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Sample records for non-maxwellian electron velocity

  1. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  2. Detecting non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, K. V.; Prunty, S. L.; Scannell, R.; Beurskens, M. N.; Walsh, M. J.; de La Luna, E.; Jet Efda Contributors

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6-7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%-20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV

  3. Non-Maxwellian Electron Velocity Distributions Observed with Thomson Scattering in the Tortur Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lammeren, A. C. A. P.; Barth, C. J.; Vanest, Q. C.; Schüller, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Thomson scattering spectrum represents the projection of the three-dimensional electron velocity distribution on the scattering vector. From this the local electron temperature and density can be derived. To determine the three-dimensional electron velocity distribution it is necessary to have s

  4. Non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions associated with steep temperature gradients in the solar transition region. Paper 1: Estimate of the electron velocity distribution functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1979-01-01

    It was shown that, in the presence of the steep temperature gradients characteristic of EUV models of the solar transition region, the electron and proton velocity distribution functions are non-Maxwellian and are characterized by high energy tails. The magnitude of these tails are estimated for a model of the transition region and the heat flux is calculated at a maximum of 30 percent greater than predicted by collision-dominated theory.

  5. Non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions associated with steep temperature gradients in the solar transition region. Paper 2: The effect of non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions on ionization equilibrium calculations for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1979-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions, previously computed for Dupree's model of the solar transition region are used to calculate ionization rates for ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Ionization equilibrium populations for these ions are then computed and compared with similar calculations assuming Maxwellian distribution functions for the electrons. The results show that the ion populations change (compared to the values computed with a Maxwellian) in some cases by several orders of magnitude depending on the ion and its temperature of formation.

  6. Measurement of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions in a reflex discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, C. R., Jr.; Bershader, D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a ruby laser Thomson scattering study of the space and time-resolved electron velocity distributions in a pulsed Penning discharge in hydrogen are presented. Electron densities were to the order of 10 to the 13th/cu cm and temperatures were roughly 3 eV. This point is just prior to the cessation of the discharge ohmic heating pulse. For magnetic strengths less than 200 G, Maxwellian distributions were found over an energy range six times thermal energy. Temperatures agreed with Langmuir probe data. For fields of 450 G, chaotic plasma potentials were observed to be unstable and the Thomson scattering showed that the electron velocity distributions had central temperatures of 2 eV and wing temperatures of 15-12 eV.

  7. Non-Maxwellian Molecular Velocity Distribution at Large Knudsen Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Jae Wan

    2012-01-01

    We have derived a non-Maxwellian molecular velocity distribution at large Knudsen numbers for ideal gas. This distribution approaches Maxwellian molecular velocity distribution as the Knudsen number approaches zero. We have found that the expectation value of the square of velocity is the same in the non-Maxwellian molecular velocity distribution as it is in the Maxwellian distribution; however, the expectation value of the speed is not the same.

  8. Effects of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions and nonspherical geometry on minor ions in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgi, A.

    1987-01-01

    A previous model has shown that in order to account for the charge state distribution in the low-speed solar wind, a high coronal temperature is necessary and that this temperature peak goes together with a peak of nx/np in the corona. In the present paper, one of the assumptions made previously, i.e., that coronal electrons are Maxwellian, is relaxed, and a much cooler model is presented, which could account for the same oxygen charge states in the solar wind due to the inclusion of non-Maxwellian electrons. Also, due to a different choice of the coronal magnetic field geometry, this model would show no enhancement of the coronal nx/np. Results of the two models are then compared, and observational tests to distinguish between the two scenarios are proposed: comparison of directly measured coronal Te to charge state measurements in the solar wind, determination of the coronal nx/np measurement of ion speeds in the acceleration region of the solar wind, and measurement of the frozen-in silicon charge state distribution.

  9. The Origin of Non-Maxwellian Solar Wind Electron Velocity Distribution Function: Connection to Nanoflares in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Che, H

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this letter based on the current knowledge of nanoflares we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfv\\'en wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This rel...

  10. High-transmission 20-channel polychromator for observing non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions in plasmas by Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, C J

    1988-07-15

    A high-transmission (~45%) twenty-channel polychromator equipped with near-infrared sensitive photomultipliers has been constructed to record Thomson scattering spectra at the TORTUR tokamak. The high transmission was achieved by the use of mirrors instead of fiber optics to guide the spectrally resolved light to a set of photomultipliers. Spectral analysis is performed with a holographically ruled concave grating. Acceptable dimensions of the wavelength selection mirrors were obtained by magnifying the spectral image by a factor of 5 with a Mangin mirror. Electron temperatures up to 1000 eV at a density of 5 x 10(19) m(-3) can be measured with an accuracy of approximately l%. Both high sensitivity and high resolution enable the detection of irregularities in the velocity distribution. For example, satellites corresponding to partial densities of (5 +/- 1) x 10(17) m(-3) were found at 23 nm from the laser wavelength.

  11. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfvén wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  12. Collisionless damping of electron waves in non-Maxwellian plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Soshnikov, V. N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we have criticized the so-called Landau damping theory. We have analyzed solutions of the standard dispersion equations for longitudinal (electric) and transversal (electromagnetic and electron) waves in half-infinite slab of the uniform collisionless plasmas with non-Maxwellian and Maxwellian-like electron energy distribution functions. One considered the most typical cases of both the delta-function type distribution function (the plasma stream with monochromatic electrons) an...

  13. Nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves with warm ions and non-Maxwellian electrons in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain Shah, Khalid; Qureshi, Nouman

    2017-04-01

    Electrons velocity distributions are often observed with non-Maxwellian features such flat tops at low energies and/or superthermal tails at high energies from different regions of near Earth plasmas such as Earth's bow shock, auroral zone and magnetosphere by numerous satellites. Such non-Maxwellian distributions are well modelled by generalized (r,q) distribution or Cairns distribution. Solitons are nonlinear solitary structures and are integral part of space plasmas. In this paper, we present a fluid model containing Cairns (r,q) distributed non-Maxwellian electrons and derive the Sagdeev potential for fully nonlinear fluid equations. We found that compressive solitons can be developed in such a plasma. The results from our model can be used to interpret solitary structures in space plasmas when electrons are obeying the non-Maxwellian flat tops along with the high energy tails.

  14. Creating Non-Maxwellian Velocity Distributions in Ultracold Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, J; McQuillen, P; Pohl, T; Killian, T C

    2011-01-01

    We present techniques to perturb, measure and model the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma produced by photoionization of strontium atoms. By optical pumping with circularly polarized light we promote ions with certain velocities to a different spin ground state, and probe the resulting perturbed velocity distribution through laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. We discuss various approaches to extract the velocity distribution from our measured spectra, and assess their quality through comparisons with molecular dynamic simulations

  15. Nonlinear development of stimulated Raman scattering from electrostatic modes excited by self-consistent non-Maxwellian velocity distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L; Daughton, W; Albright, B J; Bezzerides, B; DuBois, D F; Kindel, J M; Vu, H X

    2006-02-01

    The parametric coupling involving backward stimulated scattering of a laser and electron beam acoustic modes (BAM) is described as observed in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The BAM modes evolve from Langmuir waves (LW) as the electron velocity distribution is nonlinearly modified to be non-Maxwellian by backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS). With a marginal damping rate, BAM can be easily excited and allow an extended chirping in frequency to occur as later SRS pulses encounter modified distributions. Coincident with the emergence of this non-Maxwellian distribution is a rapid increase in BSRS reflectivities with laser intensities. Both the reflectivity scaling with laser intensity and the observed spectral features from PIC simulations are consistent with recent Trident experiments.

  16. The auroral O+ non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Leblanc

    Full Text Available New characteristics of O+ ion velocity distribution functions in a background of atomic oxygen neutrals subjected to intense external electromagnetic forces are presented. The one dimensional (1-D distribution function along the magnetic field displays a core-halo shape which can be accurately fitted by a two Maxwellian model. The Maxwellian shape of the 1-D distribution function around a polar angle of 21 ± 1° from the magnetic field direction is confirmed, taking into account the accuracy of the Monte Carlo simulations. For the first time, the transition of the O+ 1-D distribution function from a core halo shape along the magnetic field direction to the well-known toroidal shape at large polar angles, through the Maxwellian shape at polar angle of 21 ± 1° is properly explained from a generic functional of the velocity moments at order 2 and 4.

  17. Computing a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Manuel O

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a family of single-particle anomalous velocity distribution by solving a particular class of stochastic Liouville equations. The stationary state is obtained analytically and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is reobtained in a particular limit. We discuss the comparison with other different methods to obtain the stationary state. Extensions when the models cannot be solved in an exact way are also pointed out in connection with the one-ficton approximation.

  18. Nonlinear density excitations in a magnetorotating relativistic plasma with warm ions and non-Maxwellian electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ali [National Centre for Physics, Shahdara Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Centre for Physics, Shahdara Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan); COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-05-15

    Linear and nonlinear electrostatic ion acoustic waves in a weakly relativistic magnetorotating plasma in the presence of non-Maxwellian electrons and warm ions have been examined. The system under consideration has yielded two solutions, namely, the fast and slow acoustic modes which have been observed to depend on the streaming velocity, ion to electron temperature ratio, and the nonthermality parameter of the non-Maxwellian electrons. Using the multiple time scale analysis, we have derived the three dimensional nonlinear Zakharov–Kuznetsov equation and also presented its solution. Both compressive and rarefactive solitary structures have been found in consonance with the satellite observations. It has been observed that although the linear dispersion relation gives both fast and slow ion acoustic waves, the solitary structures form only for the fast acoustic mode. The dependence of the characteristics of the solitary structures on several plasma parameters has also been explored. The present investigation may be beneficial to understanding the rotating plasma environments such as those found in the planetary magnetospheres of Saturn and Jupiter.

  19. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions in models of the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneice, P.; Fontenla, J.; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the solar models of Fontenla et al. (1990) are extended to coronal temperatures using optically thin radiative losses and a semicircular loop geometry. The effects of a non-Maxwellian high-energy tail of the electron distribution function is tested by performing a Fokker-Planck calculation of the tail. The results show that the downward conductive heat flux is very clsoe to that given by Braginskii (1965) for small departures from a Maxwellian distribution. The effects of the high-energy tail of the electron distribution on element ionization are computed and found to be negligible for all ionization states of O, Ne, and Si. It is concluded that, for quiet sun loop models in stationary energy balance, the ionization state of all elements is not significantly affected by the non-Maxwellian tail of the electron velocity distribution, and that the heat flux can be computed by considering only small first-order departures from the Maxwellian distribution.

  20. Non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions due to self-generated turbulence in collisionless guide-field reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, P. A.; J. Büchner

    2016-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity space distribution functions (EVDF) are useful signatures of plasma conditions and non-local consequences of collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the past, EVDFs were obtained mainly for antiparallel reconnection and under the influence of weak guide-fields in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. EVDFs are, however, not well known, yet, for oblique (or component-) reconnection in dependence on stronger guide-magnetic fields and for the exh...

  1. Multicomponent plasma expansion into vacuum with non-Maxwellian electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkamash, Ibrahem; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    The expansion of a collisionless plasma into vacuum has been widely studied since the early works of Gurevich et al and Allen and coworkers. It has received momentum in recent years, in particular in the context of ultraintense laser pulse interaction with a solid target, in an effort to elucidate the generation of high energy ion beams. In most present day experiments, laser produced plasmas contain several ion species, due to increasingly complicated composite targets. Anderson et al have studied the isothermal expansion of a two-ion-species plasma. As in most earlier works, the electrons were assumed to be isothermal throughout the expansion. However, in more realistic situations, the evolution of laser produced plasmas into vacuum is mainly governed by nonthermal electrons. These electrons are characterized by particle distribution functions with high energy tails, which may significantly deviate from the Maxwellian distribution. In this paper, we present a theoretical model for plasma expansion of two component plasma with nonthermal electrons, modelled by a kappa-type distribution. The superthermal effect on the ion density, velocity and the electric field is investigated. It is shown that energetic electrons have a significant effecton the expansion dynamics of the plasma. This work was supported from CPP/QUB funding. One of us (I.S. Elkamash) acknowledges financial support by an Egyptian Government fellowship.

  2. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions in clusters of galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaastra, J.S.; Bykov, A.M.; Werner, N.

    2009-01-01

    Context. Thermal X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies and other sources are commonly calculated assuming Maxwellian electron distributions. There are situations where this approximation is not valid, for instance near interfaces of hot and cold gas and near shocks. Aims. The presence of non-thermal

  3. Study of non-Maxwellian distributions of electron energies in the solar transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lamei; He, Jian

    2017-01-01

    For accurate spectral diagnostics in the solar transition region, we discuss the electron energies for non-Maxwellian distributions both for and Druyvesteyn distributions. We analyze the difference between the κ and the Druyvesteyn distributions with the Maxwellian distribution and derive the expressions for the averaged collision strengths for the κ and the Druyvesteyn distributions. This discussion will be significant for spectral diagnostics of the electron density and temperature in the solar transition region.

  4. Nonlinear kinetic Alfvén waves with non-Maxwellian electron population in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, W.; Qureshi, M. N. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Shah, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The present work discusses the effects of non-Maxwellian electron distributions on kinetic Alfvén waves in low-beta plasmas. Making use of the two-potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, the existence of solitary kinetic Alfvén waves having arbitrary amplitude is investigated. It is found that the use of non-Maxwellian population of electrons in the study of kinetic Alfvén waves leads to solutions corresponding to solitary structures that do not exist for Maxwellian electrons. The present investigation solves the riddle of plasma density fluctuations associated with strong electromagnetic perturbations observed by the Freja satellite. The present findings can also be applied to regions of space where various satellite missions have observed the presence of suprathermal populations of plasma species and where the low β assumption is valid.

  5. A generalized AZ-non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function for space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, A. A.; Khan, M. Z.; Lu, Quanming; Yap, S. L.

    2017-03-01

    A more generalized form of the non-Maxwellian distribution function, i.e., the AZ-distribution function is presented. Its fundamental properties are numerically observed by the variation of three parameters: α (rate of energetic particles on the shoulder), r (energetic particles on a broad shoulder), and q (superthermality on the tail of the velocity distribution curve of the plasma species). It has been observed that (i) the A Z - distribution function reduces to the ( r , q ) - distribution for α → 0 ; (ii) the A Z - distribution function reduces to the q - distribution for α → 0 , and r → 0 ; (iii) the A Z -distribution reduces to Cairns-distribution function for r → 0 , and q → ∞ ; (iv) the AZ-distribution reduces to Vasyliunas Cairns distribution for r → 0 , and q = κ + 1 ; (v) the AZ-distribution reduces to kappa distribution for α → 0 , r → 0 , and q = κ + 1 ; and (vi) finally, the AZ-distribution reduces to Maxwellian distribution for α → 0 , r → 0 , and q → ∞ . The uses of this more generalized A Z - distribution function in various space plasmas are briefly discussed.

  6. Non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions due to self-generated turbulence in collisionless guide-field reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, P A

    2016-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity space distribution functions (EVDF) are useful signatures of plasma conditions and non-local consequences of collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the past, the evolution of the EVDFs was investigated mainly for antiparallel or weak-guide-field reconnection. The shape of EVDFs is, however, not well known yet for oblique (or component-) reconnection in dependence on a finite guide magnetic field component perpendicular to the reconnection plane. In view of the multi-spacecraft mission MMS, we derive the non-Maxwellian features of EVDFs formed by collisionless magnetic reconnection starting from very weak ($b_g\\approx0$) up to very strong ($b_g=8$) guide-field strengths $b_g$, taking into account the feedback of the self-generated turbulence. For this sake, we carry out 2.5D fully-kinetic Particle-in-Cell (PiC) simulations using the ACRONYM code. We obtained anisotropic EVDFs and the distribution of electron beams propagating along the separatrices as well as in the exhaust re...

  7. Cylindrical and spherical soliton collision of electron-acoustic waves in non-Maxwellian plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.; Moslem, W. M.; Elghmaz, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    Generation of quasielastic electron-acoustic (EA) waves head-on collision are investigated in non-planar (cylindrical/spherical) plasma composed of cold electrons fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. The cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations describing two bidirectional EA waves are derived and solved analytically. Numerical investigation have shown that only positive electron-acoustic (EA) structures can propagate and collide. The analytical phase shift |Δ A | due to the non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons is different from the Maxwellian case. Both the hot-to-cold electron number density ratio α and nonthermal parameter β have opposite effect on the phase shift behavior. The phase shift of the spherical EA waves is smaller than the cylindrical case, which indicates that the former is more stable for collision. The relevance of the present study to EA waves propagating in the Earth's auroral zone is highlighted.

  8. A model for ion-acoustic solitary waves with streaming non-Maxwellian electrons in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid Hussain, Shah; Nouman Sarwar, Qureshi Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Solitons are nonlinear solitary structures and are integral part of space plasmas. Such nonlinear structures, accompanied by streaming electrons are frequently observed by various satellites in different regions of near Earth plasmas such as Earth's bow shock, magnetopause, auroral zone, etc. In this paper, we present a fluid model consisting streaming non-Maxwellian electrons along the magnetic field and derived the Sagdeev potential for fully nonlinear fluid equations. We found that compressive solitons can be developed in such a plasma. The results from our model can be used to interpret solitary structures in space plasmas when there is streaming electron obeying the non-Maxwellian distributions

  9. H to Zn Ionization Equilibrium for the Non-Maxwellian Electron kappa-distributions: Updated Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Dzifcakova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    New data for calculation of the ionization and recombination rates have have been published in the past few years. Most of these are included in CHIANTI database. We used these data to calculate collisional ionization and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian kappa-distributions with an enhanced number of particles in the high-energy tail, which have been detected in the solar transition region and the solar wind. Ionization equilibria for elements H to Zn are derived. The kappa-distributions significantly influence both the ionization and recombination rates and widen the ion abundance peaks. In comparison with Maxwellian distribution, the ion abundance peaks can also be shifted to lower or higher temperatures. The updated ionization equilibrium calculations result in large changes for several ions, notably Fe VIII--XIV. The results are supplied in electronic form compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  10. The effect of a non-Maxwellian electron distribution on oxygen and iron ionization balances in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owocki, S. P.; Scudder, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Analytic expressions are derived for ionization and recombination rates in a parameterized non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution with an enhanced high-energy tail. These expressions are then used in investigating the effect of such an enhancement in the high-energy tail of the coronal electron velocity distribution on the oxygen and iron ionization balances, O(+6) - O(+7) and Fe(+11) - Fe(+12). Relative to a Maxwellian of the same mean electron energy, the degree of ionization allowed by such a distribution is found to be either unchanged or slightly decreased for iron but often substantially increased for oxygen. The greater sensitivity of oxygen ionization balance to the high-energy distribution tail derives from the higher oxygen ionization threshold energy. It is noted that the electron temperature inferred from a measurement of the oxygen ionization ratio, O(+6)/O(+7), could indeed overestimate the actual coronal electron temperature by nearly 10 to the 6th K if the coronal electron distribution is incorrectly assumed to be Maxwellian.

  11. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions resulting from direct laser acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Toncian, T; McCary, E; Meadows, A; Arefiev, A V; Blakeney, J; Serratto, K; Kuk, D; Chester, C; Roycroft, R; Gao, L; Fu, H; Yan, X Q; Schreiber, J; Pomerantz, I; Bernstein, A; Quevedo, H; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T; Hegelich, B M

    2015-01-01

    The irradiation of few nm thick targets by a finite-contrast high-intensity short-pulse laser results in a strong pre-expansion of these targets at the arrival time of the main pulse. The targets decompress to near and lower than critical densities plasmas extending over few micrometers, i.e. multiple wavelengths. The interaction of the main pulse with such a highly localized but inhomogeneous target leads to the generation of a short channel and further self-focusing of the laser beam. Experiments at the GHOST laser system at UT Austin using such targets measured non-Maxwellian, peaked electron distribution with large bunch charge and high electron density in the laser propagation direction. These results are reproduced in 2D PIC simulations using the EPOCH code, identifying Direct Laser Acceleration (DLA) as the responsible mechanism. This is the first time that DLA has been observed to produce peaked spectra as opposed to broad, maxwellian spectra observed in earlier experiments. This high-density electron...

  12. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions by direct laser acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toncian, T.; Wang, C.; Arefiev, A.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Blakeney, J.; Chester, C.; Roycroft, R.; Fu, H.; Yan, X. Q.; Schreiber, J.; Pomerantz, I.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Ditmire, T.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The irradiation of few nm thick targets by a finite-contrast high-intensity short-pulse laser results in a strong pre-expansion of these targets at the arrival time of the main pulse. The targets will decompress to near and lower than critical electron densities plasmas extending over lengths of few micrometers. The laser-matter interaction of the main pulse with such a highly localized but inhomogeneous the target leads to the generation of a channel and further self focussing of the laser beam. As measured in a experiment conducted with the GHOST laser system at UT Austin, 2D PIC simulations predict Direct Laser Acceleration of non-Maxwellian electron distribution in the laser propagation direction for such targets. The hereby high density electron bunches have potential applications as injector beams for a further wakefield acceleration stage. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the DARPA's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014) and the AFOSR (FA9550-14-1-0045).

  13. Electron temperature gradient mode instability and stationary vortices with elliptic and circular boundary conditions in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Q. [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zakir, U. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 25000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 18800 (Pakistan); Qamar, A. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 25000 (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode along with parallel electron dynamics is investigated by considering hydrodynamic electrons and non-Maxwellian ions. It is noticed that the growth rate of η{sub e}-mode driven linear instability decreases by increasing the value of spectral index and increases by reducing the ion/electron temperature ratio along the magnetic field lines. The eigen mode dispersion relation is also found in the ballooning mode limit. Stationary solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are obtained for both circular and elliptic boundary conditions. It is shown that the dynamics of both circular and elliptic vortices changes with the inclusion of inhomogeneity and non-Maxwellian effects.

  14. Non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions due to self-generated turbulence in collisionless guide-field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, P. A.; Büchner, J.

    2016-10-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity space distribution functions (EVDFs) are useful signatures of plasma conditions and non-local consequences of collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the past, EVDFs were obtained mainly for antiparallel reconnection and under the influence of weak guide-fields in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. EVDFs are, however, not well known, yet, for oblique (or component-) reconnection in case and in dependence on stronger guide-magnetic fields and for the exhaust (outflow) region of reconnection away from the diffusion region. In view of the multi-spacecraft Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS), we derived the non-Maxwellian EVDFs of collisionless magnetic reconnection in dependence on the guide-field strength bg from small ( b g ≈ 0 ) to very strong (bg = 8) guide-fields, taking into account the feedback of the self-generated turbulence. For this sake, we carried out 2.5D fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations using the ACRONYM code. We obtained anisotropic EVDFs and electron beams propagating along the separatrices as well as in the exhaust region of reconnection. The beams are anisotropic with a higher temperature in the direction perpendicular rather than parallel to the local magnetic field. The beams propagate in the direction opposite to the background electrons and cause instabilities. We also obtained the guide-field dependence of the relative electron-beam drift speed, threshold, and properties of the resulting streaming instabilities including the strongly non-linear saturation of the self-generated plasma turbulence. This turbulence and its non-linear feedback cause non-adiabatic parallel electron acceleration. We further obtained the resulting EVDFs due to the non-linear feedback of the saturated self-generated turbulence near the separatrices and in the exhaust region of reconnection in dependence on the guide field strength. We found that the influence of the self-generated plasma turbulence

  15. Effect on Landau damping rates for a non-Maxwellian distribution function consisting of two electron populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.N.S.Qureshi; S.Sehar; H.A.Shah; J.B.Cao

    2013-01-01

    In many physical situations where a laser or electron beam passes through a dense plasma,hot low-density electron populations can be generated,resulting in a particle distribution function consisting of a dense cold population and a small hot population.Presence of such low-density electron distributions can alter the wave damping rate.A kinetic model is employed to study the Landau damping of Langmuir waves when a small hot electron population is present in the dense cold electron population with non-Maxwellian distribution functions.Departure of plasma from Maxwellian distributions significantly alters the damping rates as compared to the Maxwellian plasma.Strong damping is found for highly non-Maxwellian distributions as well as plasmas with a higher density and hot electron population.Existence of weak damping is also established when the distribution contains broadened flat tops at the low energies or tends to be Maxwellian.These results may be applied in both experimental and space physics regimes.

  16. The ionization state in a gas with a non-Maxwellian electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owocki, S. P.; Scudder, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The inferred degree of ionization of a gas is often used in astrophysics as a diagnostic of the gas temperature. In the solar transition region and corona, in the outer atmospheres of cool stars, and in some portions of the interstellar medium), photoionization can be neglected, and the ionization state is fixed by the balance between ion-electron collisional ionization and dielectronic and/or radiative recombination. Under these conditions, higher degrees of ionization result from higher energy ion-electron collisions which are common in a high temperature gas. Actually, ionization occurs through collisions with electrons that have kinetic energies greater than the ionization potential of the given ion, and so the ionization rate depends on to the number of such high-energy electrons in the tail of the electron velocity distribution. High-velocity electrons move across large distances between effective coulomb collisions, and, in a strong temperature or density gradient, the tail can be overpopulated relative to Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of equivalent energy density. Thus, the ionization rate can also be greatly increased. These effects for a parameterized form of the electron distribution function with an enhanced high-velocity tail, namely the kappa distribution are illustrated.

  17. Slowly moving test charge in two-electron component non-Maxwellian plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Eliasson, B. [SUPA, Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Potential distributions around a slowly moving test charge are calculated by taking into account the electron-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma. Considering a neutralizing background of static positive ions, the supra-thermal hot and cold electrons are described by the Vlasov equations to account for the Kappa (power-law in velocity space) and Maxwell equilibrium distributions. Fourier analysis further leads to the derivation of electrostatic potential showing the impact of supra-thermal hot electrons. The test charge moves slowly in comparison with the hot and cold electron thermal speeds and is therefore shielded by the electrons. This gives rise to a short-range Debye-Hückel potential decaying exponentially with distance and to a far field potential decaying as inverse third power of the distance from the test charge. The results are relevant for both laboratory and space plasmas, where supra-thermal hot electrons with power-law distributions have been observed.

  18. Slowly moving test charge in two-electron component non-Maxwellian plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S.; Eliasson, B.

    2015-08-01

    Potential distributions around a slowly moving test charge are calculated by taking into account the electron-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma. Considering a neutralizing background of static positive ions, the supra-thermal hot and cold electrons are described by the Vlasov equations to account for the Kappa (power-law in velocity space) and Maxwell equilibrium distributions. Fourier analysis further leads to the derivation of electrostatic potential showing the impact of supra-thermal hot electrons. The test charge moves slowly in comparison with the hot and cold electron thermal speeds and is therefore shielded by the electrons. This gives rise to a short-range Debye-Hückel potential decaying exponentially with distance and to a far field potential decaying as inverse third power of the distance from the test charge. The results are relevant for both laboratory and space plasmas, where supra-thermal hot electrons with power-law distributions have been observed.

  19. Testing the existence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions in H II regions after assessing atomic data accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, C

    2014-01-01

    The classic optical nebular diagnostics [N II], [O II], [O III], [S II], [S III], and [Ar III] are employed to search for evidence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions, namely $\\kappa$~distributions, in a sample of well-observed Galactic H II regions. By computing new effective collision strengths for all these systems and A-values when necessary (e.g. S II), and by comparing with previous collisional and radiative datasets, we have been able to obtain realistic estimates of the electron-temperature dispersion caused by the atomic data, which in most cases are not larger than $\\sim 10$%. If the uncertainties due to both observation and atomic data are then taken into account, it is plausible to determine for some systems a representative average temperature while in others there are at least two plasma excitation regions. For the latter, it is found that the diagnostic temperature differences in the high-excitation region, e.g. $T_e$(O III), $T_e$(S III), and $T_e$(Ar III), cannot be conciliated by invoki...

  20. Kinetics of metastable atoms and non-Maxwellian electrons in two-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical and analytical solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation in two-temperature steady-state helium plasma are studied in a broad range of conditions T(a) = 5,000-20,000 K, T(e) = 10,000-20,000 K; N(a) = 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 18th per cu cm. The WKB analytical solution is found to be satisfactory in most situations. The deviation of the electron distribution from Maxwellian and a possibility of raising of the tail of the distribution in presence of sources of fast electrons is also discussed.

  1. Theory of gyroresonance and free-free emissions from non-Maxwellian quasi-steady-state electron distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    Currently there is a concern about ability of the classical thermal (Maxwellian) distribution to describe quasi-steady-state plasma in solar atmosphere including active regions. In particular, other distributions have been proposed to better fit observations, for example, kappa- and $n$-distributions. If present, these distributions will generate radio emissions with different observable properties compared with the classical gyroresonance (GR) or free-free emission, which implies a way of remote detecting these non-Maxwellian distributions in the radio observations. Here we present analytically derived GR and free-free emissivities and absorption coefficients for the kappa- and $n$-distributions and discuss their properties, which are in fact remarkably different from each other and from the classical Maxwellian plasma. In particular, the radio brightness temperature from a gyrolayer increases with the optical depth $\\tau$ for kappa-distribution, but decreases with $\\tau$ for $n$-distribution. This property ...

  2. Survey for non-Maxwellian plasma in Jupiter's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.; Frank, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Ames Research Center plasma-analyzer high resolution ion spectra, obtained during the traversals of Jupiter's magnetosheath by Pioneer 10 and 11, are examined for non-Maxwellian characteristics. Many examples are found of proton velocity distributions that are Maxwellian down to an observational limit set by the relative helium flux. However, clear deviations from a Maxwellian velocity distribution sometimes are observed. Most often, these non-Maxwellian proton velocity distributions seem to be enhanced on the low-energy side of the peak, in comparison with a Maxwellian distribution. Even less often, however, the high-energy side of the peak seems to be enhanced. A different type of non-Maxwellian spectrum is also seen occasionally near the times of bow-shock crossings, and it exhibits features of both solar-wind and high-temperature magnetosheath proton spectra combined.

  3. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasmas come mainly from the use of very central processing unit (CPU)-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closures from the nonlinear Landau Fokker-Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function (e.g. the INMDF (Izacard, O. 2016b Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas. Phys. Plasmas 23, 082504) that stands for interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function). One of the main differences with the literature is our analytic representation of the distribution function in the velocity phase space with as few hidden variables as possible thanks to the use of non-orthogonal basis sets. These new non-Maxwellian fluid equations could initiate the next generation of fluid codes including kinetic effects and can be expanded to other scientific disciplines such as astrophysics, condensed matter or hydrodynamics. As a validation test, we perform a numerical simulation based on a minimal reduced INMDF fluid model. The result of this test is the discovery of the origin of particle and heat diffusion. The diffusion is due to the competition between a growing INMDF on short time scales due to spatial gradients and the thermalization on longer time scales. The results

  4. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption with nonlinear effects of high laser intensity and non-Maxwellian distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2009-11-01

    Inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption and evolution of the electron distribution function (EDF) in a wide laser intensity range (10;{12}-10;{17} W/cm;{2}) have been studied systematically by a two velocity-dimension Fokker-Planck code. It is found that Langdon's IB operator overestimates the absorption rate at high laser intensity, consequently with an overdistorted non-Maxwellian EDF. According to the small anisotropy of EDF in the oscillation frame, we introduce an IB operator which is similar to Langdon's but without the low laser intensity limit. This operator is appropriate for self-consistently tackling the nonlinear effects of high laser intensity as well as non-Maxwellian EDF. Particularly, our operator is capable of treating IB absorption properly in the indirect and direct-drive inertial confinement fusion schemes with the National Ignition Facility and Laser MegaJoule laser parameters at focused laser intensity beyond 10;{15} W/cm;{2} .

  5. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izacard, Olivier, E-mail: izacard@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-637, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main results, it

  6. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main results, it

  7. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2017-03-29

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasmas come mainly from the use of very central processing unit (CPU)-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closures from the nonlinear Landau Fokker–Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function (e.g. the INMDF (Izacard, O. 2016b Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas.Phys. Plasmas23, 082504) that stands for interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function). One of the main differences with the literature is our analytic representation of the distribution function in the velocity phase space with as few hidden variables as possible thanks to the use of non-orthogonal basis sets. These new non-Maxwellian fluid equations could initiate the next generation of fluid codes including kinetic effects and can be expanded to other scientific disciplines such as astrophysics, condensed matter or hydrodynamics. As a validation test, we perform a numerical simulation based on a minimal reduced INMDF fluid model. The result of this test is the discovery of the origin of particle and heat diffusion. The diffusion is due to the competition between a growing INMDF on short time scales due to spatial gradients and the thermalization on longer time

  8. Collsionless tearing instability in a non-Maxwellian neutral sheet - An integro-differential formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Lee, Y. C.

    1985-01-01

    In the present investigation, a general integro-differential formalism is derived for the study of the collisionless tearing mode in a highly non-Maxwellian neutral sheet in which both electrons and ions are treated kinetically. The obtained formalism is applied to a specific non-Maxwellian distribution. The dispersion relation for the considered system is determined, taking into account the fundamental harmonic of the orbital frequency. It is found that the dispersion relation is dominated by the electrons. The results are presented in a number of graphs. The growth rates of non-Maxwellian distributions are generally much greater than the growth rate of the conventional isotropic tearing instability.

  9. Nonlinear structures of the Korteweg-de Vries and modified Korteweg-de Vries equations in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasma: Solitons collision and rogue waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Tantawy, S. A., E-mail: samireltantawy@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Moslem, W. M., E-mail: wmmoslem@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-05-15

    Solitons (small-amplitude long-lived waves) collision and rogue waves (large-amplitude short-lived waves) in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasma have been investigated. For the solitons collision, the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method is used to derive the coupled Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations with the quadratic nonlinearities and their corresponding phase shifts. The calculations reveal that both positive and negative polarity solitons can propagate in the present model. At critical value of plasma parameters, the coefficients of the quadratic nonlinearities disappear. Therefore, the coupled modified KdV (mKdV) equations with cubic nonlinearities and their corresponding phase shifts have been derived. The effects of the electron-to-positron temperature ratio, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, the positron-to-ion concentration, and the nonextensive parameter on the colliding solitons profiles and their corresponding phase shifts are examined. Moreover, generation of ion-acoustic rogue waves from small-amplitude initial perturbations in plasmas is studied in the framework of the mKdV equation. The properties of the ion-acoustic rogue waves are examined within a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) that has been derived from the mKdV equation. The dependence of the rogue wave profile on the relevant physical parameters has been investigated. Furthermore, it is found that the NLSE that has been derived from the KdV equation cannot support the propagation of rogue waves.

  10. The Use of Langmuir Probes in Non-Maxwellian Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Brace, Larry H.

    1998-01-01

    Disturbance of the Maxwellian plasma may occur in the vicinity of a spacecraft due to photoemission, interactions between the spacecraft and thermospheric gases, or electron emissions from other devices on the spacecraft. Significant non-maxwellian plasma distributions may also occur in nature as a mixture of ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas or secondaries produced by photoionization in the thermosphere or auroral precipitation. The general formulas for current collection (volt-ampere curves) by planar, cylindrical, and spherical Langmuir probes in isotropic and anisotropic non-maxwellian plasmas are examined. Examples are given of how one may identify and remove the non-maxwellian components in the Langmuir probe current to permit the ionospheric parameters to be determined. Theoretical volt-ampere curves presented for typical examples of non-maxwellian distributions include: two-temperature plasmas and a thermal plasma with an energetic electron beam. If the non-ionospheric electrons are Maxwellian at a temperature distinct from that of the ionosphere electrons, the volt-ampere curves can be fitted directly to obtain the temperatures and densities of both electron components without resorting to differenting the current. For an arbitrary isotropic distribution, the current for retarded particles is shown to be identical for the three geometries. For anisotropic distributions, the three probe geometries are not equally suited for measuring the ionospheric electron temperature and density or for determining the distribution function in the presence of non-maxwellian back-round electrons.

  11. Non-Maxwellian background effects in gyrokinetic simulations with GENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Siena, A.; Görier, T.; Doerk, H.; Citrin, J.; Johnson, T.; Schneider, M.; Poli, E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between fast particles and core turbulence has been established as a central issue for a tokamak reactor. Recent results predict significant enhancement of electromagnetic stabilisation of ITG turbulence in the presence of fast ions. However, most of these simulations were performed with the assumption of equivalent Maxwellian distributed particles, whereas to rigorously model fast ions, a non-Maxwellian background distribution function is needed. To this aim, the underlying equations in the gyrokinetic code GENE have been re-derived and implemented for a completely general background distribution function. After verification studies, a previous investigation on a particular JET plasma has been revised with linear simulations. The plasma is composed by Deuterium, electron, Carbon impurities, NBI fast Deuterium and ICRH 3He. Fast particle distributions have been modelled with a number of different analytic choices in order to study the impact of non-Maxwellian distributions on the plasma turbulence: slowing down and anisotropic Maxwellian. Linear growth rates are studied as a function of the wave number and compared with those obtained using an equivalent Maxwellian. Generally, the choice of the 3He distribution seems to have a stronger impact on the microinstabilities than that of the fast Deuterium.

  12. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account specially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very CPU-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic cor...

  13. Consequences of entropy bifurcation in non-Maxwellian astrophysical environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Leubner

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-extensive systems, accounting for long-range interactions and correlations, are fundamentally related to non-Maxwellian distributions where a duality of equilibria appears in two families, the non-extensive thermodynamic equilibria and the kinetic equilibria. Both states emerge out of particular entropy generalization leading to a class of probability distributions, where bifurcation into two stationary states is naturally introduced by finite positive or negative values of the involved entropic index kappa. The limiting Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon state (BGS, neglecting any kind of interactions within the system, is subject to infinite entropic index and thus characterized by self-duality. Fundamental consequences of non-extensive entropy bifurcation, manifest in different astrophysical environments, as particular core-halo patterns of solar wind velocity distributions, the probability distributions of the differences of the fluctuations in plasma turbulence as well as the structure of density distributions in stellar gravitational equilibrium are discussed. In all cases a lower entropy core is accompanied by a higher entropy halo state as compared to the standard BGS solution. Data analysis and comparison with high resolution observations significantly support the theoretical requirement of non-extensive entropy generalization when dealing with systems subject to long-range interactions and correlations.

  14. Population densities of hydrogenlike ions in a non-Maxwellian plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbourn, J M

    2001-04-01

    In this paper we examine the effects of non-Maxwellian electron energy distributions on the population densities of excited atomic levels for hydrogenlike ions. We model the electron energy distribution function by two Maxwellian finite elements, one approximating the bulk distribution with temperature T(b) and the other the tail distribution with temperature T(t). We present results for various T(b)/T(t) ratios for Si XIV.

  15. Kinetic non-Maxwellians, from theory to experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    This contribution shows strong progresses on the analytic prediction of some kinetic effects (e.g., presence of super-thermal particles) on a selection of theories which usually assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF). The new method developed is based on the use of non-orthogonal basis sets to represent analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions (NMDFs). This choice is motivated by its efficiency to model experimental and numerical NMDFs computed by PIC or Fokker-Plank codes and its capability to extract physical interpretation. We particularly introduce an interpreted NMDF which helped to understand the origin of the TS-ECE discrepancy (up to 20% on the electron temperature due to less than 2% of non-thermalized particles) observed in JET and TFTR. Additional results are discussed such as the inconsistency of the empirical SEE formula with a MDF, and the replacement of a diffusion ad-hoc coefficient by NMDFs. Finally, we show inclusion of kinetic effects in generalized fluid models and we focus our discussion on experimental perspectives toward NSTX-U measurements of NMDFs with different diagnostics. A part of this work is disseminated in Refs.. Footnote: LLNL-ABS-702319 Supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, Michael J., E-mail: hay@princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    An optically thin p-{sup 11}B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for the potential utility of a nonthermal distribution, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam-thermal reactivity. Comparing deuterium-tritium (DT) and p-{sup 11}B, the minimum Lawson criteria and minimum ρR required for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) volume ignition are calculated with and without the nonthermal feature. It turns out that channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and ρR, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. On the other hand, the reactivity gains that could be realized in DT plasmas are significant, the excess electron density in p-{sup 11}B plasmas increases the recirculated power cost to maintain a nonthermal feature and thereby constrains its utility to ash removal.

  17. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    An optically thin $p$-$^{11}$B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. The minimum Lawson criterion for thermal $p$-$^{11}$B plasmas and the minimum $\\rho R$ required for ICF volume ignition are calculated. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for this utility, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam- thermal reactivity. Channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and $\\rho R$, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. The gains realized with a beam thus establish an upper bound for the reductions in igniti...

  18. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasma come mainly from the use of very CPU-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closures from the nonlinear Landau Fokker-Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function (e.g., the INMDF [O. Izacard, Phys. Plasmas 23, 082504 (2016)]). One of the main dif...

  19. Electrostatic instabilities in unmagnetized and magnetized multi-component plasma with non-Maxwellian distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehar, Sumbul; Nouman Sarwar, Qureshi Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    In many physical situations such as space or laboratory plasmas a hot low-density electron populations can be generated superimposed on the bulk cold population, resulting in a particle distribution function consisting of a dense cold part and hot superthermal tail. Space observations show that electron distributions are often observed with flat top at low energies and high energy tails. The appropriate distribution to model such non-Maxwellian features is the generalized (r,q) distribution function which in limiting forms can be reduced to kappa and Maxwellian distribution functions. In this study, Kinetic model is employed to study the electron-acoustic and ion-ion acoustic instabilities in four component plasma with generalized (r,q) distribution function for both magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas. Departure of plasma from Maxwellian distributions significantly alters the growth rates as compared to the Maxwellian plasma. Significant growth observed for highly non-Maxwellian distributions as well as plasmas with higher dense and hot electron population. Existence of weak damping is also established when the distribution contains broadened flat tops at the low energies or tends to be Maxwellian. These results may be applied in both experimental and space physics regimes.

  20. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M.

    2015-11-01

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  1. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Tantawy, S. A., E-mail: samireltantawy@yahoo.com; El-Awady, E. I., E-mail: eielawady@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Tribeche, M., E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Plasma Physics Group, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, BP 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  2. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasma come mainly from the use of very CPU-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize t...

  3. Ion-dust streaming instability with non-Maxwellian ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kählert, Hanno, E-mail: kaehlert@theo-physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstr. 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The influence of non-Maxwellian ions on the ion-dust streaming instability in a complex plasma is investigated. The ion susceptibility employed for the calculations self-consistently accounts for the acceleration of the ions by a homogeneous background electric field and their collisions with neutral gas particles via a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision term [e.g., A. V. Ivlev et al., Phys. Rev. E 71, 016405 (2005)], leading to significant deviations from a shifted Maxwellian distribution. The dispersion relation and the properties of the most unstable mode are studied in detail and compared with the Maxwellian case. The largest deviations occur at low to intermediate ion-neutral damping. In particular, the growth rate of the instability for ion streaming below the Bohm speed is found to be lower than in the case of Maxwellian ions, yet remains on a significant level even for fast ion flows above the Bohm speed.

  4. Current state-of-the-art for the measurement of non-Maxwellian plasma parameters with the EISCAT UHF Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hubert

    Full Text Available New results on the information that can be extracted from simulated non-Maxwellian incoherent radar spectra are presented. The cases of a pure ionosphere and of a composite ionosphere typical of a given altitude of the auroral F region are considered. In the case of a pure ionosphere of NO+ or O+ ions it has been shown that the electron temperature and the electron density can be derived from a Maxwellian analysis of radar spectra measured at aspect angles of 0° or 21° respectively; the ion temperature and ion temperature anisotropy can be derived from a non- constraining model such as the 1D Raman fitting of a complementary measurement made at an aspect angle larger than 0° for the NO+ ions, or at an aspect angle larger than 21° for the O+ ions. Moreover with such measurements at large aspect angles, the shape of the velocity ion distribution functions can simultaneously be inferred. The case of a composite ionosphere of atomic O+ and molecular NO+ ions is a difficult challenge which requires simultaneously a complementary measurement of the electron temperature to provide the ion composition and the electron density from the incoherent radar spectra at a specific aspect angle of 21°; hence, a model dependent routine is necessary to derive the ion temperatures and ion temperature anisotropies. In the case where the electron temperature is not given, a routine which depends on ion distribution models is required first: the better the ion distribution models are, the more accurately derived the plasma parameters will be. In both cases of a composite ionosphere, the 1D Raman fitting can be used to keep a check on the validity of the results provided by the ion distribution model dependent routine.

  5. Further observations on resonance cones in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.

    1983-01-01

    Results on the angular distribution of the electrostatic potential of a pulsating point charge in a warm magnetized plasma permeated by an electron beam are presented. The theoretical formulation for a finite magnetic field is given, and the solution of the resonance cone dispersion relation is presented. Numerical results on the angular distribution of the potential are shown, and the propagation of waves outside the resonance cones is described. It is demonstrated that with the inclusions of a finite magnetic field, the field patterns of a point charge are qualitatively similar to those obtained for a uniaxial plasma. The Cerenkov radiation occurs at angles much smaller than the cold-cone angle, even with the finite magnetic field. When the beam velocity is well above the thermal velocity of the background electrons, a characteristic wave propagation occurs between the cold-cone angles.

  6. Shielding effect and wakefield pattern of a moving test charge in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Khan, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-e-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan 29050 (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    By using the Vlasov-Poisson equations, we calculate an expression for the electrostatic potential caused by a test charge in an unmagnetized non-Maxwellian dusty plasma, whose constituents are the superthermal hot-electrons, the mobile cold-electrons with a neutralizing background of cold ions, and charge fluctuating isolated dust grains. The superthermality effects due to hot electrons not only modify the dielectric constant of the electron-acoustic waves but also significantly affect the electrostatic potential. The latter can be decomposed into the Debye-Hückel and oscillatory wake potentials. Analytical and numerical results reveal that the Debye-Hückel and wakefield potentials converge to the Maxwellian case for large values of superthermality parameter. Furthermore, the plasma parameters play a vital role in the formation of shielding and wakefield pattern in a two-electron temperature plasma. The present results should be important for laboratory and space dusty plasmas, where hot-electrons can be assumed to follow the non-Maxwellian distribution function.

  7. Model description of non-Maxwellian nuclear processes in the solar interior

    CERN Document Server

    Voronchev, Victor T; Watanabe, Yukinobu

    2016-01-01

    A consistent model for the description of non-Maxwellian nuclear processes in the solar core triggered by fast reaction-produced particles is formulated. It essentially extends an approach to study suprathermal solar reactions discussed previously [Phys. Rev. C 91, 028801 (2015)] and refines its predictions. The model is applied to examine in detail the slowing-down of 8.7-MeV alpha particles produced in the 7Li(p,alpha)alpha reaction of the pp chain, and to study suprathermal processes in the solar CNO cycle induced by them. The influence of electron degeneracy and electron screening on suprathermal reactions through in-flight reaction probability and fast particle emission rate is clarified. In particular, these effects account for a 20% increase of the 14N(alpha,p)17O reaction rate at R 18F of nuclear flow transforms to abnormal sequential flow 14N --> 17O --> 18F, and the 14N(alpha,p)17O reaction rate exceeds the rate of 17O burn up through conventional 17O(p,alpha)14N and 17O(p,gamma)18F processes. It i...

  8. Electron Velocity Distribution Function in Magnetic Clouds in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchil, Teresa; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinetic properties of the electron velocity distribution functions within magnetic clouds, since they are the dominant thermal component. The study is based on high time resolution data from the GSFC WIND/SWE electron spectrometer and the Berkeley 3DP electron plasma instruments. Recent studies on magnetic clouds have shown observational evidence of anti-correlation between the total electron density and electron temperature, which suggest a polytrope law P(sub e) = alpha(Nu(sub e) (sup gamma)) for electrons with the constant gamma approximates 0.5 non-Maxwellian electron distributions (i.e. non-thermal) within magnetic clouds. These works suggested that the non-thermal electrons can contribute as much as 50% of the total electron pressure within magnetic clouds. We have revisited some of the magnetic cloud events previously studied and attempted to quantify the nature of the non-thermal electrons by modeling the electron velocity distribution function using a kappa distribution function to characterize the kinetic non-thermal effects. If non-thermal tail effects are the source for the anti-correlation between the moment electron temperature and density and if the kappa distribution is a reasonable representative model of non-thermal effects, then the electron velocity distribution within magnetic clouds should show indication for small K-values when gamma < 1.

  9. On heat conduction in multicomponent, non-Maxwellian spherically symmetric solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperman, S.; Dryer, M.

    1985-01-01

    A generalized expression for the steady-state heat flux in multicomponent, moderately non-Maxwellian spherically symmetric plasmas is presented and discussed. The work was motivated by the inability of the simple, Fourier-type formula for the thermal conductivity to explain the observed correlations in the solar wind. The results hold for situations not far from local thermodynamic equilibrium. The generalized expression includes not only correlations that have been observed but also correlations not sought for previously.

  10. Intrinsic rotation driven by non-Maxwellian equilibria in Tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M; Parra, F I; Lee, J P; Belli, E A; Nave, M F F; White, A E

    2013-08-02

    The effect of small deviations from a Maxwellian equilibrium on turbulent momentum transport in tokamak plasmas is considered. These non-Maxwellian features, arising from diamagnetic effects, introduce a strong dependence of the radial flux of cocurrent toroidal angular momentum on collisionality: As the plasma goes from nearly collisionless to weakly collisional, the flux reverses direction from radially inward to outward. This indicates a collisionality-dependent transition from peaked to hollow rotation profiles, consistent with experimental observations of intrinsic rotation.

  11. Intrinsic rotation driven by non-Maxwellian equilibria in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M; Lee, J P; Belli, E A; Nave, M F F; White, A E

    2013-01-01

    The effect of small deviations from a Maxwellian equilibrium on turbulent momentum transport in tokamak plasmas is considered. These non-Maxwellian features, arising from diamagnetic effects, introduce a strong dependence of the radial flux of co-current toroidal angular momentum on collisionality: As the plasma goes from nearly collisionless to weakly collisional, the flux reverses direction from radially inward to outward. This indicates a collisionality-dependent transition from peaked to hollow rotation profiles, consistent with experimental observations of intrinsic rotation.

  12. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account specially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numericall...

  13. On the characteristics of obliquely propagating electrostatic structures in non-Maxwellian plasmas in the presence of ion pressure anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa; Mahmood, Shahzad; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    The dynamical characteristics of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized plasma comprising ions presenting space asymmetry in the equation of state and non-Maxwellian electrons. The anisotropic ion pressure is defined using the double adiabatic Chew-Golberger-Low theory. An excess in the superthermal component of the electron population is assumed, in agreement with long-tailed (energetic electron) distribution observations in space plasmas; this is modeled via a kappa-type distribution function. Large electrostatic excitations are assumed to propagate in a direction oblique to the external magnetic field. In the linear (small amplitude) regime, two electrostatic modes are shown to exist. The properties of arbitrary amplitude (nonlinear) obliquely propagating ion-acoustic solitary excitations are thus investigated via a pseudomechanical energy balance analogy, by adopting a Sagdeev potential approach. The combined effect of the ion pressure anisotropy and excess superthermal electrons is shown to alter the parameter region where solitary waves can exist. An excess in the suprathermal particles is thus shown to be associated with solitary waves, which are narrower, faster, and of larger amplitude. Ion pressure anisotropy, on the other hand, affects the amplitude of the solitary waves, which become weaker (in strength), wider (in spatial extension), and thus slower in comparison with the cold ion case.

  14. Sensitivity of ICF ignition conditions to non-Maxwellian DT fusion reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbett W.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The hotspot ignition conditions in ICF are determined by considering the power balance between fusion energy deposition and energy loss terms. Uncertainty in any of these terms has potential to modify the ignition conditions, changing the optimum ignition capsule design. This paper considers the impact of changes to the DT fusion reaction rate due to non-thermal ion energy distributions. The DT fusion reactivity has been evaluated for a class of non-Maxwellian distributions representing a perturbation to the tail of a thermal distribution. The resulting reactivity has been used to determine hotspot ignition conditions as a function of the characteristic parameter of the modified distribution.

  15. Self-consistent full-wave and Fokker-Planck calculations for ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, E. F.

    2005-10-01

    High-performance burning plasma devices such as ITER will contain significant concentrations of non-thermal plasma particles arising from fusion reactions, neutral beam injection, and wave-driven diffusion in velocity space. Initial studies in 1-D [1] and experimental results [2] show that non-thermal energetic ions can significantly alter wave propagation and absorption in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In addition, these ions can absorb power at high harmonics of the cyclotron frequency where conventional 2-D global-wave models are not valid. In this work, the all-orders, full-wave solver AORSA [3] is generalized to treat non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Quasi-linear diffusion coefficients are derived directly from the global wave fields and used to calculate the energetic ion velocity distribution with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code [4]. Alternately, the quasi-linear coefficients can be calculated numerically by integrating the Lorentz force equations along particle orbits. Self-consistency between the wave electric field and resonant ion distribution function is achieved by iterating between the full-wave and Fokker-Planck solutions.[1] R. J. Dumont, C. K. Phillips and D. N. Smithe, Phys. Plasmas 12, 042508 (2005).[2] A. L. Rosenberg, J. E. Menard, J. R. Wilson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2441(2004).[3] E. F. Jaeger, L. A. Berry, J. R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).[4] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas (IAEA, Montreal, 1992).

  16. Imaging and Spectroscopic Observations of a Transient Coronal Loop: Evidence for the Non-Maxwellian $\\kappa$-Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Dudik, Jaroslav; Dzifcakova, Elena; Del Zanna, Giulio; Williams, David R; Karlicky, Marian; Mason, Helen E; Lorincik, Juraj; Kotrc, Pavel; Farnik, Frantisek; Zemanova, Alena

    2015-01-01

    We report on the SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS observations of a transient coronal loop. The loop brightens up in the same location after the disappearance of an arcade formed during a B8.9-class microflare three hours earlier. EIS captures this loop during its brightening phase as observed in most of the AIA filters. We use the AIA data to study the evolution of the loop, as well as to perform the DEM diagnostics as a function of $\\kappa$. Fe XI--XIII lines observed by EIS are used to perform the diagnostics of electron density and subsequently the diagnostics of $\\kappa$. Using ratios involving the Fe XI 257.772\\AA selfblend, we diagnose $\\kappa$ $\\lesssim$ 2, i.e., an extremely non-Maxwellian distribution. Using the predicted Fe line intensities derived from the DEMs as a function of $\\kappa$, we show that, with decreasing $\\kappa$, all combinations of ratios of line intensities converge to the observed values, confirming the diagnosed $\\kappa$ $\\lesssim$ 2. These results represent the first positive diagnostics ...

  17. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  18. AtomDB and PyAtomDB: Atomic Data and Modelling Tools for High Energy and Non-Maxwellian Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Adam; Smith, Randall K.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Cui, Xiaohong

    2016-04-01

    The release of AtomDB 3 included a large wealth of inner shell ionization and excitation data allowing accurate modeling of non-equilibrium plasmas. We describe the newly calculated data and compare it to published literature data. We apply the new models to existing supernova remnant data such as W49B and N132D. We further outline progress towards AtomDB 3.1, including a new energy-dependent charge exchange cross sections.We present newly developed models for the spectra of electron-electron bremsstrahlung and those due to non-Maxwellian electron distributions.Finally, we present our new atomic database access tools, released as PyAtomDB, allowing powerful use of the underlying fundamental atomic data as well as the spectral emissivities.

  19. New electromagnetic mode in a non-Maxwellian high-beta plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic (EM) mode outside of the electron cyclotron frequency in a dense plasma discharge is reported. The experimental plasma was generated in a weak, uniform magnetic field and natural magnetic fluctuations were monitored and examined for cross correlations. Wave dispersion, propagation direction polarization and the electron velocity distribution were also derived. The fluctuations observed were neither cyclotron harmonic waves nor whistlers and consisted of circularly polarized waves propagating along field lines in 3-6 cm diam flux tubes. The mode was carried away from the cathode by streaming energetic electrons. The results may be pertinent in studies of EM modes in auroral arcs or magnetic fluctuations in tokamaks with runaway electrons.

  20. Emission of fast non-Maxwellian hydrogen atoms in low-density laboratory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christian; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Pospieszczyk, Albrecht; Dickheuer, Sven

    2017-03-01

    The source of strong and broad emission of the Balmer-α line in mixed plasmas of hydrogen (or deuterium) and noble gases in front of metallic surfaces is a subject of controversial discussion of many plasma types. In this work the excitation source of the Balmer lines is investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy in the plasma device PSI-2. Neutral fast non-Maxwellian hydrogen atoms are produced by acceleration of hydrogen ions towards an electrode immersed into the plasma. By variation of the electrode potential the energy of ions and in turn of reflected fast atoms can be varied in the range of 40-300 eV. The fast atoms in front of the electrode are observed simultaneously by an Echelle spectrometer (0.001 nm/channel) and by an imaging spectrometer (0.01 nm/channel) up to few cm in the plasma. Intense excitation channels of the Balmer lines are observed when hydrogen is mixed with argon or with krypton. Especially in Ar-H and Ar-D mixed plasmas the emission of fast hydrogen atoms is very strong. Intermixing hydrogen with other noble gases (He, Ne or Xe) one observes the same effect however the emission is one order of magnitude less compared to Kr-H or Kr-D plasmas. It is shown, that the key process, impacting this emission, is the binary collision between the fast neutral hydrogen atom and the noble gas atom. Two possible sources of excitation are discussed in details: one is the excitation of hydrogen atoms by argon atoms in the ground state and the second one is the process of the so-called excitation transfer between the metastable states of noble gases and hydrogen. In the latter case the atomic data for excitation of Balmer lines are still not available in literature. Further experimental investigations are required to conclude on the source process of fast atom emission.

  1. Heat flux in a non-Maxwellian plasma. [in realistic solar coronal loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljepojevic, N. N.; Macneice, P.

    1989-01-01

    A hybrid numerical scheme is applied to solve the Landau equation for the electron distribution function over all velocity space. Evidence is presented for the first time of the degree and character of the failure of the classical Spitzer-Haerm heat flux approximation in a realistic solar coronal loop structure. In the loop model used, the failure is so severe at some points that the role of the heat flux in the plasma's energy balance is completely misinterpreted. In the lower corona the Spitzer-Haerm approximation predicts that the heat flux should act as an energy source, whereas the more accurate distribution functions calculated here show this to be an energy sink.

  2. Non-Intrusive, Time-Resolved Hall Thruster Near-Field Electron Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    approximation. Another possible explanation for this disagreement is an initial non - Maxwellian electron energy distribution due to an insufficient...I828 and I834 /I828 methods in the beginning of the cycle may suggest an initial non - Maxwellian electron energy distribution or weaknesses in the...Temperature • Line Ratio Method Disagreement may be due to : – Issues with metastable approximations in that region of the cycle – Non - Maxwellian

  3. Kinematic determination of Electron-Hole velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Ian H.; Zhou, C.

    2016-10-01

    Coherent self-sustaining BGK potential structures, like the electron holes that often form during nonlinear electrostatic instabilities and are frequently observed in space plasmas, have ``kinematic'' momentum conservation properties that determine their velocity. The electron and ion momentum, both internal and external to the hole, must be included. Momentum changes arise from hole acceleration and from hole depth growth, by energization processes we call jetting; and these must balance any additional external forces on the particles. Comprehensive analytic expressions for the contributions have been calculated for holes of arbitrary localized potential form. Using these, we can deduce velocity changes in various interesting situations such as the self-acceleration of electron holes during formation, the circumstances under which holes accelerate at the rate of the electrons in a background electric field, the influence of the ion stream pushing and pulling holes to higher or lower speeds, and the trapping of hole velocity between the velocity of two ion streams. The predictions are in excellent quantitative agreement with targeted PIC simulations. The kinematic theory thus explains why isolated holes behave the way they do. Partially supported by NSF/DOE Basic Plasma Grant DE-SC0010491.

  4. STARE velocities: 2. Evening westward electron flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Four evening events and one morning event of joint EISCAT/STARE observations during ~22h are considered and the differences between observed STARE line-of-sight (l-o-s velocities and EISCAT electron drift velocities projected onto the STARE beams are studied. We demonstrate that the double-pulse technique, which is currently in use in the STARE routine data handling, typically underestimates the true phase velocity as inferred from the multi-pulse STARE data. We show that the STARE velocities are persistently smaller (1.5–2 times than the EISCAT velocities, even for the multi-pulse data. The effect seems to be more pronounced in the evening sector when the Finland radar observes at large flow angles. We evaluate the performance of the ion-acoustic approach (IAA, Nielsen and Schlegel, 1985 and the off-orthogonal fluid approach (OOFA, Uspensky et al., 2003 techniques to predict the true electron drift velocity for the base event of 12 February 1999. The IAA technique predicts the convection reasonably well for enhanced flows of >~1000m/s, but not so well for slower ones. By considering the EISCAT N(h profiles, we derive the effective aspect angle and effective altitude of backscatter, and use this information for application of the OOFA technique. We demonstrate that the OOFA predictions for the base event are superior over the IAA predictions and thus, we confirm that OOFA predicts the electron velocities reasonably well in the evening sector, in addition to the morning sector, as concluded by Uspensky et al. (2003. To check how "robust" the OOFA model is and how successful it is for convection estimates without the EISCAT support, we analysed three additional evening events and one additional morning event for which information on N(h profiles was intentionally ignored. By accepting the mean STARE/EISCAT velocity ratio of 0.55 and the mean azimuth rotation of 9° (derived for the basic event, we show that the OOFA performs

  5. Non-Maxwellian distribution functions in flaring coronal loops - Comparison of Landau-Fokker-Planck and BGK solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljepojevic, N. N.; Macneice, P.

    1988-01-01

    The high-velocity tail of the electron distribution has been calculated by solving the high-velocity form of the Landau equation for a thermal structure representative of a flaring coronal loop. These calculations show an enhancement of the tail population above Maxwellian for electrons moving down the temperature gradient. The results obtained are used to test the reliability of the BGK approximation. The comparison shows that the BGK technique can estimate contributions to the heat flux from the high-energy tail to within an order of magnitude.

  6. Dust acoustic and drift waves in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma with dust charge fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir, U.; Haque, Q.; Imtiaz, N.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    > ) on the wave dispersion and instability are presented. It is found that the presence of the non-thermal electron and ion populations reduce the growth rate of the instability which arises due to the dust charging effect. In addition, the nonlinear vortex solutions are also obtained. For illustration, the results are analysed by using the dusty plasma parameters of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  7. Dust heating by Alfvén waves using non-Maxwellian distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubia, K. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Department of Physics, Forman Christian College, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Quasilinear theory is employed in order to evaluate the resonant heating rate by Alfvén waves, of multiple species dust particles in a hot, collisionless, and magnetized plasma, with the underlying assumption that the dust velocity distribution function can be modeled by a generalized (r, q) distribution function. The kinetic linear dispersion relation for the electromagnetic dust cyclotron Alfvén waves is derived, and the dependence of the heating rate on the magnetic field, mass, and density of the dust species is subsequently investigated. The heating rate and its dependence on the spectral indices r and q of the distribution function are also investigated. It is found that the heating is sensitive to negative value of spectral index r.

  8. The non-Maxwellian energy distribution of ions in the warm Io torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. D.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of Io's torus indicate that the majority of ions have energies of 55-75 eV, with a high-energy tail extending up to the corotation energy. It was found that such a distribution can be established via the Coulomb cooling of ions heated at the corotation energy onto the cold 5-eV electrons. The energy E(asterisk) of the main body of the ions and the shape of the energy distribution are functions of the transport loss time. Matching E(asterisk) with the data (E/asterisk/ = 55-75 eV) requires transport loss times in the range 25-1000 days.

  9. Effect of non-maxwellians ions on dust acoustic dressed soliton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-07-01

    Dust is an ubiquitous component of space and astrophysical environments, occurring for example in planetary rings, comets and the Earth's ionosphere. Dusty plasmas are known to support a wide variety of ultra low-frequency wave modes. The most well studied of such modes are the so called dust-acoustic wave (DAW) and dust ion-acoustic wave (DIAW). The aim of this communication is to study a small-amplitude dust acoustic dressed solitons in a three component dusty plasma having electrons, suprathermal ions, and dust grains. We have then investigate the effect of ion suprathermality on small amplitude dust acoustic dressed wave and compared the result with the soliton's exact solution of the fourth order of pseudo-potential and K-dV soliton.

  10. Dust kinetic Alfvén waves and streaming instability in a non-Maxwellian magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubab, N.; Jaffer, G. [Department of Space Science, Institute of Space Technology (IST), Islamabad Expressway, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-06-15

    The dust kinetic Alfvén wave (DKAW) instability is studied in a uniform dusty magnetoplasma by incorporating the superthermality effects of the electrons and perpendicularly streaming κ-distributed ions. The dispersion relation of the DKAW instability is investigated in the low-β{sub d} Lorentzian plasma limit. The solutions are analyzed for various scenarios of dusty and dusty-free plasmas. It is shown that the presence of dust particles and the cross-field superthermal ions sensibly modify the dispersion characteristics of the low-frequency DKAW. The present results are only valid for a frequency regime well below the dust cyclotron frequency. Numerical calculations are carried out for the growth rates by taking different dust parameters into account. It is found that the nonthermality is more effective for the dust kinetic Alfvén waves in the perpendicular direction as compared to the parallel one. The relevance of the results to the low-β{sub d} regions of space and astrophysical plasmas is highlighted.

  11. Insensitivity of Line-Ratio Diagnostics to Steady-State Non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions in Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Davila, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    We examine the idea that the corona is heated by a population of nonthermal particles. An upper limit on the size of the nonthermal population is derived by assuming that all of the radiation and conduction losses in the corona are provided by the nonthermal tail of the particle distribution. Only a very small percentage of nonthermal particles are allowed. These particles have a negligable effect on temperature sensitive line ratios typically observed in the EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation).

  12. Suprathermal electron distributions in the solar transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Vocks, C; Mann, G

    2016-01-01

    Suprathermal tails are a common feature of solar wind electron velocity distributions, and are expected in the solar corona. From the corona, suprathermal electrons can propagate through the steep temperature gradient of the transition region towards the chromosphere, and lead to non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions (VDFs) with pronounced suprathermal tails. We calculate the evolution of a coronal electron distribution through the transition region in order to quantify the suprathermal electron population there. A kinetic model for electrons is used which is based on solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov equation for electrons including Coulomb collisions with both ions and electrons. Initial and chromospheric boundary conditions are Maxwellian VDFs with densities and temperatures based on a background fluid model. The coronal boundary condition has been adopted from earlier studies of suprathermal electron formation in coronal loops. The model results show the presence of strong suprathermal tails ...

  13. Electron drift velocity measurements in liquid krypton-methane mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Folegani, M; Magri, M; Piemontese, L

    1999-01-01

    Electron drift velocities have been measured in liquid krypton, pure and mixed with methane at different concentrations (1-10% in volume) versus electric field strength, and a possible effect of methane on electron lifetime has been investigated. While no effect on lifetime could be detected, since lifetimes were in all cases longer than what measurable, a very large increase in drift velocity (up to a factor 6) has been measured.

  14. Measurements of electron drift velocity in pure isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B.; Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept de Fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    In this work we report on preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for pure isobutane as a function of reduced electric field (E/N) in the range from 100 Td up to 216 Td. The measurements of electron drift velocity were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique. In order to validate the technique and analyzing non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented and compared with a numerical simulation of the Bolsig+ code. (author)

  15. KAPPA: A Package for Synthesis of optically thin spectra for the non-Maxwellian kappa-distributions based on the CHIANTI database

    CERN Document Server

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Kotrč, Pavel; Fárník, František; Zemanová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    The non-Maxwellian $\\kappa$-distributions have been detected in the solar transition region and flares. These distributions are characterized by a high-energy tail and a near-Maxwellian core and are known to have significant impact on the resulting optically thin spectra arising from collisionally dominated astrophysical plasmas. We developed the KAPPA package (http://kappa.asu.cas.cz) for synthesis of such line and continuum spectra. The package is based on the freely available CHIANTI database and software, and can be used in a similar manner. Ionization and recombination rates together with the ionization equilibria are provided for a range of $\\kappa$ values. Distribution-averaged collision strengths for excitation are obtained by an approximate method for all transitions in all ions available within CHIANTI. The validity of this approximate method is tested by comparison with direct calculations. Typical precisions of better than 5% are found, with all cases being within 10%. Tools for calculation of syn...

  16. Role of grain size and particle velocity distribution in secondary electron emission in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, V. W.; Mendis, D. A.; Rosenberg, M.

    1993-01-01

    By virtue of being generally immersed in a plasma environment, cosmic dust is necessarily electrically charged. The fact that secondary emission plays an important role in determining the equilibrium grain potential has long been recognized, but the fact that the grain size plays a crucial role in this equilibrium potential, when secondary emission is important, has not been widely appreciated. Using both conducting and insulating spherical grains of various sizes and also both Maxwellian and generalized Lorentzian plasmas (which are believed to represent certain space plasmas), we have made a detailed study of this problem. In general, we find that the secondary emission yield delta increases with decreasing size and becomes very large for grains whose dimensions are comparable to the primary electron penetration depth, such as in the case of the very small grains observed at comet Halley and inferred in the interstellar medium. Moreover, we observed that delta is larger for insulators and equilibrium potentials are generally more positive when the plasma has a broad non-Maxwellian tail. Interestingly, we find that for thermal energies that are expected in several cosmic regions, grains of different sizes can have opposite charge, the smaller ones being positive while the larger ones are negative. This may have important consequences for grain accretion in polydisperse dusty space plasmas.

  17. A kinetic study of solar wind electrons in the transition region from collision dominated to collisionless flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Leer, E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the evolution of the velocity distribution function of a test population of electrons in the solar corona and inner solar wind region, using a recently developed kinetic model. The model solves the time dependent, linear transport equation, with a Fokker-Planck collision operator to describe Coulomb collisions between the 'test population' and a thermal background of charged particles, using a finite differencing scheme. The model provides information on how non-Maxwellian features develop in the distribution function in the transition region from collision dominated to collisionless flow. By taking moments of the distribution the evolution of higher order moments, such as the heat flow, can be studied.

  18. The incoherent scattering of radio waves in a non-Maxwellian plasma: The effects of Coulomb collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, V.D.; Tereshchanko, E.D. (Polar Geophysical Inst., Murmansk (USSR)); Kohl, H. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau (West Germany))

    1991-10-01

    In this paper the formulas for the ion distribution as well as the spectrum of radio waves scattered in a magnetized plasma with a strong electric field are derived. It is shown that the presence of the electric field in the ionosphere leads to an anisotropic ion velocity distribution and, therefore, to untypical incoherent scatter spectra for the F region of the polar ionosphere which are caused by ion-neutral together with ion-ion collisions. The effect of ion-ion collisions, which has not been taken into account so far, is to reduce the anisotropy of the ion velocity distribution. Estimates of the ion-ion collision frequency derived from EISCAT measurements show that this may happen above about 300 km.

  19. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10{sup 12}{omega} cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  20. The abundance discrepancy factor and t^2 in nebulae: are non-thermal electrons the culprits?

    CERN Document Server

    Ferland, G J; ODell, C R; Peimbert, M

    2016-01-01

    Photoionization produces supra-thermal electrons, electrons with much more energy than is found in a thermalized gas at electron temperatures characteristic of nebulae. The presence of these high energy electrons may solve the long-standing t^2/ADF puzzle, the observations that abundances obtained from recombination and collisionally excited lines do not agree, and that different temperature indicators give different results, if they survive long enough to affect diagnostic emission lines. The presence of these non-Maxwellian distribution electrons is usually designated by the term kappa. Here we use well-established methods to show that the distance over which heating rates change are much longer than the distance supra thermal electrons can travel, and that the timescale to thermalize these electrons are much shorter than the heating or cooling timescales. These estimates establish that supra thermal electrons will have disappeared into the Maxwellian velocity distribution long before they affect the collis...

  1. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuecks, D J; Skiff, F; Kletzing, C A

    2012-08-01

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense (ω(pe) > ω(ce)). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency ω(ce). As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation ω - k([parallel])v([parallel]) = ω(ce). The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  2. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hwataik

    2011-01-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sens...

  3. VELOCITY BUNCHING OF HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Musumeci, P; Rosenzweig, J B; Brown, W J; England, R J; Ferrario, M; Jacob, J S; Thompson, M C; Travish, G; Tremaine, A M; Yoder, R

    2004-10-15

    Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS) experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly in ICS experiments

  4. Velocity bunching of high-brightness electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly

  5. Electron two-stream instability and its application in solar and heliophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Haihong

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that electron beams accelerated in solar flares can drive two-stream instability and produce radio bursts in the solar corona as well as in the interplanetary medium. Recent observations show that the solar wind likely originates from nanoflare-like events near the surface of the Sun where locally heated plasma escapes along open field lines into space. Recent numerical simulations and theoretical studies show that electron two-stream instability (ETSI) driven by nanoflare-accelerated electron beams can produce the observed nanoflare-type radio bursts, the non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution function of the solar wind, and the kinetic scale turbulence in solar wind. This brief review focus on the basic theoretical framework and recent progress in the nonlinear evolution of ETSI driven by electron beams, including the formation of electron holes, Langmuir wave generation in warm plasma, and the nonlinear modulation instability and Langmuir collapse. Potential applications in heliophysics and astrophysics are discussed.

  6. Electron velocity distribution and lion roars in the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Masood

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Whistler waves which are termed "lion roars" in the magnetosheath are studied using data obtained by the Spectrum Analyser (SA of the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF experiment aboard Cluster. Kinetic theory is then employed to obtain the theoretical expression for the whistler wave with electron temperature anisotropy which is believed to trigger lion roars in the magnetosheath. This allows us to compare theory and data. This paper for the first time studies the details of the electron velocity distribution function as measured by the Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE in order to investigate the underlying causes for the different types of lion roars found in the data. Our results show that while some instances of lion roars could be locally generated, the source of others must be more remote regions of the magnetosheath.

  7. Interacting Electrons in Graphene: Fermi Velocity Renormalization and Optical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, T; Parida, P; Trushin, M; Ulybyshev, M V; Boyda, D L; Schliemann, J

    2017-06-30

    We have developed a Hartree-Fock theory for electrons on a honeycomb lattice aiming to solve a long-standing problem of the Fermi velocity renormalization in graphene. Our model employs no fitting parameters (like an unknown band cutoff) but relies on a topological invariant (crystal structure function) that makes the Hartree-Fock sublattice spinor independent of the electron-electron interaction. Agreement with the experimental data is obtained assuming static self-screening including local field effects. As an application of the model, we derive an explicit expression for the optical conductivity and discuss the renormalization of the Drude weight. The optical conductivity is also obtained via precise quantum Monte Carlo calculations which compares well to our mean-field approach.

  8. Electron Two-stream Instability and Its Application in Solar and Heliophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Che, Haihong

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that electron beams accelerated in solar flares can drive two-stream instability and produce radio bursts in the solar corona as well as in the interplanetary medium. Recent observations show that the solar wind likely originates from nanoflare-like events near the surface of the Sun where locally heated plasma escapes along open field lines into space. Recent numerical simulations and theoretical studies show that electron two-stream instability (ETSI) driven by nanoflare-accelerated electron beams can produce the observed nanoflare-type radio bursts, the non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution function of the solar wind, and the kinetic scale turbulence in solar wind. This brief review focus on the basic theoretical framework and recent progress in the nonlinear evolution of ETSI, including the formation of electron holes, Langmuir wave generation in warm plasma, and the nonlinear modulation instability and Langmuir collapse. Potential applications in heliophysics and astrophysics are...

  9. Modulational instability of a Langmuir wave in plasmas with energetic tails of superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, I. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    The impact of superthermal electrons on dispersion properties of isotropic plasmas and on the modulational instability of a monochromatic Langmuir wave is studied for the case when the power-law tail of the electron distribution function extends to relativistic velocities and contains most of the plasma kinetic energy. Such an energetic tail of electrons is shown to increase the thermal correction to the Langmuir wave frequency, which is equivalent to the increase of the effective electron temperature in the fluid approach, and has almost no impact on the dispersion of ion-acoustic waves, in which the role of temperature is played by the thermal spread of low-energy core electrons. It is also found that the spectrum of modulational instability in the non-maxwellian plasma narrows significantly, as compared to the equilibrium case, without change of the maximum growth rate and the corresponding wavenumber.

  10. Modulational instability of a Langmuir wave in plasmas with energetic tails of superthermal electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeev, I V

    2012-01-01

    The impact of superthermal electrons on dispersion properties of isotropic plasmas and on the modulational instability of a monochromatic Langmuir wave is studied for the case when the power-law tail of the electron distribution function extends to relativistic velocities and contains most of the plasma kinetic energy. Such an energetic tail of electrons is shown to increase the thermal correction to the Langmuir wave frequency, which is equivalent to the increase of the effective electron temperature in the fluid approach, and has almost no impact on the dispersion of ion-acoustic waves, in which the role of temperature is played by the thermal spread of low-energy core electrons. It is also found that the spectrum of modulational instability in the non-maxwellian plasma narrows significantly, as compared to the equilibrium case, without change of the maximum growth rate and the corresponding wavenumber.

  11. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hwataik; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2009-04-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sensors within cylindrical probes installed between louver blades or at the downstream face of the louver. Numerical results show quite good agreements with experimental data, and provide insights regarding measurement system design. The simulations indicate that velocity profiles are more spatially uniform at the louver outlet relative to between louver blades, that pressure drops imposed by the sensor bars are smaller with sensor bars at the louver outlet, and that placement of the sensor bars between louver blades substantially increases air velocities inside the louver. These findings suggest there is an advantage to placing the sensor bars at the louver outlet face.

  12. Effect of Electron Drift Velocity on Whistler Instability in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Yu; HUANG Guang-Li; LU Quan-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The whistler instability is studied under the condition that the electron and ion velocities can be described in a bi-Maxwellian distribution with a field-aligned electron outflow drift velocity. It is found that the electron outflow drift velocity might obviously make the threshold condition of whistler instability decrease when this velocity is parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the electron outflow drift velocity might increase the threshold condition when this velocity is anti-parallel to the magnetic field in collisionless magnetic reconnection.

  13. Measurement of ion and electron drift velocity and electronic attachment in air for ionization chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Boissonnat, Guillaume; Colin, Jean; Remadi, Aurelien; Salvador, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Air-ionization chambers have been used in radiotherapy and particle therapy for decades. However, fundamental parameters in action in the detector responses are sparsely studied. In this work we aimed to measure the electronic attachment, electrons and ions mobilities of an ionization chamber (IC) in air. The main idea is to extract these from the actual response of the IC to a single ionizing particle in order to insure that they were measured in the same condition they are to be used while neglecting undesired phenomena: recombination and space charge effect. The non-standard signal shape analysis performed here were also confronted to a more standard drift chamber measurements using time-of-flight. It was found that both detectors displayed compatible results concerning positive and negative ions drift velocities where literature data is well spread out. In the same time, electron attachment measurements sit in the middle of known measurements while electron drift velocities seemed to show an offset compar...

  14. Role of momentum and velocity for radiating electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdessus, Rémi; Noble, Adam; McKenna, Paul; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation reaction remains one of the most fascinating open questions in electrodynamics. The development of multi-petawatt laser facilities capable of reaching extreme intensities has lent this topic a new urgency, and it is now more important than ever to properly understand it. Two models of radiation reaction, due to Landau and Lifshitz and due to Sokolov, have gained prominence, but there has been little work exploring the relation between the two. We show that in the Sokolov theory, electromagnetic fields induce a Lorentz transformation between momentum and velocity, which eliminates some of the counterintuitive results of Landau-Lifshitz. In particular, the Lorentz boost in a constant electric field causes the particle to lose electrostatic potential energy more rapidly than it otherwise would, explaining the longstanding mystery of how an electron can radiate while experiencing no radiation reaction force. These ideas are illustrated in examples of relevance to astrophysics and laser-particle interactions, where radiation reaction effects are particularly prominent.

  15. Breakdown of a space charge limited regime of a sheath in a weakly collisional plasma bounded by walls with secondary electron emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydorenko, D; Kaganovich, I; Raitses, Y; Smolyakov, A

    2009-10-02

    A new regime of plasma-wall interaction is identified in particle-in-cell simulations of a hot plasma bounded by walls with secondary electron emission. Such a plasma has a strongly non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution function and consists of bulk plasma electrons and beams of secondary electrons. In the new regime, the plasma sheath is not in a steady space charge limited state even though the secondary electron emission produced by the plasma bulk electrons is so intense that the corresponding partial emission coefficient exceeds unity. Instead, the plasma-sheath system performs relaxation oscillations by switching quasiperiodically between the space charge limited and non-space-charge limited states.

  16. Velocity dispersion of correlated energy spread electron beams in the free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, L. T.; Maier, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of a correlated linear energy/velocity chirp in the electron beam in the free electron laser (FEL), and how to compensate for its effects by using an appropriate taper (or reverse-taper) of the undulator magnetic field, is well known. The theory, as described thus far, ignores velocity dispersion from the chirp in the undulator, taking the limit of a ‘small’ chirp. In the following, the physics of compensating for chirp in the beam is revisited, including the effects of velocity dispersion, or beam compression or decompression, in the undulator. It is found that the limit of negligible velocity dispersion in the undulator is different from that previously identified as the small chirp limit, and is more significant than previously considered. The velocity dispersion requires a taper which is nonlinear to properly compensate for the effects of the detuning, and also results in a varying peak current (end thus a varying gain length) over the length of the undulator. The results may be especially significant for plasma driven FELs and low energy linac driven FEL test facilities.

  17. Driven phase space vortices in plasmas with nonextensive velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pallavi; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of chirp-driven electrostatic waves in unmagnetized plasmas is numerically investigated by using a one-dimensional (1D) Vlasov-poisson solver with periodic boundary conditions. The initial velocity distribution of the 1D plasma is assumed to be governed by nonextensive q distribution [C. Tsallis, J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. For an infinitesimal amplitude of an external drive, we investigate the effects of chirp driven dynamics that leads to the formation of giant phase space vortices (PSV) for both Maxwellian (q = 1) and non-Maxwellian ( q ≠ 1 ) plasmas. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the formation of giant PSV with multiple extrema and phase velocities is shown to be dependent on the strength of "q". Novel features such as "shark"-like and transient "honeycomb"-like structures in phase space are discussed. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with previous work.

  18. Velocity Dispersion of Correlated Energy Spread Electron Beams in the Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, L T

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a correlated linear energy/velocity chirp in the electron beam in the FEL, and how to compensate for its effects by using an appropriate taper (or reverse-taper) of the undulator magnetic field, is well known. The theory, as described thus far, ignores velocity dispersion from the chirp in the undulator, taking the limit of a `small' chirp. In the following, the physics of compensating for chirp in the beam is revisited, including the effects of velocity dispersion, or beam compression or decompression, in the undulator. It is found that the limit of negligible velocity dispersion in the undulator is different from that previously identified as the small chirp limit, and is more significant than previously considered. The velocity dispersion requires a taper which is non-linear to properly compensate for the effects of the detuning, and also results in a varying peak current (end thus a varying gain length) over the length of the undulator. The results may be especially significant for plasma d...

  19. Whistler instability in an electron-magnetohydrodynamic spheromak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R L; Urrutia, J M; Strohmaier, K D

    2007-12-31

    A three-dimensional magnetic vortex, propagating in the whistler mode, has been produced in a laboratory plasma. Its magnetic energy is converted into electron kinetic energy. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions are formed which give rise to kinetic whistler instabilities. The propagating vortex radiates whistler modes along the ambient magnetic field. A new instability mechanism is proposed.

  20. Impact of Excitation and Reaction Processes on FRC Thruster Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    bimodality essentially disappears after about 50 µs, but the ion distribution function is still visibly non - Maxwellian even after 1 ms. The neutral atom...manifested in differences in their translational temperatures as well as in non - Maxwellian distribution functions. The elector and ion velocity...electron, and neutral temperatures strongly differ, and the ion and neutral gas distribution function is strongly non - Maxwellian . The electron velocity

  1. Ion and electron velocity distributions within flux transfer events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Stansberry, J. A.; Bame, S. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gosling, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    The detailed nature of the thermal and suprathermal ion and electron distributions within magnetic flux transfer events (FTEs) is examined. Examples of both magnetosheath FTEs and magnetospheric FTEs are discussed. The detailed distributions confirm that FTEs contain a mixture of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasmas. To lowest order, the distributions are consistent with a simple superposition of the two interpenetrating populations, with no strong interactions between them. To first order, some interesting differences appear, especially in the electron distributions, suggesting that considerable pitch angle scattering and some electron energy diffusion are also occurring. These observations should provide a useful test of analytical and numerical studies of interpenetrating plasmas.

  2. Measurement of the electron drift velocity for directional dark matter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mayet, F; Bosson, G; Bourrion, O; Guillaudin, O; Lamblin, J; Richer, J P; Riffard, Q; Santos, D; Iguaz, F J; Lebreton, L; Maire, D

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional track reconstruction is a key issue for directional Dark Matter detection. It requires a precise knowledge of the electron drift velocity. Magboltz simulations are known to give a good evaluation of this parameter. However, large TPC operated underground on long time scale may be characterized by an effective electron drift velocity that may differ from the value evaluated by simulation. In situ measurement of this key parameter is hence a way to avoid bias in the 3D track reconstruction. We present a dedicated method for the measurement of the electron drift velocity with the MIMAC detector. It is tested on two gas mixtures : $\\rm CF_4$ and $\\rm CF_4+CHF_3$. We also show that adding $\\rm CHF_3$ allows us to lower the electron drift velocity while keeping almost the same Fluorine content of the gas mixture.

  3. The study of dynamics of electrons in the presence of large current densities; Etude de la dynamique des electrons en presence de fortes densites de courant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G

    2007-11-15

    The runaway electron effect is considered in different fields: nuclear fusion, or the heating of the solar corona. In this thesis, we are interested in runaway electrons in the ionosphere. We consider the issue of electrons moving through an ionospheric gas of positive ions and neutrals under the influence of a parallel electric field. We develop a kinetic model of collisions including electrons/electrons, electrons/ions and electrons/neutrals collisions. We use a Fokker-Planck approach to describe binary collisions between charged particles with a long-range interaction. A computational example is given illustrating the approach to equilibrium and the impact of the different terms. Then, a static electric field is applied in a new sample run. In this run, the electrons move in the z direction, parallel to the electric field. The first results show that all the electron distribution functions are non-Maxwellian. Furthermore, runaway electrons can carry a significant part of the total current density up to 20% of the total current density. Nevertheless, we note that the divergence free of the current density is not conserved. We introduce major changes in order to take into account the variation of the different moments of the ion distribution functions. We observe that the electron distribution functions are still non-Maxwellian. Runaway electrons are created and carry the current density. The core distribution stay at rest. As these electrons undergo less collisions, they increase the plasma conductivity. We make a parametric study. We fit the electron distribution function by two Maxwellian. We show that the time to reach the maximal current density is a key point. Thus, when we increase this time, we modify the temperatures. The current density plays a primary role. When the current density increases, all the moments of the distributions increase: electron density and mean velocity of the suprathermal distribution and the electron temperature of the core and

  4. Effects of Perpendicular Thermal Velocities on the Transverse Instability in Electron Phase Space Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ming-Yu; WU Hong; LU Quan-Ming; XUE Bing-Sen

    2010-01-01

    @@ A multi-dimensional electron phase-space hole(electron hole)is considered to be unstable to the transverse instability.We perform two-dimensional(219)particle-in-cell(PIC)simulations to study the evolutions of electron holes in weakly magnetized plasma(Ωe < ωpe,where Ωe and ωpe are the electron gyrofrequency and plasma frequency,respectively),and the effects of perpendicular thermal velocities on the transverse instability are investigated.

  5. Electronic cam motion generation with special reference to constrained velocity, acceleration, and jerk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Shu; Jeng, Shyr-Long; Chieng, Wei-Hua

    2004-07-01

    Electronic cam motion involves velocity tracking control of the master motor and trajectory generation of the slave motor. Special concerns such as the limits of the velocity, acceleration, and jerk are beyond the considerations in the conventional electronic cam motion control. This study proposes the curve-fitting of a Lagrange polynomial to the cam profile, based on trajectory optimization by cubic B-spline interpolation. The proposed algorithms may yield a higher tracking precision than the conventional master-slaves control method does, providing an optimization problem is concerned. The optimization problem contains three dynamic constraints including velocity, acceleration, and jerk of the motor system.

  6. Monte Carlo computations of F-region incoherent radar spectra at high latitudes and the use of a simple method for non-Maxwellian spectral calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, K.; Barakat, A.; St-Maurice, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of ion velocity distributions in the high-latitude F region have been performed in order to improve the calculation of incoherent radar spectra in the auroral ionosphere. The results confirm that when the ion temperature becomes large due to frictional heating in the presence of collisions with the neutral background constituent, F region spectra evolve from a normal double hump, to a triple hump, to a spectrum with a single maximum. An empirical approach is developed to overcome the inadequacy of the Maxwellian assumption for the case of radar aspect angles of between 30 and 70 deg.

  7. A method to deconvolve stellar rotational velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Cure, Michel; Cassetti, Julia; Christen, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    Rotational speed is an important physical parameter of stars and knowing the distribution of stellar rotational velocities is essential for the understanding stellar evolution. However, it cannot be measured directly but the convolution of the rotational speed and the sine of the inclination angle, $v \\sin i$. We developed a method to deconvolve this inverse problem and obtain the cumulative distribution function (CDF) for stellar rotational velocities extending the work of Chandrasekhar & M\\"unch (1950). This method is applied a) to theoretical synthetic data recovering the original velocity distribution with very small error; b) to a sample of about 12.000 field main--sequence stars, corroborating that the velocity distribution function is non--Maxwellian, but is better described by distributions based on the concept of maximum entropy, such as Tsallis or Kaniadakis distribution functions. This is a very robust and novel method that deconvolve the rotational velocity cumulative distribution function fro...

  8. Influence of Fermi velocity engineering on electronic and optical properties of graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aram, Tahereh Nemati [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Neel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Asgari, Asghar, E-mail: asgari@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-06-05

    In this paper, using Kronig–Penney model, the electronic states in graphene-based superlattices with various substrates and considering exact electron Fermi velocity values are investigated. The analysis of our results clearly indicates that the difference between Fermi velocity values of gaped and gapless graphene regions determines the patency rate of band gap. Also, using transfer matrix method (TMM) the absorbance spectrum of mentioned structures is calculated. The more important result is that the absorbance of these structures is significantly near zero. - Highlights: • The electronic states in graphene superlattices with various substrates are investigated. • The exact electron Fermi velocity values are considered. • Using TMM the absorbance spectrum of two graphene-based superlattices is calculated. • The widest (narrowest) energy band gap belong to quartz–SiC (quartz–h-BN) superlattice.

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of transient electron velocity overshoot in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wraback, M.; Shen, H.; Rudin, S. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, AMSRL-SE-EM, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Bellotti, E. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, MA 02215-2421 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    We employ an optically detected time-of-flight technique with femtosecond resolution that monitors the change in the electroabsorption due to charge transport in an AlGaN/GaN heterojunction p-i-n diode to measure the electron velocity overshoot in GaN at room temperature. It has been found that electron velocity overshoot occurs at electric fields as low as 105 kV/cm, with the peak transient velocity increasing with E up to {proportional_to}320 kV/cm, at which field a peak velocity of 7.25 x 10{sup 7} cm/s is attained within the first 200 fs after photoexcitation. At higher fields, the increase in transit time with increasing field suggests the onset of negative differential resistance due to intervalley transfer. The existence of transient velocity overshoot at fields lower than the calculated peak steady-state velocity suggests that it occurs while the electrons are primarily in the {gamma} valley. Full zone Monte Carlo calculations imply that the overshoot is associated more with band nonparabolicity in the {gamma} valley than with intervalley transfer at fields less than 325 kV/cm, and, in conjunction with theoretical calculations employing a semiclassical transport model, confirm the importance of this nonparabolicity for the determination of the temporal shape of the transient velocity overshoot curves. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. A benchmark of the He-like triplet for ions with $6\\leq Z\\leq 14$ in Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Y; Bautista, M A; Mendoza, C

    2016-01-01

    After an extensive assessment of the effective collision strengths available to model the He-like triplet of C V, N VI, O VII, Ne IX, Mg XI and Si XIII in collisionally dominated plasmas, new accurate effective collision strengths are reported for Ne IX. The uncertainty intervals of the density and temperature diagnostics due to the atomic data errors are also determined for both Maxwell-Boltzmann and $\\kappa$ electron-energy distributions. It is shown that these uncertainty bands limit the temperature range where the temperature line-ratio diagnostic can be applied and its effectiveness to discern the electron-energy distribution type. These findings are benchmarked with Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra of stellar coronae and with tokamak measurements.

  11. A benchmark of the He-like triplet for ions with 6 ≤ Z ≤ 14 in Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Y.; Gatuzz, E.; Bautista, M. A.; Mendoza, C.

    2016-09-01

    After an extensive assessment of the effective collision strengths available to model the He-like triplet of C V, N VI, O VII, Ne IX, Mg XI and Si XIII in collisionally dominated plasmas, new accurate effective collision strengths are reported for Ne IX. The uncertainty intervals of the density and temperature diagnostics due to the atomic data errors are also determined for both Maxwell-Boltzmann and κ electron-energy distributions. It is shown that these uncertainty bands limit the temperature range where the temperature line-ratio diagnostic can be applied and its effectiveness to discern the electron-energy distribution type. These findings are benchmarked with Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra of stellar coronae and with tokamak measurements.

  12. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Waves in a Plasma Described by Kappa Velocity Distribution as Observed in the Saturńs Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. V.; Barbosa, M. V. G.; Simoes, F. J. L., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Observations have shown that several regions in space plasmas exhibit non-Maxwellian distributions with high energy superthermal tails. Kappa velocity distribution functions can describe many of these regions and have been used since the 60's. They suit well to represent superthermal tails in solar wind as well as to obtain plasma parameters of plasma within planetary magnetospheres. A set of initial velocities following kappa distribution functions is used in KEMPO1 particle simulation code to analyze the normal modes of wave propagation. Initial conditions are determined using observed characteristics for Saturńs magnetosphere. Two electron species with different temperatures and densities and ions as a third species are used. Each electron population is described by a different kappa index. Particular attention is given to perpendicular propagation, Bernstein modes, and parallel propagation, Langmuir and electron-acoustic modes. The dispersion relation for the Bernstein modes is strongly influenced by the shape of the velocity distribution and consequently by the value of kappa index. Simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the dispersion relation obtained in the literature and they are in good agreement.

  13. Engineering the electronic structure of graphene superlattices via Fermi velocity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene superlattices have attracted much research interest in the last years, since it is possible to manipulate the electronic properties of graphene in these structures. It has been verified that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic structure of the system. The electronic structure in the vicinity of these points has been studied for a gapless and gapped graphene superlattice and for a graphene superlattice with a spatially modulated energy gap. In each case a different behavior was obtained. In this work we show that via Fermi velocity engineering it is possible to tune the electronic properties of a graphene superlattice to match all the previous cases studied. We also obtained new features of the system never observed before, reveling that the electronic structure of graphene is very sensitive to the modulation of the Fermi velocity. The results obtained here are relevant for the development of novel graphene-based electronic devices.

  14. Signatures of the non-Maxwellian $\\kappa$-distributions in optically thin line spectra \\subtitle{I. Theory and synthetic Fe IX--XIII spectra}

    CERN Document Server

    Dudík, J; Mason, H E; Dzifčáková, E

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of diagnosing the degree of departure from the Maxwellian distribution using single-ion spectra originating in astrophysical plasmas in collisional ionization equilibrium. New atomic data for excitation of Fe IX-XIII are integrated under the assumption of a kappa-distribution of electron energies. Diagnostic methods using lines of a single ion formed at any wavelength are explored. Such methods minimize uncertainties from the ionization and recombination rates, as well as the possible presence of non-equilibrium ionization. Approximations to the collision strengths are also investigated. The calculated intensities of most of the Fe IX-XIII EUV lines show consistent behaviour with kappa at constant temperature. Intensities of these lines decrease with kappa, with the vast majority of ratios of strong lines showing little or no sensitivity to kappa. Several of the line ratios, especially involving temperature-sensitive lines, show a sensitivity to kappa that is of the order of sev...

  15. Electron velocity saturation and intervalley transfer in monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    Monolayer MoS2 is a material with a rich history and that is being suggested for many applications in electronics, including novel electron devices. Recent experiments has shown that it has a saturation velocity at high electric fields well below other electronic materials such as Si. This is a very important property that is crucial to high performance electron devices. Here, we study this property with ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of the electron transport. We find that the velocity at high electric fields is larger than the experiments, and does not show a saturation up to 100 kV cm-1. In addition, the transport at high fields is dominated by inter-valley transfer to the T valleys.

  16. Electron drift velocities in fast Argon and CF4 based drift gases

    CERN Document Server

    van Apeldoorn, G

    1998-01-01

    98-063 Electron drift velocities in gas mixtures were measured in a tabletop experiment using a nitrogen laser to create the primary electrons. The maximum drift times for electrons in a 5 mm (10 mm) honeycomb drift cell at 2200 V anode voltage were 28 ns (53 ns) and 21 ns (61 ns) for Ar-Cf4-CH4 (75/18/6) and Ar-CF4-CO2 (68/27/5), respectively. Changing the ratio of the latter mix did not change the drift velocity very much. The gains of the gases are ~10^4 for a single primary electron. CF4 causes electron attachment. The measured drift times agree well with GARFIELD simulations.

  17. Analytical calculation of electron group velocity surfaces in uniform strained graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arias, Wilfrido A.; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-12-01

    Electron group velocity for graphene under uniform strain is obtained analytically by using the tight-binding (TB) approximation. Such closed analytical expressions are useful in order to calculate the electronic, thermal and optical properties of strained graphene. These results allow to understand the behavior of electrons when graphene is subjected to strong strain and nonlinear corrections, for which the usual Dirac approach is no longer valid. Some particular cases of uniaxial and shear strain were analyzed. The evolution of the electron group velocity indicates a break-up of the trigonal warping symmetry, which is replaced by a warping consistent with the symmetry of the strained reciprocal lattice. To do this, analytical expressions for the shape of the first Brillouin zone (BZ) of the honeycomb strained reciprocal lattice are provided. Finally, the Fermi velocity becomes strongly anisotropic, i.e., for a strong pure shear strain (20% of the lattice parameter), the two inequivalent Dirac cones merge and the Fermi velocity is zero in one of the principal axis of deformation. We found that nonlinear terms are essential to describe the effects of deformation for electrons near or at the Fermi energy.

  18. Method of temperature rising velocity and threshold control of electron beam brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuedong Wang; Shun Yao

    2005-01-01

    In order to accommodate electron beam to the brazing of the joints with various curve shapes and the brazing of thermo sensitive materials, the method of electron beam scanning and brazing temperature control was developed, in which electron beam was controlled to scan according to predefined scanning track, and the actual temperature rising velocity of the brazed seam was limited in an allowed scope by detecting the brazed seam temperature, calculating the temperature rising velocity and adjusting the beam current during the brazing process; in addition, through the setting of the highest allowed temperature, the actual temperature of the brazed seam could be controlled not exceeding the threshold set value, and these two methods could be employed alone or jointly. It is shown that high precision temperature control in electron beam brazing could be realized and the productivity be increased by the proposed method.

  19. Electron velocity distribution functions from the solar wind to the corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, M.; Pierrard, V.; Lemaire, J.; Larson, D.

    1999-06-01

    Typical electron velocity distribution functions observed at 1 AU from the Sun by the instrument 3DP aboard of WIND are used as boundary conditions to determine the electron velocity distribution function at 4 solar radii in the corona. The velocity distribution functions (VDF) at low altitude are obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation, using two different sets of boundary conditions. The first set typically corresponds to a VDF observed in a low speed solar wind flow (i.e., characterized by ``core'' and ``halo'' electrons); the second one corresponds to high speed solar wind (i.e. characterized by ``core,'' ``halo'' and ``strahl'' populations). We use the observed electron VDFs as test particles which are submitted to external forces and Coulomb collisions with a background plasma. Closer to the Sun, the relative density of the core electrons is found to increase compared to the densities of the halo population. Nevertheless, we find that in order to match the observed distributions at 1 AU, suprathermal tails have to be present in the VDF of the test electron at low altitudes in the corona. Note that the present work has been submitted to Journal of Geophysical Research [6]. This is the reason why we present here only an extended summary.

  20. Electron Velocity Distributions Measured with Soft-X-Ray PHA at RTP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Cruz, D. F.; Meijer, J. H.; Donne, A. J. H.

    1992-01-01

    A soft x-ray pulse height analysis (PHA) system is begin used at the Rijhuizen Tokamak Project to study the electron velocity distribution. A liquid nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector is used to view the plasma along a tangential line of sight. A gas cell in combination with Al foils is used for filter

  1. A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas using a Frisch-grid ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-12-01

    A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas is proposed. Based on the cathode and the anode signal waveforms of the Frisch-grid ionization chamber, the electron drift velocity is extracted. With this method, the electron drift velocities in Ar + 10% CH4, Ar + 3.5% CO2 and Kr + 2.7% CO2 gases have been measured and the results are compared with the existing measurements and the simulating results. Using this method, the electron drift velocity can be monitored throughout the experiment of charged particle without bothering the measurement of other parameters, such as the energy and orientation.

  2. PIC Simulations of the Effect of Velocity Space Instabilities on Electron Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    In low-collisionality plasmas, velocity-space instabilities are a key mechanism providing an effective collisionality for the plasma. We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the interplay between electron- and ion-scale velocity-space instabilities and their effect on electron pressure anisotropy, viscous heating, and thermal conduction. The adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment in low-collisionality plasmas leads to pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}j\\equiv {p}\\perp ,j-{p}\\parallel ,j\\gt 0, if the magnetic field {\\boldsymbol{B}} is amplified ({p}\\perp ,j and {p}\\parallel ,j denote the pressure of species j (electron, ion) perpendicular and parallel to {\\boldsymbol{B}}). If the resulting anisotropy is large enough, it can in turn trigger small-scale plasma instabilities. Our PIC simulations explore the nonlinear regime of the mirror, IC, and electron whistler instabilities, through continuous amplification of the magnetic field | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| by an imposed shear in the plasma. In the regime 1≲ {β }j≲ 20 ({β }j\\equiv 8π {p}j/| {\\boldsymbol{B}}{| }2), the saturated electron pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}{{e}}/{p}\\parallel ,{{e}}, is determined mainly by the (electron-lengthscale) whistler marginal stability condition, with a modest factor of ˜1.5-2 decrease due to the trapping of electrons into ion-lengthscale mirrors. We explicitly calculate the mean free path of the electrons and ions along the mean magnetic field and provide a simple physical prescription for the mean free path and thermal conductivity in low-collisionality β j ≳ 1 plasmas. Our results imply that velocity-space instabilities likely decrease the thermal conductivity of plasma in the outer parts of massive, hot, galaxy clusters. We also discuss the implications of our results for electron heating and thermal conduction in low-collisionality accretion flows onto black holes, including Sgr A* in the Galactic Center.

  3. Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by velocity shear

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Califano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibria can exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by satellite and laboratory measurements. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and agyrotropic. We discuss how the propagation of magneto-elastic waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and its spatial filamentation which are due to the action of both the magnetic field and flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution.

  4. Revised Model of the Steady-state Solar Wind Halo Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-08-01

    A recent study discussed the steady-state model for solar wind electrons during quiet time conditions. The electrons emanating from the Sun are treated in a composite three-population model—the low-energy Maxwellian core with an energy range of tens of eV, the intermediate ˜102-103 eV energy-range (“halo”) electrons, and the high ˜103-105 eV energy-range (“super-halo”) electrons. In the model, the intermediate energy halo electrons are assumed to be in resonance with transverse EM fluctuations in the whistler frequency range (˜102 Hz), while the high-energy super-halo electrons are presumed to be in steady-state wave-particle resonance with higher-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the Langmuir frequency range (˜105 Hz). A comparison with STEREO and WIND spacecraft data was also made. However, ignoring the influence of Langmuir fluctuations on the halo population turns out to be an unjustifiable assumption. The present paper rectifies the previous approach by including both Langmuir and whistler fluctuations in the construction of the steady-state velocity distribution function for the halo population, and demonstrates that the role of whistler-range fluctuation is minimal unless the fluctuation intensity is arbitrarily raised. This implies that the Langmuir-range fluctuations, known as the quasi thermal noise, are important for both halo and super-halo electron velocity distribution.

  5. Wave solutions of ion cyclotron heated plasmas with self-consistent velocity distributions in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Wright, John; Bonoli, Paul; Harvey, Robert

    2015-11-01

    We describe a numerical model for the propagation and absorption of ion cyclotron waves in a tokamak with a non-Maxwellian velocity space distribution function. The non-Maxwellian distribution is calculated by solving Maxwell's equations and the Fokker-Plank equation self-consistently. This approach will be useful to interpret measurements of minority hydrogen tail formation during ICRF heating experiments in Alcator C-Mod. To couple the Maxwell equation solver with Fokker-Plank equation solver, the quasilinear diffusion coefficients for the fundamental ion cyclotron absorption and the first harmonic absorption are calculated. In a previous study, the all-orders spectral algorithm wave solver (AORSA) was coupled with the Fokker-Plank code (CQL3D) to find the self-consistent non-Maxwellian distribution. We derive the modified quasilinear diffusion coefficients for the finite Larmor radius (FLR) approximation using a significantly faster wave solver (TORIC) following the approach by Jaeger. The coupled TORIC-CQL3D model will be compared against results from AORSA-CQL3D in order to verify the accuracy of the reduced FLR physics in TORIC. Work supported by US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  6. Electron Velocity Enhancement in Polarization-doped AlGaN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linas ARDARAVIČIUS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional electron gas/slabs (3DEG/S can be obtained using the technique of polarization bulk doping in graded AlGaN semiconductor layer on GaN. Transport characteristics of the graded AlGaN are investigated experimentally through nanosecond-pulsed measurements. The measured current-voltage dependences were used to determine drift velocity data assuming no change in electron density upon applied electric field. The velocity results are compared with that of GaN and ungraded AlGaN/GaN. Also, experimental results are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.2.1797

  7. Velocity space evolution of a minority energetic electron population undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W. N.; Chapman, S. C., E-mail: S.C.Chapman@warwick.ac.uk [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic evolution in velocity space of a minority suprathermal electron population that is undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI) is investigated using the results from fully nonlinear numerical simulations that self-consistently evolve particles and fields in a plasma. Electron trajectories in phase space during different stages of the ADI are captured, and are analysed in relation to the characteristics of the excited electric fields and of the overall distribution of particles. For some electrons, trapping and mirroring effects are observed during the saturation phase. A relationship between the second order moments of the perpendicular electron distribution function and time is established, and is used to investigate the range of applicability of analytical approximations drawn from classical theory, that involve a quasilinear wave-driven diffusion operator.

  8. PIC Simulations of the Effect of Velocity Space Instabilities on Electron Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Riquelme, Mario; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In low-collisionality plasmas, velocity-space instabilities are a key mechanism providing an effective collisionality for the plasma. We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the interplay between electron and ion-scale velocity-space instabilities and their effect on electron pressure anisotropy, viscous heating, and thermal conduction. The adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment in low-collisionality plasmas leads to pressure anisotropy, $p_{\\perp,j} > p_{||,j}$, if the magnetic field $\\vec{B}$ is amplified ($p_{\\perp,j}$ and $p_{||,j}$ denote the pressure of species $j$ [electron, ion] perpendicular and parallel to $\\vec{B}$). If the resulting anisotropy is large enough, it can in turn trigger small-scale plasma instabilities. Our PIC simulations explore the nonlinear regime of the mirror, ion-cyclotron, and electron whistler instabilities, through continuous amplification of the magnetic field $|\\vec{B}|$ by an imposed shear in the plasma. In the regime $1 \\lesssim \\beta_j \\lesssim 20$ ($\\be...

  9. Measurements of electron drift velocity in isobutane using the pulsed Townsend technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B.; Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2010-07-01

    Full text. The electron drift velocity characterizes the electric conductivity of weakly ionized gases and is one of the most important transport parameters for simulation and modeling of radiation detectors and plasma discharges. This work presents the results of electron drift velocity as a function of the reduced electric field obtained in nitrogen and isobutane by the Pulsed Townsend technique. Due to its excellent timing properties, isobutane is a common component of standard mixtures used in RPCs (Resistive Plate Chambers), however, at moderate electric fields strength (50 Td <= E/N <= 200 Td), there are insufficient data available in literature for this gas. In our experimental apparatus, electrons are liberated from an aluminum cathode (40mm diameter) due to the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (MNL202-LD LTB) and are accelerated by the applied electric field toward the anode, made of a high resistivity glass (2 x 10{sup 10} {Omega}{center_dot}m). The fast electric signals generated is amplified and were digitalized in a 1 GHz bandwidth oscilloscope to measure the electrons transit time and to calculate the electron drift velocity in different gaps between anode and cathode. As the timing information presented in the fast electric signal originated in the anode is significant in our application, the amplifier circuit had to hold special features in order to preserve the signal shape. The linear amplifier used, based on the BGM1013 integrated circuit (Philips R), reaches up to 2.1 GHz bandwidth with 35.5 dB gain and was developed and built at Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics/Portugal. In order to validate this method, measurements were initially carried out in pure nitrogen, in reduced electric fields ranging from 148 to 194 Td. These results showed good agreement with those found in the literature for this largely investigated gas. The measurements of electron drift velocities in pure isobutane were performed as a function

  10. Effect of transverse electron velocities on the longitudinal cooling force in the Fermilab electron cooler

    CERN Document Server

    Khilkevich, Andrei; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2012-01-01

    In Fermilab's electron cooler, a 0.1A, 4.3MeV DC electron beam propagates through the 20 m cooling section, which is immersed in a weak longitudinal magnetic field. A proper adjustment of 200 dipole coils, installed in the cooling section for correction of the magnetic field imperfections, can create a helix-like trajectory with the wavelength of 1-10 m. The longitudinal cooling force is measured in the presence of such helixes at different wavelengths and amplitudes. The results are compared with a model calculating the cooling force as a sum of collisions with small impact parameters, where the helical nature of the coherent angle is ignored, and far collisions, where the effect of the coherent motion is neglected. A qualitative agreement is found.

  11. Design of electron wave filters in monolayer graphene with velocity modulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Li-Feng; Dong Li-Min; Fang Chao

    2013-01-01

    We compare the transport properties of electrons in monolayer graphene by modulating the Fermi velocity inside the barrier.A critical transmission angle is found only when the Fermi velocity in the barriers is larger than the one outside the barriers.It is shown that the transmission exhibits periodicity with the incident angle below the critical transmission angle,and attenuates exponentially in the opposite situation.For both situations,peak splitting occurs in the transmission as the number of the velocity barriers increases,and the characteristics of the transmission suggest an interesting application of an excellent band-pass filter.The dependence of the conductance on the Fermi energy through an identical velocitymodulation structure differs wildly with different Fermi velocities of the barrier.The counterpart of the peak splitting is the sharp oscillations in the conductance profile.Furthermore,some oscillations for the multiple barriers are so sharp that the structure may be used as an excellent sensor.

  12. Electron Capture from Linear Stark Rydberg States above the Matching Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, M.; Creasey, C.; MacAdam, K. B.

    1998-05-01

    The relative cross section for electron capture by singly charged ions from linear Stark Rydberg states of Na has been measured, both as a function of the angle of impact and of projectile velocity. The target, the topmost state of the n = 24 Stark manifold, was prepared by two-step laser excitation from the Na ground state, via 3p_3/2, in an electric field F_Stark= 160 V/cm. By means of a device perfected in our laboratory (the "Stark Barrel"), we aligned the target by adiabatically switching the electric field, after excitation, down to a preset low value and a desired direction in the plane determined by the ion and Na beams. Thermionic emission ion sources of Li and Na were operated at accelerating voltages 400-2000 V to allow study of electron capture in the reduced velocity range v = 1.0 - 2.5. This augments an earlier study by Homan footnote D. M. Homan, Ph. D. Dissertation, University of Kentucky 1997, unpublished. at lower velocities.

  13. Effect of orbital angular momentum on electron acoustic waves in double-Kappa plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Aman-ur; Shan, S. Ali; Hamza, M. Yousaf; Lee, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    Kinetic theory of electron acoustic waves (EAWs) in the presence of wave angular momentum has been derived to study the effect of wave angular momentum on the propagation of EAWs in a non-Maxwellian plasma. Both types of electrons (hot and cool) are modeled as Kappa-distributed velocity distribution functions. The theory is also applied to Saturn's magnetosphere where these kinds of distribution functions are commonly found. It is seen that the presence of wave angular momentum in the model has a significant effect on the existence of the regions where EAWs are weakly damped. The effect of wave angular momentum on EAWs is studied by defining a parameter η = k/(lqθ), which is the ratio of the planar wave number to the azimuthal wave number. The wave is purely planar if η→∞. The weakly damped region of EAWs depends strongly on this parameter in addition to other parameters such as hot electron spectral index κh, cool electron spectral index κc, the fraction of hot electrons, and hot to cool electrons temperature ratio. The results also show the effect of η on the propagation of EAWs in various regions of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  14. Linear and nonlinear studies of velocity shear driven three dimensional electron-magnetohydrodynamics instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaur, Gurudatt; Das, Amita [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The study of electron velocity shear driven instability in electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) regime in three dimensions has been carried out. It is well known that the instability is non-local in the plane defined by the flow direction and that of the shear, which is the usual Kelvin-Helmholtz mode, often termed as the sausage mode in the context of EMHD. On the other hand, a local instability with perturbations in the plane defined by the shear and the magnetic field direction exists which is termed as kink mode. The interplay of these two modes for simple sheared flow case as well as that when an external magnetic field exists has been studied extensively in the present manuscript in both linear and nonlinear regimes. Finally, these instability processes have been investigated for the exact 2D dipole solutions of EMHD equations [M. B. Isichenko and A. N. Marnachev, Sov. Phys. JETP 66, 702 (1987)] for which the electron flow velocity is sheared. It has been shown that dipoles are very robust and stable against the sausage mode as the unstable wavelengths are typically longer than the dipole size. However, we observe that they do get destabilized by the local kink mode.

  15. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  16. Double electron capture of He sup 2+ from He at high velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.; Justiniano, E.; Vogt, H. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Deco, G.; Gruen, N. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1991-03-14

    The double electron capture process by He{sup 2+} ions in collisions with helium is studied in the high velocity regime with the measurement of total cross sections at 1.5, 4 and 6 MeV beam energy and angular differential cross sections for 1.5 MeV. The experimental results compare well with theoretical calculations which include correlation effects in the initial and final He ground states for the derivation of the capture amplitude in a continuum distorted-wave approximation. (author).

  17. Energy distributions of electrons in electron beam produced nitrogen plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhre, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    A theory was developed which predicts the equilibrium electron energy distributions resulting from the injection of an electron beam into molecular nitrogen. The results were highly non-Maxwellian with a depletion region existing near 2.5 eV. Using these distributions, fractional power transfers to various excitation processes were calculated. The theory was verified experimentally by using Langmuir probes to measure the electron energy distributions produced by a beam generated by a cold cathode discharge in low pressure nitrogen. The distributions were measured in absolute units and compared directly with theory. All of the major features of the theory were found to be present in the measurements.

  18. STRONG VELOCITY DEPENDENCE OF ELECTRON-CAPTURE IN COLLISIONS BETWEEN ALIGNED NA-ASTERISK(3P) AND HE-2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHLATMANN, AR; HOEKSTRA, R; MORGENSTERN, R; OLSON, RE; PASCALE, J

    1993-01-01

    By analyzing spectra of emitted photons, we have studied state-selective electron capture in collisions of He2+ on aligned Na*(3p) atoms that span the ''velocity-matching'' energy between projectile and target electron. We find a strong dependence of the capture cross sections on the Na*(3p) orbital

  19. Broadband Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions for Use in the Jila Electron Edm Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresh, Daniel N.; Cossel, Kevin C.; Cornell, Eric A.; Ye, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment will use a low-lying, metastable ^3Δ_1 state in trapped molecular ions of HfF^+ or ThF^+. Prior to this work, the low-lying states of these molecules had been investigated by PFI-ZEKE spectroscopy. However, there were no detailed studies of the electronic structure. The recently developed technique of frequency comb velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) provides broad-bandwidth, high-resolution, ion-sensitive spectroscopy, allowing the acquisition of 150 cm^{-1} of continuous spectra in 30 minutes over 1500 simultaneous channels. By supplementing this technique with cw-laser VMS, we have investigated the electronic structure of HfF^+ in the frequency range of 9950 to 14600 cm^{-1}, accurately fitting and assigning 16 rovibronic transitions involving 8 different electronic states including the X^1Σ^+ and a^3Δ_1 states. In addition, an observed ^3Π_{0+} state with coupling to both the X and a states has been used in the actual eEDM experiment to coherently transfer population from the rovibronic ground state of HfF^+ to the eEDM science state. Furthermore, we report on current efforts of applying frequency comb VMS at 700 - 900 nm to the study of ThF^+, which has a lower energy ^3Δ_1 state and a greater effective electric field, and will provide increased sensitivity for a measurement of the eEDM. A. E. Leanhardt et. al., Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 270, 1-25 (2011). B. J. Barker, I. O. Antonov, M. C. Heaven, K. A. Peterson, Journal of Chemical Physics 136, 104305 (2012). L. C. Sinclair, K. C. Cossel, T. Coffey, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, Physical Review Letters 107, 093002 (2011). K.C. Cossel et. al., Chemical Physics Letters 546, 1-11 (2012).

  20. Drift velocities of excess electrons in 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane and tetramethylsilane: A fast drift technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faidas, H.; Christophorou, L. G.; McCorkle, D. L.

    1989-11-01

    A new fast drift technique for the measurement of short drift times for excess electrons is dielectric liquids is described. The technique was used to measure the drift velocities of excess electrons in 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane and tetramethylsilane as a function of the applied uniform electric field E up to respectively 11.5 × 10 4 and 12.3 × 10 4 V cm -1; at these maximum values of E, the drift velocities are 2.6 × 10 6 and 7.4 × 10 6 cm s -1, respectively.

  1. Observations of the velocity distribution of solar wind ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.; Coplan, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements made by the Isee 3 ion composition experiment have been used to determine the kinetic temperatures of 3He(++), 4He(++), 16O(6+), and 16O(7+) in the solar wind. It is found that these temperatures generally obey the relation that T(i)/m(i) equals const, but fluctuations, some of which are caused by dynamical effects in the flow, are observed. The temperature of oxygen sometimes rises above 10 K, which is very strong evidence for heating outside the collisional region of the corona. The tendency toward equal temperatures per nucleon occurs everywhere where collisions are unimportant, suggesting that the temperatures are set up close to the sun rather than elsewhere in the interplanetary medium. The velocity distribution function of helium is observed to be non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high velocity tail.

  2. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  3. Measurement of surface recombination velocity for silicon solar cells using a scanning electron microscope with pulsed beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.; Cheng, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of surface recombination velocity in the design and fabrication of silicon solar cells is discussed. A scanning electron microscope with pulsed electron beam was used to measure this parameter of silicon surfaces. It is shown that the surface recombination velocity, s, increases by an order of magnitude when an etched surface degrades, probably as a result of environmental reaction. A textured front-surface-field cell with a high-low junction near the surface shows the effect of minority carrier reflection and an apparent reduction of s, whereas a tandem-junction cell shows an increasing s value. Electric fields at junction interfaces in front-surface-field and tandem-junction cells acting as minority carrier reflectors or sinks tend to alter the value of effective surface recombination velocity for different beam penetration depths. A range of values of s was calculated for different surfaces.

  4. Electron drift velocities and electron mobilities in fast room-temperature dielectric liquids and their corresponding vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faidas, H.; Christophorou, L. G.; McCorkle, D. L.; Carter, J. G.

    1990-09-01

    The drift velocity, w, of excess electrons as a function of the applied uniform electric field, E, in liquid tetramethylsilane (TMS), 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane (TMP), tetramethyltin (TMT), and in mixtures of TMS with TMP (molar ratio, M = 1.31/1) and n-pentane ( M = 102/1; 17/1; 5.6/1) has been measured up to E-values of ˜ 10 5 V cm -1 or density ( N)-reduced ele ctric held E/ N-values of ˜ 3 × 10 -17 V cm 2. The maximum w attained for these liquids, and the corresponding values of E are: 7.2 × 10 6 cm s -1 at 125 kV cm -1 for TMS, 6.0 × 10 6 cm s -1 at 75 kV cm -1 for TMS, 2.6 × 10 6 cm s -1 at 115 kV cm -1 for TMP, 3.2 × 10 6 cm s -1 at 105 kV cm -1 for TMS/TMP ( M = 1.31/1), 6.8 × 10 6 cm s -1 at 105 kV cm -1 for TMS/n-pentane ( M = 102/1), 6.8 × 10 6 cm s -1 at 145 kV cm -1 for TMS/n-pentane ( M = 17/1), and 4.9 × 10 6 cm s -1 at 145 kV cm -1 for TMS/n-pentane ( M = 5.6/1). The thermal-electron mobilities in the above liquid media are respectively 119.3, 85.7, 31.8, 39.1, 118, 85, and 47.6 cm 2 s -1 V -1. Also, w was measured as a function of E/ N for TMS, TMP, and neopentane vapors at room temperature and is compared with that in the corresponding liquids. Properties of these media which make them desirable for radiation detectors are discussed.

  5. Particle-in-Cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Patel, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    We carry out Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On other hand, in strong relativistic case the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behaviour. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  6. Algorithms for calculating mass-velocity and Darwin relativistic corrections with n-electron explicitly correlated Gaussians with shifted centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Monika; Palikot, Ewa; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-05-01

    Algorithms for calculating the leading mass-velocity (MV) and Darwin (D) relativistic corrections are derived for electronic wave functions expanded in terms of n-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers and without pre-exponential angular factors. The algorithms are implemented and tested in calculations of MV and D corrections for several points on the ground-state potential energy curves of the H2 and LiH molecules. The algorithms are general and can be applied in calculations of systems with an arbitrary number of electrons.

  7. Electron Cyclotron Emission Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Cristina

    2009-11-01

    There is much interest in studying plasmas that generate hot electrons. The goal of this project is to develop a wide band electron cyclotron radiometer to measure the non-Maxwellian rapid rises in electron temperature. These rapid increases in temperature will then be correlated to instabilities in the plasma. This project explores a type of noncontact temperature measurement. We will attempt to show the feasibility of electron cyclotron emissions to measure the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment's electron plasma temperature. The radiometer has been designed to have 100dB of gain and a sensitivity of 24mV/dB given by its logarithmic amplifier. If successful, this radiometer will be used as a diagnostic tool in later projects such as the proposed experiment studying magnetic reconnection using solar flux loops.

  8. Measurement of the drift velocity and transverse diffusion of electrons in liquid xenon with the EXO-200 detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, J. B.; Barbeau, P. S.; Beck, D.; Belov, V.; Breidenbach, M.; Brunner, T.; Burenkov, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cen, W. R.; Chambers, C.; Cleveland, B.; Coon, M.; Craycraft, A.; Daniels, T.; Danilov, M.; Daugherty, S. J.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J.; Delaquis, S.; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A.; DeVoe, R.; Didberidze, T.; Dilling, J.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dunford, M.; Fairbank, W.; Farine, J.; Feyzbakhsh, S.; Fierlinger, P.; Fudenberg, D.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Gratta, G.; Hall, C.; Hughes, M.; Jewell, M. J.; Johnson, A.; Johnson, T. N.; Johnston, S.; Karelin, A.; Kaufman, L. J.; Killick, R.; Koffas, T.; Kravitz, S.; Krücken, R.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K. S.; Lan, Y.; Leonard, D. S.; Licciardi, C.; Lin, Y. H.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M. G.; Mong, B.; Moore, D.; Njoya, O.; Nelson, R.; Odian, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Prescott, C. Y.; Retière, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Schubert, A.; Sinclair, D.; Smith, E.; Stekhanov, V.; Tarka, M.; Tolba, T.; Tsang, R.; Twelker, K.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Waite, A.; Walton, J.; Walton, T.; Weber, M.; Wen, L. J.; Wichoski, U.; Wood, J.; Yang, L.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zeldovich, O. Ya.; Zettlemoyer, J.; EXO-200 Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    The EXO-200 Collaboration is searching for neutrinoless double β decay using a liquid xenon (LXe) time projection chamber. This measurement relies on modeling the transport of charge deposits produced by interactions in the LXe to allow discrimination between signal and background events. Here we present measurements of the transverse diffusion constant and drift velocity of electrons at drift fields between 20 V/cm and 615 V/cm using EXO-200 data. At the operating field of 380 V/cm EXO-200 measures a drift velocity of 1 .705-0.010+0.014mm /μ s and a transverse diffusion coefficient of 55 ±4 cm2 /s.

  9. Measurement of the Drift Velocity and Transverse Diffusion of Electrons in Liquid Xenon with the EXO-200 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Belov, V; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Cen, W R; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J; Delaquis, S; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dilling, J; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feyzbakhsh, S; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Krucken, R; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Lan, Y; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Njoya, O; Nelson, R; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Retiere, F; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Wood, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya; Zettlemoyer, J

    2016-01-01

    The EXO-200 Collaboration is searching for neutrinoless double beta decay using a liquid xenon (LXe) time projection chamber. This measurement relies on modeling the transport of charge deposits produced by interactions in the LXe to allow discrimination between signal and background events. Here we present measurements of the transverse diffusion constant and drift velocity of electrons at drift fields between 20~V/cm and 615~V/cm using EXO-200 data. At the operating field of 380~V/cm EXO-200 measures a drift velocity of 1.705$_{-0.010}^{+0.014}$~mm/$\\mu$s and a transverse diffusion coefficient of 55$\\pm$4~cm$^2$/s.

  10. Application of Nonlocal Electron Kinetics to Plasma Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2011-10-01

    Partially ionized plasmas are typically in a highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic state: the electrons are not in equilibrium with the neutral particle species or the ions, and the electrons are also not in equilibrium within their own ensemble, which results in a significant departure of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) from a Maxwellian. These non-equilibrium conditions provide considerable freedom to choose optimal plasma parameters for applications, which make gas-discharge plasmas remarkable tools for a variety of plasma applications, including plasma processing, discharge lighting, plasma propulsion, particle beam sources, and nanotechnology. Significant progress in understanding the formation of non-Maxwellian EVDF in the self-consistent electric fields has been one of the major achievements in the low-temperature plasmas during the last decade. This progress was made possible by a synergy between full-scale particle-in-cell simulations, analytical models, and experiments. Specific examples include rf discharges, dc discharges with auxiliary electrodes, Hall thruster discharges. In each example, nonlocal kinetic effects are identified as the main mechanisms responsible for the surprising degree of discharge self-organization. These phenomena include: explosive generation of cold electrons with rf power increase in low-pressure rf discharges; abrupt changes in discharge structure with increased bias voltage on a third electrode in a dc discharge with hot cathode; absence of a steady-state regime in Hall thruster discharges with intense secondary electron emission due to coupling of the sheath properties and the EVDF. In collaboration with Y. Raitses, A.V. Khrabrov, M. Campanell, V. I. Demidov, D. Sydorenko, I. Schweigert, and A. S. Mustafaev. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashutosh, E-mail: asingh.rs.ece@iitbhu.ac.in [Faculty of Physical Sciences, Institute of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Lucknow-Deva Road, Uttar Pradesh 225003 (India); Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Jain, P. K. [Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  12. Self-consistent system of equations for a kinetic description of the low-pressure discharges accounting for the nonlocal and collisionless electron dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor D; Polomarov, Oleg

    2003-08-01

    In low-pressure discharges, where the electron mean free path is larger or comparable with the discharge length, the electron dynamics is essentially nonlocal. Moreover, the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) deviates considerably from a Maxwellian. Therefore, an accurate kinetic description of the low-pressure discharges requires knowledge of the nonlocal conductivity operator and calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. The previous treatments made use of simplifying assumptions: a uniform density profile and a Maxwellian EEDF. In the present study, a self-consistent system of equations for the kinetic description of nonlocal, nonuniform, nearly collisionless plasmas of low-pressure discharges is derived. It consists of the nonlocal conductivity operator and the averaged kinetic equation for calculation of the non-Maxwellian EEDF. The importance of accounting for the nonuniform plasma density profile on both the current density profile and the EEDF is demonstrated.

  13. The influence of anisotropic electron drift velocity on the signal shapes of closed-end HPGe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailescu, L; Lieder, R M; Brands, H; Jaeger, H

    2000-01-01

    This study is concerned with the anisotropy of the electron drift velocity in germanium crystals at high electric fields and low temperature, and its influence on the charge collection process in n-type, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors of closed-end, coaxial geometry. The electron trajectories inside HPGe detectors are simulated using a phenomenological model to calculate the dependence of the drift velocity on the angle between the electric field and the crystal orientation. The resulting induced currents and pulse shapes for a given detector geometry and preamplifier bandwidth are compared to experiment. Experimentally, the dependence of the pulse shapes on the conductivity anisotropy in closed-end HPGe detectors was observed. The experimental data on pulse shapes were obtained by sampling preamplifier signals of an encapsulated, hexaconical EUROBALL detector, which was irradiated by collimated sup 2 sup 2 Na and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am sources. The crystal orientation was measured by neutron reflection...

  14. Broadband velocity modulation spectroscopy of HfF^+: towards a measurement of the electron electric dipole moment

    CERN Document Server

    Cossel, Kevin C; Sinclair, Laura C; Coffey, Tyler; Skripnikov, Leonid V; Petrov, Alexander N; Mosyagin, Nikolai S; Titov, Anatoly V; Field, Robert W; Meyer, Edmund R; Cornell, Eric A; Ye, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopy of trapped HfF^+ will be used in a search for the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM). While this dipole moment has yet to be observed, various extensions to the standard model of particle physics (such as supersymmetry) predict values that are close to the current limit. We present extensive survey spectroscopy of 19 bands covering nearly 5000 cm^(-1) using both frequency-comb and single-frequency laser velocity-modulation spectroscopy. We obtain high-precision rovibrational constants for eight electronic states including those that will be necessary for state preparation and readout in an actual eEDM experiment.

  15. Traveling solar-wind bulk-velocity fluctuations and their effects on electron heating in the inner heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Fahr, Hans J; Verscharen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Ambient plasma electrons undergo strong heating in regions associated with compressive traveling interplanetary solar-wind bulk-velocity jumps due to their specific interactions with the jump-inherent electric fields. After thermalization of this energy gain per shock passage through the operation of the Buneman instability, strong electron heating occurs that substantially influences the radial electron temperature profile. We describe the reduction of the jump amplitude due to energy expended by the traveling jump structure. We consider three effects; namely energy loss due to heating of electrons, energy loss due to work done against the pick-up-ion pressure gradient, and an energy gain due to nonlinear jump steepening. Taking these effects into account, we show that the decrease in jump amplitude with solar distance is more pronounced when the initial jump amplitude is higher in the inner solar system. Independent of the initial jump amplitude, it eventually decreases with increasing distance to a value o...

  16. Structure of the velocity distribution of sheath-accelerated secondary electrons in an asymmetric RF-dc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrabrov, Alexander V.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Ranjan, Alok; Chen, Lee

    2015-10-01

    Low-pressure capacitively-coupled discharges with additional dc bias applied to a separate electrode are utilized in plasma-assisted etching for semiconductor device manufacturing. Measurements of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) of the flux impinging on the wafer, as well as in the plasma bulk, show a thermal population and additional peaks within a broad range of energies. That range extends from the thermal level up to the value for the ‘ballistic’ peak, corresponding to the bias potential. The non-thermal electron flux has been correlated to alleviating the electron shading effect and providing etch-resistance properties to masking photoresist layers. ‘Middle-energy peak electrons’ at energies of several hundred eV may provide an additional sustaining mechanism for the discharge. These features in the electron velocity (or energy) distribution functions are possibly caused by secondary electrons emitted from the electrodes and interacting with two high-voltage sheaths: a stationary sheath at the dc electrode and an oscillating self-biased sheath at the powered electrode. Since at those energies the mean free path for large-angle scattering (momentum relaxation length) is comparable to, or exceeds the size of the discharge gap, these ‘ballistic’ electrons will not be fully scattered by the background gas as they traverse the inter-electrode space. We have performed test-particle simulations in which the features in the EVDF of electrons impacting the RF electrode are fully resolved at all energies. An analytical model has been developed to predict existence of peaked and step-like structures in the EVDF. Those features can be explained by analyzing the kinematics of electron trajectories in the discharge gap. Step-like structures in the EVDF near the powered electrode appear due to accumulation of electrons emitted from the dc electrode within a portion of the RF cycle, and their subsequent release. Trapping occurs when the RF

  17. Magnetoplasma excitations and the effect of electron and hole velocity renormalization in free-hanging graphene studied by Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, V. I.; Kirpichev, V. E.; Kukushkin, I. V.

    2016-07-01

    The properties of plasma and magnetoplasma excitations in free-hanging graphene have been studied for the first time by Raman scattering. In addition to single-particle excitations associated with transitions between empty Landau levels of electrons and holes, collective plasma and magnetoplasma excitations in the system of electrons (and holes) of various densities have been discovered for the first time. Hybridization of plasma and cyclotron modes corresponding to the Kohn law has been shown to occur in the limit of high filling factors, which allows measuring directly the plasma and cyclotron energies. The dependence of the electron and hole velocities on their density has been investigated via the magnetic-field dependence of the cyclotron energy in free-hanging graphene. The effect of strong renormalization of the electron and hole dispersion relations seen as an increase in the velocity (by 40-50%) with a decrease in the charge-carrier density to 1011 cm-2 has been discovered. The charge-carrier density dependences of the widths of magnetoplasma resonances in free-hanging graphene and graphene lying on a silicon dioxide surface have been measured and shown to be at least 3.5 and 14.8 meV, respectively.

  18. Catalog of fine-structured electron velocity distribution functions - Part 1: Antiparallel magnetic-field reconnection (Geospace Environmental Modeling case)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Philippe-A.

    2017-09-01

    To understand the essential physics needed to reproduce magnetic reconnection events in 2.5-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we revisit the Geospace Environmental Modeling (GEM) setup. We set up a 2-D Harris current sheet (that also specifies the initial conditions) to evolve the reconnection of antiparallel magnetic fields. In contrast to the GEM setup, we use a much smaller initial perturbation to trigger the reconnection and evolve it more self-consistently. From PIC simulation data with high-quality particle statistics, we study a symmetric reconnection site, including separatrix layers, as well as the inflow and the outflow regions. The velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of electrons have a fine structure and vary strongly depending on their location within the reconnection setup. The goal is to start cataloging multidimensional fine-structured electron velocity distributions showing different reconnection processes in the Earth's magnetotail under various conditions. This will enable a direct comparison with observations from, e.g., the NASA Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission, to identify reconnection-related events. We find regions with strong non-gyrotropy also near the separatrix layer and provide a refined criterion to identify an electron diffusion region in the magnetotail. The good statistical significance of this work for relatively small analysis areas reveals the gradual changes within the fine structure of electron VDFs depending on their sampling site.

  19. Dependence of anomalous resistivity on bulk drift velocity of electrons in the reconnecting current sheets in solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Ping Wu; Guang-Li Huang; Hai-Sheng Ji

    2010-01-01

    Anomalous resistivity is critical for triggering fast magnetic reconnection in the nearly collisionless coronal plasma.Its nonlinear dependence on bulk drift velocity is usually assumed in MHD simulations.However,the mechanism for the production of anomalous resistivity and its evolution is still an open question.We numerically solved the one dimension Vlasov equation with the typical solar coronal parameters and realistic mass ratios to infer the relationship between anomalous resistivity and bulk drift velocity of electrons in the reconnecting current sheets as well as its nonlinear characteristics.Our principal findings are summarized as follows: 1)the relationship between the anomalous resistivity and bulk drift velocity of electrons relative to ions may be described as ηmax = 0.03724(vd/ve)5.702 Ω m for vd/ve in the range of 1.4-2.0 and ηmax = 0.8746(vd/ve)1.284 Ωm for vd/ve in the range of 2.5-4.5; 2)if drift velocity is just slightly larger than the threshold of ion-acoustic instability,the anomalous resistivity due to the wave-particle interactions is enhanced by about five orders as compared with classic resistivity due to Coulomb collisions.With the increase of drift velocity from 1.4ve to 4.5ve,the anomalous resistivity continues to increase 100 times; 3)in the rise phase of unstable waves,the anomalous resistivity has the same order as the one estimated from quasi-linear theory; after saturation of unstable waves,the anomalous resistivity decreases at least about one order as compared with its peak value; 4)considering that the final velocity of electrons ejected out of the reconnecting current sheet(RCS)decreases with the distance from the neutral point in the neutral plane,the anomalous resistivity decreases with the distance from the neutral point,which is favorable for the Petschek-like reconnection to take place.

  20. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  1. Electron-positron pair production in ion collisions at low velocity beyond Born approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, R N

    2016-01-01

    We derive the spectrum and the total cross section of electromagnetic $e^{+}e^{-}$ pair production in the collisions of two nuclei at low relative velocity $\\beta$. Both free-free and bound-free $e^{+}e^{-}$ pair production is considered. The parameters $\\eta_{A,B}=Z_{A,B}\\alpha$ are assumed to be small compared to unity but arbitrary compared to $\\beta$ ($Z_{A,B}$ are the charge numbers of the nuclei and $\\alpha$ is the fine structure constant). Due to a suppression of the Born term by high power of $\\beta$, the first Coulomb correction to the amplitude appears to be important at $\\eta_{A,B}\\gtrsim \\beta$. The effect of a finite nuclear mass is discussed. In contrast to the result obtained in the infinite nuclear mass limit, the terms $\\propto M^{-2}$ are not suppressed by the high power of $\\beta$ and may easily dominate at sufficiently small velocities.

  2. Electron drift velocity in SF{sub 6} in strong electric fields determined from rf breakdown curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisovskiy, V; Yegorenkov, V [Department of Physics and Technology, Kharkov National University, Svobody sq.4, Kharkov 61077 (Ukraine); Booth, J-P [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91128 (France); Landry, K [Unaxis Displays Division France SAS, 5, Rue Leon Blum, Palaiseau 91120 (France); Douai, D [Physical Sciences Division, Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research, CEA Centre de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Cassagne, V, E-mail: lisovskiy@yahoo.co [Developpement Photovoltaique Couches Minces, Total, 2, place Jean Millier, La Defense 6, 92400 Courbevoie (France)

    2010-09-29

    This paper presents measurements of the electron drift velocity V{sub dr} in SF{sub 6} gas for high reduced electric fields (E/N = 330-5655 Td (1 Td = 10{sup -17} V cm{sup 2})). The drift velocities were obtained using the method of Lisovskiy and Yegorenkov (1998 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 31 3349) based on the determination of the pressure and voltage of the turning points of rf capacitive discharge breakdown curves for a range of electrode spacings. The V{sub dr} values thus obtained were in good agreement with those calculated from the cross-sections of Phelps and Van Brunt (1988 J. Appl. Phys. 64 4269) using the BOLSIG code. The validity of the Lisovskiy-Yegorenkov method is discussed and we show that it is applicable over the entire E/N range where rf discharge ignition at breakdown occurs for rf frequencies of 13.56 MHz or above.

  3. Simulation development and evaluation of an improved longitudinal velocity vector control wheel steering mode and electronic display format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    Using simulation, an improved longitudinal velocity vector control wheel steering mode and an improved electronic display format for an advanced flight system were developed and tested. Guidelines for the development phase were provided by test pilot critique summaries of the previous system. The results include performances from computer generated step column inputs across the full airplane speed and configuration envelope, as well as piloted performance results taken from a reference line tracking task and an approach to landing task conducted under various environmental conditions. The analysis of the results for the reference line tracking and approach to landing tasks indicates clearly detectable improvement in pilot tracking accuracy with a reduction in physical workload. The original objectives of upgrading the longitudinal axis of the velocity vector control wheel steering mode were successfully met when measured against the test pilot critique summaries and the original purpose outlined for this type of augment control mode.

  4. Particle-in-cell simulations of velocity scattering of an anisotropic electron beam by electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X. R.; Cowee, M. M.; Liu, K.; Peter Gary, S.; Winske, D.

    2014-04-01

    The velocity space scattering of an anisotropic electron beam (T⊥b/T∥b>1) flowing along a background magnetic field B0 through a cold plasma is investigated using both linear theory and 2D particle-in-cell simulations. Here, ⊥ and ∥ represent the directions perpendicular and parallel to B0, respectively. In this scenario, we find that two primary instabilities contribute to the scattering in electron pitch angle: an electrostatic electron beam instability and a predominantly parallel-propagating electromagnetic whistler anisotropy instability. Our results show that at relative beam densities nb/ne≤0.05 and beam temperature anisotropies Tb ⊥/Tb ∥≤25, the electrostatic beam instability grows much faster than the whistler instabilities for a reasonably fast hot beam. The enhanced fluctuating fields from the beam instability scatter the beam electrons, slowing their average speed and increasing their parallel temperature, thereby increasing their pitch angles. In an inhomogeneous magnetic field, such as the geomagnetic field, this could result in beam electrons scattered out of the loss cone. After saturation of the electrostatic instability, the parallel-propagating whistler anisotropy instability shows appreciable growth, provided that the beam density and late-time anisotropy are sufficiently large. Although the whistler anisotropy instability acts to pitch-angle scatter the electrons, reducing perpendicular energy in favor of parallel energy, these changes are weak compared to the pitch-angle increases resulting from the deceleration of the beam due to the electrostatic instability.

  5. Development of a compact thermal lithium atom beam source for measurements of electron velocity distribution function anisotropy in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, T; Shikama, T; Nagamizo, S; Fujii, K; Zushi, H; Uchida, M; Iwamae, A; Tanaka, H; Maekawa, T; Hasuo, M

    2013-07-01

    The anisotropy of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasmas can be deduced from the polarization of emissions induced by anisotropic electron-impact excitation. In this paper, we develop a compact thermal lithium atom beam source for spatially resolved measurements of the EVDF anisotropy in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The beam system is designed such that the ejected beam has a slab shape, and the beam direction is variable. The divergence and flux of the beam are evaluated by experiments and calculations. The developed beam system is installed in an ECR plasma device with a cusp magnetic field, and the LiI 2s-2p emission (670.8 nm) is observed in low-pressure helium plasma. The two-dimensional distributions of the degree and direction of the polarization in the LiI emission are measured by a polarization imaging system. The evaluated polarization distribution suggests the spatial variation of the EVDF anisotropy.

  6. Structure of Velocity Distribution of Sheath-Accelerated Secondary Electrons in Asymmetric RF-DC Discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Khrabrov, Alexander V; Ventzek, Peter L G; Ranjan, Alok; Chen, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The ballistic population is thought to be responsible for alleviating the electron shading effect and the notching of the photoresist layer. We have performed test-particle simulations where the features in the EVDF of electrons impacting the RF electrode are fully resolved at all energies. An analytic model has been developed to predict existence of peaked and step-like structures in the EVDF.

  7. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fraia, M., E-mail: michele.di.fraia@desy.de [University of Trieste, Department of Physics, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 – Km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); O’Keeffe, P. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy); Ovcharenko, Y. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Lyamayev, V. [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Feyer, V.; Moise, A. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 – Km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Devetta, M.; Piseri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, M. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.

  8. Simulations of Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) Waves with Variable Velocity Resolution Grids and High-Order Time-Splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Afeyan, Bedros; Crouseilles, Nicolas; Dodhy, Adila; Faou, Erwan; Mehrenberger, Michel; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2014-01-01

    KEEN waves are nonlinear, non-stationary, self-organized asymptotic states in Vlasov plasmas outside the scope or purview of linear theory constructs such as electron plasma waves or ion acoustic waves. Nonlinear stationary mode theories such as those leading to BGK modes also do not apply. The range in velocity that is strongly perturbed by KEEN waves depends on the amplitude and duration of the ponderomotive force used to drive them. Smaller amplitude drives create highly localized structures attempting to coalesce into KEEN waves. These cases have much more chaotic and intricate time histories than strongly driven ones. The narrow range in which one must maintain adequate velocity resolution in the weakly driven cases challenges xed grid numerical schemes. What is missing there is the capability of resolving locally in velocity while maintaining a coarse grid outside the highly perturbed region of phase space. We here report on a new Semi-Lagrangian Vlasov-Poisson solver based on conservative non-uniform c...

  9. Fine velocity structures collisional dissipation in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    In a weakly collisional plasma, such as the solar wind, collisions are usually considered far too weak to produce any significant effect on the plasma dynamics [1]. However, the estimation of collisionality is often based on the restrictive assumption that the particle velocity distribution function (VDF) shape is close to Maxwellian [2]. On the other hand, in situ spacecraft measurements in the solar wind [3], as well as kinetic numerical experiments [4], indicate that marked non-Maxwellian features develop in the three-dimensional VDFs, (temperature anisotropies, generation of particle beams, ring-like modulations etc.) as a result of the kinetic turbulent cascade of energy towards short spatial scales. Therefore, since collisional effects are proportional to the velocity gradients of the VDF, the collisionless hypothesis may fail locally in velocity space. Here, the existence of several characteristic times during the collisional relaxation of fine velocity structures is investigated by means of Eulerian numerical simulations of a spatially homogeneous force-free weakly collisional plasma. The effect of smoothing out velocity gradients on the evolution of global quantities, such as temperature and entropy, is discussed, suggesting that plasma collisionality can increase locally due to the velocity space deformation of the particle velocity distribution. In particular, by means of Eulerian simulations of collisional relaxation of a spatially homogeneous force-free plasma, in which collisions among particles of the same species are modeled through the complete Landau operator, we show that the system entropy growth occurs over several time scales, inversely proportional to the steepness of the velocity gradients in the VDF. We report clear evidences that fine velocity structures are dissipated by collisions in a time much shorter than global non-Maxwellian features, like, for example, temperature anisotropies. Moreover we indicate that, if small-scale structures

  10. Electric field dependence of drift velocity and electron temperature of GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEG in the low electric field region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari, Mehmet; Turkoglu, Orhan

    2004-05-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on low electric field transport of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaAs/GaAs high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) channel are reported at lattice temperature T{sub L}=1.7 K under zero magnetic field. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) and the drift velocity ({upsilon}{sub d}) dependence on the electric field (F) and the electron density in the 2DEG channel are presented. In addition, the variation of the electron temperature with the drift velocity is obtained. The results are obtained for the electric field in the region of 0.01-100 V/cm and in the electron temperature range of 1.7-60 K. It is shown that the electron temperature of 2DEG is a non-monotonous function of the electric field. The results also indicate that electron heating is seen to occur for the electric field F>0.1 V/cm which corresponds to the electron temperature T{sub e}=2 K. A sharp increase in the electron temperature T{sub e} and in the drift velocity {upsilon}{sub d} with the electric field below electron temperature of 40 K is seen. The variation of electron temperature with drift velocity is very slow in the same electron temperature range where acoustic phonon emission due to deformation potential is the dominant energy loss mechanism of electronic system. When F>5 V/cm and T{sub e}>40 K, where the optic phonon emission is a dominant relaxation mechanism, the electron temperature changes linearly with electric field and the drift velocity increases very rapidly with electron temperature. Also, the drift velocity starts to saturate in this regime. The experimental results are compared with theoretical results and a good agreement is obtained at the electron temperatures of T{sub e}<50 K. Above the electron temperature of 50 K, a disagreement is observed between the experimental and the theoretical results which indicates that additional scattering mechanisms should be taken into account and the accuracy of the assumptions concerning the

  11. Reflection of electromagnetic radiation from plasma with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagin, K. Yu., E-mail: vagin@sci.lebedev.ru; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The reflection of a test electromagnetic pulse from the plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of a circularly polarized high-power radiation pulse is analyzed using the kinetic approach to describe electron motion. It is shown that the reflected pulse is significantly amplified due to the development of Weibel instability. The amplification efficiency is determined by the maximum value of the instability growth rate, which depends on the degree of anisotropy of the photoelectron distribution function.

  12. Measurement of the electron drift velocity in CF4 and CHF3 gas mixtures in the context of upcoming directional Dark Matter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Billard, J; Bosson, G; Bourrion, O; Guillaudin, O; Lamblin, J; Richer, J P; Riffard, Q; Santos, D; Iguaz, F J; Lebreton, L; Maire, D

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the electron drift velocity is a key issue for directional detection of galactic Dark Matter as it is used for the 3D track reconstruction. The aim of this paper is to present a dedicated method for the measurement of the electron drift velocity with the MIMAC detector, using a pure CF4 gas and a CF4 + CHF3 gas mixture. This new measurement method uses high energy alpha tracks from a collimated source and includes a profile likelihood method associated to a modeling of the signal induced on the grid. In particular, we show that adding CHF3 allows us to lower the electron drift velocity while keeping almost the same Fluorine content of the gas mixture. We show that the drift velocity at 50 mbar is reduced by a factor of about 5 when considering 30% of CHF3, allowing to improve the three-dimensional track reconstruction.

  13. Study of fuzzy PID controller for velocity circuit of optical-electronic theodolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, GengXin; Yang, XiaoJun; He, SaiXian

    2017-02-01

    Two-axis stabilized turntable is an important part of optical-electronic theodolite, it carries various of measuring instruments. In order to improve the response speed of the optical-electronic theodolite when tracking high speed target. In the same time, improve the stability and precision when tracking low speed target. The traditional servo controller is double close-loop structure. On the basis of traditional structure, we use the fuzzy control theory to design the servo control speed loop adjuster as a fuzzy PID controller, and the position loop is designed as a traditional first order adjuster. We introduce the theory and characteristics of PID control and fuzzy control, and discussed the structure of the speed loop fussy controller and the tuning method of the PID parameters. The fuzzy PID controller was studied with simulation on the MATLAB/Simulink platform, the performance indexes and the anti-jamming abilities of the fussy PID controller and the traditional PID controller were compared. The experiment results show that the fussy PID controller has the ability of parameter self-tuning, and its tacking ability is much better than the traditional PID controller.

  14. Bistable Intrinsic Charge Fluctuations of a Dust Grain Subject to Secondary Electron Emission in a Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Shotorban, Babak

    2015-01-01

    A master equation was formulated to study intrinsic charge fluctuations of a grain in a plasma as ions and primary electrons are attached to the grain through collisional collection, and secondary electrons are emitted from the grain. Two different plasmas with Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian distributions were considered. The fluctuations could be bistable in either plasma when the secondary electron emission is present, as two stable macrostates, associated with two stable roots of the charge net current, may exist. Metastablity of fluctuations, manifested by the passage of the grain charge between two macrostates, was shown to be possible.

  15. Bistable intrinsic charge fluctuations of a dust grain subject to secondary electron emission in a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shotorban, B

    2015-10-01

    A master equation was formulated to study intrinsic charge fluctuations of a grain in a plasma as ions and primary electrons are attached to the grain through collisional collection, and secondary electrons are emitted from the grain. Two different plasmas with Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian distributions were considered. The fluctuations could be bistable in either plasma when the secondary electron emission is present, as two stable macrostates, associated with two stable roots of the charge net current, may exist. Metastablity of fluctuations, manifested by the passage of the grain charge between two macrostates, was shown to be possible.

  16. Violation of the transit-time limit toward generation of ultrashort electron bunches with controlled velocity chirp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seok-Gy; Shin, Dongwon; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-09-01

    Various methods to generate ultrashort electron bunches for the ultrafast science evolved from the simple configuration of two-plate vacuum diodes to advanced technologies such as nanotips or photocathodes excited by femtosecond lasers. In a diode either in vacuum or of solid-state, the transit-time limit originating from finite electron mobility has caused spatiotemporal bunch-collapse in ultrafast regime. Here, we show for the first time that abrupt exclusion of transit-phase is a more fundamental origin of the bunch-collapse than the transit-time limit. We found that by significantly extending the cathode-anode gap distance, thereby violating the transit-time limit, the conventional transit-time-related upper frequency barrier in diodes can be removed. Furthermore, we reveal how to control the velocity chirp of bunches leading to ballistic bunch-compression. Demonstration of 0.707 THz-, 46.4 femtosecond-bunches from a 50 μm-wide diode in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations shows a way toward simple and compact sources of ultrafast electron bunches for diverse ultrafast sciences.

  17. Non-Maxwellian background effects in gyrokinetic simulations with GENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Siena, A.; Gorler, T.; Doerk, H.; Citrin, J.; Johnson, T.; Schneider, M.; Poli, E.; JET Contributors,

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between fast particles and core turbulence has been established as a central issue for a tokamak reactor. Recent results predict significant enhancement of electromagnetic stabilisation of ITG turbulence in the presence of fast ions. However, most of these simulations were performed

  18. Essay on the Non-Maxwellian Theories of Electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Dvoeglazov, V V

    1996-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we review several formalisms which give alternative ways for describing the light. They are: the formalism `baroque' and the Majorana-Oppenheimer form of electrodynamics, the Sachs' theory of Elementary Matter, the Dirac-Fock-Podol'sky model, its development by Staruszkiewicz, the Evans-Vigier ${\\bf B}^{(3)}$ field, the theory with an invariant evolution parameter of Horwitz, the analysis of the action-at-a-distance concept, presented recently by Chubykalo and Smirnov-Rueda, and the analysis of the claimed `longitudity' of the antisymmetric tensor field after quantization. The second part is devoted to the discussion of the Weinberg formalism and its recent development by Ahluwalia and myself.

  19. Generation of Electron Suprathermal Tails in the Upper Solar Atmosphere: Implications for Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Wong, Hung K.; Klimas, Alexander J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a mechanism for the generation of non-Maxwellian electron distribution function in the upper regions of the solar atmosphere in the presence of collisional damping. It is suggested that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves can carry a substantial electric field component parallel to the mean magnetic field that can be significantly larger than the Dreicer electric field. This long wavelength electric fluctuation is capable of generating high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves. The analysis has been performed using 1-1/2D Vlasov and PIC numerical simulations in which both electrons and ions are treated kinetically and self consistently. The simulation results indicate that high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves are generated. The high frequency electron plasma oscillation drives electron plasma turbulence, which subsequently is damped out by the background electrons. The turbulence damping results in electron acceleration and the generation of non-Maxwellian suprathermal tails on time scales short compared to collisional damping. Bulk heating also occurs if the fluctuating parallel electric field is strong enough. This study suggests that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating, electromagnetic waves can play a significant role in the acceleration and heating of the solar corona electrons and in the coupling of medium and small-scale phenomena.

  20. Extensive Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy of ThF^+ for Use in the Jila Electron Edm Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresh, Dan; Cossel, Kevin; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric

    2014-06-01

    The metastable ^3Δ_1 state in trapped HfF^+ is being used for an ongoing measurement of the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) ThF^+, which has a larger effective electric field and a longer-lived ^3Δ_1 state, offers increased sensitivity for an eEDM measurement. Recently, the Heaven group has spectroscopically studied the low-lying states of ThF^+. However, to date there is no detailed information available about technically-accessible laser transitions in the near-infrared region of the spectrum, which are necessary for state preparation and detection in an eEDM experiment. By applying the technique of frequency comb velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) to ThF^+ we can acquire 150 cm-1 of continuous, ion-sensitive spectra with 150 MHz resolution in 25 minutes. Here, we report on extensive broadband, high-resolution survey spectroscopy of ThF^+ in the near-IR where we have observed and accurately fit several rovibronic transitions. In addition, we have observed and characterized numerous rovibronic transitions from an unknown thoriated species of molecular ions. H. Loh, K. C. Cossel, M. C. Grau, K.-K. Ni, E. R. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, Science 342, 1220 (2013). B. J. Barker, I. O. Antonov, M. C. Heaven, K. A. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104305 (2012). L. C. Sinclair, K. C. Cossel, T. Coffey, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, PRL 107, 093002 (2011).

  1. Limiting Superluminal Electron and Neutrino Velocities Using the 2010 Crab Nebula Flare and the IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of two PetaelectronVolt (PeV)-scale neutrino events reported by Ice Cube allows one to place constraints on Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) in the neutrino sector. After first arguing that at least one of the PetaelectronVolt IceCube events was of extragalactic origin, I derive an upper limit for the difference between putative superluminal neutrino and electron velocities of less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19) in units where c = 1, confirming that the observed PetaelectronVolt neutrinos could have reached Earth from extragalactic sources. I further derive a new constraint on the superluminal electron velocity, obtained from the observation of synchrotron radiation from the Crab Nebula flare of September, 2010. The inference that the greater than 1 GigaelectronVolt gamma-rays from synchrotron emission in the flare were produced by electrons of energy up to approx. 5.1 PetaelectronVolt indicates the nonoccurrence of vacuum Cerenkov radiation by these electrons. This implies a new, strong constraint on superluminal electron velocities delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 5 x 10(exp -21). It immediately follows that one then obtains an upper limit on the superluminal neutrino velocity alone of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19), many orders of magnitude better than the time-of-flight constraint from the SN1987A neutrino burst. However, if the electrons are subluminal the constraint on the absolute value of delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17), obtained from the Crab Nebula gamma-ray spectrum, places a weaker constraint on superluminal neutrino velocity of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17).

  2. A Monte Carlo simulation of the effect of ion self-collisions on the ion velocity distribution function in the high-latitude F-region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouthi, I. A.; Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian ion velocity distribution functions have been theoretically predicted and confirmed by observations, to occur at high latitudes. These distributions deviate from Maxwellian due to the combined effect of the E x B drift and ion-neutral collisions. At high altitude and/or for solar maximum conditions, the ion-to-neutral density ratio increases and, hence, the role of ion self-collisions becomes appreciable. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to investigate the behavior of O(+) ions that are E x B-drifting through a background of neutral O, with the effect of O(+) (Coulomb) self-collisions included. Wide ranges of the ion-to-neutral density ratio n(sub i)/n(sub n) and the electrostatic field E were considered in order to investigate the change of ion behavior with solar cycle and with altitude. For low altitudes and/or solar minimum (n(sub i)/n(sub n) less than or equal to 10(exp -5)), the effect of self-collisions is negligible. For higher values of n(sub i)/n(sub n), the effect of self-collisions becomes significant and, hence, the non-Maxwellian features of the O(+) distribution are reduced. The Monte Carlo results were compared to those that used simplified collision models in order to assess their validity. In general, the simple collision models tend to be more accurate for low E and for high n(sub i)/n(sub n).

  3. Effects of variations in electron thermal velocity on the whistler anisotropy instability: Particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Wang, Joseph; Decyk, Viktor K.; Gary, S. Peter

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates how the physics of the whistler anisotropy instability (WAI) is affected by variations in the electron thermal velocity vte, referred to here in terms of the ratio v̂ t e=vt e/c , where c is the speed of light. The WAI is driven by the electron condition RT>1 , where RT=Te ⊥/Te ∥ is the temperature anisotropy ratio and ⊥/∥ signify directions perpendicular/parallel to the background magnetic field B0 . While a typical value of v̂ t e in the solar wind is ˜0.005 , electromagnetic (EM) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations often use a value near 0.1 in order to maximize the computational time step. In this study, a two-dimensional (2D) Darwin particle-in-cell (DPIC) code, MDPIC2, is used. The time step in the DPIC model is not affected by the choice of v̂ t e , making DPIC suited for this study. A series of simulations are carried out under the condition that the electron βe is held fixed, while v̂ t e is varied over the range 0.1 ≥v̂ t e≥0.025 . The results show that, with βe held fixed, the linear dispersion properties and the nonlinear saturation amplitude and pitch angle scattering rates associated with the WAI are insensitive to the value of v̂ t e . A supplementary investigation is conducted which characterizes how the WAI model is affected at various values of v̂ t e by noise associated with the limited number of particles in a typical PIC simulation. It is found that the evolution of the WAI is more strongly influenced by electrostatic noise as v̂ t e is decreased. The electrostatic noise level is inversely proportional to the number of particles per computational cell ( Nc ); this implies that the number of particles required to remove nonphysical effects from the PIC simulation increases as v̂ t e decreases. It is concluded that PIC simulations of this instability which use an artificially large value of v̂ t e accurately reproduce the response of a cooler plasma as long as a realistic value of βe is used

  4. Effect of superthermal electrons on dust-acoustic Gardner solitons in nonplanar geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deb Kumar Ghosh; Yday Narayan Ghosh; Prasanta Chatterjee; C S Wong

    2013-04-01

    The properties of nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) dust-acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) in an unmagnetized, collisionless three-component dusty plasma, whose constituents are negatively charged cold dust fluid, superthermal/non-Maxwellian electrons (represented by kappa distribution) and Boltzmann distributed ions, are investigated by deriving the modified Gardner (MG) equation. The well-known reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the MG equation. The basic features of nonplanar DA Gardner solitons (GSs) are discussed. It is seen that the properties of nonplanar DAGSs (positive and negative) significantly differ as the value of spectral index changes.

  5. Electron energy probability function and L-p similarity in low pressure inductively coupled bounded plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of discharge length (L) and pressure (p) on Electron Energy Probability Function (EEPF) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) at 13.56 MHz. It is found that for both cases of varying L (0.1–0.5 m) and p (1–10 mTorr), the EEPF is a bi-Maxwellian with a step in the bounded direction (x) and non-Maxwellian with a hot tail in the symmetric unbounded directions (y, z). The plasma space po...

  6. Dust charge fluctuation effects on Langmuir waves with kappa distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M.; Rouhani, M. R.; Hakimi Pajouh, H.

    2016-03-01

    Using a kinetic description, dust charge fluctuations due to the inelastic collisions between dust particles and plasma particles are studied in unmagnetized dusty plasmas. Most astrophysical and space plasmas are observed to have non-Maxwellian high energy tail. Therefore, a kappa distribution for electrons in the equilibrium is assumed. The dispersion relation and damping rates for Langmuir waves are obtained. Considering the dust charge fluctuations increases the damping rate of Langmuir waves. It is shown that the damping rate of Langmuir waves depends on the spectral index and the dust density parameter.

  7. Orbital alignment dependence of electron transfer cross sections. I : H+-Na(3p) near the matching velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, U.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Holme, N.C.R.; Kmit, M.; Lauritsen, J.H.V.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Richter, C.; Thomsen, J.W.; Andersen, N.; Nielsen, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results for the influence of target excitation and orbital alignment on the charge exchange process for the system H+-Na(3s,3p). The experimental velocity range covers for the first time the region around and beyond the "matching velocity" of 0.47 a.u.

  8. Ion-acoustic solitons, double layers and rogue waves in plasma having superthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Saini, Nareshpal

    2016-07-01

    Most of the space and astrophysical plasmas contain different type of charged particles with non-Maxwellian velocity distributions (e.g., nonthermal, superthermal, Tsallis ). These distributions are commonly found in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere, planetary magnetosphere, solar and stellar coronas, solar wind, etc. The observations from various satellite missions have confirmed the presence of superthermal particles in space and astrophysical environments. Over the last many years, there have been a much interest in studying the different kind of properties of the electrostatic nonlinear excitations (solitons, double layers, rogue waves etc.) in a multi-component plasmas in the presence of superthermal particles. It has been analyzed that superthermal distributions are more appropriate than Maxwellian distribution for the modeling of space data. It is interesting to study the dynamics of various kinds of solitary waves, Double layers, Shocks etc. in varieties of plasma systems containing different kind of species obeying Lorentzian (kappa-type)/Tsallis distribution. In this talk, I have focused on the study of large amplitude IA solitary structures (bipolar solitary structures, double layers etc.), modulational instability and rogue waves in multicomponent plasmas. The Sagdeev potential method has been employed to setup an energy balance equation, from which we have studied the characteristics of large amplitude solitary waves under the influence of superthermality of charged particles and other plasma parameters. The critical Mach number has been determined, above which solitary structures are observed and its variation with superthermality of electrons and other parameters has also been discussed. Double layers have also been discussed. Multiple scale reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive NLS equation. From the different kind of solutions of this equation, amplitude modulation of envelope solitons and rogue waves have been

  9. Scanning transmission electron microscope analysis of amorphous-Si insertion layers prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition, causing low surface recombination velocities on crystalline silicon wafers

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Microstructures of stacked silicon-nitride/amorphous-silicon/crystalline-silicon (SiN_x/a-Si/c-Si) layers prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition were investigated with scanning transmission electron microscopy to clarify the origin of the sensitive dependence of surface recombination velocities (SRVs) of the stacked structure on the thickness of the a-Si layer. Stacked structures with a-Si layers with thicknesses greater than 10 nm exhibit long effective carrier lifetimes, while thos...

  10. DECELERATION OF ELECTRON VE LOCITY BASED ON THE WAVE- PARTICLE DUALITY LEADS TO RE LATIVE TIME ACCELERATION: HYPOTHESIS OF INCREASED BIOPHYSICAL REACTION VELOCITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Koch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The high speed of biological processes such as photosynthesis, enzymatic reactions or neuronal activity cannot completely be explained on the basis of classic physical approaches. Different quantum biology effects such as tunnelling have been postulated. We hypothetically admit that deceleration of electron velocity based on light-particle duality of electrons leads to time acceleration. Deceleration from the status of light towards a status of a particle may therefore speed up biochemical or biophysical reactions in the atomic or molecular dimension. Electrophysiological and biological phenomena are discussed on the basis of the hypothesis

  11. Plasma expansion into vacuum assuming a steplike electron energy distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Thomas; Schlegel, Theodor; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-04-01

    The expansion of a semi-infinite plasma slab into vacuum is analyzed with a hydrodynamic model implying a steplike electron energy distribution function. Analytic expressions for the maximum ion energy and the related ion distribution function are derived and compared with one-dimensional numerical simulations. The choice of the specific non-Maxwellian initial electron energy distribution automatically ensures the conservation of the total energy of the system. The estimated ion energies may differ by an order of magnitude from the values obtained with an adiabatic expansion model supposing a Maxwellian electron distribution. Furthermore, good agreement with data from experiments using laser pulses of ultrashort durations τ(L)Maxwellian electron distribution is assumed.

  12. Anisotropic Electron Tail Generation during Tearing Mode Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Almagri, Abdulgader F.; Anderson, Jay K.; Den Hartog, Daniel J.; Lee, John David; Sarff, John S.

    2017-02-01

    The first experimental evidence of anisotropic electron energization during magnetic reconnection that favors a direction perpendicular to the guide magnetic field in a toroidal, magnetically confined plasma is reported in this Letter. Magnetic reconnection plays an important role in particle heating, energization, and transport in space and laboratory plasmas. In toroidal devices like the Madison Symmetric Torus, discrete magnetic reconnection events release large amounts of energy from the equilibrium magnetic field. Fast x-ray measurements imply a non-Maxwellian, anisotropic energetic electron tail is formed at the time of reconnection. The tail is well described by a power-law energy dependence. The expected bremsstrahlung from an electron distribution with an anisotropic energetic tail (v⊥>v∥ ) spatially localized in the core region is consistent with x-ray emission measurements. A turbulent process related to tearing fluctuations is the most likely cause for the energetic electron tail formation.

  13. The interaction of a circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave with an electron having a constant time independent drift velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, M.

    2011-01-01

    A circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave may appear when a 1S electron encounters a decelerating stopping positively charged hole inside a semiconductor. The circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave can have an interaction with a conducting electron which has a constant time inde

  14. The interaction of a circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave with an electron having a constant time independent drift velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, M.

    2011-01-01

    A circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave may appear when a 1S electron encounters a decelerating stopping positively charged hole inside a semiconductor. The circularly orbiting electromagnetic harmonic wave can have an interaction with a conducting electron which has a constant time

  15. Nuclear velocity perturbation theory for vibrational circular dichroism: An approach based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function

    CERN Document Server

    Scherrer, Arne; Sebastiani, Daniel; Gross, E K U; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear velocity perturbation current-density theory (NVPT) for vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) is derived from the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function. This new formalism offers an exact starting point to include correction terms to the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) form of the molecular wave function, similarly to the complete-adiabatic approximation. The corrections depend on a small parameter that, in a classical treatment of the nuclei, is identified as the nuclear velocity. Apart from proposing a rigorous basis for the NVPT, we show that the rotational strength, related to the intensity of the VCD signal, contain a new contribution beyond-BO that can be evaluated with the NVPT and that only arises when the exact factorization approach is employed. Numerical results are presented for chiral and non-chiral systems to test the validity of the approach.

  16. Electron gas polarization effect induced by heavy H-like ions of moderate velocities channeled in a silicon crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Dauvergne, D; Bosch, F; Bräuning, H; Chevallier, M; Cohen, C; Gumberidze, A; Hagmann, S; L'Hoir, A; Kirsch, R; Kozhuharov, C; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Poizat, J C; Ray, C; Rozet, J P; Stöhlker, T; Toleikis, S; Toulemonde, M; Verma, P; St\\"{o}hlker, Th.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the observation of a strong perturbation of the electron gas induced by 20 MeV/u U$^{91+}$ ions and 13 MeV/u Pb$^{81+}$ ions channeled in silicon crystals. This collective response (wake effect) in-duces a shift of the continuum energy level by more than 100 eV, which is observed by means of Radiative Electron Capture into the K and L-shells of the projectiles. We also observe an increase of the REC probability by 20-50% relative to the probability in a non-perturbed electron gas. The energy shift is in agreement with calculations using the linear response theory, whereas the local electron density enhancement is much smaller than predicted by the same model. This shows that, for the small values of the adiabaticity parameter achieved in our experiments, the density fluctuations are not strongly localized at the vicinity of the heavy ions.

  17. Electron gas polarization effect induced by heavy H-like ions of moderate velocities channeled in a silicon crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)]. E-mail: d.dauvergne@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Justus Liebig Universitaet, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Chevallier, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Cohen, C. [Institut des Nano-Sciences de Paris, CNRS-UMR75-88, Universites Paris VI et Paris VII, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France); Gumberidze, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); L' Hoir, A. [Institut des Nano-Sciences de Paris, CNRS-UMR75-88, Universites Paris VI et Paris VII, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France); Kirsch, R. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mokler, P.H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Poizat, J.-C.; Ray, C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Rozet, J.-P. [Institut des Nano-Sciences de Paris, CNRS-UMR75-88, Universites Paris VI et Paris VII, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France); Stoehlker, Th.; Toleikis, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche Ions-Lasers, UMR 11, CEA-CNRS, 14040 Caen cedex (France); Verma, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionen Forschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    We report on the observation of a strong perturbation of the electron gas induced by 20 MeV/u U{sup 91+} ions and 13 MeV/u Pb{sup 81+} ions channeled in silicon crystals. This collective response (wake effect) induces a shift of the continuum energy level by more than 100 eV, which is observed by means of radiative electron capture into the K- and L-shells of the projectiles. We also observe an increase of the REC probability by 20-50% relative to the probability in a non-perturbed electron gas. The energy shift is in agreement with calculations using the linear response theory, whereas the local electron density enhancement is much smaller than predicted by the same model. This shows that, for the small values of the adiabaticity parameter achieved in our experiments, the density fluctuations are not strongly localized in the vicinity of the heavy ions.

  18. Velocity statistics of dynamic spinners in out-of-equilibrium magnetic suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2015-08-14

    We report on the velocity statistics of an out-of-equilibrium magnetic suspension in a spinner phase confined at a liquid interface. The suspension is energized by a uniaxial alternating magnetic field applied parallel to the interface. In a certain range of the magnetic field parameters the system spontaneously undergoes a transition into a dynamic spinner phase (ensemble of hydrodynamically coupled magnetic micro-rotors) comprised of two subsystems: self-assembled spinning chains and a gas of rotating single particles. Both subsystems coexist in a dynamic equilibrium via continuous exchange of the particles. Spinners excite surface flows that significantly increase particle velocity correlations in the system. For both subsystems the velocity distributions are strongly non-Maxwellian with nearly exponential high-energy tails, P(v) ∼ exp(-|v/v0|). The kurtosis, the measure of the deviation from the Gaussian statistics, is influenced by the frequency of the external magnetic field. We show that in the single-particle gas the dissipation is mostly collisional, whereas the viscous damping dominates over collisional dissipation for the self-assembled spinners. The dissipation increases with the frequency of the applied magnetic field. Our results provide insights into non-trivial dissipation mechanisms determining self-assembly processes in out-of-equilibrium magnetic suspensions.

  19. Energy velocity and group velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇

    1995-01-01

    A new Lagrangian method for studying the relationship between the energy velocity and the group velocity is described. It is proved that under the usual quasistatic electric field, the energy velocity is identical to the group velocity for acoustic waves in anisotropic piezoelectric (or non-piezoelectric) media.

  20. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzit, Omar, E-mail: omar.bouzit@yahoo.fr; Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, U.S.T.H.B, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Bains, A. S., E-mail: bainsphysics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N5E2 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  1. An instrument combining an electrospray ionization source and a velocity-map imaging spectrometer for studying delayed electron emission of polyanions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concina, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.concina@univ-lyon1.fr; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Barbaire, Marc; Clavier, Christian; Maurelli, Jacques; Lépine, Franck; Bordas, Christian [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2016-03-15

    An instrument combining an electrospray ionization source and a velocity-map imaging (VMI) spectrometer has been developed in order to study the delayed electron emission of molecular anions and especially of polyanions. It operates at a high repetition rate (kHz) in order to increase the acquisition speed. The VMI spectrometer has been upgraded for nanosecond time resolution by gating the voltages applied on the position-sensitive detector. Kinetic energy release distribution of thermionic emission (without any contribution from direct detachment) can be recorded for well-defined delays after the nanosecond laser excitation. The capability of the instrument is demonstrated by recording photodetachment spectra of the benchmark C{sub 60}{sup −} anion and C{sub 84}{sup 2−} dianion.

  2. Velocity effect in the l-distribution of the electron capture in collisions of highly charged Ar{sup 8+} ions with a Li(2s) target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascale, J. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Recherche sur l`Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules; Jacquet, E.; Boduch, P.; Chantepie, M.; Lecler, D. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Spectroscopie Atomique

    1994-12-31

    The effect of the velocity of the incident ions in the l-distributions of the electron capture in collisions of highly charged Ar{sup 8+} ions with a Li(2s) target is studied. These Ar{sup 8+} - Li(2s) collisions are experimentally studied by means of near UV and visible photon spectroscopy (200-600 nm) and theoretically analysed by means of three-body classical trajectory Monte-Carlo method. In addition to the effect of the projectile core, we show that the final nl-distributions are, for the most populated n = 8 and n = 9 states strongly energy dependent. (authors). 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. The effective ionization coefficients and electron drift velocities in gas mixtures of CF3I with N2 and CO2 obtained from Boltzmann equation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Yun-Kun; Xiao Deng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The electron swarm parameters including the density-normalized effective ionization coefficients (α-η)/N and the electron drift velocities Ve are calculated for a gas mixture of CF3I with N2 and CO2 by solving the Boltzmann equation in the condition of a steady-state Townsend (SST) experiment.The overall density-reduced electric field strength is from 100 Td to 1000 Td (1 Td =10-17 V·cm2),while the CF3I content k in the gas mixture can be varied over the range from 0% to 100%.From the variation of (α-η)/N with the CF3I mixture ratio k,the limiting field strength (E/N)lim for each CF3I concentration is derived.It is found that for the mixtures with 70% CF3I,the values of (E/N)lim are essentially the same as that for pure SF6.Additionally,the global warming potential (GWP) and the liquefaction temperature of the gas mixtures are also taken into account to evaluate the possibility of application in the gas insulation of power equipment.

  4. Modification of atomic physics rates due to nonlocal electron parallel heat transport in divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allais, F. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Matte, J.P. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada)]. E-mail: matte@inrs-emt.uquebec.ca; Alouani-Bibi, F. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Kim, C.G. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stotler, D.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Rognlien, T.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The effect of steep temperature gradients on the rate of ionization of atomic hydrogen is studied numerically with the electron kinetic code 'FPI' [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 (1994) 1208]. A set of cross sections ['Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction data for fusion'. Supplement to the journal Nucl. Fusion 4 (1993)] has been used which gives the same rates of radiation, ionization and recombination as in the well known edge modeling codes 'UEDGE' and 'DEGAS' for Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions. For this purpose, 30 energy levels are included in the computation, as stepwise ionization is dominant. The enhancement of the ionization rate by non-Maxwellian effects in the colder part of the plasma is significant.

  5. SU-D-210-07: The Dependence On Acoustic Velocity of Medium On the Needle Template and Electronic Grid Alignment in Ultrasound QA for Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, P; Kapoor, R; Curran, B [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); HH McGuire VA Hospital, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the impact on acoustic velocity (AV) of two different media (water and milk) using the needle template/electronic grid alignment test. Water, easily available, makes a good material to test the alignment of the template and grid although water’s AV (1498 m/s at 25°C) is significantly different from tissue (1540 m/s). Milk, with an AV much closer (1548 m/s) to prostate tissue, may be a good substitute for water in ultrasound quality assurance testing. Methods: Tests were performed using a Hitachi ultrasound unit with a mechanical arrangement designed to position needles parallel to the transducer. In this work, two materials – distilled water and homogenized whole milk (AVs of 1498 and 1548 m/s at 25°C) were used in a phantom to test ultrasound needle/grid alignment. The images were obtained with both materials and analyzed for their placement accuracy. Results: The needle template/electronic grid alignment tests showed displacement errors between measured and calculated values. The measurements showed displacements of 2.3mm (water) and 0.4mm (milk), and 1.6mm (water) and 0.3mm (milk) at depths of 7cm and 5cm respectively from true needle positions. The calculated results showed a displacement of 2.36 mm (water); 0.435mm (milk), and 1.66mm (water) and 0.31mm (milk) at a depth of 7cm and 5cm respectively. The displacements in the X and Y directions were also calculated. At depths of 7cm and 5cm, the (ΔX,ΔY) displacements in water were (0.829mm, 2.21mm) and (0.273mm, 1.634mm) and for milk were (0.15mm, 0.44mm) and (0.05mm, 0.302mm) respectively. Conclusion: The measured and calculated values were in good agreement for all tests. They show that milk provides superior results when performing needle template and electronic grid alignment tests for ultrasound units used in prostate brachytherapy.

  6. Modeling of Neutral Entrainment in an FRC Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    nonequilibirum; ion, electron, and neutral temperatures strongly differ, and the electron distribution function is non - Maxwellian . This indicates that a...as keii = ∫ gσeii(g) fe(g)dg, (1) where g is the relative collision velocity and fe is the Maxwellian distribution function. For the charge exchange...plasma temperature and concentration of reacting species, non -equlibrium of their velocity distributions, and the relashionship between different reaction

  7. Exact kinetic theory for the instability of an electron beam in a hot magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeev, I V

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency of collective beam-plasma interaction strongly depends on the growth rates of dominant instabilities excited in the system. Nevertheless, exact calculations of the full unstable spectrum in the framework of relativistic kinetic theory for arbitrary magnetic fields and particle distributions were unknown until now. In this paper we give an example of such a calculation answering the question whether the finite thermal spreads of plasma electrons are able to suppress the fastest growing modes in the beam-plasma system. It is shown that nonrelativistic temperatures of Maxwellian plasmas can stabilize only the oblique instabilities of relativistic beam. On the contrary, non-Maxwellian tails typically found in laboratory beam-plasma experiments are able to substantially reduce the growth rate of the dominant longitudinal modes affecting the efficiency of turbulent plasma heating.

  8. Exact kinetic theory for the instability of an electron beam in a hot magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Efficiency of collective beam-plasma interaction strongly depends on the growth rates of dominant instabilities excited in the system. Nevertheless, exact calculations of the full unstable spectrum in the framework of relativistic kinetic theory for arbitrary magnetic fields and particle distributions were unknown until now. In this paper, we give an example of such a calculation answering the question whether the finite thermal spreads of plasma electrons are able to suppress the fastest growing modes in the beam-plasma system. It is shown that nonrelativistic temperatures of Maxwellian plasmas can stabilize only the oblique instabilities of relativistic beam. On the contrary, non-Maxwellian tails typically found in laboratory beam-plasma experiments are able to substantially reduce the growth rate of the dominant longitudinal modes affecting the efficiency of turbulent plasma heating.

  9. Does spacecraft potential depend on the ambient electron density?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S. T.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Cahoy, K.; Thomsen, M. F.; Shprits, Y.; Lohmeyer, W. Q.; Wong, F.

    2014-12-01

    In a Maxwellian space plasma model, the onset of spacecraft charging at geosynchronous altitudes is due to the ambient electron, ambient ions, and secondary electrons. By using current balance, one can show that the onset of spacecraft charging depends not on the ambient electron density but instead on the critical temperature of the ambient electrons. If the ambient plasma deviates significantly from equilibrium, a non-Maxwellian electron distribution results. For a kappa distribution, the onset of spacecraft charging remains independent of ambient electron density. However, for double Maxwellian distributions, the densities do have a role in the onset of spacecraft charging. For a dielectric spacecraft in sunlight, the trapping of photoelectrons on the sunlit side enhances the local electron density. Using the coordinated environmental satellite data from the Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous satellites, we have obtained results that confirm that the observed spacecraft potential is independent of the ambient electron density during eclipse and that in sunlight charging the low-energy population around the sunlit side of the spacecraft is enhanced by photoelectrons trapped inside the potential barrier.

  10. First-principles study of the threshold effect in the electronic stopping power of LiF and SiO2 for low-velocity protons and helium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Fei; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Jinxia; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2014-02-01

    Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the electronic stopping power of LiF and SiO2-cristobalite-high crystalline thin films when protons and helium ions are hyperchanneling in the axis. In this theoretical framework, ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory calculations for electrons are combined with molecular dynamics simulations for ions in real time and real space. The energy transfer process between the ions and the electronic subsystem of LiF and SiO2 nanostructures is studied. The velocity-proportional stopping power of LiF and SiO2 for protons and helium ions is predicted in the low-energy range. The measured velocity thresholds of protons in LiF and SiO2, and helium ions in LiF are reproduced. The convergence of the threshold effect with respect to the separation of grid points is confirmed. The underlying physics of the threshold effect is clarified by analyzing the conduction band electron distribution. In addition, the electron transfer processes between the projectile ions and solid atoms in hyperchanneling condition are studied, and its effects on the energy loss is investigated.

  11. Diagnostic techniques for measuring suprathermal electron dynamics in plasmas (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, S

    2008-10-01

    Plasmas, both in the laboratory and in space, are often not in thermodynamic equilibrium, and the plasma electron distribution function is accordingly non-Maxwellian. Suprathermal electron tails can be generated by external drives, such as rf waves and electric fields, or internal ones, such as instabilities and magnetic reconnection. The variety and importance of the phenomena in which suprathermal electrons play a significant role explains an enduring interest in diagnostic techniques to investigate their properties and dynamics. X-ray bremsstrahlung emission has been studied in hot magnetized plasmas for well over two decades, flanked progressively by electron-cyclotron emission in geometries favoring the high-energy end of the distribution function (high-field-side, vertical, oblique emission), by electron-cyclotron absorption, by spectroscopic techniques, and at lower temperatures, by Langmuir probes and electrostatic analyzers. Continuous progress in detector technology and in measurement and analysis techniques, increasingly sophisticated layouts (multichannel and tomographic systems, imaging geometries), and highly controlled suprathermal generation methods (e.g., perturbative rf modulation) have all been brought to bear in recent years on an increasingly detailed, although far from complete, understanding of suprathermal electron dynamics.

  12. Electron velocity of 6 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at 300 K in stress engineered InAlN/GaN nano-channel high-electron-mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulkumaran, S., E-mail: SArulkumaran@pmail.ntu.edu.sg; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Teo, K. L. [Temasek Laboratories@NTU, Nanyang Technological University, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Ng, G. I., E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Shoron, O. F.; Rajan, S. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Bin Dolmanan, S.; Tripathy, S. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2015-02-02

    A stress engineered three dimensional (3D) Triple T-gate (TT-gate) on lattice matched In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN nano-channel (NC) Fin-High-Electron-Mobility Transistor (Fin-HEMT) with significantly enhanced device performance was achieved that is promising for high-speed device applications. The Fin-HEMT with 200-nm effective fin-width (W{sub eff}) exhibited a very high I{sub Dmax} of 3940 mA/mm and a highest g{sub m} of 1417 mS/mm. This dramatic increase of I{sub D} and g{sub m} in the 3D TT-gate In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN NC Fin-HEMT translated to an extracted highest electron velocity (v{sub e}) of 6.0 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s, which is ∼1.89× higher than that of the conventional In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN HEMT (3.17 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s). The v{sub e} in the conventional III-nitride transistors are typically limited by highly efficient optical-phonon emission. However, the unusually high v{sub e} at 300 K in the 3D TT-gate In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN NC Fin-HEMT is attributed to the increase of in-plane tensile stress component by SiN passivation in the formed NC which is also verified by micro-photoluminescence (0.47 ± 0.02 GPa) and micro-Raman spectroscopy (0.39 ± 0.12 GPa) measurements. The ability to reach the v{sub e} = 6 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at 300 K by a stress engineered 3D TT-gate lattice-matched In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN NC Fin-HEMTs shows they are promising for next-generation ultra-scaled high-speed device applications.

  13. Kinetic relaxation of a non-Maxwellian monatomic gas in a state of gross rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baganoff, D.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetic relaxation of a monatomic gas in a state of gross rest is studied by use of Maxwell's second-order moment equation. The molecular models considered range from the hard sphere to the Maxwell molecule. The development is exact for an ellipsoidal distribution and becomes a good approximation for more general distributions. The results show that the relaxation of second-order moments is nearly exponential for power-law molecules and that the characteristic time mu/p appears as the principal controlling parameter while the power-law constant plays a secondary role. Comparisons between results of numerical simulations using Bird's direct simulation Monte Carlo method and theory show excellent agreement for both hard-sphere and Maxwell molecules.

  14. Maxwell's second- and third-order equations of transfer for non-Maxwellian gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baganoff, D.

    1992-01-01

    Condensed algebraic forms for Maxwell's second- and third-order equations of transfer are developed for the case of molecules described by either elastic hard spheres, inverse-power potentials, or by Bird's variable hard-sphere model. These hardly reduced, yet exact, equations provide a new point of origin, when using the moment method, in seeking approximate solutions in the kinetic theory of gases for molecular models that are physically more realistic than that provided by the Maxwell model. An important by-product of the analysis when using these second- and third-order relations is that a clear mathematical connection develops between Bird's variable hard-sphere model and that for the inverse-power potential.

  15. Low-frequency sheath instability in a non-Maxwellian plasma with energetic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubtsev, Mikhail; Kamal-Al-Hassan, Md; Ito, Hiroaki; Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi

    2004-01-30

    Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations have been observed in the circuit of a positively biased electrode when the ambient nonuniform plasma is irradiated by a microwave pulse of short duration, which is approximately equal to the ion-plasma period. The instability with its characteristic frequency below the ion-plasma frequency is driven by an accelerated ion component interacting with the sheath of the electrode. A qualitative model of the instability is suggested.

  16. Non-Maxwellian probability density function of fibers with lumped polarization mode dispersion elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Cristian; Mecozzi, Antonio

    2004-05-15

    We give an analytical expression for the probability density function of the differential group delay for a concatenation of Maxwellian fiber sections and an arbitrary number of lumped elements with constant and isotropically oriented birefringence. When the contribution of the average squared of the constant birefringence elements is a significant fraction of the total, we show that the outage probability can be significantly overestimated if the probability density function of the differential group delay is approximated by a Maxwellian distribution.

  17. Theoretical models of non-Maxwellian equilibria for one-dimensional collisionless plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanson, O.; Neukirch, T.; Wilson, F.; Troscheit, S.

    2016-12-01

    It is ideal to use exact equilibrium solutions of the steady state Vlasov-Maxwell system to intialise collsionless simulations. However, exact equilibrium distribution functions (DFs) for a given macroscopic configuration are typically unknown, and it is common to resort to using `flow-shifted' Maxwellian DFs in their stead. These DFs may be consistent with a macrosopic system with the target number density and current density, but could well have inaccurate higher order moments. We present recent theoretical work on the `inverse problem in Vlasov-Maxwell equilibria', namely calculating an exact solution of the Vlasov equation for a specific given magnetic field. In particular, we focus on one-dimensional geometries in Cartesian (current sheets) coordinates.1. From 1D fields to Vlasov equilibria: Theory and application of Hermite Polynomials: (O. Allanson, T. Neukirch, S. Troscheit and F. Wilson, Journal of Plasma Physics, 82, 905820306 (2016) [28 pages, Open Access] )2. An exact collisionless equilibrium for the Force-Free Harris Sheet with low plasma beta: (O. Allanson, T. Neukirch, F. Wilson and S. Troscheit, Physics of Plasmas, 22, 102116 (2015) [11 pages, Open Access])3. Neutral and non-neutral collisionless plasma equilibria for twisted flux tubes: The Gold-Hoyle model in a background field (O. Allanson, F. Wilson and T. Neukirch, (2016)) (accepted, Physics of Plasmas)

  18. Cumulative effect of Weibel-type instabilities in counterstreaming plasmas with non-Maxwellian anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Lázár, M; Shukla, P K

    2008-01-01

    Counterstreaming plasma structures are widely present in laboratory experiments and astrophysical systems, and they are investigated either to prevent unstable modes arising in beam-plasma experiments or to prove the existence of large scale magnetic fields in astrophysical objects. Filamentation instability arises in a counterstreaming plasma and is responsible for the magnetization of the plasma. Filamentationally unstable mode is described by assuming that each of the counterstreaming plasmas has an isotropic Lorentzian (kappa) distribution. In this case, the filamentation instability growth rate can reach a maximum value markedly larger than that for a a plasma with a Maxwellian distribution function. This behaviour is opposite to what was observed for the Weibel instability growth rate in a bi-kappa plasma, which is always smaller than that obtained for a bi-Maxwellian plasma. The approach is further generalized for a counterstreaming plasma with a bi-kappa temperature anisotropy. In this case, the filam...

  19. A kinetic model for runaway electrons in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garcia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrodynamic models and measurements with satellites and incoherent scatter radars predict large field aligned current densities on one side of the auroral arcs. Different authors and different kinds of studies (experimental or modeling agree that the current density can reach up to hundreds of µA/m2. This large current density could be the cause of many phenomena such as tall red rays or triggering of unstable ion acoustic waves. In the present paper, we consider the issue of electrons moving through an ionospheric gas of positive ions and neutrals under the influence of a static electric field. We develop a kinetic model of collisions including electrons/electrons, electrons/ions and electrons/neutrals collisions. We use a Fokker-Planck approach to describe binary collisions between charged particles with a long-range interaction. We present the essential elements of this collision operator: the Langevin equation for electrons/ions and electrons/electrons collisions and the Monte-Carlo and null collision methods for electrons/neutrals collisions. A computational example is given illustrating the approach to equilibrium and the impact of the different terms (electrons/electrons and electrons/ions collisions on the one hand and electrons/neutrals collisions on the other hand. Then, a parallel electric field is applied in a new sample run. In this run, the electrons move in the z direction parallel to the electric field. The first results show that all the electron distribution functions are non-Maxwellian. Furthermore, runaway electrons can carry a significant part of the total current density, up to 20% of the total current density.

  20. Possible interaction between thermal electrons and vibrationally excited N2 in the lower E-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Cheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As one of the tasks to find the energy source(s of thermal electrons, which elevate(s electron temperature higher than neutral temperature in the lower ionosphere E-region, energy distribution function of thermal electron was measured with a sounding rocket at the heights of 93–131 km by the applying second harmonic method. The energy distribution function showed a clear hump at the energy of ~0.4 eV. In order to find the reason of the hump, we conducted laboratory experiment. We studied difference of the energy distribution functions of electrons in thermal energy range, which were measured with and without EUV radiation to plasma of N2/Ar and N2/O2 gas mixture respectively. For N2/Ar gas mixture plasma, the hump is not clearly identified in the energy distribution of thermal electrons. On the other hand for N2/O2 gas mixture, which contains vibrationally excited N2, a clear hump is found when irradiated by EUV. The laboratory experiment seems to suggest that the hump is produced as a result of interaction between vibrationally excited N2 and thermal electrons, and this interaction is the most probable heating source for the electrons of thermal energy range in the lower E-region. It is also suggested that energy distribution of the electrons in high energy part may not be Maxwellian, and DC probe measures the electrons which are non Maxwellian, and therefore "electron temperature" is calculated higher.

  1. A Monte Carlo simulation of the effect of ion self-collisions on the ion velocity distribution function in the high-latitude F-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Barakat

    Full Text Available Non-Maxwellian ion velocity distribution functions have been theoretically predicted and confirmed by observations, to occur at high latitudes. These distributions deviate from Maxwellian due to the combined effect of the E×B drift and ion-neutral collisions. The majority of previous literature, in which the effect of ion self-collisions was neglected, established a clear picture for the ion distribution under a wide range of conditions. At high altitudes and/or for solar maximum conditions, the ion-to-neutral density ratio increases and, hence, the role of ion self-collisions becomes appreciable. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to investigate the behaviour of O+ ions that are E×B-drifting through a background of neutral O, with the effect of O+ (Coulomb self-collisions included. Wide ranges of the ion-to-neutral density ratio ni/nn and the electrostatic field E were considered in order to investigate the change of ion behaviour with solar cycle and with altitude. For low altitudes and/or solar minimum (ni/nn≤ 10-5, the effect of self-collisions is negligible. For higher values of ni/nn, the effect of self-collisions becomes significant and, hence, the non-Maxwellian features of the O+ distribution are reduced. For example, the parallel temperature TiVert increases, the perpendicular temperature Ti decreases, the temperature anisotropy approaches unity and the toroidal features of the ion distribution function become less pronounced. Also, as E increases, the ion-neutral collision rate increases, while the ion-ion collision rate decreases. Therefore, the effect of ion self-collisions is reduced. Finally, the

  2. Measurement of Electron Density Using the Multipole Resonance Probe, Langmuir Probe and Optical Emission Spectroscopy in Low Pressure Plasmas with Different Electron Energy Distribution Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberberg, Moritz; Bibinov, Nikita; Ries, Stefan; Awakowicz, Peter; Institute of Electrical Engineering; Plasma Technology Team

    2016-09-01

    In recently publication, the young diagnostic tool Multipole Resonance Probe (MRP) for electron density measurements was introduced. It is based on active plasma resonance spectroscopy (APRS). The probe was simulated und evaluated for different devices. The geometrical and electrical symmetry simplifies the APRS model, so that the electron density can be easily calculated from the measured resonance. In this work, low pressure nitrogen mixture plasmas with different electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) are investigated. The results of the MRP measurement are compared with measurements of a Langmuir Probe (LP) and Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). Probes and OES measure in different regimes of kinetic electron energy. Both probes measure electrons with low kinetic energy (<10 eV), whereas the OES is influenced by electrons with high kinetic energy which are needed for transitions of molecule bands. By the determination of the absolute intensity of N2(C-B) and N2+(B-X)electron temperature and density can be calculated. In a non-maxwellian plasma, all plasma diagnostics need to be combined.

  3. Stochastic Acceleration of Electrons by Fast Magnetosonic Waves in Solar Flares: the Effects of Anisotropy in Velocity andWavenumber Space

    CERN Document Server

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera

    2014-01-01

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves") via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum $F_k$ and electron distribution function $f_{\\rm e}$. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of $F_k$ and $f_{\\rm e}$. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies $E\\in (E_{\\rm nt}, E_{\\rm max}...

  4. Physics-based formula representations of high-latitude ionospheric outflows: H+ and O+ densities, flow velocities, and temperatures versus soft electron precipitation, wave-driven transverse heating, and solar zenith angle effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Zeng, W.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive systematic dynamic fluid kinetic (DyFK) model simulations are conducted to obtain advanced simulation-based formula representations of ionospheric outflow parameters, for possible use by global magnetospheric modelers. Under F10.7 levels of 142, corresponding to solar medium conditions, we obtain the H+ and O+ outflow densities, flow velocities, and perpendicular and parallel temperatures versus energy fluxes and characteristic energies of soft electron precipitation, wave spectral densities of ion transverse wave heating, and F region level solar zenith angle in the high-latitude auroral region. From the results of hundreds of DyFK simulations of auroral outflows for ranges of each of these driving agents, we depict the H+ and O+ outflow density and flow velocity parameters at 3 R E altitude at the ends of these 2-h simulation runs in spectrogram form versus various pairs of these influencing parameters. We further approximate these results by various distilled formula representations for the O+ and H+ outflow velocities, densities, and temperatures at 3 R E altitude, as functions of the above indicated four ``driver'' parameters. These formula representations provide insight into the physics of these driven outflows, and may provide a convenient set of tools to set the boundary conditions for ionospheric plasma sources in global magnetospheric simulations.

  5. Ionization and Charge Exchange Reactions in Neutral Entrainment of a Field Reversed Configuration Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    non - Maxwellian . This indicates that a kinetic approach has to be used to model neutral entrainment in FRC thrusters. Strong impact of electron...radiative cooling can be problematic for high-Z plasma (due to a Z2 dependence) and in radiative non -equilibrium conditions (volumetric emission).1...dg, (1) where g is the relative collision velocity and fe is the Maxwellian distribution function. 2. Single charge exchange (SCX, A+ +A → A+A+) For

  6. The incomplete plasma dispersion function: properties and application to waves in bounded plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    The incomplete plasma dispersion function is a generalization of the plasma dispersion function in which the defining integral spans a semi-infinite, rather than infinite, domain. It is useful for describing the linear dielectric response and wave dispersion in non-Maxwellian plasmas when the distribution functions can be approximated as Maxwellian over finite, or semi-infinite, intervals in velocity phase-space. A ubiquitous example is the depleted Maxwellian electron distribution found near...

  7. A Michelson Interferometer for Electron Cyclotron Emission Measurements on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Stefan, Schmuck; Zhao, Hailin; John, Fessey; Paul, Trimble; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Zeying; Zang, Qing; Hu, Liqun

    2016-12-01

    A Michelson interferometer, on loan from EFDA-JET (Culham, United Kingdom) has recently been commissioned on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST, ASIPP, Hefei, China). Following a successful in-situ absolute calibration the instrument is able to measure the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrum, from 80 GHz to 350 GHz in extraordinary mode (X-mode) polarization, with high accuracy. This allows the independent determination of the electron temperature profile from observation of the second harmonic ECE and the possible identification of non-Maxwellian features by comparing higher harmonic emission with numerical simulations. The in-situ calibration results are presented together with the initial measured temperature profiles. These measurements are then discussed and compared with other independent temperature profile measurements. This paper also describes the main hardware features of the diagnostic and the associated commissioning test results. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405211, 11275233), and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106002, 2015GB101000), and the RCUK Energy Programme (No. EP/I501045), partly supported by the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program in the Field of Plasma Physics (NSFC: No. 11261140328)

  8. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  9. Spectral Analysis and Metastable Absorption Measurements of High Pressure Capacitively and Inductively Coupled Radio-Frequency Argon-Helium Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    states. The non -statistical nature implies either the equilibrium kinetics of the argon and electrons in the discharge are non - Maxwellian , the pop...and is shown in Figure 16. The clearly non - Maxwellian nature of the population distribution and the exclusion of the higher lying states are the...approaches the non - Maxwellian production and destruction rates of of the argon states in the discharge and is forcing them into a Boltzmann

  10. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco; Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Califano, Francesco; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of "magneto-elastic" waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and flow vorticity, and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm (see also [5]). Examples of these signatures are provided by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [6], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,7] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. 1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157

  11. Python framework for kinetic modeling of electronically excited reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboncoeur, John; Parsey, Guy; Guclu, Yaman; Christlieb, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    The use of plasma energy to enhance and control the chemical reactions during combustion, a technology referred to as ``plasma assisted combustion'' (PAC), can result in a variety of beneficial effects: e.g. stable lean operation, pollution reduction, and wider range of p-T operating conditions. While experimental evidence abounds, theoretical understanding of PAC is at best incomplete, and numerical tools still lack in reliable predictive capabilities. In the context of a joint experimental-numerical effort at Michigan State University, we present here an open-source modular Python framework dedicated to the dynamic optimization of non-equilibrium PAC systems. Multiple sources of experimental reaction data, e.g. reaction rates, cross-sections and oscillator strengths, are used in order to quantify the effect of data uncertainty and limiting assumptions. A collisional-radiative model (CRM) is implemented to organize reactions by importance and as a potential means of measuring a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF), when coupled to optical emission spectroscopy data. Finally, we explore scaling laws in PAC parameter space using a kinetic global model (KGM) accelerated with CRM optimized reaction sequences and sparse stiff integrators.

  12. Physics and Engineering Design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, W. L.; Austin, M. E.; Houshmandyar, S.; Phillips, P. E.; Beno, J. H.; Ouroua, A.; Weeks, D. A.; Hubbard, A. E.; Stillerman, J. A.; Feder, R. E.; Khodak, A.; Taylor, G.; Pandya, H. K.; Danani, S.; Kumar, R.

    2015-11-01

    Electron temperature (Te) measurements and consequent electron thermal transport inferences will be critical to the non-active phases of ITER operation and will take on added importance during the alpha heating phase. Here, we describe our design for the diagnostic that will measure spatial and temporal profiles of Te using electron cyclotron emission (ECE). Other measurement capability includes high frequency instabilities (e.g. ELMs, NTMs, and TAEs). Since results from TFTR and JET suggest that Thomson Scattering and ECE differ at high Te due to driven non-Maxwellian distributions, non-thermal features of the ITER electron distribution must be documented. The ITER environment presents other challenges including space limitations, vacuum requirements, and very high-neutron-fluence. Plasma control in ITER will require real-time Te. The diagnosic design that evolved from these sometimes-conflicting needs and requirements will be described component by component with special emphasis on the integration to form a single effective diagnostic system. Supported by PPPL/US-DA via subcontract S013464-C to UT Austin.

  13. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  14. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex...

  15. Investigation by high resolution electron spectroscopy of the helium-like 3lnl' Rydberg series in double capture processes at low collision velocity: auto transfer to Rydberg states and electron stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Benhenni, M. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)); Bachau, H.; Sanchez, I. (Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France). Lab. des Collisions Atomiques)

    1994-09-28

    A high resolution electron spectrometry of the (3lnl') Ryberg series populated in N[sup 7+] + He and Ne[sup 10+] + He collisions at 10 q keV, 10[sup o] allows us to observe, for the first time by this method, two post-collisional effects. First, it is found with nitrogen ions that, when n increases from n = 4 to 9, the L-distribution peaks more and more on the high angular momentum states. This is qualitatively understood as a Stark deformation of the Rydberg orbit by the Coulomb field of the receding ion. Also, in the n range where the double capture process populates symmetrical 4l4l' states (n>9), an enhancement of the intensities of the 3lnl' Rydberg lines is observed for both collisonal systems. This is thought to be a signature of the so-called auto transfer to Rydberg states effect. The transfer of population from the 3l4l' to the 3lnl' states is found to be favoured against a direct autoionization of these 4l4l' states into the n = 2 continuum. These experimental findings together with preliminary spectroscopic calculations concerning the configuration interaction of the Ne[sup 8+] (4l4l') states with the Ne[sup 8+](3lnl') Rydberg series are also discussed within the context of the electron stabilization which follows a double capture. (Author).

  16. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  17. Velocity selective optical pumping

    OpenAIRE

    Aminoff, C. G.; Pinard, M.

    1982-01-01

    We consider optical pumping with a quasi monochromatic tunable light beam, in the low intensity limit where a rate equation regime is obtained The velocity selective optical pumping (V.S.O.P.) introduces a correlation between atomic velocity and internal variables in the ground (or metastable) state. The aim of this article is to evaluate these atomic observables (orientation, alignment, population) as a function of velocity, using a phenomenological description of the relaxation effect of co...

  18. Theoretical study of electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves in the presence of AC field in Uranian magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2015-10-01

    Electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) waves with temperature anisotropy in the magnetosphere of Uranus have been studied in present work. EMEC waves are investigated using method of characteristic solution by kinetic approach, in presence of AC field. In 1986, Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus revealed that magnetosphere of Uranus exhibit non-Maxwellian high-energy tail distribution. So, the dispersion relation, real frequency and growth rate are evaluated using Lorentzian Kappa distribution function. Effect of temperature anisotropy, AC frequency and number density of particles is found. The study is also extended to oblique propagation of EMEC waves in presence and absence of AC field. Through comprehensive mathematical analysis it is found that when EMEC wave propagates parallel to intrinsic magnetic field of Uranus, its growth is more enhanced than in case of oblique propagation. Results are also discussed in context to magnetosphere of Earth and also gives theoretical explanation to existence of high energetic particles observed by Voyager 2 in the magnetosphere of Uranus. The results can present a further insight into the nature of electron-cyclotron instability condition for the whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belts of Uranus or other space plasmas.

  19. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  20. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  1. Effect of trapped ions and nonequilibrium electron-energy distribution function on dust-particle charging in gas discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhinin, G I; Fedoseev, A V; Antipov, S N; Petrov, O F; Fortov, V E

    2009-03-01

    Dust-particles charging in a low-pressure glow discharge was investigated theoretically. The dust-particle charge was found on the basis of a developed self-consistent model taking into account the nonequilibrium character of electron distribution function and the formation of an ionic coat composed of bound or trapped ions around the dust particle. The dust-particle charge, the radial distributions of electron density, free and trapped ions densities, and the distribution of electrostatic potential were found. It was shown that the non-Maxwellian electron distribution function and collisional flux of trapped ions both reduce the dust-particle charge in comparison with that received with the help of the conventional orbital motion limited (OML) model. However, in rare collisional regimes in plasma when the collisional flux is negligible, the formation of ionic coat around a particle leads to a shielding of the proper charge of a dust particle. In low-pressure experiments, it is only possible to detect the effective charge of a dust particle that is equal to the difference between the proper charge of the particle and the charge of trapped ions. The calculated effective dust particle charge is in fairly good agreement with the experimental measurements of dust-particle charge dependence on gas pressure.

  2. Superluminal Recession Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, T M; Davis, Tamara M.; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2000-01-01

    Hubble's Law, v=HD (recession velocity is proportional to distance), is a theoretical result derived from the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. v=HD applies at least as far as the particle horizon and in principle for all distances. Thus, galaxies with distances greater than D=c/H are receding from us with velocities greater than the speed of light and superluminal recession is a fundamental part of the general relativistic description of the expanding universe. This apparent contradiction of special relativity (SR) is often mistakenly remedied by converting redshift to velocity using SR. Here we show that galaxies with recession velocities faster than the speed of light are observable and that in all viable cosmological models, galaxies above a redshift of three are receding superluminally.

  3. Non-Maxwellian behavior and quasistationary regimes near the modal solutions of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam β system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, M; Leo, R A; Tempesta, P; Tsallis, C

    2012-03-01

    In a recent paper [M. Leo, R. A. Leo, and P. Tempesta, J. Stat. Mech. (2011) P03003], it has been shown that the π/2-mode exact nonlinear solution of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam β system, with periodic boundary conditions, admits two energy density thresholds. For values of the energy density ε below or above these thresholds, the solution is stable. Between them, the behavior of the solution is unstable, first recurrent and then chaotic. In this paper, we study the chaotic behavior between the two thresholds from a statistical point of view, by analyzing the distribution function of a dynamical variable that is zero when the solution is stable and fluctuates around zero when it is unstable. For mesoscopic systems clear numerical evidence emerges that near the second threshold, in a large range of the energy density, the numerical distribution is fitted accurately with a q-Gaussian distribution for very large integration times, suggesting the existence of a quasistationary state possessing a weakly chaotic behavior. A normal distribution is recovered in the thermodynamic limit.

  4. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  5. The Velocity Campaign for Ignition on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Debra

    2011-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires a high velocity implosion since the energy required for ignition scales like 1/v8. Beyond ignition, a higher velocity produces more robust performance, which will be useful for applications of ignition. In the velocity campaign, we will explore three methods for increasing implosion velocity: increased laser power and energy, optimized hohlraum and capsule materials, and optimized capsule thickness. The main issue with increasing the laser power and energy is the way in which LPI (laser plasma interactions) and hot electron preheat will change as we increase the laser power. Based on scalings from previous data and theory, we expect to couple 80-85% of 1.5 MJ at 475-500 TW. We can also increase the velocity by optimizing the hohlraum and capsule materials. In this campaign, we will explore depleted uranium hohlraums to reduce wall loss and optimize the capsule dopant by replacing the germanium dopant with silicon. Those two changes are expected to increase velocity by 6-7%. Finally, we will optimize the capsule thickness. The optimal capsule thickness is a trade-off between velocity and mix. A thinner capsule has higher velocity, but is more susceptible to mix of the ablator material into the hotspot due to hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by ablation surface imperfections. Once we have achieved adequate capsule areal density, we will optimize the velocity/mix trade off by varying the capsule thickness. We will also make direct measure of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth by backlighting the growth of engineered features on the surface of the capsule. This will allow us to benchmark our models of mix. In this paper, we will describe the designs and experimental results of the velocity campaign. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-11-01

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of {10}15-{10}16 W cm-2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about 25 and 40 {eV} for simulated delay times up to +70 {fs} after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8-18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and 30 eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. We resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser-matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  7. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, Kashif [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad and University of Wah, Wah Cantt 47040 (Pakistan); Ehsan, Zahida, E-mail: Ehsan.zahida@gmail.com [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Universita degli Studi del Molise, 86090 Pesche - IS (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Defence Road, Off Raiwind Road, Lahore 86090 (Pakistan); Khan, S. A. [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTEC, PO Box Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  8. Velocities in Solar Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  9. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  10. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...... description of this momentum flow. The Prescribed Velocity Method is a practical method for the description of an Air Terminal Device which will save grid points close to the opening and ensure the right level of the momentum flow....

  11. Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Iaquinta, Jean

    2000-04-01

    Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth's radiation balance through their effect on the rate of buildup or decay of cirrus clouds. In this study, laboratory and field-based cirrus crystal drag coefficient data, as well as analytical descriptions of cirrus crystal shapes, are used to derive more physically based expressions for the velocities of cirrus crystals than have been available in the past.Polycrystals-often bullet rosettes-are shown to be the dominant crystal types in synoptically generated cirrus, with columns present in varying but relatively large percentages, depending on the cloud. The two critical parameters needed to calculate terminal velocity are the drag coefficient and the ratio of mass to cross-sectional area normal to their fall direction. Using measurements and calculations, it is shown that drag coefficients from theory and laboratory studies are applicable to crystals of the types found in cirrus. The ratio of the mass to area, which is shown to be relatively independent of the number of bullets in the rosette, is derived from an analytic model that represents bullet rosettes containing one to eight bullets in 19 primary geometric configurations. The ratio is also derived for columns. Using this information, a general set of equations is developed to calculate the terminal velocities and masses in terms of the aspect ratio (width divided by length), ice density, and rosette maximum dimension. Simple expressions for terminal velocity and mass as a function of bullet rosette maximum dimension are developed by incorporating new information on bullet aspect ratios.The general terminal velocity and mass relations are then applied to a case from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Research Experiment (FIRE) 2, when size spectra from a balloon-borne ice crystal

  12. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  13. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  14. Radio Emissions from Plasma with Electron Kappa-Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, G. D.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Gregory Fleishman (New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA)Alexey Kuznetsov (Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk, Russia), Currently there is a concern about the ability of the classical thermal (Maxwellian) distribution to describe quasisteady-state plasma in the solar atmosphere, including active regions. In particular, other distributions have been proposed to better fit observations, for example, kappa-distributions. If present, these distributions will generate radio emissions with different observable properties compared with the classical gyroresonance (GR) or free-free emission, which implies a way of remotely detecting these kappa distributions in the radio observations. Here we present analytically derived GR and free-free emissivities and absorption coefficients for the kappa-distribution, and discuss their properties, which are in fact remarkably different from the classical Maxwellian plasma. In particular, the radio brightness temperature from a gyrolayer increases with the optical depth τ for kappa-distribution. This property has a remarkable consequence allowing a straightforward observational test: the GR radio emission from the non-Maxwellian distributions is supposed to be noticeably polarized even in the optically thick case, where the emission would have strictly zero polarization in the case of Maxwellian plasma. This offers a way of remote probing the plasma distribution in astrophysical sources, including solar active regions as a vivid example. In this report, we present analytical formulae and computer codes to calculate the emission parameters. We simulate the gyroresonance emission under the conditions typical of the solar active regions and compare the results for different electron distributions. We discuss the implications of our findings for interpretation of radio observations. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-1250374 and AGS-1262772, NASA grant NNX14AC87G to New Jersey Institute of Technology

  15. Agyrotropic pressure tensor induced by the plasma velocity shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Francesco; Del Sarto, Danele; Califano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    We show that the spatial inhomogeneity of a shear flow in a fluid plasma is transferred to a pressure anisotropy that has both a gyrotropic and a non gyrotropic component. We investigate this process both analytically and numerically by including the full pressure tensor dynamics. We determine the time evolution of the pressure agyrotropy and in general of the pressure tensor anisotropization which arise from the action of both the magnetic eld and the flow strain tensor. This mechanism can affect the onset and development of shear-induced fluid instabilities in plasmas and is relevant to the understanding of the origin of some of the non-Maxwellian distribution functions evidenced both in Vlasov simulations and in space plasma measurements that exhibit pressure agyrotropy.

  16. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  17. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Kristopher G; Howes, Gregory G.

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated s...

  18. Velocity and Magnetic Compressions in FEL Drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, L

    2005-01-01

    We will compare merits and issues of these two techniques suitable for increasing the peak current of high brightness electron beams. The typical range of applicability is low energy for the velocity bunching and middle to high energy for magnetic compression. Velocity bunching is free from CSR effects but requires very high RF stability (time jitters), as well as a dedicated additional focusing and great cure in the beam transport: it is very well understood theoretically and numerical simulations are pretty straightforward. Several experiments of velocity bunching have been performed in the past few years: none of them, nevertheless, used a photoinjector designed and optimized for that purpose. Magnetic compression is a much more consolidated technique: CSR effects and micro-bunch instabilities are its main drawbacks. There is a large operational experience with chicanes used as magnetic compressors and their theoretical understanding is quite deep, though numerical simulations of real devices are still cha...

  19. Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Coffey, Tyler; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel technique for rapid ion-sensitive spectroscopy over a broad spectral bandwidth by combining the high sensitivity of velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) with the parallel nature and high frequency accuracy of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Prior to this research, no techniques have been capable of high sensitivity velocity modulation spectroscopy on every parallel detection channel over such a broad spectral range. We have demonstrated the power of this technique by measuring the A^2Π_u - X^2Σ_g^+ (4,2) band of N_2^+ at 830 nm with an absorption sensitivity of 1×10-6 for each of 1500 simultaneous measurement channels spanning 150 Cm-1. A densely sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements to achieve 75 MHz spacing is acquired in under an hour. This technique is ideally suited for high resolution survey spectroscopy of molecular ions with applications including chemical physics, astrochemistry, and precision measurement. Currently, this system is being used to map the electronic transitions of HfF^+ for the JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment. The JILA eEDM experiment uses trapped molecular ions to significantly increase the coherence time of the measurement in addition to utilizing the strong electric field enhancement available from molecules. Previous theoretical work has shown that the metastable ^3Δ_1 state in HfF^+ and ThF^+ provides high sensitivity to the eEDM and good cancellation of systematic effects; however, the electronic level structure of these species have not previously been measured, and the theoretical uncertainties are hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers. This necessitates broad-bandwidth, high-resolution survey spectroscopy provided by frequency comb VMS in the 700-900 nm spectral window. F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) A. E. Leanhardt, et. al. arXiv:1008.2997v2 E. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, and M. P. Deskevich

  20. Transverse velocity shifts in protostellar jets: rotation or velocity asymmetries?

    CERN Document Server

    De Colle, Fabio; Riera, Angels

    2016-01-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction, which have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could be originated by rotation in the flow, or by side to side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (~ 100-200 km/s), an asymmetry >~ 10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts. Our analysis indicate that side to side velocities asymmetries could ...

  1. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  2. Minimum Length - Maximum Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Panes, Boris

    2011-01-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA about superluminal neutrinos.

  3. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Speckhard, Eric G; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming and proposed experiments will make significant improvements. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  4. Velocity centroids as tracers of the turbulent velocity statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A E A

    2004-01-01

    We use the results of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to emulate spectroscopic observations, and produce maps of variations of velocity centroids to study their scaling properties. We compare them with those of the underlying velocity field, and analytic predictions presented in a previous paper (Lazarian & Esquivel 2003). We tested, with success, a criteria for recovering velocity statistics from velocity centroids derived in our previous work. That is, if >> (where S is a 2D map of ``unnormalized'', v velocity, and I integrated intensity map -column density-), then the structure function of the centroids is dominated by the structure function of velocity. We show that it is possible to extract the velocity statistics using centroids for subsonic and mildly supersonic turbulence (e.g. Mach numbers ~2.5). While, towards higher Mach numbers other effects could affect significantly the statistics of centroids.

  5. Statistics of Velocity from Spectral Data Modified Velocity Centroids

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2003-01-01

    We address the problem of studying interstellar (ISM) turbulence using spectral line data. We construct a measure that we term modified velocity centroids (MVCs) and derive an analytical solution that relates the 2D spectra of the modified centroids with the underlying 3D velocity spectrum. We test our results using synthetic maps constructed with data obtained through simulations of compressible MHD turbulence. We prove that the MVCs are able to restore the underlying spectrum of turbulent velocity. We show that the modified velocity centroids (MVCs) are complementary to the the Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) technique that we introduced earlier. Employed together they make determining of the velocity spectral index more reliable. At the same time we show that MVCs allow to determine velocity spectra when the underlying statistics is not a power law and/or the turbulence is subsonic.

  6. Minimal information in velocity space

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, Guillaume

    1995-01-01

    Jaynes' transformation group principle is used to derive the objective prior for the velocity of a non-zero rest-mass particle. In the case of classical mechanics, invariance under the classical law of addition of velocities, leads to an improper constant prior over the unbounded velocity space of classical mechanics. The application of the relativistic law of addition of velocities leads to a less simple prior. It can however be rewritten as a uniform volumetric distribution if the relativistic velocity space is given a non-trivial metric.

  7. Visual control of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  8. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  9. Velocity dependant splash behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, C. A. E.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.; Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Bryant, R.; Newton, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme soil water repellency can occur in nature via condensation of volatile organic compounds released during wildfires and can lead to increased erosion rate. Such extreme water repellent soil can be classified as superhydrophobic and shares similar chemical and topographical features to specifically designed superhydrophobic surfaces. Previous studies using high speed videography to investigate single droplet impact behaviour on artificial superhydrophobic have revealed three distinct modes of splash behaviour (rebound, pinned and fragmentation) which are dependent on the impact velocity of the droplet. In our studies, using high-speed videography, we show that such splash behaviour can be replicated on fixed 'model' water repellent soils (hydrophobic glass beads/particles). We show that the type of splash behaviour is dependent on both the size and chemical nature of the fixed particles. The particle shape also influences the splash behaviour as shown by drop impact experiments on fixed sand samples. We have also studied soil samples, as collected from the field, which shows that the type of droplet splash behaviour can lead to enhanced soil particle transport.

  10. Geospace Plasma Dynamics Laboratory Annual Task Report (FY11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    and the other stability properties of the ion-cyclotron instability in various non - Maxwellian plasmas . For this purpose, analysis of the kinetic... Plasma Dynamics.” The goal of this research effort is to develop a detailed knowledge of the space environment by analyzing satellite data and...Furthermore, satellite-measured particle velocity distributions in the magnetosphere are often better modeled by non - Maxwellian distributions, such as

  11. Velocity Diagnosis of Critical Surface at Microwave Band in Laser-Induced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; WANG Junyan; BAI Shunbo; CHEN Jianping; CHU Ran; YUN Xiaohua; NI Xiaowu

    2008-01-01

    The velocity of critical surface at microwave band in laser-induced plasma was mea-sured and the results are presented. The results indicate that the velocity of critical surface with low electron density is larger than that with the high one; and the velocity of critical surface increases with the laser power density.

  12. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...... with a 90° angle on the vessel. Moreover secondary flow in the abdominal aorta is illustrated by scanning on the transversal axis....

  13. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  14. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov;

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making...

  15. Instantaneous Velocity Using Photogate Timers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbeck, John

    2010-01-01

    Photogate timers are commonly used in physics laboratories to determine the velocity of a passing object. In this application a card attached to a moving object breaks the beam of the photogate timer providing the time for the card to pass. The length L of the passing card can then be divided by this time to yield the average velocity (or speed)…

  16. Kriging Interpolating Cosmic Velocity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yu; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-01-01

    [abridge] Volume-weighted statistics of large scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in mass-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number $n_k$ of the nearby particles to interpolate and the density $n_P$ of the observed sample are investigated. (1) We find that Kriging induces $1\\%$ and $3\\%$ systematics at $k\\sim 0.1h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ when $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-2} ({\\rm Mpc}/h)^{-3}$ and $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-3} ({\\rm Mpc...

  17. Frequency comb velocity-modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Laura C; Cossel, Kevin C; Coffey, Tyler; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric A

    2011-08-26

    We have demonstrated a new technique that provides massively parallel comb spectroscopy sensitive specifically to ions through the combination of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy with velocity-modulation spectroscopy. Using this novel system, we have measured electronic transitions of HfF⁺ and achieved a fractional absorption sensitivity of 3×10⁻⁷ recorded over 1500 simultaneous channels spanning 150  cm⁻¹ around 800 nm with an absolute frequency accuracy of 30 MHz (0.001  cm⁻¹). A fully sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements is acquired in 30 min.

  18. Frequency Comb Velocity-Modulation Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Laura C; Coffey, Tyler; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated a new technique that provides massively parallel comb spectroscopy sensitive specifically to ions through the combination of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy with velocity modulation spectroscopy. Using this novel system, we have measured electronic transitions of HfF+ and achieved a fractional absorption sensitivity of 3 x 10-7 recorded over 1500 simultaneous channels spanning 150 cm-1 around 800 nm with an absolute frequency accuracy of 30 MHz (0.001 cm-1). A fully sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements is acquired in 30 minutes.

  19. A novel differential velocity modulation laser spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Experimental investigation of a novel differential velocity modulation laser spectroscopy is reported and demonstrated with the spectra of Meinel system. The S/N ratio excesses 500︰1, about 60 times higher than that with the traditional non-differential technique. With this technique, we obtained the high-resolution electronic absorption spectra of (1, 0) vibration-al band of CS+ for the first time. It is confirmed that this technique will be a powerful method and receive wide application in studies of new molecular ions.

  20. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  1. An Advantage of the Equivalent Velocity Spectroscopy for Femtsecond Pulse Radiolysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kondoh, Takafumi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Tomosada, Hiroshi; Yang Jin Feng; Yoshida, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    For studies of electron beam induced ultra-fast reaction process, femtosecond(fs) pulse radiolysis is under construction. To realize fs time resolution, fs electron and analyzing light pulses and their jitter compensation system are needed. About a 100fs electron pulse was generated by a photocathode RF gun linac and a magnetic pulse compressor. Synchronized Ti: Sapphire laser have a puleswidth about 160fs. And, it is significant to avoid degradation of time resolution caused by velocity difference between electron and analyzing light in a sample. In the 'Equivalent velocity spectroscopy' method, incident analyzing light is slant toward electron beam with an angle associated with refractive index of sample. Then, to overlap light wave front and electron pulse shape, electron pulse shape is slanted toward the direction of travel. As a result of the equivalent velocity spectroscopy for hydrated electrons, using slanted electron pulse shape, optical absorption rise time was about 1.4ps faster than normal electro...

  2. Low-velocity ion tracks in fine grain emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsume, M. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)]. E-mail: natsume@flab.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Hoshino, K. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kuwabara, K. [Digital and Photo Imaging Materials Research Laboratories, FUJIFILM Corporation, Minamiashigara, Kanagawa 250-0193 (Japan); Nakamura, M. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nakano, T. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Niwa, K. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sato, O. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Tani, T. [Digital and Photo Imaging Materials Research Laboratories, FUJIFILM Corporation, Minamiashigara, Kanagawa 250-0193 (Japan); Toshito, T. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2007-06-01

    We have studied low-velocity Kr ion responses of nuclear emulsions for the possibility of tracking Ag and Br recoils from galactic dark matter particles. Tracks of 680-1180 km/s Kr ions have been observed in a 40 nm-sized AgBr grain emulsion with scanning electron microscopy. The tracks have a linear energy-dependency in range, angles biased along the incident direction, and a high developed-grain number density with respect to expected electronic stopping. We find that the fine grain emulsion is sensitive enough to low-velocity heavy ions whose energy losses are mainly governed by nuclear stopping.

  3. Neutrino Velocity and Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Minakata, H

    2012-01-01

    We study distances of propagation and the group velocities of the muon neutrinos in the presence of mixing and oscillations assuming that Lorentz invariance holds. Oscillations lead to distortion of the $\

  4. Statistics of Centroids of Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A

    2009-01-01

    We review the use of velocity centroids statistics to recover information of interstellar turbulence from observations. Velocity centroids have been used for a long time now to retrieve information about the scaling properties of the turbulent velocity field in the interstellar medium. We show that, while they are useful to study subsonic turbulence, they do not trace the statistics of velocity in supersonic turbulence, because they are highly influenced by fluctuations of density. We show also that for sub-Alfv\\'enic turbulence (both supersonic and subsonic) two-point statistics (e.g. correlation functions or power-spectra) are anisotropic. This anisotropy can be used to determine the direction of the mean magnetic field projected in the plane of the sky.

  5. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  6. Event Detection by Velocity Pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose velocity pyramid for multimediaevent detection. Recently, spatial pyramid matching is proposed to in-troduce coarse geometric information into Bag of Features framework,and is eective for static image recognition and detection. In video, notonly spatial information but also temporal information, which repre-sents its dynamic nature, is important. In order to fully utilize it, wepropose velocity pyramid where video frames are divided into motionalsub-regions. Our meth...

  7. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    an electron-ion pair in the discharge. Fig. 2. EEDF is non - Maxwellian and changes along the plasma column The electron–neutral collision...plasma radius. Even at atmospheric pressure the EEDF is non - Maxwellian and it is changing along the plasma column. ...18 31st ICPIG, July 14-19, 2013, Granada, Spain EEDF usually strongly differs from Maxwellian and chages along the plasma column (this is

  8. Gait phase varies over velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yancheng; Lu, Kun; Yan, Songhua; Sun, Ming; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2014-02-01

    We sought to characterize the percent (PT) of the phases of a gait cycle (GC) as velocity changes to establish norms for pathological gait characteristics with higher resolution technology. Ninety five healthy subjects (49 males and 46 females with age 34.9 ± 11.8 yrs, body weight 64.0 ± 11.7 kg and BMI 23.5 ± 3.6) were enrolled and walked comfortably on a 10-m walkway at self-selected slower, normal, and faster velocities. Walking was recorded with a high speed camera (250 frames per second) and the eight phases of a GC were determined by examination of individual frames for each subject. The correlation coefficients between the mean PT of the phases of the three velocities gaits and PT defined by previous publications were all greater than 0.99. The correlation coefficient between velocity and PT of gait phases is -0.83 for loading response (LR), -0.75 for mid stance (MSt), and -0.84 for pre-swing (PSw). While the PT of the phases of three velocities from this study are highly correlated with PT described by Dr. Jacquenlin Perry decades ago, actual PT of each phase varied amongst these individuals with the largest coefficient variation of 24.31% for IC with slower velocity. From slower to faster walk, the mean PT of MSt diminished from 35.30% to 25.33%. High resolution recording revealed ambiguity of some gait phase definitions, and these data may benefit GC characterization of normal and pathological gait in clinical practice. The study results indicate that one should consider individual variations and walking velocity when evaluating gaits of subjects using standard gait phase classification.

  9. Amplified spontaneous emission of phonons as a likely mechanism for density-dependent velocity saturation in GaN transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurgin, Jacob B.; Bajaj, Sanyam; Rajan, Siddharth

    2016-09-01

    We show that density-dependent velocity saturation in a GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) can be related to the stimulated emission of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons. As the drift velocity of electrons increases, the drift of the Fermi distribution in reciprocal space results in population inversion and gain for the LO phonons. Once this gain reaches a threshold value, the avalanche-like increase in LO phonon emission causes a rapid loss of electron energy and momentum and leads to drift velocity saturation. Our simple model correctly predicts both the general trend of decreasing saturation velocity with increasing electron density, and the measured experimental values of saturation.

  10. Three Component Velocity and Acceleration Measurement Using FLEET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Calvert, Nathan; Dogariu, Arthur; Miles, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    The femtosecond laser electronic excitation and tagging (FLEET) method has been used to measure three components of velocity and acceleration for the first time. A jet of pure N2 issuing into atmospheric pressure air was probed by the FLEET system. The femtosecond laser was focused down to a point to create a small measurement volume in the flow. The long-lived lifetime of this fluorescence was used to measure the location of the tagged particles at different times. Simultaneous images of the flow were taken from two orthogonal views using a mirror assembly and a single intensified CCD camera, allowing two components of velocity to be measured in each view. These different velocity components were combined to determine three orthogonal velocity components. The differences between subsequent velocity components could be used to measure the acceleration. Velocity accuracy and precision were roughly estimated to be +/-4 m/s and +/-10 m/s respectively. These errors were small compared to the approx. 100 m/s velocity of the subsonic jet studied.

  11. Thickness dependence of vortex critical velocity in wide Nb films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, Gaia [CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory SuperMat, Via S. Allende, Baronissi, SA, I-84081 (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it; Leo, Antonio; Nigro, Angela; Pace, Sandro; Cirillo, Carla; Attanasio, Carmine [CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory SuperMat, Via S. Allende, Baronissi, SA, I-84081 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita di Salerno, Via S. Allende, Baronissi, SA, I-84081 (Italy)

    2008-04-01

    Pulsed I-V measurements performed on wide Nb films of different thickness show the electronic instability, at high driving currents, predicted by Larkin and Ovchinnikov (LO). We find that the associated vortex critical velocity v* decreases with the film thickness, and its temperature and magnetic field dependences exhibit some discrepancies with respect to the LO theoretical results.

  12. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    CERN Document Server

    Modanese, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the hypothetical existence of superluminal signals would imply the logical possibility of active causal violation: an observer in relative motion with respect to a primary source could in principle emit secondary superluminal signals (triggered by the primary ones) which go back in time and deactivate the primary source before the initial emission. This is a direct consequence of the structure of the Lorentz transformations, sometimes called "Regge-Tolman paradox". It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity of the moving observer required to produce the causality violation. When applied to some recent claims of slight superluminal propagation, this formula yields a required velocity very close to the speed of light; this raises some doubts about the real physical observability of such violations. We re-compute this velocity requirement introducing a realistic delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that for -any- delay it...

  13. Signal velocity in oscillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantos, C. E.; Veerman, J. J. P.; Hammond, D. K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a system of coupled oscillators on the circle, which arises from a simple model for behavior of large numbers of autonomous vehicles where the acceleration of each vehicle depends on the relative positions and velocities between itself and a set of local neighbors. After describing necessary and sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability, we derive expressions for the phase velocity of propagation of disturbances in velocity through this system. We show that the high frequencies exhibit damping, which implies existence of well-defined signal velocitiesc+ > 0 and c- < 0 such that low frequency disturbances travel through the flock as f+(x - c+t) in the direction of increasing agent numbers and f-(x - c-t) in the other.

  14. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  15. Electron-Acoustic Compressive Soliton and Electron Density Hole in Aurora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2003-01-01

    Electron-acoustic solitary waves have been studied in an electron-beam plasma system. It is found that the solution of compressive soliton only exists within a limited range of soliton velocity around the electron beam velocity. A compressive electron-acoustic soliton always accompanies with a cold electron density hole. This theoretical model is used to explain the ‘fast solitary wave' event observed by the FAST satellite in the midaltitude auroral zone.

  16. Variation of Mass with Velocity: "Kugeltheorie" or "Relativtheorie"

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with four topics: The first subject is Abraham's spherical electron, Lorentz's contracted electron and B\\"ucherer's electron. The second topic is Einstein's 1905 relativity theory of the motion of an electron. Einstein obtained expressions for the longitudinal and transverse masses of the electron using the principle of relativity and that of the constancy of the velocity of light. The third topic is Einstein's reply to Ehrenfest's query. Einstein's above solution appeared to Ehrenfest very similar to Lorentz's one: a deformed electron. Einstein commented on Ehrenfest's paper and characterized his work as a theory of principle and reasoned that beyond kinematics, the 1905 heuristic relativity principle could offer new connections between non-kinematical concepts. The final topic is Kaufmann's experiments. Kaufmann concluded that his measuring procedures were not compatible with the hypothesis posited by Lorentz and Einstein. However, unlike Ehrenfest, he gave the first clear account of the ba...

  17. X-ray and electron generation in the relativistic lambda-cubed regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordovanakis, Aghapi G.

    Over the last two decades, laser-plasma interactions at relativistic intensities have been carried out using large laser facilities producing at least several hundred millijoule pulses at a repetition rate of 10 Hz or lower. A less explored regime is when intensities in excess of 1018 W/cm2 are attained by focusing millijoule-level femtosecond pulses to a spot with a diameter comparable to the laser wavelength. This so-called relativistic lambda3 regime allows the study of certain laser-plasma experiments at kilohertz repetition rate. The present dissertation contributes to the understanding of the x-ray source and hot electrons produced in this regime. The micron-sized lambda3 focus engenders a comparably sized x-ray source that could be attractive for high resolution x-ray imaging applications. With this in mind, the source size is measured for various target materials using the knife-edge technique. Furthermore, the source spatial coherence properties are investigated by analyzing the diffraction pattern off a straight edge. Also investigated are the spatial and energy distributions of hot electrons escaping the plasma. In the case of an Al plasma, the electrons have a Maxwellian-like energy distribution with a temperature that scales with (I lambda 2)0.6 in the 1017--2 x 10 18 W/cm2 intensity range. On the other hand, in the case of an SiO2 plasma with lambda/2 scale-length, the electrons are emitted in a collimated relativistic jet having a non-Maxwellian distribution with = 675 keV. This is the first demonstration of laser-generated relativistic electron beams at kilohertz repetition rate. Additionally, this dissertation reports on two pioneering demonstrations in a related but fundamentally different regime, that of high-average power fiber lasers. In the first experiment, Ni Kalpha x-rays are produced using a fiber CPA system at the intensity of 2 x 1018 W/cm 2, the highest reported to date from a fiber system. The conversion efficiency into the Kalpha

  18. Investigation of the hybrid electron linac with negative group velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, E. A.; Alekhanov, R. Yu.; Bulanov, A. V.; Kaminskiy, V. I.; Matsievskiy, S. V.; Sobenin, N. P.

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid accelerator, incorporating travelling wave (TW) and standing wave (SW) structures is proposed and discussed. Accelerator can sum up an RF focusing in the SW buncher and lower losses in the TW accelerating structure walls. Moreover, the structure without dumping load is proposed. Input power and beam loading are chosen to minimize power reflection from buncher maintain travelling wave regime in the accelerating structure while beam loading is on. In this case SW buncher operates as a dumping load, so all input power either goes to beam or dissipates in the wall losses, it increases structure efficiency. RF characteristics and beam dynamics simulations have been performed.

  19. On the spectrum of secondary electrons emitted during nuclear $\\beta^{-}$-decay in few-electron atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2015-01-01

    Ionization of light atoms and ions during nuclear $\\beta^{-}$-decay is considered. We determine the velocity/momentum spectrum of secondary electrons emitted during nuclear $\\beta^{-}$-decay in one-electron tritium atom. The same method can be applied to describe velocity/momentum distributions of secondary electrons emitted from $\\beta^{-}$-decaying few-electron atoms and molecules.

  20. Tachoastrometry: astrometry with radial velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquini, L; Lombardi, M; Monaco, L; Leão, I C; Delabre, B

    2014-01-01

    Spectra of composite systems (e.g., spectroscopic binaries) contain spatial information that can be retrieved by measuring the radial velocities (i.e., Doppler shifts) of the components in four observations with the slit rotated by 90 degrees in the sky. By using basic concepts of slit spectroscopy we show that the geometry of composite systems can be reliably retrieved by measuring only radial velocity differences taken with different slit angles. The spatial resolution is determined by the precision with which differential radial velocities can be measured. We use the UVES spectrograph at the VLT to observe the known spectroscopic binary star HD 188088 (HIP 97944), which has a maximum expected separation of 23 milli-arcseconds. We measure an astrometric signal in radial velocity of 276 \\ms, which corresponds to a separation between the two components at the time of the observations of 18 $\\pm2$ milli-arcseconds. The stars were aligned east-west. We describe a simple optical device to simultaneously record p...

  1. Expansion Velocity Investigation of the Elliptical Planetary Nebula NGC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Younsu Choi; Lee, Seong-Jae; Hyung, Siek

    2008-12-01

    Using the spectral data in the 3700 to 10050 Å wavelength range secured with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph (HES) at the Lick observatory, we have investigated the expansion velocities and the physical conditions of the elliptical planetary nebula NGC 6803. Various forbidden and permitted lines, e.g. HI, HeI, HeII, [OIII], [NII], [ArIII], and [SII], indicate complicated but systematic physical conditions variation: electron temperatures T_{ɛ} ˜ 9000 - 11,000 K and electron number densities N_{ɛ} ˜ 2000 - 9000 cm^{-3}. The line profile analysis of these ions also indicates the systematic change or the acceleration of the expansion velocities in the range of 10 - 22 kms. We show that the velocity gradient and physical condition found in various ions are closely related to the prolate ellipsoidal structure of NGC 6803. The expansion velocity and the ionic abundance of O^{2+} were derived based on the OII and [OIII] lines. In spite of the discrepancy of ionic abundances derived by the two cases and their line profiles, the expansion velocities of them agree well. We find that the ratios of the red to blue line component of the HeII & OII lines are different from those of the [OIII] or other forbidden lines that indicates a possible involvement of emission of HeII & OII lines. This subtle difference and the different physical condition of the lines are likely to be caused by the elongated geometry and the latitude dependence of the emission zone.

  2. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  3. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, P.; Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Müller, S. H.; Fuchert, G.; Scott, B. D.; Stroth, U.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  4. Spatiotemporal velocity-velocity correlation function in fully developed turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Canet, Léonie; Wschebor, Nicolás; Balarac, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is an ubiquitous phenomenon in natural and industrial flows. Since the celebrated work of Kolmogorov in 1941, understanding the statistical properties of fully developed turbulence has remained a major quest. In particular, deriving the properties of turbulent flows from a mesoscopic description, that is from Navier-Stokes equation, has eluded most theoretical attempts. Here, we provide a theoretical prediction for the {\\it space and time} dependent velocity-velocity correlation function of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence from the field theory associated to Navier-Stokes equation with stochastic forcing. This prediction is the analytical fixed-point solution of Non-Perturbative Renormalisation Group flow equations, which are exact in a certain large wave-number limit. This solution is compared to two-point two-times correlation functions computed in direct numerical simulations. We obtain a remarkable agreement both in the inertial and in the dissipative ranges.

  5. Precise Measurement of Drift Velocities in Active-Target Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Louis

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear experiments with radioactive beams are needed to improve our understanding of nuclei structure far from stability. Radioactive beams typically have low beam rates, but active-target detectors can compensate for these low beam rates. In active-target detectors that are also Time-Projection Chambers (TPC), ionized electrons drift through an electric fieldto a detection device to imagethe trajectory of charged-particle ionization tracks within the chamber's gas volume. The measurement of the ionized electrons' drift velocity is crucial for the accurate imaging of these tracks. In order to measure this drift velocity, we will use a UV laser and photo-sensitive foil in a the ND-Cubedetector we are developing, periodically releasingelectrons from the foil at a known timesand a known distance from the electron detector, thereby precisely measuring the drift velocity in situ. We have surveyed several materials to find a material that will work well with typical solid-state UV lasers on the market. We plan to determine the best material and thickness of the foil to maximize the number of photoelectrons. The precision that will be afforded by this measurement of the drift velocity will allow us to eliminate a source of systematic uncertainty.

  6. EFFECT OF VELOCITY ON DUCTILITY UNDER HIGH VELOCITY FORMING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong; LI Chunfeng

    2007-01-01

    The ring expansion procedures over various forming velocities are calculated with ANSYS software in order to show the effect of forming velocity on ductility of rate insensitive materials. Ring expansion procedures are simplified to one-dimensional tension by constraining the radial deformation, with element birth and death method, fracture problem of circular ring are considered. The calculated results show that for insensitive materials of 1060 aluminum and 3A21 aluminum alloy, fracture strain increases corresponding to the increase of forming velocity. This trend agrees well with experimental results, and indicates inertia is the key factor to affect ductility; With element birth and death methods, fracture problems can be solved effectively. Experimental studies on formability of tubular workpieces are also conducted, experimental results show that the formability of 1060 aluminum and 3A21 aluminum alloy under electromagnetic forming is higher than that under quasistatic forming, according to the characteristics of electromagnetic forming, the forming limit diagrams of the two materials tube are also built respectively, this is very important to promote the development of electromagnetic forming and guide the engineering practices.

  7. Electromagnetic Radiation Originating from Unstable Electron Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Electromagnetic oscillations in the range 300 – 700 MHz were observed from an unmagnetized argon discharge with an unstable electron velocity distribution function.......Electromagnetic oscillations in the range 300 – 700 MHz were observed from an unmagnetized argon discharge with an unstable electron velocity distribution function....

  8. Improved Measurement of Ejection Velocities From Craters Formed in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Byers, Terry; Cardenas, Francisco; Montes, Roland; Potter, Elliot E.

    2014-01-01

    A typical impact crater is formed by two major processes: compression of the target (essentially equivalent to a footprint in soil) and ejection of material. The Ejection-Velocity Measurement System (EVMS) in the Experimental Impact Laboratory has been used to study ejection velocities from impact craters formed in sand since the late 1990s. The original system used an early-generation Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera; custom-written software; and a complex, multicomponent optical system to direct laser light for illumination. Unfortunately, the electronic equipment was overtaken by age, and the software became obsolete in light of improved computer hardware.

  9. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  10. Signal velocity for anomalous dispersive waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, F. (Bologna Univ. (Italy))

    1983-03-11

    The concept of signal velocity for dispersive waves is usually identified with that of group velocity. When the dispersion is anomalous, this interpretation is not correct since the group velocity can assume nonphysical values. In this note, by using the steepest descent method first introduced by Brillouin, the phase velocity is shown to be the signal velocity when the dispersion is anomalous in the full range of frequencies.

  11. The integration of angular velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A common problem in physics and engineering is determination of the orientation of an object given its angular velocity. When the direction of the angular velocity changes in time, this is a nontrivial problem involving coupled differential equations. Several possible approaches are examined, along with various improvements over previous efforts. These are then evaluated numerically by comparison to a complicated but analytically known rotation that is motivated by the important astrophysical problem of precessing black-hole binaries. It is shown that a straightforward solution directly using quaternions is most efficient and accurate, and that the norm of the quaternion is irrelevant. Integration of the generator of the rotation can also be made roughly as efficient as integration of the rotation. Both methods will typically be twice as efficient naive vector- or matrix-based methods. Implementation by means of standard general-purpose numerical integrators is stable and efficient, so that such problems can ...

  12. The Pulsar Kick Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, B M S; Hansen, Brad M. S.

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the sample of pulsar proper motions, taking detailed account of the selection effects of the original surveys. We treat censored data using survival statistics. From a comparison of our results with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the mean birth speed of a pulsar is 250-300 km/s, rather than the 450 km/s foundby Lyne & Lorimer (1994). The resultant distribution is consistent with a maxwellian with dispersion $ \\sigma_v = 190 km/s$. Despite the large birth velocities, we find that the pulsars with long characteristic ages show the asymmetric drift, indicating that they are dynamically old. These pulsars may result from the low velocity tail of the younger population, although modified by their origin in binaries and by evolution in the galactic potential.

  13. Multilogarithmic velocity renormalization in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anand; Kopietz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We reexamine the effect of long-range Coulomb interactions on the quasiparticle velocity in graphene. Using a nonperturbative functional renormalization group approach with partial bosonization in the forward scattering channel and momentum transfer cutoff scheme, we calculate the quasiparticle velocity, v (k ) , and the quasiparticle residue, Z , with frequency-dependent polarization. One of our most striking results is that v (k ) ∝ln[Ck(α ) /k ] where the momentum- and interaction-dependent cutoff scale Ck(α ) vanishes logarithmically for k →0 . Here k is measured with respect to one of the charge neutrality (Dirac) points and α =2.2 is the strength of dimensionless bare interaction. Moreover, we also demonstrate that the so-obtained multilogarithmic singularity is reconcilable with the perturbative expansion of v (k ) in powers of the bare interaction.

  14. Velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Wittig, C.

    1989-03-01

    The technique of velocity-aligned Doppler spectrosocopy (VADS) is presented and discussed. For photolysis/probe experiments with pulsed initiation, VADS can yield Doppler profiles for nascent photofragments that allow detailed center-of-mass (c.m.) kinetic energy distributions to be extracted. When compared with traditional forms of Doppler spectroscopy, the improvement in kinetic energy resolution is dramatic. Changes in the measured profiles are a consequence of spatial discrimination (i.e., focused and overlapping photolysis and probe beams) and delayed observation. These factors result in the selective detection of species whose velocities are aligned with the wave vector of the probe radiation k/sub pr/, thus revealing the speed distribution along k/sub pr/ rather than the distribution of nascent velocity components projected upon this direction. Mathematical details of the procedure used to model VADS are given, and experimental illustrations for HI, H/sub 2/S, and NH/sub 3/ photodissociation are presented. In these examples, pulsed photodissociation produces H atoms that are detected by sequential two-photon, two-frequency ionization via Lyman-..cap alpha.. with a pulsed laser (121.6+364.7 nm), and measuring the Lyman-..cap alpha.. Doppler profile as a function of probe delay reveals both internal and c.m. kinetic energy distributions for the photofragments. Strengths and weaknesses of VADS as a tool for investigating photofragmentation phenomena are also discussed.

  15. High velocity collisions of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald F.; Mattson, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are a unique class of material with highly functionalizable surfaces and exciting applications. With a large surface-to-volume ratio and potentially high surface tension, shocked nanoparticles might display unique materials behavior. Using density functional theory, we have simulated high-velocity NP collisions under a variety of conditions. NPs composed of diamond-C, cubic-BN, and diamond-Si were considered with particle sizes up to 3.5 nm diameter. Additional simulations involved NPs that were destabilized by incorporating internal strain. The initial spherical NP structures were carved out of bulk crystals while the NPs with internal strain were constructed as a dense core (compressive strain) encompassed by a thin shell (tensile strain). Both on-axis and off-axis collisions were simulated at 10 km/s relative velocity. The amount of internal strain was artificially increased by creating a dense inner core with bond lengths compressed up to 8%. Collision dynamics, shock propagation, and fragmentation will be analyzed, but the simulation are ongoing and results are not finalized. The effect of material properties, internal strain, and collision velocity will be discussed.

  16. Velocity Correction and Measurement Uncertainty Analysis of Light Screen Velocity Measuring Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Bin; ZUO Zhao-lu; HOU Wen

    2012-01-01

    Light screen velocity measuring method with unique advantages has been widely used in the velocity measurement of various moving bodies.For large air resistance and friction force which the big moving bodies are subjected to during the light screen velocity measuring,the principle of velocity correction was proposed and a velocity correction equation was derived.A light screen velocity measuring method was used to measure the velocity of big moving bodies which have complex velocity attenuation,and the better results were gained in practical tests.The measuring uncertainty after the velocity correction was calculated.

  17. Peculiar velocities in dynamic spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the asymptotic behavior of peculiar velocities in certain physically significant time-dependent gravitational fields. Previous studies of the motion of free test particles have focused on the \\emph{collapse scenario}, according to which a double-jet pattern with Lorentz factor $\\gamma \\to \\infty$ develops asymptotically along the direction of complete gravitational collapse. In the present work, we identify a second \\emph{wave scenario}, in which a single-jet pattern with Lorentz factor $\\gamma \\to \\infty$ develops asymptotically along the direction of wave propagation. The possibility of a connection between the two scenarios for the formation of cosmic jets is critically examined.

  18. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  19. Velocity condensation for magnetotactic bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Rupprecht, Jean-Francois; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g. active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that L\\'evy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior.

  20. Whistler Waves Driven by Anisotropic Strahl Velocity Distributions: Cluster Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, A.F.; Gurgiolo, C.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Gary, S. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Observed properties of the strahl using high resolution 3D electron velocity distribution data obtained from the Cluster/PEACE experiment are used to investigate its linear stability. An automated method to isolate the strahl is used to allow its moments to be computed independent of the solar wind core+halo. Results show that the strahl can have a high temperature anisotropy (T(perpindicular)/T(parallell) approximately > 2). This anisotropy is shown to be an important free energy source for the excitation of high frequency whistler waves. The analysis suggests that the resultant whistler waves are strong enough to regulate the electron velocity distributions in the solar wind through pitch-angle scattering

  1. Simple Motor Control Concept Results High Efficiency at High Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott; Engel, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The need for high velocity motors in space applications for reaction wheels and detectors has stressed the limits of Brushless Permanent Magnet Motors (BPMM). Due to inherent hysteresis core losses, conventional BPMMs try to balance the need for torque verses hysteresis losses. Cong-less motors have significantly less hysteresis losses but suffer from lower efficiencies. Additionally, the inherent low inductance in cog-less motors result in high ripple currents or high switching frequencies, which lowers overall efficiency and increases performance demands on the control electronics.However, using a somewhat forgotten but fully qualified technology of Isotropic Magnet Motors (IMM), extremely high velocities may be achieved at low power input using conventional drive electronics. This paper will discuss the trade study efforts and empirical test data on a 34,000 RPM IMM.

  2. Measuring of the maximum measurable velocity for dual-frequency laser interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiping Zhang; Zhaogu Cheng; Zhaoyu Qin; Jianqiang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing demand on the measurable velocity of laser interferometer in manufacturing technologies. The maximum measurable velocity is limited by frequency difference of laser source, optical configuration, and electronics bandwidth. An experimental setup based on free falling movement has been demonstrated to measure the maximum easurable velocity for interferometers. Measurement results show that the maximum measurable velocity is less than its theoretical value. Moreover, the effect of kinds of factors upon the measurement results is analyzed, and the results can offer a reference for industrial applications.

  3. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  4. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  5. Maximum tunneling velocities in symmetric double well potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, Jörn [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, 92, Wucheng Road, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Schild, Axel [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Schmidt, Burkhard, E-mail: burkhard.schmidt@fu-berlin.de [Institut für Mathematik, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Yang, Yonggang, E-mail: ygyang@sxu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, 92, Wucheng Road, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Coherent tunneling in one-dimensional symmetric double well potentials. • Potentials for analytical estimates in the deep tunneling regime. • Maximum velocities scale as the square root of the ratio of barrier height and mass. • In chemical physics maximum tunneling velocities are in the order of a few km/s. - Abstract: We consider coherent tunneling of one-dimensional model systems in non-cyclic or cyclic symmetric double well potentials. Generic potentials are constructed which allow for analytical estimates of the quantum dynamics in the non-relativistic deep tunneling regime, in terms of the tunneling distance, barrier height and mass (or moment of inertia). For cyclic systems, the results may be scaled to agree well with periodic potentials for which semi-analytical results in terms of Mathieu functions exist. Starting from a wavepacket which is initially localized in one of the potential wells, the subsequent periodic tunneling is associated with tunneling velocities. These velocities (or angular velocities) are evaluated as the ratio of the flux densities versus the probability densities. The maximum velocities are found under the top of the barrier where they scale as the square root of the ratio of barrier height and mass (or moment of inertia), independent of the tunneling distance. They are applied exemplarily to several prototypical molecular models of non-cyclic and cyclic tunneling, including ammonia inversion, Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, torsions of molecular fragments, and rotational tunneling in strong laser fields. Typical maximum velocities and angular velocities are in the order of a few km/s and from 10 to 100 THz for our non-cyclic and cyclic systems, respectively, much faster than time-averaged velocities. Even for the more extreme case of an electron tunneling through a barrier of height of one Hartree, the velocity is only about one percent of the speed of light. Estimates of the corresponding time scales for

  6. Velocity of sound in hadron matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epele, L.N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Garcia Canal, C.A.; Roulet, E.

    1987-09-01

    The velocity of sound in hadron matter, in both the confined and deconfined phases, is studied. This velocity of sound appears to be an important tool to distinguish among different bag-model-based thermodynamical descriptions of hadronic matter.

  7. Inexpensive Time-of-Flight Velocity Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Glen E.; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a circuit designed to measure time-of-flight velocity and shows how to use it to determine bullet velocity in connection with the ballistic pendulum demonstration of momentum conservation. (Author/GA)

  8. Velocity Measurement Based on Laser Doppler Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-Yan; HUO Yu-Jing; HE Shu-Fang; GONG Ke

    2010-01-01

    @@ A novel method for velocity measurement is presented.In this scheme,a parallel-linear-polarization dualfrequency laser is incident on the target and senses the target velocity with both the frequencies,which can increase the maximum measurable velocity significantly.The theoretical analysis and verification experiment of the novel method are presented,which show that high-velocity measurement can be achieved with high precision using this method.

  9. Weakly nonlinear density-velocity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorowski, M J; Chodorowski, Michal J; Lokas, Ewa L

    1996-01-01

    We rigorously derive weakly nonlinear relation between cosmic density and velocity fields up to third order in perturbation theory. The density field is described by the mass density contrast, \\de. The velocity field is described by the variable \\te proportional to the velocity divergence, \\te = - f(\\Omega)^{-1} H_0^{-1} \

  10. Balance velocities of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Ekholm, Simon;

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetery data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail......, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning....

  11. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  12. Extending the unambiguous velocity range using multiple carrier frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Z.; Jakobsson, A.; Nikolov, Svetoslav;

    2005-01-01

    Typically, velocity estimators based on the estimation of the Doppler shift will suffer from a limited unambiguous velocity range. Proposed are two novel multiple carrier based velocity estimators extending the velocity range above the Nyquist velocity limit. Numerical simulations indicate...

  13. Influence of scanning velocity on femtosecond laser direct writing lines on FOTURAN glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinzhong Wu; Ching-Yue Wang; Wei Jia; Xiaochang Ni; Minglie Hu; Lu Chai

    2008-01-01

    Lines are induced on the surface of a photosensitive (FOTURAN) glass by focused femtosecond laser transverse writing with scanning velocity in a wide range of 40- 1800μm/s. The formed lines are analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope (OM). It is observed that three distinct morphologies of lines are produced depending on the scanning velocity. Lines written in low velocity level (40 - 100 μm/s) and high velocity level (1000 - 1800 μm/s) are uniform and regular, while those written in moderate velocity level (150 - 600 μm/s) are rough. The influence of scanning velocity is explained based on different pulses overlapping or cumulative dose of laser exposure in irradiated area. Fabrication of shallow groove on the surface is also demonstrated.

  14. Velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Wittig, C.

    1989-03-01

    The use of velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy (VADS) to measure center-of-mass kinetic-energy distributions of nascent photofragments produced in pulsed-initiation photolysis/probe experiments is described and demonstrated. In VADS, pulsed photolysis and probe laser beams counterpropagate through the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The theoretical principles of VADS and the mathematical interpretation of VADS data are explained and illustrated with diagrams; the experimental setup is described; and results for the photodissociation of HI, H2S, and NH3 are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. VADS is shown to give much higher kinetic-energy resolution than conventional Doppler spectroscopy.

  15. The critical velocity in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Prampero, Pietro E; Dekerle, Jeanne; Capelli, Carlo; Zamparo, Paola

    2008-01-01

    In supra-maximal exercise to exhaustion, the critical velocity (cv) is conventionally calculated from the slope of the distance (d) versus time (t) relationship: d = I + St. I is assumed to be the distance covered at the expense of the anaerobic capacity, S the speed maintained on the basis of the subject's maximal O(2) uptake (VO2max) This approach is based on two assumptions: (1) the energy cost of locomotion per unit distance (C) is constant and (2) VO2max is attained at the onset of exercise. Here we show that cv and the anaerobic distance (d (anaer)) can be calculated also in swimming, where C increases with the velocity, provided that VO2max its on-response, and the C versus v relationship are known. d (anaer) and cv were calculated from published data on maximal swims for the four strokes over 45.7, 91.4 and 182.9 m, on 20 elite male swimmers (18.9 +/- 0.9 years, 75.9 +/- 6.4 kg), whose VO2max and C versus speed relationship were determined, and compared to I and S obtained from the conventional approach. cv was lower than S (4, 16, 7 and 11% in butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl) and I (=11.6 m on average in the four strokes) was lower than d (anaer). The latter increased with the distance: average, for all strokes: 38.1, 60.6 and 81.3 m over 45.7, 91.4 and 182.9 m. It is concluded that the d versus t relationship should be utilised with some caution when evaluating performance in swimmers.

  16. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... in the ultrasound field to find the transverse velocity. In-vivo examples from the carotid artery are shown, where complex turbulent flow is found in certain parts of the cardiac cycle. The second approach uses directional beam forming along the flow direction to estimate the velocity magnitude. Using a correlation...

  17. Why all stars should possess circumstellar temperature inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, Jack D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper shows that the circumstellar temperature inversions possessed by all stars are the consequence of the 'velocity filtration' process described by Scudder (1992), according to which a stellar envelope is hotter than its underlying layers. The filtration scenario relies on the theoretically predicted and experimentally determined non-Maxwellian velocity distributions of ions and/or electrons in other sampled astrophysical plasmas and the transition region. The most immediate consequence is that the temperature and quasi-neutral plasma density become anticorrelated with increasing radius in a thin transition region, leaving the temperature profile inverted in excess of 10 exp 6 K up into a corona, without depositing a wave of magnetic field energy into the gas above the base of the transition region.

  18. Turbulent Velocity Structure in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Ossenkopf, Volker; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2002-01-01

    We compare velocity structure observed in the Polaris Flare molecular cloud at scales ranging from 0.015 pc to 20 pc to the velocity structure of a suite of simulations of supersonic hydrodynamic and MHD turbulence computed with the ZEUS MHD code. We examine different methods of characterising the structure, including a scanning-beam size-linewidth relation, structure functions, velocity and velocity difference probability distribution functions (PDFs), and the Delta-variance wavelet transform, and use them to compare models and observations. The Delta-variance is most sensitive in detecting characteristic scales and varying scaling laws, but is limited in the observational application by its lack of intensity weighting. We compare the true velocity PDF in our models to simulated observations of velocity centroids and average line profiles in optically thin lines, and find that the line profiles reflect the true PDF better. The observed velocity structure is consistent with supersonic turbulence showing a com...

  19. Measurement of the velocity of a quantum object: A role of phase and group velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Mikaila; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2017-08-01

    We consider the motion of a quantum particle in a free space. Introducing an explicit measurement procedure for velocity, we demonstrate that the measured velocity is related to the group and phase velocities of the corresponding matter waves. We show that for long distances the measured velocity coincides with the matter wave group velocity. We discuss the possibilities to demonstrate these effects for the optical pulses in coherently driven media or for radiation propagating in waveguides.

  20. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  1. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  2. Geotail observations of FTE velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Korotova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the plasma velocity signatures expected in association with flux transfer events (FTEs. Events moving faster than or opposite the ambient media should generate bipolar inward/outward (outward/inward flow perturbations normal to the nominal magnetopause in the magnetosphere (magnetosheath. Flow perturbations directly upstream and downstream from the events should be in the direction of event motion. Flows on the flanks should be in the direction opposite the motion of events moving at subsonic and subAlfvénic speeds relative to the ambient plasma. Events moving with the ambient flow should generate no flow perturbations in the ambient plasma. Alfvén waves propagating parallel (antiparallel to the axial magnetic field of FTEs may generate anticorrelated (correlated magnetic field and flow perturbations within the core region of FTEs. We present case studies illustrating many of these signatures. In the examples considered, Alfvén waves propagate along event axes away from the inferred reconnection site. A statistical study of FTEs observed by Geotail over a 3.5-year period reveals that FTEs within the magnetosphere invariably move faster than the ambient flow, while those in the magnetosheath move both faster and slower than the ambient flow.

  3. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  4. Electron acoustic solitary waves with kappa-distributed electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanandhan, S; Singh, S V; Lakhina, G S, E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (West), Navi Mumbai (India)

    2011-08-01

    Electron acoustic solitary waves are studied in a three-component, unmagnetized plasma composed of hot electrons, fluid cold electrons and ions having finite temperatures. Hot electrons are assumed to have kappa distribution. The Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique is used to study the arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves. It is found that inclusion of cold electron temperature shrinks the existence regime of the solitons, and soliton electric field amplitude decreases with an increase in cold electron temperature. A decrease in spectral index, {kappa}, i.e. an increase in the superthermal component of hot electrons, leads to a decrease in soliton electric field amplitude as well as the soliton velocity range. The soliton solutions do not exist beyond T{sub c}/T{sub h}>0.13 for {kappa}=3.0 and Mach number M=0.9 for the dayside auroral region parameters.

  5. Refinement of turbulent flow velocity characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Bryanskaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic laws of Prandtl semi-empirical turbulence theory were analyzed in the article. It was shown, that the Prandtl – Nikuradse logarithmic distribution of velocities are not strictly universal. The change of the first and second turbulence constants was analyzed on the basis of experimental data of I. Nikuradse. The logarithmic velocity profiles for smooth and rough pipes have been transformed. A united velocity logarithmic profile for flows in pipes, appropriate for any rate of hydraulic resistance was received. A more precise, consistent with the resistance laws, description of the kinematic structure of the flow with varying parameters of the velocity profiles was set. It was shown that the position of the average velocity point for the flow in pipe remained constant when the parameters of the velocity profile changed.

  6. Surface Velocities and Hydrology at Engabreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messerli, Alexandra

    on surface velocities recorded at the site. The Svartisen Subglacial Laboratory (SSL) under Engabreen, augmented by additional subglacial pressure and hydrological measurements, provides a invaluable observations for detailed process-oriented studies. However, the lack of complementary surface velocity data...... complicates comparisons with other surface-oriented glaciohydrological studies. One major aim of this thesis is to provide a longer record of surface velocity, enabling a more complete understanding of the glacial hydro-mechanical relationship at Engabreen. In order to extend the velocity dataset here, a time......-lapse camera based study was carried out, providing seasonal velocity maps over a large portion of an inaccessible region of the glacier. The processing and feature tracking of terrestrially based imagery, in order to obtain quantitative velocity measurements, is challenging. Whilst optical feature tracking...

  7. VELOCITY PROFILES OF TURBULENT OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dianchang; WANG Xingkui; YU Mingzhong; LI Danxun

    2001-01-01

    The log-law and the wake law of velocity profile for open channel flows are discussed and compared in this paper. Experimental data from eight sources are used to verify the velocity distribution models.The effect of bed level on the velocity profile is analyzed. A formula to calculate the maximum velocity is proposed. In the region of y <δm , the velocity profile approximately follows the log-law. For the region of y >δm , the effect of the aspect ratio is considered. A new velocity profile model on the basis of log-law that can unify all of the hydraulic bed roughness is presented.

  8. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies......) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  9. Local wavefield velocity imaging for damage evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Chen Ciang; Gan, Chia Sheng; Mustapha, F.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Propagation Imaging or Acoustic Wavefield Imaging has been widely used to evaluate structural damages and internal features. Inspecting complete wavefield time history for damage identification is tedious and error-prone. A more effective way is by extracting damage-related information into a single image. A wavefield velocity imaging method that maps the local estimates of group or phase velocity is proposed. Actual velocity values rather than arbitrarily-scaled intensities are mapped, enabling damage sizing without the need of supervised training or inspecting wavefield propagation video. Performance of the proposed method was tested by inspecting a 100 mm by 100 mm area of a 2 mm thick stainless steel specimen. Local phase velocity maps of A0 mode showed a half-thickness hole of 2 mm diameter as significant change in local phase velocity from the nominal 2 m/ms. Full width at half maximum of relevant velocity profiles proved the accuracy and consistency of the damage sizing.

  10. Decreased group velocity in compositionally graded films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei

    2006-03-01

    A theoretical formalism is presented that describes the group velocity of electromagnetic signals in compositionally graded films. The theory is first based on effective medium approximation or the Maxwell-Garnett approximation to obtain the equivalent dielectric function in a z slice. Then the effective dielectric tensor of the graded film is directly determined, and the group velocities for ordinary and extraordinary waves in the film are derived. It is found that the group velocity is sensitively dependent on the graded profile. For a power-law graded profile f(x)=ax(m), increasing m results in the decreased extraordinary group velocity. Such a decreased tendency becomes significant when the incident angle increases. Therefore the group velocity in compositionally graded films can be effectively decreased by our suitable adjustment of the total volume fraction, the graded profile, and the incident angle. As a result, the compositionally graded films may serve as candidate material for realizing small group velocity.

  11. Spectral Interpretation of Radio Sounder-Stimulated Magnetospheric Plasma Resonances in Terms of Kappa Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Vinas, Adolfo, F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Purser, Carola M.; Galkin, Ivan A.; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetosphere sounders stimulate plasma resonances between the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and above the upper-hybrid frequency. More than three decades ago they were recognized as equivalent to ionospheric topside-sounder-stimulated resonances, designated as Qn resonances a decade earlier, with one important difference: the magnetospheric Qn frequencies often indicated that the background electron-velocity distribution was non-Maxwellian. Interpretations based on bi-Maxwellian and kappa distributions have been proposed. Here we expand on the latter, which requires fewer free parameters, by comparing kappa-derived Qn frequencies with observations from the Radio Plasma Imager on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite.

  12. Statistics of Peculiar Velocities from Cosmic Strings

    OpenAIRE

    Moessner, R.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the probability distribution of a single component of peculiar velocities due to cosmic strings, smoothed over regions with a radius of several $h^{-1}$ Mpc. The probability distribution is shown to be Gaussian to good accuracy, in agreement with the distribution of peculiar velocities deduced from the 1.9 Jy IRAS redshift survey. Using the normalization of parameters of the cosmic string model from CMB measurements, we show that the rms values for peculiar velocities inferred fr...

  13. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In the fields of power conversion devices and broadcasting/communication amplifiers, high power, high frequency and low losses are desirable. Further, for electronic elements in aerospace/aeronautical/geothermal surveys, etc., heat resistance to 500degC is required. Devices which respond to such hard specifications are called hard electronic devices. However, with Si which is at the core of the present electronics, the specifications cannot fully be fulfilled because of the restrictions arising from physical values. Accordingly, taking up new device materials/structures necessary to construct hard electronics, technologies to develop these to a level of IC were examined and studied. They are a technology to make devices/IC of new semiconductors such as SiC, diamond, etc. which can handle higher temperature, higher power and higher frequency than Si and also is possible of reducing losses, a technology to make devices of hard semiconducter materials such as a vacuum microelectronics technology using ultra-micro/high-luminance electronic emitter using negative electron affinity which diamond, etc. have, a technology to make devices of oxides which have various electric properties, etc. 321 refs., 194 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  15. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over a variety of types of complex terrain: on tops of hills and escarpments, over land downstream of a water surface, and over rolling terrain. Differences between spectra over many types of complex terrain, and over uniform terrain, can be explained by these hypotheses...... is horizontal, and decrease when the flow is uphill, for the longitudinal velocity component only. Since vertical-velocity spectra contain relatively less low wavenumber energy than horizontal-velocity spectra, energetic vertical-velocity fluctuations tend to be in equilibrium with local terrain....

  16. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schemes...... have been developed for performing the estimation, and the various approaches are described. The current systems only display the velocity along the ultrasound beam direction and a velocity transverse to the beam is not detected. This is a major problem in these systems, since most blood vessels...

  17. Effect of Pressure on Minimum Fluidization Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhiping; Na Yongjie; Lu Qinggang

    2007-01-01

    Minimum fluidization velocity of quartz sand and glass bead under different pressures of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Mpa were investigated. The minimum fluidization velocity decreases with the increasing of pressure. The influence of pressure to the minimum fluidization velocities is stronger for larger particles than for smaller ones.Based on the test results and Ergun equation, an experience equation of minimum fluidization velocity is proposed and the calculation results are comparable to other researchers' results.

  18. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  19. A method for determining critical swimming velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Wakayoshi, K; Hayashi, A; Sakaguchi, Y; Kitagawa, K

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the critical swimming velocity (Vcri) estimated by the swimming velocity for a distance of 300 m at maximal effort breaststroke reflects the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS). Twelve trained swimmers swam 50 m, 300 m and 2 000 m at maximal effort for determination of Vcri that averaged 1.167 +/- 0.045 m . sec (-1). Since Vcri was equivalent to 90.5 % of the mean swimming velocity over the distance of 300 m at maximal effort, the swimming velocity obtained by multiplying the swimming velocity for the distance of 300 m of each subject by 90.5 % was taken to be 100 % of the predicted critical swimming velocity (Vcri-pred). Then, in an MLSS test, the subjects were instructed to swim breaststroke 2 000 m (5 x 400 m) at three constant velocities (98 %, 100 %, and 102 % of Vcri-pred), interrupted by four short rest periods from 30 to 45 seconds for blood sampling and heart rate measurement. As a result, the blood lactate concentration at 100 % Vcri-pred showed a higher steady state than the slow velocity, but at high velocity did not show the steady state. In conclusion, we can accurately estimate the Vcri for breaststroke by a one-time 300-m maximal effort swimming test.

  20. Electronic Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New FDA Regulations Text Size: A A A Electronic Cigarettes Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are battery operated products designed ... more about: The latest news and events about electronic cigarettes on this FDA page Electronic cigarette basics ...

  1. Localization of massless Dirac particles via spatial modulations of the Fermi velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, C. A.; Portnoi, M. E.

    2017-08-01

    The electrons found in Dirac materials are notorious for being difficult to manipulate due to the Klein phenomenon and absence of backscattering. Here we investigate how spatial modulations of the Fermi velocity in two-dimensional Dirac materials can give rise to localization effects, with either full (zero-dimensional) confinement or partial (one-dimensional) confinement possible depending on the geometry of the velocity modulation. We present several exactly solvable models illustrating the nature of the bound states which arise, revealing how the gradient of the Fermi velocity is crucial for determining fundamental properties of the bound states such as the zero-point energy. We discuss the implications for guiding electronic waves in few-mode waveguides formed by Fermi velocity modulation.

  2. Monte Carlo transport simulation of velocity undershoot in zinc blende and wurtzite InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Gao, Bo; Zhuo, Qingqing [School of Microelectronics, Key Laboratory of Wide Band-gap Semiconductor Materials and Device, Xidian University, Xi& #x27; an, 710071 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Velocity undershoot in zinc blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) InN is investigated by ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) calculation. The results show that velocity undershoot arises from the relatively long energy relaxation time compared with momentum. Monte Carlo transport simulations over wide range of electric fields is presented in the paper. The results show that velocity undershoot impacts the electron transport greatly, compared with velocity overshoot, when the electric field changes quickly with time and space. A comparison study between WZ and ZB InN shows that WZ InN has more advantages in device applications due to its excellent electron transport properties. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. The Electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, George

    1972-01-01

    Electrons are elementary particles of atoms that revolve around and outside the nucleus and have a negative charge. This booklet discusses how electrons relate to electricity, some applications of electrons, electrons as waves, electrons in atoms and solids, the electron microscope, among other things.

  4. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Hard material technologies were surveyed to establish the hard electronic technology which offers superior characteristics under hard operational or environmental conditions as compared with conventional Si devices. The following technologies were separately surveyed: (1) The device and integration technologies of wide gap hard semiconductors such as SiC, diamond and nitride, (2) The technology of hard semiconductor devices for vacuum micro- electronics technology, and (3) The technology of hard new material devices for oxides. The formation technology of oxide thin films made remarkable progress after discovery of oxide superconductor materials, resulting in development of an atomic layer growth method and mist deposition method. This leading research is expected to solve such issues difficult to be easily realized by current Si technology as high-power, high-frequency and low-loss devices in power electronics, high temperature-proof and radiation-proof devices in ultimate electronics, and high-speed and dense- integrated devices in information electronics. 432 refs., 136 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Iron-nickel alloy from iron meteorite Chinga studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Abramova, N. V. [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B. [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Radio-Technical Department (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-15

    Study of iron-nickel alloy from iron meteorite Chinga using Moessbauer spectroscopy with improved velocity resolution (measurement and presentation in 4,096 channels) revealed six magnetic components which may be related to various {alpha}-Fe(Ni, Co) and {gamma}-Fe(Ni, Co) phases while previous study with low velocity resolution (in 512 channels) revealed only three magnetic components. This new result was in agreement with the scanning electron microscopy study.

  6. Precision measurement of the carrier drift velocities in <100> silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, C

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the drift velocities of electrons and holes as functions of electric field and temperature in high-purity n- and p-type silicon with crystal orientation are presented. The measurements cover electric field values between 2.4 and 50 kV/cm and temperatures between 233 and 333 K. Two methods have been used for extracting the drift velocities from current transient measurements: A time-of-flight (tof) method and fits of simulated transients to the measured transients, with the parameters describing the field and temperature dependence of the electron and hole mobilities as free parameters. A new mobility parametrization, which also provides a better description of existing data than previous ones, allowed an extension of the classical tof method to the situation of non-uniform fields. For the fit method, the use of the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms enabled us to precisely determine the electronics transfer function of the complete set-up, including the sensor properties. The agreement...

  7. Projectile Velocity and Crater Formation in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravitra Chaikulngamdee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the velocity of impact and maximum crater diameter was found for two steel balls dropped into water using 300 fps video. The maximum diameter of the crater was found to be proportional to the impact velocity and independent of the diameter of the ball.

  8. Demonstration of a Vector Velocity Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.;

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa...

  9. Velocity gradients and microturbulence in Cepheids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Variations of the microturbulent velocity with phase and height in the atmosphere have been reported in classical Cepheids. It is shown that these effects can be understood in terms of variations of the velocity gradient in the atmospheres of these stars.

  10. Position and velocity estimation through acceleration measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Antonio; Efimov, Denis; Perruquetti, Wilfrid

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper proposes a solution to the problem of velocity and position estimation for a class of oscillating systems whose position, velocity and acceleration are zero mean signals. The proposed scheme considers that the dynamic model of the system is unknown and only noisy acceleration measurements are available.

  11. Velocity spectrum for the Iranian plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastami, Morteza; Soghrat, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    Peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration values have been proposed in most building codes/guidelines, unlike spectral velocity (SV) and peak ground velocity (PGV). Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of spectral velocity and peak ground velocity in the design of long period structures (e.g., pipelines, tunnels, tanks, and high-rise buildings) and evaluation of seismic vulnerability in underground structures. The current study was undertaken to develop a velocity spectrum and for estimation of PGV. In order to determine these parameters, 398 three-component accelerograms recorded by the Building and Housing Research Center (BHRC) were used. The moment magnitude (Mw) in the selected database was 4.1 to 7.3, and the events occurred after 1977. In the database, the average shear-wave velocity at 0 to 30 m in depth (Vs30) was available for only 217 records; thus, the site class for the remaining was estimated using empirical methods. Because of the importance of the velocity spectrum at low frequencies, the signal-to-noise ratio of 2 was chosen for determination of the low and high frequency to include a wider range of frequency content. This value can produce conservative results. After estimation of the shape of the velocity design spectrum, the PGV was also estimated for the region under study by finding the correlation between PGV and spectral acceleration at the period of 1 s.

  12. Critical Landau Velocity in Helium Nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.B. Brauer; S. Smolarek; E. Loginov; D. Mateo; A. Hernando; M. Pi; M. Barranco; W.J. Buma; M. Drabbels

    2013-01-01

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitatio

  13. Simulating river flow velocity on global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schulze

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity in rivers has a major impact on residence time of water and thus on high and low water as well as on water quality. For global scale hydrological modeling only very limited information is available for simulating flow velocity. Based on the Manning-Strickler equation, a simple algorithm to model temporally and spatially variable flow velocity was developed with the objective of improving flow routing in the global hydrological model of WaterGAP. An extensive data set of flow velocity measurements in US rivers was used to test and to validate the algorithm before integrating it into WaterGAP. In this test, flow velocity was calculated based on measured discharge and compared to measured velocity. Results show that flow velocity can be modeled satisfactorily at selected river cross sections. It turned out that it is quite sensitive to river roughness, and the results can be optimized by tuning this parameter. After the validation of the approach, the tested flow velocity algorithm has been implemented into the WaterGAP model. A final validation of its effects on the model results is currently performed.

  14. Antiproton stopping at low energies: confirmation of velocity-proportional stopping power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S P; Csete, A; Ichioka, T; Knudsen, H; Uggerhøj, U I; Andersen, H H

    2002-05-13

    The stopping power for antiprotons in various solid targets has been measured in the low-energy range of 1-100 keV. In agreement with most models, in particular free-electron gas models, the stopping power is found to be proportional to the projectile velocity below the stopping-power maximum. Although a stopping power proportional to velocity has also been observed for protons, the interpretation of such measurements is difficult due to the presence of charge exchange processes. Hence, the present measurements constitute the first unambiguous support for a velocity-proportional stopping power due to target excitations by a pointlike projectile.

  15. Ultrasound systems for blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    color image of velocity at up to 20 to 60 frames a second. Both measurements are performedby repeatedly pulsing in the same direction and then usethe correlation from pulse to pulse to determine the velocity.The paper gives a simple model for the interactionbetween the ultrasound and the moving blood......Medical ultrasound scanners can be used both for displayinggray-scale images of the anatomy and for visualizing theblood flow dynamically in the body.The systems can interrogate the flow at a single position in the bodyand there find the velocity distribution over time. They can also show adynamic....... The calculation of the velocity distribution is then explainedalong with the different physical effects influencing the estimation.The estimation of mean velocities using auto- andcross-correlation for color flow mapping is also described....

  16. Minimum and terminal velocities in projectile motion

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, E N; Riba, R

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a projectile with horizontal initial velocity V0, moving under the action of the gravitational field and a drag force is studied analytically. As it is well known, the projectile reaches a terminal velocity Vterm. There is a curious result concerning the minimum speed Vmin; it turns out that the minimum velocity is lower than the terminal one if V0 > Vterm and is lower than the initial one if V0 < Vterm. These results show that the velocity is not a monotonous function. If the initial speed is not horizontal, there is an angle range where the velocity shows the same behavior mentioned previously. Out of that range, the volocity is a monotonous function. These results come out from numerical simulations.

  17. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...... shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity....

  18. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper we have demonstrated that the velocity can be estimated for a plug flow using recursive ultrasound imaging [1]. The approach involved the estimation of the velocity at every emission and using the estimates for motion compensation. An error in the estimates, however, would lead...... to an error in the compensation further increasing the error in the estimates. In this paper the approach is further developed such that no motion compensation is necessary. In recursive ultrasound imaging a new high resolution image is created after every emission. The velocity was estimated by cross...... and significantly improves the velocity estimates. The approach is verified using simulations with the program Field II and measurements on a blood-mimicking phantom. The estimates from the simulations have a bias of -3.5% and a mean standard deviation less than 2.0% for a parabolic velocity profile. The estimates...

  19. Typical object velocity influences motion extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Alexis D J; Stewart, Andrew J; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2009-02-01

    Previous work indicates that extrapolation of object motion during occlusion is affected by the velocity of the immediately preceding trial. Here we ask whether longer-term velocity representations can also influence motion extrapolation. Red, blue or green targets disappeared behind an occluder. Participants pressed a button when they thought the target had reached the other side. Red targets were slower (10-20 deg/s), blue targets moved at medium velocities (14-26 deg/s) and green targets were faster (20-30 deg/s). We compared responses on a subset of red and green trials which always travelled at 20 deg/s. Although trial velocities were identical, participants responded as if the green targets moved faster (M = 22.64 deg/s) then the red targets (M = 19.72 deg/s). This indicates that motion extrapolation is affected by longer-term information about the typical velocity of different categories of stimuli.

  20. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Cordes, J M

    2002-01-01

    (Abridged) We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars by modelling their birth, evolution, and detection in large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys, and by comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. We test models that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as sqrt(Edot) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/s and 500 km/s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (i)...

  1. Radial velocity moments of dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, R; Gottlöber, S; Mamon, G A; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Mamon, Gary A.

    2005-01-01

    Using cosmological N-body simulations we study the radial velocity distribution in dark matter haloes focusing on the lowest-order even moments, dispersion and kurtosis. We determine the properties of ten massive haloes in the simulation box approximating their density distribution by the NFW formula characterized by the virial mass and concentration. We also calculate the velocity anisotropy parameter of the haloes and find it mildly radial and increasing with distance from the halo centre. The radial velocity dispersion of the haloes shows a characteristic profile with a maximum, while the radial kurtosis profile decreases with distance starting from a value close to Gaussian near the centre. We therefore confirm that dark matter haloes possess intrinsically non-Gaussian, flat-topped velocity distributions. We find that the radial velocity moments of the simulated haloes are very well reproduced by the solutions of the Jeans equations obtained for the halo parameters with the anisotropy measured in the simu...

  2. Theory of the Electron Sheath and Presheath

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiner, Brett; Yee, Benjamin T; Hopkins, Matthew M; Barnat, Edward V

    2015-01-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions ($T_e\\gg T_i$), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under co...

  3. Hyper Velocity Missiles For Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqir Minhas

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the history of technical development in the field of hypervelocity missiles. It highlights the fact that the development of anti-ballistic systems in USA, Russia, France, UK, Sweden, and Israel is moving toward the final deployment stage; that USA and Israel are trying to sell PAC 2 and Arrow 2 to India; and that India’s Agni and Prithvi missiles have improved their accuracy, with assistance from Russia. Consequently, the paper proposes enhanced effort for development in Pakistan of a basic hypersonic tactical missile, with 300 KM range, 500 KG payload, and multi-rolecapability. The author argues that a system, developed within the country, at the existing or upgraded facilities, will not violate MTCR restrictions, and would greatly enhance the country’s defense capability. Furthermore, it would provide high technology jobs toPakistani citizens. The paper reinforces the idea by suggesting that evolution in the field of aviation and electronics favors the development of ballistic, cruise and guided missile technologies; and that flight time of short and intermediate range missiles is so short that its interception is virtually impossible.

  4. VELOCITY SHEAR INSTABILITY IN DUSTY PLASMAS OF COMET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Li; Li Zhongyuan

    2000-01-01

    The velocity shear instability in a magnetized, three-component dusty plasma is investigated for both positively and negatively charged dust particles. The critical shears as a function of the relative charge of dust grains for both positively and negatively charged dust grains are in the same form. The instability excitation is easier in colder proton's environment for positively charged dust, and so also in colder electron's environment for negatively charged dust. For a certain flow pattern, the instability excites in different direction for different sign of charged dust grains. This conclusion may be helpful in interpreting the helical structures and streamer splitted phenomena in a cometary tail.

  5. Coincidence velocity map imaging using a single detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Arthur; Sándor, Péter; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a single-detector velocity map imaging setup which is capable of rapidly switching between coincidence and non-coincidence measurements. By rapidly switching the extraction voltages on the electrostatic lenses, both electrons and ions can be collected in coincidence with a single detector. Using a fast camera as the 2D detector avoids the saturation problem associated with traditional delay line detectors and allows for easy transitions between coincidence and non-coincidence data collection modes. This is a major advantage in setting up a low-cost and versatile coincidence apparatus. We present both coincidence and non-coincidence measurements of strong field atomic and molecular ionization.

  6. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATION FOR ARBITRARY DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIDORIN,A.; SMIRNOV, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KAYRAN, D.

    2007-09-10

    Typically, several approximations are being used in simulation of electron cooling process, for example, density distribution of electrons is calculated using an analytical expression and distribution in the velocity space is assumed to be Maxwellian in all degrees of freedom. However, in many applications, accurate description of the cooling process based on realistic distribution of electrons is very useful. This is especially true for a high-energy electron cooling system which requires bunched electron beam produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (Em). Such systems are proposed, for instance, for RHIC and electron - ion collider. To address unique features of the RHIC-I1 cooler, new algorithms were introduced in BETACOOL code which allow us to take into account local properties of electron distribution as well as calculate friction force for an arbitrary velocity distribution. Here, we describe these new numerical models. Results based on these numerical models are compared with typical approximations using electron distribution produced by simulations of electron bunch through ERL of RHIC-II cooler.

  7. Velocity bias in a LCDM model

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Pierre; Kravtsov, A V; Colin, Pedro; Klypin, Anatoly; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2000-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the velocity bias of dark matter halos, the difference in the velocity fields of dark matter and halos, in a flat low- density LCDM model. The high force, 2kpc/h, and mass, 10^9Msun/h, resolution allows dark matter halos to survive in very dense environments of groups and clusters making it possible to use halos as galaxy tracers. We find that the velocity bias pvb measured as a ratio of pairwise velocities of the halos to that of the dark matter evolves with time and depends on scale. At high redshifts (z ~5) halos move generally faster than the dark matter almost on all scales: pvb(r)~1.2, r>0.5Mpc/h. At later moments the bias decreases and gets below unity on scales less than r=5Mpc/h: pvb(r)~(0.6-0.8) at z=0. We find that the evolution of the pairwise velocity bias follows and probably is defined by the spatial antibias of the dark matter halos at small scales. One-point velocity bias b_v, defined as the ratio of the rms velocities of halos and dark matter, provides a mo...

  8. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities.

  9. Velocities of Thwaites and Land glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchitta, B. K.; Mullins, Kevin F.; Ferrigno, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in the area of volume of polar ice sheets are intricately linked to changes in global climate and may severely impact the densely populated coastal regions on Earth. An ice sheet's velocity is a critical parameter, which, together with ice thickness, allows the determination of discharge rates. Using moderate-resolution satellite images such as Landsat, the velocity of floating ice can be measured quickly and relatively inexpensively by tracing crevasse patterns on shelves and ice tongues. Errors in measured velocities are as little as 0.02 km per year, if the following criteria are met: (1) the time interval is longer than 10 years; (2) the velocity is higher than 0.5 km per year; (3) the coregistration points are well dispersed and enclose the area to be measured; and (4) the image pair includes a Landsat 4 or 5 image. The fewer of these conditions that are met, the less accurate the results become; but even for poor conditions, the velocities are generally reliable to near 0.1 km per year. We are in the process of obtaining velocities of all ice shelves and ice tongues along the Bakutis and Ruppert coasts, wherever suitable crevasse patterns exist. So far, we have obtained velocities for the Thwaites and Land glacier tongues.

  10. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  11. Velocity structure and seismicity of southeastern Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Ronald Douglas; Long, Leland Timothy

    1996-04-01

    The seismic zone in southeastern Tennessee is at the confluence of major crustal features, which have been interpreted largely from potential data, and their relation to seismicity could help us understand why major earthquakes sometimes occur in the eastern United States. In this paper we solve for the previously unknown velocity structure of the upper crust by an inversion of travel time residuals from relocated earthquakes. The gravity anomalies are included by using a linear relation between average anomalous density and average anomalous velocity. The velocity model demonstrates that the seismicity is concentrated in areas of average to below average velocity and does not appear to be associated with one of the previously identified major crustal features. The high-velocity zones mark areas that are generally lacking in seismicity. The association of earthquake hypocenters with regions of low-velocity crustal rocks is consistent with other intraplate seismic zones, and this association supports the conjecture that intraplate earthquakes occur in crust that may have been weakened. The velocity anomalies at midcrustal depths do not support the New York-Alabama (NY-AL) lineament as a linear feature extending through southeastern Tennessee and parallel to contours in gravity anomalies as originally proposed. A continuation of the (NY-AL) lineament to the southwest requires either a 15 degree southwestward change in direction or a displacement to be consistent with the velocity anomalies. The seismically active areas in southeastern Tennessee do not appear to be constrained by the major crustal features, but instead, the seismicity is characterized by the distribution of hypocenters and their association with low-velocity regions at midcrustal depths.

  12. Performance of a vector velocity estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    It is a well-known limitation of all commercially available scanners that only the velocity component along the propagation direction of the emitted pulse is measured, when evaluating blood velocities with ultrasound. Proposals for solving this limitation using several transducers or speckle...... tracking can be found in the literature, but no method with a satisfactory performance has been found that can be used in a commercial implementation. A method for estimation of the velocity vector is presented. Here an oscillation transverse to the ultrasound beam is generated, so that a transverse motion...

  13. Measuring Bullet Velocity with a PC Soundcard

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Michael; Edwards, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a simple method for using a PC soundcard to accurately measure bullet velocity. The method involves placing the microphone within a foot of the muzzle and firing at a steel target between 50 and 100 yards away. The time of flight for the bullet is simply the recorded time between muzzle blast and sound of the bullet hitting the target minus the time it takes the sound to return from the target to the microphone. The average bullet velocity is simply the distance from the muzzle to the target divided by the time of flight of the bullet. This method can also be applied to measurement of paintball velocities.

  14. Low-Velocity Measurement in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Christopher; Stefan, Heinz G.

    1986-09-01

    Water velocities in the centimeter per second range or less are measurable by only a few instruments. Experimental laboratory studies frequently require such measurements. A review of low water velocity measurement methods is presented. An inexpensive optical hydrogen bubble-tracing technique is described for velocity measurements in the range 0.5 to 8 cm/s. Modification to a thymol blue (pH) tracer method extends its applicability to the range 0.1 to 1.0 cm/s. Design and operational characteristics of the hydrogen bubble/thymol blue current meter are described.

  15. Sound velocities in iron to 110 gigapascals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiquet, G; Badro, J; Guyot, F; Requardt, H; Krisch, M

    2001-01-19

    The dispersion of longitudinal acoustic phonons was measured by inelastic x-ray scattering in the hexagonal closed-packed (hcp) structure of iron from 19 to 110 gigapascals. Phonon dispersion curves were recorded on polycrystalline iron compressed in a diamond anvil cell, revealing an increase of the longitudinal wave velocity (VP) from 7000 to 8800 meters per second. We show that hcp iron follows a Birch law for VP, which is used to extrapolate velocities to inner core conditions. Extrapolated longitudinal acoustic wave velocities compared with seismic data suggest an inner core that is 4 to 5% lighter than hcp iron.

  16. The velocities of light in modified QED vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Scharnhorst, K

    1998-01-01

    QED vacua under the influence of external conditions (background fields, finite temperature, boundary conditions) can be considered as dispersive media whose complex behaviour can no longer be described in terms of a single universal vacuum velocity of light c. Beginning in the early 1950's (J.S. Toll), quantum field theoretic investigations have led to considerable insight into the relation between the vacuum structure and the propagation of light. Recent years have witnessed a significant growth of activity in this field of research. After a short overview, two characteristic situations are discussed: the propagation of light in a constant homogeneous magnetic field and in a Casimir vacuum. The latter appears to be particularly interesting because the Casimir vacuum has been found to exhibit modes of the propagation of light with phase and group velocities larger than c in the low frequency domain omega<electron mass. The impact of this result on the front velocity of light in a Casi...

  17. Spin-Orbit Twisted Spin Waves: Group Velocity Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F.; Baboux, F.; Ullrich, C. A.; D'Amico, I.; Vignale, G.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SOC), Coulomb interaction, and motion of conduction electrons in a magnetized two-dimensional electron gas. Via a transformation of the many-body Hamiltonian we introduce the concept of spin-orbit twisted spin waves, whose energy dispersions and damping rates are obtained by a simple wave-vector shift of the spin waves without SOC. These theoretical predictions are validated by Raman scattering measurements. With optical gating of the density, we vary the strength of the SOC to alter the group velocity of the spin wave. The findings presented here differ from that of spin systems subject to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Our results pave the way for novel applications in spin-wave routing devices and for the realization of lenses for spin waves.

  18. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  19. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE FLYING VELOCITY IN HIGH VELOCITY OXYGEN FUEL SPRAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiping; Dong Zujue; Huo Shubin

    2000-01-01

    Based on gas dynamics,thermodynamics,fluid dynamics of multiphase systems and other theories,the dynamic analyses of the particle flying velocity in a high velocity oxygen fuel spray (HVOF) is accomplished.The relationships between the flying velocity of a particle and the flying time or flying length,particle size,hot gas velocity,and pressure or density of the gas are proposed.Meanwhile,the influences of the velocity and mass rate of flow of the flame gas of a HVOF gun,and particle size on the particle flying velocity are discussed in detail.The dynamic pressure concept is introduced to express the flow capacity of hot gas of a HVOF gun,and the relationship between the dynamic pressure of a HVOF gun and the velocity of a particle for depositing is presented.

  20. Global Effects of the Interplanetary Shock Propagation through the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: 3D Hybrid Kinetic ModelingA.S. Lipatov {1}, D.G. Sibeck {2}{1} GPHI UMBC/NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA {2} NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmasphere particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that the shock causes strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us to determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere. We compare our predictions with THEMIS and Van Allen Probes spacecraft observations.

  1. Global effects of transmitted shock wave propagation through the Earth's inner magnetosphere: First results from 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmaspheric particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that shocks cause strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  2. Vlasov simulations of multi-ion plasma turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Perrone, Denise; Servidio, Sergio; Dalena, Serena; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are employed to investigate the role of kinetic effects in a two-dimensional turbulent multi-ion plasma, composed of protons, alpha particles and fluid electrons. In the typical conditions of the solar-wind environment, and in situations of decaying turbulence, the numerical results show that the velocity distribution functions of both ion species depart from the typical configuration of thermal equilibrium. These non-Maxwellian features are quantified through the statistical analysis of the temperature anisotropy, for both protons and alpha particles, in the reference frame given by the local magnetic field. Anisotropy is found to be higher in regions of high magnetic stress. Both ion species manifest a preferentially perpendicular heating, although the anisotropy is more pronounced for the alpha particles, according with solar wind observations. Anisotropy of the alpha particle, moreover, is correlated to the proton anisotropy, and also depends on the local differential flo...

  3. The incomplete plasma dispersion function: properties and application to waves in bounded plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Baalrud, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    The incomplete plasma dispersion function is a generalization of the plasma dispersion function in which the defining integral spans a semi-infinite, rather than infinite, domain. It is useful for describing the linear dielectric response and wave dispersion in non-Maxwellian plasmas when the distribution functions can be approximated as Maxwellian over finite, or semi-infinite, intervals in velocity phase-space. A ubiquitous example is the depleted Maxwellian electron distribution found near boundary sheaths or double layers, where the passing interval can be modeled as Maxwellian with a lower temperature than the trapped interval. The depleted Maxwellian is used as an example to demonstrate the utility of using the incomplete plasma dispersion function for calculating modifications to wave dispersion relations.

  4. Ambient Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2012-10-01

    We report the recent research progress and future prospects of flexible and printed electronics, focusing on molecular electronic material-based thin-film transistors, which are expected to usher in a new era of electronics.

  5. On Zitterbewegung of Electron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-yong; XIONG Cai-dong; ZHOU Ping

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, all the discussions on zitterbewegung (zbw) of electron are based on relativistic quantum mechanics. In this article, from the viewpoint of quantum field theory and in terms of the creation and annihilation operators as well as the polarization vectors of spin-1 field, a more detailed description and some new perspectives for zbw are obtained. Especially, it is shown that zbw arises from a to-and-fro vacuum polarization that occurring in the neighborhood of electron; the zbw vectors form a vector triplet with total spin projections 0 and ±1 in the direction of the momentum of electron, respectively; the macroscopic velocity of the vacuum medium vanishes in all inertial systems.

  6. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  7. Computer program calculates transonic velocities in turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanis, T.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, TSONIC, combines velocity gradient and finite difference methods to obtain numerical solution for ideal, transonic, compressible flow for axial, radial, or mixed flow cascade of turbomachinery blades.

  8. Optimal Moments for Velocity Fields Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, H A; Melott, A; Feldman, Hume A; Watkins, Richard; Melott, Adrian; Proxy, Will Chambers; ccsd-00000954, ccsd

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new method of overcoming problems inherent in peculiar velocity surveys by using data compression as a filter with which to separate large-scale, linear flows from small-scale noise that biases the results systematically. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method using realistic catalogs of galaxy velocities drawn from N--body simulations. Our tests show that a likelihood analysis of simulated catalogs that uses all of the information contained in the peculiar velocities results in a bias in the estimation of the power spectrum shape parameter $\\Gamma$ and amplitude $\\beta$, and that our method of analysis effectively removes this bias. We expect that this new method will cause peculiar velocity surveys to re--emerge as a useful tool to determine cosmological parameters.

  9. The escape velocity and Schwarzschild metric

    CERN Document Server

    Murzagalieva, A G; Murzagaliev, G Z

    2002-01-01

    The escape velocity value in the terms of general relativity by means Schwarzschild metric is provided to make of the motion equation with Friedman cosmological model behavior build in the terms of Robertson-Worker metric. (author)

  10. Velocity distributions in dilute granular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zon, J S; MacKintosh, F C

    2005-11-01

    We investigate the idea that velocity distributions in granular gases are determined mainly by eta, the coefficient of restitution and q, which measures the relative importance of heating (or energy input) to collisions. To this end, we study by numerical simulation the properties of inelastic gases as functions of eta, concentration phi, and particle number N with various heating mechanisms. For a wide range of parameters, we find Gaussian velocity distributions for uniform heating and non-Gaussian velocity distributions for boundary heating. Comparison between these results and velocity distributions obtained by other heating mechanisms and for a simple model of a granular gas without spatial degrees of freedom, shows that uniform and boundary heating can be understood as different limits of q, with q>1 and q < or approximately 1 respectively. We review the literature for evidence of the role of q in the recent experiments.

  11. Transport velocities of coal and sand particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanez, J. (Inst. de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain)); Diego, L.F. de (Inst. de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain)); Gayan, P. (Inst. de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1993-10-01

    Transport velocities of narrow cut sizes of coarse particles of sand and coal were determined at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. These velocities were obtained by four different methods previously utilized by other authors with fine particles. The four methods tested gave good predictions of the transport velocities. The method based on the measurement of the time required for all the solids to leave the bed without feeding in any fresh solid is specially interesting because of its rapidity and simplicity. The determined transport velocities were strongly dependent on the solid particle size and density. The experimental values were fitted to an equation which fitted both the experimental results obtained in this work and other published results obtained with fine particles. (orig.)

  12. Velocity Field in a Vertical Foam Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiwert, Jacopo; Kervil, Ronan; Nou, Soniraks; Cantat, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    The drainage of vertical foam films governs their lifetime. For a foam film supported on a rectangular solid frame, when the interface presents a low resistance to shear, the drainage dynamics involves a complex flow pattern at the film scale, leading to a drainage time proportional to the frame width. Using an original velocimetry technique, based on fluorescent foam films and photobleaching, we measure the horizontal and vertical components of the velocity in a draining film, thus providing the first quantitative experimental evidence of this flow pattern. Upward velocities up to 10 cm /s are measured close to the lateral menisci, whereas a slower velocity field is obtained in the center of the film, with comparable downwards and horizontal components. Scaling laws are proposed for all characteristic velocities, coupling gravitational effects, and capillary suction.

  13. Velocity in Lorentz-Violating Fermion Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Altschul, B D; Colladay, Don

    2004-01-01

    We consider the role of the velocity in Lorentz-violating fermionic quantum theory, especially emphasizing the nonrelativistic regime. Information about the velocity will be important for the kinematical analysis of scattering and other problems. Working within the minimal standard model extension, we derive new expressions for the velocity. We find that generic momentum and spin eigenstates may not have well-defined velocities. We also demonstrate how several different techniques may be used to shed light on different aspects of the problem. A relativistic operator analysis allows us to study the behavior of the Lorentz-violating Zitterbewegung. Alternatively, by studying the time evolution of Gaussian wave packets, we find that there are Lorentz-violating modifications to the wave packet spreading and the spin structure of the wave function.

  14. Velocity moments of dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, R; Gottlöber, S; Mamon, G A; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Mamon, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    Using cosmological N-body simulations we study the line-of-sight velocity distribution of dark matter haloes focusing on the lowest-order even moments, dispersion and kurtosis, and their application to estimate the mass profiles of cosmological structures. For each of the ten massive haloes selected from the simulation box we determine the virial mass, concentration and the anisotropy parameter. In order to emulate observations from each halo we choose randomly 300 particles and project their velocities and positions along the line of sight and on the surface of the sky, respectively. After removing interlopers we calculate the profiles of the line-of-sight velocity moments and fit them with the solutions of the Jeans equations. The estimates of virial mass, concentration parameter and velocity anisotropy obtained in this way are in good agreement with the values found from the full 3D analysis.

  15. Electron cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.

    2004-10-01

    The brief review of the most significant and interesting achievements in electron cooling method, which took place during last two years, is presented. The description of the electron cooling facilities-storage rings and traps being in operation or under development-is given. The applications of the electron cooling method are considered. The following modern fields of the method development are discussed: crystalline beam formation, expansion into middle and high energy electron cooling (the Fermilab Recycler Electron Cooler, the BNL cooler-recuperator, cooling with circulating electron beam, the GSI project), electron cooling in traps, antihydrogen generation, electron cooling of positrons (the LEPTA project).

  16. Heavy electrons: Electron droplets generated by photogalvanic and pyroelectric effects

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnoholovets, V; Kukhtareva, T

    2009-01-01

    Electron clusters, X-rays and nanosecond radio-frequency pulses are produced by 100 mW continuous-wave laser illuminating ferroelectric crystal of LiNbO_3. A long-living stable electron droplet with the size of about 100 mcm has freely moved with the velocity 0.5 cm/s in the air near the surface of the crystal experiencing the Earth gravitational field. The microscopic model of cluster stability, which is based on submicroscopic mechanics developed in the real physical space, is suggested. The role of a restraining force plays the inerton field, a substructure of the particles' matter waves, which a solitary one can elastically withstand the Coulomb repulsion of electrons. It is shown that electrons in the droplet are heavy electrons whose mass at least 1 million of times exceeds the rest mass of free electron. Application for X-ray imaging and lithography is discussed.

  17. Cyclotron radiation cooling of a short electron bunch kicked in an undulator with guiding magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Bandurkin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose to use of an undulator with the guiding axial magnetic field as a “kicker” forming a bunch of electron gyro-oscillators with a small spread in the axial velocity. The cyclotron emission from the bunch leads to losing oscillatory velocity of electron gyrorotation, but it does not perturb the axial electron velocity. This effect can be used for transformation of minimization of the spread in electron axial velocity in the undulator section into minimization of the spread in electron energy in the cyclotron radiation section.

  18. Quantum rainbow scattering at tunable velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Strebel, M; Ruff, B; Stienkemeier, F; Mudrich, M

    2012-01-01

    Elastic scattering cross sections are measured for lithium atoms colliding with rare gas atoms and SF6 molecules at tunable relative velocities down to ~50 m/s. Our scattering apparatus combines a velocity-tunable molecular beam with a magneto-optic trap that provides an ultracold cloud of lithium atoms as a scattering target. Comparison with theory reveals the quantum nature of the collision dynamics in the studied regime, including both rainbows as well as orbiting resonances.

  19. Velocity Fluctuations in Electrostatically Driven Granular Media

    OpenAIRE

    Aranson, I. S.; Olafsen, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    We study experimentally the particle velocity fluctuations in an electrostatically driven dilute granular gas. The experimentally obtained velocity distribution functions have strong deviations from Maxwellian form in a wide range of parameters. We have found that the tails of the distribution functions are consistent with a stretched exponential law with typical exponents of the order 3/2. Molecular dynamic simulations shows qualitative agreement with experimental data. Our results suggest t...

  20. Velocity Fields as a Probe of Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Hume

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of peculiar velocity surveys face several challenges, including low signal--to--noise in individual velocity measurements and the presence of small--scale, nonlinear flows. I will present three new analyses that attempt to address these inherent problems. The first is geared towards the better understanding of the estimated errors in the surveys, specifically sampling errors, and the resolution of the seeming disagreements between the surveys. Another develops a new statistic that do...

  1. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  2. Mean Velocity Estimation of Viscous Debris Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjuan Yang; Fangqiang Wei; Kaiheng Hu

    2014-01-01

    The mean velocity estimation of debris flows, especially viscous debris flows, is an impor-tant part in the debris flow dynamics research and in the design of control structures. In this study, theoretical equations for computing debris flow velocity with the one-phase flow assumption were re-viewed and used to analyze field data of viscous debris flows. Results show that the viscous debris flow is difficult to be classified as a Newtonian laminar flow, a Newtonian turbulent flow, a Bingham fluid, or a dilatant fluid in the strict sense. However, we can establish empirical formulas to compute its mean velocity following equations for Newtonian turbulent flows, because most viscous debris flows are tur-bulent. Factors that potentially influence debris flow velocity were chosen according to two-phase flow theories. Through correlation analysis and data fitting, two empirical formulas were proposed. In the first one, velocity is expressed as a function of clay content, flow depth and channel slope. In the second one, a coefficient representing the grain size nonuniformity is used instead of clay content. Both formu-las can give reasonable estimate of the mean velocity of the viscous debris flow.

  3. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngeraa, T S; Pedersen, L M; Mantoni, T; Belhage, B; Rasmussen, L S; van Lieshout, J J; Pott, F C

    2013-02-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies. During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow but also challenges cerebral autoregulation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Effect of ion velocity on SHI-induced mixing in Ti/Bi system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nisha; Kumar, Sarvesh; Khan, Saif Ahmad; Chauhan, R. S.

    2016-03-01

    Energetic ion beams are proving to be versatile tools for modification and depth profiling of materials. The energy and ion species are the deciding factor in the ion-beam-induced materials modification. Among the various parameters such as electronic energy loss, fluence and heat of mixing, velocity of the ions used for irradiation plays an important role in mixing at the interface. The present study is carried out to find the effect of the velocity of swift heavy ions on interface mixing of a Ti/Bi bilayer system. Ti/Bi/C was deposited on Si substrate at room temperature by an electron gun in a high-vacuum deposition system. Carbon layer is deposited on top to avoid oxidation of the samples. Eighty mega electron volts Au ions and 100 MeV Ag ions with same value of Se for Ti are used for the irradiation of samples at the fluences 1 × 1013-1 × 1014 ions/cm2. Different techniques like Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the pristine and irradiated samples. The mixing effect is explained in the framework of the thermal spike model. It has been found that the mixing rate is higher for low-velocity Au ions in comparison to high-velocity Ag ions. The result could be explained as due to less energy deposition in thermal spike by high-velocity ions.

  5. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  6. Water velocity and the nature of critical flow in large rapids on the Colorado River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magirl, C.S.; Gartner, J.W.; Smart, G.M.; Webb, R.H.

    2009-01-01

     Rapids are an integral part of bedrock-controlled rivers, influencing aquatic ecology, geomorphology, and recreational value. Flow measurements in rapids and high-gradient rivers are uncommon because of technical difficulties associated with positioning and operating sufficiently robust instruments. In the current study, detailed velocity, water surface, and bathymetric data were collected within rapids on the Colorado River in eastern Utah. With the water surface survey, it was found that shoreline-based water surface surveys may misrepresent the water surface slope along the centerline of a rapid. Flow velocities were measured with an ADCP and an electronic pitot-static tube. Integrating multiple measurements, the ADCP returned velocity data from the entire water column, even in sections of high water velocity. The maximum mean velocity measured with the ADCP was 3.7 m/s. The pitot-static tube, while capable of only point measurements, quantified velocity 0.39 m below the surface. The maximum mean velocity measured with the pitot tube was 5.2 m/s, with instantaneous velocities up to 6.5 m/s. Analysis of the data showed that flow was subcritical throughout all measured rapids with a maximum measured Froude number of 0.7 in the largest measured rapids. Froude numbers were highest at the entrance of a given rapid, then decreased below the first breaking waves. In the absence of detailed bathymetric and velocity data, the Froude number in the fastest-flowing section of a rapid was estimated from near-surface velocity and depth soundings alone.

  7. Electron - whistler interaction at the Earth`s bow shock: 2. Electron pitch angle diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltri, P.; Zimbardo, G. [Universita della Calabria, Cosenza (Italy)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the authors further examine the interactions of whistler waves with electrons in the bow shock, simulating a crossing made on Nov 7, 1977. The authors consider the effects of whistler waves and electrostatic noise on the electron distribution function, using a Monte Carlo technique. Their simulations are able to reproduce the moments of the distribution function, including spatial and velocity profiles. They conclude that the fields in the bow shock accelerate electrons, creating asymmetric distributions, which are filled in due to diffusion caused by the electrostatic noise, and which have the velocity distributions balanced due to pitch angle scattering of parallel electrons from whistler waves.

  8. Distributional Monte Carlo Methods for the Boltzmann Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    become the first to possess non - Maxwellian distributions, and therefore become the only location where 112 collisions are required to be calculated... Maxwellian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 fMB Maxwell-Boltzmann Density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 nMB Maxwell-Boltzmann...is equivalent to assuming that millions of actual particles all share the exact velocity vector. This assumption is non -physical in the sense that

  9. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finney, W.C. (ed.); Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    During the previous reporting period (Quarter Six), the charging and removal of a fine, high resistivity aerosol using the advanced technology of electron beam precipitation was successfully accomplished. Precharging a dust stream circulating through the EBP wind tunnel produced collection efficiency figures of up to 40 times greater than with corona charging and collection alone (Table 1). The increased system collection efficiency attributed to electron beam precharging was determined to be the result of increased particle charge. It was found that as precharger electric field was raised, collection efficiency became greater. In sequence, saturation particle charge varies with the precharger electric field strength, particle migration velocity varies with the precharger and collector electric field, and collection efficiency varies with the migration velocity. Maximizing the system collection efficiency requires both a high charging electric field (provided by the E-beam precharger), and a high collecting electric field (provided by the collector wires and plates). Because increased particle collection efficiency is directly attributable to higher particle charge, the focus of research during Quarter Seven was shifted to learning more about the actual charge magnitude on the aerosol particles. Charge determinations in precipitators have traditionally been made on bulk dust samples collected from the flue gas stream, which gives an overall charge vs. mass (Q/M) ratio measurement. More recently, techniques have been developed which allow the measurement of the charge on individual particles in a rapid and repeatable fashion. One such advanced technique has been developed at FSU for use in characterizing the electron beam precharger.

  10. Graphene for radio frequency electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Graphene is emerging as an attractive electronic material for future electronics. With the highest carrier mobility, high saturation velocity, high critical current densities, and single atomic thickness, graphene has great potential for ultra-high speed transistors, with the highest projected cut-off frequency exceeding 1 THz. However, the fabrication of high speed graphene transistors is of significant challenge, since conventional electronic fabrication processes often introduce undesirable defects into graphene lattices. Significant efforts have made to mitigate these challenges. Here we review the opportunities, challenges, as well as the recent advances in the development of high speed graphene transistors and circuits.

  11. Use of hot wire anemometry to measure velocity of the limb during human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S C; Mote, C D; Skinner, H B

    1992-09-01

    Hot film anemometry, x-configuration probes were used in two experiments to evaluate their effectiveness at measurement of limb velocity. Data from tests with a probe attached to the end of a pendulum establish that the hot films measure velocity in the swing phase within 0.098 ms-1. The kinetic energy per unit mass of the pendulum was predicted within +/- 0.005 m2 s-2, from the measured velocity. In gait experiments with one human subject at speeds greater than 0.25 ms-1, the hot film anemometer and a video system predicted speeds within 0.083 ms-1. The hot film data are electronic signals that are easily stored and processed. The results from these experiments demonstrate that hot film anemometry is an effective and efficient method for direct measurement and analysis of the limb velocity.

  12. Untangling the Recombination Line Emission from HII Regions with Multiple Velocity Components

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, L D; Wenger, T V; Bania, T M; Balser, Dana S

    2015-01-01

    HII regions are the ionized spheres surrounding high-mass stars. They are ideal targets for tracing Galactic structure because they are predominantly found in spiral arms and have high luminosities at infrared and radio wavelengths. In the Green Bank Telescope HII Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) we found that >30% of first Galactic quadrant HII regions have multiple hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) velocities, which makes determining their Galactic locations and physical properties impossible. Here we make additional GBT RRL observations to determine the discrete HII region velocity for all 117 multiple-velocity sources within 18deg. < l < 65deg. The multiple-velocity sources are concentrated in the zone 22deg. < l < 32deg., coinciding with the largest regions of massive star formation, which implies that the diffuse emission is caused by leaked ionizing photons. We combine our observations with analyses of the electron temperature, molecular gas, and carbon recombination lines to determ...

  13. Optical refraction in silver: counterposition, negative phase velocity and orthogonal phase velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, Qaisar A [Department of Electronics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mackay, Tom G [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lakhtakia, Akhlesh, E-mail: nqaisar@yahoo.com, E-mail: T.Mackay@ed.ac.uk, E-mail: akhlesh@psu.edu [NanoMM-Nanoengineered Metamaterials Group, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Complex behaviour associated with metamaterials can arise even in commonplace isotropic dielectric materials. We demonstrate how silver, for example, can support negative phase velocity and counterposition, but not negative refraction, at optical frequencies. The transition from positive to negative phase velocity is not accompanied by remarkable changes in the Abraham and Minkowski momentum densities. In particular, orthogonal phase velocity is associated with nonzero Abraham and Minkowski momentum densities.

  14. Point Measurements of Fermi Velocities by a Time-of-Flight Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, David S.; Henningsen, J. O.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt;

    1972-01-01

    The present paper describes in detail a new method of obtaining information about the Fermi velocity of electrons in metals, point by point, along certain contours on the Fermi surface. It is based on transmission of microwaves through thin metal slabs in the presence of a static magnetic field...... obtained one component of the velocity along half the circumference of the centrally symmetric orbit for B→∥[100]. The results are in agreement with current models for the Fermi surface. For B→∥[011], the electrons involved are not moving in a symmetry plane of the Fermi surface. In such cases one cannot...... immediately derive the velocity components, but the method can still be used to provide a comparison of different Fermi surface models. Such a comparison has been made of an augmented-plane-wave model (Christensen) and a Fourier model (Halse), both yielding the experimentally determined areas and cyclotron...

  15. Range/velocity limitations for time-domain blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    The traditional range/velocity limitation for blood velocity estimation systems using ultrasound is elucidated. It is stated that the equation is a property of the estimator used, not the actual physical measurement situation, as higher velocities can be estimated by the time domain cross......-correlation approach. It is demonstrated that the time domain technique under certain measurement conditions will yield unsatisfactory results, when trying to estimate high velocities. Various methods to avoid these artifacts using temporal and spatial clustering techniques are suggested. The improvement...

  16. Extension of the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity to the hydrophobic microchannels with velocity slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H M; Kim, T W

    2009-01-21

    Electrokinetic flows through hydrophobic microchannels experience velocity slip at the microchannel wall, which affects volumetric flow rate and solute retention time. The usual method of predicting the volumetric flow rate and velocity profile for hydrophobic microchannels is to solve the Navier-Stokes equation and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electric potential with the boundary condition of velocity slip expressed by the Navier slip coefficient, which is computationally demanding and defies analytic solutions. In the present investigation, we have devised a simple method of predicting the velocity profiles and volumetric flow rates of electrokinetic flows by extending the concept of the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity to microchannels with Navier slip. The extended Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity is simple to use and yields accurate results as compared to the exact solutions. Employing the extended Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity, the analytical expressions for volumetric flow rate and velocity profile for electrokinetic flows through rectangular microchannels with Navier slip have been obtained at high values of zeta potential. The range of validity of the extended Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity is also investigated.

  17. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    reliable as the earth becomes horizontally nonconstant. Even mild lateral velocity variations can significantly distort subsurface structures on the time migrated images. Conversely, depth migration provides the potential for more accurate reconstructions, since it can handle significant lateral variations. However, this approach requires good input data, known as a 'velocity model'. We address the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth, i.e., the problem of constructing a velocity model, which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. The main goals are to develop algorithms to convert time-migration velocities to true seismic velocities, and to convert time-migrated images to depth images in regular Cartesian coordinates. Our main results are three-fold. First, we establish a theoretical relation between the true seismic velocities and the 'time migration velocities' using the paraxial ray tracing. Second, we formulate an appropriate inverse problem describing the relation between time migration velocities and depth velocities, and show that this problem is mathematically ill-posed, i.e., unstable to small perturbations. Third, we develop numerical algorithms to solve regularized versions of these equations which can be used to recover smoothed velocity variations. Our algorithms consist of efficient time-to-depth conversion algorithms, based on Dijkstra-like Fast Marching Methods, as well as level set and ray tracing algorithms for transforming Dix velocities into seismic velocities. Our algorithms are applied to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems, and we test them on a collection of both synthetic examples and field data.

  18. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    earth becomes horizontally nonconstant. Even mild lateral velocity variations can significantly distort subsurface structures on the time migrated images. Conversely, depth migration provides the potential for more accurate reconstructions, since it can handle significant lateral variations. However, this approach requires good input data, known as a "velocity model". We address the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth, i.e., the problem of constructing a velocity model, which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. The main goals are to develop algorithms to convert time-migration velocities to true seismic velocities, and to convert time-migrated images to depth images in regular Cartesian coordinates. Our main results are three-fold. First, we establish a theoretical relation between the true seismic velocities and the "time migration velocities" using the paraxial ray tracing. Second, we formulate an appropriate inverse problem describing the relation between time migration velocities and depth velocities, and show that this problem is mathematically ill-posed, i.e., unstable to small perturbations. Third, we develop numerical algorithms to solve regularized versions of these equations which can be used to recover smoothed velocity variations. Our algorithms consist of efficient time-to-depth conversion algorithms, based on Dijkstra-like Fast Marching Methods, as well as level set and ray tracing algorithms for transforming Dix velocities into seismic velocities. Our algorithms are applied to both two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems, and we test them on a collection of both synthetic examples and field data.

  19. Relaxation Time of the Particle Beam with an Anisotropic Velocity Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Vechirka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The computer experiment for study of the relaxation time of the beam particles with an anisotropic velocity distribution is performed by the molecular dynamics. Obtained results agree with the characteristic times of thermal relaxation in plasma for the electronic coolers in modern storage rings.

  20. Interplay of nonlocal response, damping, and low group velocity in surface-plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    augmented with quantum mechanical corrections, such as the electron spill-out effect and nonlocal response. Here, we discuss the latter and its implications on the waveguiding characteristics, such as dispersion and group velocity, of the surface-plasmon polariton mode supported at a metal-air interface....

  1. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe Miki Busk; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocit...

  2. POTENT Reconstruction from Mark III Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekel, A.; Eldar, A.; Kolatt, T.; Yahil, A.; Willick, J. A.; Faber, S. M.; Courteau, S.; Burstein, D.

    1999-09-01

    We present an improved version of the POTENT method for reconstructing the cosmological velocity and mass density fields from radial peculiar velocities, test it with mock catalogs, and apply it to the Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities. The method is improved in several ways: (1) the inhomogeneous Malmquist bias is reduced by grouping and corrected statistically in either forward or inverse analyses of inferred distances, (2) the smoothing into a radial velocity field is optimized such that window and sampling biases are reduced, (3) the density field is derived from the velocity field using an improved weakly nonlinear approximation in Eulerian space, and (4) the computational errors are made negligible compared to the other errors. The method is carefully tested and optimized using realistic mock catalogs based on an N-body simulation that mimics our cosmological neighborhood, and the remaining systematic and random errors are evaluated quantitatively. The Mark III catalog, with ~3300 grouped galaxies, allows a reliable reconstruction with fixed Gaussian smoothing of 10-12 h-1 Mpc out to ~60 h-1 Mpc and beyond in some directions. We present maps of the three-dimensional velocity and mass-density fields and the corresponding errors. The typical systematic and random errors in the density fluctuations inside 40 h-1 Mpc are +/-0.13 and +/-0.18 (for Ω=1). In its gross features, the recovered mass distribution resembles the galaxy distribution in redshift surveys and the mass distribution in a similar POTENT analysis of a complementary velocity catalog (SFI), including such features as the Great Attractor, Perseus-Pisces, and the large void in between. The reconstruction inside ~40 h-1 Mpc is not affected much by a revised calibration of the distance indicators (VM2, tailored to match the velocities from the IRAS 1.2 Jy redshift survey). The volume-weighted bulk velocity within the sphere of radius 50 h-1 Mpc about the Local Group is V50=370+/-110 km s-1

  3. Boosting Moving Object Indexing through Velocity Partitioning

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Thi; Zhang, Rui; Ward, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    There have been intense research interests in moving object indexing in the past decade. However, existing work did not exploit the important property of skewed velocity distributions. In many real world scenarios, objects travel predominantly along only a few directions. Examples include vehicles on road networks, flights, people walking on the streets, etc. The search space for a query is heavily dependent on the velocity distribution of the objects grouped in the nodes of an index tree. Motivated by this observation, we propose the velocity partitioning (VP) technique, which exploits the skew in velocity distribution to speed up query processing using moving object indexes. The VP technique first identifies the "dominant velocity axes (DVAs)" using a combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and k-means clustering. Then, a moving object index (e.g., a TPR-tree) is created based on each DVA, using the DVA as an axis of the underlying coordinate system. An object is maintained in the index whose DVA...

  4. Imaging thermal plasma mass and velocity analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Andrew W.; Howarth, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and principle of operation of the imaging ion mass and velocity analyzer on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP), which measures low-energy (1-90 eV/e) ion mass composition (1-40 AMU/e) and velocity distributions using a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer (HEA), a time-of-flight (TOF) gate, and a pair of toroidal electrostatic deflectors (TED). The HEA and TOF gate measure the energy-per-charge and azimuth of each detected ion and the ion transit time inside the analyzer, respectively, providing the 2-D velocity distribution of each major ionospheric ion species and resolving the minor ion species under favorable conditions. The TED are in front of the TOF gate and optionally sample ions at different elevation angles up to ±60°, for measurement of 3-D velocity distribution. We present examples of observation data to illustrate the measurement capability of the analyzer, and show the occurrence of enhanced densities of heavy "minor" O++, N+, and molecular ions and intermittent, high-velocity (a few km/s) upward and downward flowing H+ ions in localized regions of the quiet time topside high-latitude ionosphere.

  5. Power Spectrum Estimation from Peculiar Velocity Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Macaulay, Edward; Ferreira, Pedro G; Jaffe, Andrew H; Agarwal, Shankar; Hudson, Michael J; Watkins, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The peculiar velocities of galaxies are an inherently valuable cosmological probe, providing an unbiased estimate of the distribution of matter on scales much larger than the depth of the survey. Much research interest has been motivated by the high dipole moment of our local peculiar velocity field, which suggests a large scale excess in the matter power spectrum, and can appear to be in some tension with the LCDM model. We use a composite catalogue of 4,537 peculiar velocity measurements with a characteristic depth of 33 h-1 Mpc to estimate the matter power spectrum. We compare the constraints with this method, directly studying the full peculiar velocity catalogue, to results from Macaulay et al. (2011), studying minimum variance moments of the velocity field, as calculated by Watkins, Feldman & Hudson (2009) and Feldman, Watkins & Hudson (2010). We find good agreement with the LCDM model on scales of k > 0.01 h Mpc-1. We find an excess of power on scales of k < 0.01 h Mpc-1, although with a 1 s...

  6. Measuring Global Monopole Velocities, one by one

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Eiguren, Asier; Achúcarro, Ana

    2016-01-01

    We present an estimation of the average velocity of a network of global monopoles in a cosmological setting using large numerical simulations. In order to obtain the value of the velocity, we improve some already known methods, and present a new one. This new method estimates individual global monopole velocities in a network, by means of detecting each monopole position in the lattice and following the path described by each one of them. Using our new estimate we can settle an open question previously posed in the literature: velocity-dependent one-scale (VOS) models for global monopoles predict two branches of scaling solutions, one with monopoles moving at subluminal speeds and one with monopoles moving at luminal speeds. Previous attempts to estimate monopole velocities had large uncertainties and were not able to settle that question. Our simulations find no evidence of a luminal branch. We also estimate the values of the parameters of the VOS model. With our new method we can also study the microphysics...

  7. Fall velocity of multi-shaped clasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Jacobus P.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate settling velocity predictions of differently shaped micro- or macroclasts are required in many branches of science and engineering. Here, a single, dimensionally correct equation is presented that yields a significant improvement on previous settling formulas for a wide range of clast shapes. For smooth or irregular clasts with known axial dimensions, a partially polynomial equation based on the logarithmic values of dimensionless sizes and settling velocities is presented, in which the values of only one coefficient and one exponent need to be adapted for different shapes, irrespective of the Reynolds number. For irregular, natural clasts with unknown axial dimensions, a polynomial equation of the same form is applied, but with different coefficients. Comparison of the predicted and measured settling velocities of 8 different shape classes as well as natural grains with unknown axial dimensions in liquids, representing a total of 390 experimental data points, shows a mean percentage error of - 0.83% and a combined R2 value of 0.998. The settling data of 169 differently shaped particles of pumice, glass and feldspar falling in air were also analyzed, which demonstrates that the proposed equation is also valid for these conditions. Two additional shape classes were identified in the latter data set, although the resultant equations are less accurate than for liquids. An Excel spreadsheet is provided to facilitate the calculation of fall velocities for grains settling individually and in groups, or alternatively to determine the equivalent sieve size from the settling velocity, which can be used to calibrate settling tubes.

  8. Measuring global monopole velocities, one by one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Eiguren, Asier; Urrestilla, Jon; Achúcarro, Ana

    2017-01-01

    We present an estimation of the average velocity of a network of global monopoles in a cosmological setting using large numerical simulations. In order to obtain the value of the velocity, we improve some already known methods, and present a new one. This new method estimates individual global monopole velocities in a network, by means of detecting each monopole position in the lattice and following the path described by each one of them. Using our new estimate we can settle an open question previously posed in the literature: velocity-dependent one-scale (VOS) models for global monopoles predict two branches of scaling solutions, one with monopoles moving at subluminal speeds and one with monopoles moving at luminal speeds. Previous attempts to estimate monopole velocities had large uncertainties and were not able to settle that question. Our simulations find no evidence of a luminal branch. We also estimate the values of the parameters of the VOS model. With our new method we can also study the microphysics of the complicated dynamics of individual monopoles. Finally we use our large simulation volume to compare the results from the different estimator methods, as well as to asses the validity of the numerical approximations made.

  9. Indentation of aluminium foam at low velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The indentation behaviour of aluminium foams at low velocity (10 m/s ∼ 30 m/s was investigated both in experiments and numerical simulation in this paper. A flat-ended indenter was used and the force-displacement history was recorded. The Split Hopkinson Pressure bar was used to obtain the indentation velocity and forces in the dynamic experiments. Because of the low strength of the aluminium foam, PMMA bar was used, and the experimental data were corrected using Bacon's method. The energy absorption characteristics varying with impact velocity were then obtained. It was found that the energy absorption ability of aluminium foam gradually increases in the quasi-static regime and shows a significant increase at ∼10 m/s velocity. Numerical simulation was also conducted to investigate this process. A 3D Voronoi model was used and models with different relative densities were investigated as well as those with different failure strain. The indentation energy increases with both the relative density and failure strain. The analysis of the FE model implies that the significant change in energy absorption ability of aluminium foam in indentation at ∼10 m/s velocity may be caused by plastic wave effect.

  10. Distinct patterns of seasonal Greenland glacier velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Twila; Joughin, Ian; Smith, Ben; van den Broeke, Michiel R; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Usher, Mika

    2014-10-28

    Predicting Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss due to ice dynamics requires a complete understanding of spatiotemporal velocity fluctuations and related control mechanisms. We present a 5 year record of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 marine-terminating glaciers distributed around the ice sheet margin, along with ice-front position and runoff data sets for each glacier. Among glaciers with substantial speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position. The other two patterns are more prevalent and appear to be meltwater controlled. These patterns reveal differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. The difference may be determined by meltwater availability, which in some regions may be influenced by perennial firn aquifers. Our results highlight the need to understand subglacial meltwater availability on an ice sheet-wide scale to predict future dynamic changes. First multi-region seasonal velocity measurements show regional differencesSeasonal velocity fluctuations on most glaciers appear meltwater controlledSeasonal development of efficient subglacial drainage geographically divided.

  11. Distinct patterns of seasonal Greenland glacier velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Twila; Joughin, Ian; Smith, Ben; van den Broeke, Michiel R; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Usher, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Predicting Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss due to ice dynamics requires a complete understanding of spatiotemporal velocity fluctuations and related control mechanisms. We present a 5 year record of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 marine-terminating glaciers distributed around the ice sheet margin, along with ice-front position and runoff data sets for each glacier. Among glaciers with substantial speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position. The other two patterns are more prevalent and appear to be meltwater controlled. These patterns reveal differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. The difference may be determined by meltwater availability, which in some regions may be influenced by perennial firn aquifers. Our results highlight the need to understand subglacial meltwater availability on an ice sheet-wide scale to predict future dynamic changes. Key Points First multi-region seasonal velocity measurements show regional differences Seasonal velocity fluctuations on most glaciers appear meltwater controlled Seasonal development of efficient subglacial drainage geographically divided PMID:25821275

  12. Vector Velocity Imaging Using Cross-Correlation and Virtual Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown promising results in using the directional cross-correlation method to estimate velocity vectors. The velocity vector estimate provides information on both velocity direction and magnitude. The direction is estimated by beamforming signals along directions...

  13. Automatic stabilization of velocity for ultrasonic vibration system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Describes the structure of a current feedback ultrasonicgeneration system with such characteristic as velocity stabilization and automatic frequency tracking, discusses the velocity stabilization principle, and points out that successful frequency tracking is precondition for velocity stabilization.

  14. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  15. Velocity Segregation and Systematic Biases In Velocity Dispersion Estimates With the SPT-GMOS Spectroscopic Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayliss, Matthew.B. [MIT, MKI; Zengo, Kyle [Colby Coll.; Ruel, Jonathan [Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Benson, Bradford A. [Fermilab; Bleem, Lindsey E. [Argonne; Bocquet, Sebastian [Argonne; Bulbul, Esra [MIT, MKI; Brodwin, Mark [Missouri U., Kansas City; Capasso, Raffaella [Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Chiu, I-non [Taiwan, Natl. Tsing Hua U.; McDonald, Michael [MIT, MKI; Rapetti, David [NASA, Ames; Saro, Alex [Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Stalder, Brian [Inst. Astron., Honolulu; Stark, Antony A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Strazzullo, Veronica [Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Stubbs, Christopher W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Zenteno, Alfredo [Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.

    2016-12-08

    The velocity distribution of galaxies in clusters is not universal; rather, galaxies are segregated according to their spectral type and relative luminosity. We examine the velocity distributions of different populations of galaxies within 89 Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) selected galaxy clusters spanning $ 0.28 < z < 1.08$. Our sample is primarily draw from the SPT-GMOS spectroscopic survey, supplemented by additional published spectroscopy, resulting in a final spectroscopic sample of 4148 galaxy spectra---2868 cluster members. The velocity dispersion of star-forming cluster galaxies is $17\\pm4$% greater than that of passive cluster galaxies, and the velocity dispersion of bright ($m < m^{*}-0.5$) cluster galaxies is $11\\pm4$% lower than the velocity dispersion of our total member population. We find good agreement with simulations regarding the shape of the relationship between the measured velocity dispersion and the fraction of passive vs. star-forming galaxies used to measure it, but we find a small offset between this relationship as measured in data and simulations in which suggests that our dispersions are systematically low by as much as 3\\% relative to simulations. We argue that this offset could be interpreted as a measurement of the effective velocity bias that describes the ratio of our observed velocity dispersions and the intrinsic velocity dispersion of dark matter particles in a published simulation result. Measuring velocity bias in this way suggests that large spectroscopic surveys can improve dispersion-based mass-observable scaling relations for cosmology even in the face of velocity biases, by quantifying and ultimately calibrating them out.

  16. Velocity Controller for a Class of Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Przemyslaw

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of velocity tracking control for various fully-actuated robotic vehicles. The presented method, which is based on transformation of equations of motion allows one to use, in the control gain matrix, the dynamical couplings existing in the system. Consequently, the dynamics of the vehicle is incorporated into the control process what leads to fast velocity error convergence. The stability of the system under the controller is derived based on Lyapunov argument. Moreover, the robustness of the proposed controller is shown too. The general approach is valid for 6 DOF models as well as other reduced models of vehicles. Simulation results on a 6 DOF indoor airship validate the described velocity tracking methodology.

  17. JET VELOCITY OF LINEAR SHAPED CHARGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vječislav Bohanek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shaped explosive charges with one dimension significantly larger than the other are called linear shaped charges. Linear shaped charges are used in various industries and are applied within specific technologies for metal cutting, such as demolition of steel structures, separating spent rocket fuel tanks, demining, cutting holes in the barriers for fire service, etc. According to existing theories and models efficiency of linear shaped charges depends on the kinetic energy of the jet which is proportional to square of jet velocity. The original method for measuring velocity of linear shaped charge jet is applied in the aforementioned research. Measurements were carried out for two different linear materials, and the results are graphically presented, analysed and compared. Measurement results show a discrepancy in the measured velocity of the jet for different materials with the same ratio between linear and explosive mass (M/C per unit of surface, which is not described by presented models (the paper is published in Croatian.

  18. Magnetized galactic halos and velocity lags

    CERN Document Server

    Henriksen, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytic model of a magnetized galactic halo surrounding a Mestel gravitating disc. The magnetic field is taken to be in energy equipartition with the pressure dominant rotating halo gas ({\\it not} with the cosmic rays), and the whole system is in a steady state. A more flexible `anisotropic equipartition' model is also explored. A definite pressure law is required to maintain the equilibrium, but the halo density is constant. The velocity/magnetic system is scale-free. The objective is to find the rotational velocity lag in such a halo. The magnetic field is not force-free so that angular momentum may be transported from the halo to the intergalactic medium. We find that the `X'-shaped structure observed for halo magnetic fields can be obtained together with a simple analytic formula for the rate of decline of the velocity with height $z$. The formula also predicts the change in lag with radius, $r$.

  19. Critical Landau velocity in helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Nils B; Smolarek, Szymon; Loginov, Evgeniy; Mateo, David; Hernando, Alberto; Pi, Marti; Barranco, Manuel; Buma, Wybren J; Drabbels, Marcel

    2013-10-11

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitations of the helium atoms in the liquid. In the present work we determine to what extent this concept can still be applied to nanometer-scale, finite size helium systems. To this end, atoms and molecules embedded in helium nanodroplets of various sizes are accelerated out of the droplets by means of optical excitation, and the speed distributions of the ejected particles are determined. The measurements reveal the existence of a critical velocity in these systems, even for nanodroplets consisting of only a thousand helium atoms. Accompanying theoretical simulations based on a time-dependent density functional description of the helium confirm and further elucidate this experimental finding.

  20. Constraining cosmology with pairwise velocity estimator

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a full statistical method for the pairwise velocity estimator previously proposed, and apply Cosmicflows-2 catalogue to this method to constrain cosmology. We first calculate the covariance matrix for line-of-sight velocities for a given catalogue, and then simulate the mock full-sky surveys from it, and then calculate the variance for the pairwise velocity field. By applying the $8315$ independent galaxy samples and compressed $5224$ group samples from Cosmicflows-2 catalogue to this statistical method, we find that the joint constraint on $\\Omega^{0.6}_{\\rm m}h$ and $\\sigma_{8}$ is completely consistent with the WMAP 9-year and Planck 2015 best-fitting cosmology. Currently, there is no evidence for the modified gravity models or any dynamic dark energy models from this practice, and the error-bars need to be reduced in order to provide any concrete evidence against/to support $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology.

  1. Cosmology with Peculiar Velocities: Observational Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Per; Howlett, Cullan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how observational effects could possibly bias cosmological inferences from peculiar velocity measurements. Specifically, we look at how bulk flow measurements are compared with theoretical predictions. Usually bulk flow calculations try to approximate the flow that would occur in a sphere around the observer. Using the Horizon Run 2 simulation we show that the traditional methods for bulk flow estimation can overestimate the magnitude of the bulk flow for two reasons: when the survey geometry is not spherical (the data do not cover the whole sky), and when the observations undersample the velocity distributions. Our results may explain why several bulk flow measurements found bulk flow velocities that seem larger than those expected in standard {\\Lambda}CDM cosmologies. We recommend a different approach when comparing bulk flows to cosmological models, in which the theoretical prediction for each bulk flow measurement is calculated specifically for the geometry and sampling rate o...

  2. Decorrelation-based blood flow velocity estimation: effect of spread of flow velocity, linear flow velocity gradients, and parabolic flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupotti, F.A.; Steen, A.F.W. van der; Mastik, F.; Korte, C.L. de

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, a new method to measure transverse blood flow, based on the decorrelation of the radio frequency (RF) signals has been developed. In this paper, we investigated the influence of nonuniform flow on the velocity estimation. The decorrelation characteristics of transverse blood flow us

  3. Velocity, acceleration and gravity in Einstein's relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, Marek A

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's relativity theory demands that all meaningful physical objects should be defined covariantly, i.e. in a coordinate independent way. Concepts of relative velocity, acceleration, gravity acceleration and gravity potential are fundamental in Newton's theory and they are imprinted in everyone's physical intuition. Unfortunately, relativistic definitions of them are not commonly known or appreciated. Every now and then some confused authors use wrong, non-covariant, definitions of velocity, acceleration and gravity, based on their vague Newtonian intuitions and hidden in a superficial, often purely semantic, relativistic disguise. A recent example of such a confusion (Gorkavyi & Vasilkov, 2016) is discussed at the end of this Note.

  4. Pulse Wave Velocity in the Carotid Artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jensen, Julie Brinck; Udesen, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the carotid artery (CA) has been estimated based on ultrasound data collected by the experimental scanner RASMUS at DTU. Data is collected from one test subject using a frame rate (FR) of 4000 Hz. The influence of FRs is also investigated. The PWV is calculated from...... distension wave forms (DWF) estimated using cross-correlation. The obtained velocities give results in the area between 3-4 m/s, and the deviations between estimated PWV from two beats of a pulse are around 10%. The results indicate that the method presented is applicable for detecting the local PWV...

  5. Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Basin Velocity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 4- 12 Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Basin Velocity Analysis Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry...library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CHL TR-14-12 October 2014 Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Basin Velocity Analysis...system of levees, gates, and drainage structures in the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC) basin and the greater New Orleans, Louisiana, area. Two

  6. Analyses of hydraulic performance of velocity caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Degn Eskesen, Mark Chr.; Buhrkall, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic performance of a velocity cap has been investigated. Velocity caps are often used in connection with offshore intakes. CFD (computational fluid dynamics) examined the flow through the cap openings and further down into the intake pipes. This was combined with dimension analyses...... in order to analyse the effect of different layouts on the flow characteristics. In particular, flow configurations going all the way through the structure were revealed. A couple of suggestions to minimize the risk for flow through have been tested....

  7. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Plavchan, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 micron near-infrared radial velocity surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility, combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m/s on our survey targets.

  8. Hubble expansion is not a velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we clarify the difference between the Hubble expansion and the Doppler shift pedagogically and illustrate both physically and mathematically why the Hubble expansion cannot be regarded as a velocity. Therefore, we suggest to replace the misleading word ‘recession velocity’ to be ‘Hubble recession’ to describe the cosmic expansion. We further derive how the peculiar velocity of a galaxy is related to its observed redshift and proper distance, which has practical use in the galaxy redshift and distance surveys.

  9. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchitta, B K; Ferguson, H M

    1986-11-28

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  10. STUDY ON STARTING VELOCITY OF COHESIVE SEDIMENTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, with the starting velocity experiments of natural cohesive sedimentation, the author proposes an assumption concerning the starting mechanism of cohesive sedimentation and gives a formula to determine the starting velocity of compact clay. It is pointed out that the fluctuating function of flow is a main factor for the starting of sedimentation. And the component and the structure of cohesive sedimentation are also the affecting factors for the starting. Consequently, the study shows that modern results of soil mechanics, clay mineralogy and fluid mechanics are helpful in the investigation of this kind of engineering problem.

  11. A first comparison of irregularity and ion drift velocity measurements in the E-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Makarevich

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available E-region irregularity velocity measurements at large flow angles with the STARE Finland coherent VHF radar are considered in context of the ion and electron velocity data provided by the EISCAT tristatic radar system, CUTLASS Finland coherent HF radar, and IMAGE fluxgate magnetometers. The data have been collected during a special experiment on 27 March 2004 during which EISCAT was scanning between several E- and one F-region altitudes along the magnetic field line. Within the E-region, the EISCAT measurements at two altitudes of 110 and 115 km are considered while the electron velocity is inferred from the EISCAT ion velocity measurements at 278 km. The line-of-sight (l-o-s VHF velocity measured by STARE VHF los is compared to the ion and electron velocity components (Vi0 comp and Ve0 comp along the STARE l-o-s direction. The comparison with Ve0 comp for the entire event shows that the measurements exhibit large scatter and small positive correlation. The correlation with Ve0 comp was substantial in the first half of the interval under study when Ve0 comp was larger in magnitude. The comparison with Vi0 comp at 110 and 115 km shows a considerable positive correlation, with VHF velocity being typically larger (smaller in magnitude than Vi0 comp at 110 km (115 km so that VVHF los appears to be bounded by the ion velocity components at two altitudes. It is also demonstrated that the difference between VVHF los and Vi0 comp at 110 km can be treated, in the first approximation, as a linear function of the effective backscatter height heff also counted from 110 km; heff varies in the range 108–114 km due to the altitude integration effects in the scattering cross-section. Our results are consistent with the notion that VHF

  12. Optical Refraction in Silver: Counterposition, Negative Phase Velocity and Orthogonal Phase Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Qaisar A.; Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2011-01-01

    Complex behaviour associated with metamaterials can arise even in commonplace isotropic dielectric materials. We demonstrate how silver, for example, can support negative phase velocity and counterposition, but not negative refraction, at optical frequencies. The transition from positive to negative phase velocity is not accompanied by remarkable…

  13. Counterposed phase velocity and energy-transport velocity vectors in a dielectric-magnetic uniaxial medium

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhtakia, A.; McCall, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    When a plane wave is launched from a plane surface in a linear, homogenous, dielectric-magnetic, uniaxial medium, we show that its phase velocity and the energy-transport velocity vectors can be counterposed (i.e., lie on different sides of the surface normal) under certain circumstances.

  14. Optical Refraction in Silver: Counterposition, Negative Phase Velocity and Orthogonal Phase Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Qaisar A.; Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2011-01-01

    Complex behaviour associated with metamaterials can arise even in commonplace isotropic dielectric materials. We demonstrate how silver, for example, can support negative phase velocity and counterposition, but not negative refraction, at optical frequencies. The transition from positive to negative phase velocity is not accompanied by remarkable…

  15. Velocity Segregation and Systematic Biases In Velocity Dispersion Estimates with the SPT-GMOS Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Matthew. B.; Zengo, Kyle; Ruel, Jonathan; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Bulbul, Esra; Brodwin, Mark; Capasso, Raffaella; Chiu, I.-non; McDonald, Michael; Rapetti, David; Saro, Alex; Stalder, Brian; Stark, Antony A.; Strazzullo, Veronica; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2017-03-01

    The velocity distribution of galaxies in clusters is not universal; rather, galaxies are segregated according to their spectral type and relative luminosity. We examine the velocity distributions of different populations of galaxies within 89 Sunyaev Zel’dovich (SZ) selected galaxy clusters spanning 0.28population. We find good agreement with simulations regarding the shape of the relationship between the measured velocity dispersion and the fraction of passive versus star-forming galaxies used to measure it, but we find a small offset between this relationship as measured in data and simulations, which suggests that our dispersions are systematically low by as much as 3% relative to simulations. We argue that this offset could be interpreted as a measurement of the effective velocity bias that describes the ratio of our observed velocity dispersions and the intrinsic velocity dispersion of dark matter particles in a published simulation result. Measuring velocity bias in this way suggests that large spectroscopic surveys can improve dispersion-based mass-observable scaling relations for cosmology even in the face of velocity biases, by quantifying and ultimately calibrating them out.

  16. Fast Electronics in High-Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigand, Clyde

    1958-08-08

    A brief review of fast electronics is given, leading up to the present state of the art. Cherenkov counters in high-energy physics are discussed, including an example of a velocity-selecting Cherenkov counter. An electronic device to aid in aligning external beams from high-energy accelerators is described. A scintillation-counter matrix to identify bubble chamber tracks is discussed. Some remarks on the future development of electronics in high-energy physics experiments are included.

  17. In vivo lateral blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiantian; Hozan, Mohsen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we proposed blood measurement using speckle size estimation, which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame based on the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if blood flow is in the same direction as the electronically controlled transducer line selection in a 2-D image. In this observational study, the clinical viability of ultrasound blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation was investigated and compared with that of conventional spectral Doppler of carotid artery blood flow data collected from human patients in vivo. Ten patients (six male, four female) were recruited. Right carotid artery blood flow data were collected in an interleaved fashion (alternating Doppler and B-mode A-lines) with an Antares Ultrasound Imaging System and transferred to a PC via the Axius Ultrasound Research Interface. The scanning velocity was 77 cm/s, and a 4-s interval of flow data were collected from each subject to cover three to five complete cardiac cycles. Conventional spectral Doppler data were collected simultaneously to compare with estimates made by speckle size estimation. The results indicate that the peak systolic velocities measured with the two methods are comparable (within ±10%) if the scan velocity is greater than or equal to the flow velocity. When scan velocity is slower than peak systolic velocity, the speckle stretch method asymptotes to the scan velocity. Thus, the speckle stretch method is able to accurately measure pure lateral flow, which conventional Doppler cannot do. In addition, an initial comparison of the speckle size estimation and color Doppler methods with respect to computational complexity and data acquisition time indicated potential time savings in blood flow velocity estimation using speckle size estimation. Further studies are needed for calculation of the speckle stretch method

  18. Renormalization of the graphene dispersion velocity determined from scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jungseok; Jung, Suyong; Young, Andrea F; Dean, Cory R; Wang, Lei; Gao, Yuanda; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hone, James; Shepard, Kenneth L; Kim, Phillip; Zhitenev, Nikolai B; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2012-09-14

    In graphene, as in most metals, electron-electron interactions renormalize the properties of electrons but leave them behaving like noninteracting quasiparticles. Many measurements probe the renormalized properties of electrons right at the Fermi energy. Uniquely for graphene, the accessibility of the electrons at the surface offers the opportunity to use scanned probe techniques to examine the effect of interactions at energies away from the Fermi energy, over a broad range of densities, and on a local scale. Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we show that electron interactions leave the graphene energy dispersion linear as a function of excitation energy for energies within ±200  meV of the Fermi energy. However, the measured dispersion velocity depends on density and increases strongly as the density approaches zero near the charge neutrality point, revealing a squeezing of the Dirac cone due to interactions.

  19. Prediction of the Shear Wave Velocity from Compressional Wave Velocity for Gachsaran Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvizi Saeed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Shear and compressional wave velocities, coupled with other petrophysical data, are very important for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. In situ shear wave velocity (Vs is measured by some sonic logging tools. Shear velocity coupled with compressional velocity is vitally important in determining geomechanical parameters, identifying the lithology, mud weight design, hydraulic fracturing, geophysical studies such as VSP, etc. In this paper, a correlation between compressional and shear wave velocity is obtained for Gachsaran formation in Maroon oil field. Real data were used to examine the accuracy of the prediction equation. Moreover, the genetic algorithm was used to obtain the optimal value for constants of the suggested equation. Furthermore, artificial neural network was used to inspect the reliability of this method. These investigations verify the notion that the suggested equation could be considered as an efficient, fast, and cost-effective method for predicting Vs from Vp.

  20. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)