alessandra; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cecconi, Rosaria; Fabiani, Leila; Guberti, Emilia; Lorini, Chiara; Minelli, Liliana; Pocetta, Giancarlo; Contu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    According to the Nairobi Call to Action, the growth of practitioners' skills can be favoured by setting accreditation standards and by reorienting professional competencies of current and future health workers. This will make it possible to develop a critical mass of competent practitioners, foster training, and increase visibility of the professional field. Through a review of the literature, the authors offer an overview of competency-based strategies for professional development in health promotion. The main research questions discussed were as follows: Is there a shared definition of public health?; Is there a shared definition of health promotion?; Who are the main stakeholders for public health and health promotion in Europe?; What is the meaning of professional competencies in education and practice for public health and health promotion?; Is there a shared system of professional core competencies in public health and health promotion?;What is common and what is specific between the two systems of professional competencies?; Is it useful and feasible to create specific strategies of professional development for public health and health promotion? A transformative use of competencies makes it possible to inform students, professionals, employers, and political decision-makers about what is expected from a specific profession and its values.

  2. Occupational health management system: A study of expatriate construction professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, I Y S; Leung, M Y; Liu, A M M

    2016-08-01

    Due to its direct impact on the safety and function of organizations, occupational health has been a concern of the construction industry for many years. The inherent complexity of occupational health management presents challenges that make a systems approach essential. From a systems perspective, health is conceptualized as an emergent property of a system in which processes operating at the individual and organizational level are inextricably connected. Based on the fundamental behavior-to-performance-to-outcome (B-P-O) theory of industrial/organizational psychology, this study presents the development of an I-CB-HP-O (Input-Coping Behaviors-Health Performance-Outcomes) health management systems model spanning individual and organizational boundaries. The model is based on a survey of Hong Kong expatriate construction professionals working in Mainland China. Such professionals tend to be under considerable stress due not only to an adverse work environment with dynamic tasks, but also the need to confront the cross-cultural issues arising from expatriation. A questionnaire was designed based on 6 focus groups involving 44 participants, and followed by a pilot study. Of the 500 questionnaires distributed in the main study, 137 valid returns were received, giving a response rate of 27.4%. The data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as factor analysis, reliability testing, Pearson correlation analysis, multiple regression modeling, and structural equation modeling. Theories of coping behaviors and health performance tend to focus on the isolated causal effects of single factors and/or posits the model at single, individual level; while industrial practices on health management tend to focus on organizational policy and training. By developing the I-CB-HP-O health management system, incorporating individual, interpersonal, and organizational perspectives, this study bridges the gap between theory and practice while providing empirical support for a

  3. Explaining mental health care professionals’ resistance to implement Diagnosis Related Groups: (no) benefits for society, patients and professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Tummers (Lars); S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEffective health system reform requires support from health care professionals. However, many studies show an increasing discontent among health care professionals toward certain government policies. When professionals resist implementing policies, this may have serious consequences for

  4. Occupational Risks of Health Professionals in Turkey as an Emerging Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulutasdemir, Nilgun; Cirpan, Metin; Copur, Ebru Ozturk; Tanir, Ferdi

    2015-01-01

    Health services are one of the work areas that contain important risks in terms of the occupational health and safety of the laborer. Professionals in various areas of health services encounter biological, chemical, physical, ergonomic, and psychosocial risks, particularly in hospitals. This study has been performed to evaluate the impacts of the occupational risks on health of health professionals in Turkey. In Turkey, as an emerging economy, the history of studies on health professionals is not longstanding. There have been various regulations intended for the occupational health and safety of health professionals in line with the Regulation of the Provision on Patient and Staff Safety prepared in 2012. However, applications can differ from region to region, institution to institution, and person to person. We believe that this review will lead health professionals to be aware of occupational risks and contribute to planning health services for health professionals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Theology and the research on Spirituality and Health: a pilot study among health professionals and chaplains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Rute Gomes Esperandio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil the relationship between religiosity/spirituality and health has been mainly studied by medicine and nursing. There are few studies on the behavior and beliefs of health professionals and chaplains. This study aims to find out how the dimension of religiosity/spirituality is understood and integrated (or not by health professionals and chaplains in health care in a hospital in Curitiba-PR. The research method is a quantitative survey, cross-sectional and descriptive. The applied instrument consists of a questionnaire with 35 closed questions and 1 semi-structured question. Participants are n = 100 health professionals: nurses, technicians and nursing assistants, psychologists, social workers, physiotherapists, phonoaudiologists, pharmacists, clinical nutritionists and chaplains. The results indicate that most of these professionals believe that religiosity/spirituality affects health outcomes and they believe it is important to be aware of this relationship. However, only few of them report that they integrate spirituality into their care practice as they lack (in formation on these issues. We conclude that theology can contribute to a theoretical reflection on spirituality and health, and also to the training of these professionals about the subject, in collaboration with other disciplines.

  6. "It depends on what you mean": a qualitative study of Swedish health professionals' views on health and health promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinehall Lars

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of health services must be re-oriented towards health promotion to more effectively contribute to population health. One of the objectives of the Swedish public health policy is that health promotion and disease prevention should be an integral part of the health care system and an important component of all care and treatment. However, the uncertainty about what the concepts of health and health promotion mean poses a challenge for implementation. Depending on how these concepts are interpreted, the attitudes of health professionals toward health promoting practices will differ. Thus, a more in-depth understanding of health professionals' views can be a starting point for a discussion about the values and attitudes that influence the current health care system and about the barriers and possibilities for future development of a health promoting health service. Methods Seven focus group discussions (n = 34 were carried out with health professionals, from different health care settings, to understand how they communicate about health and health promotion. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis of health professional's general understanding of the concept of health resulted in the category; a multi-facetted concept, whilst the category; a subjective assessment describes what health means to themselves. A third category; health is about life, the whole life. describes their understanding of health as an outcome of a multiplicity of contextually dependent determinants. The health professional's multiple ways of associating health promotion to disease prevention suggest a concept that is diffuse, elusive and difficult to apply in practice. Despite a shared view of health, the health professionals described their health promotion role very differently depending partly on how the concept of health promotion was interpreted. The analysis resulted in the development of three ideal

  7. The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education: A Health Professional's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In responding to Upton's discourse arguing for reform of undergraduate health profession curricula to maximise the inclusion of health psychology, it is first important to concede the enormity of the task. After all, psychologists are inherently biased towards their subject, quite simply due to their immersion within it which convinces them of its…

  8. Innovation in Graduate Education for Health Professionals in Humanitarian Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dabney P; Anderson, Mark; Shahpar, Cyrus; Del Rio, Carlos; Curran, James W

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this report was to show how the Center for Humanitarian Emergencies (the Center) at Emory University (Atlanta, Georgia USA) has trained graduate students to respond to complex humanitarian emergencies (CHEs) through innovative educational programs, with the goal of increasing the number of trained humanitarian workers. Natural disasters are on the rise with more than twice as many occurring from 2000-2009 as there were from 1980-1989. In 2012 alone, 144 million people were affected by a natural disaster or displaced by conflict worldwide. This has created an immense need for trained humanitarian workers to respond effectively to such disasters. The Center has developed a model for educational programming that targets learners along an educational continuum ranging from the undergraduate level through continuing professional education. These programs, based in the Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH) of Emory University, include: a competency-based graduate certificate program (the Certificate) in humanitarian emergencies; a fellowship program for mid-career professionals; and funded field practica. The competency-based Certificate program began in 2010 with a cohort of 14 students. Since then, 101 students have received the Certificate with 50 more due for completion in 2016 and 2017 combined. The fellowship program for mid-career professionals has hosted four fellows from conflict-affected or resource-poor countries, who have then gone on to assume leadership positions with humanitarian organizations. From 2009-2015, the field practicum program supported 34 students in international summer practicum experiences related to emergency response or preparedness. Students have participated in summer field experiences on every continent but Australia. Together the Certificate, funded field practicum opportunities, and the fellowship comprise current efforts in providing innovative education and training for graduate and post-graduate students of public

  9. Sexual health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: experiences, needs and communication with health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Kristina Areskoug; Gard, Gunvor

    2012-06-01

    Pain, fatigue and decreased joint mobility caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often decrease sexual health in RA patients. Regular physiotherapy interventions in patients with RA are often aimed at improving those factors. The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences and views of patients concerning the impact of RA on their sexual health, the possible impact of physiotherapy interventions, and communication in clinical situations. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to patients with RA at two rehabilitation clinics in Sweden. The questionnaire included questions concerning the impact of RA on intimate relationships and sexual function, as well as experiences of physiotherapy and sexual health communication with health professionals. The questionnaire was answered by 63 patients. The majority of the patients thought that pain, stiffness, fatigue and physical capacity were related to sexual health. Communication between health professionals and patients about sexual health was less common, even if the desire for communication about sexual health was higher in this study than in other studies. The authors concluded that physiotherapists need to be aware that pain, fatigue, decreased joint mobility and physical capacity can affect sexual health and that physiotherapy can make a difference in sexual health in patients with RA. The impact of RA on sexual health is rarely discussed by health professionals and RA patients, and needs greater attention.

  10. Queer patients and the health care professional-regulatory arrangements matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuklenk, Udo; Smalling, Ricardo

    2013-06-01

    This paper discusses a number of critical ethical problems that arise in interactions between queer patients and health care professionals attending them. Using real-world examples, we discuss the very practical problems queer patients often face in the clinic. Health care professionals face conflicts in societies that criminalise same sex relationships. We also analyse the question of what ought to be done to confront health care professionals who propagate falsehoods about homosexuality in the public domain. These health care professionals are more often than not motivated by strong religious convictions that conflict with mainstream medical opinion on homosexuality. We argue that they ought to be held accountable for their conduct by their professional statutory bodies, given that they abuse their professional standing to propagate sectarian views not representative of their profession. Lastly, we propose that medical schools have special responsibilities in training future health care professionals that will enable them to respond professionally to queer patients seeking health care.

  11. [Health communication and public media: professionals need to be heard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijman, F J

    2008-08-09

    The exchange of information on individual healthcare and public health as well as public opinion on medical matters are characterized by their own systems of values, norms and conventions that are not always compatible. All of these aspects put together give public communication on health and care its complex and dynamic nature--where the interests of the individual and the community are often opposed. In this respect, the free interaction of publicity forces and the educational role of healthcare providers have traditionally been the backbone of policy in the Netherlands. There is only limited support by public money, only a few restrictions (for example, on direct-to-consumer drug-advertising) but no substantive guidance from the government. Websites funded from public money that provide information on healthcare have only been set up in the last few years. The Health Council of the Netherlands has recently proposed trust marking for screening tests only. Research is urgently needed with regard to health literacy, direct-to-consumer advertising and public communication on the appropriate use of care. Furthermore, professional opinion in the public arena is required as well as a more active role on the part of clinical and scientific professionals in the area of public debate.

  12. Analysis of drug adversiting targeted to health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Campos Esqueff Abdalla

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The advertising of medicines is the dissemination of the product by the pharmaceutical industry, with emphasis on brand, aiming to promote their prescription and/or purchase. This practice must comply with the legal provisions in effect determined by Brazilian National Surveillance Agency. The present work aimed to analyze advertisements of medicines offered by the industry to health professionals. The capture of advertisements covered physician offices of various specialties, public and private hospitals and magazines directed at health professionals. The analysis of the collected parts involved the verification of legibility and viewing of information required, as well as the compliance with the health legislation that regulates the promotion and advertising of medicines in Brazil – agency’s resolution n. 96/2008. The results showed that no piece meets the health legislation in full. Most industries employs strategies that hinder access to restricted information of use of the medicine, as contra-indications, for example, constituting an obstacle to rational use. It was also observed the presence of indications other than those approved by the agency and use indication for different age groups in the specified product registration. It is obvious the need for a new model controller and more rigid regulator that prioritize above all particular interests, a major importance, that is the society. This must be protected from false advertising and abusive, promoting the rational use of medicines.

  13. Expectations of Health Care Professionals Regarding the Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Hanafi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The provision of accurate and timely drug information to health care professionals is an important mechanism to promote safe and effective drug therapy for patients. World’s Drug and Poison Information Centers (DPICs are mainly affiliated to hospitals, rather rarely with faculties of pharmacy or with faculties of medicine and other related organizations.Methods: Data was collected from a questionnaire which was distributed among 400 health care providers in April 2009. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 17.Results: Medical reference books and drug information textbooks (36.7% and expert colleagues (29.7% were the “most commonly” used drug information resources. In addition, 77.8% of respondents “almost never” use DPICs. About 77% of respondents were non- acquainted with these centers’ activities. Five expectations were considered ‘very important’ by respondents: Provide information on IV drugs incompatibilities (74%, Provide drug interaction information (70.1%, Provide new drugs information (56.5%, Education/training of health care professionals regarding rational drug therapy and prevention of medication errors (54.9%, Providing information on dosage forms of drugs available in Iran (53.5%.Conclusion: Being non acquaintance with services of DPIC centers can be considered as the most important reason of not using them. Considering “announcement of availability of drugs in pharmacy” as one of the activities of DPICs, shows that the health care professionals are not acquainted with real services of these centers. It shows an urgent need for culture building activities to introduce them to these centers services.

  14. [Information in health care: the use of SIAB by the professional teams of Family Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolino, Janaína Souza; Scochi, Maria José

    2010-06-01

    The remarkable expansion of Family Health Care Program and the discussion of issues related to the amount of the collected data stimulated the need for designing an information system that embraced the complex organization of basic health care. So, in 1998, the Basic Health Care Information System (SI4B) was founded. This research aimed to investigate the use of SIAB by the professional teams of the Family Health Care. A questionnaire was applied to 75 professionals belonging to 10 teams which were observed, one week each. The study evidenced that the Family Health Care teams that participated in this research have not used the available information for planning or assessing their health care services, and so, they have missed the opportunity of using the available information for health care local needs.

  15. Solvability of mental health care in the Family Health Strategy: social representation of professionals and users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Salete Bessa Jorge

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To aprehend the social representations about the solvability in mental health care with users of the Family Health Strategy and professionals of family health teams and of the Center for Psychosocial Care. Method A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews for data collection, and the Alceste software for analysis. This software uses the Hierarchical Descending Classification based on the examination of lexical roots, considering the words as units and providing context in the corpus. Results The representations emerge in two opposing poles: the users require satisfaction with care and the professionals realize the need for improvement of health actions. Although the matricial support in mental health and the home visits are developed, the barriers related to investment in health, continuing education and organization of care persist. Conclusion The different representations enable improvements in customer service, solvability of care and aggregate knowledge and practices in the expanded perspective of health needs in the family, social and therapeutic context.

  16. Engaging Health Professionals in Health Economics: A Human Capital Informed Approach for Adults Learning Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, Robert D.; Leon, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a Wikipedia-based project designed for a graduate course introducing health economics to experienced healthcare professionals. The project allows such students to successfully write articles on niche topics in rapidly evolving health economics subspecialties. These students are given the opportunity to publish their completed…

  17. Perspectives on Terminology and Conceptual and Professional Issues in Health Education and Health Promotion Credentialing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Alyson; Allegrante, John P.; Barry, Margaret M.; Sakagami, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    This article was prepared to inform the deliberations of the Galway Consensus Conference by providing a common and global reference point for the discussion of terminology and key conceptual and professional issues in the credentialing of health education and health promotion specialists. The article provides a review of the terminology that is…

  18. Engaging Health Professionals in Health Economics: A Human Capital Informed Approach for Adults Learning Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, Robert D.; Leon, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a Wikipedia-based project designed for a graduate course introducing health economics to experienced healthcare professionals. The project allows such students to successfully write articles on niche topics in rapidly evolving health economics subspecialties. These students are given the opportunity to publish their completed…

  19. Welcoming and mental health: professional challenge in the family health strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Helena Iversen Sucigan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory and descriptive study aims to understand how nursing professionals from family health teams welcome mental health patients and their feelings towards this work. The research was accomplished at a primary health care unit in Campinas (SP. Two categories were acknowledged: the differences between welcoming and forwarding and: knowing oneself and the other: a possibility for welcoming. The discussion on the findings was mainly based on Rogers’ reference framework. It was apprehended that welcoming was fundamentally characterized as a form of forwarding nursing professionals use. On the other hand, it was acknowledged that, when welcoming was successful and managed to solve problems, those professionals could use their empathetic skills, despite ignoring empathy as a method. This reveals what it really means to gain self-confidence and ability to value the patient’s experience, leading to an improvement in that relation and greater production in health.

  20. US and International Health Professions’ Requirements for Continuing Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofade, Toyin; Thakkar, Namrata; Rouse, Michael

    2014-01-01

    There is not a comprehensive global analysis of continuing professional development (CPD) and continuing education (CE) in the major health professions in published literature. The aim of this article is to summarize findings from the US and international literature on CPD and CE practices in the health professions, comparing the different requirements and frameworks to see what similarities and challenges exist and what the future focus should be for the pharmacy profession. A literature review was conducted on CPD and CE in selected health professions, namely pharmacy, medicine, nursing, ophthalmology, dentistry, public health, and psychology. Over 300 papers from the health professions were retrieved and screened. Relevant articles based on the abstracts and introductions were summarized into tabular form by profession, minimum requirements for licensure, nature of credits, guidelines on how to record CE and CPD activities, and specific CE and CPD definitions. Wide variations exist among the health professions. Lessons learned from this information can be used to further clarify and define the role of CE and CPD and self-directed lifelong learning in pharmacy and the health professions. PMID:25147401

  1. Teacher education professionals as partners in health science outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtz, Lynne E; Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M; Mu, Keli; Royeen, Charlotte B

    2004-01-01

    Medical school and other health science outreach programs to educate and recruit precollege students always have relied on successful collaborative efforts. Creighton University shares the value, significance, and strategies of involving teacher education professionals in several of its current outreach programs, including HPPI, Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, and HHMI Build a Human Project. The education department partner serves as an essential team member in the development, implementation, assessment, and dissemination of these projects to promote science and mathematics achievement and interest in medical careers. Specific examples and mistakes to avoid are included.

  2. Ethics education for health professionals: a values based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbold, Rosemary; Lees, Amanda

    2013-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that ethics is an essential part of educating health professionals. Despite a clear mandate to educators, there are differing approaches, in particular, how and where ethics is positioned in training programmes, underpinning philosophies and optimal modes of assessment. This paper explores varying practices and argues for a values based approach to ethics education. It then explores the possibility of using a web-based technology, the Values Exchange, to facilitate a values based approach. It uses the findings of a small scale study to signal the potential of the Values Exchange for engaging, meaningful and applied ethics education.

  3. Ready for eHealth? Health Professionals' Acceptance and Adoption of eHealth Interventions in Inpatient Routine Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Severin; Beutel, Manfred E; Zwerenz, Rüdiger

    2017-03-01

    eHealth interventions can be effective in treating health problems. However, adoption in inpatient routine care seems limited. The present study therefore aimed to investigate barriers and facilitators to acceptance of eHealth interventions and of online aftercare in particular in health professionals of inpatient treatment. A total of 152 out of 287 health professionals of various professional groups in four inpatient rehabilitation facilities filled out a self-administered web-based questionnaire (response rate: 53%); 128 individuals were eligible for further data analysis. Acceptance and possible predictors were investigated with a complex research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Acceptance of eHealth interventions was rather low (M = 2.47, SD = 0.98); however, acceptance of online aftercare was moderate (M = 3.08, SD = 0.96, t(127) = 8.22, p acceptance. No differences were found between professional and age groups. Although acceptance of eHealth interventions was limited in health professionals of inpatient treatment, moderate acceptance of online aftercare for work-related stress implies a basis for future implementation. Tailored eHealth education addressing misconceptions about inferiority and incongruity with conventional treatment considering the systemic aspect of acceptance formation are needed.

  4. Predictors of burnout among correctional mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavan, Deanna B; Newman, Jody L

    2013-02-01

    This study focused on the experience of burnout among a sample of correctional mental health professionals. We examined the relationship of a linear combination of optimism, work family conflict, and attitudes toward prisoners with two dimensions derived from the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Professional Quality of Life Scale. Initially, three subscales from the Maslach Burnout Inventory and two subscales from the Professional Quality of Life Scale were subjected to principal components analysis with oblimin rotation in order to identify underlying dimensions among the subscales. This procedure resulted in two components accounting for approximately 75% of the variance (r = -.27). The first component was labeled Negative Experience of Work because it seemed to tap the experience of being emotionally spent, detached, and socially avoidant. The second component was labeled Positive Experience of Work and seemed to tap a sense of competence, success, and satisfaction in one's work. Two multiple regression analyses were subsequently conducted, in which Negative Experience of Work and Positive Experience of Work, respectively, were predicted from a linear combination of optimism, work family conflict, and attitudes toward prisoners. In the first analysis, 44% of the variance in Negative Experience of Work was accounted for, with work family conflict and optimism accounting for the most variance. In the second analysis, 24% of the variance in Positive Experience of Work was accounted for, with optimism and attitudes toward prisoners accounting for the most variance.

  5. Interprofessional and Team-Based Continuing Education For Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Gjorgjeska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of implementing interprofessional and team­based programs are well recognized. However, for interprofes­ sional education to  be effective and broadly implemented, the health professions, policymakers, insurers, academic institutions, health care providers, and regulatory bodies should embrace and adopt a new, interprofessional education framework. These stakeholders should create a shared value and vision for interprofessional health professions’ educa­ tion, research, and practice. This vision should be patient­oriented and contain a measurable component across the entire educational continuum, from admission into a health professional program through retirement. Such a framework would maximize and value the strengths of individual professions in the integrated delivery of high quality care. Finally, in creating a successful model, a series of questions should be considered: how  best can team competence be measured, how should individual behavioral changes be documented when we think of individual rather than team­level changes, how do we create and measure performance criteria based on shared understanding and experience in the practice setting? Within academic settings, there are more specific barriers including a lack of administrative support, financial and human resources for interprofessional education, conflicts in schedules and health professions’ curricula, and limitations to the time required to plan and implement faculty development for interprofessional learning. Finally, despite progress, there remain regulatory and professional barriers to achieving full and meaningful implementation of effective models. Recom­ mendations which  are given emphasize that investing in research to evaluate the efficacy of continuing education and its impact on patient outcomes and the healthcare delivery system is inherent in this process.

  6. Association of health professional leadership behaviors on health promotion practice beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jacqueline D; Belcher, Harolyn M E; Attoh, Prince; D'Abundo, Michelle; Gong, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Leadership is a process by which an individual influences a group or individual to achieve a common goal, in this case health promotion for individuals with disabilities. (1) To examine the association between the transformational leadership behaviors of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) network professionals and their practice beliefs about health promotion activities, specifically cardiovascular fitness and healthy weight, for people with disabilities. (2) To determine if discipline and/or years of practice moderate the association between transformational leadership behaviors and practice beliefs regarding health promotion. There is a positive association between transformational leadership behaviors and health professionals practice beliefs regarding health promotion activities for persons with disabilities. A quantitative cross-sectional web-based survey design was used to determine the association between leadership behaviors and practices beliefs regarding health promotion for people with disabilities. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and an adapted version of the Role of Health Promotion in Physical Therapy Survey were used to measure leadership and practice beliefs, respectively. Multiple regression analysis was applied to determine the association of leadership behaviors with health promotion practice beliefs variables. Transformational leadership behaviors of the AUCD network professionals were positively associated with health promotion practice beliefs about cardiovascular fitness for people with disabilities. Years post licensure and discipline did not moderate the association between transformational leadership and practice beliefs regarding health promotion. Transformational leadership may facilitate health professionals' health promotion practices for people with disabilities. Further research and training in leadership is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Solvability of mental health care in the Family Health Strategy: social representation of professionals and users

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Salete Bessa Jorge; Mardênia Gomes Ferreira Vasconcelos; Euton Freitas de Castro Junior; Levi Alves Barreto; Lianna Ramalho de Sena Rosa; Leilson Lira Lima

    2014-01-01

    Objective To aprehend the social representations about the solvability in mental health care with users of the Family Health Strategy and professionals of family health teams and of the Center for Psychosocial Care. Method A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews for data collection, and the Alceste software for analysis. This software uses the Hierarchical Descending Classification based on the examination of lexical roots, c...

  8. Categorizing Health Websites: E-Knowledge, E-Business and E-Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne; Skinner, James

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three types of health website categories (e-knowledge, e-business and e-professional) which are currently being used to disseminate health-related information, services and medical literature to the health consumer and professional. Moreover, criteria which have been used to establish a health website's category is…

  9. Categorizing Health Websites: E-Knowledge, E-Business and E-Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne; Skinner, James

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three types of health website categories (e-knowledge, e-business and e-professional) which are currently being used to disseminate health-related information, services and medical literature to the health consumer and professional. Moreover, criteria which have been used to establish a health website's category is…

  10. Public health leadership competency level among health professionals in a South Eastern European country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orjola Pampuri

    2015-12-01

    the overall scores and the subscale scores of the current and the required level of leadership competencies among health professionals. Results: Mean value of the overall summary score for the 52 items of the instrument was significantly lower for the current leadership competency level compared with the required leadership competency level (138.4±11.2 vs. 159.7±25.3, respectively; P<0.001. Most of the subscales’ scores were significantly higher for the required than for the current leadership competency level. Conclusion: Our study provides useful evidence about the current and the required level of leadership competencies among health professionals in transitional Albania. Findings of this study may help policymakers in Albania to identify the gap between the required and the current level of leadership competencies among health  professionals. Furthermore, findings of this study should be expanded in the neighbouring countries of the South Eastern European region and beyond.

  11. Medical health care professionals' assessments of oral health needs in children with disabilities: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Ulrika; Klingberg, Gunilla

    2005-10-01

    Good collaboration between medical and dental care is essential to provide not only good oral health care, but also more holistic care for children with disabilities. The aim was to explore and describe medical health care professionals' assessments and considerations of orofacial problems and treatment needs in children with disabilities and in their families. In-depth interviews focusing on orofacial function were carried out with 17 medical health care employees. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed in open and focused (selective) coding processes according to grounded theory. A core category was identified and named focusing on basic needs, showing that oral health care assessment was not on the agenda of medical health care professionals, but was instead viewed as a responsibility of parents or dentists. This study shows that oral health issues are not fully integrated in the medical care of children with disabilities. The omission of oral health issues from the medical agenda implies a risk of oral health problems in children with disabilities. To put the oral cavity and oral health on the medical agenda, dentists need to influence the undergraduate training of medical professionals and to initiate co-operation with the medical care system.

  12. Collaboration in crisis: Carer perspectives on police and mental health professional's responses to mental health crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Alice; Warren, Narelle; Peterson, Violeta; Hollander, Yitzchak; Boscarato, Kara; Lee, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    For many situations involving a mental health crisis, carers (e.g. family or friends) are present and either attempt to help the person overcome the crisis or request assistance from professional services (e.g. mental health or police). Comparatively, little research has explored how carers experience the crisis, the professional response and how the nature of the response, in turn, impacts carers. The current study was conducted to explore these issues during individual interviews with nine carers who had previous contact with police and mental health services during a crisis response. Collected data described the definition and perceived impact of a mental health crisis for carers, how carers had experienced a crisis response from police and mental health services, and how the professional response had impacted on carers. Of importance was the finding that carers were often themselves traumatized by witnessing or being involved in the crisis, however, were rarely offered direct education or support to help them cope or prevent future crises. A number of carers described a reluctance to request assistance from professional services due to previous poor experiences. This highlighted the importance of implementing strategies to deliver more timely, respectful, specialist and collaborative crisis responses to improve carer and consumer outcomes. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. Community Health Worker Professional Advocacy: Voices of Action from the 2014 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Samantha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Phillips, David; Haywoord, Catherine; Redondo, Floribella; Bell, Melanie L; Ingram, Maia

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explores community health worker (CHW) engagement in professional advocacy. Data from the National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey (n = 1661) assessed the relationship between CHW professional advocacy and CHW demographics, and work characteristics. Qualitative data articulated the quality of professional advocacy efforts. Approximately, 30% of CHW respondents advocated for professional advancement or collaborated with other CHWs to advance the workforce. Advocacy was more prevalent among CHWs affiliated with a professional network. CHW advocacy targeted recognition of the field, appropriate training and compensation, and sustainable funding. CHW professional advocacy is imperative to advancement of the field.

  14. Evaluation of a Training Programme for Non-Health Professionals as Oral Health Educators

    OpenAIRE

    Seman, Kamariah; Yaacob, Habibah; Hamid, Abd. Manaf Hj.; Ismail, Abdul Rashid; Yusoff, Azizah

    2008-01-01

    Involvement of oral health educators among non-health professionals in oral health promotion is important in the prevention of oral diseases. This study was carried out to compare the level of oral health knowledge among pre-school teachers before and after oral health seminar. Pre-test data was collected by distributing questionnaire to pre-school teachers in Pasir Mas, who attended the seminar on “Oral Health” (n=33) and they were required to fill anonymously before the seminar started. The...

  15. Professional identity in entrepreneurship – the perspective from nutrition and health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard, Michael Breum

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the construction of a professional identity as an entrepreneur in a sample of people with educational background in nutrition and health. The study examines the connection between professional identity construction and entrepreneurial business emergence using...

  16. [Community participation. Some perspectives on professional involvement in health programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Mendoza, S; Ascanio, S V

    1990-01-01

    Action Community regarding health is but part of a long-term project started out back in the 1960. As far as Latin America was concerned the so-called experience did not work out; notwithstanding, it has become an Attention-Getter among the countries of the area once again. How so? Because of the Primary-Approach. Understood as an approach based on the global development of society, self-involvement lies at the cornerstone of the whole process. The health section gives full measure of the primary-approach theoretical framework and propose alternatives to get it of the ground. Professionals from the health section aim at "self-involvement" as activity performed willingly. Besides as it were, it should be supervised by experts. Nowadays the venezuelan government promotes action community claiming it will endorse the Primary-Approach on health granted the national health system bill is approved. Amid such context dentistry most meet the challenge of upcoming changes, so must fellow-dentists who, in the end, will dominate center stage. The process must narrow down to actions with will stem from its own dynamics along the way. Needless to say, these actions can not be easily foreseen, let alone do they guarantee success.

  17. Health discourse and within-group stigma in professional BDSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Danielle J

    2013-12-01

    This article directly deals with health and stigma within practices of erotic labor. Scant previous literature has focused on erotic laborers' perceptions of stigma and the ways in which regimes of stigmatization operate within their particular social worlds. I use the commercial BDSM (Bondage, Discipline, Sadism, Masochism) "dungeon" as a strategic research site to investigate these workers' conceptions and management of their own stigma, and I find that discourses about stigma are inextricably entwined with concerns about health and wellbeing. Data are derived from ethnographic fieldwork with professional dominatrices ("pro-dommes") who work in New York City and San Francisco as well as in-depth interviews conducted between September 2007 and April 2008. Counter to stereotypes of erotic laborers as violent or as vectors of disease, BDSM workers are in fact not only concerned about safety but professionally invested in it, reinforcing it through an identity politics of hierarchies of erotic labor. There are multiple implications of this work for public perception and policy-implications that could only be brought to light through the ethnographic method.

  18. [Promoting factors for breastfeeding: the role of health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Quijano, María Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    By the end of their first year of life, infants are ready to sit at the dinner table, to eat the same food as their family and to accept a variety of foods in sufficient quantity to maintain adequate nutritional status. In this context, breastfeeding contributes through different mechanisms such as: self-regulation in milk consumption and exposure to different flavors to assure a good nutrition and to create adequate feeding habits. However, breastfeeding is one of several options available to feed a newborn and a behavior that women need to learn. Today, the responsibility to counsel and guide women and their families in breastfeeding falls upon health professionals, specifically the general practitioner. This paper discusses the characteristics and functioning of the mammary gland as well as anatomical and physiological bases of suction exerted by the baby on the breast, so the health professional can recognize the factors that promote successful breastfeeding and to solve the problems or difficulties that could arise. Also are discussed here the main elements of a practice and proper technique, which are essential to provide breastfeeding counseling.

  19. Death with Dignity: The Developing Debate Among Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakman, Brittany N; Campbell, Hope E; Runk, Lindsay M

    2015-06-01

    The right-to-die movement-known variously as death with dignity, physician-assisted suicide, or aid in dying-remains controversial. The recently publicized death of 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, who chose to end her life through physician-assisted suicide, forced many health care professionals to evaluate or re-evaluate their stance on the issue. Currently, only five states have aid-in-dying laws, but many others have bills under consideration. The legalized process for physician-assisted suicide has a strict set of procedures that physicians and patients must follow to ensure the competency and safety of all parties involved. Opposition against legalizing physician-assisted suicide encompasses more than simply moral, religious, or ethical differences. While some individuals believe that physician-assisted suicide gives patients autonomy in their end-of-life care, health care professionals also may have reservations about the liability of the situation. Pharmacists, in particular, play a pertinent role in the dispensing of, and counseling about, the medications used to assist patients in hastening their death. It is imperative that pharmacists be aware of the intended use of the particular medication so that they can make informed decisions about their participation and ensure that they perform all the necessary steps required to remain compliant with the laws or statutes in their jurisdiction. This practice places an increased burden on pharmacists to evaluate their opinion on the concept of death with dignity and whether or not they want to participate.

  20. Professional stress and health among critical care nurses in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Dragana; Golubović, Boris; Brkić, Nina; Prokeš, Bela

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and analyse professional stressors, evaluate the level of stress in nurses in Intensive Care Units (ICU), and assess the correlation between the perception of stress and psychological and somatic symptoms or diseases shown by nurses. The research, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out in the Intensive Care Units (ICU), in health centres in Serbia. The sample population encompassed 1000 nurses. Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS) was used as the research instrument. ENSS revealed a valid metric characteristic within our sample population. Nurses from ICUs rated situations involving physical and psychological working environments as the most stressful ones, whereas situations related to social working environment were described as less stressful; however, the differences in the perception of stressfulness of these environments were minor. Socio-demographic determinants of the participants (age, marital status and education level) significantly affected the perception of stress at work. Significant differences in the perception of stressfulness of particular stress factors were observed among nurses with respect to psychological and somatic symptoms (such as headache, insomnia, fatigue, despair, lower back pain, mood swings etc.) and certain diseases (such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus etc). In view of permanent escalation of professional stressors, creating a supportive working environment is essential for positive health outcomes, prevention of job-related diseases and better protection of already ill nurses.

  1. Determination of awareness of health professionals about violence during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Sen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the awareness of medical professionals about violence during pregnancy.Methods: It was conducted in a Maternity Hospital, Izmir between 15th November 2007- 15th January 2008. 120 individuals participate in the research (midwives, nurses, doctors, N=160.Results: All of the participants defined the violence during pregnancy as a health problem and 66.7% of them find themselves adequate to diagnose the symptoms of violence. Answers for the physical and psychological findings of violence were; 72.5% think of abuse when they see a bruise, bump or wound on pregnant women's body, 50.8%  don't think of abuse in case of insomnia complaint. Answers for pregnancy complications of violence were: 61.7% "sometimes" think of abuse in pregnant women who applied for preterm birth and 59.2%  don't think of abuse when fetus growth retardation is determined. Answers for questions about affectless use of healthy life behaviors of violence were; 55.0% "sometimes" think of abuse in pregnant women who applied for abortion and 60.8% don't think of abuse in the presence of genital infections in pregnant women.Conclusion: Medical professionals have problems in diagnosing the violence during pregnancy and perceive violence as a health problem; insufficient action is taken against violence cases.

  2. Educating Health Professionals about the Electronic Health Record (EHR: Removing the Barriers to Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Bellwood

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the healthcare industry we have had a significant rise in the use of electronic health records (EHRs in health care settings (e.g. hospital, clinic, physician office and home. There are three main barriers that have arisen to the adoption of these technologies: (1 a shortage of health professional faculty who are familiar with EHRs and related technologies, (2 a shortage of health informatics specialists who can implement these technologies, and (3 poor access to differing types of EHR software. In this paper we outline a novel solution to these barriers: the development of a web portal that provides facility and health professional students with access to multiple differing types of EHRs over the WWW. The authors describe how the EHR is currently being used in educational curricula and how it has overcome many of these barriers. The authors also briefly describe the strengths and limitations of the approach.

  3. Perceived reciprocal value of health professionals' participation in global child health-related work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Sarah; Wigle, Jannah; Akseer, Nadia; Barac, Raluca; Barwick, Melanie; Zlotkin, Stanley

    2017-05-22

    Leading children's hospitals in high-income settings have become heavily engaged in international child health research and educational activities. These programs aim to provide benefit to the institutions, children and families in the overseas locations where they are implemented. Few studies have measured the actual reciprocal value of this work for the home institutions and for individual staff who participate in these overseas activities. Our objective was to estimate the perceived reciprocal value of health professionals' participation in global child health-related work. Benefits were measured in the form of skills, knowledge and attitude strengthening as estimated by an adapted Global Health Competency Model. A survey questionnaire was developed following a comprehensive review of literature and key competency models. It was distributed to all health professionals at the Hospital for Sick Children with prior international work experience (n = 478). One hundred fifty six health professionals completed the survey (34%). A score of 0 represented negligible value gained and a score of 100 indicated significant capacity improvement. The mean respondent improvement score was 57 (95% CI 53-62) suggesting improved overall competency resulting from their international experiences. Mean scores were >50% in 8 of 10 domains. Overall scores suggest that international work brought value to the hospital and over half responded that their international experience would influence their decision to stay on at the hospital. The findings offer tangible examples of how global child health work conducted outside of one's home institution impacts staff and health systems locally.

  4. Stress reactions after a patient suicide and their relations to the profile of mental health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli Dransart, Dolores Angela; Heeb, Jean-Luc; Gulfi, Alida; Gutjahr, Elisabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient suicide is a professional hazard for mental health professionals and an event likely to trigger stress reactions among them. This study aimed to identify typical profiles of professionals after a patient suicide to address the severity of stress reactions and its discriminant variables. Methods Mental health professionals (N = 666) working in institutional settings or private practice in the French-speaking part of Switzerland filled out a self-administered questionnaire in...

  5. Continuing professional development needs of nursing and allied health professionals with responsibility for prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglicki, Robert S; Reynolds, Julie; Rivers, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) for non-medical prescribers is recognised as being pivotal in maintaining up -to -date knowledge and skills influencing prescribing competence. This study was, therefore, designed to ascertain the aspirations, priorities and preferred mode of CPD for non-medical prescribers. Qualitative data were derived from semi-structured in-depth interviews and a focus group given by 16 allied health professionals working in primary and secondary care settings. A topic guide was used to cover clinical decision-making (including difficult decisions), legal aspects of prescribing and diagnostic issues. A content analysis of the verbatim transcripts enabled four key emerging themes to be identified, thus offering a basis for developing a greater understanding of the CPD needs of non-medical prescribers. The four key emerging themes identified are the following: Theme 1: "Personal anxiety undermining confidence to prescribe", Theme 2: "External barriers and other factors that exacerbate anxiety", Theme 3: "Need for support identified through coping strategies", and Theme 4: "Preferred mode or style of learning". The findings suggest that anxiety and lack of confidence in non-medical prescribing pose a significant challenge for CPD. Strategies that are most likely to improve prescribing confidence are through a blended learning approach. Local higher education and workplace employer collaboration is an appropriate step forward to achieve this. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Writing skills enhancement for public health professionals in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deonandan R

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Raywat Deonandan,1 Nodine Sangwa,1 Steve Kanters,2 Sabin Nsanzimana3 1Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 2University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Rwanda Biomedical Center, Kigali, Rwanda Abstract: In 2013, Canadian scholars delivered a 1-week workshop to 30 junior public health professionals in Rwanda. The goal was to improve the Rwandans’ skills and confidence with respect to writing scientific papers for submission to international peer-reviewed global health journals. As a result of the workshop, there was a statistically significant improvement in participants’ reported confidence in many aspects of navigating the publishing process, but no improvement in confidence regarding statistically analyzing their data. Remarkably, as a group, participants were able to write an article for a leading international journal, which was subsequently published. Results indicate that similar interventions would be both successful and well received, especially if targeted to individuals at a similar stage of career progress. Keywords: education, Rwanda, public health, skills

  7. Perceptions of the population and health professionals regarding visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Rose Ferraz; da Luz, Zélia Maria Profeta; Bevilacqua, Paula Dias

    2016-02-01

    Based on theoretical qualitative research reference methodology, this study sought to investigate the perception of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) by social actors directly involved in the prevention and control of the disease. Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with residents, focus groups were staged with 18 health workers in an endemic VL area and depositions were collected, which after being processed by content analysis revealed shortcomings and challenges. The population associated VL with dogs, acknowledged their co-responsibility in tackling the disease and demanded information. Health workers identified environmental sanitation as an essential factor for VL prevention. Among the shortcomings, the lack of information about the disease and culpability of the individual because of non-adherence to prevention measures were observed, especially environmental management. Probably, approaches emphasizing the role of the environment as a health promotion agent and the timely definition of specific environmental measures against VL, constitute a prospect for overcoming these shortcomings. The consensus is that the main challenge for enhancing the prevention and control might be the participatory and dialogical construction of these approaches between health professionals and the population.

  8. Educational games for mental health professionals: a Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoopathi, P S; Sheoran, R; Adams, C E

    2007-05-01

    Learning in general can be been a passive process. This review is aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of educational games as a teaching strategy in mental health professionals. We searched for all relevant randomised control trials (RCT) that compared educational games as teaching strategies with other methods of learning using electronic and reference searching, and by contacting trial authors. Data were extracted from selected trials and, individual person data was analysed using fixed effect Peto Odds Ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI). If appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) or number needed to harm (NNH) was estimated. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences. We identified one trial (n = 34) of an educational game for mental health nursing students which followed up participants only over a few hours. For an outcome we arbitrarily defined ('no academically important improvement [a 10% improvement in scores]'), those allocated to educational games fared considerably better than students in the standard education techniques group (OR 0.06 CI 0.01 to 0.27, NNT 3 CI 2 to 4). On average those in the games group scored six more points than the control students on a test of questions relevant to psychosis set to the standard of the mental health nursing curriculum of the day (WMD 6 CI 2.63 to 9.37). Current limited evidence suggests educational games could help mental health students gain more points in their tests; however this interesting study should be refined and repeated.

  9. International health electives: thematic results of student and professional interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosoniak, Andrew; McCarthy, Anne; Varpio, Lara

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the complexities (including harms and benefits) of international health electives (IHEs) involving medical trainees. This exploration contributes to the ongoing debate about the goals and implications of IHEs for medical trainees. This qualitative study used anonymous, one-to-one, semi-structured interviews. All participants had previous international health experiences. Between September 2007 and March 2008, we interviewed a convenience sample of health care professionals (n=10) and medical trainees (n=10). Using a modified grounded theory methodology, we carried out cycles of data analysis in conjunction with data collection in an iterative and constant comparison process. The study's thematic structure was finalised when theme saturation was achieved. Participants described IHEs in both negative and positive terms. IHEs were described as unsustained short-term contributions that lacked clear educational objectives and failed to address local community needs. Ethical dilemmas were described as IHE challenges. Participants reflected that many IHEs included aspects of medical tourism and the majority of participants described the IHE in negative terms. However, a few participants acknowledged the benefits of the IHE. Specifically, it was seen as an introduction to a career in global health and as a potential foundation for more sustainable projects with positive host community impacts. Finally, despite similar understandings among participants, self-awareness of medical tourism was low. International health electives may include potential harms and benefits for both the trainee and the host community. Educational institutions should encourage and support structured IHEs for trainee participation. We recommend that faculties of medicine and global health educators establish pre-departure training courses for trainees and that IHE opportunities have sufficient structures in place to mitigate the negative effects of medical

  10. Health Care Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health in Their Future Professional Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerbild, H.; Larsen, C. M.; Rolander, B.

    2017-01-01

    Students’ attitudes and educational needs regarding sexual health are important, since their ability to promote sexual health in their future profession can be challenged by their attitudes and knowledge of sexuality and sexual health. There are no existing Danish instruments able to measure...... of the SA-SH (SA-SH-D) had a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.67. The content validity index showed high relevance (item context validity index 0.82–1.0), and item scale correlation was satisfactory. The SA-SH-D is a valid and reliable questionnaire, which can be used to measure health care professional students...

  11. Factors influencing korean international students' preferences for mental health professionals: a conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Feigon, Maia

    2014-01-01

    Asian students comprise over half of all international students in the United States, yet little is known about their help-seeking behaviors and preferences for mental health professionals. The purpose of this study was to use conjoint analysis to examine characteristics of mental health professionals influencing Korean international students' preferences when choosing a mental health professional. Korean international students from three universities in the United States were recruited on a volunteer basis to participate in this study (N = 114). Results indicated that mental health professional characteristics, including ethnicity, age, professional identity, and training institution, were significant factors in students' preference formation; however, gender of the mental health professional was not found to be a significant factor in the present study. Ethnic similarity was the most powerful predictor of preference formation. Implications for promoting help-seeking and mental health service utilization among Asian international students are discussed.

  12. [Use of ineffective practices in Primary Health Care: professional opinions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Bustillo, L; Barrasa Villar, J I; Castán Ruíz, S; Moliner Lahoz, F J; Aibar Remón, C

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of ineffective practices in Primary Health Care (PHC) based on the opinions of clinical professionals from the sector, and to assess the significance, implications and factors that may be contributing to their continuance. An on line survey of opinion from a convenience sample of 575 professionals who had published articles over the last years in Atención Primaria and Semergen medical journals. A total of 212 professionals replied (37%). For 70.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64.5 to 73.3) the problem of ineffective practices is frequent or very frequent in PHC, and rate their importance with an average score of 7.3 (standard deviation [SD]=1.8) out of 10. The main consequences would be endangering the sustainability of the system (48.1%; 95% CI, 41.2 to 54.9) and harming patients (32.1%; 95% CI, 25.7 to 38.5). These ineffective practices are the result of the behaviour of the patients themselves (28%; 95% CI, 22.6 to 35.0) workload (26.4%; 95% CI, 20.3 to 32.5), and the lack of the continuous education (19.3%; 95% CI, 13.9 to 24.7). Clinical procedures of greatest misuse are the prescribing of antibiotics for certain infections, the frequency of cervical cancer screening, rigorous pharmacological monitoring of type 2 diabetes in patients over 65 years, the use of psychotropic drugs in the elderly, or the use of analgesics in patients with hypertension or renal failure. The use of ineffective procedures in PHC is considered a very important issue that negatively affects many patients and their treatment, and possibly endangering the sustainability of the system and causing harm to patients. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Teaching Health Sciences Students about Culturally Sensitive Communication between Health Professionals and Patients from Diverse Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Mónica; Pena, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    As members of a nationally accredited research project (I?+?D+i) InterMED (ref.: FF2011-25500) being carried out in the field of Intercultural Mediation, we are aware of the mediator's delicate role in communicative interactions between health professionals and foreign population. Sales has pointed out the dangers of stereotyping minorities and…

  14. Local professionals' perceptions of health assets in a low-SES Dutch neighbourhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, den Lea; Uiters, Ellen; Hofland, Aafke; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Schuit, Albertine Jantine

    2017-01-01

    Background: Asset-based approaches have become popular in public health. As yet it is not known to what extent health and welfare professionals are able to identify and mobilise individual and community health assets. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand professional's perceptions o

  15. CONCEPT OF HEALTH: A STUDY WITH HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS AND STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Bosco Oliveira Ribeiro da Silva

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of a questionnaire, the degree of knowledge that pediatricians, maternal-infant health nurses and medical and nursing students have of the concept of health. Methods: It was a cross-sectional and prospective study, previously approved by UNIFENAS Committee on Ethics in Research, having been carried out with pediatricians (n=42, maternal-infant health nurses (n=69, medical students (n=118, and nursing students (n=68 from two southern towns of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, which have medical and nursing schools. A survey was done in hospitals, medical clinics, City Health Bureaus and universities to reach the total number of students and professionals, weighing the possibility of a professional working in more than a job. The replies were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. For the open questions the contents analysis was used, according to BARDIN (1977. The data were presented in table. Results: According to the answer of 71,74% of the pediatricians 72,60% of the maternal-infant unit nurses, 77,77% of the medical school students and 63,76% of the nursing school students, health is a total physical, mental and social well-being. Health was also found to be a balance between the body and its environment by 10,87% of the pediatricians, 10,95% of the maternal-infant unit nurses, 15.07% of the medical school students and 18,84% of the nursing school students. Conclusions: The difficulty to define health is well known, once it is a condition with different meanings. The notions of health and disease are strongly influenced by the cultural context in which they occur. The binomial health / disease is not related only to microorganisms, but also to socioeconomic, political and educational issue, and, the students as well as the health professionals are committed with this new health concept.

  16. Level of knowledge about information searching in health professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Molina Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: the accelerated growing of the importance and the amount of the information do not allow accumulating and storing all the information needed. It demands the development of abilities to take them back, understand them, and place them in the adequate format in the case of those needed for its organization or for the individual. Objective: to measure the level of knowledge about information searching in health professionals. Methods: a descriptive, transversal study carried out in the library of the medicine school in Cienfuegos city from March to May 2007. It included 100 users selected at simple random. Characterization of the sample, perception of the users about the knowledge on the steps to make to perform a search, main medical web sites and how to search for the information in INFOMED, sites and data bases in which they carry out the search, knowledge of elements, sites and tools for searching were the variables analyzed. The data were obtained from a survey and processed on Microsoft Excel system. Results: only 48 % of the users master the steps to carry out a search, 46 % stated to know the main medical web sites and, 61 % of them declared to know how to make a search in INFOMED which was the most visited web site. 58 % of the users do not have the abilities for an effective information search. Conclusions: our professionals have a low level of knowledge about information searching and medical web sites.

  17. Treating the elite athlete: anti-doping information for the health professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Shikha; Bowers, Larry D; Fedoruk, Matthew N

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and health professionals are a vital component in preserving the integrity of competition and the core principles of true sport. When treating an athlete, health professionals need to be cognizant of the anti-doping rules of the relevant sport organization. This review aims to provide an overview of the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, roles and responsibilities of the health professional, as well as provide resources that will guide their work with athletes.

  18. The Mental Health Condition of Manufacturing Front-line Workers: The Interrelationship of Personal Resources, Professional Tasks and Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing front-line workers were more likely to experience mental health problems. Personal resources and professional tasks were the major factors of workers’ mental health. Therefore, this study was to explore the interrelationship of these three key factors. A questionnaire including the revised Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI-R and the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90 covered 480 manufacturing front-line workers to measure their personal resources, professional tasks and mental health. Results showed that among manufacturing front-line workers, the status of mental health and professional tasks were below the national average level, and the personal resources were relatively deficient as well. Correlation analysis indicated a negative relation between the indicators of mental health and professional tasks (except responsibility, while personal resources and mental health were significantly positive correlation. These findings suggested that personal resources and professional tasks were highly related to mental health in manufacturing front-line workers.

  19. Developing a course to teach Spanish for health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Melanie; Timmerman, Gayle M; Sands, Dolores

    2006-07-01

    To make the baccalaureate nursing curriculum more responsive to changing U.S. demographics, the School of Nursing at The University of Texas at Austin instituted a required course, titled Spanish for Health Care Professionals. This course, developed in collaboration with the University's Department of Spanish and Portuguese, focuses on conversational Spanish using the communicative language teaching approach, rather than grammar and medical terminology instruction. Class activities, along with course materials, are linked to nursing practice. Course assignments are designed to develop authentic communication in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and understanding culture, and students demonstrated oral and written linguistic gains in relation to their Spanish fluency and accuracy. Because the Hispanic population is now the largest minority group in the United States, this course will help nurses communicate with Spanish-speaking patients.

  20. Coping With Stress as an LGBTQ+ Health Care Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Michele J; Streed, Carl; Henne, Michael

    2017-05-24

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other sexual/gender minority (LGBTQ+) health care providers face both general work-related stresses and working in heteronormative settings with ill-informed or hostile coworkers and patients, yet there has been little study of whether the coping strategies are specific to LGBTQ+ stress. We analyzed qualitative data from 277 health care professionals. Sources of stress included religiously and politically conservative coworkers, coworker/patient lack of knowledge, stresses of being closeted, and concerns about being out to patients. Consequences of being out as LGBTQ+ included lack of promotions, gossip, refusals of tenure, and anti-LGBTQ+ comments and behaviors in the workplace. Respondents showed mostly positive coping strategies to deal with stress, including becoming educators/advocates and self-care activities. Self-care options were common in rural areas with few LGBTQ+ social resources. Negative coping strategies were reported by 18% of respondents. The study highlights the extra burden of stress on LGBTQ+ health care providers.

  1. In defense of unified health system: discourses of health professionals, municipal counselors and aldermen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karly Garcia Delamuta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of municipal health counselors, primary care professionals and aldermen about the Unified Health System and the Brazilian Primary Care Policy. From these, we intend to analyze their involvement to improve the system and verify participation in projects that foster discussions about the challenges of this issue. The investigation took a qualitative approach, the data being collected through 28 semi-structured interviews conducted between November and December 2010 in Londrina-PR. Between the interviewed groups, it becomes apparent that health professionals have better conceptual approach of public health policies. However, all groups demonstrate misconceptions and distance for the principles and guidelines of the Unified Health System, as well as provisions of the Brazilian Primary Care Policy. The findings pointed indicate focus on disease, prioritization of medical consultations and greater value of hospital structures. Although conceptualized with misconceptions, limitations are noted at the public health services. However, the proposals to change the frame remain with distorted connotations. In these groups no practical actions or projects were found to improve the public health scenario. It is concluded the need for ownership of theoretical knowledge about policies involving health organization, by stakeholders, to change the paradigms of the traditional model to the Primary Health care become valued and understood as form of organization of the system.

  2. Nigeria's National Health Act: An assessment of health professionals' knowledge and perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osahon Enabulele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nigeria's National Health Act 2014 (NHA 2014 was signed into law on October 31, 2014. It provides a legal framework for the regulation, development, and management of Nigeria's Health System. This study assessed the knowledge and perception of the NHA 2014 by health professionals. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted in December 2015, in Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria. Data entry and analysis were done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 (IBM SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA statistical software, with Pearson's Chi-square, which is used to determine the associations between variables. Statistical significance was set at a P < 0.05. Results: The study population comprised 130 health professionals (medical doctors/dentists, nurses, pharmacists, laboratory scientists, and other health-related professionals in attendance at a medical conference. The respondents' age ranged from 21 to 75 years with a mean age of 44.53 ± 12.46 years. Medical practitioners accounted for 82.3% of the respondents. Although most (79.2% respondents had a good perception of the NHA 2014 with majority (86.2% claiming they were aware of the act, majority (73.8% exhibited poor knowledge of the act. A little more than half (53.1% of the respondents believed that the NHA 2014 will help to reduce strike actions in the health sector. Conclusion: Although health professionals in Nigeria have good awareness and perception of the NHA 2014, their knowledge of the Act is poor.

  3. THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL SUBJECTIVE POSITION OF MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol'ga L. Zadvornaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of development of professional-subjective position of managerial staff of health care in the system of continuous professional education in the conditions of optimization of activities of the health system. Professional and subject position reflects the position of individual managers in a professional environment, its relationship to the quality of professional activity, to himself, to patients and colleagues to level their skills.Purpose/objectives: analysis of core competencies, forming the professional and subject position of heads of medical organizations; identify possible ways of development of professional-subjective position of managerial staff of the public health based on the use of modern technologies and active methods of training in system of continuous professional education. Methodology. In conducting the present study used data from official sources, literature review, scientific methods of analysis and synthesis, comparative analysis and modeling. The results of the study indicate the necessity of actualization of the subject position of heads of medical organizations. Conclusions /Significance. The necessity of formation and development of professional subjective position of the heads due to the needs of society and the health care system with modern requirements for quality management training of health. Professional and subject position is a characteristic feature of a highly qualified specialist in the area of governance, reflecting its active attitude toward self and professional activity, factor of efficiency of activity of medical organizations. The real practice of activity of medical organizations requires improved approaches in the preparation of healthcare managers. Most of the leaders are having difficulties, associated not only with necessity of development of universal and professional competences, but also the necessity of development of professional-subjective position

  4. [Professional values: a strategic component of health professionals. The contribution of decisional research at the Toulouse University Hospital Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péoc'h, Nadia; Ceaux, Christine

    2012-03-01

    The organizational involvement concept is often developed by many researchers and practitioners. This study is in the right inheritance of Allen and Meyer (1990) and Thevenet and Neveu (2002) works who all considered the involvement as "an affective or emotional attachment towards the organization such as an individual strongly involved identifies himself, reinforces his own agreement and enjoys being a member of the organization that employs him". The aim of this study was to demonstrate the impact of professional values (in terms of adherence to the purposes, norms and values of the establishment upon the subject's involvement in professional activities). 1538 health professionals practising in Toulouse academic hospital center have answered a questionnaire upon the subject's individual perception of his personal involvement in his workplace; the possible working impacts upon his own motivation, the perceptions upon professional values. Results indicate that if involvement is subject to professional values, it turns towards a double determination: technical and axiological or ethical. The professional and axiological dimension introduces a moral position and a cognitive framework that participates in the decision-making action : working together, creating a climate of confidence, trusting the group, and progressing for greater cohesion. The ethical dimension joins historic and humanist values: self respect and altruism; developing human values for oneself and for others. Specifying values is already a project in itself, in terms of consciousness. Understanding those impacts upon health professionals involvements' is also the aim to include the historical of our Care Project in collective interaction, alteration and construction purposes.

  5. Mental Health Professionals in Children's Advocacy Centers: Is There Role Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Theodore P.; Fine, Janet E.; Jones, Lisa M.; Walsh, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    Two recent chapters in professional books have criticized children's advocacy centers for creating role conflict for mental health professionals because of their work with criminal justice and child protection professionals in children's advocacy centers as part of a coordinated response to child abuse. This article argues that these critiques…

  6. Current Technology Trends and Issues among Health and Physical Education Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jennifer M.; Franks, Hillary; Lynch, Brandy

    2017-01-01

    Health and physical education professionals who implement technology appropriately can contribute to helping students become physically educated individuals (NASPE, 2009). It is imperative that professionals be knowledgeable and resourceful in how to integrate technology effectively, but it is unclear what current challenges professionals face in…

  7. The Role of Fitness Professionals in Public Health: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lyon, Alexander T. C.; Neville, Ross D.; Armour, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    Kinesiology researchers have long had an interest in physical activity, fitness, and health issues and in the professional education and work practices of teachers and coaches. The professional development needs and practices of "fitness professionals," however, have not been a major concern for researchers in the field. The purpose of…

  8. Impact of "+Contigo" training on the knowledge and attitudes of health care professionals about suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the results of "+Contigo" training, developed by nurses and directed at 66 health professionals of integrated school health teams in Primary Health Care.METHOD: quantitative with data collection through the Suicide Behavior Attitude Questionnaire, administered before and after the training.RESULTS: significant increases were observed in suicide prevention knowledge and in changing attitudes of health professionals towards individuals with suicidal behavior.CONCLUSION: these results allow us to affirm that nurses hold scientific and pedagogical knowledge that grant them a privileged position in the health teams, to develop training aimed at health professionals involved in suicide prevention.

  9. Empathy in health professional students: A comparative cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, Cristina; La Cerra, Carmen; Aloisio, Federica; Montanari, Paola; Lancia, Loreto

    2016-06-01

    It has been shown that empathy strengthens the relationship between patients and health professionals and also improves patient and health professional satisfaction, which helps promote the best clinical outcomes. Empathy is considered an essential prerequisite for a nurse to effectively care for a patient and for a holistic understanding of a patient's perspective in a student population. The main aim was to compare empathy levels between health professional students attending different university courses. A comparative study with a cross-sectional approach was conducted in two successive academic year cohorts of 1st year health professional students at a public Italian university. A sample of 1st year health professional students at a public Italian university was investigated using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy Health Professional Students version (JSE-HPS). Overall, 502 health professional students were included in the study. The students in nursing showed significantly higher empathy levels than the students in other health professions. Furthermore, the female students were found to exhibit significantly more overall empathy than the male students were. The undergraduate nursing students showed a significantly higher mean score of empathy measured by the Jefferson Scale of Empathy Health Professional Students version (JSE-HPS) than the students attending other health undergraduate courses. This could mean that a particular aptitude in establishing a help-relationship with other people exists among the students that choose to become a nurse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Professional roles of a health team: a view of its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Saar, Sandra Regina; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Theory of Roles, this study aimed to examine health team professionals' views on the role played by their colleagues. We interviewed 39 health professionals: 01 nutritionist, 02 psychologists, 02 nurses, 03 physiotherapists, 04 pharmacists, 10 dentists and 17 physicians. The results showed that the participants considered that teamwork shares responsibility, which relieves stress and is a way of learning; they also indicate that expectations regarding the professionals' role are not very clear and that most participants have little knowledge about their colleagues' professional role. The most clearly described professional roles are those of physicians, nurses and pharmacists. The most obscure is the psychologist's role.

  11. Interprofessional education for internationally educated health professionals: an environmental scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arain M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mubashir Arain,1 Esther Suter,1 Sara Mallinson,1 Shelanne L Hepp,1 Siegrid Deutschlander,1 Shyama Dilani Nanayakkara,2 Elizabeth Louise Harrison,3 Grace Mickelson,4 Lesley Bainbridge,5 Ruby E Grymonpre2 1Workforce Research & Evaluation, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, 2College of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, 3School of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, 4Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC, 5Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Objective: The objective of this environmental scan was to identify Western Canadian interprofessional education (IPE resources that currently exist for internationally educated health professionals (IEHPs. Methodology: A web-based search was conducted to identify learning resources meeting defined inclusion criteria with a particular focus on the resources available in the Western Canadian provinces. Information was extracted using a standardized template, and we contacted IEHP programs for additional information if necessary. Members of the research team reviewed preliminary findings, identified missing information from their respective provinces, and contacted organizations to fill in any gaps. Results: The scan identified 26 learning resources for IEHPs in Western Canadian provinces and 15 in other provinces focused on support for IEHPs to meet their profession-specific licensing requirements and to acquire knowledge and competencies relevant to working in the Canadian health care system. Most learning resources, such as those found in bridging programs for IEHPs, included an orientation to the Canadian health care system, components of cultural competence, and at least one aspect of interprofessional competence (eg, communication skills. None of the 41 learning resources provided comprehensive training for IEHPs to cover the six interprofessional competency

  12. Health Care Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health in Their Future Professional Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerbild, Helle Nygaard; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Areskoug Josefsson, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    students’ attitudes towards working with and communicating about sexual health; thus, to be able to use the Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health (SA-SH) questionnaire in a Danish context, it is necessary to translate and test the translated questionnaire psychometrically. The aim......Students’ attitudes and educational needs regarding sexual health are important, since their ability to promote sexual health in their future profession can be challenged by their attitudes and knowledge of sexuality and sexual health. There are no existing Danish instruments able to measure...... of the SA-SH (SA-SH-D) had a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.67. The content validity index showed high relevance (item context validity index 0.82–1.0), and item scale correlation was satisfactory. The SA-SH-D is a valid and reliable questionnaire, which can be used to measure health care professional students...

  13. Definition of Professionalism by Different Groups of Health Care Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, George

    2017-01-01

    Professionalism is important in all service-providing professions. Professional bodies have extensive rules and regulations creating the foundations of the definition of professionalism, its meaning and these rules have to be followed. In view of this, healthcare students are given intensive training. A prospective study conducted in a District…

  14. Major surgery delegation to mid-level health practitioners in Mozambique: health professionals' perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCord Colin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines the opinions of health professionals about the capacity and performance of the 'técnico de cirurgia', a surgically trained assistant medical officer in the Mozambican health system. Particular attention is paid to the views of medical doctors and maternal and child health nurses. Methods The results are derived from a qualitative study using both semi-structured interviews and group discussions. Health professionals (n = 71 were interviewed at both facility and system level. Eight group discussion sessions of about two hours each were run in eight rural hospitals with a total of 48 participants. Medical doctors and district officers were excluded from group discussion sessions due to their hierarchical position which could have prevented other workers from expressing opinions freely. Results Health workers at all levels voiced satisfaction with the work of the "técnicos de cirurgia". They stressed the life-saving skills of these cadres, the advantages resulting from a reduction in the need for patient referrals and the considerable cost reduction for patients and their families. Important problems in the professional status and remuneration of "técnicos de cirurgia" were identified. Conclusion This study, the first one to scrutinize the judgements and attitudes of health workers towards the "técnico de cirurgia", showed that, despite some shortcomings, this cadre is highly appreciated and that the health delivery system does not recognize and motivate them enough. The findings of this study can be used to direct efforts to improve motivation of health workers in general and of técnicos de cirurgia in particular.

  15. Quality of health care: the responsibility of health care professionals in delivering high quality services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, A

    1998-11-01

    According to a recent definition, quality of care consists of the degree to which health services increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge; a definition that introduces both requirements of outcomes and the appropriateness of the process used. Clearly many different figures are interested in quality assessment initiatives in the health care field and these include patients, administrators and doctors each having different perspective. Doctors obviously pay greater attention to technical quality and results, giving greater emphasis to the health of the individual patient, tending to give priority to technical excellence and interaction between patient and doctor. Although the perspective of health care professionals is widely acknowledged to be important and useful, other perspectives on quality have been emphasised in recent years. The most important of these is the recognition that care must be responsive to the preferences and values of the consumers of health care services. In complete harmony with one's own professional commitment, the attention to the perspectives of patients must give physician the chance to identify methods of measuring and verifying quality which take account of the expectations of the many groups with an interest in improving the functioning of the health system. A global approach in the health field is needed the more specialization advances. The quality of medicine lies in its capacity to integrate what science says is appropriate and to be recommended, what can be reconciled with human rights and the self determination of the patient and what can be achieved by optimising available resources. In this complex context, the doctor could take on both the role of the person who decides on the use of resources and the one of social mediator.

  16. Reproductive health care for asylum-seeking women - a challenge for health professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Dealing with pregnancy, childbirth and the care of newborn babies is a challenge for female asylum seekers and their health care providers. The aim of our study was to identify reproductive health issues in a population of women seeking asylum in Switzerland, and to examine the care they received. The women were insured through a special Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO) and were attending the Women's Clinic of the University Hospital in Basel. We also investigated how the health professionals involved perceived the experience of providing health care for these patients. Methods A mixed methods approach combined the analysis of quantitative descriptive data and qualitative data obtained from semi-structured interviews with health care providers and from patients' files. We analysed the records of 80 asylum-seeking patients attending the Women's Clinic insured through an HMO. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 care providers from different professional groups. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively. Qualitative data analysis was guided by Grounded Theory. Results The principal health problems among the asylum seekers were a high rate of induced abortions (2.5 times higher than in the local population), due to inadequate contraception, and psychosocial stress due to the experience of forced migration and their current difficult life situation. The language barriers were identified as a major difficulty for health professionals in providing care. Health care providers also faced major emotional challenges when taking care of asylum seekers. Additional problems for physicians were that they were often required to act in an official capacity on behalf of the authorities in charge of the asylum process, and they also had to make decisions about controlling expenditure to fulfil the requirements of the HMO. They felt that these decisions sometimes conflicted with their duty towards the patient. Conclusion Health policies for asylum

  17. Reproductive health care for asylum-seeking women - a challenge for health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemp Elisabeth

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dealing with pregnancy, childbirth and the care of newborn babies is a challenge for female asylum seekers and their health care providers. The aim of our study was to identify reproductive health issues in a population of women seeking asylum in Switzerland, and to examine the care they received. The women were insured through a special Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO and were attending the Women's Clinic of the University Hospital in Basel. We also investigated how the health professionals involved perceived the experience of providing health care for these patients. Methods A mixed methods approach combined the analysis of quantitative descriptive data and qualitative data obtained from semi-structured interviews with health care providers and from patients' files. We analysed the records of 80 asylum-seeking patients attending the Women's Clinic insured through an HMO. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 care providers from different professional groups. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively. Qualitative data analysis was guided by Grounded Theory. Results The principal health problems among the asylum seekers were a high rate of induced abortions (2.5 times higher than in the local population, due to inadequate contraception, and psychosocial stress due to the experience of forced migration and their current difficult life situation. The language barriers were identified as a major difficulty for health professionals in providing care. Health care providers also faced major emotional challenges when taking care of asylum seekers. Additional problems for physicians were that they were often required to act in an official capacity on behalf of the authorities in charge of the asylum process, and they also had to make decisions about controlling expenditure to fulfil the requirements of the HMO. They felt that these decisions sometimes conflicted with their duty towards the patient. Conclusion

  18. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: towards an integrative framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Joe, Ron; Otto, Tony

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our approach for integrating electronic patient records into health professional education. Electronic patient record (EPR) use is increasing globally. The EPR is considered the cornerstone of the modernization and streamlining of healthcare worldwide. However, despite the importance of the EPR, health professional education in much of the world provides health professional students (who will become the practicing health professionals of the future) with limited access or knowledge about the EPR. New ways of exposing students to EPRs will be needed in order to ensure that health professionals will adopt and use this complex technology wisely and effect the positive benefits EPRs are expected to bring to healthcare globally. In this paper we describe: (a) a framework we have developed for integrating EPRs into health professional education and (b) an innovative Web portal, known as the University of Victoria Electronic Health Record (EHR) Educational Portal (which houses a number of EPRs) that can be used to explore the integration of EPRs in health professional education. It is hoped that adoption and use of EPRs will ultimately be improved through the use of the portal to allow students virtual and ubiquitous access to example EPRs, coupled with principled educational approaches for integrating EPR technology into health professional curricula.

  19. The attitude of health care professionals towards accreditation: A systematic review of the literature

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    Abdullah Alkhenizan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accreditation is usually a voluntary program, in which authorized external peer reviewers evaluate the compliance of a health care organization with pre-established performance standards. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature of the attitude of health care professionals towards professional accreditation. A systematic search of four databases including Medline, Embase, Healthstar, and Cinhal presented seventeen studies that had evaluated the attitudes of health care professionals towards accreditation. Health care professionals had a skeptical attitude towards accreditation. Owners of hospitals indicated that accreditation had the potential of being used as a marketing tool. Health care professionals viewed accreditation programs as bureaucratic and demanding. There was consistent concern, especially in developing countries, about the cost of accreditation programs and their impact on the quality of health care services.

  20. Acceptance of health information technology in health professionals: an application of the revised technology acceptance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis; Dimitrovski, Tomislav; Lazuras, Lambros; Bath, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    The response of health professionals to the use of health information technology (HIT) is an important research topic that can partly explain the success or failure of any HIT application. The present study applied a modified version of the revised technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the relevant beliefs and acceptance of HIT systems in a sample of health professionals (n = 133). Structured anonymous questionnaires were used and a cross-sectional design was employed. The main outcome measure was the intention to use HIT systems. ANOVA was employed to examine differences in TAM-related variables between nurses and medical doctors, and no significant differences were found. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the predictors of HIT usage intentions. The findings showed that perceived ease of use, but not usefulness, relevance and subjective norms directly predicted HIT usage intentions. The present findings suggest that a modification of the original TAM approach is needed to better understand health professionals' support and endorsement of HIT. Perceived ease of use, relevance of HIT to the medical and nursing professions, as well as social influences, should be tapped by information campaigns aiming to enhance support for HIT in healthcare settings.

  1. Incarcerated adolescents. The need for the development of professional ethical standards for institutional health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, E J

    1989-11-01

    Large numbers of children are incarcerated in juvenile correctional facilities each year in the United States. These children suffer from a wide range of physical and psychiatric illnesses and are in critical need of professional health care services. This article summarizes the health care needs of these children and documents the ethical problems faced by health care professionals who work in juvenile institutions. The adequacy of current ethical standards as a source of guidance and support for institutional health care professionals is reviewed and a series of recommendations for the development of comprehensive health care standards is set forth.

  2. 76 FR 55928 - Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Health Professional... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  3. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  4. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Kathy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a community related public health nurses; (b school public health nurses; (c GPs and practice nurses (primary care; and (d occupational health nurses (workplace from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based - to determine the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  5. Survey of research activity among multidisciplinary health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrea P; Roberts, Shelley; Baker, Mark J; Keijzers, Gerben; Young, Jessica; Stapelberg, N J Chris; Crilly, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe the research activities being undertaken by health service employees within one Australian health service and explore their experiences with undertaking research.Methods The present mixed-methods study was conducted across one health service in Queensland, Australia, and included a cross-sectional online survey and interviews with healthcare service employees. The anonymous survey was a self-administered online questionnaire, distributed to all 6121 employees at the health service via email, asking about research activity and engagement. Willing participants were also interviewed on their perceptions and experiences with research and capacity building.Results In all, 151 participants responded to the survey and 22 participated in interviews. Three-quarters of respondents reported actively participating in research over the past 6 years and several research outputs, such as publications, conference presentations and competitive grant funding, were displayed. Four concepts emerged from interview findings, namely collaborative partnerships, skilled mentorship, embedding research and organisational support, which represented the overall theme 'opportunities for a research-infused health service'.Conclusion Employees of the health service recognised the importance of research and had a range of research skills, knowledge and experience. They also identified several opportunities for building research capacity in this service.What is known about the topic? Building research capacity among healthcare professionals is important for enabling the conduct of high-quality research in healthcare institutions. However, building research capacity is complex and influenced by the uniqueness of organisational context. In order to successfully build research capacity among employees at any health service, current research activity, skills and experience, as well as staff perceptions around building research capacity in that

  6. 42 CFR 414.67 - Incentive payments for Health Professional Shortage Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incentive payments for Health Professional Shortage Areas. 414.67 Section 414.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners...

  7. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  8. Successfully living with chronic arthritis : the role of the allied health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, E.; Bobiatynska, E.; Lloyd, J.; Veehof, M.M.; Rasker, W.J.; Oosterveld, F.G.J.; Rasker, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment and care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex and various health professionals with different areas of expertise may be involved. The objective of this article is to review the treatments and their efficacy as provided by health care professionals in RA care. The requi

  9. Health Professionals' Responses to Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse History: Female Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Kim; Julich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had…

  10. Developing Consensus on the CompHP Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speller, Viv; Parish, Richard; Davison, Heather; Zilnyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Building on the CompHP Core Competencies for health promotion the Professional Standards for Health Promotion have been developed and consulted on across Europe. The standards were formulated to fit within the complexity of professional, occupational and educational standards frameworks in Europe as learning outcome standards with performance…

  11. Health Professionals' Responses to Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse History: Female Child Sexual Abuse Survivors' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Kim; Julich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had…

  12. Bilingual Glossary of Professional Mental Health Terms = Glosario Bilingue de Terminos Profesionales de Salud Mental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Ralph, Comp.

    Designed to acquaint social workers and other professionals in the mental health field with the basic terms necessary for professional discussions, paper presentations, and international correspondence, the English/Spanish-Spanish/English glossary lists 130 selected mental health terms. The glossary includes two sections: English to Spanish and…

  13. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  14. Paediatric death and dying: exploring coping strategies of health professionals and perceptions of support provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Elizabeth; Hafiz, Alaa

    2015-06-01

    Without question a child's death is a devastating event for parents and families. Health professionals working with the dying child and family draw upon their expertise and experience to engage with children, parents and families on this painful journey. This is a delicate and sensitive area of practice and has strong and penetrating effects on health professionals. They employ physical, emotional, spiritual and problem solving strategies to continue to perform this role effectively and to protect their continued sense of wellbeing. To explore health professionals' perceptions of bereavement support surrounding the loss of a child. The research was underpinned by social constructionism. Semi-structured interviews were held with 10 health professionals including doctors, nurses and social workers who were directly involved in the care of the dying child and family in 7 cases of paediatric death. Health professional narratives were analysed consistent with Charmarz's (2006) approach. For health professionals, constructions around coping emerged as peer support, personal coping strategies, family support, physical impact of support and spiritual beliefs. Analysis of the narratives also revealed health professionals' perceptions of their support provision. Health professionals involved in caring for dying children and their families use a variety of strategies to cope with the emotional and physical toll of providing support. They also engage in self-assessment to evaluate their support provision and this highlights the need for self-evaluation tools in paediatric palliative care.

  15. Substance Abuse among Health-Care Professionals in Rutherford and Surrounding Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sherri Reid; Heritage, Jeannette G.

    Drug abuse is a serious problem in today's work force. It is found in every occupation, from the entry-level employee to the chief executive officer. Among health care professionals alcohol is the number-one substance abused, prescription drugs are second, and cocaine is third. Substance abuse among health-care professionals in Rutherford,…

  16. Bilingual Glossary of Professional Mental Health Terms = Glosario Bilingue de Terminos Profesionales de Salud Mental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Ralph, Comp.

    Designed to acquaint social workers and other professionals in the mental health field with the basic terms necessary for professional discussions, paper presentations, and international correspondence, the English/Spanish-Spanish/English glossary lists 130 selected mental health terms. The glossary includes two sections: English to Spanish and…

  17. The cost of health professionals' brain drain in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbary Akpa

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Past attempts to estimate the cost of migration were limited to education costs only and did not include the lost returns from investment. The objectives of this study were: (i to estimate the financial cost of emigration of Kenyan doctors to the United Kingdom (UK and the United States of America (USA; (ii to estimate the financial cost of emigration of nurses to seven OECD countries (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Portugal, UK, USA; and (iii to describe other losses from brain drain. Methods The costs of primary, secondary, medical and nursing schools were estimated in 2005. The cost information used in this study was obtained from one non-profit primary and secondary school and one public university in Kenya. The cost estimates represent unsubsidized cost. The loss incurred by Kenya through emigration was obtained by compounding the cost of educating a medical doctor and a nurse over the period between the average age of emigration (30 years and the age of retirement (62 years in recipient countries. Results The total cost of educating a single medical doctor from primary school to university is US$ 65,997; and for every doctor who emigrates, a country loses about US$ 517,931 worth of returns from investment. The total cost of educating one nurse from primary school to college of health sciences is US$ 43,180; and for every nurse that emigrates, a country loses about US$ 338,868 worth of returns from investment. Conclusion Developed countries continue to deprive Kenya of millions of dollars worth of investments embodied in her human resources for health. If the current trend of poaching of scarce human resources for health (and other professionals from Kenya is not curtailed, the chances of achieving the Millennium Development Goals would remain bleak. Such continued plunder of investments embodied in human resources contributes to further underdevelopment of Kenya and to keeping a majority of her people in the vicious

  18. Professional uncertainty and disempowerment responding to ethnic diversity in health care: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Kai

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While ethnic disparities in health and health care are increasing, evidence on how to enhance quality of care and reduce inequalities remains limited. Despite growth in the scope and application of guidelines on "cultural competence," remarkably little is known about how practising health professionals experience and perceive their work with patients from diverse ethnic communities. Using cancer care as a clinical context, we aimed to explore this with a range of health professionals to inform interventions to enhance quality of care. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a qualitative study involving 18 focus groups with a purposeful sample of 106 health professionals of differing disciplines, in primary and secondary care settings, working with patient populations of varying ethnic diversity in the Midlands of the UK. Data were analysed by constant comparison and we undertook processes for validation of analysis. We found that, as they sought to offer appropriate care, health professionals wrestled with considerable uncertainty and apprehension in responding to the needs of patients of ethnicities different from their own. They emphasised their perceived ignorance about cultural difference and were anxious about being culturally inappropriate, causing affront, or appearing discriminatory or racist. Professionals' ability to think and act flexibly or creatively faltered. Although trying to do their best, professionals' uncertainty was disempowering, creating a disabling hesitancy and inertia in their practice. Most professionals sought and applied a knowledge-based cultural expertise approach to patients, though some identified the risk of engendering stereotypical expectations of patients. Professionals' uncertainty and disempowerment had the potential to perpetuate each other, to the detriment of patient care. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests potential mechanisms by which health professionals may inadvertently contribute to ethnic

  19. Perceptions and practices of Angolan health care professionals concerning intimate partner violence against women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Edna de Fátima Gonçalves Alves do; Ribeiro, Adalgisa Peixoto; Souza, Edinilsa Ramos de

    2014-06-01

    This was a qualitative exploratory study with the objective of identifying perceptions and practices among health professionals in Angola concerning intimate partner violence against women. Semi-structured interviews were held with a senior health administrator, head nurses, medical directors, psychologists, and nurse technicians in three national hospitals in the capital city of Luanda. The perceptions of Angolan health professionals towards violence against women are marked by the cultural construction of woman's social role in the family and the belief in male superiority and female weakness. Despite their familiarity with the types of violence and the consequences for physical and mental health, the health professionals' practices in providing care for women in situations of violence focus on the treatment of physical injuries, overlooking the subjectivity and complexity of these situations. Recent inclusion of the issue in public policies is reflected in health professionals' practices and raises challenges for the health sector in caring for women in situations of violence.

  20. Work process, performance and professional profile of a Hearing Health Network: reference for satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escarce, Andrezza Gonzalez; Lemos, Stela Maris Aguiar; Carvalho, Sirley Alves da Silva

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the correlation between the satisfaction of professionals from the Hearing Health Care network in two micro-regions of Minas Gerais state and the sociodemographic profile, work process, and work performance in the health service. This is a cross-sectional, observational, analytic study with a non-probabilistic sample including 34 professionals from the Hearing Health Care services. Data collection occurred through individual interviews in the municipality of professional practice. Associations between the Professional Satisfaction variable and the explanatory variables Sociodemographic Data, Work Routine, and Developed Actions were conducted. Professionals with graduate studies were more satisfied with the human resources policy and the activities developed, whereas health civil servants showed more satisfaction with the wage policy and the work schedule. The correlation analysis between work process and satisfaction revealed a moderate positive correlation between items such as Health Promotion Actions, Satisfaction with Diagnostic Equipment, and Satisfaction with Maintenance Equipment. The present study revealed a higher level of satisfaction among professionals with graduate studies (human resources policy and activities developed) and civil servants (wage policy and work schedule). The relevance of this study lies on the important role that health professionals play on the Health Care Network. Additionally, the study of satisfaction level can provide a search for improvements, considering that satisfied professionals not only improve service quality, but also show greater creativity, commitment, and performance.

  1. The impact of eLearning on health professional educators' attitudes to information and communication technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville V

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Neville,1 Mary Lam,2 Christopher J Gordon3 1Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, The University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Science, 3Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: The use of information and communication technology (ICT in health professional education is increasing rapidly. Health professional educators need to be responsive to health professionals' information and communication technological needs; however, there is a paucity of information about educators' attitudes to, and capabilities with, ICT. Methods: Fifty-two health professional educators, enrolled in health professional education postgraduate studies, participated in an online subject with specific eLearning components requiring the use of ICT. They completed a pre- and postquestionnaire pertaining to ICT attitudes, confidence, and usage. Results: Participants reported significant increases in overall ICT confidence during the subject despite it being high at baseline (mean: 7.0 out of 10; P=0.02. Even with increased ICT confidence, there were decreases in the participants' sense of ICT control when related to health professional education (P=0.002; whereas, the amount of time participants engaged with ICT devices was negatively correlated with the sense of ICT control (P=0.002. The effect of age and health discipline on ICT attitudes and confidence was not significant (P>0.05. Conclusion: This study reports that health professional educators have perceptual deficits toward ICT. The impact of eLearning increased confidence in ICT but caused a reduction in participants' sense of control of ICT. Health professional educators require more ICT training and support to facilitate better ICT integration in health professional education settings. Keywords: confidence, sense of control 

  2. Local professionals' perceptions of health assets in a low-SES Dutch neighbourhood: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Broeder, Lea; Uiters, Ellen; Hofland, Aafke; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Schuit, Albertine Jantine

    2017-07-12

    Asset-based approaches have become popular in public health. As yet it is not known to what extent health and welfare professionals are able to identify and mobilise individual and community health assets. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand professional's perceptions of health and health assets. In a low-SES neighbourhood, 21 health and welfare professionals were interviewed about their definition of health and their perceptions of the residents' health status, assets available in the neighbourhood's environment, and the way residents use these assets. A Nominal Group Technique (NGT) session was conducted for member check. Verbatim transcripts of the semi-structured interviews were coded and analysed using Atlas.ti. The professionals used a broad health concept, emphasizing the social dimension of health as most important. They discussed the poor health of residents, mentioning multiple health problems and unmet health needs. They provided many examples of behaviour that they considered unhealthy, in particular unhealthy diet and lack of exercise. Professionals considered the green physical environment, as well as health and social services, including their own services, as important health enhancing factors, whereas social and economic factors were considered as major barriers for good health. Poor housing and litter in public space were considered as barriers as well. According to the professionals, residents underutilized neighbourhood health assets. They emphasised the impact of poverty on the residents and their health. Moreover, they felt that residents were lacking individual capabilities to lead a healthy life. Although committed to the wellbeing of the residents, some professionals seemed almost discouraged by the (perceived) situation. They looked for practical solutions by developing group-based approaches and supporting residents' self-organisation. Our study shows, firstly, that professionals in the priority district Slotermeer rated

  3. Educational needs of health professionals working in rheumatology in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H.M; Alliot-Launois, Francoise; Beauvais, Catherine; Gobbo, Milena; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Munuera-Martínez, Pedro V; Opava, Christina H; Prior, Yeliz; Redmond, Anthony; Smucrova, Hana; Wiek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the availability of postgraduate education for health professionals (HPs) working in rheumatology in Europe, and their perceived educational needs and barriers for participation in current educational offerings. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with national representatives of rheumatology HPs' organisations and an online survey among individual HPs was disseminated through existing European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) networks (10 languages including English). These comprised questions on: availability of postgraduate education, familiarity with EULAR and its educational offerings, unmet needs regarding the contents and mode of delivery and potential barriers to participate in education (0–10 scales). Results According to 17 national representatives, postgraduate rheumatology education was most common for nurses, physical and occupational therapists. There were 1041 individuals responding to the survey, of whom 48% completed all questions. More than half (56%) were familiar with EULAR as an organisation, whereas rheumatology education for HPs in most countries. There are opportunities to raise awareness regarding EULAR educational offerings and to develop courses provided in HPs' own country, tailored to national needs and barriers and taking language barriers into consideration. PMID:27933210

  4. Publication planning: an effective corporate strategy to influence health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical companies integrate scientific publications into the communication strategies they employ to influence the practices of health professionals. In their"publication plan", pharmaceutical companies, or the communication agencies they hire, develop key messages to promote their drugs and then plan in advance how, when and where to disseminate them in medical journals or at conferences. Although their true intent is promotional, these messages must appear to be purely scientific, and are therefore disseminated as research articles, review articles, editorials, commentaries. Publication planning involves the use of "ghost" authors who work directly for pharmaceutical companies, but whose contribution is rarely acknowledged in the final published article. Key opinion leaders are recruited as the honorary authors of these articles, to which they have made little, if any, contribution. The criteria for authorship set by journals that publish primary research articles do not provide adequate protection against the practice of ghost and honorary authorship. Certain journals publishing primary research derive a large proportion of their revenue from selling reprints used by pharmaceutical companies to promote their drugs, especially by their sales representatives.

  5. Expertise about herbs and dietary supplements among diverse health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Charles

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbs and other dietary supplements are among the most commonly used complementary medical therapies. However, clinicians generally have limited knowledge, confidence and communication about herbs and dietary supplements (HDS. We compared diverse clinicians' expertise about HDS to better target future curricula. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of physicians, pharmacists, nurses, dietitians and trainees in these professions prior to e-curriculum about HDS in 2004–2005. The survey had 28 questions about knowledge, 19 questions about their confidence and 11 questions about their communication practices about HDS. Results Of the 1,268 participants, 25% were male; the average age was 40 years. Mean scores were 66% correct for knowledge; 53/95 on the confidence scale and 2.2 out of possible 10 on the communication practices scale. On average, scores were lowest for those who used fewer HDS; and trainees and nurses compared with physicians, pharmacists and dietitians (P Conclusion Clinicians have moderate levels of knowledge and confidence, but poor communication skills about HDS. Future curricula about HDS should target nurses, students, practitioners and those not currently using HDS. Research is needed to determine the most cost-effective educational strategies for diverse health professionals.

  6. Bridging the gap between health care professionals and communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Hartley

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bridging the gap between health care professionals and communities is a difficult task. It involves establishing a culture of community participation and improving the process of communication between the two groups. Effective communication between these groups is not easy. The people concerned often speak different languages, have different levels of education and competence, different priorities in life and generally understand things differently. In addition, the greatest proportion of communication is transmitted non-verbally, through gestures, facial expressions and ‘body language’. This is important for two reasons. Firstly, any feelings of pity, superiority, frustration, dismissal or respect, will almost certainly be transmitted through these alternative modes of communication, they carry much more powerful messages than those contained in what is said. Secondly, many of these non-verbal messages, with the major exception of speech intonation, are visual and are therefore missed by people who cannot see well enough to pick them up. This combines to give an effective recipe for communication breakdown.

  7. Best interests decisions: professional practices in health and social care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Val; Boyle, Geraldine; Jepson, Marcus; Swift, Paul; Williamson, Toby; Heslop, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on data collected in 2011 from a national study about the operation of the best interests principle, a key feature of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 for England and Wales. The objective was to provide a picture of current professional practices in best interests decision-making. Four contrasting sample sites were selected, in which National Health Service trusts, social care and other organisations were recruited to participate. A multimethod design was followed, including an online survey with 385 participants, followed by qualitative research through a telephone survey of 68 participants, and face-to-face semi-structured interviews following up 25 best interests cases, with different perspectives on the process in 12 of those cases. The current paper reports only on the qualitative findings. The findings indicate that the MCA was successful in providing a structure for these practitioners, and that the five principles of the MCA were in general adhered to. A variety of perceived risks led to best interests processes being undertaken, and a typical scenario was for a period of hospitalisation or ill health to trigger a best interests decision process about a social care and or a life decision. The study supported previous research in finding the notion of capacity the most difficult aspect of the MCA, and it provides evidence of some specific capacity assessment practices, including problematic ones relating to 'insight'. Best interests decisions were often made by consensus, with practitioners taking on different roles within the process. Meetings played a key part, but other ways of involving people lacking capacity and significant others were also important. It was recommended that the issues highlighted in this research could be clarified further in the Code of Practice, or within risk guidance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. "We inform the experience of health": perspectives on professionalism in nursing self-employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-07-01

    Nursing work has evolved tremendously over the last century, raising ongoing questions about nursing's professional status. Through various strategies, professionalization in nursing has to some extent been accomplished, although autonomy over nursing practice has been elusive. This is especially so in the contemporary health care system, in which managerial control is emphasized and physician dominance continues. In response to professional constraints in traditional work settings, nursing self-employment is growing. In this study I used focused ethnography to explore the professional experiences of Canadian self-employed nurses and to reconsider nursing knowledge, ethics, and professionalism in this unique context. Despite the barriers they faced, these nurses offered a perspective on nursing professionalism that transcends classic professional traits, showing how the concept of professionalism can be invoked not as a way to "prove" status but as a way to describe a sense of commitment and the contribution to societal well-being.

  9. [Professional training and competency development for health promotion capacity building in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Hiram V

    2009-06-01

    The subject of health promotion professional training has raised a lot of interest in academic spheres, in professional organizations and in the health services sector at global and regional levels. Some of the topics that have stimulated regional dialogue and actions have been the following: developing curriculum and professional competencies for health promotion and health education academic programs; defining competencies and know-how in order to reorient health promotion capacity building initiatives for public health personnel; strengthening and increasing the academic and professional health promotion networks in Latin America; and organizing meetings and academic events and publications around the subject. During the academic years 2006-8, the Inter-American Coalition of Universities and Training Centers for Health Education and Health Promotion Personnel (www.ciueps.org) has been studying the different foci, competencies and characteristics of health promotion and health education professional training programs in the Latin American region. As part of this study, they have observed differences in curriculum foci between undergraduate, postgraduate and other levels of academic training and certifications. The Coalition as well as other Latin American entities has reiterated the challenges in the field of health promotion of professional training in the region. These include: maintaining an active forum to constantly refine professional competencies;expanding offerings at the different levels of health promotion training; developing courses on health-promotion-related disciplines; increasing the networks and academic exchanges between institutions in Latin America; encouraging the development of international courses on health promotion; increasing the production of theory and concepts on health promotion, health education and related practices in the Latin American context; improving dissemination of experiences in publications, at conferences and in

  10. Perceptions and attitudes of health professionals in kenya on national health care resource allocation mechanisms: a structural equation modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Opiyo Owili

    Full Text Available Health care resource allocation is key towards attaining equity in the health system. However, health professionals' perceived impact and attitude towards health care resource allocation in Sub-Saharan Africa is unknown; furthermore, they occupy a position which makes them notice the impact of different policies in their health system. This study explored perceptions and attitudes of health professionals in Kenya on health care resource allocation mechanism.We conducted a survey of a representative sample of 341 health professionals in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital from February to April 2012, consisting of over 3000 employees. We assessed health professionals' perceived impact and attitudes on health care resource allocation mechanism in Kenya. We used structural equation modeling and applied a Confirmatory Factor Analysis using Robust Maximum Likelihood estimation procedure to test the hypothesized model.We found that the allocation mechanism was negatively associated with their perceived positive impact (-1.04, p < .001, health professionals' satisfaction (-0.24, p < .01, and professionals' attitudes (-1.55, p < .001 while it was positively associated with perceived negative impact (1.14, p < .001. Perceived positive impact of the allocation mechanism was negatively associated with their overall satisfaction (-0.08 and attitude (-0.98 at p < .001, respectively. Furthermore, overall satisfaction was negatively associated with attitude (-1.10, p <.001. On the other hand, perceived negative impact of the allocation was positively associated with overall satisfaction (0.29, p <.001 but was not associated with attitude.The result suggests that health care resource allocation mechanism has a negative effect towards perceptions, attitudes and overall satisfaction of health professionals who are at the frontline in health care. These findings can serve as a crucial reference for policymakers as the Kenyan health system move towards devolving the

  11. Competency Guidelines for Public Health Laboratory Professionals: CDC and the Association of Public Health Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ned-Sykes, Renée; Johnson, Catherine; Ridderhof, John C; Perlman, Eva; Pollock, Anne; DeBoy, John M

    2015-05-15

    These competency guidelines outline the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for public health laboratory (PHL) professionals to deliver the core services of PHLs efficiently and effectively. As part of a 2-year workforce project sponsored in 2012 by CDC and the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), competencies for 15 domain areas were developed by experts representing state and local PHLs, clinical laboratories, academic institutions, laboratory professional organizations, CDC, and APHL. The competencies were developed and reviewed by approximately 170 subject matter experts with diverse backgrounds and experiences in laboratory science and public health. The guidelines comprise general, cross-cutting, and specialized domain areas and are divided into four levels of proficiency: beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. The 15 domain areas are 1) Quality Management System, 2) Ethics, 3) Management and Leadership, 4) Communication, 5) Security, 6) Emergency Management and Response, 7) Workforce Training, 8) General Laboratory Practice, 9) Safety, 10) Surveillance, 11) Informatics, 12) Microbiology, 13) Chemistry, 14) Bioinformatics, and 15) Research. These competency guidelines are targeted to scientists working in PHLs, defined as governmental public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratories that provide analytic biological and/or chemical testing and testing-related services that protect human populations against infectious diseases, foodborne and waterborne diseases, environmental hazards, treatable hereditary disorders, and natural and human-made public health emergencies. The competencies support certain PHL workforce needs such as identifying job responsibilities, assessing individual performance, and providing a guiding framework for producing education and training programs. Although these competencies were developed specifically for the PHL community, this does not preclude their broader application to other professionals

  12. An innovation in child health: Globally reaching out to child health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Jones

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide deaths of children younger than 5 years reduced from 12.7 million in 1990 to 6.3 million in 2013. Much of this decline is attributed to an increase in the knowledge, skills, and abilities of child health professionals. In turn this increase in knowledge, skills, and abilities has been brought about by increased child-health-focused education available to child health professionals. Therefore child-health-focused education must be part of the strategy to eliminate the remaining 6.3 million deaths and to achieve the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. This article describes a child-health-focused program that was established in 1992 and operates in 20 countries: Australia, Bangladesh, Botswana, Cambodia, China, Ethiopia, Hong Kong, India, Kenya, Malawi, Mongolia, Myanmar, Sierra Leone, the Seychelles, the Solomon Islands, Tanzania, Tonga, Vanuatu, Vietnam, and Zimbabwe. The Diploma in Child Health/International Postgraduate Paediatric Certificate (DCH/IPPC course provides a comprehensive overview of evidence-based current best practice in pediatrics. This includes all subspecialty areas from infectious diseases and emergency medicine through to endocrinology, respiratory medicine, neurology, nutrition, and dietetics. Content is developed and presented by international medical experts in response to global child health needs. Content is provided to students via a combination of learning outcomes, webcasts, lecture notes, personalized study, tutorials, case studies, and clinical practice. One hundred eleven webcasts are provided, and these are updated annually. This article includes a brief discussion of the value and focus of medical education programs; a description of the DCH/IPPC course content, approaches to teaching and learning, course structure and the funding model; the most recent evaluation of the DCH/IPPC course; and recommendations for overcoming the challenges for implementing a multinational child-health

  13. Successfully living with chronic arthritis. The role of the allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, Erik; Bobietinska, Elzbieta; Lloyd, Jill; Veehof, Martine; Rasker, Wietske Jm; Oosterveld, F G J Frits; Rasker, J J Hans

    2006-03-01

    The treatment and care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex and various health professionals with different areas of expertise may be involved. The objective of this article is to review the treatments and their efficacy as provided by health care professionals in RA care. The requirements for further research in this area are formulated. To achieve better effects of treatment it is necessary to improve the coordination of services as provided by the different specialists. The important roles of the patients themselves in the care and management of the disease are emphasized, as well as the roles of the informal caregivers such as a spouse or other family members and friends and the role of patient societies. The possible role of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to improve the communication and facilitate the coordination among health professionals and between patients and health professionals is mentioned. The topics presented in this article may encourage further discussion and research, particularly concerning the effects of the treatments as provided by allied health professionals. Health professionals play an important role in the life of patients with rheumatic disorders, in all the domains of the ICF: body functions and structure, activities (action by an individual) and participation (involvement in a life situation). Health professionals in rheumatology can make the difference in the lives of RA patients and their families.

  14. Empowerment of health professionals: how high level security education can raise awareness and confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Matthias; Busch, Christoph; Pharow, Peter; Blobel, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Setting up networks among physicians and other health professionals in virtually any medical discipline is an important part of establishing eHealth world-wide. Medical research strategies nowadays advance diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge and guidelines allowing patients to benefits. Patient data and samples are among the most sensitive information and must carefully be protected according to rules of ethics and professional discretion as well as national and international privacy legislation. A lot has been said about "patient involvement, patient empowerment". What about health professionals? How can they be involved and empowered to address the paradigm shift towards a personalized health service provision? Information and communication technology (ICT), medical devices, and software applications are not among the topics health professionals typically deal with while being theoretically and practically trained to diagnose diseases and treat patients. An ICT-based training and information provision is required to update the ICT skills of health professionals. The German CAST association provides such an information platform where health professionals attend applied computer security education events. This article aims at describing how ICT and security education is provided to health professionals, and how these training courses are designed, structured, performed, and assessed.

  15. Sexual health matters! learning for life: mapping client need and professional sexual health education for nurses in England

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, David Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Sexual health matters! This motif underpins the entire thesis. With survey responses from university educators and focus group encounters with clinical professionals undertaking the UK-wide Sexual Health Skills course, the study explores ways in which specific discourses pertaining to sexual health and illness inform the need for, and provision of, professional education for nurses in England.\\ud \\ud Through using a Foucauldian ‘lens’ and a novel process called crystallisation in sexualities ...

  16. Blogs and tweets, texting and friending social media and online professionalism in health care

    CERN Document Server

    DeJong, Sandra M

    2013-01-01

    Blogs and Tweets, Texting and Friending: Social Media and Online Professionalism in Health Care summarizes the most common mistakes - and their legal and ethical ramifications -made in social media by busy health care professionals. It gives best practices for using social media while maintaining online professionalism. The book goes on to identify categories of caution, from confidentiality of patient information and maintaining the professional's privacy to general netiquette in tweeting, texting, blogging, and friending. And it guides you in setting up a faculty page (or choosing

  17. Collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination: professional nurse communication skill sets in health care team interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apker, Julie; Propp, Kathleen M; Zabava Ford, Wendy S; Hofmeister, Nancee

    2006-01-01

    This study explored how nurses communicate professionalism in interactions with members of their health care teams. Extant research show that effective team communication is a vital aspect of a positive nursing practice environment, a setting that has been linked to enhanced patient outcomes. Although communication principles are emphasized in nursing education as an important component of professional nursing practice, actual nurse interaction skills in team-based health care delivery remain understudied. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts with 50 participants at a large tertiary hospital revealed four communicative skill sets exemplified by nursing professionals: collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination. Study findings highlight specific communicative behaviors associated with each skill set that exemplify nurse professionalism to members of health care teams. Theoretical and pragmatic conclusions are drawn regarding the communicative responsibilities of professional nurses in health care teams. Specific interaction techniques that nurses could use in nurse-team communication are then offered for use in baccalaureate curriculum and organizational in-service education.

  18. Collaboration between general practitioners and mental health care professionals: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haavet Ole R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between general practice and mental health care has been recognised as necessary to provide good quality healthcare services to people with mental health problems. Several studies indicate that collaboration often is poor, with the result that patient' needs for coordinated services are not sufficiently met, and that resources are inefficiently used. An increasing number of mental health care workers should improve mental health services, but may complicate collaboration and coordination between mental health workers and other professionals in the treatment chain. The aim of this qualitative study is to investigate strengths and weaknesses in today's collaboration, and to suggest improvements in the interaction between General Practitioners (GPs and specialised mental health service. Methods This paper presents a qualitative focus group study with data drawn from six groups and eight group sessions with 28 health professionals (10 GPs, 12 nurses, and 6 physicians doing post-doctoral training in psychiatry, all working in the same region and assumed to make professional contact with each other. Results GPs and mental health professionals shared each others expressions of strengths, weaknesses and suggestions for improvement in today's collaboration. Strengths in today's collaboration were related to common consultations between GPs and mental health professionals, and when GPs were able to receive advice about diagnostic treatment dilemmas. Weaknesses were related to the GPs' possibility to meet mental health professionals, and lack of mutual knowledge in mental health services. The results describe experiences and importance of interpersonal knowledge, mutual accessibility and familiarity with existing systems and resources. There is an agreement between GPs and mental health professionals that services will improve with shared knowledge about patients through systematic collaborative services, direct cell

  19. Portfolios and Professional Development in the Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gail M.; Saylor, Coleen

    The usefulness of portfolios for professional development and reflection was studied in the disciplines of physical therapy and nursing. The student sample may not represent the larger population of professional students, but data are presented as useful in understanding more about the general phenomenon of use of portfolios in professional…

  20. Project management educational curriculum for public health professionals: development and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sabapathy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful completion of public health projects is critical to achieving population health objectives. However project execution can be challenging due to scarce time and resources, rapidly changing environments and complex stakeholder requirements. To address these challenges physicians and other professionals working in public health need to learn the practical skills of project management. However curricula tailored to project management skill development for public health professionals is not widely available. A one-week curriculum on project management for public health professionals has been developed enabling participants to independently lead small-scale public health projects. This course adapts a private-sector curriculum for use in public health practice and incorporates a unique skill-building teaching method. Evaluation of the initial curriculum delivery at the Weill-Bugando University, Tanzania indicated the majority of students intended to use project management upon return to their positions in public health. Students indicated a lack of a critical mass of public health professionals with required knowledge and skills represents the greatest barrier to integration of project management into public health practice. A unique one-week curriculum in project management has been developed and is being made publicly available. The course will enable physicians and other professionals working in public health to rapidly learn and apply the methodology to the front lines of public health.

  1. The need to incorporate health information technology into physicians' education and professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Jones, Pierce; Jain, Sachin H; Friedman, Charles P; Marcotte, Leah; Blumenthal, David

    2012-03-01

    Nationwide, as physicians and health care systems adopt electronic health records, health information technology is becoming integral to the practice of medicine. But current medical education and professional development curricula do not systematically prepare physicians to use electronic health records and the data these systems collect. We detail how training in meaningful use of electronic health records could be incorporated into physician training, from medical school, through licensure and board certification, to continuing medical education and the maintenance of licensure and board certification. We identify six near-term opportunities for professional organizations to accelerate the integration of health information technology into their requirements.

  2. Achieving Excellence in Palliative Care: Perspectives of Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret I Fitch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caring for individuals at the end of life in the hospital environment is a challenging proposition. Understanding the challenges to provide quality end of life care is an important first step in order to develop appropriate approaches to support and educate staff members and facilitate their capacity remaining "caring." Four studies were undertaken at our facility to increase our understanding about the challenges health professionals experience in caring for patients at end of life and how staff members could be supported in providing care to patients and families: (1 In-depth interviews were used with cancer nurses (n = 30 to explore the challenges talking about death and dying with patients and families; (2 Surveys were used with nurses (n = 27 and radiation therapists (n = 30 to measure quality of work life; (3 and interprofessional focus groups were used to explore what it means "to care" (five groups held; and (4 interprofessional focus groups were held to understand what "support strategies for staff" ought to look like (six groups held. In all cases, staff members confirmed that interactions concerning death and dying are challenging. Lack of preparation (knowledge and skill in palliative care and lack of support from managers and colleagues are significant barriers. Key strategies staff members thought would be helpful included: (1 Ensuring all team members were communicating and following the same plan of care, (2 providing skill-based education on palliative care, and (3 facilitating "debriefing" opportunities (either one-on-one or in a group. For staff to be able to continue caring for patients at the end of life with compassion and sensitivity, they need to be adequately prepared and supported appropriately.

  3. An Interactive Session on Nutritional Pathologies for Health Professional Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua DeSipio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have emphasized the need to improve the nutrition training of health professionals, which will help them to provide optimal patient care. Nutrition-based interactive sessions may serve as an efficient approach to instigate an interest in nutrition among the students. Here we report the reception and effectiveness of a nutrition-pathology based interactive activity that we designed and implemented in the gastroenterology course given to the second year students at our medical school. The activity involved team work, individual accountability and peer-teaching. Nutrition pathology case stems (Kwashiorkor, vitamin B-12 deficiency, zinc deficiency and zinc-induced copper deficiency were posted on the course website for the students to read before the session. At the start of the session, all the groups (each made up of four members took a pre-quiz. Each student was then given an information sheet describing one case. Each group discussed the four cases with students acting as the “teacher” for the case assigned to them. A post-quiz was administered to the groups to assess acquisition of knowledge as well as in-depth thinking about the nutrition aspects discussed. The efficacy of the session measured by pre (39% questions correctly answered in total and post-quizzes (96% questions correctly answered in total and the overwhelmingly positive student feedback indicated that the session was highly effective. Ninety-five percent of students thought that the session demonstrated the clinical relevance of nutrition, while 98% students found the peer teaching to be engaging.

  4. Community mental health nurses speak out: the critical relationship between emotional wellbeing and satisfying professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jayln; Glass, Nel

    2006-10-01

    The article reports on selected findings of a research study concerning emotional wellbeing and professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). It highlights the relationship between community mental health nurses' and emotional wellbeing, and their capacity to provide satisfying professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). The notion of emotional wellbeing, factors that impacted upon the participants' emotional wellbeing, and the relationship of emotional wellbeing to professional practice were revealed in the study. These findings were based on a qualitative critical feminist research inquiry and specifically, interviews with five women community mental health nurses in Australia. Whilst complex, emotional wellbeing was found to be both implicitly and explicitly linked to the participants intertwined personal and professional experiences. Four key components were identified: the nebulous notion; the stress relationship; the mind, body, spirit connection; and, inner sense of balance. In terms of emotional wellbeing and professional practice, three themes were revealed. These were: being able to speak out (or not); being autonomous (or not) and being satisfied (or not). The authors argue that the emotional wellbeing of nurses working in community mental health settings is critical to satisfying professional practice. Furthermore nursing work involves emotional work which impacts on one's emotional wellbeing and emotional wellbeing is integrally linked to professional practice. It is recommended that health organisations must be pro-active in addressing the emotional needs of nurses to ensure the delivery of health care that is aligned to professional practice. This approach will ensure nurses will feel more recognised and validated in terms of their nursing practice.

  5. Awareness of medico-legal issues among medical and dental college health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Senthilkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The changing doctor-patient relationship and commercialization of modem medical practice has affected the practice of medicine. The fundamental values of medicine insist that the doctors should be aware about the various medico-legal issues which help in proper recording of medical management details. Aim: To evaluate the knowledge on Medico-legal Issues among Medical and Dental College Health Professionals of Meenakshi University (MAHER, Tamilnadu. Materials & Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among health professionals of Meenakshi University (MAHER, Tamilnadu. A total o f320 health professionals (163 medical and 157 dental participated in the study. A structured, closed ended, self-administered questionnaire was used for collection of data. Chi-square test was used to compare the awareness of medico-legal issues between medical and dental health professionals. Results: Among the 320 health professionals, 87.4% of medical and 76.1% of dental professionals were aware about the informed consent, 18.8% of medical and 5.7% of dental professionals had awareness about COPRA and only 14.3% of medical and 7.6% of dental professionals had awareness regarding the Medico-legal programs/courses. Conclusions: The results illustrated that the participants had little awareness on medico-legal issues. Hence there is an urgent need to update the understanding of these issues to be on a legally safer side.

  6. Networked Learning and Network Science: Potential Applications to Health Professionals' Continuing Education and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Alvaro; Parboosingh, John

    2015-01-01

    Prior interpersonal relationships and interactivity among members of professional associations may impact the learning process in continuing medical education (CME). On the other hand, CME programs that encourage interactivity between participants may impact structures and behaviors in these professional associations. With the advent of information and communication technologies, new communication spaces have emerged that have the potential to enhance networked learning in national and international professional associations and increase the effectiveness of CME for health professionals. In this article, network science, based on the application of network theory and other theories, is proposed as an approach to better understand the contribution networking and interactivity between health professionals in professional communities make to their learning and adoption of new practices over time.

  7. Patient-professional interactions in mental health institutions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    by discursive and narrative approaches, the aim of the study is to shed light on how the professionals and users construct patient identities. How are the users and the professionals positioned in their interactions? How are concepts such as psychiatric diagnosis and mental illness negotiated within...... the institution? How are possibilities for participation and service user involvement negotiated? Finally, the study wishes to understand what the encounters with the professionals and the practices of the institution may mean for the users’ self-understandings and subjectivity....

  8. The role of health professional organizations in improving maternal and newborn health: The FIGO LOGIC experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David J

    2015-10-01

    The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health improved the internal and external capacity of eight national professional organizations of obstetrics and gynecology in six African and two Asian countries. The initiative was funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and had three key objectives: to support the eight FIGO member associations to strengthen their capacity to work effectively; to influence national policies on maternal and newborn health; and to work toward improving clinical practice in this area. Through improved capacity, and underpinned by Memoranda of Understanding with their governments, the associations influenced national policy in maternal and newborn health, impacted clinical care through the development of over forty national clinical guidelines, delivered national curricula, trained clinical and management staff, and led the development of national maternal death and near-miss review programs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Professionalism and Occupational Well-Being: Similarities and Differences Among Latin American Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Context: Empathy, teamwork, and lifelong learning are described as key elements of professionalism. The first recipients of their benefits are professionals themselves. Paradoxically, scarce studies have reported association between professionalism and occupational well-being. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the influence that empathy, teamwork, and lifelong learning, play in the occupational well-being of physicians and nurses working in Latin American healthcare institutions. Materials and Methods: The Jefferson Scale of Empathy, the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration, the Jefferson Scale of Physicians Lifelong Learning, and the Scale of Collateral Effects (somatization, exhaustion, and work alienation), were administered to 522 physicians and nurses working in institutions of Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, and Argentina. Internal reliability was calculated. Gender and discipline were used as explanatory variables in comparison analysis. Two-way analysis of variance was performed to examine differences due to the main effects of the gender, and discipline, and to determine possible combined effects. Correlation analysis was performed to measure associations between collateral effects and age, and between collateral effects and professionalism. Results: A total of 353 (68%) surveys were returned fully completed. Adequate reliability was confirmed in all instruments. No differences were found among countries for collateral effects. Correlation analysis confirmed in physicians an inverse association between empathy and collateral effects (P = -0.16; p gender confirmed higher somatization in women physicians and nurses than in men groups (p stereotypes, play in the interaction between professionalism and occupational well-being. PMID:28179893

  10. The Impact of the Health Care System Reform on the Romanian Nurses Professionalization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia POPOVICI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian health sector went through a process of reform began in 2000 which entered into a final adjustment phase in 2010 when the economic crisis, the health professionals accelerated trend of labour migration, the precarious health of the population brought new challenges to the unsolved existing problems. Nurses are numerically the most important category of health professionals. Since 1994 they experienced a convergent movement of professionalization in the interior of the nurse profession. The aim of the study is to explore the nurses’ perceptions of the impact of the health care system reform on their own profession and on the internal process of professionalization. As a result a quantitative research was conducted on a sample including 411 nurses of different specialties working in Iasi county. The results of the research point out the significant impact of factors related to the reform of the health care system on the quality of the care process, on the nurses’ work conditions and professional satisfaction. The external disruptive factors produce negative effects on nurses’ group cohesion, despite the centripetal efforts of the professional organization and induce a slowdown movement of the nurses professionalization process.

  11. The Influence of Work Characteristics in the Quality of Life of Mental Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental health professionals are the main instrument for intervention in this area considered as a priority in Public Health and are subject to emotional exhaustion and stress that can negatively affect their quality of life. Aims: This study aims to assess the influence of job characteristics on health-related quality of life of health professionals.Methods: To address this it was decided to conduct a cross-sectional analytical study with a quantitative approach. SF-36v2 was used as a generic instrument for assessing quality of life, which is already validated for Portuguese population, complemented by a social and professional survey. Data collection took place from 28 January to 30 April 2013.Results and Conclusions: The sample comprised 201 mental health professionals in Portugal. Health-related quality of life shows statistically significant differences in the groups of studied professionals, according to the number of hours worked per week (p=0.04 and the degree of job satisfaction (p<0.001. The assessment of the quality of life of mental health professionals allows the implementation of changes in the organization of mental health services and may contribute to an improvement in the provision of healthcare services.

  12. Multi-level analysis of electronic health record adoption by health care professionals: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrecque Michel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The electronic health record (EHR is an important application of information and communication technologies to the healthcare sector. EHR implementation is expected to produce benefits for patients, professionals, organisations, and the population as a whole. These benefits cannot be achieved without the adoption of EHR by healthcare professionals. Nevertheless, the influence of individual and organisational factors in determining EHR adoption is still unclear. This study aims to assess the unique contribution of individual and organisational factors on EHR adoption in healthcare settings, as well as possible interrelations between these factors. Methods A prospective study will be conducted. A stratified random sampling method will be used to select 50 healthcare organisations in the Quebec City Health Region (Canada. At the individual level, a sample of 15 to 30 health professionals will be chosen within each organisation depending on its size. A semi-structured questionnaire will be administered to two key informants in each organisation to collect organisational data. A composite adoption score of EHR adoption will be developed based on a Delphi process and will be used as the outcome variable. Twelve to eighteen months after the first contact, depending on the pace of EHR implementation, key informants and clinicians will be contacted once again to monitor the evolution of EHR adoption. A multilevel regression model will be applied to identify the organisational and individual determinants of EHR adoption in clinical settings. Alternative analytical models would be applied if necessary. Results The study will assess the contribution of organisational and individual factors, as well as their interactions, to the implementation of EHR in clinical settings. Conclusions These results will be very relevant for decision makers and managers who are facing the challenge of implementing EHR in the healthcare system. In addition

  13. Statistical methods used in the public health literature and implications for training of public health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Matthew J; Powell, Amanda; Johnson, Tessa; Cadwell, Betsy L

    2017-01-01

    Statistical literacy and knowledge is needed to read and understand the public health literature. The purpose of this study was to quantify basic and advanced statistical methods used in public health research. We randomly sampled 216 published articles from seven top tier general public health journals. Studies were reviewed by two readers and a standardized data collection form completed for each article. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and frequency distributions. Results were summarized for statistical methods used in the literature, including descriptive and inferential statistics, modeling, advanced statistical techniques, and statistical software used. Approximately 81.9% of articles reported an observational study design and 93.1% of articles were substantively focused. Descriptive statistics in table or graphical form were reported in more than 95% of the articles, and statistical inference reported in more than 76% of the studies reviewed. These results reveal the types of statistical methods currently used in the public health literature. Although this study did not obtain information on what should be taught, information on statistical methods being used is useful for curriculum development in graduate health sciences education, as well as making informed decisions about continuing education for public health professionals.

  14. [E-health and Cyberdoc - "health portals" from a professional and quality assurance viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, E

    2002-01-01

    As a special expression of e-business in the health service the sphere of e-health has developed in recent years which increasingly manifests itself in the internet via health portals. Next to the transmitting of medical contents, the offer of community functions and the trading with goods from the medical sector, these health portals now increasingly provide advisory services for citizens by medical experts. Even if these services are predominantly effected by physicians, this activity is in agreement with the regulations of the currently valid professional responsibility law for German physicians, as its main emphasis (at the moment) is on health prevention and information. The safeguarding of quality of the online retrievable health information creates a further problem. The different approaches to the safeguarding of the quality of medical contents in the internet do not exempt the user from making a self-responsible decision as to which information he may consider reliable. This is due to the fact that there are no standardised control criteria.

  15. Professional Norms versus Managerialism in Campus Mental Health Centers: The Experiences of Eight Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Elizabeth C.; Ayers, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand better how, if at all, eight campus-based mental health clinicians experienced and negotiated managerialist practices, and with what outcomes. It was found that managerialism was experienced as challenges to professional ethics, clinical judgment, and challenges related to professional role…

  16. National nutrition month: promoting the diversified role of dietitians as health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danga-Storm, D; Gallagher, L; Nixon, D

    1986-02-01

    In summary, the planning and directing of NNM activities for a large metropolitan hospital required extensive public relations efforts to assure the success of each event. NNM provided a unique opportunity for health care professionals to interact with the business community, therefore promoting a positive image of dietitians as professionals. The events, successful in promoting nutrition education, identified dietitians as nutrition experts.

  17. Professional Competencies in Health Sciences Education: From Multiple Intelligences to the Clinic Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F.

    2010-01-01

    Nontechnical competencies identified as essential to the health professionals success include ethical behavior, interpersonal, self-management, leadership, business, and thinking competencies. The literature regarding such diverse topics, and the literature regarding "professional success" is extensive and wide-ranging, crossing educational,…

  18. Measuring the development of insight by dental health professionals in training using workplace-based assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prescott-Clements, L.E.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Schuwirth, L.; Gibb, E.; Hurst, Y.; Rennie, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: For health professionals, the development of insight into their performance is vital for safe practice, professional development and self-regulation. This study investigates whether the development of dental trainees' insight, when provided with external feedback on performance, can be

  19. Professional Development in Law, Health Care, and Aging: A Model Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    2000-01-01

    Argues there is a growing need for a core of professionals with the education and sensitivities necessary to integrate the fields of law, health care, and gerontology. Paper describes a professional development fellowship program which attempts to address this need by having recently graduated attorneys assess, on a firsthand level, provisions of…

  20. Social contract theory as a foundation of the social responsibilities of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welie, Jos V M

    2012-08-01

    This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract.

  1. Professional Competencies in Health Sciences Education: From Multiple Intelligences to the Clinic Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F.

    2010-01-01

    Nontechnical competencies identified as essential to the health professionals success include ethical behavior, interpersonal, self-management, leadership, business, and thinking competencies. The literature regarding such diverse topics, and the literature regarding "professional success" is extensive and wide-ranging, crossing educational,…

  2. Learning Processes in the Professional Development of Mental Health Counselors: Knowledge Restructuring and Illness Script Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Josef; Gruber, Hans

    2015-01-01

    An important part of learning processes in the professional development of counselors is the integration of declarative knowledge and professional experience. It was investigated in-how-far mental health counselors at different levels of expertise (experts, intermediates, novices) differ in their availability of experience-based knowledge…

  3. A Review of Contemporary Ethical Decision-Making Models for Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Perry C.

    2015-01-01

    Mental health professionals are faced with increasingly complex ethical decisions that are impacted by culture, personal and professional values, and the contexts in which they and their clients inhabit. This article presents the reasons for developing and implementing multiple ethical decision making models and reviews four models that address…

  4. Impact of international experience on research capacity of Chinese health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingjiao; Zhang, Liming; Sun, Lina; Wang, Xun

    2015-02-07

    It is common practice worldwide for health professionals to study abroad. However, the outcome of such experience has not been rigorously evaluated in China. Our current study aimed to quantify the impact on research of studying abroad among Chinese health professionals. A self-administered structured questionnaire was developed among health professionals in Harbin Medical University and its affiliated hospitals who had studied abroad ('returning' professionals) and health professionals who did not have experience abroad ('resident' professionals). 166 'returning' professionals (Group A) and 166 age-, sex- and specialty-matched 'resident' professionals (Group B) were included in the study. SPSS software was used for data entry and analysis. The total IF of papers published by Group A and Group B was, respectively, 1933.52 and 629.23 (Pabroad was associated with the duration abroad (Pabroad (P>0.05). The total IF of papers published at home, and the number of NSFC had no relationship with the duration abroad (both P>0.05) nor the age of going abroad (both P>0.05). The total IF of papers published at home and the number of NSFC were positively correlated with the total IF of papers published abroad (both Pstudy reflects the beneficial experience of working overseas. The opportunity for overseas experience should not be limited by age. Overseas study should be prolonged.

  5. Health services reform in Bangladesh: hearing the views of health workers and their professional bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockcroft Anne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Bangladesh, widespread dissatisfaction with government health services did not improve during the Health and Population Sector Programme (HPSP reforms from 1998-2003. A 2003 national household survey documented public and health service users' views and experience. Attitudes and behaviour of health workers are central to quality of health services. To investigate whether the views of health workers influenced the reforms, we surveyed local health workers and held evidence-based discussions with local service managers and professional bodies. Methods Some 1866 government health workers in facilities serving the household survey clusters completed a questionnaire about their views, experience, and problems as workers. Field teams discussed the findings from the household and health workers' surveys with local health service managers in five upazilas (administrative sub-districts and with the Bangladesh Medical Association (BMA and Bangladesh Nurses Association (BNA. Results Nearly one half of the health workers (45% reported difficulties fulfilling their duties, especially doctors, women, and younger workers. They cited inadequate supplies and infrastructure, bad behaviour of patients, and administrative problems. Many, especially doctors (74%, considered they were badly treated as employees. Nearly all said lack of medicines in government facilities was due to inadequate supply, not improved during the HPSP. Two thirds of doctors and nurses complained of bad behaviour of patients. A quarter of respondents thought quality of service had improved as a result of the HPSP. Local service managers and the BMA and BNA accepted patients had negative views and experiences, blaming inadequate resources, high patient loads, and patients' unrealistic expectations. They said doctors and nurses were demotivated by poor working conditions, unfair treatment, and lack of career progression; private and unqualified practitioners sought to

  6. Do nurses and other health professionals' in elderly care have education in family nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, Olivia Sissil; Øyen, Karianne Røssummoen; Ytrehus, Siri

    2017-05-19

    Family caregivers are an important resource for providing care to elderly living at home. How nurses and other health professionals interact with family caregivers can have both a positive and a negative impact on the family caregivers' situation. We lack knowledge of Norwegian nurses' and other health professionals' participation in educational programmes about family caregivers' needs and situations. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether nurses and other health professionals working in home-care nursing had participated in educational programmes about family caregivers. Additionally, the study aimed to determine whether participation in educational programmes was associated with awareness of family caregivers' contributions to elder care. This is a quantitative study, and it was conducted as a cross-sectional study. The participants were required to be educated as nurses, nursing assistants or other health professionals with relevant health education and to be working with the elderly in home-care nursing settings. Descriptive statistics and trivariate table analysis using the Pearson Chi-square t-test were conducted using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). A total of 152 nurses and health professionals in home-care nursing in 23 municipalities have participated (in one county in Norway). The results showed that only half of the respondents had participated in educational programmes about family caregivers' needs and situations. The study did not provide a clear answer regarding the association between participation in educational programmes and awareness of family caregivers' contributions. The results indicate that nurses and other health professionals, to a small extent, have participated in educational programmes about family caregivers. Our findings indicate that participation in educational programmes may be particularly important for health professionals in leadership positions and for health professionals with vocational

  7. Health professionals' knowledge, attitude and practices towards pharmacovigilance in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaian S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacovigilance can be helpful in protecting consumers from harmful effects of medicines. Healthcare professionals should consider Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR reporting as their professional obligation and should be aware of the existing pharmacovigilance mechanisms in their countries. In Nepal, pharmacovigilance activities were initiated in 2004. Objectives: The present study evaluated the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP of the healthcare professionals towards ADRs and pharmacovigilance in Manipal Teaching Hospital (MTH, a tertiary care teaching hospital attached to the regional pharmacovigilance center in western Nepal. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2007 using a pretested (Cronbach alpha=0.72 questionnaire having 25 questions (15 questions on knowledge, 5 on attitude and 5 on practice. The correct/positive responses were given a score of ‘2’ and the wrong/negative responses ‘1’, maximum possible score of ‘50’. Results: A total of 131 responses were obtained among which 42 were incomplete and remaining 89 [females 49 (55.1%] were analyzed. Of the 89 professionals, 29 (32.6% were doctors, 46 (51.8 nurses and 14 (15.7% pharmacists. The mean age was 28.32 (SD=8.46 years and the median (interquartile range of duration of the service 14.5 (6-36 months. The total KAP scores was 40.06 (SD=3.51 for doctors, 38.92 (SD=4.83 for pharmacists, and 35.82 (SD=3.75 for nurses. Among the 89 professionals, 59 (62.3% had not reported even a single ADR to the pharmacovigilance center. Conclusion: The healthcare professionals at the MTH had a poor KAP towards ADRs and pharmacovigilance and there is a need for educational and awareness intervention for these professionals.

  8. A Model for Health Professional Education in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie; Vela, Leonel; Cigarroa, Francisco G.

    2008-01-01

    In 1997, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio established the Regional Academic Health Center (RAHC) for the Lower Rio Grande Valley in south Texas. Through medical education programs, research facilities, and partnerships with health-care providers, the RAHC aims to improve the health status and access to health services…

  9. Pilot study of the psychological factors in the professional health of managers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingaev S.M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main research problems and tasks of a new scientific field in Russia—the psychology of professional health — are formulated. A definition of professional health as the abilities of a person successfully to cope with the demands and requirements in a professional environment is offered. A psychological vision for professional health with four basic provisions is proposed. The aim of the research was to study the extent of the influence on the professional health of managers of such psychological factors as systems of values, stress in professional activity, individual and psychological features, strategies for overcoming stressful situations. Data are provided from research conducted in 2002-2012 on managers in Russian companies. Taking part in the research were 651 managers of various organizations in St. Petersburg, Moscow, Yekaterinburg, Veliky Novgorod, and Kharkov. For collecting empirical material on methods of supervision, I used polls, tests, interviews, content analysis, self-reports of participants in training programs, and a method for forming the experiment. In addition I employed psychodiagnostic techniques intended for studying the cognitive, behavioral, and emotional components of health, a technique for revealing the personal potentials (regulatory, communicative, intellectual of the managers, and also my own techniques. The study positively correlated health with such values as having interesting work, having a happy family life, being financially secure, having an active life, and giving and receiving love. Connections between the behavioral manifestations of type A behavior and the managers’ values were revealed. The greatest negative impact on the managers was made by such factors of professional activity as an excessive workload, emotional pressure at work, difficulty in carrying out activity, and insufficient time. Health is important in the structure of the professional activity of managers; it acts as a strategic

  10. Millennium Development Goals: how public health professionals perceive the achievement of MDGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Lomazzi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been various consultations on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs by different groups. However, even if it is clear that the health sector has led the development success of the MDGs, only a few MDG reports consider public health experts’ points of view and these are mainly government driven. Designs: The World Federation of Public Health Associations (WFPHA has executed a global survey to consult public health professionals worldwide concerning the implementation and achievements of the MDGs.The survey was conceived by WFPHA health professionals and promulgated online. Public health professionals and organisations dealing with MDGs responded to the survey. Content analysis was conducted to analyse the data. Results: Survey participants attributed the highest importance worldwide to MDGs dealing with women, poverty and hunger reduction, and disease prevention and management. Moreover, they underlined the role of education, referring both to school children and professionals. In high and upper-middle income countries, environmental challenges also received considerable attention.Notably, respondents underlined that weak governance and unstable political situations, as well as the gap between professionals and politicians, were among the main causes that detracted from MDG achievements. Conclusion: The public health workforce felt it would be imperative to be included from the outset in the design and implementation of further goals. This implies that those professionals have to take an active part in the political process leading to a new and accountable framework.

  11. The Impact of Structured Inter-professional Education on Health Care Professional Students' Perceptions of Collaboration in a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Alison; Lee, Sam; Lombardo, Samantha; Salama, Mariam; Ellis, Sandi; Kay, Theresa; Davies, Robyn; Landry, Michel D

    2012-01-01

    To examine how a structured inter-professional education (IPE) clinical placement influences health care professional (HCP) students' perceptions of inter-professional collaboration (IPC) relative to that of students in a traditional clinical placement. This study used a mixed-methods design. The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was administered to HCP students (n=36) in two Toronto hospitals before and after a structured 5-week IPE clinical placement to examine changes in their perceptions of IPC. Students in a traditional clinical placement (n=28) were used as a control group. Focus groups were then conducted with seven students who took part in the structured IPE clinical placement. A coding framework was devised a priori, and the qualitative results were used to explain the quantitative findings. There were no statistically significant differences between groups after the structured IPE clinical placement, but the intervention group showed a greater positive trend in total IEPS scores from baseline to follow-up. Qualitative data suggest that students valued the knowledge and skills gained through the structured IPE clinical placement. Findings suggest that structured IPE clinical placements may provide students with valuable collaborative learning opportunities, enhanced respect for other professionals, and insight into the value of IPC in healthcare delivery. More research is needed to explore other factors that influence specific perceptions among physical therapy students. Purpose: To examine how a structured inter-professional education (IPE) clinical placement influences health care professional (HCP) students' perceptions of inter-professional collaboration (IPC) relative to that of students in a traditional clinical placement. Methods: This study used a mixed-methods design. The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was administered to HCP students (n=36) in two Toronto hospitals before and after a structured 5-week IPE

  12. Information-searching behaviors of main and allied health professionals: a nationwide survey in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi-Hao; Kuo, Ken N; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Lo, Heng-Lien; Shih, Ya-Hui; Chiu, Ya-Wen

    2013-10-01

    There are a variety of resources to obtain health information, but few studies have examined if main and allied health professionals prefer different methods. The current study was to investigate their information-searching behaviours. A constructed questionnaire survey was conducted from January through April 2011 in nationwide regional hospitals of Taiwan. Questionnaires were mailed to main professionals (physicians and nurses) and allied professionals (pharmacists, physical therapists, technicians and others), with 6160 valid returns collected. Among all professional groups, the most commonly used resource for seeking health information was a Web portal, followed by colleague consultations and continuing education. Physicians more often accessed Internet-based professional resources (online databases, electronic journals and electronic books) than the other groups (P < 0.05). In contrast, physical therapists more often accessed printed resources (printed journals and textbooks) than the other specialists (P < 0.05). And nurses, physical therapists and technicians more often asked colleagues and used continuing education than the other groups (P < 0.01). The most commonly used online database was Micromedex for pharmacists and MEDLINE for physicians, technicians and physical therapists. Nurses more often accessed Chinese-language databases rather than English-language databases (P < 0.001). This national survey depicts the information-searching pattern of various health professionals. There were significant differences between and within main and allied health professionals in their information searching. The data provide clinical implications for strategies to promote the accessing of evidence-based information. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Health Professionals "Make Their Choice": Pharmaceutical Industry Leaders' Understandings of Conflict of Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Quinn; Tierney, Lisa; Mayes, Christopher; Lipworth, Wendy

    2017-09-14

    Conflicts of interest, stemming from relationships between health professionals and the pharmaceutical industry, remain a highly divisive and inflammatory issue in healthcare. Given that most jurisdictions rely on industry to self-regulate with respect to its interactions with health professionals, it is surprising that little research has explored industry leaders' understandings of conflicts of interest. Drawing from in-depth interviews with ten pharmaceutical industry leaders based in Australia, we explore the normalized and structural management of conflicts of interest within pharmaceutical companies. We contrast this with participants' unanimous belief that the antidote to conflicts of interest with health professionals were "informed consumers." It is, thus, unlikely that a self-regulatory approach will be successful in ensuring ethical interactions with health professionals. However, the pharmaceutical industry's routine and accepted practices for disclosing and managing employees' conflicts of interest could, paradoxically, serve as an excellent model for healthcare.

  14. What constitutes an excellent allied health care professional? A multidisciplinary focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, W.; Wijkamp, J.S.; Wiltens, E.; Wolfensberger, M.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining what constitutes an excellent allied health care professional (AHCP) is important, since this is what will guide the development of curricula for training future physical therapists, oral hygienists, speech therapists, diagnostic radiographers, and dietitians. This also

  15. Discourses of healthcare professionals about health surveillance actions for Tuberculosis control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mitano

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze the meanings produced in the Health Surveillance actions for tuberculosis control, carried out by healthcare professionals in Mozambique. METHOD Qualitative study using the theoretical and methodological framework of the French Discourse Analysis. RESULTS A total of 15 healthcare professionals with more than one year of experience in disease control actions participated in the study. Four discursive blocks have emerged from the analysis: tuberculosis diagnosis process; meeting, communication and discussion of treatment; local strategies for tuberculosis control; involvement of family and community leaders in the tuberculosis control. CONCLUSION The statements of the healthcare professionals suggest, as Health Surveillance actions, practices that include collecting sputum in the patient's home and sending it to the laboratory; deployment of the medical team with a microscope for tuberculosis testing; and testing for diseases that may be associated with tuberculosis. In this context, the actions of Health Surveillance for tuberculosis control involve valuing all actors: family, community leaders, patients and health professionals.

  16. Lung Cancer, Questions to Ask Your Health Professional | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Questions to Ask Your Health Professional Past Issues / ... 2013 Table of Contents Tests What type of lung cancer do I have? Has the cancer spread from ...

  17. Developing Continuing Professional Education in the Health and Medical Professions through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wojnar, Margaret; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how to negotiate power and interest among multiple stakeholders to develop continuing professional education programs as graduate study for those in the health and medical professions.

  18. The relationship between burnout symptoms and Type D personality among health care professionals in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Atilla; Karadağ, Hekim; Yayla, Sinan

    2016-04-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between burnout and Type D personality in health care professionals. The study randomly included 120 health care professionals (73 nurses, 47 doctors). Sociodemographic data form, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Type D Personality Scale were applied to each participant; 38.3% of the health care professionals (n = 46) had the Type D personality. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization of health care professionals with Type D personality were higher than of those without Type D personality (p = .006 and p = .005). Stepwise regression analysis indicated that Type D personality was a predictor of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (p = .005 and p = .001, respectively). Our results suggest that Type D personality is associated with higher burnout levels.

  19. Academical training of Health Sciences professionals as a resource to integrate teaching, assistance and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Mur Villar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic training of Health Sciences professionals is an essential resource to integrate teaching, assistance and research and should be considered as an inherent attribute of professional practice. In present times this issue is still being questioned, because educational practice has not been fully transformed in the clinical setting. This work supports the potentials of academic training in Health Sciences to achieve this integration and is a call for professionals to create scientific basis of educational knowledge production in order to link health care practice to teaching and research. Bibliographic analysis showed that assistance centers should be academic centers for the development of Health Sciences. Academic training of professionals enables the integration we are looking for and establishes a mutual empowerment relationship, where each dimension is favoured in its interface.

  20. Building on the diversity and multiculturalism of health professional women around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Sally

    2010-05-01

    This article is based a presentation delivered to the Fifth Annual Building Global Alliances Symposium, "The Challenges of Migration for Health Professional Women," convened by CGFNS International, Philadelphia, PA, December 8, 2008.

  1. ASSESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF BREAST SELF EXAMINATION AND BREAST CANCER AWARENESS AMONG HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tejaswi Vittal; Gayathri; Seema; Linganagouda; Sathyanand; Hamsa; Dhruva; Gautam

    2015-01-01

    .... To assess breast cancer awareness among health care professionals. METHODOLOGY : A questionnaire based cross sectional study in which 133 women belonging to various medical and allied specialties were included. RESULTS...

  2. Mainstream health professionals' stigmatising attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelleboer-gunnink, H.A.; Van Oorsouw, W.M.W.J.; Van Weeghel, J.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.

    Background Equal access to mainstream healthcare services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) still requires attention. Although recent studies suggest that health professionals hold positive attitudes towards people with ID, stigmatising attitudes may influence their efforts to serve

  3. Collaborative Learning Processes in the Context of a Public Health Professional Development Program: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Chiocchio, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The health promotion laboratory (HPL-Canada) is a public health professional development program building on a collaborative learning approach in order to support long-term practice change in local health services teams. This study aims to analyse the collaborative learning processes of two teams involved in the program during the first year of…

  4. Mobile Devices and Their Use in Library Professional Practice: The Health Librarian and the Ipad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Vicky; Kumaran, Maha; Lê, Mê-Linh; Murphy, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices are being extensively adopted by health sciences faculty, students, and practitioners, but there is little evidence of how this technology is being used by health librarians in their own professional practice. In 2011, health sciences librarians at the University of Saskatchewan undertook a project to familiarize themselves with…

  5. Promoting Cultural Competence, Health Behaviors, and Professional Practice in Undergraduate Education through Peer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) has been identified as an important skill for all healthcare and public health professionals, and it must be integrated into all aspects of health practice. However, few university and college health education programs in North America have included CC education in their curriculums. This article describes an…

  6. Promoting Cultural Competence, Health Behaviors, and Professional Practice in Undergraduate Education through Peer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) has been identified as an important skill for all healthcare and public health professionals, and it must be integrated into all aspects of health practice. However, few university and college health education programs in North America have included CC education in their curriculums. This article describes an…

  7. Collaborative Learning Processes in the Context of a Public Health Professional Development Program: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Chiocchio, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The health promotion laboratory (HPL-Canada) is a public health professional development program building on a collaborative learning approach in order to support long-term practice change in local health services teams. This study aims to analyse the collaborative learning processes of two teams involved in the program during the first year of…

  8. Investigation Clinical Competence and Its Relationship with Professional Ethics and Spiritual Health in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Ramezanzade Tabriz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Study of clinical competence in nursing helps determine the quality of health care delivered to patients. Given the priority of observance of principles over caretaking and necessity of spirituality existence at the core of health care provision, this study was conducted to investigate clinical competence and its relationship with professional ethics and spiritual health in nurses. Methods: In this cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational study, 281 nurses were enrolled by consensus sampling. Sampling was conducted from February, 2016 till June, 2016. The data were gathered by a demographics questionnaire, a self-assessment scale of clinical competence, a nursing ethics questionnaire, and a spiritual health questionnaire, and analyzed by descriptive statistics and t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, ANOVA, and linear regression analysis in SPSS 21. Results: The total scores for self-assessment scale of nurses' clinical competence, professional ethics, and spiritual health were moderate. In the light of the results of Spearman's correlation coefficient, there was a significant and positive correlation between clinical competence and spiritual health. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between professional ethics and spiritual health but there was no correlation between professional ethics and clinical competence. Conclusion: Managers' and personnel's Knowledge about the level of nurses clinical competence, professional ethics, and spiritual health in teaching health care centers provides valuable information to develop in-service and efficacious education programs and ultimately to improve the quality of nursing services.

  9. Evidence-Based Principles for Using Technology-Enhanced Learning in the Continuing Professional Development of Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen M; Baur, Louise; Barrett, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, health professional training involves the use of educational technologies through what is broadly termed "Technology-Enhanced Learning" (TEL). TEL includes hardware, such as computers and mobile devices, and software, such as software applications (apps), learning management systems, and discussion boards. For many years, TEL has formed an integral part of health professional programs and is growing in acceptance, if not expectation, in postgraduate training and continuing education. TEL generally aims to be flexible, engaging, learner focused and interactive, and may involve collaboration and communication. It offers many benefits for learning and teaching, whether used on its own or in conjunction with face-to-face teaching through blended learning. The ubiquity of mobile devices in clinical settings means TEL is ideal for busy clinicians, both as learners and teachers. TEL enables participants to learn at a time and place that is convenient to them, so learners living in geographically dispersed locations can access standardized courses. To realize these potential benefits, we recommend that those developing TEL programs for health professionals take a systematic approach to planning, development, implementation, and evaluation. To that end, we propose 10 principles: clarify purpose and conduct a needs assessment; allocate adequate time and technology; incorporate proven approaches to improve learning; consider the need for a skills component; enable interaction between learners and with others; create different resources for different groups; pilot before implementing; incorporate measures to retain learners; provide opportunities for revision to aid retention; and evaluate learning outcomes, not just satisfaction.

  10. A qualitative study of the intrinsic motivation of physicians and other health professionals to teach

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the intrinsic motivation of physicians and other health professionals to teach. Methods: Qualitative data from in-depth interviews were thematically analysed. A purposive opportunity sample of eight physicians and other healthcare professionals employed by our institution to teach Bachelor-level courses in health care participated in the study. Results: Four themes that suggested an internal desire to teach were identified: 1. Interest in the subject matter; 2. Interest...

  11. Improving health care professionals' feedback on communication skills: Development of an on-line resource

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, G; Hayden, S.; Cook, V.; Cushing, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This project aimed to develop an open-access on-line resource to assist health care professionals in providing effective feedback on patient-centered clinical and communication skills. The collaborative nature of the development of this learning resource is outlined and evaluation of its use is discussed. Methods: An inter-professional team of teaching staff from two London Universities employed a researcher to interview experienced clinical and academic health care professiona...

  12. [Quality of life and health promotion in students of professional education institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubochkina, E I; Molchanova, S S; Kulikova, A V

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of quality of life in adolescents attending professional education institutions revealed significant difference between their socio-medical characteristics and those of pupils in schools providing general education. The main risk factors in the two groups are identified. It is shown that social conditions, mode of teaching, and life style may contribute to the deterioration of health status and functional abilities of adolescents. The data obtained can be used in the elaboration of health protection programs for students of professional education institutions.

  13. Physiotherapy management of joint hypermobility syndrome - a focus group study of patient and health professional perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, S.; Terry, R.; Rimes, K. A.; Clark, Carol J.; Simmonds, J; Horwood, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop an understanding of patient and health professional views and experiences of physiotherapy to manage joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS).Design: An explorative qualitative design. Seven focus groups were convened, audio recorded, fully transcribed and analysed using a constant comparative method to inductively derive a thematic account of the data.Setting: Four geographical areas of the UK.Participants: 25 people with JHS and 16 health professionals (14 physiotherapists a...

  14. Lay and health care professional understandings of self-management: A systematic review and narrative synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Euan Sadler; Charles DA Wolfe; Christopher McKevitt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Self-management is widely promoted but evidence of effectiveness is limited. Policy encourages health care professionals to support people with long-term conditions to learn self-management skills, yet little is known about the extent to which both parties share a common understanding of self-management. Thus, we compared health care professional and lay understandings of self-management of long-term conditions.Methods: Systematic review and narrative synthesis of qualitative stud...

  15. Making "social" safer: are Facebook and other online networks becoming less hazardous for health professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Major concerns about privacy have limited health professionals' usage of popular social networking sites such as Facebook. However, the landscape of social media is changing in favor of more sophisticated privacy controls that enable users to more carefully manage public and private information. This evolution in technology makes it potentially less hazardous for health professionals to consider accepting colleagues and patients into their online networks, and invites medicine to think constructively about how social media may add value to contemporary healthcare.

  16. Validation of the instrument of health literacy competencies for Chinese-speaking health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chun; Chen, Yu-Chi; Liao, Li-Ling; Wu, Fei Ling; Hsieh, Pei-Lin; Chen, Hsiao-Jung

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to illustrate the constructs and test the psychometric properties of an instrument of health literacy competencies (IOHLC) for health professionals. A multi-phase questionnaire development method was used to develop the scale. The categorization of the knowledge and practice domains achieved consensus through a modified Delphi process. To reduce the number of items, the 92-item IOHLC was psychometrically evaluated through internal consistency, Rasch modeling, and two-stage factor analysis. In total, 736 practitioners, including nurses, nurse practitioners, health educators, case managers, and dieticians completed the 92-item IOHLC online from May 2012 to January 2013. The final version of the IOHLC covered 9 knowledge items and 40 skill items containing 9 dimensions, with good model fit, and explaining 72% of total variance. All domains had acceptable internal consistency and discriminant validity. The tool in this study is the first to verify health literacy competencies rigorously. Moreover, through psychometric testing, the 49-item IOHLC demonstrates adequate reliability and validity. The IOHLC may serve as a reference for the theoretical and in-service training of Chinese-speaking individuals' health literacy competencies.

  17. Mental health professionals' perspectives of telemental health with remote and rural First Nations communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kerri; O'Donnell, Susan; Coulson, Heather; Kakepetum-Schultz, Tina

    2011-01-01

    We conducted an online survey and interviews amongst mental health workers in Canada who reported experience in working with rural and remote First Nations (although not necessarily telemental health). Sixty-three respondents (of the 164) to the online survey reported experience in working with clients in remote and rural First Nations. Only 16 of the online survey respondents with remote and rural First Nations experience reported having received training in videoconferencing use. When asked how frequently they used videoconferencing with clients, 51% reported never using it, 19% used it once every few months and 10% reported using it a few times a month. Approximately 50% of participants reported finding it useful. Approximately 38% found the technology easy or very easy to use, and 15% found it very difficult. Individual in-depth interviews were also conducted with professionals who had First Nations telemental health experience specifically (n = 5). A quantitative data analysis was used to explore their perceptions of usefulness and ease of use of telemental health, as well as the relationships among these constructs. Advantages, disadvantages and challenges in using the technology were identified from the qualitative data. Promising ways forward include incorporating traditional practices and the Seven Teachings into telemental health services.

  18. Crosswalking public health and health education competencies: implications for professional preparation and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Lynn D; Auld, M Elaine; Miner, Kathleen; Alley, Kelly Bishop; Lysoby, Linda; Livingood, William C

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights similarities and differences between the public health competencies recently developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) and one public health specialty, health education (HE), which has used competencies in its quality assurance systems for more than 20 years. Based on a crosswalk methodology developed for this analysis, some 50 percent to 61 percent of the HE and ASPH competencies had similarities of varying degrees; 18 percent were deemed matches due to sameness in skill or content. Most similarities were found between the ASPH social and behavioral sciences competencies and the HE competencies. Significant domains of "no match" were found between the HE and ASPH competencies in the areas of Systems Thinking, Leadership, and Public Health Biology. The study results have implications for academic programs related to curricula review and revision, continuing education providers who are developing training agendas for the workforce, employers anticipating competencies in new job hires, and prospective students and practitioners who are considering a form of certification. Qualitative insights from the study related to professional culture, purpose, age, and consistency of the scope or depth of the two competency sets, as well as the crosswalk methodology itself, may be useful to those comparing other competency sets.

  19. Validation of the instrument of health literacy competencies for Chinese-speaking health professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chun

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to illustrate the constructs and test the psychometric properties of an instrument of health literacy competencies (IOHLC) for health professionals. A multi-phase questionnaire development method was used to develop the scale. The categorization of the knowledge and practice domains achieved consensus through a modified Delphi process. To reduce the number of items, the 92-item IOHLC was psychometrically evaluated through internal consistency, Rasch modeling, and two-stage factor analysis. In total, 736 practitioners, including nurses, nurse practitioners, health educators, case managers, and dieticians completed the 92-item IOHLC online from May 2012 to January 2013. The final version of the IOHLC covered 9 knowledge items and 40 skill items containing 9 dimensions, with good model fit, and explaining 72% of total variance. All domains had acceptable internal consistency and discriminant validity. The tool in this study is the first to verify health literacy competencies rigorously. Moreover, through psychometric testing, the 49-item IOHLC demonstrates adequate reliability and validity. The IOHLC may serve as a reference for the theoretical and in-service training of Chinese-speaking individuals’ health literacy competencies. PMID:28264036

  20. 'Even now it makes me angry': health care students' professionalism dilemma narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrouxe, Lynn V; Rees, Charlotte E; Endacott, Ruth; Ternan, Edwina

    2014-05-01

    Medical students encounter situations during workplace learning in which they witness or participate in something unprofessional (so-called professionalism dilemmas), sometimes having a negative emotional impact on them. Less is known about other health care students' experiences of professionalism dilemmas and the resulting emotional impact. To examine dental, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy students' narratives of professionalism dilemmas: the types of events they encounter ('whats') and the ways in which they narrate those events ('hows'). A qualitative cross-sectional study. Sixty-nine health care students (29 dentistry, 13 nursing, 12 pharmacy, 15 physiotherapy) participated in group/individual narrative interviews. Data were analysed using framework analysis (examining the 'whats'), linguistic inquiry and word count software (examining the 'hows' by dilemma type and student group) and narrative analysis (bringing together 'whats' and 'hows'). In total, 226 personal incident narratives (104 dental, 34 nursing, 39 pharmacy and 49 physiotherapy) were coded. Framework analysis identified nine themes, including 'Theme 2: professionalism dilemmas', comprising five sub-themes: 'student abuse', 'patient safety and dignity breaches by health care professionals', 'patient safety and dignity breaches by students', 'whistleblowing and challenging' and 'consent'. Using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (liwc) software, significant differences in negative emotion talk were found across student groups and dilemma types (e.g. more anger talk when narrating patient safety and dignity breaches by health care professionals than similar breaches by students). The narrative analysis illustrates how events are constructed and the emotional implications of assigning blame (an ethical dimension) resulting in emotional residue. Professionalism dilemmas experienced by health care students, including issues concerning whistleblowing and challenging, have implications for

  1. Quality of internal communication in health care and the professional-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Cerdá, Joan Carles; Prieto Rodríguez, María Angeles; Pérez Corral, Olivia; Lorenzo, Sergio Minué; Danet, Alina

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken for the purpose of describing internal communication and the professional-patient relationship and to establish a descriptive model of the interaction between these 2 variables. A nationwide survey was carried out in primary care and specialist care centers in Spain. A simple random sampling method was used with 1183 health care professionals. The data collection instrument was a Likert questionnaire that recorded information on the perceived quality of internal communication (0-100 scale), professional-patient relationships (0-100 scale), and sociodemographic variables. The results were analyzed using SPSS 15.0, performing mean comparisons and a suitable linear regression model.The total average of the quality of internal communication was 53.79 points, and that of the professional-patient relationships was 74.17 points. Sex made no statistically significant difference. Age shows that the older the participant, the better his/her opinion of internal communication and professional-patient relationships. Nursing staff had the highest opinion of internal communication and professional-patient relationships. The association between internal communication and professional-patient relationship was positive (R = 0.45).It was concluded that continuous exchange of information among health care professionals, together with learning and shared decision making or a positive emotional climate, is an element that will consolidate good professional-patient relationships and ensure patient satisfaction.

  2. Health professionals' attitude toward euthanasia: a cross-sectional study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turla, Ahmet; Ozkara, Erdem; Ozkanli, Cağlar; Alkan, Nevzat

    There is an ongoing debate on the definition of euthanasia and attempts to change laws about euthanasia and its practice in many countries. It is the medical doctors and the other health professionals who will elucidate the issue. Therefore, we performed this study to reveal attitude of Turkish health professionals toward euthanasia. This is an observational and cross-sectional study and data were collected with a questionnaire. The questionnaire was distributed to 545 health professionals in Samsun, a city in the Black Sea Region in Turkey. Data were analyzed with SPSS package programs. Of all health professionals included in the study, 43.5% were medical doctors and 45.5% auxiliary health professionals. Of all participants, 33.6% did not object to euthanasia and 7.9% were asked to perform euthanasia. Eighty point seven percent of the participants noted that euthanasia could be abused even if a euthanasia law were passed. It can be concluded that the health professionals should have a chance to discuss euthanasia and that their attitude toward and their expectations and worries about euthanasia should be taken into account when a euthanasia law is drafted.

  3. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Health professional expectations for self-care skill development in youth with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, Rachel Neff

    2010-01-01

    The author examined expectations for the development of self-care skills for youth with spina bifida (SB) among a multidisciplinary group of health professionals, including physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and other professionals. Ninety-seven professionals from U.S. SB clinics completed a Web-based survey of expectations for youth attainment of bowel, bladder, and skin care skills. Professionals rated expectations for two hypothetical vignettes: a child with moderate SB severity and a child with greater severity. Most professionals believed that all skills were attainable by the end of elementary school in the moderate severity condition. Expectations for skill attainment in the severe condition were lower and significantly later (end of high school) than in the moderate condition. Professionals who treated more patients annually expected earlier bowel and bladder skill attainment. Findings highlight the importance of developing different timelines for nursing education of youth with moderate versus more severe condition impairment.

  5. Professionalism and the know-do gap: exploring intrinsic motivation among health workers in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Kenneth L; Masatu, Melkiory C

    2010-12-01

    Professionalism can be defined generally as adhering to the accepted standards of a profession and placing the interests of the public above the individual professional's immediate interests. In the field of medicine, professionalism should lead at least some practitioners in developing countries to effectively care for their patients despite the absence of extrinsic incentives to do so. In this study we examine the behavior of 80 practitioners from the Arusha region of Tanzania for evidence of professionalism. We show that about 20% of these practitioners behave professionally, and almost half of those who do so practice in the public sector. These professional health care workers provide high quality care even when they work in an environment that does not reward this effort, a finding that has important implications for the use of performance-based incentives. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Child oral health from the professional perspective - a global ICF-CY survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulks, Denise; Molina, Gustavo; Eschevins, Caroline; Dougall, Alison

    2016-07-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Children and Youth version (ICF-CY) (WHO) may serve as a tool for the application of holistic models of oral health. The ICF-CY Global Oral Health Survey explored international professional opinion regarding factors relating to child oral health, including social environment, functioning, activity, and participation. Networking resulted in 514 professionals from 81 countries registering for a two-round Delphi survey online. Participants were pooled into 18 groups according to six WHO world regions and three professional groups. In a randomized stratification process, eight from each pool (n = 144) completed the survey. The first round consisted of eight open-ended questions. Open-expression replies were analysed for meaningful concepts and linked using established rules to the ICF-CY. In the second round, items were rated for their relevance to oral health (86% response rate). A total of 86 ICF-CY items and 31 other factors were considered relevant to child oral health and function by at least 80% of professionals. The ICF-CY can describe the holistic experience of oral health in children from the professional perspective. The data from this study will contribute to the development of an ICF-CY Core Set in Oral Health. © 2015 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Achieving meaningful learning in health information management students: the importance of professional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Anne; McIntosh, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Learning is a complex process, not merely a transfer of information from teacher to student. for learning to be meaningful, students need to adopt a deep approach, and in the case of vocational students, to be given the opportunity to learn experientially. Health information management is a practice profession for which students are educated through theory at university and professional experience in the workplace. This article discusses how, through the process of experiential learning, professional experience can promote reflective thinking and thus deep learning, that is, the ability to integrate theory and practice, as well as professional and personal development in health information management students.

  8. Service quality in public health clinics: perceptions of users and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Domingos Fernandes; Negromonte Filho, Rinaldo Bezerra; Castro, Felipe Nalon

    2017-10-09

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the expectations and quality gaps in services provided at city public health clinics in the city of Natal, Brazil, from the perspective of patients and healthcare service providers. Design/methodology/approach The research sample consisted of 1,200 patients who used public health services and 265 providers - doctors, nutritionists, physiotherapists, psychologists, pharmacists and managers at three health clinics in the city of Natal, Brazil. A scale with 25 health service attributes was used in data collection. Summary statistics and t-test were used to analyze the data. Findings The results show that the providers think that users have lower levels of expectations than those indicated by the users in all attributes. Providers and users have the most approximate insights into what attributes are considered most important: explanations, level of knowledge and attention dispensed by health professionals. Users and providers perceived similar quality gaps for most of the attributes. The gaps were statistically the same, when comparing the mean quality shortcomings by means of a Student's test, considering a significance level of 5 percent, obtained independently by the manifestation of users and providers. Research limitations/implications The results reveal only a photograph of the moment. The study did not consider the differences that may exist between groups with different income levels, genders or age groups. A qualitative study could improve the understanding of the differences and coincidences of the diverse points of views. A more advanced research could even study possibilities so that health managers could promote changes in the service, some of them low cost, as the health professionals training for contact with patients. Practical implications The evaluation of the service quality complemented by the matrix of opportunities, importance × quality gaps generates information to help make decisions in the

  9. Stigma as a Structural Power in Mental Health Care Reform: An Ethnographic Study Among Mental Health Care Professionals in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sercu, Charlotte; Bracke, Piet

    2016-12-01

    The growing interest among scholars and professionals in mental health stigma is closely related to different mental health care reforms. This article explores professionals' perceptions of the dehospitalization movement in the Belgian context, paying particular attention to the meaning of stigma. Combined participant observation and semi-structured interviews were used to both assess and contextualize the perceptions of 43 professionals. The findings suggest that stigma may function as a structural barrier to professionals' positive evaluation of de-hospitalization, depending on the framework they are working in. It is important to move beyond a unilateral understanding of the relationship between stigma and de-hospitalization in order to attain constructive health care reform. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Knowledge of health professionals about the rights of hospitalized children: an exploratory study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ilvana Lima Verde; Caetano, Rosângela; Jorge, Maria Salete Bessa

    2010-03-01

    Along the years, the rights of children and adolescents including those related to hospital context have been proclaimed in Brazil. The low level of knowledge by health professionals about the rights can be a factor that contributes to that non observance. In this paper, we tried to understand how health professionals who deal with inpatient children on a daily basis perceive children's and their families' rights. It was a research of descriptive aspect with qualitative analysis using semi-structured interviews. Eleven interviews have been carried out with health professionals of a pediatrics hospital in the city of Fortaleza, capital of the state of Ceará, during 2006. The analysis of the data happened after a process of multiple readings and these were interpreted with the reference regarding the elaborated topics. The analysis resulted in two themes: Knowledge of children's rights by the multi-professional team and Guarantee of children's rights. We can conclude that health professionals know children's rights partially, especially those rights contained in the ECA (Children and Adolescent's Statute), with a tendency to see mainly those rights which were limited to their professional category: the guarantee of children's rights is one of the objectives of the hospital and a desire of almost all professionals.

  11. Burnout syndrome in health-care professionals in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Lucila Corsino; Canário, Ana Carla Gomes; de Paiva China, Eneluzia Lavynnya Corsino; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate professional achievement and factors associated with occupational burnout among health professionals. An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 436 healthcare providers, consisting of 101 nurses, 81 doctors and 254 nursing technicians, all meeting pre-established inclusion criteria. Occupational burnout was detected using the Maslach occupational burnout inventory tool. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires comprising questions concerning socio-demographics, education and training, and the Maslach occupational burnout inventory was used to identify levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and professional achievement. Emotional exhaustion was associated with education level and work place for nursing technicians. Depersonalization was associated with gender in nursing technicians. For nurses, depersonalization showed a significant association with education level, whereas this factor was associated with number of jobs for doctors. Lower levels of professional achievement were observed for unspecialized doctors compared to those with further training. Higher levels of professional achievement were associated with professionals with postgraduate training compared to those without. High levels of emotional exhaustion were found in professionals from the maternity unit as well as in professionals with lower educational levels. Depersonalization was higher in physicians with several jobs and in female nurses. Low professional achievement was found in unspecialized doctors, while high professional achievement was associated with postgraduate training.

  12. Workplace stress and its influence in professional and private life of health care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotelis Koinis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress work place influences the physical and mental well-being of health professionals, reducing performance and negatively affecting health-related quality of life. Aim: The purpose of this review was to investigate the causes of occupational stress and the impact on the professional and personal lives of healthcare professionals. Methodology: It is conducted a literature review of published journals from scientific databases such as Medline, Pub Med, Google Scholar, for the period 1985-2010, using keywords: "health professionals", "stress", “anxiety”, "working environment", "working conditions "," effects of stress on mental health. " Total of 205 studies were found and 48 of them were reviewed for this study. Results: The last fifteen years there was a significant increase of anxiety disorders in workplace and specifically in health organizations (hospitals, private clinics etc. The vast majority of the sample was nurses and practitioner doctors. However it is important to note that because of these cases, (which were persistent and repetitive, there were (increasing, negative impacts in mental and physical health of professionals. These were the key factors, due to which the employees are reluctant to work, or in many cases they think to quit their profession. Conclusions: The work environment in combination with other factors of the life of health professionals helps in triggering anxiety. Although the context is still under investigation by the authorities of health facilities (hospitals, clinics, etc.Also, health care professionals are invited to acquire knowledge for recognition of anxiety in the workplace and to develop policies and intervention in order to prevent and cope with the phenomenon.

  13. Hand Hygiene among Health Care Professionals - anno 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Sussie; Kristensen, Brian

    2007-01-01

    A literature review shows that hand disinfection is superior to hand washing concerning the elimination of microorganisms. Alcohol-based hand rubs quickly and easily reduce the number of microorganisms on hands. It is important that healthcare professionals prevent the transmission of microorgani...

  14. Attitudes of Health Professionals to Child Sexual Abuse and Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, N.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Results of surveying 299 professionals concerning their knowledge and attitudes about child sexual abuse and incest showed that the type of sexual activity involved influenced responses; the type of relationship between adult and child, less so. Estimates of incest were low but incest was considered to be harmful to the victim. (Author/DB)

  15. Stress Among Health Care Professionals - The Need for Resiliency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kakunje

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare professionals are subjected to considerable levels of stress such as work overload, excessive working hours, sleep deprivation, repeated exposure to emotionally charged situations, dealing with difficult patients and conflicts with other staffs. Management of such stress should be given due importance, right from the days of training in medical sciences.

  16. The crisis of capitalism and the marketisation of health care: the implications for public health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2012-12-28

    The current economic crisis in Europe has challenged the basis of the economic model that currently prevails in much of the industrialised world. It has revealed a system that is managed not for the benefit of the people but rather for the corporations and the small elite who lead them, and which is clearly unsustainable in its present form. Yet, there is a hidden consequence of this system: an unfolding crisis in health care, driven by the greed of corporations whose profit-seeking model is also failing. Proponents of commodifying healthcare simultaneously argue that the cost of providing care for ageing populations is unaffordable while working to create demand for their health care products among those who are essentially healthy. Will healthcare be the next profit-fuelled investor bubble? In this paper, we call on health professionals to heed the warnings from the economic crisis and, rather than stand by while a crisis unfolds, act now to redirect increasingly market-oriented health systems to serve the common good.

  17. Understanding Health Seeking Behavior Of Health Care Professionals In Tertiary Care Hospitals In Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bana, Shazia; Yakoob, Javed; Jivany, Nourin; Faisal, Asima; Jawed, Humeira; Awan, Safia

    2016-01-01

    Health seeking behaviour refers to the behaviour of people towards seeking their own health through provided health services. The medical professionals are at a higher risk of avoiding health seeking behaviour because they believe they are aware of the diseases and their symptoms as well as the pharmaceutical management of the disease. The aim of this study was to understand the healthcare seeking behaviour of nurses and doctors as well as the factors affecting it in hospitals of a major city in a developing country. A cross-sectional study was designed and a self-report questionnaire was distributed to healthcare workers at four tertiary care hospitals from July, 2012 to December, 2014. A total of 1015 participants responded. There were 234 (23%) doctors, 664 (65%) nurses, 60 (6%) pharmacist and 57 (6%) paramedical staff. The doctors 194 (83%) had a greater access to medical facilities compared to nurses 278 (42%) (phealth compared to doctors 102 (44%) (phealth check-ups compared to doctor 234 (100%) (pseek healthcare when they get sick. Self-medication is common in both groups.

  18. Health professionals as mobile content creators: teaching medical students to develop mHealth applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Ken

    2014-10-01

    Patient access to health information and patient-provider communication is integral to medicine, and can be facilitated by mobile applications ("apps"). Traditionally, student training in mobile Health (mHealth) has focussed on health professionals as consumers of information, with negative impacts on the quality and value of medical apps. This study focuses on teaching medical students to develop their own medical apps. At Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, an app development environment, iBuildApp, was taught to medical students and used to develop their first apps. Students were surveyed on their perceptions of the project. Of the 166 students, 107 (64.5%) completed the survey. There was an increase in the perceived need for such learning, apps were aimed primarily at patients, and previous programming experience was the strongest influencer of a positive experience. A majority (77.6%) wanted more sophisticated development environments in spite of their apparent struggles. The impact of previous experience is similar to other studies; the perceived value and focus on patient apps is indicative of an awareness of patients' use of the devices not reflected in all literature. It is possible to teach medical students the fundamentals of app design so that they may contribute to app development in the future.

  19. Using social media to enhance career development opportunities for health promotion professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Leah A

    2014-07-01

    For health promotion professionals, social media offers many ways to engage with a broader range of colleagues; participate in professional development events; promote expertise, products, or services; and learn about career-enhancing opportunities such as funding and fellowships. Previous work has recommended "building networking into what you are already doing." This article provides updated and new social media resources, as well as practical examples and strategies to promote effective use of social media. Social media offers health promotion professionals cost-effective opportunities to enhance their career by building communities of practice, participating in professional development events, and enriching classroom learning. Developing the skills necessary to use social media for networking is important in the public health workforce, especially as social media is increasingly used in academic and practice settings.

  20. A conceptual model for analysing informal learning in online social networks for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Gray, Kathleen; Chang, Shanton; Elliott, Kristine; Barnett, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Online social networking (OSN) provides a new way for health professionals to communicate, collaborate and share ideas with each other for informal learning on a massive scale. It has important implications for ongoing efforts to support Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the health professions. However, the challenge of analysing the data generated in OSNs makes it difficult to understand whether and how they are useful for CPD. This paper presents a conceptual model for using mixed methods to study data from OSNs to examine the efficacy of OSN in supporting informal learning of health professionals. It is expected that using this model with the dataset generated in OSNs for informal learning will produce new and important insights into how well this innovation in CPD is serving professionals and the healthcare system.

  1. Allied health graduate program - supporting the transition from student to professional in an interdisciplinary program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robyn A; Pilling, Samantha

    2007-06-01

    The transition from student to professional is challenging. Training programs provide discipline specific skills but do not adequately develop the interprofessional, team focused and work ready clinicians needed for the current workplace. In Australia, a formal graduate year is common in nursing; however, structured programs to support the student to professional transition are uncommon in allied health. This paper reports on the first year of an innovative program designed to address this gap. Fourteen new graduates at Northern Health in Melbourne, Australia from the disciplines of occupational therapy, physical education, physiotherapy, podiatry, social work and speech pathology participated in twelve, 2-hour sessions over a ten-month period during their first year of professional practice. These facilitated sessions aimed to foster reflective practice, peer support, to develop professional characteristics and provide an interdisciplinary forum for sharing experiences and learning. The paper outlines graduates and facilitators experience, together with the impacts for the health service.

  2. Emotional Support for Health Care Professionals: A Therapeutic Role for the Hospital Ethics Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooljian, David M; Hallenbeck, James; Ezeji-Okoye, Stephen C; Sebesta, Robert; Iqbal, Hasan; Kuschner, Ware G

    2016-01-01

    Hospital ethics committees (HECs) are typically charged with addressing ethical disputes, conflicts, and dilemmas that arise in the course of patient care. HECs are not widely viewed as having a therapeutic role for health care professionals who experience psychological distress or anticipatory grief in the course of discharging professional duties. A case is presented in which an ethics consultation was requested, chiefly, to secure emotional support for health care professionals who had been asked by a patient to discontinue life-sustaining treatments. As the case demonstrates, HECs may be called upon to provide emotional support and reassurance to health care professionals who willingly carry out psychologically difficult actions, even though these actions may be ethically uncontroversial. In providing this service, the HEC may not necessarily engage in its customary activity of deliberating an ethics issue and resolving a conflict but may still provide valuable assistance, as in the case presented.

  3. What motivates health professionals? Opportunities to gain greater insight from theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetow, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    Health care policy-makers and researchers need to pay more attention to understanding the influence of motivation on professional behaviour. Goal setting theory, including two hypotheses - the business case and the pride case - dominates current attempts to motivate professionals. However, the predominance of goal setting theory stifles other approaches to conceptualizing professional motivation. These approaches include other cognitive theories of motivation, such as self-determination theory (concerned with how to use extrinsic rewards that enhance intrinsic motivation), as well as content, psychoanalytic and environmental theories. A valuable opportunity exists to develop and test such theories in addition to possible hybrids, for example, by elaborating goal setting theory in health care. The results can be expected to inform health policy and motivate individual professionals, groups, organizations and workforces to improve and deliver high quality care.

  4. [Meanings of the use of alcohol and tobacco for health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisdorfer, Emilene; Gherardi-Donato, Edilaine Cristina da Silva; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otávio

    2013-12-01

    In order to improve the quality of health care in the Brazilian public Family Health Strategy (FHS), it is important that health care professionals consider the meaning they attribute to the use of alcohol and tobacco in their self-knowledge process. The aim of this study was to understand the meaning attributed to the use of alcohol and tobacco by health care professionals working in the FHS. A qualitative study was performed in five small towns in southern Brazil between March and May of 2012. Direct observations and in-depth interviews were performed with 39 subjects. From the content analysis, two central categories were identified "Do what I say but not what I do," and "I am a role model." It was possible to identify that the health professionals experience an interactive process of reframing concepts about their own use of psychoactive substances, which causes them to respond to the social expectation of being a role model of behavior.

  5. A case study: planning a statewide information resource for health professionals: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, Erinn E; Chew, Katherine; Watson, Linda; Parker, Mary

    2009-10-01

    What is the best approach for implementing a statewide electronic health library (eHL) to serve all health professionals in Minnesota? The research took place at the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries. In January 2008, the authors began planning a statewide eHL for health professionals following the five-step process for evidence-based librarianship: formulating the question, finding the best evidence, appraising the evidence, assessing costs and benefits, and evaluating the effectiveness of resulting actions. The authors identified best practices for developing a statewide eHL for health professionals relating to audience or population served, information resources, technology and access, funding model, and implementation and sustainability. They were compared to the mission of the eHL project to drive strategic directions by developing recommendations. EBL can guide the planning process for a statewide eHL, but findings must be tailored to the local environment to address information needs and ensure long-term sustainability.

  6. Prevention of violence in prison - The role of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, Jörg; Stöver, Heino; Gétaz, Laurent; Casillas, Alejandra; Wolff, Hans

    2015-08-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies violence prevention as a public health priority. In custodial settings, where violence is problematic, administrators and custodial officials are usually tasked with the duty of addressing this complicated issue-leaving health care professionals largely out of a discussion and problem-solving process that should ideally be multidisciplinary in approach. Health care professionals who care for prisoners are in a unique position to help identify and prevent violence, given their knowledge about health and violence, and because of the impartial position they must sustain in the prison environment in upholding professional ethics. Thus, health care professionals working in prisons should be charged with leading violence prevention efforts in custodial settings. In addition to screening for violence and detecting violent events upon prison admission, health care professionals in prison must work towards uniform in-house procedures for longitudinal and systemized medical recording/documentation of violence. These efforts will benefit the future planning, implementation, and evaluation of focused strategies for violence prevention in prisoner populations.

  7. Nutrition competencies in health professionals' education and training: a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Akabas, Sharon R; Douglas, Pauline; Kohlmeier, Martin; Laur, Celia; Lenders, Carine M; Levy, Matthew D; Nowson, Caryl; Ray, Sumantra; Pratt, Charlotte A; Seidner, Douglas L; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Most health care professionals are not adequately trained to address diet and nutrition-related issues with their patients, thus missing important opportunities to ameliorate chronic diseases and improve outcomes in acute illness. In this symposium, the speakers reviewed the status of nutrition education for health care professionals in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Nutrition education is not required for educating and training physicians in many countries. Nutrition education for the spectrum of health care professionals is uncoordinated, which runs contrary to the current theme of interprofessional education. The central role of competencies in guiding medical education was emphasized and the urgent need to establish competencies in nutrition-related patient care was presented. The importance of additional strategies to improve nutrition education of health care professionals was highlighted. Public health legislation such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act recognizes the role of nutrition, however, to capitalize on this increasing momentum, health care professionals must be trained to deliver needed services. Thus, there is a pressing need to garner support from stakeholders to achieve this goal. Promoting a research agenda that provides outcome-based evidence on individual and public health levels is needed to improve and sustain effective interprofessional nutrition education.

  8. The impact of global inequities on health professional migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Janet Hatcher

    2008-11-01

    Health determinants and how they are distributed have an important impact on health systems around the world. Nurses can play a significant role in mediating the effects of many of these determinants both inside the health care system and outside. Yet the areas that have the greatest health inequities and heaviest disease burdens have the fewest health workers. A number of efforts are underway to understand and manage health care worker migration. Intersectoral collaboration is key, as are other factors necessary to build strong health systems, including research for development, capacity-building, integrated health systems, evidence-based decision-making, a strong and vibrant civil society and accountability and transparency in the public and private sectors.

  9. National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Student Health Professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Womble, R.

    2010-04-02

    Familiarize students affiliated with the Student National Medical Association with the National Library of Medicine's online resources that address medical conditions, health disparities, and public health preparedness needs.

  10. Social construction of the managerialism of needs assessment by health and social care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevannes, Mel

    2002-05-01

    Managerialism in community care has not only radically changed organisational structures delivering care, but the assessment of health and social care needs, the justifications for the assessments, and the experience of those who require publicly funded services. The present paper describes the social construction of the managerialism of needs assessment by health and social care professionals, and illustrates this through the identification of older people as a particular kind of client. The argument draws on 'third way', modernity and postmodernity thinking to show needs assessment as a socially constructed area of welfare. The empirical work in this study is based on the views of 38 health and social care professionals obtained by semi-structured in-depth interviews and a postal questionnaire. The views of these professionals show that the social construction of needs assessment takes place in managing the matching of eligibility criteria against types of services. The key to this process is the application of the concept of management that places health and social care professionals in roles where they are acting for state, voluntary or private agencies, and not in all contexts working together with older people. The study shows that professionals identify older people into two groups or 'classes', i.e. those having health needs as distinct from those with social care. The techniques used amount to an exercise of power by professionals over older people. Change is necessary to break down the dominance by professionals in the needs assessment process. A broader concept of the 'third way' vision by Giddens (1998) is also required to achieve greater relevance to how health and social care is organised, and how relations between professionals and older people are integrated into the idea and practice of participatory care. Therefore, the emancipatory side of modernity remains a largely unfinished project.

  11. Epistemological beliefs and therapeutic health concepts of physiotherapy students and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bientzle, Martina; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    Health knowledge develops fast and includes a lot of ambiguous or tentative information. In their daily routine, both health care students and professionals continuously have to make judgments about the viability of health knowledge. People's epistemological beliefs (EBs) and their therapeutic health concepts are factors that influence how they deal with health knowledge. However, very little is known about the occurrence of these factors at different stages of people's career. The present study examines the EBs and therapeutic health concepts of physiotherapy students in their vocational training and the EBs and therapeutic health concepts of professionals. In a cross-sectional study physiotherapy students and professional physiotherapists filled in a questionnaire that measured their personal EBs about physiotherapy and medicine, as well as their biomedical and biopsychosocial therapeutic health concepts. We compared the participants' EBs regarding both knowledge domains, and their therapeutic health concepts using paired samples t-tests. We also examined the differences between first-year students, advanced students, and professionals regarding their EBs and their therapeutic health concepts using ANOVAs. Eighty-three students and 84 professionals participated in this study, 114/167 (68%) participants were female. EBs as well as therapeutic health concepts differed depending upon the participants' training status. Professionals had more sophisticated EBs than students regarding both knowledge in physiotherapy (F(2, 164) = 6.74, P = 0.002, η(2)(p) = 0.08) and knowledge in medicine (F(2, 164) = 5.93, P = 0.003, η(2)(p) = 0.07). In addition, high values in a biopsychosocial therapeutic health concept already occurred in an early phase of training (F(2, 164) = 5.39, P = 0.005, η(2)(p) = 0.06), whereas increased values in a biomedical concept did not occur until people's professional life (F(2, 164) = 10.99, P personal EBs

  12. Integrating Compassionate, Collaborative Care (the "Triple C") Into Health Professional Education to Advance the Triple Aim of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Beth A; McIntosh, Sharrie; Gaines, Martha E; McGuinn, Kathy; Hatem, David S

    2016-03-01

    Empathy and compassion provide an important foundation for effective collaboration in health care. Compassion (the recognition of and response to the distress and suffering of others) should be consistently offered by health care professionals to patients, families, staff, and one another. However, compassion without collaboration may result in uncoordinated care, while collaboration without compassion may result in technically correct but depersonalized care that fails to meet the unique emotional and psychosocial needs of all involved. Providing compassionate, collaborative care (CCC) is critical to achieving the "triple aim" of improving patients' health and experiences of care while reducing costs. Yet, values and skills related to CCC (or the "Triple C") are not routinely taught, modeled, and assessed across the continuum of learning and practice. To change this paradigm, an interprofessional group of experts recently recommended approaches and a framework for integrating CCC into health professional education and postgraduate training as well as clinical care. In this Perspective, the authors describe how the Triple C framework can be integrated and enhance existing competency standards to advance CCC across the learning and practice continuum. They also discuss strategies for partnering with patients and families to improve health professional education and health care design and delivery through quality improvement projects. They emphasize that compassion and collaboration are important sources of professional, patient, and family satisfaction as well as critical aspects of professionalism and person-centered, relationship-based high-quality care.

  13. Health workforce imbalances in times of globalization: brain drain or professional mobility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy

    2003-01-01

    The health workforce is of strategic importance to the performance of national health systems as well as of international disease control initiatives. The brain drain from rural to urban areas, and from developing to industrialized countries is a long-standing phenomenon in the health professions but has in recent years taken extreme proportions, particularly in Africa. Adopting the wider perspective of health workforce balances, this paper presents an analysis of the underlying mechanisms of health professional migration and possible strategies to reduce its negative impact on health services. The opening up of international borders for goods and labour, a key strategy in the current liberal global economy, is accompanied by a linguistic shift from 'human capital flight' and 'brain drain' to 'professional mobility' or 'brain circulation'. In reality, this mobility is very asymmetrical, to the detriment of less developed countries, which lose not only much-needed human resources, but also considerable investments in education and fiscal income. It is argued that low professional satisfaction and the decreasing social valuation of the health professionals are important determinants of the decreasing attraction of the health professions, which underlies both the push from the exporting countries, as well as the pull from the recipient countries. Solutions should therefore be based on this wider perspective, interrelating health workforce imbalances between, but also within developing and developed countries.

  14. Health visiting and refugee families: issues in professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari M; Joseph, Judy

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the perceptions of experienced health visitors working with refugee families in Inner London. Women who are refugees and asylum seekers in the United Kingdom are more likely to experience depression than either non-refugee women or male asylum seekers. Health visitors provide a universal public health service to all women on the birth of a child, or with children aged under five, and as such are well placed to identify emotional and mental health problems of women who are refugees. Despite successive waves of refugees to the United Kingdom in the 20th century, there are no empirical studies of health visiting practice with this vulnerable group. There is also no body of evidence to inform the practice of health visitors new to working with asylum seekers and refugees. An exploratory study was undertaken in Inner London in 2001. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 13 health visitors experienced in working with women and families who are refugees. A range of structural challenges was identified that mediated against the development of a health-promoting relationship between health visitors and refugee women. With refugee families, who were living in temporary accommodation, health visitors were prioritizing basic needs that had to be addressed: in addition, they prioritized the needs of children before those of women. Health visitors were aware of the emotional needs of women and had strategies for addressing these with women in more settled circumstances. Health visitors considered themselves ill-prepared to deal with the complexities of working with women in these situations. This study identifies issues for further exploration, not least from the perspective of refugee women receiving health visiting services. Health visitors in countries receiving refugee women are framing their work with these women in ways that reflect Maslow's theory of a hierarchy of needs. This study suggests ways that public health

  15. The awareness of osteoporosis among health professionals, consumers, and journalists.

    OpenAIRE

    Renner, J H

    1989-01-01

    A survey of physicians, consumers, journalists, and experts on osteoporosis showed that the level of awareness, particularly among consumers and physicians, regarding osteoporosis and calcium supplementation is high. Professionals and consumers alike agree that osteoporosis is a serious disease. Most think that the disease is preventable, although serious. Most women are aware that osteoporosis may begin years before symptoms become evident, and that they may be subject to the disease. Most c...

  16. Hand Hygiene among Health Care Professionals - anno 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Sussie; Kristensen, Brian

    2007-01-01

    A literature review shows that hand disinfection is superior to hand washing concerning the elimination of microorganisms. Alcohol-based hand rubs quickly and easily reduce the number of microorganisms on hands. It is important that healthcare professionals prevent the transmission...... of microorganisms by hand disinfection before and after patient-related procedures. Factors that influence adherence to hand disinfection are discussed. Udgivelsesdato: Nov 26...

  17. Working at the interface in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health: focussing on the individual health professional and their organisation as a means to address health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Annabelle M; Kelly, Janet; Magarey, Anthea; Jones, Michelle; Mackean, Tamara

    2016-11-17

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience inequity in health outcomes in Australia. Health care interactions are an important starting place to seek to address this inequity. The majority of health professionals in Australia do not identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and the health care interaction therefore becomes an example of working in an intercultural space (or interface). It is therefore critical to consider how health professionals may maximise the positive impact within the health care interaction by skilfully working at the interface. Thirty-five health professionals working in South Australia were interviewed about their experiences working with Aboriginal people. Recruitment was through purposive sampling. The research was guided by the National Health and Medical Research Council Values and Ethics for undertaking research with Aboriginal communities. Critical social research was used to analyse data. Interviews revealed two main types of factors influencing the experience of non-Aboriginal health professionals working with Aboriginal people at the interface: the organisation and the individual. Within these two factors, a number of sub-factors were found to be important including organisational culture, organisational support, accessibility of health services and responding to expectations of the wider health system (organisation) and personal ideology and awareness of colonisation (individual). A health professional's practice at the interface cannot be considered in isolation from individual and organisational contexts. It is critical to consider how the organisational and individual factors identified in this research will be addressed in health professional training and practice, in order to maximise the ability of health professionals to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and therefore contribute to addressing health equity.

  18. Professionals' views on mental health service users' education: challenges and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, I; Kaunonen, M

    2017-02-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Mental health service users (MHSUs) may experience disruptions in their education. However, education has been shown to have a positive influence on their recovery, potentially offering them broader employment opportunities. The literature suggests that providing support for MHSUs in their educational efforts may be beneficial and is wished for by the service users themselves. However, there is a lack of mental health professionals' views on the topic in the setting of a community mental health centre. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO THE EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In the perception of mental health professionals, the predominance of disease in the life of MHSUs and their marginalization may form barriers to their success in education. Professionals can support MHSUs in their educational efforts by strengthening the MHSUs' internal resources and creating a supportive environment with professional expertise available. A service user-centred education might further help MHSUs to achieve their educational goals. Our findings confirm previous knowledge of a recovery-oriented approach to supporting MHSUs' education. This study explored the topic from the professionals' perspective in the context of community mental health centres, which is a fresh view in the research literature. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The findings suggest which types of support professionals perceive to be required for MHSUs to advance their studies. Knowledge of adequate forms of support can be applied in the mental health nursing practice to develop support measures for service users to advance in their studies. All levels of the community mental health centres should be aware of and adopt a recovery-oriented approach. MHSUs and professionals need to have a shared opinion on the definition of recovery orientation. This requires mutual discussion and the more active involvement of MHSUs in the design of their own rehabilitation process.

  19. Motivation and Factors Affecting It among Health Professionals in the Public Hospitals, Central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagne, Tesfaye; Beyene, Waju; Berhanu, Negalign

    2015-07-01

    Motivation is an individual's degree of willingness to exert and maintain an effort towards organizational goals. This study assessed motivational status and factors affecting it among health professionals in public hospitals of West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region. Facility based cross-sectional survey was employed. All health professionals who served at least for 6 months in Ambo, Gedo and Gindeberet hospitals were included. Self-administered Likert scale type questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Mean motivation calculated as percentage of maximum scale score was used. Bivariate and multiple linear regression analyses were done to see the independent effects of explanatory variables. The overall motivation level of health professionals was 63.63%. Motivation level of health professionals varied among the hospitals. Gindeberet Hospital had lower motivation score as compared to Ambo Hospital (B = -0.54 and 95% CI; -0.08,-0.27). The mean motivation score of health professionals who got monthly financial benefit was significantly higher than those who did not (B = 0.71 and 95% CI; 0.32, 1.10). Environmental factors had higher impact on doctors' motivation compared to nurses' (B = 0.51 and 95% CI; 0.10, 0.92). Supervisor-related factors highly varied in motivation relative to other variables. Motivation of health professionals was affected by factors related to supervisor, financial benefits, job content and hospital location. Efforts should be made to provide financial benefits to health professionals as appropriate especially, to those who did not get any such benefits. Officially recognizing best performance is also suggested.

  20. Health inequalities, physician citizens and professional medical associations: an Australian case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naccarella Lucio

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As socioeconomic health inequalities persist and widen, the health effects of adversity are a constant presence in the daily work of physicians. Gruen and colleagues suggest that, in responding to important population health issues such as this, defining those areas of professional obligation in contrast to professional aspiration should be on the basis of evidence and feasibility. Drawing this line between obligation and aspiration is a part of the work of professional medical colleges and associations, and in doing so they must respond to members as well as a range of other interest groups. Our aim was to explore the usefulness of Gruen's model of physician responsibility in defining how professional medical colleges and associations should lead the profession in responding to socioeconomic health inequalities. Methods We report a case study of how the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners is responding to the issue of health inequalities through its work. We undertook a consultation (80 interviews with stakeholders internal and external to the College and two focus groups with general practitioners and program and policy review of core programs of College interest and responsibility: general practitioner training and setting of practice standards, as well as its work in public advocacy. Results Some strategies within each of these College program areas were seen as legitimate professional obligations in responding to socioeconomic health inequality. However, other strategies, while potentially professional obligations within Gruen's model, were nevertheless contested. The key difference between these lay in different moral orientations. Actions where agreement existed were based on an ethos of care and compassion. Actions that were contested were based on an ethos of justice and human rights. Conclusion Colleges and professional medical associations have a role in explicitly leading a debate about values

  1. Mental health promotion competencies in the health sector in Finland: a qualitative study of the views of professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, Nina; Solin, Pia; Stengård, Eija; Kannas, Lasse; Kettunen, Tarja

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate what competencies are needed for mental health promotion in health sector practice in Finland. A qualitative study was carried out to seek the views of mental health professionals regarding mental health promotion-related competencies. The data were collected via two focus groups and a questionnaire survey of professionals working in the health sector in Finland. The focus groups consisted of a total of 13 professionals. Further, 20 questionnaires were received from the questionnaire survey. The data were analysed using the qualitative data analysis software ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH, Berlin. A content analysis was carried out. In total, 23 competencies were identified and clustered under the categories of theoretical knowledge, practical skills, and personal attitudes and values. In order to promote mental health, it is necessary to have a knowledge of the principles and concepts of mental health promotion, including methods and tools for effective practices. Furthermore, a variety of skills-based competencies such as communication and collaboration skills were described. Personal attitudes and values included a holistic approach and respect for human rights, among others. The study provides new information on what competencies are needed to plan, implement and evaluate mental health promotion in health sector practice, with the aim of contributing to a more effective workforce. The competencies provide aid in planning training programmes and qualifications, as well as job descriptions and roles in health sector workplaces related to mental health promotion.

  2. The Work Experiences of Community Health Professionals: Implications for the Continued Rollout of the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hector P; Ramirez, Jeremy C

    2015-01-01

    State health reform (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [ACA]) policies may impact the work experiences of community health professionals. We examine the extent to which community health professional work experiences differ depending on state Medicaid expansion and health insurance exchange policies. Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) (2014) responses from public health nurses, community health workers, health educators, and other public health professionals were merged with state ACA Medicaid expansion and health insurance exchange operations data. We used multivariate regression to examine the extent to which community health professionals in states without Medicaid expansion, or expansion states without a state-run health insurance exchange, reported lower-quality work experiences and less leadership support than did community health professionals working in Medicaid expansion states with state-run health insurance exchanges, controlling for worker characteristics. Local and state health departments (SHD) in 37 states. 10,246 state health department and 6450 local health department (LHD) workers. Work satisfaction (job, organization, pay, and job security), quality of work experiences, leadership support, and impact of the ACA on work. In adjusted analyses, LHD community health professionals in states without Medicaid expansion reported worse experiences of leadership support (β = -9.83; P < .05). LHD community health professionals in Medicaid expansion states without state-run health insurance exchange operations reported lower-quality work experiences (β = -13.06; P < .01), less leadership support (β = -11.52; P < .001), and perceived greater impacts of the ACA on their work (β = 9.18; P < .001) than did LHD community health professionals in expansion states with state-run health insurance exchanges. Less state control over health insurance exchange operations or state inaction with respect to Medicaid expansion may

  3. Professionalism in a digital age: opportunities and considerations for using social media in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Kendra; Sabus, Carla

    2015-03-01

    Since the beginning of the millennium, there has been a remarkable change in how people access and share information. Much of this information is user-generated content found on social media sites. As digital technologies and social media continue to expand, health care providers must adapt their professional communication to meet the expectations and needs of consumers. This adaptation may include communication on social media sites. However, many health care providers express concerns that professional social media use, particularly interactions with patients, is ethically problematic. Social media engagement does not create ethical dissonance if best practices are observed and online communication adheres to terms of service, professional standards, and organizational policy. A well-executed social media presence provides health care providers, including physical therapists, the opportunity-and perhaps a professional obligation-to use social media sites to share or create credible health care information, filling a consumer void for high-quality online information on fitness, wellness, and rehabilitation. This perspective article provides a broad review of the emergence of social media in society and health care, explores policy implications of organizational adoption of health care social media, and proposes individual opportunities and guidelines for social media use by the physical therapy professional.

  4. Do structured arrangements for multidisciplinary peer group supervision make a difference for allied health professional outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuipers P

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pim Kuipers,1,2 Susan Pager,1 Karen Bell,3 Fiona Hall,4 Melissa Kendall2,5,6 1Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2Centre for Community Science, School of Human Services, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; 3Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service, Queensland, Australia; 4Allied Health Professions Office of Queensland, Health Service and Innovation Division, Queensland, Australia; 5Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Service, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 6Transitional Rehabilitation Programme, Metro South Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Abstract: Peer group supervision, particularly in multidisciplinary formats, presents a potential means of providing professional support, and specifically clinical supervision, for allied health professionals. Debate exists regarding the extent to which the activities of these groups should be formalized. Results drawn from an evaluation of a large-scale peer group supervision initiative are described. Analysis of 192 responses from professionals involved in peer groups indicates that participants in groups that used formal documentation – which adopted the tools provided in training, and particularly those that used formal evaluation of their groups – rated their groups as having better processes and greater impact. Interestingly, multidisciplinary peer groups were rated as having similar impacts, processes, and purposes as the more homogenous single-discipline groups. It is concluded that the implementation of formal arrangements enhances the processes and outcomes of peer groups implemented for professional support and clinical supervision. Multidisciplinary membership of such groups is perceived as equally beneficial as single-discipline groups. Keywords: allied health, professional supervision, clinical supervision, professional support, multidisciplinary

  5. Providing medical care for undocumented migrants in Denmark: what are the challenges for health professionals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræbel, Tania Aase; K Jensen, Natascha; Nørredam, Marie;

    2011-01-01

    Background: The rights of undocumented migrants are frequently overlooked. Denmark has ratified several international conventions recognizing the right to health care for all human beings, but has very scanty legislation and no existing policies for providing health care to undocumented migrants...... experience an unequal access to primary care facilities and that great uncertainties exist amongst health professionals as how to respond in such situations. The lack of official policies concerning the right to health care for undocumented migrants continue to pass on the responsibility to healt....... This study focuses on how health professionals navigate and how they experience providing treatment for undocumented migrants in the Danish health care system. Methods: The study was carried out as part of an EU-project on European Best Practices in Access, Quality and Appropriateness of Health Services...

  6. Analysis of clinical uncertainties by health professionals and patients: an example from mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanenblatt Michael

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first step in practising Evidence Based Medicine (EBM has been described as translating clinical uncertainty into a structured and focused clinical question that can be used to search the literature to ascertain or refute that uncertainty. In this study we focus on questions about treatments for schizophrenia posed by mental health professionals and patients to gain a deeper understanding about types of questions asked naturally, and whether they can be reformulated into structured and focused clinical questions. Methods From a survey of uncertainties about the treatment of schizophrenia we describe, categorise and analyse the type of questions asked by mental health professionals and patients about treatment uncertainties for schizophrenia. We explore the value of mapping from an unstructured to a structured framework, test inter-rater reliability for this task, develop a linguistic taxonomy, and cross tabulate that taxonomy with elements of a well structured clinical question. Results Few of the 78 Patients and 161 clinicians spontaneously asked well structured queries about treatment uncertainties for schizophrenia. Uncertainties were most commonly about drug treatments (45.3% of clinicians and 41% of patients, psychological therapies (19.9% of clinicians and 9% of patients or were unclassifiable.(11.8% of clinicians and 16.7% of patients. Few naturally asked questions could be classified using the well structured and focused clinical question format (i.e. PICO format. A simple linguistic taxonomy better described the types of questions people naturally ask. Conclusion People do not spontaneously ask well structured clinical questions. Other taxonomies may better capture the nature of questions. However, access to EBM resources is greatly facilitated by framing enquiries in the language of EBM, such as posing queries in PICO format. People do not naturally do this. It may be preferable to identify a way of searching

  7. [The trajectory towards alternative medicines: an analysis of health professionals' social representations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, M S

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on social representations of alternative medicines by a group of professors from the School of Medicine and health professionals from the public health system in the city of Campinas, São Paulo, basically physicians and nurses. The article also emphasizes personal trajectories by which these health professionals opted for a dissident theoretical and practical perspective vis-à-vis the hegemonic positivist scientific medical paradigm. The research methods were mainly ethnographic, from a phenomenological perspective. The article concludes by sustaining (in theoretical terms) the importance of these dissident perspectives for scientific development.

  8. Speaking up for patient safety by hospital-based health care professionals: a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okuyama, A.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speaking up is important for patient safety, but often, health care professionals hesitate to voice concerns. Understanding the influencing factors can help to improve speaking-up behaviour and team communication. This review focused on health care professionals’ speaking-up behaviour fo

  9. Communication Skills Training Increases Self-Efficacy of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Birgitte; Ammentorp, Jette; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the knowledge of good communication as a precondition for optimal care and treatment in health care, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals. An orthopedic surgery department initiated a 3-day communication skills training course for all staff members expecting…

  10. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  11. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of the Use of Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeye, Adebisi

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) use has improved significantly in health care organizations. However, many barriers and factors influence the success of EMR implementation and adoption. The purpose of the descriptive qualitative single-case study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of the use of EMRs at a hospital division of a…

  12. Health Professionals' Attitudes and Educational Needs regarding New Food Processing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gutierrez, C.; Bruhn, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    This project evaluates the attitudes of food and health professionals to 3 new food processing technologies that have been developed to respond to consumer demands such as superior taste, longer shelf life, higher nutritional content, health benefits, and environment-friendly processing. Educational brochures for high pressure (HP), pulsed…

  13. Health librarians: developing professional competence through a 'legitimate peripheral participation' model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sara; Thomas, Zoe

    2011-12-01

    This feature considers the legitimate peripheral participation model in developing professional competencies in health librarianship. It is described how this model was used in the development of a framework for mapping and recognising the competencies gained by new health librarians at the Royal Free Hospital Medical Library. HS.

  14. Models of Professional and Paraprofessional Training in Refugee Mental Health. Task VI--Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, George; Bamford, Pauline

    Pursuant to the mission of the University of Minnesota's Mental Health Technical Assistance Center for the state refugee assistance programs, this report presents models of culturally sensitive training for professional and paraprofessional personnel who provide mental health service to refugees. After an introduction which places this report in…

  15. Speaking up for patient safety by hospital-based health care professionals: a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okuyama, A.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speaking up is important for patient safety, but often, health care professionals hesitate to voice concerns. Understanding the influencing factors can help to improve speaking-up behaviour and team communication. This review focused on health care professionals’ speaking-up behaviour fo

  16. Speaking up for patient safety by hospital-based health care professionals: a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okuyama, A.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speaking up is important for patient safety, but often, health care professionals hesitate to voice concerns. Understanding the influencing factors can help to improve speaking-up behaviour and team communication. This review focused on health care professionals’ speaking-up behaviour

  17. Permanent health education based on research with professionals of a multidisciplinary residency program: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Trivisiol da Silva

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the perception of professional members of a multi-professional residency program on Permanent Health Education. It is a case study research using a qualitative approach, with sixteen members of a multi-professional residency program. The data were collected from January to May 2012, through semi-structured interviews, document analysis and systematic observation, and analyzed according to Thematic Content Analysis. Two categories were identified: Permanent Health Education establishing collective spaces of reflection of practices and Permanent Health Education that promotes integration between disciplines. The members of the multiprofessional residency team were found to be aware that permanent education permeates their training and enables reflection on their clinical practices and multidisciplinary action as producers of health actions.

  18. [Communication skills: a preventive factor in Burnout syndrome in health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Costa, C; Díaz-Agea, J L; Tirado-González, S; Rodríguez-Marín, J; van-der Hofstadt, C J

    2015-01-01

    Health professionals are a group that suffers high levels of job stress and burnout. The aim of this study is to demonstrate empirically that the healthcare count on communication skills helps prevent Burnout Syndrome. An observational, analytical, cross-sectional study was proposed, involving a sample of 927 health professionals (197 doctors, 450 nurses and 280 auxiliary nurses). Participants completed questionnaires measuring communication skills in health care (EHC-PS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). A negative and statistically significant correlation between the different dimensions of communication skills and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization dimensions of burnout was obtained. On the other hand, a positive and statistically significant correlation between the dimensions of communication skills and the personal accomplishment dimension of burnout was observed. It was shown that the communication skills of health professionals provide protection from and cushion Burnout Syndrome.

  19. [Chronic illness from the perspective of patients and health professionals: a qualitative study in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Martínez, Francisco J; Hernández-Ibarra, Eduardo

    2007-09-01

    Chronic diseases are leading causes of morbidity, mortality, and increasing expenditures in numerous countries. However, little is known about how chronic diseases are perceived and managed by social actors. This article aims to compare the perspectives of health professionals and patients towards chronic diseases, besides analyzing the relationship between these two groups. A qualitative, multi-center study was conducted in three Mexican cities: Guadalajara, San Luis Potosí, and Mexico City. Participants included chronically ill individuals, physicians, and other health professionals from primary and secondary health care centers. Data collection used focus groups and interviews. The data were analyzed using discourse analysis. Participants' perceptions varied, from the medicalized view of physicians to that of patients focused on illness and the lifeworld. The participants agreed that there are unequal relationships between health professionals, families, and the chronically ill, but that relationships are more equal among the chronically ill themselves. The article includes by discussing various implications of the findings.

  20. Towards malecentric communication: sensitizing health professionals to the realities of male childhood sexual abuse survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teram, Eli; Stalker, Carol; Hovey, Angela; Schachter, Candice; Lasiuk, Gerri

    2006-06-01

    This article extends earlier reports of an ongoing qualitative inquiry on childhood sexual abuse survivors' experiences with health professionals. In this paper, we aim to enhance understanding of male survivors' experience. While male and female participants express similar anxieties and fears about their encounters with health professionals, there are gender-based differences related to the perceptions of victimhood and manhood; guilt and shame; homophobia; disclosure of abuse; and the expression of vulnerability. The implications of these differences for sensitive health care practice are analyzed within the context of gender relationships and the differential socialization of men. Malecentric communication is proposed as a method for addressing the specific experiences of male survivors in their encounters with health professionals.

  1. An outline of the need for psychology knowledge in health professionals: implications for community development and breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Maryam; Samah, Asnarulkhadi Abu; Saidu, Mohammed Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of health and community psychology in health professionals influences psychosocial and community determinants of health and promoting participation in disease prevention at the community level. This paper appraises the potential of knowledge on psychology in health care professionals and its contribution to community empowerment through individual behavior change and health practice. The authors proposed a schematic model for the use of psychological knowledge in health professionals to promote participation in health interventions/disease prevention programs in developing countries. By implication, the paper provides a vision on policies towards supporting breast cancer secondary prevention efforts for community health development in Asian countries.

  2. The role of professional education in developing compassionate practitioners: a mixed methods study exploring the perceptions xof health professionals and pre-registration students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lucy; O'Brien, Mary R; Kirton, Jennifer; Zubairu, Kate; Christiansen, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Compassionate practice is a public expectation and a core health professional value. However, in the face of growing public and professional unease about a perceived absence of compassion in health care it is essential that the role of education in developing compassionate practitioners is fully understood. The aim of this study was to explore qualified health professionals' and pre-registration students' understanding of compassion and the role of health professional education in promoting compassionate care. A sequential explanatory mixed methods study collected data using surveys and qualitative semi-structured interviews from qualified health professionals (n=155) and pre-registration students (n=197). Participants were from a range of health and social care disciplines and registered at a UK university. The findings indicate a high level of consensus in relation to participants' understanding of compassion in health care. Acting with warmth and empathy, providing individualised patient care and acting in a way you would like others to act towards you, were seen as the most common features of compassionate care. However, ambiguities and contradictions were evident when considering the role of health professional education in promoting compassionate practice. This study adds to the debate and current understanding of the role of education in fostering compassionate health care practice.

  3. Using information and communication technology to revitalise continuing professional development for rural health professionals: evidence from a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, J F

    2009-01-01

    This project revitalised continuing professional development (CPD) among rural health professionals in Uganda, Africa, using information and communication technology (ICT). The project was piloted in 3 rural hospitals where CPD activities were failing to meet demand because activities were not properly coordinated, the meetings were too infrequent, the delivery methods were inappropriate, and the content was highly supply-driven and generally irrelevant to the performance needs of the health workers. The project intervention involved the installation of various ICT equipment including computers, liquid crystal display (LCD) projectors, office copiers, printers, spiral binders and CDs. A number of health workers were also trained in ICT use. Three years later, an evaluation study was conducted using interviews, focus group discussions and document review. The results indicated that there had been a rapid increase in the number of staff attending the CPD sessions, an increased staff mix among participants, improved quality of CPD presentations, increased use of locally produced content, more relevant topics discussed and an increased interest by hospital management in CPD, manifested by commitment of staff training funds. Staff motivation, attitude and responsiveness to clients had also improved as a result of the invigorated CPD activities.

  4. eHealth education of professionals in the Baltic Sea Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygholm, Ann; Günther, Julia; Bertelsen, Pernille; Nøhr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a study on the extent, level and content of e-Health in existing formal educational systems in Lithuania, Germany, Finland, Norway and Denmark with the objectives of identifying future educational needs within this area. The study was carried out as a desk-top study and took place within the context of the ICT for Health project. The results of the study on the one hand revealed a wide range of programs and courses that included e-Health, but on the other hand also showed that in the educations of health care professionals (physicians, nurses etc.) the integration of e-Health elements are often marginal or non-existing. Thus the study indicates that there is a need for a higher integration of e-Health in the education of health care professionals. We discuss what kind of knowledge of e-Health is needed and how it could or should be integrated in these educations. We argue that providing possibilities for applying and experimenting with e-Health system in a concrete and tangible manner is central in order to raise the acceptance and capabilities of health care professionals to use e-Health systems.

  5. [The professional self and hetero image among public health nurses: a study of social representations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Antonio Marcos Tosoli; Oliveira, Denize Cristina de

    2005-01-01

    The object of this study is the professional image constructed by public health nurses and the objective is to describe and analyze the professional images present in the representations of nurses who deliver direct care to this clientele. The theoretical-methodological reference framework adopted was Social Representations Theory. A qualitative study was developed in Petrópolis-Rio de Janeiro/Brazil, through in-depth interviews with 30 nurses. Alceste 4.5 software was used for the lexical analysis. The results reveal the existence of a professional self-image with three groups of meanings: being a reference for the team, the non-specific image and the image of plaster; and a professional hetero-image with four groups of meanings: administrator, invisible, positive image and superposition. The study of the professional image reflects the construction of the nurse's identity in itself and emphasizes Social Representations Theory as a useful tool for nursing research development.

  6. Professional attitudes regarding the sexual abuse of children: comparing police, child welfare and community mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trute, B; Adkins, E; MacDonald, G

    1992-01-01

    A survey was completed involving three of the key professional groups engaged in the investigation and treatment of child sexual abuse. Police, child welfare and community mental health in a large, rural geographic area in Canada completed attitudinal items relating to professional response to child sexual abuse. An empirical scale was created which was comprised of three orthogonal factors, each with acceptable levels of internal consistency: 1) Beliefs in regard to the extensiveness and seriousness of the issue; 2) treatment versus punishment priority; and 3) view regarding identity of those who perpetrate child sexual abuse. Important gender differences were found across professional groupings in attitude toward sexual abuse. Greatest difference in attitude between service sectors was tied to emphasis placed on treatment versus punishment as a primary aspect of professional intervention. Significant differences were found between child welfare and police, the two service sectors most needing a coordinated approach during the "investigative phase" of professional intervention.

  7. Iraqi health system in kurdistan region: medical professionals' perspectives on challenges and priorities for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Abubakir M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The views of medical professionals on efficiency of health system and needs for any changes are very critical and constitute a cornerstone for any health system improvement. This is particularly relevant to Iraqi Kurdistan case as the events of the last few decades have significantly devastated the national Iraqi health system while the necessity for adopting a new health care system is increasingly recognized since 2004. This study aims to examine the regional health system in Iraqi Kurdistan from medical professionals' perspectives and try to define its problems and priorities for improvement. Methods A survey questionnaire was developed and administered to a convenience sample of 250 medical professionals in Erbil governorate. The questionnaire included four items; rating of the quality of services and availability of resources in the health institutions, view on different aspects of the health system, the perceived priority needs for health system improvement and gender and professional characteristics of the respondents. Results The response rate to the survey was 83.6%. A high proportion of respondents rated the different aspects of services and resources in the health institutions as weak or very weak including the availability of the required quantity and quality of medicines (68.7%, the availability of sufficient medical equipment and investigation tools (68.7%, and the quality of offered services (65.3%. Around 72% of respondents had a rather negative view on the overall health system. The weak role of medical research, the weak role of professional associations in controlling the system and the inefficient health education were identified as important problems in the current health system (87.9%, 87.1% and 84.9%, respectively. The priority needs of health system improvement included adoption of social insurance for medical care of the poor (82%, enhancing the role of family medicine (77.2%, adopting health

  8. Attitudes towards implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy: a national survey in Danish health-care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jens B; Mortensen, Peter T; Videbæk, Regitze

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to examine health-care professionals attitudes towards implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy and issues discussed with patients. Methods and results Survey of 209 health-care professionals providing specialized treatment and care of ICD patients......-physicians. Physicians were less likely to believe that their personal attitude towards ICD treatment has no influence on how they deal professionally with patients (27.8 vs. 43.6%; P = 0.04). Physicians and non-physicians were equally positive towards ICD therapy as primary prophylaxis in ischaemic cardiomyopathy (87...... discussing ICD treatment with candidate patients. At the same time, physicians are more aware that their attitude towards ICD treatment may influence how they deal professionally with patients compared with non-physicians....

  9. Decision-making around antithrombotics for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: the health professionals' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yishen; Bajorek, Beata

    2016-08-01

    Background For stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy has been complicated by older age, multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy and the different pharmacological properties of warfarin and the nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). The complexity of decision-making has been associated with a reluctance by health professionals to use antithrombotic therapy, leading to poor clinical outcomes. In order to improve stroke prevention in patients with AF, the contemporary perspectives of health professionals on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy needs exploration. Objective To elicit emerging themes describing health professionals' perspectives on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Setting Sydney metropolitan area of New South Wales, Australia. Method A qualitative study based on face-to-face interviews was conducted from August to October 2014. Seven pharmacists, seven specialists, six general practitioners and six nurses practising in the Sydney metropolitan area and managing antithrombotic therapy for AF were interviewed until theme saturation was achieved in each subgroup. Interview transcripts were analysed using manual inductive coding. Main outcome measure Emerging themes describing health professionals' perspectives on the decision-making around antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Results Three overarching themes emerged. (1) Comprehensive assessment is necessary for decision-making but is not always implemented. Health professionals mostly focused on stroke risk assessment, not on the bleeding risk and medication safety issues. (2) Health professionals from different disciplines have different preferences for antithrombotic therapies. Although the majority of health professionals considered warfarin as the first-line therapy, NOACs were preferred by neurologists and

  10. [Primary health care professionals attitudes towards influenza immunzation in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torner, Nuria; Godoy, Pere; Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Rius, Cristina; Domínguez, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Health personnel are at risk of acquiring influenza infection and of nosocomial influenza transmission. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between the knowledge and attitudes of primary care health personnel in Catalonia as regards influenza vaccine and the factors related to the uptake of this vaccine. A cross-sectional study using a web survey. Primary care health personnel of the Catalan Health Institute. A total of 1212 primary health care personnel were included in the survey. Those who had medical reasons for being or not being vaccinated were excluded. A total of 423 replies were valid, with a 46.6% overall vaccination coverage. Vaccination rate was higher among 45 to 54 year-olds, paediatricians, those vaccinated in preceding seasons, and those living with chronic patients. There was an association between having received the vaccine and considering vaccination the best preventive action, advocating vaccination to at risk population, concern about acquiring influenza, and considering health personnel vaccination important. Actions taken to increase vaccination rate among health personnel should aim at correcting lack of knowledge and misconceptions about influenza vaccination of health personnel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Trafficking: A Review for Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushko, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of current research on human trafficking for mental health practitioners and scholars. In addition to an overview of definitions, causes and processes of trafficking, the article highlights mental health consequences of trafficking along with suggestions for treatment of survivors. Directions for counseling services,…

  12. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-06-09

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention.

  13. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chowdhury

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention.

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweeney Karl J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts. Female gender (p Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of potential benefits and risks associated with these therapies.

  15. Canadian health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of nutritional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Mark; Morin, Karine; Ries, Nola; Castle, David

    2010-10-01

    Nutritional genomics has reached the public through applications of the Human Genome Project offered direct to consumers (DTC). The ability to pursue nutrigenetic testing without the involvement of a health care professional has received considerable attention from academic and policy commentators. To better understand the knowledge and attitudes of Canadian health care professionals regarding nutritional genomics and nutrigenetic testing, qualitative research in the form of focus group discussions was undertaken. Four key themes emerged: (1) concerns over DTC testing; (2) lack of health care professional competency; (3) genetic scepticism and inevitability; (4) expectation of regulation. Together, they indicate that health care professionals have little knowledge about nutritional genomics and hold contradictory attitudes towards genomics in general, and to nutritional genomics in particular. Respondents argue in favour of a delivery model where health care professionals act as intermediaries. They are also aware of their lack of competency to provide such services. To ensure greater public protection, respondents cite the importance of more stringent regulatory oversight of DTC genetic testing. Whether such an approach is necessary to address the various ethical and social issues raised by nutrigenetic testing remains an open debate.

  16. Family-health professional relations in pediatric weight management: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnesi, B C; Ball, G D C; Newton, A S

    2012-06-01

    In this integrative review, we examined contemporary literature in pediatric weight management to identify characteristics that contribute to the relationship between families and health professionals and describe how these qualities can inform healthcare practices for obese children and families receiving weight management care. We searched literature published from 1980 to 2010 in three electronic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO and CINAHL). Twenty-four articles identified family-health professional relationships were influenced by the following: health professionals' weight-related discussions and approaches to care; and parents' preferences regarding weight-related terminology and expectations of healthcare delivery. There was considerable methodological heterogeneity in the types of reports (i.e. qualitative studies, review articles, commentaries) included in this review. Overall, the findings have implications for establishing a positive clinical relationship between families and health professionals, which include being sensitive when discussing weight-related issues, using euphemisms when talking about obesity, demonstrating a non-judgmental and supportive attitude and including the family (children and parents) in healthcare interactions. Experimental research, clinical interventions and longitudinal studies are needed to build on the current evidence to determine how best to establish a collaborative partnership between families and health professionals and whether such a partnership improves treatment adherence, reduces intervention attrition and enhances pediatric weight management success.

  17. Developing the role of big data and analytics in health professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Pusic, Martin V; Galbraith, Robert M; Cameron, Terri

    2014-03-01

    As we capture more and more data about learners, their learning, and the organization of their learning, our ability to identify emerging patterns and to extract meaning grows exponentially. The insights gained from the analyses of these large amounts of data are only helpful to the extent that they can be the basis for positive action such as knowledge discovery, improved capacity for prediction, and anomaly detection. Big Data involves the aggregation and melding of large and heterogeneous datasets while education analytics involves looking for patterns in educational practice or performance in single or aggregate datasets. Although it seems likely that the use of education analytics and Big Data techniques will have a transformative impact on health professional education, there is much yet to be done before they can become part of mainstream health professional education practice. If health professional education is to be accountable for its programs run and are developed, then health professional educators will need to be ready to deal with the complex and compelling dynamics of analytics and Big Data. This article provides an overview of these emerging techniques in the context of health professional education.

  18. Analysis of the literature pertaining to the education of public health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie J Evashwick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A well-educated workforce is essential to the infrastructure of a public health system. At the time when global focus on public health is increasing, a severe shortage of public health professionals is projected. A strong educational framework is imperative to ensure the capacity and capability of the worldwide public health workforce for the future. Frenk and Chen (2011 comment that academic public health has done far less than medicine or nursing to examine its pedagogy. The goal of this study is to examine the literature pertaining to the education of public health professionals in order to document the extent to which those preparing public health professionals think about what they teach, how they teach, and what the results of the instruction are. The specific objectives are to (1 identify relevant peer reviewed literature, (2 analyze that literature for content, (3 characterize the literature according to type of methodology, and (4 draw conclusions and implications to enhance future pedagogical efforts. The study searched three bibliographic sources for articles written in English between 2000-2012. The search of PubMed, Scopus, Education Full Text identified 576 unique articles. The articles were analyzed according to ten content themes and four format categories. The conclusions are that those teaching public health professionals devote considerable thought to what and how they teach, although original research and evaluation studies are fewer than descriptive reports of courses, programs and curricula. A journal devoted specifically to articles pertaining to education of public health professionals will encourage academicians to write articles sharing approaches to educating the public health workforce.

  19. Extended roles for allied health professionals: an updated systematic review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxon RL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Robyn L Saxon,1–3 Marion A Gray,1,2 Florin I Oprescu1,2 1School of Health and Sports Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, 2Cluster for Health Improvement, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, 3Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Background: Internationally, health care services are under increasing pressure to provide high quality, accessible, timely interventions to an ever increasing aging population, with finite resources. Extended scope roles for allied health professionals is one strategy that could be undertaken by health care services to meet this demand. This review builds upon an earlier paper published in 2006 on the evidence relating to the impact extended scope roles have on health care services. Methods: A systematic review of the literature focused on extended scope roles in three allied health professional groups, ie, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology, was conducted. The search strategy mirrored an earlier systematic review methodology and was designed to include articles from 2005 onwards. All peer-reviewed published papers with evidence relating to effects on patients, other professionals, or the health service were included. All papers were critically appraised prior to data extraction. Results: A total of 1,000 articles were identified by the search strategy; 254 articles were screened for relevance and 21 progressed to data extraction for inclusion in the systematic review. Conclusion: Literature supporting extended scope roles exists; however, despite the earlier review calling for more robust evaluations regarding the impact on patient outcomes, cost-effectiveness, training requirements, niche identification, or sustainability, there appears to be limited research reported on the topic in the last 7 years. The evidence available suggests that extended scope practice allied health practitioners could be a cost-effective and consumer

  20. What health professionals should know about the health effects of air pollution and climate change on children and pregnant mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Poursafa, Parinaz; Kelishadi, Roya

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health professionals face the adverse health effects of climate change and air pollution in their practices. This review underscores the effects of these environmental factors on maternal and children's health, as the most vulnerable groups to climate change and air pollution. METHODS: We reviewed electronic databases for a search of the literature to find relevant studies published in English from 1990 to 2011. RESULTS: Environmental factors, notably climate change and air pollut...

  1. Construct comparisons of IT adoption theories across cultures and innovativeness of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Sung; Kim, Hye-Sook; Park, Young-Taek; Speedie, Stuart M

    2008-11-06

    This investigation verified the study model derived from TAM and tested path significance across moderating variables such as cultures, personal innovativeness in IT (PIIT), and two different health care professionals. The findings demonstrated that the theory can apply to other settings and to different work professionals as well as across PIIT. There were different aspects on path significance, which have managerial implications on how an organization can successfully use their IT resources without resistance.

  2. Redirecting traditional professional values to support safety: changing organisational culture in health care

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, J.; Quijada, M.

    2004-01-01

    Professionals in healthcare organisations who seek to enhance safety and quality in an increasingly demanding industry environment often identify culture as a barrier to change. The cultural focus on individual autonomy, for example, seems to conflict with desired norms of teamwork, problem reporting, and learning. We offer a definition and explication of why culture is important to change efforts. A cultural analysis of health care suggests professional values that can be redirected to suppo...

  3. Conscientious refusal and health professionals: does religion make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Freedom of Conscience and Freedom of Religion should be taken to protect two distinct sets of moral considerations. The former protects the ability of the agent to reflect critically upon the moral and political issues that arise in her society generally, and in her professional life more specifically. The latter protects the individual's ability to achieve secure membership in a set of practices and rituals that have as a moral function to inscribe her life in a temporally extended narrative. Once these grounds are distinguished, it becomes more difficult to grant healthcare professionals' claims to religious exemptions on the basis of the latter than it is on the basis of the former. While both sets of considerations generate 'internal reasons' for rights to accommodation, the relevant 'external' reasons present in the case of claims of moral conscience do not possess analogues in the case of claims of religious conscience. However, the argument applies only to 'irreducibly religious' claims, that is to claims that cannot be translated into moral vocabulary. What's more, there may be reasons to grant the claims of religious persons to exemptions that have to do not with the nature of the claims, but with the beneficial effects that the presence of religious persons may have in the context of the healthcare institutions of multi-faith societies.

  4. Stemming the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa: a systemic review of policy options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zimbudzi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Africa has been losing professionally trained health workers who are the core of the health system of this continent for many years. Faced with an increased burden of disease and coupled by a massive exodus of the health workforce, the health systems of many African nations are risking complete paralysis. Several studies have suggested policy options to reduce brain drain from Africa. The purpose of this paper is to review possible policies, which can stem the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa. A systemic literature review was conducted. Cinahl, Science Direct and PubMed databases were searched with the following terms: health professional brain drain from Africa and policies for reducing impact of brain drain from Africa. References were also browsed for relevant articles. A total of 425 articles were available for the study but only 23 articles met the inclusion criteria. The review identified nine policy options, which were being implemented in Africa, but the most common was task shifting which had success in several African countries. This review has demonstrated that there is considerable consensus on task shifting as the most appropriate and sustainable policy option for reducing the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa.

  5. A Comparison of the Regulation of Health Professional Boundaries across OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Lynn Bourgeault

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased attention has been paid recently to the issue of the regulation of professional boundaries. In this paper, we undertake an international comparison of the regulation of health professional boundaries across the OECD countries of Canada, the U.S., the U.K. and Australia. Our case studies focus on the inter-professional boundary negotiation between medicine and nursing and the intra-professional boundary negotiation between domestic and internationally trained physicians. Our analysis draws upon the complementary interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives of institutional economics and the concept of professional closure from the sociology of professions. In applying these lenses to the two case studies in these four country contexts, we reveal that there has been a shift in the context of professional regulation towards a more coordinated national approach to licensure. There has also been a broad scale move towards breaking down at least the regulatory barriers to inter-professional collaboration between physicians and nurses which has included the expansion of the scope of nursing practice to take up traditionally exclusive domains of medicine. The seemingly protectionist professional regulatory policies vis-a-vis international medical graduates also seem to be breaking down primarily through government measures. Overall, there has been an increased permeability of professional boundaries both inter-professionally and intra-professionally, and market-oriented systems seem to be in a better position to overcome medical dominance than state-led ones, even though they do not change the main rules of regulation at the macro-level.

  6. [National Policy of Humanization and education of health care professionals: integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Guilherme Correa; Meneguim, Silmara; Lima, Silvana Andréa Molina; Moreno, Vania

    2013-01-01

    The National Policy of Humanization aims at innovations in health production, management and care with emphasis on permanent education for workers in the Unified Public Health System and training of university students in the health care field. This study aimed to know, through an integrative review of the literature, the scientific production about the National Policy of Humanization and education of health care professionals, from 2002 to 2010. Ten articles were analyzed in thematic strand through three axes: humanization and users caring, humanization and the work process, humanization and training. The articles point to the need to overcome the biological conception, valuing cultural aspects of users. The work process is marked by the devaluation of workers and by users deprived of their rights. The training of health professionals is grounded in health services where the prevailing standards are practices that hinder innovative attitudes.

  7. User violence towards nursing professionals in mental health services and emergency units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomé Llor-Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is present in many work sectors, but in the area of mental health, nurses have a higher risk due to the close relationship they have with users. This study analyzed hostile user statements against nursing professionals of Mental Health Services and Emergency Units in Health Service (MHS hospitals in Murcia, Spain, and determined the frequency of exposure to the different violent user behaviors. The study was carried out with a sample of 518 nursing professionals from four hospital services: Mental Health, Emergency Units, Medical Hospitalization, and Maternal-and-Child. The nursing staff of Mental Health and Emergency Units was the most exposed to violence. Non-physical violence was more frequent in Emergency Units, whereas physical violence was more frequent in Mental Health. Among the consequences of exposure to non-physical violence are workers’ emotional exhaustion and the presence of psychological distress.

  8. Health Professional Workforce Education in the Asia Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Jessica; Webb, Gillian; Coulston, Frances; Smart, Aidan; Remedios, Louisa

    2016-04-26

    To design and implement an international and interprofessional Global Learning Partnership Model, which involves shared learning between academics and students from Universitas 21 network with other universities with United Nations Millennium Development Goal needs. Two literature reviews were conducted to inform ethical aspects and curriculum design of the GLP model. Feedback from conference presentations and consultation with experts in education and public health has been incorporated to inform the current iteration of the GLP model. The pilot group of 25 students from U21 universities and Kathmandu University, representing six health disciplines will meet in Nepal in April 2016 for a shared learning experience, including a one week university based workshop and three week community based experience. A multi-phase, mixed method design was selected for the evaluation of the GLP model, utilising a combination of focus groups and questionnaires to evaluate the efficacy of the placement through student experience and learning outcomes in cultural competency, UN SDG knowledge, community engagement and health promotion skills. The literature review demonstrated that cultural awareness and cultural knowledge were improved through participation in cultural immersion programs that incorporated preparatory workshops and clinical experiences. Data will be gathered in April 2006 and the results of the evaluation will be published in the future. The GLP model proposes a project around the fundamental concept of engagement and sharing between students and academics across universities and cultural contexts to build capacity through education, while capitalising on strengths of existing global health placements. Further the inclusion of host-country students and academics in this learning exchange will promote the establishment of an international and interprofessional network for ongoing health promotion. Significance for public healthThe Global Learning Partnership model

  9. To Study and Compare Perception of Health Care Professionals Regarding the Role of Pharmacist in Health Care System in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashfeen Akhtar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthcare team is mainly a triad of Physicians, Pharmacist & Nurses. Objective: The purpose of this paper is to help healthcare professionals understand more clearly the role of pharmacists within a health care team, especially inter-professional communication, pharmacists' responsibilities, and availability issues. A total of 200 samples were selected from 4 hospitals which include 100 samples of doctors and 100 of the nurses. Each sample is basically a questionnaire comprising of 23 questions. A total of two hundred questionnaires were distributed and one hundred and seventy-six questionnaires were returned resulting in the response rate of 88%. Pharmacists are being one of the major healthcare professional groups in the world after physicians and nurses are playing a very significant role in health care system. This understanding is a requirement for better communication and collaboration among the professions and for accomplishing the combined goal of better health care system.

  10. [Primary Care Health Houses: a new balance between continuity, accessibility of care and health professionals working conditions?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Marie-Caroline; Couralet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Mousquès, Julien; Pierre, Aurélie; Bourgueil, Yann

    2009-03-29

    This evaluation explore empirically, the concept of Multidisciplinary Health Houses, considered as a solution to maintain GP's in remote areas and simultaneously to improve quality of care. Our sample concern 9 health Houses, 71 health professionals of which 32 GP's in two regions. We mixed data collected by questionnaire, visits and interviews. Professional activity and consumptions of care by patients were assessed with claims data from national sickness fund database. Comparison was made with professionals and patients of local zones for each Health Houses. Beyond heterogeneity of health houses in terms of location, size, number of professionals involved, we found a higher level of equipment than average practices, larger access in the day, the week and the year and many informal collaboration. With the same medical activity, doctors declare to have longer holidays. Different level of collaboration can be identified according to the level of substitution between them to their patients. To conclude, Multidisciplinary Health Houses enable GP's to find new balance between work and leisure time and offers larger time accessibility to patients.

  11. Professional paths of alumni from doctorate programs in health and biological sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Hortale,Virginia Alonso; Moreira, Carlos Ot?vio Fi?za; Bochner,Rosany; Leal,Maria do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the career path and professional satisfaction of alumni from the doctorate degree programs in health sector. METHODS Exploratory study with 827 alumni of doctoral programs in public health, biological and health sciences at the Funda??o Oswaldo Cruz , RJ, Southeastern Brazil, from1984 to 2007. The subjects were grouped in three cross-temporal cohorts according to year. The profiles of the alumni were analyzed, their career paths mapped and information on the perceptions o...

  12. 77 FR 1495 - Criteria for Determining Priorities Among Correctional Facility Health Professional Shortage Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ...In accordance with the requirements of section 333A(b)(1) of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, as amended by the Health Care Safety Net Amendments of 2002, 42 U.S.C. 254f-1(b)(1), the Secretary of HHS shall establish the criteria which she will use to make determinations under section 333A(a)(1)(A) of the health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) with the greatest shortages. This notice......

  13. Doctoral degree in health professions: professional needs and legal requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Matko; Mimica, Mladen; Mihanović, Frane; Janković, Stipan

    2013-01-01

    To respond to ever increasing complexity of health care professions, education of nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, radiology engineers, and medical laboratory workers, has been upgraded to pregraduate, graduate and postgraduate university levels. In Croatia, nursing was defined as a branch of clinical medical science in 1997. Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina have introduced first two levels, but there is a strong need for the third one (doctoral degree). It should last three years and contain 180 ECTS points. It includes acquisition of evidence-based advanced health care, and the ability for independent research and critical analysis. Doctoral degrees in health professions are instrumental for academic careers of faculty of health professions. Yet this will not separate them from their patients or make them administrators, as the majority of their work will still be spent alongside patients. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  14. Views of Women and Health Professionals on mHealth Lifestyle Interventions in Pregnancy: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pligt, Paige; Ball, Kylie; Wilkinson, Shelley A; Lappas, Martha; McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Campbell, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that women are failing to meet guidelines for nutrition, physical activity, and weight gain during pregnancy. Interventions to promote a healthy lifestyle in pregnancy demonstrate mixed results and many are time and resource intensive. mHealth-delivered interventions offer an opportunity to provide trusted source information in a timely and cost-effective manner. Studies regarding women’s and health professionals’ views of mHealth in antenatal care are limited. Objective This study aimed to explore women’s and health professionals’ views regarding mHealth information sources and interventions to assist women to eat well, be physically active, and gain healthy amounts of weight in pregnancy. Methods A descriptive qualitative research approach employed focus groups and in-depth interviews with 15 pregnant or postpartum women and 12 in-depth interviews with health professionals including two from each category: obstetricians, general practitioners, midwives, dietitians, physiotherapists, and community pharmacists. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Results Women uniformly embraced the concept of mHealth information sources and interventions in antenatal care and saw them as central to information acquisition and ideally incorporated into future antenatal care processes. Health professionals exhibited varied views perceiving mHealth as an inevitable, often parallel, service rather than one integrated into the care model. Four key themes emerged: engagement, risk perception, responsibility, and functionality. Women saw their ability to access mHealth elements as a way to self-manage or control information acquisition that was unavailable in traditional care models and information sources. The emergence of technology was perceived by some health professionals to have shifted control of information from trusted sources, such as health professionals and health organizations, to nontrusted sources. Some

  15. The meaning of occupational health among human resources professionals--a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, Kim

    2006-06-01

    The study findings provide clear rationale for employing occupational health nurses as specialists in understanding occupational health, particularly in the areas of information seeking (e.g., identifying health resources and best practices) and illness or disability management (e.g., managing complex cases and addressing psychosocial factors). Occupational health nurses can assist human resources professionals to direct their energies to administrative and cultural features within their organizations that impact the health of employees and that clearly fall within their realm of expertise (e.g., working to create a workplace climate of genuine concern for employees). Occupational health nurses can provide aggregate information on the health of the work force to strategically encourage, direct, and harness employer investments in workplace health. Finding ways to translate and communicate workplace health information so it is accessible and useable by employers to direct decision making is a key role for occupational health nurses.

  16. Approaches to health-care provider education and professional development in perinatal depression: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legere, Laura E; Wallace, Katherine; Bowen, Angela; McQueen, Karen; Montgomery, Phyllis; Evans, Marilyn

    2017-07-24

    Perinatal depression is the most common mental illness experienced by pregnant and postpartum women, yet it is often under-detected and under-treated. Some researchers suggest this may be partly influenced by a lack of education and professional development on perinatal depression among health-care providers, which can negatively affect care and contribute to stigmatization of women experiencing altered mood. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of educational and professional development needs and strategies for health-care providers in perinatal depression. A systematic search of the literature was conducted in seven academic health databases using selected keywords. The search was limited to primary studies and reviews published in English between January 2006 and May/June 2015, with a focus on perinatal depression education and professional development for health-care providers. Studies were screened for inclusion by two reviewers and tie-broken by a third. Studies that met inclusion criteria were quality appraised and data extracted. Results from the studies are reported through narrative synthesis. Two thousand one hundred five studies were returned from the search, with 1790 remaining after duplicate removal. Ultimately, 12 studies of moderate and weak quality met inclusion criteria. The studies encompassed quantitative (n = 11) and qualitative (n = 1) designs, none of which were reviews, and addressed educational needs identified by health-care providers (n = 5) and strategies for professional development in perinatal mental health (n = 7). Consistently, providers identified a lack of formal education in perinatal mental health and the need for further professional development. Although the professional development interventions were diverse, the majority focused on promoting identification of perinatal depression and demonstrated modest effectiveness in improving various outcomes. This systematic review reveals a

  17. Stealth voluntarism: an expectation of health professional work in underserviced areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Neil; Halseth, Greg; Ostry, Alec

    2011-01-01

    Voluntarism can take many forms, and its boundaries are not always straightforward. In this paper, we explore a particular type of voluntary activities carried out as an add-on to formal duties of health care professionals and administrators. We outline some impressions of what we term 'stealth voluntarism', which we situate at the interstices of health care professionalism, place integration, and welfare retrenchment. Our discussion draws on exploratory research looking at health care and social support in smaller urban centres in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. While stealth voluntarism can occur anywhere, we highlight its unique implications for systems of support in rural and small town places. We conclude by considering the wider implications of stealth voluntarism as an expectation of professional work in underserviced areas, particularly in the context of welfare retrenchment and the offloading of care.

  18. In praise of cultural-competence training for mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsky, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Mental health practitioners in Israel encounter clients from a variety of ethnic groups and cultural backgrounds. Yet, culturally-informed practice standards have neither been defined nor promoted by the professional establishment. A model for cultural-competence training for mental health professionals is presented and evaluated based on self-reports of 51 trainees. An increase in the trainees' understanding of their clients' cultural experiences is elicited, as well as the expansion of their cultural self-awareness, empathy and respect for cultural diversity. this is a qualitative evaluation with a limited number of respondents and provides data only on short term effects of the training. the evaluation demonstrates positive training effects on the practice. Hopefully, this experience will encourage addressing cultural issues in the practice and training of mental health professionals in Israel.

  19. Employment Satisfaction and Health Outcomes among Professional Iraqi refugees as compared to Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Hikmet; Aldhalimi, Abir; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates employment and health outcomes in Iraqi refugees compared to Iraqi immigrants. We surveyed 148 Iraqi professional refugees and 111 Iraqi professional immigrants residing in the U.S. We hypothesized that Iraqi refugees would report lower employment and worse self-rated health as compared to Iraqi immigrants. Logistic Regression was used to test various models. Results showed that more immigrants were employed, as well as employed in their original profession as compared to refugees. Regardless of immigration status, participants' age and the way they rated their job played a larger role in health. The study is the first to demonstrate that, controlling for professional, ethnic and cultural background, there are unknown mechanisms resulting in lower employment and skilled employment in refugees as compared to matched immigrant controls. Furthermore, satisfaction with the new work appears more important than employment per se. PMID:24683383

  20. Health professionals and the meaning they apply to women‟s remaining in violent conjugal relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadirlene Pereira Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors aim to investigate the meanings attributed by health professionals working in the Family Health Strategy to women‟s remaining in violent conjugal relationships. The research is based in the method of Grounded Theory. Interviews were held between May and August 2012 with 52 professionals who work in Family Health in a city in the Brazilian state of Santa Catarina. It is indicated that violence is related to the threats made, to the partner‟s involvement in drug trafficking, to economic and emotional dependence, to the valuing of marriage, to the belief in female submission, and to shame. The professionals indicate the need for strategies in defense of a life free from violence for women: psycho-social support; educational activities regarding the social construction of gender; and articulation of policies based on intersectoriality.

  1. Antenatal pelvic floor exercises: a survey of both patients' and health professionals' beliefs and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, K; Owen, L; Hirst, G; Emery, S

    2007-10-01

    The aim was to discover how often women perform pelvic floor exercises (PFE) in the antenatal period and how they wished to be taught. We compared this with the opinions of the health professionals looking after them. A total of 54 women attending the antenatal day assessment unit completed questionnaires. A total of 21 obstetricians, 29 midwives and 25 GPs returned similar questionnaires. Most women think they should be performing PFE daily but only 15% do so. Some 57% of the women wanted to be taught in the antenatal period. Over 50% of the women/midwives believed that PFE should be taught in an individual basis. Obstetricians/GPs favoured classes. A total of 76% of the women want midwives to teach them PFE and 57% of midwives agree. Most health professionals felt that they had not received adequate training on PFE. The midwife is felt to be the best placed person to teach PFE. Health professionals give PFE low priority.

  2. Good practice in health care for migrants: views and experiences of care professionals in 16 European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priebe, S.; Sandhu, S.; Dias, S.; Gaddini, A.; Greacen, T.; Ioannidis, E.; Kluge, U.; Krasnik, A.; Lamkaddem, M.; Lorant, V.; Puigpinósi Riera, R.; Sarvary, A.; Soares, J.J.F.; Stankunas, M.; Straßmayr, C.; Wahlbeck, K.; Welbel, M.; Bogic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health services across Europe provide health care for migrant patients every day. However, little systematic research has explored the views and experiences of health care professionals in different European countries. The aim of this study was to assess the difficulties professionals

  3. Good practice in health care for migrants: views and experiences of care professionals in 16 European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priebe, S.; Sandhu, S.; Dias, S.; Gaddini, A.; Greacen, T.; Ioannidis, E.; Kluge, U.; Krasnik, A.; Lamkaddem, M.; Lorant, V.; Puigpinósi Riera, R.; Sarvary, A.; Soares, J.J.F.; Stankunas, M.; Straßmayr, C.; Wahlbeck, K.; Welbel, M.; Bogic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health services across Europe provide health care for migrant patients every day. However, little systematic research has explored the views and experiences of health care professionals in different European countries. The aim of this study was to assess the difficulties professionals ex

  4. Information and Communication Technologies and Continuing Health Professional Education in Canada. A Survey of Providers Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memorial Univ., St. John's (Newfoundland).

    The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in continuing health professional education (CHPE) was examined in a national survey of Canadian CHPE providers. Of the 3,044 surveys distributed to schools of medicine, nursing, and pharmacy, national/provincial health professional associations, nonprofit health advocacy organizations,…

  5. Analysis of the literature pertaining to the education of public health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evashwick, Connie J; Tao, Donghua; Bax, Kate

    2013-01-01

    A well-educated workforce is essential to the infrastructure of a public health system (1). At a time when global focus on public health is increasing, a severe shortage of public health professionals is projected (2). A strong educational framework is thus imperative to ensure the capacity and capability of the worldwide public health workforce for the future. The education of those who work in public health is spread across disciplines, subject-specific training programs and types of academic institutions. In the 2011 report on the Health Professionals for a New Century, Frenk and Chen comment that, compared to medicine and nursing, public health has done the least to examine what and how it teaches (3). This does not bode well for meeting the demands of the public health workforce for the future. The purpose of the study reported here is to analyze the state of pedagogy pertaining to the education of the public health workforce as evidenced by published literature. The focus is on "professionals," defined as those who have formal education, are self-governing, and can work independently.

  6. The impact of socially-accountable health professional education: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Carole; Woolley, Torres; Ross, Simone J; Mohammadi, Leila; Halili, Servando Ben; Cristobal, Fortunato; Siega-Sur, Jusie Lydia J; Neusy, A-J

    2017-01-01

    This literature review describes the impact of health professional schools with a social accountability mandate by identifying characteristics of medical education found to impact positively on medical students, health workforce, and health outcomes of disadvantaged communities. A critical appraisal tool was used to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the published articles. Data are presented as a narrative synthesis due to the variety of methodologies in the studies, and characterized using a logic model. Health professional schools aiming to improve health outcomes for their disadvantaged local communities described collaborative partnerships with communities, equitable selection criteria, and community-engaged placements in underserved areas as positively impacting the learning and attitudes of students. Students of socially accountable schools were more likely to stay in rural areas and serve disadvantaged communities, and were often more skilled than students from more traditional schools to meet the needs of underserved communities. However, published literature on the impact of socially accountable health professional education on communities and health outcomes is limited, with only one study investigating health outcomes. The findings of this literature review guide schools on the inputs likely to maximize their socially accountability outputs and increase their impact on students, local health workforce and local communities.

  7. Burnout and health among critical care professionals: The mediational role of resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrogante, Oscar; Aparicio-Zaldivar, Eva

    2017-05-22

    To analyse the mediational role of resilience in relationships between burnout and health in critical care professionals; to determine relationships among resilience level, three burnout dimensions, and physical/mental health; and to establish demographic differences in psychological variables evaluated. Cross-sectional study. A total of 52 critical care professionals, mainly nurses, were recruited from an intensive care unit of Madrid (Spain). All participants were assessed with the questionnaires 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, and Short Form-12 Health Survey. No demographic differences were found. Three burnout dimensions were negatively associated with mental health and resilience. Mediational analyses revealed resilience mediated 1) the relationships between emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation with mental health (partial mediations) and 2) the relationship between personal accomplishment and mental health (total mediation). Resilience minimises and buffers the impact of negative outcomes of workplace stress on mental health of critical care professionals. As a result, resilience prevents the occurrence of burnout syndrome. Resilience improves not only their mental health, but also their ability to practice effectively. It is therefore imperative to develop resilience programs for critical care nurses in nursing schools, universities and health centres. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of the Literature Pertaining to the Education of Public Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evashwick, Connie J.; Tao, Donghua; Bax, Kate

    2013-01-01

    A well-educated workforce is essential to the infrastructure of a public health system (1). At a time when global focus on public health is increasing, a severe shortage of public health professionals is projected (2). A strong educational framework is thus imperative to ensure the capacity and capability of the worldwide public health workforce for the future. The education of those who work in public health is spread across disciplines, subject-specific training programs and types of academic institutions. In the 2011 report on the Health Professionals for a New Century, Frenk and Chen comment that, compared to medicine and nursing, public health has done the least to examine what and how it teaches (3). This does not bode well for meeting the demands of the public health workforce for the future. The purpose of the study reported here is to analyze the state of pedagogy pertaining to the education of the public health workforce as evidenced by published literature. The focus is on “professionals,” defined as those who have formal education, are self-governing, and can work independently. PMID:24350216

  9. [Research on professional health training in the MERCOSUR: a contribution to regional integration policies for training health technicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Marise

    2007-01-01

    Progress with regional economic integration in the Southern Cone raises the problem of workers' circulation, requiring reciprocal recognition of curricula and mechanisms for professional certification. The Escola Politécnica de Saúde Joaquim Venâncio (Joaquim Venâncio Polytechnic Health School) of the Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Oswaldo Cruz Foundation), as a WHO Collaborating Center for Technical Education in Health, has focused on this issue by conducting studies and standardizations for the integration of training policies for health technicians within the MERCOSUR. An important challenge is to identify and systematize the quantitative and qualitative supply of technical education in health in the MERCOSUR member countries, to help establish commonalities between prevailing curricular regulations, titles, diplomas, and professional work codes in the respective countries. The purpose of the current article is to situate this challenge vis-à-vis the relationship between work, education, and health.

  10. The breach between academic studies and professional intervention in health field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela H. Tonón

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this project was the definition of the breach between academic studies and professional exercise of professional that work in Health field. The project was developed in the Psychology Research Center of the Faculty of Social Sciences of the Universidad de Palermo (Argentina, which was a training space for students of the Psychology Doctoral Program of this university. It is a qualitative descriptive study in which we applied semi-structured interviews to professionals that work in Health field in private and public health institutions of the Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. People interviewed said that in their university studies the role of the theory was more important than the role of practice; even we can observe differences between the decades of graduation and type of university institution (public or private. At the same time, they recognized a breach between academic studies and professional exercise which characterized by the lack of spaces for the practice before the graduation and the knowledge about labor market, and at the same time the increase of the number of students in the universities. They recommended give a protagonist role to the practice in the university studies and regain the recognition for health professionals from the population and the governments. 

  11. Analysis of knowledge of the general population and health professionals on organ donation after cardiac death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenko, Ramon Correa; Nisihara, Renato; Yokoi, Douglas Shun; Candido, Vinícius de Mello; Galina, Ismael; Moriguchi, Rafael Massayuki; Ceulemans, Nico; Salvalaggio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the knowledge and acceptance of the public and professionals working in intensive care units regarding organ donation after cardiac death. Methods The three hospitals with the most brain death notifications in Curitiba were selected, and two groups of respondents were established for application of the same questionnaire: the general public (i.e., visitors of patients in intensive care units) and health professionals working in the same intensive care unit. The questionnaire contained questions concerning demographics, intention to donate organs and knowledge of current legislation regarding brain death and donation after cardiac death. Results In total, 543 questionnaires were collected, including 442 from family members and 101 from health professionals. There was a predominance of women and Catholics in both groups. More females intended to donate. Health professionals performed better in the knowledge comparison. The intention to donate organs was significantly higher in the health professionals group (p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the intention to donate in terms of education level or income. There was a greater acceptance of donation after uncontrolled cardiac death among Catholics than among evangelicals (p < 0.001). Conclusion Most of the general population intended to donate, with greater intentions expressed by females. Education and income did not affect the decision. The type of transplant that used a donation after uncontrolled cardiac death was not well accepted in the study population, indicating the need for more clarification for its use in our setting. PMID:27626950

  12. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne J. Snodgrass

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is increasing. The potential for allied health professionals to intervene through the provision of lifestyle advice is unknown. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals in the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for clients with overweight or obesity. Dietitians, exercise physiologists, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists (n = 296 working in New South Wales were surveyed using paper-based and online methods. The majority of health professionals (71% believed that providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice; 81% provided physical activity advice but only 57% provided dietary advice. Other than dietitians, few had received training in client weight management during their professional qualification (14% or continuing education (16%. Providing dietary advice was associated with: believing it was within their scope of practice (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–7.9, p < 0.01, training during their entry-level qualification (OR 7.2, 3.2–16.4, p < 0.01 and having departmental guidelines (OR 4.7, 2.1–10.9, p < 0.01. Most health professionals are willing to provide lifestyle advice to clients with overweight or obesity but few have received required training. Developing guidelines and training for in client weight management may potentially impact on rising obesity levels.

  13. A Qualitative Study of Communication between Young Women with Disorders of Sex Development and Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sanders

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Health communication is a critical aspect of care for both providers and recipients having a direct influence on engagement and outcomes. Communicating which in this context includes talking and listening in order to share information or support young women to understand their DSD can be difficult especially since the topic area is sensitive. Methods. In this qualitative study thirteen young women (aged 14–19 years with a disorder of sex development who engaged with health care professionals were purposively recruited between 2011 and 2012 from three specialist centres across the United Kingdom. The young women either were interviewed or completed a diary about their experiences of communication with a range of health care professionals. An interpretative phenomenological approach was used to analyse these data. Results. By analysis of data the young women were able to clearly articulate the qualities and skills health professional needed in relation to communication. Two main categories focused on the duty in which professionals have to share information and their role in supporting young women to manage this information. Discussion and Conclusion. The study results revealed that these young women with a DSD expected to meet skilled professionals who could recognise the emotional aspects of dialogues in the short and longer term.

  14. Faith communities and their assets for health promotion: the views from health professionals and faith leaders in Dundee, in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Donna M; Kiger, Alice; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-06-01

    Within the European Union, as well as in Canada and the United States (US), health promoters employ a number of strategies to encourage community-based health improvements. This involves the creation of innovative health promotion partnerships to support and enable people to choose and engage in healthy living practices. Compared to the US, in other Western countries, such as the United Kingdom, faith communities have largely been ignored in health promotion partnerships. This study established existing evidence about health promotion in faith communities in Scotland by examining the perceptions and attitudes concerning health promotion among faith leaders and health promotion professionals. We conducted 33 semi-structured interviews with health promotion professionals (n = 9) and representatives of Christian and non-Christian faith communities (n = 24). The majority of participants expressed an interest in the concept of health promotion in a faith community and could readily envision its application in their area of work. Both groups identified multiple physical assets, as well as social supports within faith communities that could be directed towards healthy living activities. Faith groups and church organisations may constitute potential partners and new settings to increase community capacity for health promotion. Further research and funding for demonstration projects may be particularly helpful to provide evidence of the strengths and limitations of faith-based health promotion in Scotland, which in turn could inform health promotion practice and policy.

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals and women towards medication use in breastfeeding: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermele Narmin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many breastfeeding women require and regularly take medicines, especially those available over-the-counter, and the safe use of these is dependent on the advice provided by health professionals such as general practitioners and pharmacists. The primary aim of this review therefore, was to investigate the literature relating to health professionals' and women's knowledge, attitudes and practices towards medication use and safety in breastfeeding. The limited literature that was uncovered identified that general practitioners and pharmacists have poor knowledge, but positive attitudes, and variable practices that are mostly guided by personal experience. They tend to make decisions about the use of a medicine whilst breastfeeding based on the potential 'risk' that it poses to the infant in terms of possible adverse reactions, rather than its 'compatibility' with breast milk. The decision-making process between health professionals and women is usually not a negotiated process, and women are often asked to stop breastfeeding whilst taking a medicine. Women, in turn, are left dissatisfied with the advice received, many choosing not to initiate therapy or not to continue breastfeeding. Some directions for future research have been suggested to address the issues identified in this critical area. This review is important from a societal perspective because many breastfeeding women require and regularly take medications, especially those available without prescription, and the safe use of these is dependent on the advice provided by health professionals, which is ultimately influenced by their knowledge, attitudes and practices. However, there is an absence of high quality evidence from randomised controlled trials on the safety of medications taken during breastfeeding, which naturally would hinder health professionals from appropriately advising women. It is equally important to know about women's experiences of advice received from health

  16. Fathers of children with disabilities: encounters with health professionals in a Chinese context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ping; Tsai, Sen-Wei; Kellett, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of fathers of developmentally disabled children during interactions with health professionals in Taiwan. The role of Chinese fathers in raising a disabled child has been neglected because most studies on the impact of parenting a child with disabilities in this culture have primarily focused on mothers. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was undertaken to recover and interpret fathers' experiences. Sixteen fathers living with their disabled child (0-18 years old) were purposively recruited from a teaching hospital in central Taiwan. Data were collected using in-depth interviews and journal notes. All participants were interviewed twice. Interviews lasted from 50-100 minutes, and all were recorded. Three shared meanings were attributed to fathers' interactions with health professionals: (1) experiencing no supportive communication, (2) missing the critical time for disability management and (3) being excluded from medical decision making. Fathers in Taiwan commonly rely on health professionals to solve their child's health problems owing to their perceived power to cure and their professional authority in Chinese society. However, fathers felt powerless and hopeless when they received unclear information and incorrect diagnoses, which delayed appropriate treatment. Expressions of dissatisfaction and possessing a sense of futility were common experiences related to exclusion in a paternalistic healthcare system. Taiwanese clinicians' attitudes and parental-professional relationships challenge an exploration of ethics and standards of medical care shaped by Chinese culture. Ways of promoting parental inclusion in decision making and care, in particular father's inclusion, need to be explored. Recognition of the Chinese mother and father and their differing parental healthcare experiences are important to understand to ensure improvement in encounters with health professionals and the maximisation of positive

  17. Mental Health Professionals and Behavioral Interventions for Obesity: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prost, Stephanie Grace; Ai, Amy L; Ainsworth, Sarah E; Ayers, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Adult obesity in the United States has risen to epidemic proportions, and mental health professionals must be called to action. The objectives of this article were to (a) synthesize outcomes of behavioral health interventions for adult obesity in recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews (MAs/SRs) as well as randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and further, (b) evaluate the role of mental health professionals in these behavioral health interventions. Articles were included if published in English between January 1, 2004, and May 1, 2014, in peer-reviewed journals examining behavioral health interventions for adults with obesity. Data were subsequently extracted and independently checked by two authors. Included MAs/SRs utilized motivational interviewing, financial incentives, multicomponent behavioral weight management programs, as well as dietary and lifestyle interventions. Behavioral health interventions in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were discussed across 3 major intervention types (educational, modified caloric intake, cognitive-based). Regarding the 1st study objective, multiple positive primary (e.g., weight loss) and secondary outcomes (e.g., quality of life) were found in both MAs/SRs and RCTs. However, the majority of included studies made no mention of interventionist professional background and little inference could be made regarding the effects of professional background on behavioral health intervention outcomes for adults facing obesity; an important limitation and direction for future research. Future studies should assess the effects of interventionist profession in addition to primary and secondary outcomes for adults facing obesity. Implications for mental health professionals' educational curricula, assessment, and treatment strategies are discussed.

  18. Occupational stress, mental health and coping among information technology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jakkula V; Chandraiah, K

    2012-01-01

    Experience of occupational stress is inevitably involved in the execution of any type of work. Stress has an adaptive value. It motivates the individual to attend to the task and get rid of the tension or demand the unattended task produced. The study was planned to investigate the differences between executives and shop floor workers on occupational stress, mental health, job satisfaction and coping. A random sample of 200 executives and shop floor employees collected from Nuclear Fuel Complex of Hyderabad City. A well developed sub-scales of Occupational Stress indicator like Mental Health, and Coping behavior were used in the present study. The shop floor workers experiencing more job stress and lower mental health. But these two groups did not differ in their coping behaviour. The executives are better with work home balance.

  19. Knowledge of Pharmacogenetics among Healthcare Professionals and Faculty Members of Health Training Institutions in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudzi, W; Addy, B S; Dzudzor, B

    2015-03-01

    Pharmacogenetics has a potential for optimizing drug response and identifying risk of toxicity for patients. Pharmacogenetics knowledge of healthcare professionals and the unmet need for pharmacogenetics education in health training institutions are some of the challenges of integrating pharmacogenetics into routine medical practice. To assess pharmacogenetics knowledge among healthcare professionals and faculty members of health training institutions in Ghana. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to interview healthcare professionals from selected public and private hospitals. Faculty members from health training institutions were also interviewed. The respondents were Medical doctors 42 (46.7%), Pharmacists 29 (32.2%) and Nurses 19 (21.1%). Healthcare professionals rated their knowledge of Pharmacogenetics as Excellent 5 (5.6%), Very Good 10 (11.2%), Good 53 (60%) and Poor 19 (21.4%). Thirty-two faculty members from health training institutions were also interviewed. Faculty members rated their knowledge of pharmacogenetics as Excellent 2 (6.3%), Very Good 3 (9.4%), Good 9 (28.1%), Fair 12 (37.5%) and Poor 6 (18.8%). Thirty seven percent (12) of these faculty members said pharmacogenetics was not part of their institutions' curriculum, 7 (22%) did not know if pharmacogenetics was part of their curriculum and only 13 (40.6%) said it was part of their curriculum. Few healthcare professionals and faculty members of training institutions are aware of the discipline of pharmacogenetics. There is the need for continuous professional education on pharmacogenetics and development of competency standards for all healthcare professionals in Ghana.

  20. Pharmaceutical Care: ethical considerations of the health professional with the medicine user.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilceu José OLIVEIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the extensive number of instruments working Pharmacist, in the context ofthe Health, wefoundthe Pharmaceutical Carefor deploying services in pharmacies and drugstores. Thus, this health professional interacts with the drug users searching for better conditions to treatment adherence; self-medication, reactions and side effects reduction, and otherdesirables featuresin the correctuse of the drug. Historical and cultural contexts, values , realities, attitudes, behaviors, from bothprofessional anduser, trustand partnership, it’s all involved in thiscontext. The relationship betweenrights and dutiesin a trusting environment must betaken intoaccount. Thepersonal and professional ethics pervade this complex environment, as well as the relationship of duty andright, which should betaken into accountin this regard.

  1. Integrating the humanities in the education of health professionals: implications for search and retrieval of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, Robert G; Farmer, Elizabeth S

    2002-03-01

    This article examines the increasing use of the humanities in the education of health professionals and posits that the approach may be of use in teaching health professionals information search and retrieval skills. However little evidence exists to support the educational effectiveness of using the humanities. This lack of evidence raises concerns about the costs of financing this approach to learning. These costs include the issue of copyright which cannot be ignored. While the humanities might provide a more attractive approach to teaching information search and retrieval skills, further research is needed to justify the costs of this approach to learning in more general terms and urgent attention to.

  2. Adopting a critical intercultural communication approach to understanding health professionals' encounter with ethnic minority patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    and anthropology. However, within these disciplines such concepts as culture, interculturality, and ethnicity are subjected to contestation due to co-existing, but competing paradigms. This paper demonstrates how healthcare discourses on ethnic minority patients reflect shifting intercultural communication...... professionals and their approach to ethnic minority patients influence the accessibility of healthcare and availability of health prevention resources of ethnic minorities. When adapting healthcare practice to minority patients, healthcare professionals draw on insights from intercultural communication...... paradigms and advocates the adoption of a critical intercultural communication approach in relation to ethnicity-based health inequality....

  3. Direct-to-consumer genomic testing from the perspective of the health professional: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Lesley; Jackson, Leigh; O'Connor, Anita; Skirton, Heather

    2013-04-01

    Since the 1990s, there has been a rapid expansion in the number and type of genetic tests available via health professionals; the last 10 years, however, have seen certain types of genetic and genomic tests available direct-to-consumer. The aim of this systematic review was to explore the topic of direct-to-consumer genetic testing from the health professional perspective. Search terms used to identify studies were 'direct-to-consumer', personal genom*, health* professional*, physician* 'genomic, genetic' in five bibliographic databases, together with citation searching. Eight quantitative papers were reviewed. Findings indicate a low level of awareness and experience of direct-to-consumer testing in health professionals. Inconsistent levels of knowledge and understanding were also found with two studies showing significant effects for gender and age. Concerns about clinical utility and lack of counselling were identified. Health professionals specialising in genetics were most likely to express concerns. There was also evidence of perceived increased workload for health professionals post-testing. However, some health professionals rated such tests clinically useful and cited benefits such as the increased opportunity for early screening. Despite limited awareness, knowledge and experience of actual cases, we concluded that the concerns and potential benefits expressed may be warranted. It may be useful to explore the attitudes and experiences of health professionals in more depth using a qualitative approach. Finally, it is essential that health professionals receive sufficient education and guidelines to equip them to help patients presenting with the results of these tests.

  4. Changing values for nursing and health promotion: exploring the policy context of professional ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, J; Cribb, A

    1999-09-01

    In this article we illustrate, and argue for, the importance of researching the social context of health professionals' ethical agendas and concerns. We draw upon qualitative interview data from 20 nurses working in two occupational health sites, and our discussion focuses mainly upon aspects of the shifting 'ethical context' for those nurses with a health promotion remit who are working in the British National Health Service. Within this discussion we also raise a number of potentially substantive issues, including the risks of colluding in 'double standards', and the tensions between the practitioner and managerial roles in nursing. Overall, we hope to pose questions about the best ways to understand the ethical agency and responsibilities of health professionals.

  5. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective cancer communication between the health care team, cancer patients, and their family is important. Learn about communication skills that support a patient-centered practice and how to talk with adults and children about their diagnosis, prognosis, and transition to end-of-life care in this expert-reviewed summary.

  6. Interpreting Statistical Findings A Guide For Health Professionals And Students

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This book is aimed at those studying and working in the field of health care, including nurses and the professions allied to medicine, who have little prior knowledge of statistics but for whom critical review of research is an essential skill.

  7. What health professionals should know about omega-3 fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    n-3 fatty acids might be of benefit include obesity, Crohn's disease, ... and Child Health Foundation ..... http://www.sacn.gov.uk/pdfs/fics_sacn_advice_fish.pdf. 7. ... of the Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; Council on ...

  8. Leadership communication styles: a descriptive analysis of health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rebekah RogersSchool of Communication, East Carolina University, NC, USAAbstract: The study of leadership in health care is important to examine for many reasons. Health care leaders will inevitably have an impact on the lives of many people, as individuals rely on physicians and nurses during some of the most critical moments in their lives. This paper presents a broad overview of a research study conducted over the past year and highlights its general conclusions. In this study, I examined the leadership styles of health care administrators and those of physicians and nurses who chair departments. Thorough analysis yielded three clear themes: viewpoints on leadership, decision making, and relationships. Physicians' viewpoints on leadership varied; however, it was assumed that they knew they were leaders. Nurses seemed to be in a category of their own, in which it was common for them to use the term “servant leadership.” Results from the hospital administrators suggested that they were always thinking “big picture leadership.” Leadership is a working component of every job and it is important for people to become as educated as possible about their own communication style.Keywords: leadership, communication, health care

  9. Physicians' professional performance: An occupational health psychology perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    In modern medical practice, multiple demands and high workloads challenge physician well-being. Physician well-being is considered a precondition for optimal health care. Physicians’ work-related well-being can be indicated by their work engagement, which is considered the opposite of burnout. We

  10. Health professional workforce education in the Asia Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Lees

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To design and implement an international and interprofessional Global Learning Partnership Model, which involves shared learning between academics and students from Universitas 21 network with other universities with United Nations Millennium Development Goal needs. Design. Two literature reviews were conducted to inform ethical aspects and curriculum design of the GLP model. Feedback from conference presentations and consultation with experts in education and public health has been incorporated to inform the current iteration of the GLP model. Intervention. The pilot group of 25 students from U21 universities and Kathmandu University, representing six health disciplines will meet in Nepal in April 2016 for a shared learning experience, including a one week university based workshop and three week community based experience.Outcome measures. A multi-phase, mixed method design was selected for the evaluation of the GLP model, utilising a combination of focus groups and questionnaires to evaluate the efficacy of the placement through student experience and learning outcomes in cultural competency, UN SDG knowledge, community engagement and health promotion skills. Results. The literature review demonstrated that cultural awareness and cultural knowledge were improved through participation in cultural immersion programs that incorporated preparatory workshops and clinical experiences. Data will be gathered in April 2006 and the results of the evaluation will be published in the future. Conclusions. The GLP model proposes a project around the fundamental concept of engagement and sharing between students and academics across universities and cultural contexts to build capacity through education, while capitalising on strengths of existing global health placements. Further the inclusion of host-country students and academics in this learning exchange will promote the establishment of an international and interprofessional network for

  11. English for Medical Purposes for Saudi Medical and Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Alqurashi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the English language needs of 156 Saudi fellowship doctors and students of medical majors who are enrolled at medical and training programs in Australian hospitals and universities. Data were collected via a questionnaire adopted from a previous study. Participants’ responses showed the most frequently used language sub-skills were those sub-skills they considered highly important. Results emphasize the findings of previous studies that learners usually attach high importance to any skills that they use frequently to help them achieve the utmost aim of improving their language abilities. In addition, the study findings suggest current college English language courses for medical majors need to focus more on improving language-related aspects like fluency, understanding, accuracy, and structure. Such changes are necessary to prepare doctors and medical professionals for work in medical jobs that depend on heavy usage of the English language and also improving communicative competence aspects to ensure smooth cultural interaction with co-workers from all around the world. The study concludes by pointing that there is a critical need to restructure English for medical purposes programs in Saudi Arabia to make better course design, content, and materials responsive to target language learners’ own future goals. Keywords: Saudi; English language skills; Needs analysis (NA; English for specific purposes (ESP; English for medical purposes (EMP

  12. Qualities and Practices of Professional Social Work Leadership in an Interdisciplinary Mental Health Service: An Action Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, David; Webster, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, health service restructuring in New Zealand has strengthened managerialism, arguably detracting from professional considerations. Professional leaders without line-management responsibilities have replaced social work departments headed by a professional social worker. An emerging social work contribution to interdisciplinary…

  13. It's not all about me: motivating hand hygiene among health care professionals by focusing on patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Adam M; Hofmann, David A

    2011-12-01

    Diseases often spread in hospitals because health care professionals fail to wash their hands. Research suggests that to increase health and safety behaviors, it is important to highlight the personal consequences for the actor. However, because people (and health care professionals in particular) tend to be overconfident about personal immunity, the most effective messages about hand hygiene may be those that highlight its consequences for other people. In two field experiments in a hospital, we compared the effectiveness of signs about hand hygiene that emphasized personal safety ("Hand hygiene prevents you from catching diseases") or patient safety ("Hand hygiene prevents patients from catching diseases"). We assessed hand hygiene by measuring the amount of soap and hand-sanitizing gel used from dispensers (Experiment 1) and conducting covert, independent observations of health care professionals' hand-hygiene behaviors (Experiment 2). Results showed that changing a single word in messages motivated meaningful changes in behavior: The hand hygiene of health care professionals increased significantly when they were reminded of the implications for patients but not when they were reminded of the implications for themselves.

  14. Students' response to disaster: a lesson for health care professional schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Humberto

    2010-11-16

    The response of medical students, young physicians, and other health professionals to the February 2010 earthquake and tsunami in Chile provides important lessons about health care delivery during disasters and about the development of professionalism. Tertiary and secondary care of victims of these disasters was possible because local and national resources were available and field hospitals provided by Chile's armed forces and foreign countries replaced damaged hospitals. However, primary care of persons living on the outskirts of towns and in small villages and coves that were destroyed and isolated by the disaster required the involvement of volunteer groups that were largely composed of students and other young members of the health professions, all of whom were motivated by solidarity, compassion, and social commitment. This experience, similar to previous catastrophes in Chile and elsewhere, reinforces that medical and other health professional schools must instill in graduates an understanding that the privileges of being a health professional come with responsibilities to society. Beyond providing high-quality scientific and technological education, curricula in these schools should include training that enables graduates to meaningfully contribute in the setting of unexpected disasters and that nurtures a sense of responsibility to do so.

  15. Sex preferences for colonoscopists and GI physicians among patients and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Deepa K; Karasek, Veronika; Gerkin, Richard D; Ramirez, Francisco C; Young, Michele A

    2011-07-01

    There are indications that many women prefer female health care providers. To determine whether (1) patients and health care professionals have sex preferences for gastroenterologists (for office visit and colonoscopy) and (2) the reasons behind these preferences. Prospective survey. Patients from primary care clinics at a Veterans Affairs and a community hospital and health care professionals. A total of 1364 individuals completed the survey: 840 patients (566 men and 274 women) and 524 health care professionals (211 men and 313 women). Sex preferences for colonoscopists and gastroenterologists at a clinic. Women had a stronger sex preference (compared with no preference) for an office visit with a gastroenterologist (44.3%) and for a colonoscopist (53%) than men (23% and 27.8% respectively; P embarrassment for both office visit and colonoscopy. For all respondents with a sex preference for colonoscopy, a higher level of education was an independent predictor of patients feeling embarrassed (P = .003). Single city, patient population from only 2 institutions. Female patients and female health care professionals have sex preferences in choosing a gastroenterologist for an office visit and colonoscopy, and the reasons for this are significantly influenced by their level of education. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  16. Legal professionals and witness statements from people with a suspected mental health diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavey, Paula; Wilcock, Rachel; Brown, Steven D; Batty, Richard; Fuller, Serina

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with mental health problems are considered to be part of a group labeled 'vulnerable' in forensic psychology literature and the legal system more generally. In producing witness statements, there are numerous guidelines in the UK, designed to facilitate the production of reliable and valid accounts by those deemed to be vulnerable witnesses. And yet, it is not entirely clear how mental health impacts on reliability and validity within the judicial system, partly due to the diversity of those who present with mental health difficulties. In this paper, we set out to explore how legal professionals operating in the UK understand the impact of mental distress on the practical production of witness testimonies. Twenty legal professionals, including police officers, judges, magistrates and detectives were involved in a semi-structured interview to examine their knowledge and experience of working with mental health problems, and how they approached and worked with this group. A thematic analysis was conducted on the data and specific themes relevant to the overall research question are presented. These include a) dilemmas and deficiencies in knowledge of mental health, b) the abandonment of diagnosis and c) barriers to knowledge: time restrictions, silence, professional identity and fear. Finally, we explore some of the implications of these barriers, with regard to professional practice.

  17. Association between burnout and cortisol secretion, perceived stress, and psychopathology in palliative care unit health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sánchez, José Carlos; Pérez-Mármol, José Manuel; Blásquez, Antonia; Santos-Ruiz, Ana María; Peralta-Ramírez, María Isabel

    2017-04-24

    A high incidence of burnout has been reported in health professionals working in palliative care units. Our present study aims to determine whether there are differences in the secretion of salivary cortisol between palliative care unit health professionals with and without burnout, and to elucidate whether there is a relationship between burnout syndrome and perceived stress and psychopathological status in this population. A total of 69 health professionals who met the inclusion criteria participated in our study, including physicians, nurses, and nursing assistants. Some 58 were women (M = 29.65 years, SD = 8.64) and 11 men (M = 35.67 years, SD = 11.90). The level of daily cortisol was registered in six measurements taken over the course of a workday. Burnout syndrome was evaluated with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), the level of perceived stress was measured using the Perceived Stress Scale, and psychopathological status was gauged using the SCL-90-R Symptoms Inventory. There were statistically significant differences in secretion of cortisol in professionals with high scores on a single subscale of the MBI-HSS [F(3.5) = 2.48, p burnout showed higher scores on the psychopathology and stress subscales than professionals without it. A higher score in any dimension of the burnout syndrome in palliative care unit health professionals seems to be related to several physiological and psychological parameters. These findings may be relevant for further development of our understanding of the relationship between levels of burnout and cortisol secretion in the health workers in these units.

  18. Educational outreach visits: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson O'Brien, M A; Oxman, A D; Davis, D A; Haynes, R B; Freemantle, N; Harvey, E L

    2000-01-01

    Outreach visits have been identified as an intervention that may improve the practice of health care professionals, in particular prescribing. This type of 'face to face' visit has been referred to as university-based educational detailing, public interest detailing, and academic detailing. To assess the effects of outreach visits on improving health professional practice or patient outcomes. We searched MEDLINE up to March 1997, the Research and Development Resource Base in Continuing Medical Education, and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. Randomised trials of outreach visits (defined as a personal visit by a trained person to a health care provider in his or her own setting). The participants were health care professionals. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Eighteen studies were included involving more than 1896 physicians. All of the outreach visit interventions consisted of several components, including written materials and conferences. Reminders or audit and feedback complemented some visits. In 13 studies, the targeted behaviours were prescribing practices. In three studies, the behaviours were preventive services, including counselling for smoking cessation. In two studies, the outreach visits were directed toward improving the general management of common problems encountered in general practice, including asthma, diabetes, otitis media, hypertension, anxiety, and acute bronchitis. All studies examined physician behaviour and in three studies other health professionals such as nurses, nursing home attendants or health care workers were targeted. Positive effects on practice were observed in all studies. Only one study measured a patient outcome. Few studies examined the cost effectiveness of outreach. Educational outreach visits, particularly when combined with social marketing, appear to be a promising approach to modifying health professional behaviour, especially prescribing. Further

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chang, Kah Hoong

    2011-05-24

    Abstract Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts). Female gender (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.004), higher educational background (p < 0.001), higher annual household income (p = 0.001), private health insurance (p = 0.001) and non-Christian (p < 0.001) were factors associated with more likely CAM use. Multivariate analysis identified female gender (p < 0.001), non-Christian (p = 0.001) and private health insurance (p = 0.015) as independent predictors of CAM use. Most health care professionals thought they did not have adequate knowledge (58.8%) nor were up to date with the best evidence (79.2%) on CAM use in oncology. Health care professionals who used CAM were more likely to recommend it to patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of

  20. Bioethics and its dimensions in the actions of the health professional.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Sánchez Machado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article it is made a historical recount of the evolution of Bioethics from the origins of this discipline in the United States of North America, by Van Rensselaer Potter, medical oncologist of the University of Wisconsin, and their ulterior development in the Latin America as well as their development in Cuba... Emphasis is made in the necessity of contributing, decisively, to the reinforcement of the national identity, the social commitment, the love to the university, and the invigoration of social ethical values, the construction of values ethical professionals evidenced in acting with bigger civic responsibility and professional. Some reflections are exposed about the dimensions of the Bioethics that should characterize the doctor's professional formation in their performance contexts whose mission is the preparation of professionals able to assure the historical continuity of the Cuban system of health.