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Sample records for non-lymphoma viral sub-populations

  1. Kinematic sub-populations in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ural, Ugur; Koch, Andreas; Gilmore, Gerard; Beers, Timothy C; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N Wyn; Grebel, Eva K; Vidrih, Simon; Zucker, Daniel B

    2008-01-01

    We present new spectroscopic data for twenty six stars in the recently-discovered Canes Venatici I (CVnI) dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We use these data to investigate the recent claim of the presence of two dynamically inconsistent stellar populations in this system (Ibata et al., 2006). We do not find evidence for kinematically distinct populations in our sample and we are able to obtain a mass estimate for CVnI that is consistent with all available data, including previously published data. We discuss possible differences between our sample and the earlier data set and study the general detectability of sub-populations in small kinematic samples. We conclude that in the absence of supporting observational evidence (for example, metallicity gradients), sub-populations in small kinematic samples (typically fewer than 100 stars) should be treated with extreme caution, as their detection depends on multiple parameters and rarely produces a signal at the 3sigma confidence level. It is therefore essential to determi...

  2. Identification of a sub-population of B cells that proliferates after infection with epstein-barr virus

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    Ye Jianjiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-driven B cell proliferation is critical to its subsequent persistence in the host and is a key event in the development of EBV-associated B cell diseases. Thus, inquiry into early cellular events that precede EBV-driven proliferation of B cells is essential for understanding the processes that can lead to EBV-associated B cell diseases. Methods Infection with high titers of EBV of mixed, primary B cells in different stages of differentiation occurs during primary EBV infection and in the setting of T cell-immunocompromise that predisposes to development of EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases. Using an ex vivo system that recapitulates these conditions of infection, we correlated expression of selected B cell-surface markers and intracellular cytokines with expression of EBV latency genes and cell proliferation. Results We identified CD23, CD58, and IL6, as molecules expressed at early times after EBV-infection. EBV differentially infected B cells into two distinct sub-populations of latently infected CD23+ cells: one fraction, marked as CD23hiCD58+IL6- by day 3, subsequently proliferated; another fraction, marked as CD23loCD58+, expressed IL6, a B cell growth factor, but failed to proliferate. High levels of LMP1, a critical viral oncoprotein, were expressed in individual CD23hiCD58+ and CD23loCD58+ cells, demonstrating that reduced levels of LMP1 did not explain the lack of proliferation of CD23loCD58+ cells. Differentiation stage of B cells did not appear to govern this dichotomy in outcome either. Memory or naïve B cells did not exclusively give rise to either CD23hi or IL6-expressing cells; rather memory B cells gave rise to both sub-populations of cells. Conclusions B cells are differentially susceptible to EBV-mediated proliferation despite expression of viral gene products known to be critical for continuous B cell growth. Cellular events, in addition to viral gene expression, likely play a

  3. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Král, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Bachelor's Thesis deals with effective promotional tools called viral marketing. The main contribution of the thesis is the definition and history of viral marketing, making analysis of process of viral marketing, progresses definition and rules for creating a viral campaign. And also aspects are necessary for a successful viral spread. There are analysis of the characteristics of social media which are dividing according to the orientation and marketing tactics. Thesis is especially about so...

  4. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    BLÁHOVÁ, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my thesis is to provide a comprehensive overview of the viral marketing and to analyze selected viral campaigns. There is a description of advantages and disadvantages of this marketing tool. In the end I suggest for which companies viral marketing is an appropriate form of the promotion.

  5. Identification of geographically distributed sub-populations of Leishmania (Leishmania major by microsatellite analysis

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    Schwenkenbecher Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania (Leishmania major, one of the agents causing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL in humans, is widely distributed in the Old World where different species of wild rodent and phlebotomine sand fly serve as animal reservoir hosts and vectors, respectively. Despite this, strains of L. (L. major isolated from many different sources over many years have proved to be relatively uniform. To investigate the population structure of the species highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were employed for greater discrimination among it's otherwise closely related strains, an approach applied successfully to other species of Leishmania. Results Multilocus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT based on 10 different microsatellite markers was applied to 106 strains of L. (L. major from different regions where it is endemic. On applying a Bayesian model-based approach, three main populations were identified, corresponding to three separate geographical regions: Central Asia (CA; the Middle East (ME; and Africa (AF. This was congruent with phylogenetic reconstructions based on genetic distances. Re-analysis separated each of the populations into two sub-populations. The two African sub-populations did not correlate well with strains' geographical origin. Strains falling into the sub-populations CA and ME did mostly group according to their place of isolation although some anomalies were seen, probably, owing to human migration. Conclusion The model- and distance-based analyses of the microsatellite data exposed three main populations of L. (L. major, Central Asia, the Middle East and Africa, each of which separated into two sub-populations. This probably correlates with the different species of rodent host.

  6. Divergence Effect at Alaska's Treelines a Result of Sub-Population Behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmking, M.; Singh, J.

    2007-12-01

    The "divergence effect" (off-set between tree-ring based temperature reconstruction and measured temperatures) in northern forest poses a serious question to tree-ring based climate reconstructions, since it seems to violate the uniformitarian principle of dendroclimatology. Several possible reasons emerge, among them false assumptions about 1) climate data (e.g. which climate parameter can be modeled most effectively), 2) tree-ring data (e.g. shift in climate sensitivity of tree growth) or 3) a truly new and unprecedented phenomenon (e.g. rapid climate warming exceeding the adaptive capacity of trees). Here we test, if undetected emergent sub-population behavior at Alaska's treelines might result in a divergence effect. We reanalyzed seven data sets spanning the entire northern treeline in the Brooks Range, Alaska, which showed populations of trees responding positively, non-significant and negatively to recent warming. There is no effect of standardization (i.e. conventional versus RCS) technique on the grouping and we thus used RCS for the following analysis. Without grouping into sub- populations, a clear divergence between tree-ring based temperature reconstruction and actual climate data emerged. However, if only those trees were used for the climate reconstruction, which showed a consistent positive response to the target temperatures (June/July), tree growth modeled climate data extremely well following the rise in temperature during the last decades (actual climate data 0.53°/decade versus tree-ring based reconstruction 0.44°/decade over 1970-2000 period). This result hints at the possibility that some of the reported divergence might be eliminated (at least at Alaska's treelines) through careful test of sub-population behavior.

  7. Differential Impact of Tobacco Control Policies on Youth Sub-Populations

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    John A. Tauras

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: While previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of tobacco control interventions in reducing tobacco use among youth overall, there have been very few studies that examine the potential differential impact of tobacco control policies on various youth subgroups, defined by socio-economic status (SES, race/ethnicity, and gender. Objective: We examined the relationship between state-level cigarette prices and smoke-free air laws and youth smoking prevalence and intensity for various youth sub-populations in the United States. Methods: We estimated a 2-part model of cigarette demand using data from the 1991 through 2010 nationally representative surveys of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students as part of the Monitoring the Future project. Findings: We found that real cigarette prices are strong determinants of youth smoking. Blacks, females, Hispanics, and low-SES subpopulations are found to have a larger price response with respect to smoking prevalence than the full sample. Smoke-free air laws are found to have a negative effect on smoking prevalence for the full sample and for the male, white, and high-SES sub-populations. Conclusions: This research concludes that higher cigarette prices will reduce smoking prevalence rates of Blacks, Hispanics, females, and low-SES subpopulations faster than the overall youth population and other youth sub-populations. Moreover, this research concludes that smoke-free air laws will reduce smoking prevalence for the overall youth population with the largest reductions in high SES and male subpopulations.

  8. Viral information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Forest; Barott, Katie

    2013-03-01

    Viruses are major drivers of global biogeochemistry and the etiological agents of many diseases. They are also the winners in the game of life: there are more viruses on the planet than cellular organisms and they encode most of the genetic diversity on the planet. In fact, it is reasonable to view life as a viral incubator. Nevertheless, most ecological and evolutionary theories were developed, and continue to be developed, without considering the virosphere. This means these theories need to be to reinterpreted in light of viral knowledge or we need to develop new theory from the viral point-of-view. Here we briefly introduce our viral planet and then address a major outstanding question in biology: why is most of life viral? A key insight is that during an infection cycle the original virus is completely broken down and only the associated information is passed on to the next generation. This is different for cellular organisms, which must pass on some physical part of themselves from generation to generation. Based on this premise, it is proposed that the thermodynamic consequences of physical information (e.g., Landauer's principle) are observed in natural viral populations. This link between physical and genetic information is then used to develop the Viral Information Hypothesis, which states that genetic information replicates itself to the detriment of system energy efficiency (i.e., is viral in nature). Finally, we show how viral information can be tested, and illustrate how this novel view can explain existing ecological and evolutionary theories from more fundamental principles.

  9. VIRAL MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    OLENTSOVA Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This project seeks to investigate how the company Gitz can create awareness towards their brand by using viral marketing. To do this we analyze which elements of viral marketing the company can use, to reach their goal. In order to utilize the selected tools of viral marketing best possible, we need to figure out the company’s customer segment and figure out how to reach that segment. This has been done with the use of Henrik Dahl’s Minerva-model that divides the population into f...

  10. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  11. GROWTH OF STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS IN BIOFILMS ALTERS PEPTIDE SIGNALING AT THE SUB-POPULATION LEVEL

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    Robert Colquhoun Shields

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (pppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations.

  12. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  13. Viral quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Raul; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-05-01

    New generation sequencing is greatly expanding the capacity to examine the composition of mutant spectra of viral quasispecies in infected cells and host organisms. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of quasispecies dynamics, notably the occurrence of intra-mutant spectrum interactions, and implications of fitness landscapes for virus adaptation and de-adaptation. Complementation or interference can be established among components of the same mutant spectrum, dependent on the mutational status of the ensemble. Replicative fitness relates to an optimal mutant spectrum that provides the molecular basis for phenotypic flexibility, with implications for antiviral therapy. The biological impact of viral fitness renders particularly relevant the capacity of new generation sequencing to establish viral fitness landscapes. Progress with experimental model systems is becoming an important asset to understand virus behavior in the more complex environments faced during natural infections.

  14. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromard, Cécile; Barreau, Corinne; André, Mireille; Berger-Müller, Sandra; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Benard, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG) constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the SVF. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events.

  15. The vertical motions of mono-abundance sub-populations in the Milky Way disk

    CERN Document Server

    Bovy, Jo; Hogg, David W; Beers, Timothy C; Lee, Young Sun; Zhang, Lan

    2012-01-01

    We present the vertical kinematics of stars in the Milky Way's stellar disk inferred from SDSS/SEGUE G-dwarf data, deriving the vertical velocity dispersion, \\sigma_z, as a function of vertical height |z| and Galactocentric radius R for a set of 'mono-abundance' sub-populations of stars with very similar elemental abundances [\\alpha/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We find that all components exhibit nearly isothermal kinematics in |z|, and a slow outward decrease of the vertical velocity dispersion: $\\sigma_z (z,R\\,|[\\alpha/Fe],[Fe/H]) ~ \\sigma_z ([\\alpha/Fe],[Fe/H]) x \\exp (-(R-R_0)/7 kpc})$. The characteristic velocity dispersions of these components vary from ~ 15 km/s for chemically young, metal-rich stars, to >~ 50 km/s for metal poor stars. The mean \\sigma_z gradient away from the mid plane is only 0.3 +/- 0.2 km/s/kpc. We find a continuum of vertical kinetic temperatures (~\\sigma^2_z) as function of ([\\alpha/Fe],[Fe/H]), which contribute to the stellar surface mass density as \\Sigma_{R_0}(\\sigma^2_z) ~ \\exp(-\\sigma^2_...

  16. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations

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    Cécile eDromard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the stromal vascular fraction. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events.

  17. Viral epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milavetz, Barry I; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2015-01-01

    DNA tumor viruses including members of the polyomavirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, and herpes virus families are presently the subject of intense interest with respect to the role that epigenetics plays in control of the virus life cycle and the transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell. To date, these studies have primarily focused on the role of histone modification, nucleosome location, and DNA methylation in regulating the biological consequences of infection. Using a wide variety of strategies and techniques ranging from simple ChIP to ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq to identify histone modifications, nuclease digestion to genome wide next generation sequencing to identify nucleosome location, and bisulfite treatment to MeDIP to identify DNA methylation sites, the epigenetic regulation of these viruses is slowly becoming better understood. While the viruses may differ in significant ways from each other and cellular chromatin, the role of epigenetics appears to be relatively similar. Within the viral genome nucleosomes are organized for the expression of appropriate genes with relevant histone modifications particularly histone acetylation. DNA methylation occurs as part of the typical gene silencing during latent infection by herpesviruses. In the simple tumor viruses like the polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and papillomaviruses, transformation of the cell occurs via integration of the virus genome such that the virus's normal regulation is disrupted. This results in the unregulated expression of critical viral genes capable of redirecting cellular gene expression. The redirected cellular expression is a consequence of either indirect epigenetic regulation where cellular signaling or transcriptional dysregulation occurs or direct epigenetic regulation where epigenetic cofactors such as histone deacetylases are targeted. In the more complex herpersviruses transformation is a consequence of the expression of the viral latency proteins and RNAs which again can

  18. Viral infections in asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Koichiro; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Airway viral infections are associated with the pathogenesis of asthma and COPD. It has been argued that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infancy is a probable causal factor in the development of pediatric asthma. RSV infections tend to induce Th2-biased immune responses in the host airways. RSV infection, atopy, and low pulmonary function in neonates may work synergistically toward the development of pediatric asthma. Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a representative virus associated with the exacerbation of asthma in both children and adults. Viral infections trigger innate immune responses including granulocytic inflammation and worsen the underlying inflammation due to asthma and COPD. The innate immune responses involve type-I and -III interferon (IFN) production, which plays an important role in anti-viral responses, and the airway epithelia of asthmatics reportedly exhibit defects in the virus-induced IFN responses, which renders these individuals more susceptible to viral infection. A similarly impaired IFN response is seen in COPD, and several investigators propose that latent adenoviral infection may be involved in COPD development. Persistent RSV infections were detected in a sub-population of patients with COPD and were associated with the accelerated decline of lung function. The virus-induced upregulation of co-inhibitory molecules in the airway epithelium partly accounts for the persistent infections. Experimental animal models for virus-asthma/COPD interactions have shed light on the underlying immune mechanisms and are expected to help develop novel approaches to treat respiratory diseases.

  19. Development of a culture sub-population induction model: signaling pathways synergy and taxanes production by Taxus canadensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Ryan S; Phisalaphong, Muenduen; Karim, M Nazmul; Linden, James C

    2006-01-01

    Cell cultures of Taxus canadensis were subjected to exogenously applied ethylene (ET) hormone and methyl jasmonate (MJ) elicitation in factorial design experiments. Levels of extracellular taxanes, including paclitaxel, were used with principal component analysis for fault detection and real-coded genetic algorithms for parameter optimization to construct a culture sub-population induction model. Culture sub-populations were identified by the model as (1) uninduced, (2) induced to unilateral function of the ET-signaling pathway, and (3) induced to cooperation between jasmonic acid (JA)- and ET-signaling pathways. Comprehensive model results suggested greater rates of cellular induction (resulting in exogenous taxane production) by ET gas as opposed to MJ elicitation. However, cellular induction of ET-signaling pathway genes increased the rate of induction of JA-signaling pathway genes by orders of magnitude. In addition, model results showed that induction of genes leading to extracellular production of the simple taxane 10-deacetylbaccatin III was regulated by the unilateral ET-signaling pathway. However, it was suggested that further processing of this simple taxane to complex taxane structures, such as paclitaxel, required further gene induction by the JA-signaling pathway. Thus, production rate constants of exogenous complex taxanes were predicted to be an order of magnitude lower than that for the simple taxane 10-deacetylbaccatin III. The fraction of the cell culture sub-population displaying unilateral ET-signaling pathway gene induction was found inversely proportional to levels of MJ elicitation. When coupled with simple non-growth product models, levels of all extracellular taxanes were effectively predicted using the culture sub-population induction model.

  20. Flow cytometry studies on the Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemocytes sub-populations and immune responses to novel pathogen spiroplasma MR-1008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jie; Zhu, Huanxi; Ren, Qian; Liu, Peng; Chen, Jing; Xiu, Yunji; Yao, Wei; Meng, Qingguo; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen

    2012-10-01

    Flow cytometry provides rapid and reproducible methods for analyzing crustacean cellular immune responses to pathogens. We used this method to investigate the hemocytes sub-populations of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and their immune responses to a novel pathogen spiroplasma MR-1008. M. rosenbergii inoculated with 100 μl spiroplasma strain MR-1008 in logarithmic phase (10(8) spiroplasmas ml(-1)) were examined for total hemocytes count (THC) and changes in differential involvement of hemocytes sub-populations during 1-28 d after inoculation. The results showed that THC was dramatically lowered 1 d after inoculation, and it obviously increased at the 5 d after inoculation; thereafter, a high level of THC was maintained to 15 d. Three morphologically distinct hemocytes sub-populations including granular cells (GC), semigranular cells (SGC) and hyaline cells (HC) could be identified by flow cytometry, and the proportions of the 3 kinds of cell categories varied obviously during the infection of spiroplasma suggesting differential involvement according to the pathogen. The flow cytometry used in this study confirmed that the semigranular cells were the main hemocytes involved in the cellular defense against spiroplasma in the M. rosenbergii.

  1. Does the sex difference in competitiveness decrease in selective sub-populations? A test with intercollegiate distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaner, Robert O; Lowen, Aaron; Rogers, William; Saksa, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in some preferences and motivations are well established, but it is unclear whether they persist in selective sub-populations, such as expert financial decision makers, top scientists, or elite athletes. We addressed this issue by studying competitiveness in 1,147 varsity intercollegiate distance runners. As expected, across all runners, men reported greater competitiveness with two previously validated instruments, greater competitiveness on a new elite competitiveness scale, and greater training volume, a known correlate of competitiveness. Among faster runners, the sex difference decreased for one measure of competitiveness but did not decrease for the two other competitiveness measures or either measure of training volume. Across NCAA athletic divisions (DI, DII, DIII), the sex difference did not decrease for any competitiveness or training measure. Further analyses showed that these sex differences could not be attributed to women suffering more injuries or facing greater childcare responsibilities. However, women did report greater commitment than men to their academic studies, suggesting a sex difference in priorities. Therefore, policies aiming to provide men and women with equal opportunities to flourish should acknowledge that sex differences in some kinds of preferences and motivation may persist even in selective sub-populations.

  2. Does the sex difference in competitiveness decrease in selective sub-populations? A test with intercollegiate distance runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowen, Aaron; Rogers, William; Saksa, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in some preferences and motivations are well established, but it is unclear whether they persist in selective sub-populations, such as expert financial decision makers, top scientists, or elite athletes. We addressed this issue by studying competitiveness in 1,147 varsity intercollegiate distance runners. As expected, across all runners, men reported greater competitiveness with two previously validated instruments, greater competitiveness on a new elite competitiveness scale, and greater training volume, a known correlate of competitiveness. Among faster runners, the sex difference decreased for one measure of competitiveness but did not decrease for the two other competitiveness measures or either measure of training volume. Across NCAA athletic divisions (DI, DII, DIII), the sex difference did not decrease for any competitiveness or training measure. Further analyses showed that these sex differences could not be attributed to women suffering more injuries or facing greater childcare responsibilities. However, women did report greater commitment than men to their academic studies, suggesting a sex difference in priorities. Therefore, policies aiming to provide men and women with equal opportunities to flourish should acknowledge that sex differences in some kinds of preferences and motivation may persist even in selective sub-populations. PMID:25922790

  3. Does the sex difference in competitiveness decrease in selective sub-populations? A test with intercollegiate distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert O. Deaner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences in some preferences and motivations are well established, but it is unclear whether they persist in selective sub-populations, such as expert financial decision makers, top scientists, or elite athletes. We addressed this issue by studying competitiveness in 1,147 varsity intercollegiate distance runners. As expected, across all runners, men reported greater competitiveness with two previously validated instruments, greater competitiveness on a new elite competitiveness scale, and greater training volume, a known correlate of competitiveness. Among faster runners, the sex difference decreased for one measure of competitiveness but did not decrease for the two other competitiveness measures or either measure of training volume. Across NCAA athletic divisions (DI, DII, DIII, the sex difference did not decrease for any competitiveness or training measure. Further analyses showed that these sex differences could not be attributed to women suffering more injuries or facing greater childcare responsibilities. However, women did report greater commitment than men to their academic studies, suggesting a sex difference in priorities. Therefore, policies aiming to provide men and women with equal opportunities to flourish should acknowledge that sex differences in some kinds of preferences and motivation may persist even in selective sub-populations.

  4. Resolution of Two Sub-Populations of Conformers and Their Individual Dynamics by Time Resolved Ensemble Level FRET Measurements.

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    Gil Rahamim

    Full Text Available Most active biopolymers are dynamic structures; thus, ensembles of such molecules should be characterized by distributions of intra- or intermolecular distances and their fast fluctuations. A method of choice to determine intramolecular distances is based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements. Major advances in such measurements were achieved by single molecule FRET measurements. Here, we show that by global analysis of the decay of the emission of both the donor and the acceptor it is also possible to resolve two sub-populations in a mixture of two ensembles of biopolymers by time resolved FRET (trFRET measurements at the ensemble level. We show that two individual intramolecular distance distributions can be determined and characterized in terms of their individual means, full width at half maximum (FWHM, and two corresponding diffusion coefficients which reflect the rates of fast ns fluctuations within each sub-population. An important advantage of the ensemble level trFRET measurements is the ability to use low molecular weight small-sized probes and to determine nanosecond fluctuations of the distance between the probes. The limits of the possible resolution were first tested by simulation and then by preparation of mixtures of two model peptides. The first labeled polypeptide was a relatively rigid Pro7 and the second polypeptide was a flexible molecule consisting of (Gly-Ser7 repeats. The end to end distance distributions and the diffusion coefficients of each peptide were determined. Global analysis of trFRET measurements of a series of mixtures of polypeptides recovered two end-to-end distance distributions and associated intramolecular diffusion coefficients, which were very close to those determined from each of the pure samples. This study is a proof of concept study demonstrating the power of ensemble level trFRET based methods in resolution of subpopulations in ensembles of flexible macromolecules.

  5. Viral Marketing Past Present Future

    OpenAIRE

    Nessipbekova, Zarina

    2010-01-01

    The work studies the viral marketing. These are past viral campaigns, viral campaigns today, and evaluates their actuality. The work tries to predict the development of viral marketing on the basis of the research done by the author.

  6. Comparison of capillary and venous blood in the analysis of concentration and function of leucocyte sub-populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Elisa F D; Keane, J; McLellan, C P; Gray, A B

    2016-08-01

    Compare capillary and venous blood in the analysis of concentration and function of leucocyte sub-populations. This study hypothesised that capillary samples may be used in a site-specific manner as an alternative source of blood samples for assays of leucocyte concentration and neutrophilic phagocytic function and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, allowing acquisition of multiple samples to better monitor transient but significant post-exercise immune modulation. Resting blood samples were simultaneously obtained from vein, finger and earlobe of healthy subjects (n = 10, age: 25.1 ± 3.1 years). Leucocyte concentrations were measured using a five-part differential haematological analyser. Leucocyte sub-populations (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD56, CD14) and granulocytic functional-related (CD11b, CD18, CD16b, CD66b) surface antigen markers, neutrophil phagocytosis (FITC-labelled Escherichia coli) and stimulated ROS production (DHR) were quantified utilizing flow cytometry. A MANOVA (α < 0.05 significance) analysed the effects of the different sampling sites in the concentrations of leucocyte populations, their surface antigen expression and granulocytic functions. Leucocyte concentration and neutrophilic ROS production yielded non-significant differences between sampling sites. Expression of granulocytic surface antigens was increased in both capillary sites compared to venous site (p = 0.008), particularly for adhesion markers CD11b/CD18. The percentage of neutrophils performing phagocytosis was higher in venous samples compared to finger (p = 0.025). Increased number of E. coli ingested was observed in venous sample compared to finger (p = 0.001) and to earlobe (p = 0.006). Whilst attention must be paid for varying neutrophilic surface antigen expression and further studies are needed to establish appropriate reference ranges, this study supports the use of capillary blood samples in a site-specific manner to enhance sampling capabilities field

  7. The association between socio-demographic characteristics and adherence to breast and colorectal cancer screening: Analysis of large sub populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vainer Anna

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Populations having lower socioeconomic status, as well as ethnic minorities, have demonstrated lower utilization of preventive screening, including tests for early detection of breast and colorectal cancer. The objective To explore socio-demographic disparities in adherence to screening recommendations for early detection of cancer. Methods The study was conducted by Maccabi Healthcare Services, an Israeli HMO (health plan providing healthcare services to 1.9 million members. Utilization of breast cancer (BC and colorectal cancer (CC screening were analyzed by socio-economic ranks (SERs, ethnicity (Arab vs non-Arab, immigration status and ownership of voluntarily supplemental health insurance (VSHI. Results Data on 157,928 and 303,330 adults, eligible for BC and CC screening, respectively, were analyzed. Those having lower SER, Arabs, immigrants from Former Soviet Union countries and non-owners of VSHI performed fewer cancer screening examinations compared with those having higher SER, non-Arabs, veterans and owners of VSHI (p Conclusion Patients from low socio-economic backgrounds, Arabs, immigrants and those who do not own supplemental insurance do fewer tests for early detection of cancer. These sub-populations should be considered priority populations for targeted intervention programs and improved resource allocation.

  8. A SAGE-based screen for genes expressed in sub-populations of neurons in the mouse dorsal root ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garces Alain

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The different sensory modalities temperature, pain, touch and muscle proprioception are carried by somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. Study of this system is hampered by the lack of molecular markers for many of these neuronal sub-types. In order to detect genes expressed in sub-populations of somatosensory neurons, gene profiling was carried out on wild-type and TrkA mutant neonatal dorsal root ganglia (DRG using SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression methodology. Thermo-nociceptors constitute up to 80 % of the neurons in the DRG. In TrkA mutant DRGs, the nociceptor sub-class of sensory neurons is lost due to absence of nerve growth factor survival signaling through its receptor TrkA. Thus, comparison of wild-type and TrkA mutants allows the identification of transcripts preferentially expressed in the nociceptor or mechano-proprioceptor subclasses, respectively. Results Our comparison revealed 240 genes differentially expressed between the two tissues (P Conclusion We have identified and characterized the detailed expression patterns of three genes in the developing DRG, placing them in the context of the known major neuronal sub-types defined by molecular markers. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes in this tissue promises to extend our knowledge of the molecular diversity of different cell types and forms the basis for understanding their particular functional specificities.

  9. Unravelling the differential functions and regulation of striatal neuron sub-populations in motor control, reward and motivational processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina eEna

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The striatum, the major input structure of the basal ganglia, is critically involved in motor control and learning of habits and skills, and is also involved in motivational and reward processes. The dorsal striatum, caudate-putamen, is primarily implicated in motor functions whereas the ventral striatum, the nucleus accumbens, is essential for motivation and drug reinforcement. Severe basal ganglia dysfunction occurs in movement disorders as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, and in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. The striatum is essentially composed of GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs that are output neurons giving rise to the so-called direct and indirect pathways and are targets of the cerebral cortex and mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. Although the involvement of striatal sub-areas in motor control and motivation has been thoroughly characterized, major issues remained concerning the specific and respective functions of the two MSNs sub-populations, D2R-striatopallidal (dopamine D2 receptor-positive and D1R-striatonigral (dopamine D1 receptor-positive neurons, as well as their specific regulation. Here, we review recent advances that gave new insight in the understanding of the differential roles of striatopallidal and striatonigral neurons in the basal ganglia circuit. We discuss innovative techniques developed in the last decade which allowed a much precise evaluation of molecular pathways implicated in motivational processes and functional roles of striatopallidal and striatonigral neurons in motor control and in the establishment of reward-associated behaviour.

  10. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  11. [Emergent viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infecti

  12. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  13. Viral Disease Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  14. Macrophage sub-populations and the lipoxin A4 receptor implicate active inflammation during equine tendon repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Georgina Dakin

    Full Text Available Macrophages (Mφ orchestrate inflammatory and reparatory processes in injured connective tissues but their role during different phases of tendon healing is not known. We investigated the contribution of different Mφ subsets in an equine model of naturally occurring tendon injury. Post mortem tissues were harvested from normal (uninjured, sub-acute (3-6 weeks post injury and chronically injured (>3 months post injury superficial digital flexor tendons. To determine if inflammation was present in injured tendons, Mφ sub-populations were quantified based on surface antigen expression of CD172a (pan Mφ, CD14(highCD206(low (pro-inflammatory M1Mφ, and CD206(high (anti-inflammatory M2Mφ to assess potential polarised phenotypes. In addition, the Lipoxin A(4 receptor (FPR2/ALX was used as marker for resolving inflammation. Normal tendons were negative for both Mφ and FPR2/ALX. In contrast, M1Mφ predominated in sub-acute injury, whereas a potential phenotype-switch to M2Mφ polarity was seen in chronic injury. Furthermore, FPR2/ALX expression by tenocytes was significantly upregulated in sub-acute but not chronic injury. Expression of the FPR2/ALX ligand Annexin A1 was also significantly increased in sub-acute and chronic injuries in contrast to low level expression in normal tendons. The combination of reduced FPR2/ALX expression and persistence of the M2Mφ phenotype in chronic injury suggests a potential mechanism for incomplete resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. To investigate the effect of pro-inflammatory mediators on lipoxin A(4 (LXA(4 production and FPR2/ALX expression in vitro, normal tendon explants were stimulated with interleukin-1 beta and prostaglandin E(2. Stimulation with either mediator induced LXA(4 release and maximal upregulation of FPR2/ALX expression after 72 hours. Taken together, our data suggests that although tenocytes are capable of mounting a protective mechanism to counteract inflammatory stimuli, this

  15. Macrophage Sub-Populations and the Lipoxin A4 Receptor Implicate Active Inflammation during Equine Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Werling, Dirk; Hibbert, Andrew; Abayasekara, Dilkush Robert Ephrem; Young, Natalie Jayne; Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages (Mϕ) orchestrate inflammatory and reparatory processes in injured connective tissues but their role during different phases of tendon healing is not known. We investigated the contribution of different Mϕ subsets in an equine model of naturally occurring tendon injury. Post mortem tissues were harvested from normal (uninjured), sub-acute (3–6 weeks post injury) and chronically injured (>3 months post injury) superficial digital flexor tendons. To determine if inflammation was present in injured tendons, Mϕ sub-populations were quantified based on surface antigen expression of CD172a (pan Mϕ), CD14highCD206low (pro-inflammatory M1Mϕ), and CD206high (anti-inflammatory M2Mϕ) to assess potential polarised phenotypes. In addition, the Lipoxin A4 receptor (FPR2/ALX) was used as marker for resolving inflammation. Normal tendons were negative for both Mϕ and FPR2/ALX. In contrast, M1Mϕ predominated in sub-acute injury, whereas a potential phenotype-switch to M2Mϕ polarity was seen in chronic injury. Furthermore, FPR2/ALX expression by tenocytes was significantly upregulated in sub-acute but not chronic injury. Expression of the FPR2/ALX ligand Annexin A1 was also significantly increased in sub-acute and chronic injuries in contrast to low level expression in normal tendons. The combination of reduced FPR2/ALX expression and persistence of the M2Mϕ phenotype in chronic injury suggests a potential mechanism for incomplete resolution of inflammation after tendon injury. To investigate the effect of pro-inflammatory mediators on lipoxin A4 (LXA4) production and FPR2/ALX expression in vitro, normal tendon explants were stimulated with interleukin-1 beta and prostaglandin E2. Stimulation with either mediator induced LXA4 release and maximal upregulation of FPR2/ALX expression after 72 hours. Taken together, our data suggests that although tenocytes are capable of mounting a protective mechanism to counteract inflammatory stimuli, this appears to be of

  16. Viral marketing on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Štverák, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Thesis provides an overview of viral marketing. It describes the process by which you can be inspired to implement viral campaign. The thesis includes analysis of specific viral Web project. The aim of this thesis is to create a breakdown of the various components of viral marketing, to establish conditions that should be satisfied for the viral marketing to success, suggesting how to use viral marketing on social network Facebook and evaluate the various components of this service for the pr...

  17. Hepatitis viral aguda

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Rubén Hernández Garcés; René F Espinosa Álvarez

    1998-01-01

    Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de las hepatitis virales agudas sobre aspectos vinculados a su etiología. Se tuvieron en cuenta además algunos datos epidemiológicos, las formas clínicas más importantes, los exámenes complementarios con especial énfasis en los marcadores virales y el diagnóstico positivoA bibliographical review of acute viral hepatitis was made taking into account those aspects connected with its etiology. Some epidemiological markers, the most important clinical forms, ...

  18. Understanding Image Virality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Example non-viral images. Figure 1: Top: Images with high viral scores in our dataset depict internet “celebrity” memes ex. “Grumpy Cat”; Bottom: Images...of images that is most similar to ours is the concurrently introduced viral meme generator of Wang et al., that combines NLP and Computer Vision (low...doing any of our tasks. The test included questions about widely spread Reddit memes and jargon so that anyone familiar with Reddit can easily get a high

  19. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contaminated food or water, although person-to-person transmission also is possible. Rotavirus. Worldwide, this is the ... contaminated drinking water is a cause of viral diarrhea, in many cases the virus is passed through ...

  20. Hepatitis viral aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rubén Hernández Garcés

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de las hepatitis virales agudas sobre aspectos vinculados a su etiología. Se tuvieron en cuenta además algunos datos epidemiológicos, las formas clínicas más importantes, los exámenes complementarios con especial énfasis en los marcadores virales y el diagnóstico positivoA bibliographical review of acute viral hepatitis was made taking into account those aspects connected with its etiology. Some epidemiological markers, the most important clinical forms, and the complementary examinations with special emphasis on the viral markers and the positive diagnosis were also considered

  1. Viral quasispecies complexity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Esteban, Juan I; Quer, Josep; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Mutant spectrum dynamics (changes in the related mutants that compose viral populations) has a decisive impact on virus behavior. The several platforms of next generation sequencing (NGS) to study viral quasispecies offer a magnifying glass to study viral quasispecies complexity. Several parameters are available to quantify the complexity of mutant spectra, but they have limitations. Here we critically evaluate the information provided by several population diversity indices, and we propose the introduction of some new ones used in ecology. In particular we make a distinction between incidence, abundance and function measures of viral quasispecies composition. We suggest a multidimensional approach (complementary information contributed by adequately chosen indices), propose some guidelines, and illustrate the use of indices with a simple example. We apply the indices to three clinical samples of hepatitis C virus that display different population heterogeneity. Areas of virus biology in which population complexity plays a role are discussed.

  2. Treatment of viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2009-03-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations. The time course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, subacute, or chronic. Pathologically there are encephalitis with direct viral entry into the CNS in which brain parenchyma exhibits neuronal damaging and viral antigens and there are postinfectious autoimmune encephalitis associated with systemic viral infections with brain tissue presenting perivascular aggregation of immune cells and myelin damaging. Some virus affect previously healthy individuals while others produce encephalitis among imunocompromised ones. Factors such evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some viral encephalitis [e.g. West-Nile virus, and Japanese B virus]. Citomegalovirus and JC virus are examples of infections of the brain that have been seen more frequently because they occur in immunocompromised patients. In the other hand many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. In this article, we will present the current drug options in the management of the main acute and chronic viral infection of the central nervous system of immunocompetent and immunocompromised adults, focusing on drugs mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects. The early diagnosis and correct management of such diseases can reduce mortality and neurological sequelae; however, even with recent treatment advances, potentially devastating outcomes are still possible.

  3. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  4. Microvesicles and Viral Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, David G.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Cells secrete various membrane-enclosed microvesicles from their cell surface (shedding microvesicles) and from internal, endosome-derived membranes (exosomes). Intriguingly, these vesicles have many characteristics in common with enveloped viruses, including biophysical properties, biogenesis, and uptake by cells. Recent discoveries describing the microvesicle-mediated intercellular transfer of functional cellular proteins, RNAs, and mRNAs have revealed additional similarities between viruses and cellular microvesicles. Apparent differences include the complexity of viral entry, temporally regulated viral expression, and self-replication proceeding to infection of new cells. Interestingly, many virally infected cells secrete microvesicles that differ in content from their virion counterparts but may contain various viral proteins and RNAs. For the most part, these particles have not been analyzed for their content or functions during viral infection. However, early studies of microvesicles (L-particles) secreted from herpes simplex virus-infected cells provided the first evidence of microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication. In the case of Epstein-Barr virus, recent evidence suggests that this tumorigenic herpesvirus also utilizes exosomes as a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication through the transfer of signaling competent proteins and functional microRNAs to uninfected cells. This review focuses on aspects of the biology of microvesicles with an emphasis on their potential contributions to viral infection and pathogenesis. PMID:21976651

  5. Microvesicles and viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, David G; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2011-12-01

    Cells secrete various membrane-enclosed microvesicles from their cell surface (shedding microvesicles) and from internal, endosome-derived membranes (exosomes). Intriguingly, these vesicles have many characteristics in common with enveloped viruses, including biophysical properties, biogenesis, and uptake by cells. Recent discoveries describing the microvesicle-mediated intercellular transfer of functional cellular proteins, RNAs, and mRNAs have revealed additional similarities between viruses and cellular microvesicles. Apparent differences include the complexity of viral entry, temporally regulated viral expression, and self-replication proceeding to infection of new cells. Interestingly, many virally infected cells secrete microvesicles that differ in content from their virion counterparts but may contain various viral proteins and RNAs. For the most part, these particles have not been analyzed for their content or functions during viral infection. However, early studies of microvesicles (L-particles) secreted from herpes simplex virus-infected cells provided the first evidence of microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication. In the case of Epstein-Barr virus, recent evidence suggests that this tumorigenic herpesvirus also utilizes exosomes as a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication through the transfer of signaling competent proteins and functional microRNAs to uninfected cells. This review focuses on aspects of the biology of microvesicles with an emphasis on their potential contributions to viral infection and pathogenesis.

  6. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets.

  7. Massively parallel pyrosequencing highlights minority variants in the HIV-1 env quasispecies deriving from lymphomonocyte sub-populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chillemi Giovanni

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-associated cell membrane proteins acquired by HIV-1 during budding may give information on the cellular source of circulating virions. In the present study, by applying immunosorting of the virus and of the cells with antibodies targeting monocyte (CD36 and lymphocyte (CD26 markers, it was possible to directly compare HIV-1 quasispecies archived in circulating monocytes and T lymphocytes with that present in plasma virions originated from the same cell types. Five chronically HIV-1 infected patients who underwent therapy interruption after prolonged HAART were enrolled in the study. The analysis was performed by the powerful technology of ultra-deep pyrosequencing after PCR amplification of part of the env gene, coding for the viral glycoprotein (gp 120, encompassing the tropism-related V3 loop region. V3 amino acid sequences were used to establish heterogeneity parameters, to build phylogenetic trees and to predict co-receptor usage. Results The heterogeneity of proviral and viral genomes derived from monocytes was higher than that of T-lymphocyte origin. Both monocytes and T lymphocytes might contribute to virus rebounding in the circulation after therapy interruptions, but other virus sources might also be involved. In addition, both proviral and circulating viral sequences from monocytes and T lymphocytes were predictive of a predominant R5 coreceptor usage. However, minor variants, segregating from the most frequent quasispecies variants, were present. In particular, in proviral genomes harboured by monocytes, minority variant clusters with a predicted X4 phenotype were found. Conclusion This study provided the first direct comparison between the HIV-1 quasispecies archived as provirus in circulating monocytes and T lymphocytes with that of plasma virions replicating in the same cell types. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing generated data with some order of magnitude higher than any previously obtained with conventional

  8. Viral induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    Viral induced demyelination, in both humans and rodent models, has provided unique insights into the cell biology of oligodendroglia, their complex cell-cell interactions and mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections in which no infectious virus is readily evident, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Although of interest in their own right, an understanding of the diverse mechanisms used by viruses to induce demyelination may shed light into the etiology and pathogenesis of the common demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). This notion is supported by the persistent view that a viral infection acquired during adolescence might initiate MS after a long period of quiescence. Demyelination in both humans and rodents can be initiated by infection with a diverse group of enveloped and non-enveloped RNA and DNA viruses (Table 1). The mechanisms that ultimately result in the loss of CNS myelin appear to be equally diverse as the etiological agents capable of causing diseases which result in demyelination. Although demyelination can be a secondary result of axonal loss, in many examples of viral induced demyelination, myelin loss is primary and associated with axonal sparing. This suggests that demyelination induced by viral infections can result from: 1) a direct viral infection of oligodendroglia resulting in cell death with degeneration of myelin and its subsequent removal; 2) a persistent viral infection, in the presence or absence of infectious virus, resulting in the loss of normal cellular homeostasis and subsequent oligodendroglial death; 3) a vigorous virus-specific inflammatory response wherein the virus replicates in a cell type other than oligodendroglia, but cytokines and other immune mediators directly damage the

  9. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  10. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  11. Discovery of a new sub-population, mapping and updated Red List assessment of the Endangered Cycas beddomei Dyer (Cycadales: Cycadaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ravi Prasad Rao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new sub-population of Cycas beddomei Dyer (Cycadaceae, hitherto believed to be endemic to the Seshachalam Hills (Tirupati-Kadapa Hills of Andhra Pradesh is discovered from Velikonda Hills (Nellore-Kadapa districts of Andhra Pradesh.  Hence its global distribution status is hereby revised endemic to Seshachalam and Velikonda hills  of Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh.  Combined datasets of our earlier studies with the latest indicated no change in its ‘Endangered’ status.  

  12. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date.

  13. Viral infections in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, D; Vindevogel, H

    2006-07-01

    This review provides a current update on the major viral diseases of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica), based on scientific reports and clinical experience. Paramyxovirus 1, adenovirus, rotavirus, herpesvirus 1, poxvirus and circovirus infections are described according to common clinical signs and target tissues. Since pigeons are sometimes treated as if they were poultry, the review also summarises the common viral infections of poultry for which pigeons are considered resistant. It is hoped that the review will provide a useful reference for veterinarians and others and offer advice on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major infectious diseases of pigeons.

  14. Viral diseases of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogstad, Aric P; Simpson, Janet E; Korte, Scott W

    2005-01-01

    Viral disease in the rabbit is encountered infrequently by the clinical practitioner; however, several viral diseases were reported to occur in this species. Viral diseases that are described in the rabbit primarily may affect the integument, gastrointestinal tract or, central nervous system or maybe multi-systemic in nature. Rabbit viral diseases range from oral papillomatosis, with benign clinical signs, to rabbit hemorrhagic disease and myxomatosis, which may result in significant clinical disease and mortality. The wild rabbit may serve as a reservoir for disease transmission for many of these viral agents. In general, treatment of viral disease in the rabbit is supportive in nature.

  15. Immigration and viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sharma (Suraj); M. Carballo (Manuel); J.J. Feld (Jordan J.); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and

  16. Varied sensitivity to therapy of HIV-1 strains in CD4+ lymphocyte sub-populations upon ART initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paxton William A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although antiretroviral therapy (ART has proven its success against HIV-1, the long lifespan of infected cells and viral latency prevent eradication. In this study we analyzed the sensitivity to ART of HIV-1 strains in naïve, central memory and effector memory CD4+ lymphocyte subsets. Methods From five patients cellular HIV-1 infection levels were quantified before and after initiation of therapy (2-5 weeks. Through sequencing the C2V3 region of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope, we studied the effect of short-term therapy on virus variants derived from naïve, central memory and effector memory CD4+ lymphocyte subsets. Results During short-term ART, HIV-1 infection levels declined in all lymphocyte subsets but not as much as RNA levels in serum. Virus diversity in the naïve and central memory lymphocyte populations remained unchanged, whilst diversity decreased in serum and the effector memory lymphocytes. ART differentially affected the virus populations co-circulating in one individual harboring a dual HIV-1 infection. Changes in V3 charge were found in all individuals after ART initiation with increases within the effector memory subset and decreases found in the naïve cell population. Conclusions During early ART virus diversity is affected mainly in the serum and effector memory cell compartments. Differential alterations in V3 charge were observed between effector memory and naïve populations. While certain cell populations can be targeted preferentially during early ART, some virus strains demonstrate varied sensitivity to therapy, as shown from studying two strains within a dual HIV-1 infected individual.

  17. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Wilson Disease Hepatitis (Viral) View or Print All Sections What is Viral Hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection that causes liver inflammation ...

  18. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  19. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  20. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  1. Immunogenetics of viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maureen P; Carrington, Mary

    2005-10-01

    The HLA class I and II genes encode molecules that lie at the heart of the acquired immune response against infectious diseases. Associations between these polymorphic loci and genetically complex infectious diseases have been historically elusive, in contrast to the more obvious HLA associations with autoimmune diseases. High resolution molecular typing of large, clinically well-defined cohorts has begun to uncover evidence for the influence of HLA diversity on diseases of viral etiology, such as those caused by HIV-1, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human papilloma virus. Combinations of HLA and KIR also appear to affect outcome to viral infection, supporting a role for HLA class I diversity in the innate immune response in addition to the acquired immune response.

  2. Viral quasispecies evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo, Esteban; Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of...

  3. Viral membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  4. Hepatitis viral C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Poma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El virus de la hepatitis C se trasmite por contacto directo con la sangre de la persona infectada. La mayoría de los pacientes no presenta síntomas en la fase aguda o crónica de la hepatitis. Dos a tres décadas después, algunos pacientes progresan a la cirrosis compensada, que también es asintomática. En un examen de sangre, los anticuerpos se presentan como una sorpresa, porque no se les relaciona con un episodio de contagio. Un embarazo ocasiona la posibilidad de efectos negativos de la infección en la madre o el niño. El tratamiento actual no ofrece la certeza de cura, dependiendo del genotipo viral, y presenta efectos adversos que pueden ser severos. La cirrosis descompensada causa la mayoría de muertes relacionadas con esta infección; algunos de estos pacientes desarrollan carcinoma hepatocelular. La reproducción viral causa partículas virales diferentes del virus original, característica que ha impedido el desarrollo de una vacuna. Actualmente, la prevención consiste en evitar el contacto con sangre infectada. Este artículo revisa la infección con el virus de la hepatitis C, incluyendo los últimos progresos en tratamiento. Es necesario educar a la comunidad acerca de los efectos de este virus en la salud pública.

  5. Distinct DNA methylation epigenotypes in bladder cancer from different Chinese sub-populations and its implication in cancer detection using voided urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Joanna HM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world and the incidence is particularly high in southwestern Taiwan. Previous studies have identified several tumor-related genes that are hypermethylated in bladder cancer; however the DNA methylation profile of bladder cancer in Taiwan is not fully understood. Methods In this study, we compared the DNA methylation profile of multiple tumor suppressor genes (APC, DAPK, E-cadherin, hMLH1, IRF8, p14, p15, RASSF1A, SFRP1 and SOCS-1 in bladder cancer patients from different Chinese sub-populations including Taiwan (104 cases, Hong Kong (82 cases and China (24 cases by MSP. Two normal human urothelium were also included as control. To investigate the diagnostic potential of using DNA methylation in non-invasive detection of bladder cancer, degree of methylation of DAPK, IRF8, p14, RASSF1A and SFRP1 was also accessed by quantitative MSP in urine samples from thirty bladder cancer patients and nineteen non-cancer controls. Results There were distinct DNA methylation epigenotypes among the different sub-populations. Further, samples from Taiwan and China demonstrated a bimodal distribution suggesting that CpG island methylator phentotype (CIMP is presented in bladder cancer. Moreover, the number of methylated genes in samples from Taiwan and Hong Kong were significantly correlated with histological grade (P SFRP1, IRF8, APC and RASSF1A were significantly associated with increased tumor grade, stage. Methylation of RASSF1A was associated with tumor recurrence. Patients with methylation of APC or RASSF1A were also significantly associated with shorter recurrence-free survival. For methylation detection in voided urine samples of cancer patients, the sensitivity and specificity of using any of the methylated genes (IRF8, p14 or sFRP1 by qMSP was 86.7% and 94.7%. Conclusions Our results indicate that there are distinct methylation epigenotypes among different Chinese sub-populations

  6. How aluminum adjuvants could promote and enhance non-target IgE synthesis in a genetically-vulnerable sub-population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Todd D; Deth, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum-containing adjuvants increase the effectiveness of vaccination, but their ability to augment immune responsiveness also carries the risk of eliciting non-target responses, especially in genetically susceptible individuals. This study reviews the relevant actions of aluminum adjuvants and sources of genetic risk that can combine to adversely affect a vulnerable sub-population. Aluminum adjuvants promote oxidative stress and increase inflammasome activity, leading to the release of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-33, but not the important regulatory cytokine IL-12. In addition, they stimulate macrophages to produce PGE₂, which also has a role in regulating immune responses. This aluminum-induced cytokine context leads to a T(H)2 immune response, characterized by the further release of IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, and IgE-potentiating factors such as sCD23. Genetic variants in cytokine genes, such as IL-4, IL-13, IL-33, and IL-18 influence the response to vaccines in children and are also associated with atopy. These genetic factors may therefore define a genetically-vulnerable sub-population, children with a family history of atopy, who may experience an exaggerated T(H)2 immune response to aluminum-containing vaccines. IL-4, sCD23, and IgE are common factors for both atopy and the immune-stimulating properties of aluminum adjuvants. IL-4 is critical in the production of IgE and total IgE up-regulation. IL-4 has also been reported to induce the production of sCD23 and trigger resting sIgM+, sIgD+ B-cells to switch to sIgE+ B-cells, making them targets for IgE-potentiating factors. Further, the actions of IgE-potentiating factors on sIgE+ B-cells are polyclonal and unrestricted, triggering their differentiation into IgE-forming plasma cells. These actions provide a mechanism for aluminum-adjuvant promotion and enhancement of non-target IgE in a genetically vulnerable sub-population. Identification of these individuals may decrease the risk of adverse events

  7. Low-dose chemotherapy delays relapse of a dominated and resistant sub-population in a heterogeneous human SCLC xenograft in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, K; Vindeløv, L L; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the influence of cellular heterogeneity on the response to low-dose BCNU chemotherapy of an artificially mixed human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) xenograft in nude mice containing a BCNU-sensitive and dominating sub-population and a BCNU-resistant and undetectable (dominated) sub...... (LD10) was given to both groups of treated tumors. Changes in the relative proportions of and cell lines in the tumors were measured by FCM on fine-needle tumor aspirates. At the time of low-dose treatment, all the tumors were totally dominated by the sensitive cells. A temporary response was seen....... At the time of progression after the response to the high-dose treatment, the resistant cell line was the predominant population. If compared with a single high-dose BCNU treatment, the response of tumors treated with a low dose was superior, indicating that the presence of a dominating and slower growing sub...

  8. Immunoreactive Cu-SOD and Mn-SOD in lymphocytes sub-populations from normal and trisomy 21 subjects according to age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeteman, M.A. (Centre de Genetique Medicale and INSERM U. 242, France); Baret, A.; Courtiere, A.; Rebuffel, P.; Mattei, J.F.

    1983-02-21

    Copper and manganese superoxide dismutases (Cu-SOD and Mn-SOD) were measured by radioimmunoassay in B and T lymphocytes and macrophages, in patients with trisomy 21 and in matched controls. In the controls, Cu-SOD was present in greater amounts than Mn-SOD and there were quantitative differences in the distribution in the three cellular sub-populations. In trisomy 21, levels of Cu-SOD were raised, with no change in levels of Mn-SOD, supporting the theory of a gene dosage effect. There were significant positive and negative correlations between age and Cu-SOD levels in controls, and a correlation approaching significance for Mn-SOD. In trisomy 21, there was no correlation between age and Cu-SOD levels, and the only significant correlation for Mn-SOD was for B lymphocytes.

  9. Both size-frequency distribution and sub-populations of the main-belt asteroid population are consistent with YORP-induced rotational fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, S.; Scheeres, D.; Rossi, A.; Marzari, F.; Davis, D.

    2014-07-01

    From the results of a comprehensive asteroid-population-evolution model, we conclude that the YORP-induced rotational-fission hypothesis has strong repercussions for the small size end of the main-belt asteroid size-frequency distribution and is consistent with observed asteroid-population statistics and with the observed sub-populations of binary asteroids, asteroid pairs and contact binaries. The foundation of this model is the asteroid-rotation model of Marzari et al. (2011) and Rossi et al. (2009), which incorporates both the YORP effect and collisional evolution. This work adds to that model the rotational fission hypothesis (i.e. when the rotation rate exceeds a critical value, erosion and binary formation occur; Scheeres 2007) and binary-asteroid evolution (Jacobson & Scheeres, 2011). The YORP-effect timescale for large asteroids with diameters D > ˜ 6 km is longer than the collision timescale in the main belt, thus the frequency of large asteroids is determined by a collisional equilibrium (e.g. Bottke 2005), but for small asteroids with diameters D Morbidelli 2009). The binary-asteroid evolution model is highly constrained by the modeling done in Jacobson & Scheeres, and therefore the asteroid-population evolution model has only two significant free parameters: the ratio of low-to-high-mass-ratio binaries formed after rotational fission events and the mean strength of the binary YORP (BYORP) effect. Using this model, we successfully reproduce the observed small-asteroid sub-populations, which orthogonally constrain the two free parameters. We find the outcome of rotational fission most likely produces an initial mass-ratio fraction that is four to eight times as likely to produce high-mass-ratio systems as low-mass-ratio systems, which is consistent with rotational fission creating binary systems in a flat distribution with respect to mass ratio. We also find that the mean of the log-normal BYORP coefficient distribution B ≈ 10^{-2}.

  10. Development of a qPCR assay for tracking the ecological niches of genetic sub-populations within Pseudo-nitzschia pungens (Bacillariophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Park, Bum Soo; Wang, Pengbin; Patidar, Shailesh Kumar; Han, Myung-Soo

    2017-03-01

    Three genetic sub-populations (clade I, II and III) of Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, the potential toxic marine diatom, are known to have distinguishable growth characteristics under different culture conditions and distinct distributed patterns in the world. However, to date their exact eco-physiological traits are unrevealed in fields due to lack of the method to detect and/or measure abundances of each sub-populations, hence, the qPCR (quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction) assay was developed to detect and quantify the P. pungens cells of each clade. Designed two specific primer sets, Pcla12F/R (for clade I and II) and Pcla3F/R (for clade III) only could amplify each target genomic DNA. The, significant linear relationships (R(2)>0.998) was established between Ct (threshold cycle) value and the log of cell abundance for each clade. Through the melting curve analysis, comparisons for gene copy numbers among the three clades and spike test for field study, our qPCR assay was reliable to quantify the cell numbers of each clade. There was strong linear correlation (R(2)>0.990) between cell abundances as estimated by qPCR assay and direct counting via light microscope in spike test, and 0.24 (clade I), 0.25 (clade II) and 0.33 (clade III) P. pungens cells per mL were detected markedly upon the use of specific two-primer set. Finally, developed qPCR assay was applied on field samples successfully. Our study implicate that our qPCR assay is an accurate and sensitive technique to estimate the cell abundances of each clade of P. pungens in field works.

  11. VIRAL HEPATITIS E DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Malinnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The results of clinical and epidemiological studies conducted in the M.P. Chumakov’ Research Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral Encephalitis and in the different research institutions of the world have been summarized in the current article. Data on etiology, pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, epidemiology and prevention of hepatitis E are presented. Increasing of significance of this infection for health care system in Russia is emphasized . The actual problems of hepatitis E (autochthonic hepatitis E, hepatitis E as zoonosis, chronic hepatitis E are discussed.

  12. Viral infections of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter J; Donnelly, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Viral diseases of rabbits have been used historically to study oncogenesis (e.g. rabbit fibroma virus, cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) and biologically to control feral rabbit populations (e.g. myxoma virus). However, clinicians seeing pet rabbits in North America infrequently encounter viral diseases although myxomatosis may be seen occasionally. The situation is different in Europe and Australia, where myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease are endemic. Advances in epidemiology and virology have led to detection of other lapine viruses that are now recognized as agents of emerging infectious diseases. Rabbit caliciviruses, related to rabbit hemorrhagic disease, are generally avirulent, but lethal variants are being identified in Europe and North America. Enteric viruses including lapine rotavirus, rabbit enteric coronavirus and rabbit astrovirus are being acknowledged as contributors to the multifactorial enteritis complex of juvenile rabbits. Three avirulent leporid herpesviruses are found in domestic rabbits. A fourth highly pathogenic virus designated leporid herpesvirus 4 has been described in Canada and Alaska. This review considers viruses affecting rabbits by their clinical significance. Viruses of major and minor clinical significance are described, and viruses of laboratory significance are mentioned. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytokine determinants of viral tropism

    OpenAIRE

    McFadden, Grant; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Bartee, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The specificity of a given virus for a ceil type, tissue or species — collectively known as viral tropism — is an important factor in determining the outcome of viral infection in any particular host. Owing to the increased prevalence of zoonotic infections and the threat of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, gaining a better understanding of the factors that determine viral tropism has become particularly important. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of the central role ...

  14. Viral causes of diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodgame, R W

    2001-09-01

    Viruses are important causes of diarrhea. In healthy adults, the main clinical manifestation is acute, self-limited gastroenteritis. Advances in molecular diagnostics have shown that epidemics of acute gastroenteritis most frequently are due to caliciviruses spread through contaminated food or through person-to-person contact. Application of similar technology is needed to make a definitive statement about the role of such candidate viruses as rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus as the cause of nonepidemic acute gastroenteritis in adults. Rarely a previously healthy adult gets acute CMV colitis. CMV and EBV mainly cause diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, however. Advances in prophylaxis and treatment have reduced the frequency and severity of these diseases. Acute infantile gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus. These viral diseases of the gut are seen by the physician as routine and rare clinical problems.

  15. Viral quasispecies evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Esteban; Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-06-01

    Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory.

  16. Impaired intestinal mucosal immunity is associated with the imbalance of T lymphocyte sub-populations in intrauterine growth-restricted neonatal piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Zhong, Xiang; Zhang, Lili; Kong, Lingrui; Kong, Yili; Kou, Tao; Wang, Tian

    2015-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) impairs the immunity of both piglets and humans. We hypothesized that the poor cytokine secreting ability of the small intestines of IUGR neonatal piglets might be associated with lower CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Therefore, we used neonatal piglets as IUGR models to investigate the effects of IUGR on the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte cell populations. Six normal-birth-weight (NBW) and six IUGR neonatal piglets were chosen and divided into NBW and IUGR groups, respectively. The cytokine and immunoglobulin levels in the blood; the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte contents in the thymus, blood, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, jejunum and ileum; and the distribution of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes in the ileum were measured. We further compared the gene expression and protein distribution of MHC-II in the jejunum and ileum of the NBW and IUGR neonatal piglets. The results showed that the IUGR piglets exhibited lower (Pmucosal immunity is associated with an imbalance in the T lymphocyte sub-populations in IUGR neonatal piglets.

  17. Characterisation of a divergent progenitor cell sub-populations in human osteoarthritic cartilage: the role of telomere erosion and replicative senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, Christopher R.; Williams, Rebecca; Davies, Iwan R.; Gohil, Kajal; Baird, Duncan M.; Fairclough, John; Rooney, Paul; Archer, Charles W.; Khan, Ilyas M.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that articular cartilage harbours a viable pool of progenitor cells and interest has focussed on their role during development and disease. Analysis of progenitor numbers using fluorescence-activated sorting techniques has resulted in wide-ranging estimates, which may be the result of context-dependent expression of cell surface markers. We have used a colony-forming assay to reliably determine chondroprogenitor numbers in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage where we observed a 2-fold increase in diseased tissue (P  < 0.0001). Intriguingly, cell kinetic analysis of clonal isolates derived from single and multiple donors of osteoarthritic cartilage revealed the presence of a divergent progenitor subpopulation characterised by an early senescent phenotype. Divergent sub-populations displayed increased senescence-associated β–galactosidase activity, lower average telomere lengths but retained the capacity to undergo multi-lineage differentiation. Osteoarthritis is an age-related disease and cellular senescence is predicted to be a significant component of the pathological process. This study shows that although early senescence is an inherent property of a subset of activated progenitors, there is also a pool of progenitors with extended viability and regenerative potential residing within osteoarthritic cartilage. PMID:28150695

  18. Dengue viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurugama Padmalal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  19. Emerging zoonotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-F; Crameri, G

    2014-08-01

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are naturally transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans and vice versa. They are caused by all types of pathogenic agents, including bacteria, parasites, fungi, viruses and prions. Although they have been recognised for many centuries, their impact on public health has increased in the last few decades due to a combination of the success in reducing the spread of human infectious diseases through vaccination and effective therapies and the emergence of novel zoonotic diseases. It is being increasingly recognised that a One Health approach at the human-animal-ecosystem interface is needed for effective investigation, prevention and control of any emerging zoonotic disease. Here, the authors will review the drivers for emergence, highlight some of the high-impact emerging zoonotic diseases of the last two decades and provide examples of novel One Health approaches for disease investigation, prevention and control. Although this review focuses on emerging zoonotic viral diseases, the authors consider that the discussions presented in this paper will be equally applicable to emerging zoonotic diseases of other pathogen types.

  20. Sphingolipids in viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Viruses exploit membranes and their components such as sphingolipids in all steps of their life cycle including attachment and membrane fusion, intracellular transport, replication, protein sorting and budding. Examples for sphingolipid-dependent virus entry are found for: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which besides its protein receptors also interacts with glycosphingolipids (GSLs); rhinovirus, which promotes the formation of ceramide-enriched platforms and endocytosis; or measles virus (MV), which induces the surface expression of its own receptor CD150 via activation of sphingomyelinases (SMases). While SMase activation was implicated in Ebola virus (EBOV) attachment, the virus utilizes the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C protein 1 (NPC1) as 'intracellular' entry receptor after uptake into endosomes. Differential activities of SMases also affect the intracellular milieu required for virus replication. Sindbis virus (SINV), for example, replicates better in cells lacking acid SMase (ASMase). Defined lipid compositions of viral assembly and budding sites influence virus release and infectivity, as found for hepatitis C virus (HCV) or HIV. And finally, viruses manipulate cellular signaling and the sphingolipid metabolism to their advantage, as for example influenza A virus (IAV), which activates sphingosine kinase 1 and the transcription factor NF-κB.

  1. Viral infection, inflammation and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeland, Rachel E; Fatemi, S Hossein

    2013-04-05

    Schizophrenia is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with genetic and environmental etiologies. Prenatal viral/bacterial infections and inflammation play major roles in the genesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we describe a viral model of schizophrenia tested in mice whereby the offspring of mice prenatally infected with influenza at E7, E9, E16, and E18 show significant gene, protein, and brain structural abnormalities postnatally. Similarly, we describe data on rodents exposed to bacterial infection or injected with a synthetic viral mimic (PolyI:C) also demonstrating brain structural and behavioral abnormalities. Moreover, human serologic data has been indispensible in supporting the viral theory of schizophrenia. Individuals born seropositive for bacterial and viral agents are at a significantly elevated risk of developing schizophrenia. While the specific mechanisms of prenatal viral/bacterial infections and brain disorder are unclear, recent findings suggest that the maternal inflammatory response may be associated with fetal brain injury. Preventive and therapeutic treatment options are also proposed. This review presents data related to epidemiology, human serology, and experimental animal models which support the viral model of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enfermedades virales emergentes y reemergentes

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño; Ana Isabel Toro Montoya

    1996-01-01

    Los virus no son una excepción al principio de que toda forma de vida de hoyes el producto de la evolución de información gen ética preexistente. Tradicionalmente se ha reconocido que ta expresión clínica de las enfermedades virales cambia con el tiempo; molecularmente se ha demostrado que esos cambios fenotípicos son el producto de variaciones en el genoma viral. La tasa de cambio
    gen ético y fenotípico no es la misma en todos los agentes virales y ello está determinado, principal...

  3. Encefalitis virales en la infancia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    La encefalitis viral es una enfermedad grave que implica el compromiso inflamatorio del parénquima cerebral. Las infecciones virales del SNC ocurren con frecuencia como complicación de infecciones virales sistémicas. Más de 100 virus están implicados como agentes causales, entre los cuales el virus Herpes simplex tipo I, es el agente causal más frecuente de encefalitis no epidémica en todos los grupos poblacionales del mundo; es el responsable de los casos más graves en todas las edades. Much...

  4. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNassi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist's toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic

  5. FastStats: Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Viral Hepatitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are for the U.S. Morbidity Number of new hepatitis A cases: 1,781 (2013) Number of new ...

  6. Viral marketing as epidemiological model

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia

    2015-01-01

    In epidemiology, an epidemic is defined as the spread of an infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time. In the marketing context, a message is viral when it is broadly sent and received by the target market through person-to-person transmission. This specific marketing communication strategy is commonly referred as viral marketing. Due to this similarity between an epidemic and the viral marketing process and because the understanding of the critical factors to this communications strategy effectiveness remain largely unknown, the mathematical models in epidemiology are presented in this marketing specific field. In this paper, an epidemiological model SIR (Susceptible- Infected-Recovered) to study the effects of a viral marketing strategy is presented. It is made a comparison between the disease parameters and the marketing application, and simulations using the Matlab software are performed. Finally, some conclusions are given and their marketing impli...

  7. Statistical mechanics of viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K

    2015-01-09

    Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements-yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy-ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together-is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

  8. Viral Evolution Core | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon F. Keele, Ph.D. PI/Senior Principal Investigator, Retroviral Evolution Section Head, Viral Evolution Core Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Frederick, MD 21702-1201 Tel: 301-846-173

  9. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  10. Validity of Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome Prediction Model for In-hospital Mortality in A Sub-population of Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalill Ramjane; Han LEI; Jing CHANG

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine the validity and applicability of the global registry of acute coronary events (GRACE) pre-diction model for in-hospital mortality in all forms of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a sub population of Chongqing. Methods Data of 669 ACS patients were collected retrospectively from Jan 2005 to Apr 2008 and were re-corded on a standardized case report form. For each patient the GRACE risk score (GRACE RS) was calculated (using the GRACE calculator available from the grace website) using specific variables collected at admission. Patients with missing data and those transferred from other hospitals were excluded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted for the GRACE risk score. Results Among 576 ACS patients, 98 (17.01%), 36 (6. 25 %), and 442 (76. 74 %) presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (MI), non-ST elevation MI and unstable angina, re-spectively. The GRACE risk score could not be determined in 91 (9. 3 %) patients due to missing data or for patients who were transferred from other hospitals and were excluded from the analysis. The median GRACE risk score was 133 (interquartile range: 92 - 174) and, the in-hospital rates of death and death/(re-) MI were 6. 1% and 7.6 %, respec-tively. The GRACE risk score demonstrated excellent discrimination (c-statistic = 0. 86, 95 % CI 0. 79 - 0. 91, P < 0. 001) for in-hospital death/ (re) -MI. Conclusions The GRACE RS study had a good predictive accuracy for death or MI across the wide range of ACS in this population. It may be a useful risk stratification tool that helps identify high-risk patients who will benefit most from myocardial revascularization and low risk patients who may be spared from un-dergoing more aggressive interventional treatment.

  11. Metrics for Local Community Planning and Evaluation: The Case for Observational Measurement of High Risk Rural Sub-Populations in Occupant Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Davidson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to examine the relevance of non-specific safety belt use data for interventions to rural teens and to pilot a data collection project to provide more specific data to traffic safety stakeholders and educators in rural areas.Methods: Twelve high schools in Southeast Georgia were used for observed safety belt data collection over a 16 month period. Observational surveys were conducted at the entrance to student parking lots of the studied schools in the morning or afternoon. Observers were trained and survey methods were standardized to maintain comparability between results.Results: Observational surveys revealed a safety belt usage rate of 38.6% among high schools teens at the studied high schools. Safety belt usage rates ranged from 9.5% to 66.9%. Observed safety belt use for female vehicle occupants was 48.4% compared to 35.6% for males.Conclusion: The observational survey results from this study support research showing that rural teens have lower safety belt usage rates than adults or urban teens. Despite efforts to target rural areas, programs must specifically target sub populations, especially rural male teens, in order to hold any traction. Because of the wide gap between measured safety belt use in rural Georgia (79.9% and the studied rural high schools (38.6%, local program planners must assess actual safety belt usage in their high risk rural teen population in order to use accurate metrics for intervention and education efforts. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(4:380-383.

  12. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  13. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  14. Viral control of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Galluzzi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the process of pathogen-host co-evolution, viruses have developed a battery of distinct strategies to overcome biochemical and immunological defenses of the host. Thus, viruses have acquired the capacity to subvert host cell apoptosis, control inflammatory responses, and evade immune reactions. Since the elimination of infected cells via programmed cell death is one of the most ancestral defense mechanisms against infection, disabling host cell apoptosis might represent an almost obligate step in the viral life cycle. Conversely, viruses may take advantage of stimulating apoptosis, either to kill uninfected cells from the immune system, or to induce the breakdown of infected cells, thereby favoring viral dissemination. Several viral polypeptides are homologs of host-derived apoptosis-regulatory proteins, such as members of the Bcl-2 family. Moreover, viral factors with no homology to host proteins specifically target key components of the apoptotic machinery. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the viral modulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, by focusing in particular on the mechanisms by which viral proteins control the host cell death apparatus.

  15. Viral RNAs are unusually compact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajaykumar Gopal

    Full Text Available A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly.

  16. Hepatitis B virus: pathogenesis, viral intermediates, and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Locarnini, Stephen

    2004-05-01

    Although HBV has the potential to generate an almost limitless spectrum of quasispecies during chronic infection, the viability of the majority of these quasispecies is almost certainly impaired due to constraints imposed by the remarkably compact organization of the HBV genome. On the other hand, single mutations may affect more than one gene and result in complex and unpredictable effects on viral phenotype. Better understanding of the constraints imposed by gene overlap and of genotype-phenotype relationships should help in the development of improved antiviral strategies and management approaches. Although the probability of developing viral resistance is directly proportional to the intensity of selection pressure and the diversity of quasispecies, potent inhibition of HBV replication should be able to prevent development of drug resistance because mutagenesis is replication dependent. If viral replication can be suppressed for a sufficient length of time, viral load should decline to a point where the continued production of quasispecies with the potential to resist new drug treatments no longer occurs. Clinical application of this concept will require optimization of combination therapies analogous to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection. Total cure of hepatitis B will require elimination of the intranuclear pool of viral minichromosomes, which will probably only be achieved by normal cell turnover, reactivation of host immunity, or elucidation of the antiviral mechanisms operating during cytokine clearance in acute hepatitis B (see Fig. 1).

  17. Tv-commercial verliest het van virals

    OpenAIRE

    Gisbergen, M.S. van; Ketelaar, P.E.; Baudoin, P,

    2007-01-01

    Viral commercials werken goed. De meeste jongeren bekijken viral commercials en beoordelen ze positiever dan tv-commercials. Doordat viral commercials volgens consumenten voor vermaak zorgen, ontwijken zij ze minder dan tv-commercials. Ook onthouden jongeren de in viral commercials geadverteerde producten en merken goed. Dit blijkt uit onderzoek van de Radboud Universiteit in samenwerking met De Vos & Jansen onder 412 jongeren.

  18. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  19. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution.

  20. Predicted sub-populations in a marine shrimp proteome as revealed by combined EST and cDNA data from multiple Penaeus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotewong Rattanawadee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many species of marine shrimp in the Family Penaeidae, viz. Penaeus (Litopenaeus vannamei, Penaeus monodon, Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus chinensis, and Penaeus (Marsupenaeus japonicus, are animals of economic importance in the aquaculture industry. Yet information about their DNA and protein sequences is lacking. In order to predict their collective proteome, we combined over 270,000 available EST and cDNA sequences from the 4 shrimp species with all protein sequences of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. EST data from 4 other crustaceans, the crab Carcinus maenas, the lobster Homarus americanus (Decapoda, the water flea Daphnia pulex, and the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana were also used. Findings Similarity searches from EST collections of the 4 shrimp species matched 64% of the protein sequences of the fruit fly, but only 45% of nematode proteins, indicating that the shrimp proteome content is more similar to that of an insect than a nematode. Combined results with 4 additional non-shrimp crustaceans increased matching to 78% of fruit fly and 56% of nematode proteins, suggesting that present shrimp EST collections still lack sequences for many conserved crustacean proteins. Analysis of matching data revealed the presence of 4 EST groups from shrimp, namely sequences for proteins that are both fruit fly-like and nematode-like, fruit fly-like only, nematode-like only, and non-matching. Gene ontology profiles of proteins for the 3 matching EST groups were analyzed. For non-matching ESTs, a small fraction matched protein sequences from other species in the UniProt database, including other crustacean-specific proteins. Conclusions Shrimp ESTs indicated that the shrimp proteome is comprised of sub-populations of proteins similar to those common to both insect and nematode models, those present specifically in either model, or neither. Combining small EST collections from related species to compensate for their

  1. Neurons derived from patients with bipolar disorder divide into intrinsically different sub-populations of neurons, predicting the patients' responsiveness to lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S; Santos, R; Marchetto, M C; Mendes, A P D; Rouleau, G A; Biesmans, S; Wang, Q-W; Yao, J; Charnay, P; Bang, A G; Alda, M; Gage, F H

    2017-02-28

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a progressive psychiatric disorder with more than 3% prevalence worldwide. Affected individuals experience recurrent episodes of depression and mania, disrupting normal life and increasing the risk of suicide greatly. The complexity and genetic heterogeneity of psychiatric disorders have challenged the development of animal and cellular models. We recently reported that hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived fibroblasts of BD patients are electrophysiologically hyperexcitable. Here we used iPSCs derived from Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-lymphocytes to verify that the hyperexcitability of DG-like neurons is reproduced in this different cohort of patients and cells. Lymphocytes are readily available for research with a large number of banked lines with associated patient clinical description. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of over 460 neurons to characterize neurons derived from control individuals and BD patients. Extensive functional analysis showed that intrinsic cell parameters are very different between the two groups of BD neurons, those derived from lithium (Li)-responsive (LR) patients and those derived from Li-non-responsive (NR) patients, which led us to partition our BD neurons into two sub-populations of cells and suggested two different subdisorders. Training a Naïve Bayes classifier with the electrophysiological features of patients whose responses to Li are known allows for accurate classification with more than 92% success rate for a new patient whose response to Li is unknown. Despite their very different functional profiles, both populations of neurons share a large, fast after-hyperpolarization (AHP). We therefore suggest that the large, fast AHP is a key feature of BD and a main contributor to the fast, sustained spiking abilities of BD neurons. Confirming our previous report with fibroblast-derived DG neurons, chronic Li treatment reduced

  2. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  3. Integrin Activation and Viral Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-dian GAO; Jun-zheng DU; Jian-hua ZHOU; Hui-yun CHANG; Qing-ge XIE

    2008-01-01

    Integrins are members of a ubiquitous membrane receptor family which includes 18 different α subunits and 8 β subunits forming more than 20 α/β heterodimers. Integrins play key functions in vascular endothelial cell and tumour cell adhesion, lymphocyte trafficking, tumor growth and viral infection. Current understanding of the molecular basis of integrins as viral receptors has been achieved through many decades of study into the biology of transmembrane glycoproteins and their interactions with several viruses. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the molecular bases of interactions between viruses and integrins, which are of potential practical significance. Inhibition of virus-integrin interactions at the points of virus attachment or entry will provide a novel approach for the therapeutic treatment of viral diseases.

  4. Enfermedades virales emergentes y reemergentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Los virus no son una excepción al principio de que toda forma de vida de hoyes el producto de la evolución de información gen ética preexistente. Tradicionalmente se ha reconocido que ta expresión clínica de las enfermedades virales cambia con el tiempo; molecularmente se ha demostrado que esos cambios fenotípicos son el producto de variaciones en el genoma viral. La tasa de cambio
    gen ético y fenotípico no es la misma en todos los agentes virales y ello está determinado, principalmente, por factores intrínsecos del virus, como la naturaleza de su ácido nucleico, y por la longevidad
    y tasa reproductiva del huésped.

  5. Acute bacterial and viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartt, Russell

    2012-12-01

    Most cases of acute meningitis are infectious and result from a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Acute meningitis is infectious in most cases and caused by a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. Shifts in the epidemiology of bacterial pathogens have been influenced by changes in vaccines and their implementation. Seasonal and environmental changes influence the likely viral and rickettsial pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Pertinent testing and treatment can vary with the clinical presentation, season, and possible exposures. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute meningitis.

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Ahmed; Said, Adnan

    2015-02-01

    There are several extrahepatic cutaneous manifestations associated with hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infection. Serum sickness and polyarteritis nodosa are predominantly associated with hepatitis B infection, whereas mixed cryoglobulinemia associated vasculitis and porphyria cutanea tarda are more frequently seen in hepatitis C infection. The clinico-pathogenic associations of these skin conditions are not completely defined but appear to involve activation of the host immune system including the complement system. Management of the aforementioned cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis is often similar to that done in cases without viral hepatitis, with control of immune activation being a key strategy. In cases associated with hepatitis B and C, control of viral replication with specific antiviral therapy is also important and associated with improvement in most of the associated clinical manifestations.

  7. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Snapp, Erik L

    2015-10-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses.

  8. Ventilator and viral induced inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennus, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis expands current knowledge on ventilator induced lung injury and provides insights on the immunological effects of mechanical ventilation during viral respiratory infections. The experimental studies in the first part of this thesis improve our understanding of how mechanical ventilation

  9. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides to their corresponding monophosphate compounds. dNks also phosphorylate deoxyribonucleoside analogues that are used in the treatment of cancer or viral infections. The study of the mammalian dNKs has therefore always been of gr...

  10. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  11. Autistic disorder and viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, Jane E; Sweeten, Thayne L; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

  12. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stocha...

  13. Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases 2016 Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral infections of the avian gastrointestinal tract negatively impact poultry production; however, determining the complex etiologies of the viral enteric diseases in poultry has been difficult. Project scientists are continuing to investigate the species specificity, molecular phylogenetics, and p...

  14. Exploring the viral world through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Karyna; Breitbart, Mya

    2011-10-01

    Viral metagenomics, or shotgun sequencing of purified viral particles, has revolutionized the field of environmental virology by allowing the exploration of viral communities in a variety of sample types throughout the biosphere. The introduction of viral metagenomics has demonstrated that dominant viruses in environmental communities are not well-represented by the cultured viruses in existing sequence databases. Viral metagenomic studies have provided insights into viral ecology by elucidating the genetic potential, community structure, and biogeography of environmental viruses. In addition, viral metagenomics has expanded current knowledge of virus-host interactions by uncovering genes that may allow viruses to manipulate their hosts in unexpected ways. The intrinsic potential for virus discovery through viral metagenomics can help advance a wide array of disciplines including evolutionary biology, pathogen surveillance, and biotechnology.

  15. Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Global Health Health Consequences of Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal ... Publications » DrugFacts » Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Email Facebook Twitter Revised March ...

  16. Viral commercials: the consumer as marketeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, P.E.; Lucassen, P.; Kregting, G.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Research into the reasons why consumers pass along viral commercials: their motives, the content characteristics of viral commercials and the medium context in which viral commercials appear. Based on the uses and gratifications perspective this study has determined which motives of consumers,

  17. Viral ecology of a shallow eutrophic lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to give an insight into the ecology of the viral community in a shallow eutrophic lake. To achieve this, the population dynamics, diversity and control of the viral community in Lake Loosdrecht were studied, as well as the impact of the viral community on plankton mortality and comm

  18. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Smits (Saskia); R. Bodewes (Rogier); A. Ruiz-Gonzalez (Aritz); V. Baumgärtner (Volkmar); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A. Schürch (Anita)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractViral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow r

  19. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    A number of herpes- and poxviruses encode 7TM G-protein coupled receptors most of which clearly are derived from their host chemokine system as well as induce high expression of certain 7TM receptors in the infected cells. The receptors appear to be exploited by the virus for either immune evasion...... in various parts of the viral life cyclus. Most of the receptors encoded by human pathogenic virus are still orphan receptors, i.e. the endogenous ligand is unknown. In the few cases where it has been possible to characterize these receptors pharmacologically, they have been found to bind a broad spectrum...... expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  20. [Recent acquisitions on viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resti, M; Tucci, F; Vierucci, A

    1990-01-01

    In the last years the research on viral hepatitis let to better understand the biological, molecular, immunological and epidemiologic characteristics of the viruses that are responsible for hepatitis. The first studied virus was hepatitis B virus (HBv). The scientific attention is still, today, focused on that virus since new markers of infectivity and biological importance in early diagnosis and in disease evolution have been found. The most important result in the last years in the field of viral hepatitis has been, however, the identification of agents responsible for Non-A-Non-B hepatitis. Its epidemiology and clinical importance are discussed in the present paper. Virus C is the most important parenteral agent of NANB hepatitis. Its epidemiology in at risk populations and its role in post-transfusional and cryptogenetic hepatitis are here discussed. The research of new markers of HCV infection is today considered a main goal since the role of the only marker now available is still under discussion.

  1. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  2. RHEUMATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune reactions are of primary importance in the development of extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis, among which there are rheumatic symptoms and syndromes. The incidence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is shown to be relatively low, but they may be in the foreground in the clinical picture of the disease and are noted for severity. It is concluded that due to the high prevalence of hepatitis and the systemic pattern of their chronic forms, patients with extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis may be encountered in the practice of a therapist and a rheumatologist. The onset of the infection caused by hepatitis viruses may be accompanied by articular lesion therefore the rheumatologist may be the first physician such a patient may resort to.

  3. RHEUMATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune reactions are of primary importance in the development of extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis, among which there are rheumatic symptoms and syndromes. The incidence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is shown to be relatively low, but they may be in the foreground in the clinical picture of the disease and are noted for severity. It is concluded that due to the high prevalence of hepatitis and the systemic pattern of their chronic forms, patients with extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis may be encountered in the practice of a therapist and a rheumatologist. The onset of the infection caused by hepatitis viruses may be accompanied by articular lesion therefore the rheumatologist may be the first physician such a patient may resort to.

  4. Viral diseases and human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish l...

  5. Treatment of acute viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis represents the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most frequently identified virus, but many other viruses may also cause acute bronchiolitis. There is no common definition of acute viral bronchiolitis used internationally, and this may explain part of the confusion in the literature. Most children with bronchiolitis have a self limiting mild disease and can be safely managed at home with careful attention to feeding and respiratory status. Criteria for referral and admission vary between hospitals as do clinical practice in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, and there is confusion and lack of evidence over the best treatment for this condition. Supportive care, including administration of oxygen and fluids, is the cornerstone of current treatment. The majority of infants and children with bronchiolitis do not require specific measures. Bronchodilators should not be routinely used in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, but may be effective in some patients. Most of the commonly used management modalities have not been shown to have a clear beneficial effect on the course of the disease. For example, inhaled and systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies, antibiotics, antiviral therapy, and chest physiotherapy should not be used routinely in the management of bronchiolitis. The potential effect of hypertonic saline on the course of the acute disease is promising, but further studies are required. In critically ill children with bronchiolitis, today there is little justification for the use of surfactant and heliox. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure may be beneficial in children with severe bronchiolitis but a large trial is needed to determine its value. Finally, very little is known on the effect of the various

  6. STUDY OF PERSISTENT VIRAL INFECTION IN AN ANIMAL MODEL OF VIRAL MYOCARDITIS BY PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马睿; 陈曙霞; 刘晶星

    2000-01-01

    ffeStnn6 Objectif Etudier ie r6le de l'infection virale persistante dans ie pethog4de de la myOCardite virale.ANt~ L' ARN viral dens ie my~rde et ie mug et l' alteration potholedque du m~rde ent ate ewilnd per la techniquede PCR adns un mangle de myrmrdite virale chez ies ~ris. Rhaltats L 'ARN viral a ate detects an 3'jour dens ie mug etie myrmrde. An 8'jour, I 'ARN viral an niveau du mug a ate pertiellement dewnu then f lorsque l' alteration pethologiquedu myocarde a atteint un maximum. he 12'jour, L' ARN ...

  7. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma.

  8. Problems in diagnosing viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, F; Colloredo Mels, G; Bellati, G; Ideo, G; Oliveri, F; Colombatto, P; Brunetto, M R

    1993-01-01

    The most reliable method of making a specific aetiological diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis would be to identify virus specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes responsible for the killing of virus infected hepatocytes in each patient's liver. Unfortunately, this can not be proposed for routine diagnosis and surrogate tests are required. The detection of virus markers, and even of the virus itself, does not imply that liver damage is caused by virus infection. Indirect markers of the host's antiviral immunoresponse have to be used to confirm more specifically the diagnosis of viral hepatitis. IgM antibodies against viral antigens implicated in the elimination of the virus seem to be suitable alternative candidates. Significant changes in the serum values of viraemia and aminotransferases occur within a few days, while a significant variation in liver histology takes much longer. Only the kinetics of the highly variable parameters can be used for an appropriate study of the relationship between viraemia, antiviral immunoresponse, and liver cell necrosis. Quantitative and dynamic analyses of hepatitis virus markers seem the most suitable and reliable methods of monitoring the patients eligible for antiviral treatment and identifying the most appropriate time to start this. PMID:8314490

  9. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Vale-Costa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC, and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition.

  10. Viral-templated Palladium Nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuixian

    Despite recent progress on nanocatalysis, there exist several critical challenges in simple and readily controllable nanocatalyst synthesis including the unpredictable particle growth, deactivation of catalytic activity, cumbersome catalyst recovery and lack of in-situ reaction monitoring. In this dissertation, two novel approaches are presented for the fabrication of viral-templated palladium (Pd) nanocatalysts, and their catalytic activities for dichromate reduction reaction and Suzuki Coupling reaction were thoroughly studied. In the first approach, viral template based bottom-up assembly is employed for the Pd nanocatalyst synthesis in a chip-based format. Specifically, genetically displayed cysteine residues on each coat protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) templates provide precisely spaced thiol functionalities for readily controllable surface assembly and enhanced formation of catalytically active Pd nanoparticles. Catalysts with the chip-based format allow for simple separation and in-situ monitoring of the reaction extent. Thorough examination of synthesis-structure-activity relationship of Pd nanoparticles formed on surface-assembled viral templates shows that Pd nanoparticle size, catalyst loading density and catalytic activity of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts can be readily controlled simply by tuning the synthesis conditions. The viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts with optimized synthesis conditions are shown to have higher catalytic activity per unit Pd mass than the commercial Pd/C catalysts. Furthermore, tunable and selective surface assembly of TMV biotemplates is exploited to control the loading density and location of Pd nanocatalysts on solid substrates via preferential electroless deposition. In addition, the catalytic activities of surface-assembled TMV-templated Pd nanocatalysts were also investigated for the ligand-free Suzuki Coupling reaction under mild reaction conditions. The chip-based format enables simple catalyst separation and

  11. Extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Marc R; Andrew White, K

    2007-08-01

    The analysis of viral RNA is a fundamental aspect of plant RNA virus research. Studies that focus on viral RNAs often involve virus infections of plant protoplasts (see UNITS 16D.1-16D.4). Protoplast offer the advantage of simultaneous initiation of infections, which allows for superior temporal and quantitative analyses of viral RNAs. The efficient isolation of intact viral RNA is key to any such investigations. This unit describes two basic protocols for extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts. An approach for preparing double-stranded viral RNA from total RNA pools is also provided. The viral RNA prepared by using these techniques can be used for further analyses such as primer extension, reverse transcription-PCR, and northern blotting.

  12. Encefalitis virales en la infancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monserrat Téllez de Meneses

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La encefalitis viral es una enfermedad grave que implica el compromiso inflamatorio del parénquima cerebral. Las infecciones virales del SNC ocurren con frecuencia como complicación de infecciones virales sistémicas. Más de 100 virus están implicados como agentes causales, entre los cuales el virus Herpes simplex tipo I, es el agente causal más frecuente de encefalitis no epidémica en todos los grupos poblacionales del mundo; es el responsable de los casos más graves en todas las edades. Muchos de los virus para los cuales existe vacunas también pueden causar encefalitis como: sarampión, paperas, polio, rabia, rubéola, varicela. El virus produce una inflamación del tejido cerebral, la cual puede evolucionar a una destrucción de neuronas, provocar hemorragia y daño cerebral, dando lugar a encefalitis graves, como la encefalitis necrotizante o hemorrágica, con mucho peor pronóstico, produciendo secuelas graves, incluso la muerte. El cuadro clínico, incluye la presencia de cefalea, fiebre y alteración de la conciencia, de rápida progresión. El pronóstico de las encefalitis víricas es variable, algunos casos son leves, con recuperación completa, sin embargo existen casos graves que pueden ocasionar secuelas importantes a nivel cerebral. Es fundamental realizar un diagnóstico lo antes posible, a través de pruebas de laboratorio (bioquímica, PCR, cultivos y de neuroimagen (TAC, RM y ante todo, la instauración de un tratamiento precoz para evitar la evolución del proceso y sus posibles complicaciones. El pronóstico empeora si se retrasa la instauración del tratamiento.

  13. Evaluation of Viral Meningoencephalitis Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Ilhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate retrospectively adult cases of viral encephalitis. METHOD: Fifteen patients described viral encephalitis hospitalized between the years 2006-2011 follow-up and treatment at the infectious diseases clinic were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Most of the patients (%60 had applied in the spring. Fever (87%, confusion (73%, neck stiffness (73%, headache (73%, nausea-vomiting (33%, loss of consciousness (33%, amnesia (33%, agitation (20%, convulsion (%20, focal neurological signs (13%, Brudzinski-sign (13% were most frequently encountered findings. Electroencephalography test was applied to 13 of 14 patients, and pathological findings compatible with encephalitis have been found. Radiological imaging methods such as CT and MRI were performed in 9 of the 14 patients, and findings consistent with encephalitis were reported. All of initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were abnormal. The domination of the first examples was lymphocytes in 14 patients; only one patient had an increase in neutrophilic cells have been found. CSF protein level was high in nine patients, and low glucose level was detected in two patients. Herpes simplex virus polymerized chain reaction (PCR analyze was performed to fourteen patients CSF. Only two of them (14% were found positive. One of the patients sample selectively examined was found to be Parvovirus B19 (+, the other patient urine sample Jacobs-creutzfeld virus PCR was found to be positively. Empiric acyclovir therapy was given to all patients. Neuropsychiatric squeal developed at the one patient. CONCLUSION: The cases in the forefront of change in mental status viral meningoencephalitis should be considered and empirical treatment with acyclovir should be started. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(4.000: 447-452

  14. RNA silencing and plant viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Bo; Masuta, Chikara; Smith, Neil A; Shimura, Hanako

    2012-10-01

    RNA silencing plays a critical role in plant resistance against viruses, with multiple silencing factors participating in antiviral defense. Both RNA and DNA viruses are targeted by the small RNA-directed RNA degradation pathway, with DNA viruses being also targeted by RNA-directed DNA methylation. To evade RNA silencing, plant viruses have evolved a variety of counter-defense mechanisms such as expressing RNA-silencing suppressors or adopting silencing-resistant RNA structures. This constant defense-counter defense arms race is likely to have played a major role in defining viral host specificity and in shaping viral and possibly host genomes. Recent studies have provided evidence that RNA silencing also plays a direct role in viral disease induction in plants, with viral RNA-silencing suppressors and viral siRNAs as potentially the dominant players in viral pathogenicity. However, questions remain as to whether RNA silencing is the principal mediator of viral pathogenicity or if other RNA-silencing-independent mechanisms also account for viral disease induction. RNA silencing has been exploited as a powerful tool for engineering virus resistance in plants as well as in animals. Further understanding of the role of RNA silencing in plant-virus interactions and viral symptom induction is likely to result in novel anti-viral strategies in both plants and animals.

  15. Viral diseases of marine invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. T.

    1984-03-01

    Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine sponges; turbellarian and monogenetic flatworms; cephalopod, bivalve, and gastropod mollusks; nereid polychaetes; and isopod and decapod crustaceans. Most of the viruses can be tentatively assigned to the Herpesviridae, Baculoviridae, Iridoviridae, Adenoviridae, Papovaviridae, Reoviridae, “Birnaviridae”, Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Viruslike particles found in oysters might be representatives of the Togaviridae and Retroviridae. Enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses from crustaceans have developmental and morphological characteristics intermediate between families, and some show evidence of relationships to the Paramyxoviridae as well as the Bunyaviridae or Rhabdoviridae. Certain small viruses of shrimp cannot be assigned, even tentatively, to a particular family. Some viruses cause disease in wild and captive hosts, others are associated with disease states but may not be primary instigators, and many occur in apparently normal animals. The frequency of viral disease in natural populations of marine invertebrates is unknown. Several viruses that cause disease in captive animals, with or without experimental intervention, have also been found in diseased wild hosts, including herpeslike viruses of crabs and oysters, iridovirus of octopus, and reolike and bunyalike viruses of crabs. Iridolike viruses have been implicated in massive mortalities of cultured oysters. Baculoviruses, and IHHN virus, which is of uncertain affinities, cause economically damaging diseases in cultured penaeid shrimp. Double or multiple viral infection is common in crabs. For example, a reolike virus and associated rhabdolike virus act synergistically to cause paralytic and fatal disease in Callinectes sapidus. Information on host range, most susceptible stage, and viral latency is available only for viruses of shrimp. One baculovirus attacks five species of New World penaeid shrimp. IHHN virus infects three species of

  16. [The ABC of viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bambeke, F

    2008-03-01

    Viral hepatitis has long been under-diagnosed. Hepatitis A is an acute disease, while patients infected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses are likely to develop chronical infections and severe complications (cancer, cirrhosis). The current treatment of hepatitis B and C consists in alpha interferon (preferably under its pegylated form), in combination with ribavirin for hepatitis C. The frequent and severe adverse effects of interferon-based therapy constitute, however, a major limiting factor (reactions at the injection site, flu-like syndrome, neurological disorders, ...). For hepatitis B, two alternatives are available so far, namely lamivudine and adefovir (used as a prodrug with highe oral bioavailability).

  17. Authentic counterfeit in viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This master thesis deals with authentic fake, a phenomenon present in viral marketing. After a brief introduction into the issue and clarification of terms, the study aims to find out whether a seemingly authentic video recording of a catchy incident helps a marketing campaign to succeed, that is to say to achieve high sharing figures amongst internet users. In a theoretical part, the thesis elaborates information from technical books, publications and internet sources dealing with authentici...

  18. Mast cells in viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Witczak; Ewa Brzezińska-Błaszczyk

    2012-01-01

     There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9), but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Fu...

  19. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  20. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  1. Commercialization of veterinary viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flore, P H

    2004-12-01

    If vaccines are to reliably prevent disease, they must be developed, produced and quality-controlled according to very strict regulations and procedures. Veterinary viral vaccine registrations are governed by different rules in different countries, but these rules all emphasize that the quality of the raw materials--the cells, eggs, animals or plants that are used in production--need to be carefully controlled. The veterinary vaccine business is also very cost-conscious. Emphasis over the last 5-10 years has therefore been to develop culture systems that minimize labor and sterility problems and thus provide for reliable and cost-effective production. Implementing these often more complex systems in a production environment takes considerable effort, first in scale-up trials and further down the line in convincing production personnel to change their familiar system for something new and possibly untried. To complete scale-up trials successfully, it is absolutely necessary to understand the biochemistry of the cells and the influence of the virus on the cells under scale-up and later production conditions. Once a viral product can be produced on a large scale, it is imperative that the quality of the end-product is controlled in an intelligent way. One needs to know whether the end-product performs in the animal as was intended during its conception in the research and development department. The development of the appropriate tests to demonstrate this plays an important role in the successful development of a vaccine.

  2. Innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shohei; Ishii, Ken J; Coban, Cevayir; Akira, Shizuo

    2008-09-01

    In viral infections the host innate immune system is meant to act as a first line defense to prevent viral invasion or replication before more specific protection by the adaptive immune system is generated. In the innate immune response, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are engaged to detect specific viral components such as viral RNA or DNA or viral intermediate products and to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in the infected cells and other immune cells. Recently these innate immune receptors and their unique downstream pathways have been identified. Here, we summarize their roles in the innate immune response to virus infection, discrimination between self and viral nucleic acids and inhibition by virulent factors and provide some recent advances in the coordination between innate and adaptive immune activation.

  3. Sponging of Cellular Proteins by Viral RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Charley, Phillida A.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNAs accumulate to high levels during infection and interact with a variety of cellular factors including miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Although many of these interactions exist to directly modulate replication, translation and decay of viral transcripts, evidence is emerging that abundant viral RNAs may in certain cases serve as a sponge to sequester host non coding RNAs and proteins. By effectively reducing the ability of cellular RNA binding proteins to regulate host cell gene exp...

  4. Viral Advertising on Facebook in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Phuong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore which factors affect the effectiveness of viral advertising on Facebook in Vietnam. The quantitative research method is applied in this research and the sample is Vietnamese Facebook users. After the data analysis stage using SPSS, it became clear that weak ties, perceptual affinity and emotions have an impact on the effectiveness of viral advertising. The results provide a pratical implication of how to make an Ad which can go viral on Facebook. Moreo...

  5. Pediatric knowledge about acute viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Franca,Rita; Silva,Luciana; Melo, Maria Clotildes; Cavalcante,Suzy; Lima, Bruno; Rocha, Anita; Gomes, Cristiana; Franca, Mônica

    2004-01-01

    p.227-235 Knowledge about hepatotropic viruses is crucial for pediatricians because of the high prevalence of viral hepatitis during childhood. The multiplicity of hepatotropic viruses, the spectrum of acute and chronic infections, and the sequels of viral hepatitis result in a need for physicians to better understand the clinical and epidemiological context of patients with viral hepatitis, as well as the importance of prevention measures for hepatitis. A descriptive cross-sectional study...

  6. Consumers’ attitude towards viral marketing in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Kiani Irshad ZERNIGAH; Kamran SOHAIL

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advancement of technology has opened many costeffective avenues for marketers to promote their products. One of the emerging techniques of products promotion through the use of technology is viral marketing that is becoming a popular direct marketing tool for marketers across the world. Therefore, marketers should understand factors that result in increased acceptance of viral marketing by consumers. The present research was conducted to investigate consumers’ attitude towards viral...

  7. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  8. Virion-targeted viral inactivation: new therapy against viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okui, N; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Sakuma, R; Ishikawa, T; Kitamura, T

    2001-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is resistant to all current therapy. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative or additive to current, unsatisfactory AIDS therapy. To develop an antiviral molecule targeting viral integrase (HIV IN), we generated a single-chain antibody, termed scAb, which interacted with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN and inhibited virus replication at the integration step when expressed intracellularly. To reduce infectivity from within the virus particles, we made expression plasmids (pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-CA, and pC-scAbE-WXXF), which expressed the anti-HIV IN scAb fused to the N-terminus of HIV-1-associated accessory protein R (Vpr), capsid protein (CA), and specific binding motif to Vpr (WXXF), respectively. All fusion proteins were tagged with a nine-amino acid peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) at the C terminus. The fusion molecules, termed scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF, interacted specifically with HIV IN immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. Immunoblot analysis showed that scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF were incorporated into the virions produced by cotransfection of 293T cells with HIV-1 infectious clone DNA (pLAI) and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF. A multinuclear activation galactosidase indicator (MAGI) assay revealed that the virions released from 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF had as little 1000-fold of the infectivity of the control wild-type virions, which were produced from the 293T cells transfected with pLAI alone. Furthermore, the virions produced from the 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and an scAb expression vector (pC-scAb) showed only 1% of the infectivity of the control HIV-1 in a MAGI assay, although scAb was not incorporated into the virions. In either instance, the total quantity of the progeny virions released from the transfected 293T cells and the patterns of the virion proteins were hardly affected by the presence of

  9. Exploring Text Virality in Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guerini, Marco; Ozbal, Gozde

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to shed some light on the concept of virality - especially in social networks - and to provide new insights on its structure. We argue that: (a) virality is a phenomenon strictly connected to the nature of the content being spread, rather than to the influencers who spread it, (b) virality is a phenomenon with many facets, i.e. under this generic term several different effects of persuasive communication are comprised and they only partially overlap. To give ground to our claims, we provide initial experiments in a machine learning framework to show how various aspects of virality can be independently predicted according to content features.

  10. Chronic viral hepatitis : diagnosis and therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, George Y; Koff, Raymond S

    2001-01-01

    .... The discussion of patient management includes contributions on developing novel therapeutics, supporting patients during therapy, alternative treatments, the use of drugs in chronic viral hepatitis...

  11. Viral Subversion of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Le Sage

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC acts as a selective barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and is responsible for mediating communication by regulating the transport of RNA and proteins. Numerous viral pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to hijack the NPC in order to regulate trafficking of viral proteins, genomes and even capsids into and out of the nucleus thus promoting virus replication. The present review examines the different strategies and the specific nucleoporins utilized during viral infections as a means of promoting their life cycle and inhibiting host viral defenses.

  12. STUDY OF PERSISTENT VIRAL INFECTION IN AN ANIMALMODEL OF VIRAL MYOCARDITIS BY PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the role of persistent viral infection in the mechanism of viral myocarditis. Methods A mice model of CVB3m viral myocarditis was made and the viral RNA in mice myocardium and whole blood sample was tested by using polymerase chain reaction ( PCR ) technique. The pathological changes in mice myocardium were determined. Results On day 3, the viral gene in whole blood and myocardium was found, which partly became negative on day 8, but the change of myocardial pathology became obvious. Although the blood specimens were tested negatively on day 12, the viral gene in mice myocardium remained positive within 120d. Conclusion This study indicates that persistent viral infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis.

  13. Viral diseases of northern ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Frölich

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes viral diseases reported in northern ungulates and those that are a potential threat to these species. The following diseases are discussed: bovine viral diarrhoea/mucosal disease (BVD/MD, alphaherpesvirus infections, malignant catarrhal fever (MCF, poxvirus infections, parainfluenza type 3 virus infection, Alvsborg disease, foot-and-mouth disease, epizootic haemorrhage disease of deer and bluetongue disease, rabies, respiratory syncytial virus infection, adenovirus infection, hog-cholera, Aujeszky's disease and equine herpesvirus infections. There are no significant differences in antibody prevalence to BVDV among deer in habitats with high, intermediate and low density of cattle. In addition, sequence analysis from the BVDV isolated from roe deer (Capreolus capreolus showed that this strain was unique within BVDV group I. Distinct BVDV strains might circulate in free-ranging roe deer populations in Germany and virus transmission may be independent of domestic livestock. Similar results have been obtained in a serological survey of alpha-herpesviruses in deer in Germany. Malignant catarrhal fever was studied in fallow deer (Cervus dama in Germany: the seroprevalence and positive PCR results detected in sheep originating from the same area as the antibody-positive deer might indicate that sheep are the main reservoir animals. Contagious ecthyma (CE is a common disease in domestic sheep and goats caused by the orf virus. CE has been diagnosed in Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis, mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus, Dall sheep (Ovis dalli, chamois (Rupkapra rupi-capra, muskox {Ovibos moschatus and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus. Most parainfluenza type 3 virus infections are mild or clinically undetectable. Serological surveys in wildlife have been successfully conducted in many species. In 1985, a new disease was identified in Swedish moose (Alces alces, designated as Alvsborg disease. This wasting syndrome probably

  14. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  15. [Microbiological diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Roberto; Aguilera, Antonio; Córdoba, Juan; Fuertes, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Liver inflammation or hepatitis has many different causes, both infectious and non-infectious. Among the former, viral infection is responsible for at least half of all hepatitis worldwide. Different viruses have been described with primary tropism for liver tissue. These microorganisms have been successively named with letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E and G. The aim of this paper is to review this heterogeneous group of viruses in its most basic aspects, including clinical implications, treatment, main control, and prophylactic measures and, of special interest, diagnostic approaches, both serological and molecular, which are used for their detection, quantification and characterization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  17. Viral bronchiolitis for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2011-04-01

    Viral bronchiolitis is common, and about 98-99% of infants are managed in the home. Because about 95% of infants < 2 years old are infected with respiratory syncytial virus, however, bronchiolitis is the commonest reason for admission to hospital in the first 6 months of life. It is usually a self-limiting condition lasting around a week in previously well children. About 1% of infants are admitted to hospital, and about 10% of hospitalised infants will require admission to the intensive care unit. Respiratory syncytial virus is isolated from about 70% of infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis. The emphasis of hospital treatment is to ensure adequate hydration and oxygenation. Other than supplemental oxygen, little in the way of pharmacological treatment has been demonstrated to alter the course of the illness or the risk of wheezing in the months following bronchiolitis.

  18. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  19. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  20. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  1. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2014 Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Cases Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Discussion Hepatitis A virus Index PAGE DESCRIPTION Table 2.1 Reported ...

  2. Viral Quasispecies Assembly via Maximal Clique Enumeration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toepfer, A.; Marschall, T.; Bull, R.A.; Luciani, F.; Schoenhuth, A.; Beerenwinkel, N.

    2014-01-01

    Virus populations can display high genetic diversity within individual hosts. The intra-host collection of viral haplotypes, called viral quasispecies, is an important determinant of virulence, pathogenesis, and treatment outcome. We present HaploClique, a computational approach to reconstruct the s

  3. Emerging Viral Diseases of Tomato Crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanssen, I.M.; Lapidot, M.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Viral diseases are an important limiting factor in many crop production systems. Because antiviral products are not available, control strategies rely on genetic resistance or hygienic measures to prevent viral diseases, or on eradication of diseased crops to control such diseases. Increasing intern

  4. Characterization of the viral O-glycopeptidome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cló, Emiliano; Kracun, Stjepan K; Nudelman, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Viral envelope proteins mediate interactions with host cells, leading to internalization and intracellular propagation. Envelope proteins are glycosylated and are known to serve important functions in masking host immunity to viral glycoproteins. However, the viral infectious cycle in cells may...... also lead to aberrant glycosylation that may elicit immunity. Our knowledge of immunity to aberrant viral glycans and glycoproteins is limited, potentially due to technical limitations in identifying immunogenic glycans and glycopeptide epitopes. This work describes three different complementary...... methods for high-throughput screening and identification of potential immunodominant O-glycopeptide epitopes on viral envelope glycoproteins: (i) on-chip enzymatic glycosylation of scan peptides, (ii) chemical glycopeptide microarray synthesis, and (iii) a one-bead-one-compound random glycopeptide library...

  5. Ethical Considerations in Research Participation Virality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis-Barton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    This article seeks to commence and encourage discussion around the upcoming ethical challenges of virality in network structures. When the call for participation in a research project on lupus in Ireland went from an advertisement in a newsletter to a meme (unit of transmissible information) on a closed Facebook page, the ethical considerations of virality were raised. The article analyzes the Association of Internet Researchers guidelines, Facebook policies, and the context of privacy in relation to virality. Virality creates the leverage for methodological pluralism. The nature of the inquiry can determine the method rather than the other way around. Viral ethical considerations are evolving due to the cyber world becoming the primary meme of communication, with flexibility in the researcher's protocol providing opportunities for efficient, cost-effective, and diverse recruitment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Origins and challenges of viral dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Wang, David

    2017-02-09

    The accurate classification of viral dark matter - metagenomic sequences that originate from viruses but do not align to any reference virus sequences - is one of the major obstacles in comprehensively defining the virome. Depending on the sample, viral dark matter can make up from anywhere between 40 and 90% of sequences. This review focuses on the specific nature of dark matter as it relates to viral sequences. We identify three factors that contribute to the existence of viral dark matter: the divergence and length of virus sequences, the limitations of alignment based classification, and limited representation of viruses in reference sequence databases. We then discuss current methods that have been developed to at least partially circumvent these limitations and thereby reduce the extent of viral dark matter.

  7. Chagasic patients are able to respond against a viral antigen from influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasso Paola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, is an obligate intracellular parasite which induces a CD8+ T cell immune response with secretion of cytokines and release of cytotoxic granules. Although an immune-suppressive effect of T. cruzi on the acute phase of the disease has been described, little is known about the capacity of CD8+ T cell from chronic chagasic patients to respond to a non-T. cruzi microbial antigen. Methods In the present paper, the frequency, phenotype and the functional activity of the CD8+ T cells specific from Flu-MP*, an influenza virus epitope, were determined in 13 chagasic patients and 5 healthy donors. Results The results show that Flu-MP* peptide specific CD8+ T cells were found with similar frequencies in both groups. In addition, Flu-MP* specific CD8+ T cells were distributed in the early or intermediate/late differentiation stages without showing enrichment of a specific sub-population. The mentioned Flu-MP* specific CD8+ T cells from chagasic patients were predominately TEM (CCR7- CD62L-, producing IL-2, IFNγ, CD107a/b and perforin, and did not present significant differences when compared with those from healthy donors. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that there is no CD8+ T cell nonspecific immune-suppression during chronic Chagas disease infection. Nonetheless, other viral antigens must be studied in order to confirm our findings.

  8. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... the United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  9. [Treatment of viral hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O

    1996-12-14

    Viral hepatitis C is a serious public health problem in France by the number of infected patients, the evolutive profile and by the lack of fully efficient therapeutics. However, the risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma may not be so high as it has been stated until now. Interferon alpha is at the present time, the only approved drug for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Its efficiency on criteria such as normalization of aminotransferases values or negativation of viremia is obtained in less than 25% of patients. The present recommendation is to use 3 MU of interferon alpha, 3 times per week during 12 months. While interferon leads to improvement of histologic lesions, it is not yet proved that a treatment by interferon can reduce, years after, the incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. No therapeutic strategy has been defined yet for the frequent situations of "no response", relapses or presence of factors that reduce the efficacy of treatment (high initial viremia level, genotype 1b, cirrhosis). It is possible that the course of patients having low or no elevation of aminotransferases and/or minimal histologic lesions, is good without any treatment. The efficacy of interferon alone appears insufficient. Thus trials in progress concern associations of antiviral drugs such as vidarabine. In lack of vaccine, preventive treatment is essential and depends upon knowledge of conditions of transmission of the virus. Transmission through blood and intravenous drug addiction represent 60 to 70% of cases of hepatitis C.

  10. Immunological techniques in viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehermann, Barbara; Naoumov, Nikolai V

    2007-03-01

    The need to quantitate and monitor immune responses of large patient cohorts with standardized techniques is increasing due to the growing range of treatment options for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, the development of combination therapies, and candidate experimental vaccines for HCV. In addition, advances in immunological techniques have provided new tools for detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of cellular immune responses. At present, there is substantial variation in laboratory protocols, reagents, controls and analysis and presentation of results. Standardization of immunological assays would therefore allow better comparison of results amongst individual laboratories and patient cohorts. The EASL-sponsored and AASLD-endorsed Monothematic Conference on Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis was held at the University College London, United Kingdom, Oct 7-8, 2006 to bring together investigators with research experience in clinical immunology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections for in-depth discussion, critical evaluation and standardization of immunological assays. This report summarizes the information presented and discussed at the conference, but is not intended to represent a consensus statement. Our aim is to highlight topics and issues that were supported by general agreement and those that were controversial, as well as to provide suggestions for future work.

  11. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia L Smits

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow rapid phylogenetic characterization of these new viruses. Often, however, complete viral genomes are not recovered, but rather several distinct contigs derived from a single entity, some of which have no sequence homology to any known proteins. De novo assembly of single viruses from a metagenome is challenging, not only because of the lack of a reference genome, but also because of intrapopulation variation and uneven or insufficient coverage. Here we explored different assembly algorithms, remote homology searches, genome-specific sequence motifs, k-mer frequency ranking, and coverage profile binning to detect and obtain viral target genomes from metagenomes. All methods were tested on 454-generated sequencing datasets containing three recently described RNA viruses with a relatively large genome which were divergent to previously known viruses from the viral families Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae. Depending on specific characteristics of the target virus and the metagenomic community, different assembly and in silico gap closure strategies were successful in obtaining near complete viral genomes.

  12. Vaccines in the Prevention of Viral Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clementine S; Jha, Akhilesh; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is of great global public health importance. Viral infections play both direct and indirect parts in its cause across the globe. Influenza is a leading cause of viral pneumonia in both children and adults, and respiratory syncytial virus is increasingly recognized as causing disease at both extremes of age. Vaccination offers the best prospect for prevention but current influenza vaccines do not provide universal and durable protection, and require yearly reformulation. In the future, it is hoped that influenza vaccines will give better and universal protection, and that new vaccines can be found for other causes of viral pneumonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A skeptical look at viral immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, I A; Rouse, B T

    1997-12-01

    In the past several years, many viral gene products have been found to encode proteins which interfere with immune defense mechanisms. Whether these interactions between virus and immune system components are actually evasion mechanisms used during viral infections in their natural hosts remains to be proven. In vitro studies do, however, reveal several tactics which may aid viral replication and dissemination by interfering with components of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this manuscript, we discuss the more intensively studied of these putative in vitro evasion tactics and ponder their relevance in in vivo situations.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL LIPOSOMAL VIRAL VACCINE SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanova OA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. With the transport links development there is rather important issue respiratory viral infections spread, especially influenza. The only method controlling influenza is vaccination. Search and development effective and safe vaccines is important. Material and methods. In base SO "Mechnikov Institute Microbiology and Immunology National Ukrainian Academy Medical Sciences" in the scientific theme "Developing new approaches to creating viral vaccines and study specific activity depending of type and degree component`s modification" was created several experimental influenza vaccine with subsequent component`s modification for selecting the most optimal pattern of safety and immunogenicity. In assessing the influenza vaccine safety is using a few criteria, including, reactivity, as measured by the frequency of local and systemic adverse (negative effects, which due to its introduction, and for lipid content drugs, ability to influence oxidation processes. At present study phase was determined: a systemic reaction and local reaction of delayed-type hypersensitivity (foot pad swelling assay;b lipids and proteins peroxidation processes after administration officinal and experimental vaccines (content protein’s carbonyl groups, lipid’s hydroperoxides, activity of glutathione-peroxidase.Study objects were trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine, "Vaxigrip" (Sanofi Pasteur, S.A., France, "Inflexal V" (Biotech Ltd. Berne, Switzerland and experimental vaccine samples. Highest immunogenicity vaccines had undergone improvements and modifications using adjuvant systems and acylation influenza proteins. Liposomes 2 – the experimental influenza vaccine with a liposome negative charge and antigenic composition like split vaccines "Vaksihryp". Liposomes 2.1 - the adjuvantexperimental influenza vaccine with modifications liposomal components (etoniy and chlorophyllipt molecules embedded in liposomal membrane. Liposomes 2.2 - the adjuvant

  15. Viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francque Sven M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignant tumors in the world. The incidence of HCC varies considerably with the geographic area because of differences in the major causative factors. Chronic hepatitis B and C, mostly in the cirrhotic stage, are responsible for the great majority of cases of HCC worldwide. The geographic areas at the highest risk are South-East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, here hepatitis B is highly endemic and is the main cause of HCC. In areas with an intermediate rate of HCC such as Southern Europe and Japan, hepatitis C is the predominant cause, whereas in low rate areas such as Northern Europe and the USA, HCC is often related to other factors as alcoholic liver disease. There is a rising incidence in HCC in developed countries during the last two decades, due to the increasing rate of hepatitis C infection and improvement of the clinical management of cirrhosis. Methods This article reviews the literature on hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Medline search was carried out using these key words and articles were selected on epidemiology, risk factors, screening, and prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma. Results Screening of patients with advanced chronic hepatitis B and C with hepatic ultrasound and determination of serum alfa-fetoprotein may improve the detection of HCC, but further studies are needed whether screening improves clinical outcome. Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV/HCV can be implicated in the development of HCC in an indirect way, through induction of chronic inflammation, or directly by means of viral proteins or, in the case of HBV, by creation of mutations by integration into the genome of the hepatocyte. Conclusion The most effective tool to prevent HCC is avoidance of the risk factors such as viral infection. For HBV, a very effective vaccine is available. Preliminary data from Taiwan indicate a protective effect of universal vaccination on the

  16. Metatranscriptomic analysis of extremely halophilic viral communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santos, Fernando; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Meseguer, Inmaculada; López, Cristina; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon; Parro, Víctor; Antón, Josefa

    2011-01-01

    .... In this work, we analyzed the viral expression in one crystallizer using a metatranscriptomic approach in which clones from a metaviromic library were immobilized in a microarray and used as probes...

  17. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Barr virus, also called infectious mononucleosis; herpesvi rus; parvovirus; and adenovirus. What are the symptoms of viral ... such as cytomega lovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpesvirus, parvovirus, and adenovirus. These cases are called non-A– ...

  18. viral infections of the central nervous system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) include both acute and chronic conditions ... ADEM is a rare, immune-mediated disorder that is triggered by an environmental stimulus in ... difficulties and apathy. Typically there is cognitive ...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  2. [Pediatrics. New treatment options for viral bronchiolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, I; Hafen, G

    2013-01-16

    The combination of nebulized epinephrine and high dose dexamethasone, or nebulized hypertonic saline, are promising new therapeutic strategies for viral bronchiolitis in the young infant. However, further research is needed before a general recommendation can be given.

  3. Viral fitness: definitions, measurement, and current insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Viral fitness is an active area of research, with recent work involving an expanded number of human, non-human vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and bacterial viruses. Many publications deal with RNA viruses associated with major disease emergence events, such as HIV-1, influenza virus, and Dengue virus. Study topics include drug resistance, immune escape, viral emergence, host jumps, mutation effects, quasispecies diversity, and mathematical models of viral fitness. Important recent trends include increasing use of in vivo systems to assess vertebrate virus fitness, and a broadening of research beyond replicative fitness to also investigate transmission fitness and epidemiologic fitness. This is essential for a more integrated understanding of overall viral fitness, with implications for disease management in the future.

  4. Notified viral hepatitis in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlashan, N

    1976-05-26

    Statistical analysis of notified cases of viral hepatits in New Zealand for an 18-month period is used first to demonstrate and then to consider a geographical gradient across the country with implications warranting further epidemiologic enquiry.

  5. Mechanisms of influenza viral membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blijleven, Jelle S; Boonstra, Sander; Onck, Patrick R; van der Giessen, Erik; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2016-12-01

    Influenza viral particles are enveloped by a lipid bilayer. A major step in infection is fusion of the viral and host cellular membranes, a process with large kinetic barriers. Influenza membrane fusion is catalyzed by hemagglutinin (HA), a class I viral fusion protein activated by low pH. The exact nature of the HA conformational changes that deliver the energy required for fusion remains poorly understood. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HA structure and dynamics, describes recent single-particle experiments and modeling studies, and discusses their role in understanding how multiple HAs mediate fusion. These approaches provide a mechanistic picture in which HAs independently and stochastically insert into the target membrane, forming a cluster of HAs that is collectively able to overcome the barrier to membrane fusion. The new experimental and modeling approaches described in this review hold promise for a more complete understanding of other viral fusion systems and the protein systems responsible for cellular fusion.

  6. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  8. A Rapid Method for Viral Particle Detection in Viral-Induced Gastroenteritis: A TEM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, M. John; Barrish, James P.; Hayes, Elizabeth S.; Leer, Laurie C.; Estes, Mary K.; Cubitt, W. D.

    1995-10-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a common cause of hospitalization in the pediatric population. The most frequent cause of gastroenteritis is viral in origin. The purpose of this study was to compare a rapid modified negative-staining TEM method with the conventional pseudoreplica technique in detection of viral particles in fecal samples from children with viral gastroenteritis. The modified negative-staining method resulted in a significantly higher (2.5 ± 0.5, p = 0.02) viral rating score than that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique (1.7 ± 0.4). In addition, the preparation time for the negative-staining method was approximately one fifth that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique. Rapid diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis may be made by ultrastructural detection of viral particles in fecal samples using the negative staining technique.

  9. Rapid and highly fieldable viral diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a rapid, highly fieldable, nearly reagentless diagnostic to identify active RNA viral replication in a live, infected cells, and more particularly in leukocytes and tissue samples (including biopsies and nasal swabs) using an array of a plurality of vertically-aligned nanostructures that impale the cells and introduce a DNA reporter construct that is expressed and amplified in the presence of active viral replication.

  10. Rapid and highly fieldable viral diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Timothy E.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a rapid, highly fieldable, nearly reagentless diagnostic to identify active RNA viral replication in a live, infected cells, and more particularly in leukocytes and tissue samples (including biopsies and nasal swabs) using an array of a plurality of vertically-aligned nanostructures that impale the cells and introduce a DNA reporter construct that is expressed and amplified in the presence of active viral replication.

  11. Institute of Medicine's Report on Viral Hepatitis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-18

    In this podcast, Dr. John Ward, Director of CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, discusses the 2010 report, Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C, from the Institute of Medicine.  Created: 5/18/2010 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 5/18/2010.

  12. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dawn Weynberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis.

  13. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing.

  14. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maytawan Thanunchai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs are a subset of nonhematopoietic adult stem cells, readily isolated from various tissues and easily culture-expanded ex vivo. Intensive studies of the immune modulation and tissue regeneration over the past few years have demonstrated the great potential of MSCs for the prevention and treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD, immune-related disorders, and viral diseases. In immunocompromised individuals, the immunomodulatory activities of MSCs have raised safety concerns regarding the greater risk of primary viral infection and viral reactivation, which is a major cause of mortality after allogeneic transplantation. Moreover, high susceptibilities of MSCs to viral infections in vitro could reflect the destructive outcomes that might impair the clinical efficacy of MSCs infusion. However, the interplay between MSCs and virus is like a double-edge sword, and it also provides beneficial effects such as allowing the proliferation and function of antiviral specific effector cells instead of suppressing them, serving as an ideal tool for study of viral pathogenesis, and protecting hosts against viral challenge by using the antimicrobial activity. Here, we therefore review favorable and unfavorable consequences of MSCs and virus interaction with the highlight of safety and efficacy for applying MSCs as cell therapy.

  16. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  17. Comparing viral metagenomics methods using a highly multiplexed human viral pathogens reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Mee, Edward T; Collot-Teixeira, Sophie; Anderson, Rob; Schepelmann, Silke; Minor, Philip D; Delwart, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Unbiased metagenomic sequencing holds significant potential as a diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of any previously genetically described viral nucleic acids in clinical samples. Viral genome sequences can also inform on likely phenotypes including drug susceptibility or neutralization serotypes. In this study, different variables of the laboratory methods often used to generate viral metagenomics libraries were compared for their abilities to detect multiple viruses and generate full genome coverage. A biological reagent consisting of 25 different human RNA and DNA viral pathogens was used to estimate the effect of filtration and nuclease digestion, DNA/RNA extraction methods, pre-amplification and the use of different library preparation kits on the detection of viral nucleic acids. Filtration and nuclease treatment led to slight decreases in the percentage of viral sequence reads and number of viruses detected. For nucleic acid extractions silica spin columns improved viral sequence recovery relative to magnetic beads and Trizol extraction. Pre-amplification using random RT-PCR while generating more viral sequence reads resulted in detection of fewer viruses, more overlapping sequences, and lower genome coverage. The ScriptSeq library preparation method retrieved more viruses and a greater fraction of their genomes than the TruSeq and Nextera methods. Viral metagenomics sequencing was able to simultaneously detect up to 22 different viruses in the biological reagent analyzed including all those detected by qPCR. Further optimization will be required for the detection of viruses in biologically more complex samples such as tissues, blood, or feces.

  18. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    polishing by Karl Habel (a superb senior virologist who left the National Institutes of Health and came to Scripps), and the gifted postdoctoral fellows who joined my laboratory over four decades form the log of my scientific voyage. The strong friendships and collaborations developed with other young but growing experimentalists like Bernie Fields and Abner Notkins are the fabric of the tale I will weave and were pivotal in the establishment of viral pathogenesis as a discipline.

  19. Distinct patterns of HIV-1 evolution within metastatic tissues in patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salemi

    Full Text Available Despite highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, AIDS related lymphoma (ARL occurs at a significantly higher rate in patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV than in the general population. HIV-infected macrophages are a known viral reservoir and have been shown to have lymphomagenic potential in SCID mice; therefore, there is an interest in determining if a viral component to lymphomagenesis also exists. We sequenced HIV-1 envelope gp120 clones obtained post mortem from several tumor and non-tumor tissues of two patients who died with AIDS-related Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (ARL-NH. Similar results were found in both patients: 1 high-resolution phylogenetic analysis showed a significant degree of compartmentalization between lymphoma and non-lymphoma viral sub-populations while viral sub-populations from lymph nodes appeared to be intermixed within sequences from tumor and non-tumor tissues, 2 a 100-fold increase in the effective HIV population size in tumor versus non-tumor tissues was associated with the emergence of lymphadenopathy and aggressive metastatic ARL, and 3 HIV gene flow among lymph nodes, normal and metastatic tissues was non-random. The different population dynamics between the viruses found in tumors versus the non-tumor associated viruses suggest that there is a significant relationship between HIV evolution and lymphoma pathogenesis. Moreover, the study indicates that HIV could be used as an effective marker to study the origin and dissemination of lymphomas in vivo.

  20. Dicer-2 processes diverse viral RNA species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah R Sabin

    Full Text Available RNA silencing pathways play critical roles in gene regulation, virus infection, and transposon control. RNA interference (RNAi is mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, which are liberated from double-stranded (dsRNA precursors by Dicer and guide the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC to targets. Although principles governing small RNA sorting into RISC have been uncovered, the spectrum of RNA species that can be targeted by Dicer proteins, particularly the viral RNAs present during an infection, are poorly understood. Dicer-2 potently restricts viral infection in insects by generating virus-derived siRNAs from viral RNA. To better characterize the substrates of Dicer-2, we examined the virus-derived siRNAs produced during the Drosophila antiviral RNAi response to four different viruses using high-throughput sequencing. We found that each virus was uniquely targeted by the RNAi pathway; dicing substrates included dsRNA replication intermediates and intramolecular RNA stem loops. For instance, a putative intergenic RNA hairpin encoded by Rift Valley Fever virus generates abundant small RNAs in both Drosophila and mosquito cells, while repetitive sequences within the genomic termini of Vaccinia virus, which give rise to abundant small RNAs in Drosophila, were found to be transcribed in both insect and mammalian cells. Moreover, we provide evidence that the RNA species targeted by Dicer-2 can be modulated by the presence of a viral suppressor of RNAi. This study uncovered several novel, heavily targeted features within viral genomes, offering insight into viral replication, viral immune evasion strategies, and the mechanism of antiviral RNAi.

  1. Prospects for cannabinoid therapies in viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbrig, Marylou V; Fan, Yijun; Hazelton, Paul

    2013-11-06

    Cannabinoids are promising therapies to support neurogenesis and decelerate disease progression in neuroinflammatory and degenerative disorders. Whether neuroprotective effects of cannabinoids are sustainable during persistent viral infection of the CNS is not known. Using a rodent model of chronic viral encephalitis based on Borna Disease (BD) virus, in which 1 week treatment with the general cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 has been shown to be neuroprotective (Solbrig et al., 2010), we examine longer term (2 week treatment) effects of a general (CB1 and CB2) cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (1mg/kg ip twice per day) or a specific (CB2) cannabinoid receptor agonist HU-308 (5mg/kg ip once daily) on histopathology, measures of frontostriatal neurogenesis and gliogenesis, and viral load. We find that WIN and HU-308 differ in their ability to protect new BrdU(+) cells. The selective CB2 agonist HU increases BrdU(+) cells in prefrontal cortex (PFC), significantly increases BrdU(+) cells in striatum, differentially regulates polydendrocytes vs. microglia/macrophages, and reduces immune activation at a time WIN-treated rats appear tolerant to the anti-inflammatory effect of their cannabinoid treatment. WIN and HU had little direct viral effect in PFC and striatum, yet reduced viral signal in hippocampus. Thus, HU-308 action on CB2 receptors, receptors known to be renewed during microglia proliferation and action, is a nontolerizing mechanism of controlling CNS inflammation during viral encephalitis by reducing microglia activation, as well as partially limiting viral infection, and uses a nonpsychotropic cannabinoid agonist.

  2. Molecular piracy: the viral link to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-11-01

    The vast majority of the human experience with viral infections is associated with acute symptoms, such as malaise, fever, chills, rhinitis and diarrhea. With this acute or lytic phase, the immune system mounts a response and eliminates the viral agent while acquiring antibodies to that specific viral subtype. With latent or chronic infections, the viral agent becomes incorporated into the human genome. Viral agents capable of integration into the host's genetic material are particularly dangerous and may commandeer the host's ability to regulate normal cell growth and proliferation. The oncogenic viruses may immortalize the host cell, and facilitate malignant transformation. Cell growth and proliferation may be enhanced by viral interference with tumor suppressor gene function (p53 and pRb). Viruses may act as vectors for mutated proto-oncogenes (oncogenes). Overexpression of these oncogenes in viral-infected cells interferes with normal cell function and allows unregulated cell growth and proliferation, which may lead to malignant transformation and tumour formation. Development of oral neoplasms, both benign and malignant, has been linked to several viruses. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with oral hairy leukoplakia, lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Human herpesvirus-8 has been implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, multiple myeloma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and Castleman's disease. Human herpesvirus-6 has been detected in lymphoproliferative disease, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The role of human papillomavirus in benign (squamous papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris), premalignant (oral epithelial dysplasia), and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) neoplasms within the oral cavity is well recognized. Herpes simplex virus may participate as a cofactor in oral squamous

  3. Fish viral infections in northwest of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledo, A; Lupiani, B; Dopazo, C P; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

    1990-06-01

    During a three years survey, a total of 149 samples from 20 farms of rainbow trout, salmon and turbot were examined for the presence of virus with the purpose to study the viral infections affecting cultured fish and their incidence in the fishfarms of Northwestern Spain. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was the only viral agent isolated from salmonid fish. Fry and fingerlings of trout showed the highest infection rate (24%). This virus was not detected in broodstock or embryonated eggs, although it was isolated from ovaric and seminal fluids and from juvenile carriers. From 24 samples of salmon analyzed, IPNV was only detected in one sample of juveniles. Examination of turbot led the isolation of a new virus belonging to the reoviridae family, which affected to the ongrowing population. All of the IPNV tested belonged to serotype Sp regardless of the origin of the trout stocks. During the monitorization of imported embryonated eggs, no virus was detected from any of the samples. However, in some case, IPNV was isolated when testing the fry obtained in our laboratory from those samples of imported eggs. Our findings indicate that: i) the analysis of fingerlings increase the probability to detect viral infections allowing us an optimal control of importations, and ii) most of the viral infections of fish take place in the own fish farms. The detection of mixed viral and bacterial infections emphasize the importance of carrying out an integral microbiological analysis to determine the causal agent(s) of fish mortalities.

  4. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  5. Pancreatic involvement in chronic viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiki Katakura; Hiroshi Yotsuyanagi; Kiyoe Hashizume; Chiaki Okuse; Noriaki Okuse; Kohji Nishikawa; Michihiro Suzuki; Shiro Iino; Fumio Itoh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the frequency and characteristics of pancreatic disorders in the course of chronic viral hepatitis. METHODS: We prospectively assessed the serum pancreatic enzyme levels and imaging findings in patients with chronic viral hepatitis and healthy control subjects. RESULTS: Serum amylase (t-Amy), salivary amylase (s-Amy), pancreatic amylase (p-Amy) and serum lipase levels were higher in hepatitis patients in comparison to control subjects. However, in asymptomatic viral carriers, only the serum t-Amy levels were higher than those of the controls. The levels of each enzyme rose with the progression of liver disease in patients with hepatitis B or C; whereas the levels of each enzyme within the same clinical stage of the disease did not differ between patients diagnosed with either hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus. Imaging findings demonstrated chronic pancreatitis in only 1 out of 202 patients (0.5%).CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that serum levels of pancreatic enzymes increase with the progression of liver disease in patients diagnosed with viral hepatitis. Pancreatic disease, asymptomatic in most cases, may represent an extrahepatic manifestation of chronic viral hepatitis.

  6. Bacterial coinfections in children with viral wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, P; Jartti, T; Virkki, R; Vuorinen, T; Leinonen, M; Peltola, V; Ruohola, A; Ruuskanen, O

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial coinfections occur in respiratory viral infections, but the attack rates and the clinical profile are not clear. The aim of this study was to determine bacterial coinfections in children hospitalized for acute expiratory wheezing with defined viral etiology. A total of 220 children aged 3 months to 16 years were investigated. The viral etiology of wheezing was confirmed by viral culture, antigen detection, serologic investigation, and/or PCR. Specific antibodies to common respiratory bacteria were measured from acute and convalescent serum samples. All children were examined clinically for acute otitis media, and subgroups of children were examined radiologically for sinusitis and pneumonia. Rhinovirus (32%), respiratory syncytial virus (31%), and enteroviruses (31%) were the most common causative viruses. Serologic evidence of bacterial coinfection was found in 18% of the children. Streptococcus pneumoniae (8%) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (5%) were the most common causative bacteria. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 44% of the children. Chest radiographs showed alveolar infiltrates in 10%, and paranasal radiographs and clinical signs showed sinusitis in 17% of the older children studied. Leukocyte counts and serum C-reactive protein levels were low in a great majority of patients. Viral lower respiratory tract infection in children is often associated with bacterial-type upper respiratory tract infections. However, coexisting bacterial lower respiratory tract infections that induce systemic inflammatory response are seldom detected.

  7. Regulatory T cells in viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Billerbeck; Tobias B(o)ttler; Robert Thimme

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis and outcome of viral infections are significantly influenced by the host immune response.The immune system is able to eliminate many viruses in the acute phase of infection. However, some viruses,like hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV),can evade the host immune responses and establish a persistent infection. HCV and HBV persistence is caused by various mechanisms, like subversion of innate immune responses by viral factors, the emergence of T cell escape mutations, or T cell dysfunction and suppression.Recently, it has become evident that regulatory T cells may contribute to the pathogenesis and outcome of viral infections by suppressing antiviral immune responses.Indeed, the control of HCV and HBV specific immune responses mediated by regulatory T cells may be one mechanism that favors viral persistence, but it may also prevent the host from overwhelming T cell activity and liver damage. This review will focus on the role of regulatory T cells in viral hepatitis.

  8. Viral genome sequencing by random priming methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinsheng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most emerging health threats are of zoonotic origin. For the overwhelming majority, their causative agents are RNA viruses which include but are not limited to HIV, Influenza, SARS, Ebola, Dengue, and Hantavirus. Of increasing importance therefore is a better understanding of global viral diversity to enable better surveillance and prediction of pandemic threats; this will require rapid and flexible methods for complete viral genome sequencing. Results We have adapted the SISPA methodology 123 to genome sequencing of RNA and DNA viruses. We have demonstrated the utility of the method on various types and sources of viruses, obtaining near complete genome sequence of viruses ranging in size from 3,000–15,000 kb with a median depth of coverage of 14.33. We used this technique to generate full viral genome sequence in the presence of host contaminants, using viral preparations from cell culture supernatant, allantoic fluid and fecal matter. Conclusion The method described is of great utility in generating whole genome assemblies for viruses with little or no available sequence information, viruses from greatly divergent families, previously uncharacterized viruses, or to more fully describe mixed viral infections.

  9. Pancreatic involvement in chronic viral hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakura, Yoshiki; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Kiyoe; Okuse, Chiaki; Okuse, Noriaki; Nishikawa, Kohji; Suzuki, Michihiro; Iino, Shiro; Itoh, Fumio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the frequency and characteristics of pancreatic disorders in the course of chronic viral hepatitis. METHODS: We prospectively assessed the serum pancreatic enzyme levels and imaging findings in patients with chronic viral hepatitis and healthy control subjects. RESULTS: Serum amylase (t-Amy), salivary amylase (s-Amy), pancreatic amylase (p-Amy) and serum lipase levels were higher in hepatitis patients in comparison to control subjects. However, in asymptomatic viral carriers, only the serum t-Amy levels were higher than those of the controls. The levels of each enzyme rose with the progression of liver disease in patients with hepatitis B or C; whereas the levels of each enzyme within the same clinical stage of the disease did not differ between patients diagnosed with either hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus. Imaging findings demonstrated chronic pancreatitis in only 1 out of 202 patients (0.5%). CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that serum levels of pancreatic enzymes increase with the progression of liver disease in patients diagnosed with viral hepatitis. Pancreatic disease, asymptomatic in most cases, may represent an extrahepatic manifestation of chronic viral hepatitis. PMID:15962364

  10. Diagnosis and Control of Viral Diseases of Reproductive Importance: Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis and Bovine Viral Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Givens, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Both bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine herpesvirus 1 can have significant negative reproductive impacts on cattle health. Vaccination is the primary control method for the viral pathogens in US cattle herds. Polyvalent, modified-live vaccines are recommended to provide optimal protection against various viral field strains. Of particular importance to bovine viral diarrhea control is the limitation of contact of pregnant cattle with potential viral reservoirs during the critical first 125 days of gestation.

  11. Strongly correlated electrostatics of viral genome packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Toan T

    2013-03-01

    The problem of viral packaging (condensation) and ejection from viral capsid in the presence of multivalent counterions is considered. Experiments show divalent counterions strongly influence the amount of DNA ejected from bacteriophage. In this paper, the strong electrostatic interactions between DNA molecules in the presence of multivalent counterions is investigated. It is shown that experiment results agree reasonably well with the phenomenon of DNA reentrant condensation. This phenomenon is known to cause DNA condensation in the presence of tri- or tetra-valent counterions. For divalent counterions, the viral capsid confinement strongly suppresses DNA configurational entropy, therefore the correlation between divalent counterions is strongly enhanced causing similar effect. Computational studies also agree well with theoretical calculations.

  12. Hepatitis viral load correlates to glutathione levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Several recent scientific articles have found a direct correlation between Glutathione levels and viral activity for hepatitis B and C. When viral load increases, Glutathione decreases. Researchers from Germany report that adding NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) to HBV producing cells lines can reduce hepatitis viral load 50 fold. Glutathione is used by the liver to help break down toxins. Patients who have chronic infection for more than 90 days should ask their physicians to check their Glutathione levels. A test kit is available from ImmunoSciences Labs; contact information is included. An amino acid, L-Glutamine, can be used with Alpha Lipoic Acid and NAC to increase Glutathione levels. Chlorophyll also offers benefits to people with hepatitis and other infections. Instructions on how to use a special retention enema containing chlorophyll, water, and apple cider vinegar are provided.

  13. V-GAP: Viral genome assembly pipeline

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Yoji

    2015-10-22

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed the rapid determination of the complete genomes of many organisms. Although shotgun sequences from large genome organisms are still difficult to reconstruct perfect contigs each of which represents a full chromosome, those from small genomes have been assembled successfully into a very small number of contigs. In this study, we show that shotgun reads from phage genomes can be reconstructed into a single contig by controlling the number of read sequences used in de novo assembly. We have developed a pipeline to assemble small viral genomes with good reliability using a resampling method from shotgun data. This pipeline, named V-GAP (Viral Genome Assembly Pipeline), will contribute to the rapid genome typing of viruses, which are highly divergent, and thus will meet the increasing need for viral genome comparisons in metagenomic studies.

  14. Viral markers in HIV infection and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A L; Dwyer, D E; Dowton, D N

    1993-01-01

    Viral and immune markers are used for monitoring either progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease or response to antiviral therapy. Ideal properties of viral markers are that they are present in all HIV-infected persons at all stages of disease, that they are related to disease pathogenesis, that they can be easily quantitated, that this quantitation correlates rapidly and predictably with both disease stage and response to antivirals, and that they can be developed into rapid, reproducible automated tests. Currently available viral markers include HIV p24 antigenemia (after acid glycine dissociation), anti-p24 antibody titres, quantitative DNA and RNA polymerase chain reaction performed on cells and plasma, and HIV isolate phenotype. In Australia, these markers have been studied in acute HIV seroconversion, in neonatal infection, in body fluids other than blood, and in monitoring of response to antiviral drug therapy.

  15. The fecal viral flora of wild rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung G Phan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in

  16. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  17. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  18. Arrhythmias in viral myocarditis and pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksi, A John; Kanaganayagam, G Sunthar; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2015-06-01

    Acute viral myocarditis and acute pericarditis are self-limiting conditions that run a benign course and that may not involve symptoms that lead to medical assessment. However, ventricular arrhythmia is frequent in viral myocarditis. Myocarditis is thought to account for a large proportion of sudden cardiac deaths in young people without prior structural heart disease. Identification of acute myocarditis either with or without pericarditis is therefore important. However, therapeutic interventions are limited and nonspecific. Identifying those at greatest risk of a life-threatening arrhythmia is critical to reducing the mortality. This review summarizes current understanding of this challenging area in which many questions remain.

  19. Viral diseases in honey bee queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew

    Honey bees are important insects for human welfare, due to pollination as well as honey production. Viral diseases strongly impact honey bee health, especially since the spread of varroa mites. This dissertation deals with the interactions between honey bees, viruses and varroa mites. A new tool...... was developed to diagnose three viruses in honey bees. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the distribution of two popular viruses in five different tissues of 86 honey bee queens. Seasonal variation of viral infection in honey bee workers and varroa mites were determined by sampling 23 colonies under...

  20. Structure of viral hepatitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many current studies are devoted to the study of hepatitis caused by viral infections, which are qualified as TORCH-infection. In infants TORCH-induced lesions prevail in the structure of viral hepatitis, the largest proportion is hepatitis of cytomegalovirus etiology. The purpose was to study the structure of viral hepatitis in infants. Materials and methods. The study included sixty-two children (mean age 1.8 ± 0.9 years born in 2007–2016 treated in Chernivtsi Regional Children’s Clinical Hospital. The comparison group consisted of 36 healthy children of the same age. The pathogens of viral hepatitis B, C, TORCH infections were verified by enzyme immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction. The results of the research were analyzed using computer package Statistica StatSoft Inc. and Excel XP for Windows for a personal computer. Results. The results of the analysis of the liver diseases structure in 62 young children, according to hospital statistics, determined that the overwhelming majority (38 children; 61.3 % had viral hepatitis (VH, the other 24 (38.7 % patients were divided by the etiological structure of liver damage as follows: 8 (12.9 % patients had prolonged conjunctive jaundice, 7 (11.3 % patients had congenital metabolic disorders, 9 (14.5 % patients had congenital hepatobiliary abnomalities. 16.6 % of young children had hepatitis B and C viruses. In 5.8 % of cases VH was caused by viruses of the TORCH group of infections. Conclusions. In the structure of hepatobiliary diseases in infants, viral hepatitis (68.4 % is on the first ranked place. Among the viral hepatitis in children in the first year of life, CMV-hepatitis (68.4 % is most common, in children over 1 year old chronic hepatitis B and C. Severe obstetrical anamnesis, violations of pregnancy, placental infection are rather significant in the group of children with viral hepatitis. The main clinical signs of CMV-hepatitis are prolonged jaundice, cholestasis

  1. Temporary divergence paralysis in viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Stef L M; Gan, Ivan M

    2008-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman who reported diplopia and headache was found to have comitant esotropia at distance fixation and normal alignment at reading distance (divergence paralysis). Eye movement, including abduction, was normal as was the rest of the neurologic examination. Brain MRI was normal. Lumbar puncture showed an elevated opening pressure and a cerebrospinal fluid formula consistent with viral meningitis. The patient was treated with intravenous fluids and analgesics and with a temporary prism to alleviate diplopia. Within 3 weeks, she had fully recovered. This is the first report of divergence palsy in viral meningitis.

  2. ViralORFeome: an integrated database to generate a versatile collection of viral ORFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellet, J; Tafforeau, L; Lucas-Hourani, M; Navratil, V; Meyniel, L; Achaz, G; Guironnet-Paquet, A; Aublin-Gex, A; Caignard, G; Cassonnet, P; Chaboud, A; Chantier, T; Deloire, A; Demeret, C; Le Breton, M; Neveu, G; Jacotot, L; Vaglio, P; Delmotte, S; Gautier, C; Combet, C; Deleage, G; Favre, M; Tangy, F; Jacob, Y; Andre, P; Lotteau, V; Rabourdin-Combe, C; Vidalain, P O

    2010-01-01

    Large collections of protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) established in a versatile recombination-based cloning system have been instrumental to study protein functions in high-throughput assays. Such 'ORFeome' resources have been developed for several organisms but in virology, plasmid collections covering a significant fraction of the virosphere are still needed. In this perspective, we present ViralORFeome 1.0 (http://www.viralorfeome.com), an open-access database and management system that provides an integrated set of bioinformatic tools to clone viral ORFs in the Gateway(R) system. ViralORFeome provides a convenient interface to navigate through virus genome sequences, to design ORF-specific cloning primers, to validate the sequence of generated constructs and to browse established collections of virus ORFs. Most importantly, ViralORFeome has been designed to manage all possible variants or mutants of a given ORF so that the cloning procedure can be applied to any emerging virus strain. A subset of plasmid constructs generated with ViralORFeome platform has been tested with success for heterologous protein expression in different expression systems at proteome scale. ViralORFeome should provide our community with a framework to establish a large collection of virus ORF clones, an instrumental resource to determine functions, activities and binding partners of viral proteins.

  3. Good Friends, Bad News - Affect and Virality in Twitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2011-01-01

    The link between affect, defined as the capacity for sentimental arousal on the part of a message, and virality, defined as the probability that it be sent along, is of significant theoretical and practical importance, e.g. for viral marketing. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the prob......The link between affect, defined as the capacity for sentimental arousal on the part of a message, and virality, defined as the probability that it be sent along, is of significant theoretical and practical importance, e.g. for viral marketing. The basic measure of virality in Twitter...

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Viral Zoonoses in Wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Zoonoses are a worldwide public health concern, accounting for approximately 75% of human infectious diseases. In addition, zoonoses adversely affect agricultural production and wildlife. We review some mathematical models developed for the study of viral zoonoses in wildlife and identify areas where further modeling efforts are needed.

  5. Vaccination of cattle against bovine viral diarrhoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.; Bruschke, C.J.M.; Rijn, van P.A.

    1999-01-01

    This brief review describes types and quality (efficacy and safety) of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) vaccines that are in the market or under development. Both conventional live and killed vaccines are available. The primary aim of vaccination is to prevent congenital infection, but the few

  6. Vaccination of cattle against bovine viral diarrhoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.; Bruschke, C.J.M.; Rijn, van P.A.

    1999-01-01

    This brief review describes types and quality (efficacy and safety) of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) vaccines that are in the market or under development. Both conventional live and killed vaccines are available. The primary aim of vaccination is to prevent congenital infection, but the few va

  7. Viral neuroinvasion : causes, mechanisms and potential consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, George

    2014-01-01

    Meer inzicht in ontstaan virale ziekten van het centrale zenuwstelsel Over het ontstaan van ernstige neurologische ziekten zoals de ziekte van Alzheimer, Multiple Sclerose (MS) en de ziekte van Parkinson, is nog veel onduidelijk. Wel vermoeden wetenschappers dat er een verband zou kunnen bestaan

  8. Meta-analyses on viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the meta-analyses of interventions for viral hepatitis A, B, and C. Some of the interventions assessed are described in small trials with unclear bias control. Other interventions are supported by large, high-quality trials. Although attempts have been made to adjust...

  9. Acute pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the frequency and characteristics of pancreatic involvement in the course of acute (nonfulminant) viral hepatitis.METHODS: We prospectively assessed the pancreatic involvement in patients with acute viral hepatitis who presented with severe abdomimanl pain.RESULTS: We studied 124 patients with acute viral hepatitis, of whom 24 presented with severe abdominal pain. Seven patients (5.65%) were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. All were young males. Five patients had pancreatitis in the first week and two in the fourth week after the onset of jaundice. The pancreatitis was mild and all had uneventful recovery from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment.The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 4,hepatitis A virus in 2, and hepatitis B virus in 1 patient.One patient had biliary sludge along with HEV infection.The abdominal pain of remaining seventeen patients was attributed to stretching of Glisson's capsule.CONCLUSION: Acute pancreatitis occurs in 5.65% of patients with acute viral hepatitis, it is mild and recovers with conservative management.

  10. Recombinant viruses as vaccines against viral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.D. Souza

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine approaches to infectious diseases are widely applied and appreciated. Amongst them, vectors based on recombinant viruses have shown great promise and play an important role in the development of new vaccines. Many viruses have been investigated for their ability to express proteins from foreign pathogens and induce specific immunological responses against these antigens in vivo. Generally, gene-based vaccines can stimulate potent humoral and cellular immune responses and viral vectors might be an effective strategy for both the delivery of antigen-encoding genes and the facilitation and enhancement of antigen presentation. In order to be utilized as a vaccine carrier, the ideal viral vector should be safe and enable efficient presentation of required pathogen-specific antigens to the immune system. It should also exhibit low intrinsic immunogenicity to allow for its re-administration in order to boost relevant specific immune responses. Furthermore, the vector system must meet criteria that enable its production on a large-scale basis. Several viral vaccine vectors have thus emerged to date, all of them having relative advantages and limits depending on the proposed application, and thus far none of them have proven to be ideal vaccine carriers. In this review we describe the potential, as well as some of the foreseeable obstacles associated with viral vaccine vectors and their use in preventive medicine.

  11. Sanitation of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    A sanitation programme for stamping-out viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) was implemented in Denmark in 1965. The programme has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of infected rainbow trout farms, from approximate to 400 to 26. The programme is carried out on a voluntary basis...

  12. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biosecurity and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the recommended procedures involved in setting up biosecurity and control programs designed to limit bovine viral diarrhea virus infections in beef cattle operations. For the purpose of these discussions, a working definition of a biosecurity plan was considered to be an organiz...

  13. DETECTION OF THE BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA ANTIBODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Goraichuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea is a widespread infection of cattle that has a wide range of clinical symptoms in domestic and wild ruminants. It is a major problem in cattle and causes significant economic losses in the cattle industry. The virus infects bovines of all ages and causes both immunosuppression and reproductive, respiratory and digestive disorders. Persistently infected cattle are the main factor in transmission of the disease between and among herds. Comparative results of antibodies presence received by two methods of enzymoimmunoassay and virus neutralization test are given in the paper. During the work, 1010 samples of blood serum of cattle from three farms in the Kharkiv region were selected and analyzed. Bovine viral diarrhea virus concerning antibodies were found by enzymoimmunoassay in 704 samples (69.7% using commercial kit and in 690 samples (68.3% using in house method. After results clarification by virus neutralization test, bovine viral diarrhea antibodies were found in 712 samples (70.5%. Immunoenzyme analysis is recommended for mass screening of cattle for viral diarrhea occurrence. The results confirm that the sensitivity immunoenzyme analysis satisfies the requirements of the diagnostic methods. Using the neutralization reaction of viruses as the «gold standard» of serological methods, it is appropriate to clarify the results of immunoenzyme analysis. Since the results contain a signi ficant number of false positive results, it is necessary to carry out comprehensive studies using both serological and molecular genetics methods.

  14. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    on a novel three-step procedure that identifies any reactive viral O-glycosyl peptide epitope with respect to (i) relevant peptide sequence, (ii) the reactive glycoform out of several possible glycopeptide isomers of that peptide sequence, and (iii) possibly tolerated carbohydrate or peptide structural...

  15. Optimal cytoplasmic transport in viral infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R D'Orsogna

    Full Text Available For many viruses, the ability to infect eukaryotic cells depends on their transport through the cytoplasm and across the nuclear membrane of the host cell. During this journey, viral contents are biochemically processed into complexes capable of both nuclear penetration and genomic integration. We develop a stochastic model of viral entry that incorporates all relevant aspects of transport, including convection along microtubules, biochemical conversion, degradation, and nuclear entry. Analysis of the nuclear infection probabilities in terms of the transport velocity, degradation, and biochemical conversion rates shows how certain values of key parameters can maximize the nuclear entry probability of the viral material. The existence of such "optimal" infection scenarios depends on the details of the biochemical conversion process and implies potentially counterintuitive effects in viral infection, suggesting new avenues for antiviral treatment. Such optimal parameter values provide a plausible transport-based explanation of the action of restriction factors and of experimentally observed optimal capsid stability. Finally, we propose a new interpretation of how genetic mutations unrelated to the mechanism of drug action may nonetheless confer novel types of overall drug resistance.

  16. Viral skin diseases of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Anna L

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the viral skin diseases affecting the domestic rabbit, the most important being myxomatosis. Transmission and pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and control are described and the article will be of interest to veterinary practitioners who treat rabbits. Shope fibroma virus, Shope papilloma virus, and rabbitpox are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tissue interactions of avian viral attachment proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I.N.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses can infect a wide range of hosts; varying from bacteria and plants to animals and humans. While many viral infections may pass unnoticed, some are of major importance due to their implications on health and welfare of plants, animals and/or humans. In particular, viruses that can infect avia

  18. Viral genome sequencing bt random priming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most emerging health threats are of zoonotic origin. For the overwhelming majority, their causative agents are viruses which include but are not limited to HIV, Influenza, SARS, Ebola, Dengue, and Hantavirus. Of increasing importance therefore is an understanding of the viral diversity to enable b...

  19. Contagious Content: Viral Video Ads Identification of Content Characteristics that Help Online Video Advertisements Go Viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yentl Knossenburg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Why do some online video advertisements go viral while others remain unnoticed? What kind of video content keeps the viewer interested and motivated to share? Many companies have realized the need to innovate their marketing strategies and have embraced the newest ways of using technology, as the Internet, to their advantage as in the example of virality. Yet few marketers actually understand how, and academic literature on this topic is still in development. This study investigated which content characteristics distinguish successful from non-successful online viral video advertisements by analyzing 641 cases using Structural Equation Modeling. Results show that Engagement and Surprise are two main content characteristics that significantly increase the chance of online video advertisements to go viral.  

  20. Viral immunoblotting: a sensitive method for detecting viral-specific oliogoclonal bands in unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, S; Keir, G; Thompson, E J

    1984-06-01

    A new method for detecting viral antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid is described. The technique has many advantages over previously published methods in that it is highly sensitive eliminating the need to concentrate the CSF, takes 5 h to complete, avoids the use of radionucleides, and most importantly circumvents problems associated with prozone effects which occur in immunoprecipitation reaction since the viral antigen is immobilized on nitrocellulose membranes.

  1. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Winton, James R.; Grady, Courtney; Collins, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 101 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml–1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 × 108 pfu fish–1 d–1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring.

  2. Viral perturbations of host networks reflect disease etiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natali Gulbahce

    Full Text Available Many human diseases, arising from mutations of disease susceptibility genes (genetic diseases, are also associated with viral infections (virally implicated diseases, either in a directly causal manner or by indirect associations. Here we examine whether viral perturbations of host interactome may underlie such virally implicated disease relationships. Using as models two different human viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV, we find that host targets of viral proteins reside in network proximity to products of disease susceptibility genes. Expression changes in virally implicated disease tissues and comorbidity patterns cluster significantly in the network vicinity of viral targets. The topological proximity found between cellular targets of viral proteins and disease genes was exploited to uncover a novel pathway linking HPV to Fanconi anemia.

  3. Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Health Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Other Pacific Islanders MMWR Publications HIV and AIDS Viral Hepatitis STDs Tuberculosis Training and Networking Resources Call for ...

  4. The evolution of bovine viral diarrhea: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Goens, Denise

    2002-01-01

    The economic importance of bovine viral diarrhea is increasing with the emergence of seemingly more virulent viruses, as evidenced by outbreaks of hemorrhagic syndrome and severe acute bovine viral diarrhea beginning in the 1980s and 1990s. It appears that evolutionary changes in bovine viral diarrhea virus were responsible for these outbreaks. The genetic properties of the classical bovine viral diarrhea virus that contribute to the basis of current diagnostic tests, vaccines, and our unders...

  5. Viral DNA in horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, N R; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie; Casey, J W; Lahn, S; Stephens, R. M.; Edwards, J.

    1989-01-01

    The amount and distribution of viral DNA were established in a horse acutely infected with the Wyoming strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). The highest concentration of viral DNA were found in the liver, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and spleen. The kidney, choroid plexus, and peripheral blood leukocytes also contained viral DNA, but at a lower level. It is estimated that at day 16 postinoculation, almost all of the viral DNA was located in the tissues, with the liver alone containing...

  6. Anti-Viral Prophylaxis Target Product Profile Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-24

    or emerging viral diseases, as medical countermeasures to viral biowarfare threats are limited. • Objective: avian influenza (oseltamavir) • Threshold...to viral biowarfare threats are limited. • Objective: hepatitis A (immune serum globulin) • Threshold: HIV postexposure prophylaxis). Route of...administration: • Objective: modeled from influenza (oseltamavir); • Threshold modeled from hepatitis A, rabies (immune serum globulin, rabies immune

  7. [Clinical aspects of viral hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki

    2005-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) is defined as virus infections that usually cause pyrexia and hemorrhagic symptoms with multiple organ failure. VHF includes following viral infections: Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) and Lassa fever. In particular, the causative agents of EHF, MHF, CCHF, and Lassa fever are Ebola, Marburg, CCHF, Lassa viruses, respectively, and regarded as biosafety level-4 pathogens because of their high virulence to humans. Recently, relatively large outbreaks of EHF and MHF have occurred in Africa, and areas of EHF- and MHF-outbreaks seem to be expanding. Although outbreaks of VHF have not been reported in Japan, there is a possibility that the deadly hemorrhagic fever viruses would be introduced to Japan in future. Therefore, preparedness for possible future outbreaks of VHF is necessary in areas without VHF outbreaks.

  8. Potential Pitfalls in Estimating Viral Load Heritability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Gabriel E; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    In HIV patients, the set-point viral load (SPVL) is the most widely used predictor of disease severity. Yet SPVL varies over several orders of magnitude between patients. The heritability of SPVL quantifies how much of the variation in SPVL is due to transmissible viral genetics. There is currently no clear consensus on the value of SPVL heritability, as multiple studies have reported apparently discrepant estimates. Here we illustrate that the discrepancies in estimates are most likely due to differences in the estimation methods, rather than the study populations. Importantly, phylogenetic estimates run the risk of being strongly confounded by unrealistic model assumptions. Care must be taken when interpreting and comparing the different estimates to each other.

  9. ASTHMA AND VIRAL INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most common pathogens of acute respiratory diseases — most often causing mild symptoms of common cold: cough, runny nose, temperature increases. At the same time, 1/3 of children have the following symptoms of lower respiratory tract disorders: shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, respiratory failure. Virus-induced wheezing are risk factors for development of asthma in childhood. Recent clinical and scientific data suggest: the more difficult are viral respiratory infections in young children, the higher their risk of asthma later on. Another feature is that children with allergic diseases are much more likely to have viral respiratory infections(and with longer clinical course, compared with children without atopy. The use of ibuprofen is safe for children over 3 months, including suffering from bronchial asthma.

  10. Zoonotic Viral Deseases and Virus Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel

    Viruses are the most abundant organisms on earth and are ubiquitous in all environments where life is present. They are capable of infecting all cellular forms of life, sometimes causing disease in the infected host. This thesis is broadly divided into two main sections with three projects...... representing work on viruses that are transmitted between humans and animals, and 3 three projects describing the search for (novel) viruses or a viral association in human diseases with no known cause. Common for all projects was the need for employing a range of different molecular tools examples...... program of wildlife, and with the purpose of preventing the next disease emerging from these animals. Numerous viruses were detected of which many were novel variants, thus reaffirming the notion that attention should be focused at these animals. Near-complete viral genome sequencing was performed...

  11. Polymerase Chain Reaction on a Viral Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr-Smith, James; Pacheco-Gómez, Raúl; Little, Haydn A; Hicks, Matthew R; Sandhu, Sandeep; Steinke, Nadja; Smith, David J; Rodger, Alison; Goodchild, Sarah A; Lukaszewski, Roman A; Tucker, James H R; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2015-12-18

    The field of synthetic biology includes studies that aim to develop new materials and devices from biomolecules. In recent years, much work has been carried out using a range of biomolecular chassis including α-helical coiled coils, β-sheet amyloids and even viral particles. In this work, we show how hybrid bionanoparticles can be produced from a viral M13 bacteriophage scaffold through conjugation with DNA primers that can template a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This unprecedented example of a PCR on a virus particle has been studied by flow aligned linear dichroism spectroscopy, which gives information on the structure of the product as well as a new protototype methodology for DNA detection. We propose that this demonstration of PCR on the surface of a bionanoparticle is a useful addition to ways in which hybrid assemblies may be constructed using synthetic biology.

  12. Annotation of selection strengths in viral genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCauley, Stephen; de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Viral genomes tend to code in overlapping reading frames to maximize information content. This may result in atypical codon bias and particular evolutionary constraints. Due to the fast mutation rate of viruses, there is additional strong evidence for varying selection between intra......- and intergenomic regions. The presence of multiple coding regions complicates the concept of Ka/Ks ratio, and thus begs for an alternative approach when investigating selection strengths. Building on the paper by McCauley & Hein (2006), we develop a method for annotating a viral genome coding in overlapping...... may thus achieve an annotation both of coding regions as well as selection strengths, allowing us to investigate different selection patterns and hypotheses. Results: We illustrate our method by applying it to a multiple alignment of four HIV2 sequences, as well as four Hepatitis B sequences. We...

  13. Lytic to temperate switching of viral communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, B.; Silveira, C. B.; Bailey, B. A.; Barott, K.; Cantu, V. A.; Cobián-Güemes, A. G.; Coutinho, F. H.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Felts, B.; Furby, K. A.; George, E. E.; Green, K. T.; Gregoracci, G. B.; Haas, A. F.; Haggerty, J. M.; Hester, E. R.; Hisakawa, N.; Kelly, L. W.; Lim, Y. W.; Little, M.; Luque, A.; McDole-Somera, T.; McNair, K.; de Oliveira, L. S.; Quistad, S. D.; Robinett, N. L.; Sala, E.; Salamon, P.; Sanchez, S. E.; Sandin, S.; Silva, G. G. Z.; Smith, J.; Sullivan, C.; Thompson, C.; Vermeij, M. J. A.; Youle, M.; Young, C.; Zgliczynski, B.; Brainard, R.; Edwards, R. A.; Nulton, J.; Thompson, F.; Rohwer, F.

    2016-03-01

    Microbial viruses can control host abundances via density-dependent lytic predator-prey dynamics. Less clear is how temperate viruses, which coexist and replicate with their host, influence microbial communities. Here we show that virus-like particles are relatively less abundant at high host densities. This suggests suppressed lysis where established models predict lytic dynamics are favoured. Meta-analysis of published viral and microbial densities showed that this trend was widespread in diverse ecosystems ranging from soil to freshwater to human lungs. Experimental manipulations showed viral densities more consistent with temperate than lytic life cycles at increasing microbial abundance. An analysis of 24 coral reef viromes showed a relative increase in the abundance of hallmark genes encoded by temperate viruses with increased microbial abundance. Based on these four lines of evidence, we propose the Piggyback-the-Winner model wherein temperate dynamics become increasingly important in ecosystems with high microbial densities; thus ‘more microbes, fewer viruses’.

  14. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Viral Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara; Kaufman, James

    Using methods drawn from physics we study the life cycle of viruses. We analyze a model of viral infection and evolution using the ``grand canonical ensemble'' and formalisms from statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Using this approach we determine possible genetic states of a model virus and host as a function of two independent pressures-immune response and system temperature. We show the system has a real thermodynamic temperature, and discover a new phase transition between a positive temperature regime of normal replication and a negative temperature ``disordered'' phase of the virus. We distinguish this from previous observations of a phase transition that arises as a function of mutation rate. From an evolutionary biology point of view, at steady state the viruses naturally evolve to distinct quasispecies. The approach used here could be refined to apply to real biological systems, perhaps providing insight into immune escape, the emergence of novel pathogens and other results of viral evolution.

  15. Infección viral respiratoria nosocomial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. March Rosselló

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Las infecciones virales nosocomiales han sido objeto de pocos estudios. En este contexto, el objetivo de este trabajo es revisar los datos epidemiológicos y terapéuticos publicados sobre los principales agentes virales productores de infección nosocomial respiratoria. De este modo se pretende ampliar el conocimiento sobre el comportamiento de estos agentes en las infecciones nosocomiales y proporcionar información para mejorar la aplicación de las medidas de prevención. De manera pormenorizada se exponen conceptos relativos a los mimivirus, virus herpes simple, virus varicela-zóster, citomegalovirus, virus respiratorio sincitial, virus parainfluenza, virus de la gripe, adenovirus, metapneumovirus y virus del sarampión.

  16. Multiplexing Short Primers for Viral Family PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S N; Hiddessen, A L; Hara, C A; Williams, P L; Wagner, M; Colston, B W

    2008-06-26

    We describe a Multiplex Primer Prediction (MPP) algorithm to build multiplex compatible primer sets for large, diverse, and unalignable sets of target sequences. The MPP algorithm is scalable to larger target sets than other available software, and it does not require a multiple sequence alignment. We applied it to questions in viral detection, and demonstrated that there are no universally conserved priming sequences among viruses and that it could require an unfeasibly large number of primers ({approx}3700 18-mers or {approx}2000 10-mers) to generate amplicons from all sequenced viruses. We then designed primer sets separately for each viral family, and for several diverse species such as foot-and-mouth disease virus, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase segments of influenza A virus, Norwalk virus, and HIV-1.

  17. Crosslinking in viral capsids via tiling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarock, R; Hendrix, R W

    2006-06-07

    A vital part of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence protects the viral genome. It has been shown in Twarock [2004. A tiling approach to vius capsids assembly explaining a structural puzzle in virology. J. Theor. Biol. 226, 477-482] that the surface structures of viruses with icosahedrally symmetric capsids can be modelled in terms of tilings that encode the locations of the protein subunits. This theory is extended here to multi-level tilings in order to model crosslinking structures. The new framework is demonstrated for the case of bacteriophage HK97, and it is shown, how the theory can be used in general to decide if crosslinking, and what type of crosslinking, is compatible from a mathematical point of view with the geometrical surface structure of a virus.

  18. Benign Testis Mass After Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbie Hurtt

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of viral associated orchitis and subsequent testis masses concerning for malignancy both on physical exam and scrotal ultrasound. In both cases, the patients underwent radical orchiectomy after a discussion of management options. Both pathologic analyses were negative for malignancy, and our literature search revealed no other similar case reports. We review our two cases specifically, as well as briefly review orchitis and discuss possible management strategies of similar cases.

  19. Benign Testis Mass After Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtt, Robbie; Pound, Charles; Bean, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    We present two cases of viral associated orchitis and subsequent testis masses concerning for malignancy both on physical exam and scrotal ultrasound. In both cases, the patients underwent radical orchiectomy after a discussion of management options. Both pathologic analyses were negative for malignancy, and our literature search revealed no other similar case reports. We review our two cases specifically, as well as briefly review orchitis and discuss possible management strategies of similar cases.

  20. Respiratory Viral Infections in Chronic Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Clemente J; Brady, Virginia; Lee, Seiwon; Dela Cruz, Charles S

    2017-03-01

    Chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, cystic fibrosis (CF) and interstitial lung diseases (ILD), affect many individuals worldwide. Patients with these chronic lung diseases are susceptible to respiratory lung infections and some of these viral infections can contribute to disease pathogenesis. This review highlights the associations of lung infections and the respective chronic lung diseases and how infection in the different lung diseases affects disease exacerbation and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Faces of contemporary literature: the viral poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Roberto do Prado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at discussing an aspect of contemporary literature, the viral poetry in Brazilian fanpages on Facebook, in perspective from a lyrical demand of literary modernity: the need for concentration of poetic language and critical exercise. In addition, we discuss some reasons for the resistance that still can be felt by literature teachers and researchers, with focus on the problem of value.

  2. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    the rat model. The therapeutic effect of HSV-1 oncolysis on meningeal metastases was presented ( oral ) at the annual meeting of the World Molecular...Abstracts, and Presentations Presentations & Abstracts: 1. Oral Presentation at WMIC, Seoul. “Novel oncolytic HSV-1 therapeutics for breast cancer...tomography of herpes simplex virus 1 oncolysis. Cancer Research. 2007; 67(7): 3295. 3. Kuruppu D, Tanabe KK. Viral oncolysis by herpes simplex virus and

  3. [Bovine viral diarrhea control in Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliukin, M I; Iurov, K P; Glotov, A G; Donchenko, N A

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is one of the greatest challenges for breeding and commercial livestock. It is characterized by lesions of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, abortion, infertility, immune deficiency, and persistence of the pathogen. In this work, a set of measures for the rehabilitation and prevention of BVD in cattle is described. It includes the data of the literature, guidance documents for the diagnosis and control of BVD adopted by OIE, EU countries, USA, as well as the results of this research.

  4. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Ma; Xiaojuan Li; Ersheng Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral...

  5. The epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bener Abdulbari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem in many countries all over the world and especially in Middle East, Asia, East-Europe, and Africa. The aim of our study was to assess the incidence of viral hepatitis A, B and C in Qatar and compare it with other countries. This is a retrospective cohort study, which was conducted at Hamad General Hospital, State of Qatar from 2002-2006. Patients who were screened and diagnosed with viral hepatitis were included in this study. The diagnostic classification of definite viral hepatitis was made in accordance with criteria based on the International Classification of Disease tenth revision (ICD-10. A total of 527 cases of hepatitis C, 396 cases of hepatitis B, 162 cases of hepatitis A and 108 cases of unspecified were reported during the year 2006. Reported incidence rate per 10,000 populations during the year 2006 for hepatitis A was 1.9, hepatitis B 4.7, and Hepatitis C 6.3. The proportion of hepatitis B and C was significantly higher in male population than females across the years (2002-2006. Hepatitis A was more prevalent in children below 15 years (72.3%, hepatitis B in adults aged above 15 years, and hepatitis C in the population above 35 years of age. The incidence of hepatitis A has been declining in Qataris and increasing in expatriates. There was a significant relationship in gender and age group of the patients with hepatitis A, B and C. We conclude that hepatitis has become a national health issue in Qatar. The incidence rate of hepatitis in Qatar is comparable to its neighboring countries, United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. There is a need for further research on hepatitis and the associated risk factors.

  6. Viral quasispecies assembly via maximal clique enumeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpfer, Armin; Marschall, Tobias; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio; Schönhuth, Alexander; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2014-03-01

    Virus populations can display high genetic diversity within individual hosts. The intra-host collection of viral haplotypes, called viral quasispecies, is an important determinant of virulence, pathogenesis, and treatment outcome. We present HaploClique, a computational approach to reconstruct the structure of a viral quasispecies from next-generation sequencing data as obtained from bulk sequencing of mixed virus samples. We develop a statistical model for paired-end reads accounting for mutations, insertions, and deletions. Using an iterative maximal clique enumeration approach, read pairs are assembled into haplotypes of increasing length, eventually enabling global haplotype assembly. The performance of our quasispecies assembly method is assessed on simulated data for varying population characteristics and sequencing technology parameters. Owing to its paired-end handling, HaploClique compares favorably to state-of-the-art haplotype inference methods. It can reconstruct error-free full-length haplotypes from low coverage samples and detect large insertions and deletions at low frequencies. We applied HaploClique to sequencing data derived from a clinical hepatitis C virus population of an infected patient and discovered a novel deletion of length 357±167 bp that was validated by two independent long-read sequencing experiments. HaploClique is available at https://github.com/armintoepfer/haploclique. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5.

  7. Endogenous viral elements in algal genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; YU Jun; WU Shuangxiu; LIU Tao; SUN Jing; CHI Shan; LIU Cui; LI Xingang; YIN Jinlong; WANG Xumin

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) are host-genomic fragments originated from viral genomes. They have been found universally in animal and plant genomes. Here we carried out a systematic screening and analy-sis of EVEs in algal genomes and found that EVEs commonly exist in algal genomes. We classified the EVE fragments into three categories according to the length of EVE fragments. Due to the probability of sequence similarity by chance, we ignored the potential function of medium-length EVE fragments. However, long-length EVE fragments probably had capability to encode protein domains or even entire proteins, and some short-length EVE fragments had high similarity with host's siRNA sequences and possibly served functions of small RNAs. Therefore, short and long EVE fragments might provide regulomic and proteomic novelty to the host's metabolism and adaptation. We also found several EVE fragments shared by more than 3 algal genomes. By phylogenetic analysis of the shared EVEs and their corresponding species, we found that the integration of viral fragments into host genomes was an ancient event, possibly before the divergence of Chlorophytes and Ochrophytes. Our findings show that there is a frequent genetic flow from viruses to algal genomes. Moreover, study on algal EVEs shed light on the virus-host interaction in large timescale and could also help us understand the balance of marine ecosystems.

  8. Viral quasispecies assembly via maximal clique enumeration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Töpfer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Virus populations can display high genetic diversity within individual hosts. The intra-host collection of viral haplotypes, called viral quasispecies, is an important determinant of virulence, pathogenesis, and treatment outcome. We present HaploClique, a computational approach to reconstruct the structure of a viral quasispecies from next-generation sequencing data as obtained from bulk sequencing of mixed virus samples. We develop a statistical model for paired-end reads accounting for mutations, insertions, and deletions. Using an iterative maximal clique enumeration approach, read pairs are assembled into haplotypes of increasing length, eventually enabling global haplotype assembly. The performance of our quasispecies assembly method is assessed on simulated data for varying population characteristics and sequencing technology parameters. Owing to its paired-end handling, HaploClique compares favorably to state-of-the-art haplotype inference methods. It can reconstruct error-free full-length haplotypes from low coverage samples and detect large insertions and deletions at low frequencies. We applied HaploClique to sequencing data derived from a clinical hepatitis C virus population of an infected patient and discovered a novel deletion of length 357±167 bp that was validated by two independent long-read sequencing experiments. HaploClique is available at https://github.com/armintoepfer/haploclique. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5.

  9. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the

  10. Constrained pattern of viral evolution in acute and early HCV infection limits viral plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Pfafferott

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses during acute Hepatitis C virus (HCV and HIV infection are a known correlate of infection outcome. Viral adaptation to these responses via mutation(s within CD8+ T-cell epitopes allows these viruses to subvert host immune control. This study examined HCV evolution in 21 HCV genotype 1-infected subjects to characterise the level of viral adaptation during acute and early HCV infection. Of the total mutations observed 25% were within described CD8+ T-cell epitopes or at viral adaptation sites. Most mutations were maintained into the chronic phase of HCV infection (75%. The lack of reversion of adaptations and high proportion of silent substitutions suggests that HCV has structural and functional limitations that constrain evolution. These results were compared to the pattern of viral evolution observed in 98 subjects during a similar phase in HIV infection from a previous study. In contrast to HCV, evolution during acute HIV infection is marked by high levels of amino acid change relative to silent substitutions, including a higher proportion of adaptations, likely reflecting strong and continued CD8+ T-cell pressure combined with greater plasticity of the virus. Understanding viral escape dynamics for these two viruses is important for effective T cell vaccine design.

  11. Morphological and growth responses to water stress of two sub-populations of Bromus pictus from soils with contrasting water availability Respuestas morfológicas y de crecimiento al estrés hídrico de dos subpoblaciones de Bromus pictus provenientes de suelos con contrastante disponibilidad de agua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ L ROTUNDO

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied morphological and growth responses to drought of two sub-populations of Bromus pictus from communities with soils with different water availability from the Patagonian steppe. After a process of acclimatization common to both sub-populations, individuals from both sub-populations were subjected to three levels of water availability during 44 days. Independently of the water availability treatment, the sub-population from the community of high soil water availability showed higher aboveground relative growth rate (RGR and higher leaf size (area and weight compared to the sub-population from the community of low soil water availability. These results prove the expected evolution of higher growth rates and leaf sizes in resource rich environments. The sub-population from the community with low water availability also showed a higher tillering rate and a more prostrate morph than the sub-population from the community with high water availability. A higher number of small tillers may be a useful strategy for a quick response to water inputs and for distribute the risk of drought-induced mortality. A more prostrate morph may also present advantages like reducing the area exposed to dry air. The results obtained showed that soil heterogeneity may promote genetic variation. We were unable to detect statistically significant interactions between population and water availability treatments. The genetic variation found between the populations may be useful to develop breeding programs of a native species and may also increase the evolutionary potential of a native species to adapt to environmental changesNosotros estudiamos respuestas morfológicas y de crecimiento a la sequía para dos subpoblaciones de Bromus pictus provenientes de comunidades con suelos de distinta disponibilidad de agua en la estepa patagónica. Luego de un proceso de aclimatización común a ambas subpoblaciones, individuos de cada subpoblación fueron sometidos a tres

  12. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinnamon L. Hardee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic

  13. [Kunjin virus replicon--a novel viral vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shihua; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, E'de; Qin, Chengfeng

    2011-02-01

    Viral replicon is a kind of self-replicating viral RNA sourced from viral genome, which contains viral non-structural genes that are critical for viral genome replication with structural proteins deleted or replaced by foreign genes. Kunjin virus is a member of the Flavivirida family, Flavivirus genus, and Kunjin virus replicon is the first and the clearly defined flavivirus replicon. Kunjun virus replicon has been regarded as an excellent viral vector on account of its high expression, lower cytotoxicity and genetic stability. These unique characteristics of kunjin virus replicons make them suitable for the study of viral genome replication, recombinant proteins production, vaccine development and gene therapy. In this article, recent progress in the development, properties and applications of kunjin virus replicon system was briefly reviewed.

  14. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Cinnamon L.; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka; Hornstein, Benjamin D.; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic. PMID:28208635

  15. Viral immunity. Transkingdom control of viral infection and immunity in the mammalian intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Julie K; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-01-15

    Viruses that infect the intestine include major human pathogens (retroviruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses, astroviruses, picornaviruses, adenoviruses, herpesviruses) that constitute a serious public health problem worldwide. These viral pathogens are members of a large, complex viral community inhabiting the intestine termed "the enteric virome." Enteric viruses have intimate functional and genetic relationships with both the host and other microbial constituents that inhabit the intestine, such as the bacterial microbiota, their associated phages, helminthes, and fungi, which together constitute the microbiome. Emerging data indicate that enteric viruses regulate, and are in turn regulated by, these other microbes through a series of processes termed "transkingdom interactions." This represents a changing paradigm in intestinal immunity to viral infection. Here we review recent advances in the field and propose new ways in which to conceptualize this important area.

  16. Underreporting of viral encephalitis and viral meningitis, Ireland, 2005-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tara A; O'Lorcain, Piaras; Moran, Joanne; Garvey, Patricia; McKeown, Paul; Connell, Jeff; Cotter, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Viral encephalitis (VE) and viral meningitis (VM) have been notifiable infectious diseases under surveillance in the Republic of Ireland since 1981. Laboratories have reported confirmed cases by detection of viral nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid since 2004. To determine the prevalence of these diseases in Ireland during 2005-2008, we analyzed 3 data sources: Hospital In-patient Enquiry data (from hospitalized following patients discharge) accessed through Health Intelligence Ireland, laboratory confirmations from the National Virus Reference Laboratory, and events from the Computerised Infectious Disease Reporting surveillance system. We found that the national surveillance system underestimates the incidence of these diseases in Ireland with a 10-fold higher VE hospitalization rate and 3-fold higher VM hospitalization rate than the reporting rate. Herpesviruses were responsible for most specified VE and enteroviruses for most specified VM from all 3 sources. Recommendations from this study have been implemented to improve the surveillance of these diseases in Ireland.

  17. Viral dependence on cellular ion channels - an emerging anti-viral target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, Samantha; Foster, Becky; Barr, John; Mankouri, Jamel

    2017-01-22

    The broad range of cellular functions governed by ion channels represents an attractive target for viral manipulation. Indeed, modulation of host cell ion channel activity by viral proteins is being increasingly identified as an important virus-host interaction. Recent examples have demonstrated that virion entry, virus-egress and the maintenance of a cellular environment conducive to virus persistence are in part, dependent on virus manipulation of ion channel activity. Most excitingly, evidence has emerged that targeting ion channels pharmacologically can impede virus lifecycles. Here we discuss current examples of virus-ion channel interactions and the potential of targeting ion channel function as a new, pharmacologically safe and broad ranging anti-viral therapeutic strategy.

  18. Viral exploitation of actin:force-generation and scaffolding functions in viral infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Spear; Yuntao Wu

    2014-01-01

    As a fundamental component of the host cellular cytoskeleton, actin is routinely engaged by infecting viruses. Furthermore, viruses from diverse groups, and infecting diverse hosts, have convergently evolved an array of mechanisms for manipulating the actin cytoskeleton for efifcacious infection. An ongoing chorus of research now indicates that the actin cytoskeleton is critical for viral replication at many stages of the viral life cycle, including binding, entry, nuclear localization, genomic transcription and reverse transcription, assembly, and egress/dissemination. Speciifcally, viruses subvert the force-generating and macromolecular scaffolding properties of the actin cytoskeleton to propel viral surifng, internalization, and migration within the cell. Additionally, viruses utilize the actin cytoskeleton to support and organize assembly sites, and eject budding virions for cell-to-cell transmission. It is the purpose of this review to provide an overview of current research, focusing on the various mechanisms and themes of virus-mediated actin modulation described therein.

  19. Content Recommendation for Viral Social Influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanov, Sergei; Theocharidis, Konstantinos; Terrovitis, Manolis

    2017-01-01

    How do we create content that will become viral in a whole network after we share it with friends or followers? Significant research activity has been dedicated to the problem of strategically selecting a seed set of initial adopters so as to maximize a meme’s spread in a network. This line of work...... assumes that the success of such a campaign depends solely on the choice of a tunable seed set of adopters, while the way users perceive the propagated meme is fixed. Yet, in many real-world settings, the opposite holds: a meme’s propagation depends on users’ perceptions of its tunable characteristics...

  20. Viral leads for chemokine-modulatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Lüttichau, Hans Rudolf; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    of years of experience in manipulating this system. For example, virally encoded "biopharmaceuticals"--chemokines and chemokine binding proteins--demonstrate the effectiveness of blocking a carefully selected group of chemokine receptors and how the local immune response can be changed from one dominated...... by Th1 cells to one dominated by Th2 cells by targeting specific chemokine receptors. The crucial importance of the binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans to produce their effects is also highlighted by viruses that produce binding proteins to disrupt the gradient of chemokines, which guides...

  1. Anti-Viral Drugs for Human Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chor Wing Sing

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many stages in the development of a new drug for viral infection and such processes are even further complicated for adenovirus by the fact that there are at least 51 serotypes, forming six distinct groups (A–F, with different degree of infectivity. This review attempts to address the importance of developing pharmaceuticals for adenovirus and also review recent development in drug discovery for adenovirus, including newer strategies such as microRNA approaches. Different drug screening strategies will also be discussed.

  2. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Bernet; Jayati Mullick; Akhilesh K Singh; Arvind Sahu

    2003-04-01

    The complement system is a potent innate immune mechanism consisting of cascades of proteins which are designed to fight against and annul intrusion of all the foreign pathogens. Although viruses are smaller in size and have relatively simple structure, they are not immune to complement attack. Thus, activation of the complement system can lead to neutralization of cell-free viruses, phagocytosis of C3b-coated viral particles, lysis of virus-infected cells, and generation of inflammatory and specific immune responses. However, to combat host responses and succeed as pathogens, viruses not only have developed/adopted mechanisms to control complement, but also have turned these interactions to their own advantage. Important examples include poxviruses, herpesviruses, retroviruses, paramyxoviruses and picornaviruses. In this review, we provide information on the various complement evasion strategies that viruses have developed to thwart the complement attack of the host. A special emphasis is given on the interactions between the viral proteins that are involved in molecular mimicry and the complement system.

  3. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Viral Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara A; Lessler, Justin; Bianco, Simone; Kaufman, James H

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses methods drawn from physics to study the life cycle of viruses. The paper analyzes a model of viral infection and evolution using the "grand canonical ensemble" and formalisms from statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Using this approach we enumerate all possible genetic states of a model virus and host as a function of two independent pressures-immune response and system temperature. We prove the system has a real thermodynamic temperature, and discover a new phase transition between a positive temperature regime of normal replication and a negative temperature "disordered" phase of the virus. We distinguish this from previous observations of a phase transition that arises as a function of mutation rate. From an evolutionary biology point of view, at steady state the viruses naturally evolve to distinct quasispecies. This paper also reveals a universal relationship that relates the order parameter (as a measure of mutational robustness) to evolvability in agreement with recent experimental and theoretical work. Given that real viruses have finite length RNA segments that encode proteins which determine virus fitness, the approach used here could be refined to apply to real biological systems, perhaps providing insight into immune escape, the emergence of novel pathogens and other results of viral evolution.

  4. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

    2007-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish and is listed as reportable by many nations and international organizations (Office International des Epizooties 2006). Prior to 1988, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that the virus is endemic among many marine and anadromous fish species in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005). Genetic analysis reveals that isolates of VHSV can be divided into four genotypes that generally correlate with geographic location with the North American isolates generally falling into VHSV Genotype IV (Snow et al. 2004). In 2005-2006, reports from the Great Lakes region indicated that wild fish had experienced disease or, in some cases, very large die-offs from VHSV (Elsayed et al. 2006, Lumsden et al. 2007). The new strain from the Great Lakes, now identified as VHSV Genotype IVb, appears most closely related to isolates of VHSV from mortalities that occurred during 2000-2004 in rivers and near-shore areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada (Gagne et al. 2007). The type IVb isolate found in the Great Lakes region is the only strain outside of Europe that has been associated with significant mortality in freshwater species.

  5. Ribozymes:an anti-viral agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asad U.Khan; Shahper N.Khan

    2008-01-01

    The discovery that RNA can act as an enzyme led Thomas Cech to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and led immediately to the next wave of attempts to find an effective RNA-based therapy.The tantalizing idea that RNA enzymes called trans-cleaving ribozymes enables them to act as potential antiviral and powerful tool for functional genomic studies.The efficacy of ribozyme function in a complex intracellular environment is depend-ent on the intracellular fate of the RNA that is being targeted.Recently,ribozymes have been used successfully to inhibit gene expression in a variety of biological systems in vitro and in vivo.Ribozyme has also been used successfully to combat many cases of viral infection,as clinical trial.Despite it needs to be investigated and explored as far as its structural and functional aspects are concern.In view of the significance of ribozyme in modern medicine,we reviewed the recent literature on general approach to control viral infection.

  6. Branching dynamics of viral information spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, José Luis; Moro, Esteban

    2011-10-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking, or marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants’ decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real viral marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31 000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris branching process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the “tipping point” and can be used for prediction and management of viral information spreading processes.

  7. Viral genetic variation accounts for a third of variability in HIV-1 set-point viral load in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquart, François; Wymant, Chris; Cornelissen, Marion; Gall, Astrid; Bakker, Margreet; Bezemer, Daniela; Hall, Matthew; Hillebregt, Mariska; Ong, Swee Hoe; Albert, Jan; Bannert, Norbert; Fellay, Jacques; Fransen, Katrien; Gourlay, Annabelle J; Grabowski, M Kate; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kivelä, Pia; Kouyos, Roger; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Liitsola, Kirsi; Meyer, Laurence; Porter, Kholoud; Ristola, Matti; van Sighem, Ard; Vanham, Guido; Berkhout, Ben; Kellam, Paul; Reiss, Peter; Fraser, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    HIV-1 set-point viral load-the approximately stable value of viraemia in the first years of chronic infection-is a strong predictor of clinical outcome and is highly variable across infected individuals. To better understand HIV-1 pathogenesis and the evolution of the viral population, we must quantify the heritability of set-point viral load, which is the fraction of variation in this phenotype attributable to viral genetic variation. However, current estimates of heritability vary widely, from 6% to 59%. Here we used a dataset of 2,028 seroconverters infected between 1985 and 2013 from 5 European countries (Belgium, Switzerland, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and estimated the heritability of set-point viral load at 31% (CI 15%-43%). Specifically, heritability was measured using models of character evolution describing how viral load evolves on the phylogeny of whole-genome viral sequences. In contrast to previous studies, (i) we measured viral loads using standardized assays on a sample collected in a strict time window of 6 to 24 months after infection, from which the viral genome was also sequenced; (ii) we compared 2 models of character evolution, the classical "Brownian motion" model and another model ("Ornstein-Uhlenbeck") that includes stabilising selection on viral load; (iii) we controlled for covariates, including age and sex, which may inflate estimates of heritability; and (iv) we developed a goodness of fit test based on the correlation of viral loads in cherries of the phylogenetic tree, showing that both models of character evolution fit the data well. An overall heritability of 31% (CI 15%-43%) is consistent with other studies based on regression of viral load in donor-recipient pairs. Thus, about a third of variation in HIV-1 virulence is attributable to viral genetic variation.

  8. Viral genetic variation accounts for a third of variability in HIV-1 set-point viral load in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wymant, Chris; Cornelissen, Marion; Gall, Astrid; Bakker, Margreet; Bezemer, Daniela; Hall, Matthew; Hillebregt, Mariska; Ong, Swee Hoe; Albert, Jan; Bannert, Norbert; Fellay, Jacques; Fransen, Katrien; Gourlay, Annabelle J.; Grabowski, M. Kate; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Kivelä, Pia; Kouyos, Roger; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Liitsola, Kirsi; Meyer, Laurence; Porter, Kholoud; Ristola, Matti; van Sighem, Ard; Vanham, Guido; Berkhout, Ben; Kellam, Paul; Reiss, Peter; Fraser, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 set-point viral load—the approximately stable value of viraemia in the first years of chronic infection—is a strong predictor of clinical outcome and is highly variable across infected individuals. To better understand HIV-1 pathogenesis and the evolution of the viral population, we must quantify the heritability of set-point viral load, which is the fraction of variation in this phenotype attributable to viral genetic variation. However, current estimates of heritability vary widely, from 6% to 59%. Here we used a dataset of 2,028 seroconverters infected between 1985 and 2013 from 5 European countries (Belgium, Switzerland, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and estimated the heritability of set-point viral load at 31% (CI 15%–43%). Specifically, heritability was measured using models of character evolution describing how viral load evolves on the phylogeny of whole-genome viral sequences. In contrast to previous studies, (i) we measured viral loads using standardized assays on a sample collected in a strict time window of 6 to 24 months after infection, from which the viral genome was also sequenced; (ii) we compared 2 models of character evolution, the classical “Brownian motion” model and another model (“Ornstein–Uhlenbeck”) that includes stabilising selection on viral load; (iii) we controlled for covariates, including age and sex, which may inflate estimates of heritability; and (iv) we developed a goodness of fit test based on the correlation of viral loads in cherries of the phylogenetic tree, showing that both models of character evolution fit the data well. An overall heritability of 31% (CI 15%–43%) is consistent with other studies based on regression of viral load in donor–recipient pairs. Thus, about a third of variation in HIV-1 virulence is attributable to viral genetic variation. PMID:28604782

  9. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H

    2014-09-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish.

  10. Viral Evasion and Manipulation of Host RNA Quality Control Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J Robert

    2016-08-15

    Viruses have evolved diverse strategies to maximize the functional and coding capacities of their genetic material. Individual viral RNAs are often used as substrates for both replication and translation and can contain multiple, sometimes overlapping open reading frames. Further, viral RNAs engage in a wide variety of interactions with both host and viral proteins to modify the activities of important cellular factors and direct their own trafficking, packaging, localization, stability, and translation. However, adaptations increasing the information density of small viral genomes can have unintended consequences. In particular, viral RNAs have developed features that mark them as potential targets of host RNA quality control pathways. This minireview focuses on ways in which viral RNAs run afoul of the cellular mRNA quality control and decay machinery, as well as on strategies developed by viruses to circumvent or exploit cellular mRNA surveillance.

  11. Effects of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Salimi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active ingredient in marijuana, and their derivatives have received remarkable attention in the last two decades because they can affect tumor growth and metastasis. There is a large body of evidence from in vivo and in vitro models showing that cannabinoids and their receptors influence the immune system, viral pathogenesis, and viral replication. The present study reviews current insights into the role of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections. The results reported here indicate that cannabinoids and their receptors have different sequels for viral infection. Although activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors in the majority of viral infections are proper targets for development of safe and effective treatments, caution is required before using pharmaceutical cannabinoids as a treatment agent for patients with viral infections.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of neuroinflammation and injury during acute viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, Katherine D; Tyler, Kenneth L; Beckham, J David

    2017-03-11

    Viral infections in the central nervous system are a major cause of encephalitis. West Nile virus (WNV) and Herpes simplex virus (HSV) are the most common causes of viral encephalitis in the United States. We review the role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of WNV and HSV infections in the central nervous system (CNS). We discuss the role of the innate and cell-mediated immune responses in peripheral control of viral infection, viral invasion of the CNS, and in inflammatory-mediated neuronal injury. By understanding the role of specific inflammatory responses to viral infections in the CNS, targeted therapeutic approaches can be developed to maximize control of acute viral infection while minimizing neuronal injury in the CNS.

  13. Inhibitor-Based Therapeutics for Treatment of Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Debajit; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Viral hepatitis remains a significant worldwide threat, in spite of the availability of several successful therapeutic and vaccination strategies. Complications associated with acute and chronic infections, such as liver failure, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, are the cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. Given the significant burden on the healthcare system caused by viral hepatitis, it is essential that novel, more effective therapeutics be developed. The present review attempts to summarize the current treatments against viral hepatitis, and provides an outline for upcoming, promising new therapeutics. Development of novel therapeutics requires an understanding of the viral life cycles and viral effectors in molecular detail. As such, this review also discusses virally-encoded effectors, found to be essential for virus survival and replication in the host milieu, which may be utilized as potential candidates for development of alternative therapies in the future. PMID:27777893

  14. APOBEC3 Interference during Replication of Viral Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Willems

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Co-evolution of viruses and their hosts has reached a fragile and dynamic equilibrium that allows viral persistence, replication and transmission. In response, infected hosts have developed strategies of defense that counteract the deleterious effects of viral infections. In particular, single-strand DNA editing by Apolipoprotein B Editing Catalytic subunits proteins 3 (APOBEC3s is a well-conserved mechanism of mammalian innate immunity that mutates and inactivates viral genomes. In this review, we describe the mechanisms of APOBEC3 editing during viral replication, the viral strategies that prevent APOBEC3 activity and the consequences of APOBEC3 modulation on viral fitness and host genome integrity. Understanding the mechanisms involved reveals new prospects for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Phosphorylation of the viral coat protein regulates RNA virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover HS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Haley S Hoover, C Cheng Kao Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA Abstract: Coat proteins (CPs are the most abundant protein produced during a viral infection. CPs have been shown to regulate the infection processes of RNA viruses, including RNA replication and gene expression. The numerous activities of the CP in infection are likely to require regulation, possibly through posttranslational modifications. Protein posttranslational modifications are involved in signal transduction, expanding and regulating protein function, and responding to changes in the environment. Accumulating evidence suggests that phosphorylation of viral CPs is involved in the regulation of the viral infection process from enabling virion disassembly to regulation of viral protein synthesis and replication. CP phosphorylation also affects viral trafficking and virion assembly. This review focuses on the regulatory roles that phosphorylation of CPs has in the life cycle of viruses with RNA genomes. Keywords: viral capsid protein, posttranslational modification, phosphorylation, protein–RNA interaction

  16. The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Keystone Meeting Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara W. Bird

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Newly observed mechanisms for viral entry, assembly, and exit are challenging our current understanding of the replication cycle of different viruses. To address and better understand these mechanisms, a Keystone Symposium was organized in the snowy mountains of Colorado (“The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Entry, Assembly, Exit, and Spread”; 30 March–4 April 2014, Beaver Run Resort, Breckenridge, Colorado, organized by Karla Kirkegaard, Mavis Agbandje-McKenna, and Eric O. Freed. The meeting served to bring together cell biologists, structural biologists, geneticists, and scientists expert in viral pathogenesis to discuss emerging mechanisms of viral ins and outs. The conference was organized around different phases of the viral replication cycle, including cell entry, viral assembly and post-assembly maturation, virus structure, cell exit, and virus spread. This review aims to highlight important topics and themes that emerged during the conference.

  17. Silencing and Innate Immunity in Plant Defense Against Viral and Non-Viral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. Zvereva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The frontline of plant defense against non-viral pathogens such as bacteria, fungi and oomycetes is provided by transmembrane pattern recognition receptors that detect conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, leading to pattern-triggered immunity (PTI. To counteract this innate defense, pathogens deploy effector proteins with a primary function to suppress PTI. In specific cases, plants have evolved intracellular resistance (R proteins detecting isolate-specific pathogen effectors, leading to effector-triggered immunity (ETI, an amplified version of PTI, often associated with hypersensitive response (HR and programmed cell death (PCD. In the case of plant viruses, no conserved PAMP was identified so far and the primary plant defense is thought to be based mainly on RNA silencing, an evolutionary conserved, sequence-specific mechanism that regulates gene expression and chromatin states and represses invasive nucleic acids such as transposons. Endogenous silencing pathways generate 21-24 nt small (sRNAs, miRNAs and short interfering (siRNAs, that repress genes post-transcriptionally and/or transcriptionally. Four distinct Dicer-like (DCL proteins, which normally produce endogenous miRNAs and siRNAs, all contribute to the biogenesis of viral siRNAs in infected plants. Growing evidence indicates that RNA silencing also contributes to plant defense against non-viral pathogens. Conversely, PTI-based innate responses may contribute to antiviral defense. Intracellular R proteins of the same NB-LRR family are able to recognize both non-viral effectors and avirulence (Avr proteins of RNA viruses, and, as a result, trigger HR and PCD in virus-resistant hosts. In some cases, viral Avr proteins also function as silencing suppressors. We hypothesize that RNA silencing and innate immunity (PTI and ETI function in concert to fight plant viruses. Viruses counteract this dual defense by effectors that suppress both PTI-/ETI-based innate responses

  18. Bio-mathematical models of viral dynamics to tailor antiviral therapy in chronic viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maurizia Rossana Brunetto; Piero Colombatto; Ferruccio Bonino

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the dynamics of viral infections by mathematical equations has been applied successfully to the study of viral infections during antiviral therapy. Standard models applied to viral hepatitis describe the viral load decline in the first 2-4 wk of antiviral therapy, but do not adequately simulate the dynamics of viral infection for the following period. The hypothesis of a constant clearance rate of the infected cells provides an unrealistic estimation of the time necessary to reach the control or the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV)/ hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To overcome the problem, we have developed a new multiphasic model in which the immune system activity is modulated by a negative feedback caused by the infected cells reduction, and alanine aminotransferase kinetics serve as a surrogate marker of infected-cell clearance. By this approach, we can compute the dynamics of infected cells during the whole treatment course, and find a good correlation between the number of infected cells at the end of therapy and the long-term virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The new model successfully describes the HBV infection dynamics far beyond the third month of antiviral therapy under the assumption that the sum of infected and non-infected cells remains roughly constant during therapy, and both target and infected cells concur in the hepatocyte turnover. In clinical practice, these new models will allow the development of simulators of treatment response that will be used as an "automatic pilot" for tailoring antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B as well as chronic hepatitis C patients.

  19. Bio-mathematical models of viral dynamics to tailor antiviral therapy in chronic viral hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, Maurizia Rossana; Colombatto, Piero; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the dynamics of viral infections by mathematical equations has been applied successfully to the study of viral infections during antiviral therapy. Standard models applied to viral hepatitis describe the viral load decline in the first 2-4 wk of antiviral therapy, but do not adequately simulate the dynamics of viral infection for the following period. The hypothesis of a constant clearance rate of the infected cells provides an unrealistic estimation of the time necessary to reach the control or the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To overcome the problem, we have developed a new multiphasic model in which the immune system activity is modulated by a negative feedback caused by the infected cells reduction, and alanine aminotransferase kinetics serve as a surrogate marker of infected-cell clearance. By this approach, we can compute the dynamics of infected cells during the whole treatment course, and find a good correlation between the number of infected cells at the end of therapy and the long-term virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The new model successfully describes the HBV infection dynamics far beyond the third month of antiviral therapy under the assumption that the sum of infected and non-infected cells remains roughly constant during therapy, and both target and infected cells concur in the hepatocyte turnover. In clinical practice, these new models will allow the development of simulators of treatment response that will be used as an “automatic pilot” for tailoring antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B as well as chronic hepatitis C patients. PMID:19195054

  20. [Viral nosocomial infections: the problem of contemporary hospital management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanowska-Szpakowicz, Teresa; Zajkowska, Joanna M; Pancewicz, Sławomir A; Kondrusik, Maciej; Grygorczuk, Sambor S

    2003-01-01

    The most frequent viral pathogens which are the cause of nosocomial infections were presented. Influenza and parainfluenza viruses as well as RS virus affect frequently respiratory tract. So called enteric viruses which are rotaviruses, adenoviruses, small round viruses, astroviruses, caliciviruses, corona viruses, Coxackie, ECHO may be the agents of disorders in digestive tract in the form of intoxications. Viruses of viral hepatitis B, C, D and HIV, CMV, EBV may be the source of nosocomial viral infections transmitted by blood (transfusions).

  1. Intracranial Injection of Adeno-associated Viral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Lowery, Rebecca L.; Ania K Majewska

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial injection of viral vectors engineered to express a fluorescent protein is a versatile labeling technique for visualization of specific subsets of cells in different brain regions both in vivo and in brain sections. Unlike the injection of fluorescent dyes, viral labeling offers targeting of individual cell types and is less expensive and time consuming than establishing transgenic mouse lines. In this technique, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is injected intracranially us...

  2. Internet-induced marketing techniques: Critical factors of viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Woerndl, M; Papagiannidis, S; Bourlakis, M. A.; Li, F.

    2008-01-01

    The rapid diffusion of the Internet and the emergence of various social constructs facilitated by Internet technologies are changing the drivers that define how marketing techniques are developed and refined. This paper identifies critical factors for viral marketing, an Internet-based ‘word-of-mouth’ marketing technique. Based on existing knowledge, five types of viral marketing factors that may critically influence the success of viral marketing campaigns are identified. These factors are t...

  3. Fatal case of acute gastroenteritis with multiple viral coinfections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Julien; Morel-Baccard, Christine; Michard-Lenoir, Anne-Pascale; Germi, Raphaële; Pothier, Pierre; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Morand, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    We report a fatal case of acute gastroenteritis in a child with autism spectrum disorder. Multiple viral coinfections were detected by PCR in the patient's stool and digestive biopsy specimens. As viral detection is not necessarily associated with symptomatic disease, a semi-quantitative approach using cycle treshold values was proposed for the clinical interpretation of PCR. We discuss whether concomitant viral infections could be a risk factor for severe outcome in gastroenteritis cases. Individual risk factors are also addressed.

  4. Nucleic Acid-Based Approaches for Detection of Viral Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    BEHZADI, Payam; Ranjbar, Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: To determining suitable nucleic acid diagnostics for individual viral hepatitis agent, an extensive search using related keywords was done in major medical library and data were collected, categorized, and summarized in different sections. Results: Various types of molecular biology tools can be used to detect and quantify viral genomic elements and analyze the sequences. These molecular assays are proper technologies for rapidly detecting viral agents with high accuracy, high sensit...

  5. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  6. Immune therapy of a persistent and disseminated viral infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, R.; Jamieson, B D; Porter, D D

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of viral clearance was studied by using the mouse model of chronic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Distinct patterns of viral clearance and histopathology were observed in different organs after adoptive immune therapy of persistently infected (carrier) mice. Clearance from the liver occurred within 30 days and was accompanied by extensive mononuclear cell infiltrates and necrosis of hepatocytes. Infectious virus and viral antigen were eliminated concurrently....

  7. MORBILI PADA ANAK DALAM PENGOBATAN ANTI RETRO VIRAL (ARV)

    OpenAIRE

    Surya Dipta Nugraha

    2016-01-01

    MEASLES IN CHILDREN WITH ANTI RETRO VIRAL (ARV) ON TREATMENT ABSTRACT Introduction: Morbili is an acute viral infectious disease caused by a virus transmitted morbili. Morbili is a contagious acute viral infectious disease that is characterized by three stages: catarrhal stage, eruption stage and convalence stage. Another name morbili is measles, measles, or rubeola. Morbili caused by a virus that is classified as Family paramyxovirus, the virus genus morbili contained in nasopharyngea...

  8. Viral and host proteins involved in picornavirus life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Kuo-Feng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Picornaviruses cause several diseases, not only in humans but also in various animal hosts. For instance, human enteroviruses can cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease, herpangina, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, severe neurological complications, including brainstem encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis, and even death. The interaction between the virus and the host is important for viral replication, virulence and pathogenicity. This article reviews studies of the functions of viral and host factors that are involved in the life cycle of picornavirus. The interactions of viral capsid proteins with host cell receptors is discussed first, and the mechanisms by which the viral and host cell factors are involved in viral replication, viral translation and the switch from translation to RNA replication are then addressed. Understanding how cellular proteins interact with viral RNA or viral proteins, as well as the roles of each in viral infection, will provide insights for the design of novel antiviral agents based on these interactions.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF CORTISONE ON EXPERIMENTAL VIRAL INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Edwin D.

    1957-01-01

    The administration of cortisone to chicken embryos infected with influenza B virus results in (a) an initial inhibition of viral synthesis and (b) an eventual increase in the final yield of virus attained. Increased yields of virus are attained regardless of the number of viral particles in the infecting inoculum or the proportion of particles which are infective. Changes in the distribution ratios of allantoic fluid and intramembrane virus are effected by cortisone only as the secondary result of reduction in viral synthesis. The manifest effect of cortisone on influenza A virus increase is inhibitory unless inocula containing relatively high proportions of inactive viral particles are used. PMID:13481248

  10. Toward Information Diffusion Model for Viral Marketing in Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulwah AlSuwaidan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Current obstacles in the study of social media marketing include dealing with massive data and real-time updates have motivated to contribute solutions that can be adopted for viral marketing. Since information diffusion and social networks are the core of viral marketing, this article aims to investigate the constellation of diffusion methods for viral marketing. Studies on diffusion methods for viral marketing have applied different computational methods, but a systematic investigation of these methods has limited. Most of the literature have focused on achieving objectives such as influence maxi-mization or community detection. Therefore, this article aims to conduct an in-depth review of works related to diffusion for viral marketing. Viral marketing has applied to business-to-consumer transactions but has seen limited adoption in business-to-business transactions. The literature review reveals a lack of new diffusion methods, especially in dynamic and large-scale networks. It also offers insights into applying various mining methods for viral marketing. It discusses some of the challenges, limitations, and future research directions of information diffusion for viral marketing. The article also introduces a viral marketing informa-tion diffusion model. The proposed model attempts to solve the dynamicity and large-scale data of social networks by adopting incremental clustering and a stochastic differential equation for business-to-business transactions.

  11. Viral load of patients with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Carla María; Pires-Marczeski, Fanny Clara; Padula, Paula Julieta

    2015-11-01

    Hantavirus causes severe illness including pneumonia, which leads to hospitalization and often death. At present, there is no specific treatment available. The hantavirus pathogenesis is not well understood, but most likely both virus-mediated and host-mediated mechanisms, are involved. The aim of this study was to correlate viral load in samples of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome cases and hantavirus infected individuals, with clinical epidemiological parameters and disease outcome. The variables that could potentially be related with viral load were analyzed. The retrospective study included 73 cases or household contacts, with different clinical evolution. Viral load was measured by reverse-transcription and real time polymerase chain reaction. There was no statistically significant association between blood viral RNA levels and severity of disease. However, viral load was inversely correlated with IgG response in a statistically significant manner. The level of viral RNA was significantly higher in patients infected with Andes virus South lineage, and was markedly low in persons infected with Laguna Negra virus. These results suggest that the infecting viral genotype is associated with disease severity, and that high viral load is associated with a low specific IgG response. Sex, age and disease severity were not related with viral load. Further investigations increasing strikingly the number of cases and also limiting the variables to be studied are necessary.

  12. Viral loads of cerebrospinal fluid in infants with enterovirus meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Hisashi; Ioi, Hiroaki; Ishii, Chiako; Hasegawa, Yuka; Amaha, Masahiro; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Takekuma, Kouji; Hoshika, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    For a better understanding of the role of the viral load, free radicals, and cytokines in viral meningitis, we surveyed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from patients below 1 year of age who showed positive for enterovirus. In their first examinations interleukin (IL)-6 and free radicals increased whereas pleocytosis was rarely observed. IL-6 decreased within the short period. Viral loads and free radicals increased simultaneously. IL-6 and free radicals of CSF are helpful for diagnosis and treatment of viral meningitis at an early stage.

  13. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Liming Yan; Jie Zhang; Hong Guo; Shicui Yan; Qingxiu Chen; Fuxian Zhang; Qin Fang

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsi...

  14. Mechanical oscillations of a viral capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Daryn; Sankey, Otto; Dykeman, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Viruses are sub-microscopic infectious agents that infect almost every living creature on Earth. They are unable to grow or reproduce outside of a host cell and are therefore parasitic in nature. A virus' internal genetic material is protected by an external protein coat (capsid). We developed a theoretical model which uses the interaction of light with a viral capsid to create large amplitude motions within the capsid. This work displays the results of the model on the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with attached RNA genome. The development of this model was motivated by the experimental work of Tsen et. al. [1] who used ultra-short laser pulses to inactivate viruses. [1] K-T. Tsen et al., J. of Physics -- Cond. Mat. 19, 472201 (2007).

  15. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ftika, L; Maltezou, H C

    2013-03-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound haemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. VHFs that have the potential for human-to-human transmission and onset of large nosocomial outbreaks include Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Ebola haemorrhagic fever, Marburg haemorrhagic fever and Lassa fever. Nosocomial outbreaks of VHFs are increasingly reported nowadays, which likely reflects the dynamics of emergence of VHFs. Such outbreaks are associated with an enormous impact in terms of human lives and costs for the management of cases, contact tracing and containment. Surveillance, diagnostic capacity, infection control and the overall preparedness level for management of a hospital-based VHF event are very limited in most endemic countries. Diagnostic capacities for VHFs should increase in the field and become affordable. Availability of appropriate protective equipment and education of healthcare workers about safe clinical practices and infection control is the mainstay for the prevention of nosocomial spread of VHFs.

  16. Vaccines in the prevention of viral pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, R F

    1995-12-01

    Vaccines to control respiratory virus infections have been limited to inactivated whole virus or split virus product of influenza. Over the last few years, advances in the understanding of immunity to and importance of these infections has led to the development of newer, more immunogenic inactivated influenza vaccines and to the exploration of live attenuated influenza vaccines. In parallel, both inactivated and live attenuated vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus have been undergoing evaluation. More effective or new vaccines could reduce morbidity, reduce the frequency of hospitalization, and decrease the death rate. Since viral respiratory disease would be decreased in frequency, vaccines could reduce the use of antibiotics, and by so doing, preserve the usefulness of our currently available antibiotics.

  17. Zoonotic Viral Deseases and Virus Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel

    program of wildlife, and with the purpose of preventing the next disease emerging from these animals. Numerous viruses were detected of which many were novel variants, thus reaffirming the notion that attention should be focused at these animals. Near-complete viral genome sequencing was performed...... in three studies and used for genome characterization and to infer the evolutionary relationship to other similar viruses. Finally, no known viruses were detected in one of the “human disease”-studies and although the other study is currently ongoing and at a very preliminary stage, results are encouraging.......Viruses are the most abundant organisms on earth and are ubiquitous in all environments where life is present. They are capable of infecting all cellular forms of life, sometimes causing disease in the infected host. This thesis is broadly divided into two main sections with three projects...

  18. Viral hepatitis in women of reproductive age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Zaytsev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Annually in Ukraine, about 17 thousands of newborns are at risk of vertical infection with hepatitis B and C. Identification of infected women at the stage of family planning is the best way to prevent infection in newborns, and therefore it must be performed strictly in accordance with established norms. In case of detection of hepatitis, further tactics depend on the variant of the virus: in case of hepatitis C, pre-pregnancy treatment is preferable. In case of hepatitis B — pregnancy with subsequent simultaneous vaccination of the newborn. Antiviral therapy is possible in women with high viral load to prevent intrauterine infection. Similar tactics should be followed in case of in vitro fertilisation too. The text of the lecture is illustrated by clinical examples. The lecture is intended for infectious disease physicians and obstetrician-gynecologists.

  19. Viral gastrointestinal syndrome in our environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patić A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral gastrointestinal syndrome is a cause of morbidity and death worldwide. Infection is spread through contact with an infected person, as well as through contaminated food and water. A lethal outcome is possible in infants and young children due to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. The study included 141 patients with gastroenteritis from Vojvodina. Real-Time PCR method in stool samples was used to determine the presence of rota-, noro-, and astrovirus nucleic acid. Out of 141 patients with gastroenteritis, 60.3% were confirmed to have one of the three viruses. Rotavirus was significantly more common in children up to 3 years of age (43.3%. Norovirus was more frequently detected in patients older than 20 (50%. These infections started in collectives. Astrovirus was detected in four patients (2.8%. The results confirm the necessity to implement PCR in routine diagnostics for the proper treatment of patients.

  20. Confirmed viral meningitis with normal CSF findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Naghum; Desjobert, Edouard; Lumley, Janine; Webster, Daniel; Jacobs, Michael

    2014-07-17

    An 18-year-old woman presented with a progressively worsening headache, photophobia feverishness and vomiting. Three weeks previously she had returned to the UK from a trip to Peru. At presentation, she had clinical signs of meningism. On admission, blood tests showed a mild lymphopenia, with a normal C reactive protein and white cell count. Chest X-ray and CT of the head were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microscopy was normal. CSF protein and glucose were in the normal range. MRI of the head and cerebral angiography were also normal. Subsequent molecular testing of CSF detected enterovirus RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. The patient's clinical syndrome correlated with her virological diagnosis and no other cause of her symptoms was found. Her symptoms were self-limiting and improved with supportive management. This case illustrates an important example of viral central nervous system infection presenting clinically as meningitis but with normal CSF microscopy.

  1. Branching Dynamics of Viral Information Spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarren, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Despite its importance for rumors or innovations propagation, peer-to-peer collaboration, social networking or Marketing, the dynamics of information spreading is not well understood. Since the diffusion depends on the heterogeneous patterns of human behavior and is driven by the participants' decisions, its propagation dynamics shows surprising properties not explained by traditional epidemic or contagion models. Here we present a detailed analysis of our study of real Viral Marketing campaigns where tracking the propagation of a controlled message allowed us to analyze the structure and dynamics of a diffusion graph involving over 31,000 individuals. We found that information spreading displays a non-Markovian branching dynamics that can be modeled by a two-step Bellman-Harris Branching Process that generalizes the static models known in the literature and incorporates the high variability of human behavior. It explains accurately all the features of information propagation under the "tipping-point" and can...

  2. A viral infection of the hands: Orf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Uluğ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orf is a viral infection transmitted to humans from sheep and goats. In this report, three cases with orf were presented.Two of our patients had lesions on only one hand, whereas one patient had additional lesions on the other hand. Thelesions were most commonly located on the dorsal aspect of the fingers and typically started as a painless itchy maculethat became papular and, subsequently, purulent with a necrotic center. The lesions were managed conservatively, andno specific therapy was undertaken. The lesions regressed spontaneously and slowly without scarring during the nextfive weeks. In conclusion, we are of the opinion that human infection with orf will continue to occur, and can occur anywhere;thus, all physicians should be aware of the possibility of orf infection and consider orf in the differential diagnosisof cases with relevant animal exposure. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013; 3(1: 41-44Key words: Orf, skin infection, zoonoses

  3. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2011-05-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  4. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  5. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS OF VIRAL INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Markovа

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of viral infections, ophthalmologists, pediatricians and general practitioners should all be aware of ocular manifestations of these diseases. According to our observations, despite the presence of corneal disorders, in 95 percent of children changes were reversible and in 1.5 months visual acuity was high. Only in five percent of cases despite the intensive therapy, patients had bacterial complications, causing a decrease in visual acuity.The combined  efforts of infectious disease specialists and ophthalmologists as well as timely and proper treatment are required to reduce the inflammation symptoms and prevent complications. By adding Ophtalmoferon® medication to the complex therapy of ocular surface diseases we observed its high therapeutic efficacy and a good safety profile. This medication is available in the form of ready-to-use eye drops, unlike other antiviral agents, improving  its compliance in outpatients.

  6. Virally encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors in the role of viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Lüttichau, Hans R; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    are the acquisition and modification of host-encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors. The described viral molecules leave nothing to chance and have thoroughly and efficiently corrupted the host immune system. Through this process viruses have identified key molecules in antiviral responses by their inhibition...... of these or potent ways to alter an efficient antiviral response to a weak Th2-driven response. Examples here are the chemokine scavenging by US28, attractance of Th2 cells and regulatory cells by vMIP1-3 and the selective engaging of CCR8 by MC148. Important insights into viral pathology and possible targets...... for antiviral therapies have been provided by UL33, UL78 and in particular ORF74 and the chances are that many more will follow. In HHV8 vMIP-2 and the chemokine-binding proteins potent anti-inflammatory agents have been provided. These have already had their potential demonstrated in animal models and may...

  7. [Development of viral vectors and the application for viral entry mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hideki

    2011-06-01

    Virus is identified as one of the obligate intracellular parasites, which only amplify in cells of specific living things. Viral vectors, which are developed by utilizing these properties, are available in the various fields such as basic research of medical biology or application of gene therapy. Our research group has studied development of viral vectors using properties of baculovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Due to the development of new baculoviral vectors for mammalian cells, it is possible to be more efficient transduction of foreign gene in mammalian cells and animals. Furthermore, pseudotype or recombinant VSV possessing the envelope proteins of hepatitis C virus, Japanese encephalitis virus or baculovirus were constructed, and characteristics of the envelope proteins or entry mechanisms of these viruses were analyzed.

  8. Viral tropism and pathology associated with viral hemorrhagic septicemia in larval and juvenile Pacific herring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovy, Jan; Lewis, N.L.; Hershberger, P.K.; Bennett, W.; Meyers, T.R.; Garver, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa causes mass mortality in wild Pacific herring, a species of economic value, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Young of the year herring are particularly susceptible and can be carriers of the virus. To understand its pathogenesis, tissue and cellular tropisms of VHSV in larval and juvenile Pacific herring were investigated with immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and viral tissue titer. In larval herring, early viral tropism for epithelial tissues (6d post-exposure) was indicated by foci of epidermal thickening that contained heavy concentrations of virus. This was followed by a cellular tropism for fibroblasts within the fin bases and the dermis, but expanded to cells of the kidney, liver, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract and meninges in the brain. Among wild juvenile herring that underwent a VHS epizootic in the laboratory, the disease was characterized by acute and chronic phases of death. Fish that died during the acute phase had systemic infections in tissues including the submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, kidney, liver, and meninges. The disease then transitioned into a chronic phase that was characterized by the appearance of neurological signs including erratic and corkscrew swimming and darkening of the dorsal skin. During the chronic phase viral persistence occurred in nervous tissues including meninges and brain parenchymal cells and in one case in peripheral nerves, while virus was mostly cleared from the other tissues. The results demonstrate the varying VHSV tropisms dependent on the timing of infection and the importance of neural tissues for the persistence and perpetuation of chronic infections in Pacific herring.

  9. Fecal Viral Concentration and Diarrhea in Norovirus Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C.W.; Wong, Bonnie; Choi, K. W.; Sin, Winnie; Lui, Grace; Chan, Paul K. S.; Lai, Raymond W. M.; Cockram, C S; Joseph J Y Sung; Leung, Wai K

    2007-01-01

    Fecal viral concentrations of 40 patients infected with norovirus genogroup GII.4 correlated with diarrhea duration and frequency of vomiting. Higher viral concentration and older age were independently associated with prolonged diarrhea (>4 days). These findings provide information on the pathogenesis and transmission of norovirus infections.

  10. Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    We have made a number of interesting observations of importance to the fields of virology and plant molecular biology. Topics include the genome of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), recombination of the CMV genome, transgenic plants and viral movement genes, mapping resistance breakage sequences in the tomato mosaic virus (TMV) genome, and mapping pathogeneticity domains and viral RNA heterogeneity. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Respiratory viral infection predisposing for bacterial disease : a concise review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hament, JM; Kimpen, JLL; Fleer, A; Wolfs, TFW

    1999-01-01

    Although bacterial superinfection in viral respiratory disease is a clinically well documented phenomenon, the pathogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. Recent studies have revealed some of the mechanisms involved. Physical damage to respiratory cells as a result of viral infection may lead

  12. A Strong Case for Viral Genetic Factors in HIV Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T. Herbeck

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV infections show great variation in the rate of progression to disease, and the role of viral genetic factors in this variation had remained poorly characterized until recently. Now a series of four studies [1–4] published within a year has filled this important gap and has demonstrated a robust effect of the viral genotype on HIV virulence.

  13. Investigating a mystery disease: tales from a viral detective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, W Ian

    2014-11-01

    Viral outbreak investigation is challenging logistically as well as scientifically. In the context of addressing a fictional emerging viral disease, I describe the process of discovery, from the initial report of a problem through discussions of intellectual property and sample management, study design, management, experimental execution, and reporting of results. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Recurrent and Sustained Viral Infections in Primary Immunodeficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffner, Melanie A.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Henrickson, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    Viral infections are commonplace and often innocuous. Nevertheless, within the population of patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDDs), viral infections can be the feature that drives a diagnostic evaluation or can be the most significant morbidity for the patient. This review is focused on the viral complications of PIDDs. It will focus on respiratory viruses, the most common type of viral infection in the general population. Children and adults with an increased frequency or severity of respiratory viral infections are often referred for an immunologic evaluation. The classic teaching is to investigate humoral function in people with recurrent sinopulmonary infections, but this is often interpreted to mean recurrent bacterial infections. Recurrent or very severe viral infections may also be a harbinger of a primary immunodeficiency as well. This review will also cover persistent cutaneous viral infections, systemic infections, central nervous system infections, and gastrointestinal infections. In each case, the specific viral infections may drive a diagnostic evaluation that is specific for that type of virus. This review also discusses the management of these infections, which can become problematic in patients with PIDDs. PMID:28674531

  15. Internet-induced marketing techniques: Critical factors of viral marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woerndl, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid diffusion of the Internet and the emergence of various social constructs facilitated by Internet technologies are changing the drivers that define how marketing techniques are developed and refined. This paper identifies critical factors for viral marketing, an Internet-based ‘word-of-mouth’ marketing technique. Based on existing knowledge, five types of viral marketing factors that may critically influence the success of viral marketing campaigns are identified. These factors are the overall structure of the campaign, the characteristics of the product or service, the content of the message, the characteristics of the diffusion and, the peer-to-peer information conduit. The paper discusses three examples of viral marketing campaigns and identifies the specific factors in each case that influence its success. The paper concludes with a viral marketing typology differentiating between viral marketing communications, unintended viral marketing and commercial viral marketing. This is still a rapidly evolving area and further research is clearly needed to monitor new developments and make sense of the radical changes these developments bring to the market.

  16. Viral load: Roche applies for marketing approval for ultrasensitive test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-07

    Roche Molecular Systems has applied for FDA permission to market a more sensitive viral load test. The Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor UltraSensitive Method tests viral load as low as 50 copies; current tests are only accurate to 400 copies. There is a widespread consensus among physicians that testing below 400 copies would be a valuable treatment tool.

  17. Inhibition of superinfection and the evolution of viral latency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berngruber, Thomas W.; Weissing, Franz J.; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Latent viruses generally defend their host cell against superinfection by nonlatent virulent mutants that could destroy the host cell. Superinfection inhibition thus seems to be a prerequisite for the maintenance of viral latency. Yet viral latency can break down when resistance to superinfection in

  18. Serología en hepatitis virales = Serology in viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaramillo Aristizábal, María Clara

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cuando ocurre infección por el virus de hepatitis A (VHA, virus de hepatitits B (VHB, virus de hepatitis C (VHC virus de hepatitis D o virus de hepatitis E (VHE el cuadro clínico y bioquímico es similar, por lo que se hace necesario recurrir a pruebas de laboratorio diferentes a las de función hepática para identificar con certeza el agente etiológico; dentro de estas se encuentran: la serología, que permite detectar antígenos virales o anticuerpos contra estos y las pruebas moleculares que permiten detectar el genoma viral. Para diagnosticar la existencia de una infección actual por alguno de estos virus basta con la realización de pruebas serológicas, excepto en el caso del infección por VHC para la que es necesario realizar detección del genoma viral. Las pruebas moleculares son de gran utilidad para el seguimiento y la toma de decisiones terapéuticas en los pacientes con infección crónica por VHB o VHC.

  19. Viral metagenomics analysis demonstrates the diversity of viral flora in piglet diarrhoeic faeces in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Tang, Cheng; Yue, Hua; Ren, Yupeng; Song, Zhigang

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the diversity of viral flora, we used metagenomics to study the viral communities in a pooled faecal sample of 27 diarrhoeic piglets from intensive commercial farms in China. The 15 distinct mammalian viruses identified in the pooled diarrhoeic sample were, in order of abundance of nucleic acid sequence, Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), sapovirus, porcine bocavirus-4 (PBoV-4), sapelovirus, torovirus, coronavirus, PBoV-2, stool-associated single-stranded DNA virus (poSCV), astrovirus (AstV), kobuvirus, posavirus-1, porcine enterovirus-9 (PEV-9), porcine circovirus-like (po-circo-like) virus, picobirnavirus (PBV) and Torque teno sus virus 2 (TTSuV-2). The prevalence rate of each virus was verified from diarrhoeic and healthy piglets by PCR assay. A mean of 5.5 different viruses were shed in diarrhoeic piglets, and one piglet was in fact co-infected with 11 different viruses. By contrast, healthy piglets shed a mean of 3.2 different viruses. Compared with samples from healthy piglets, the co-infection of PEDV and PBoV had a high prevalence rate in diarrhoea samples, suggesting a correlation with the appearance of diarrhoea in piglets. Furthermore, we report here for the first time the presence of several recently described viruses in China, and the identification of novel genotypes. Therefore, our investigation results provide an unbiased survey of viral communities and prevalence in faecal samples of piglets.

  20. Interleukin-12 (IL-12), but not IL-23, deficiency ameliorates viral encephalitis without affecting viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapil, Parul; Atkinson, Roscoe; Ramakrishna, Chandran; Cua, Daniel J; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Stohlman, Stephen A

    2009-06-01

    The relative contributions of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-23 to viral pathogenesis have not been extensively studied. IL-12p40 mRNA rapidly increases after neurotropic coronavirus infection. Infection of mice defective in both IL-12 and IL-23 (p40(-/-)), in IL-12 alone (p35(-/-)), and in IL-23 alone (p19(-/-)) revealed that the symptoms of coronavirus-induced encephalitis are regulated by IL-12. IL-17-producing cells never exceeded background levels, supporting a redundant role of IL-23 in pathogenesis. Viral control, tropism, and demyelination were all similar in p35(-/-), p19(-/-), and wild-type mice. Reduced morbidity in infected IL-12 deficient mice was also not associated with altered recruitment or composition of inflammatory cells. However, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) levels and virus-specific IFN-gamma-secreting CD4 and CD8 T cells were all reduced in the central nervous systems (CNS) of infected p35(-/-) mice. Transcription of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, but not tumor necrosis factor, were initially reduced in infected p35(-/-) mice but increased to wild-type levels during peak inflammation. Furthermore, although transforming growth factor beta mRNA was not affected, IL-10 was increased in the CNS in the absence of IL-12. These data suggest that IL-12 does not contribute to antiviral function within the CNS but enhances morbidity associated with viral encephalitis by increasing the ratio of IFN-gamma to protective IL-10.

  1. Viral miRNA targeting of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Jung, Jae U; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Successful viral infection entails a choreographic regulation of viral gene expression program. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes numerous miRNAs that regulate viral life cycle. However, few viral targets have been identified due to the lack of information on KSHV 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Recent genome-wide mapping of KSHV transcripts and 3'UTRs has revealed abundant bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts. The extended 3'UTRs of the 5' proximal genes of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts offer additional regulatory targets. Indeed, a genome-wide screening of KSHV 3'UTRs has identified several bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts as the novel targets of viral miRNAs. Together, these works have expanded our knowledge of the unique features of KSHV gene regulation program and provided valuable resources for the research community.

  2. Viral-bacterial interactions in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Tal; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2012-12-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a polymicrobial disease, which usually occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI). While respiratory viruses alone may cause viral AOM, they increase the risk of bacterial middle ear infection and worsen clinical outcomes of bacterial AOM. URI viruses alter Eustachian tube (ET) function via decreased mucociliary action, altered mucus secretion and increased expression of inflammatory mediators among other mechanisms. Transient reduction in protective functions of the ET allows colonizing bacteria of the nasopharynx to ascend into the middle ear and cause AOM. Advances in research help us to better understand the host responses to viral URI, the mechanisms of viral-bacterial interactions in the nasopharynx and the development of AOM. In this review, we present current knowledge regarding viral-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis and clinical course of AOM. We focus on the common respiratory viruses and their established role in AOM.

  3. RNAi, a new therapeutic strategy against viral infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fischer L. TAN; James Q. YIN

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an adaptive defense mechanism triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). It is a powerful reverse genetic tool that has been widely employed to silence gene expression in mammalian and human cells.RNAi-based gene therapies, especially in viral diseases have become more and more interesting and promising. Recently,small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be used to protect host from viral infection, inhibit the expression of viral antigen and accessory genes, control the transcription and replication of viral genome, hinder the assembly of viral particles, and display influences in virus-host interactions. In this review, we attempt to present recent progresses of this breakthrough technology in the above fields and summarize the possibilities of siRNA-based drugs.

  4. Increased fecal viral content associated with obesity in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hariom; Yadav; Shalini; Jain; Ravinder; Nagpal; Francesco; Marotta

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of total gut viral content in obese mice, and establish correlation with obesity associated metabolic measures and gut microbiome.METHODS: Fresh fecal samples were collected from normal and obese(Leptin deficient Lepob/ob) mice. Total viral DNA and RNA was isolated and quantified for establishing the correlation with metabolic measures and composition of gut bacterial communities.RESULTS: In this report, we found that obese mice feces have higher viral contents in terms of total viral DNA and RNA(P 0.6), whilst negatively correlated with bacteroidetes and bifidobacteria. CONCLUSION: This study suggests the strong correlation of increased viral population into the gut of obese mice and opens new avenues to explore the role of gut virome in pathophysiology of obesity.

  5. Good Friends, Bad News - Affect and Virality in Twitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2011-01-01

    is the probability of retweet and we are interested in which dimensions of the content of a tweet leads to retweeting. We hypothesize that negative news content is more likely to be retweeted, while for non-news tweets positive sentiments support virality. To test the hypothesis we analyze three corpora: A complete...... sample of tweets about the COP15 climate summit, a random sample of tweets, and a general text corpus including news. The latter allows us to train a classifier that can distinguish tweets that carry news and non-news information. We present evidence that negative sentiment enhances virality in the news......The link between affect, defined as the capacity for sentimental arousal on the part of a message, and virality, defined as the probability that it be sent along, is of significant theoretical and practical importance, e.g. for viral marketing. The basic measure of virality in Twitter...

  6. Immunological aspects in viral hepatitis B and C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Irena; Manea, Cristian Nicolae; Miron, Nicolae; Cristea, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, viral hepatitis chronic infections are a serious health problem and a very interesting topic for both clinicians and researchers. Viral hepatitis has a variety of clinical forms: mild, inactive or severe and with a slow evolution, whose architectural structure of the hepatic tissue evolves towards cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Sometimes, the virally induced hepatic injury evolves spectacularly and rapidly leads to exitus. The factors that generate this evolution pattern depend on the immune response of the host and equally on the viral survival and immune surveillance avoidance strategies. This paper aims to resume new discoveries in the field of immunology of the B and C viral hepatitis infection, from the perspective of the complex interactions between virus and host.

  7. Integrated Evaluation of Latent Viral Reactivation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This application proposes a continuation of our current effort, which has provided the first demonstration of viral reactivation during space flight. We have used the herpesvirus EBV as a model for latent viral reactivation and have shown that increased amounts of EBV DNA were shed by astronauts during space flight. Analysis of the Antarctic space flight analog indicated that the frequency of viral shedding may also increase (along with the increased numbers of virus) during long periods of isolation. However, a number of critical questions remain before the findings may be considered a significant health risk during extended space flight. These include: Are other latent viruses (e.g., other herpesviruses and polyornaviruses) in addition to EBV also reactivated and shed more frequently and/or in higher numbers during space flight? Is the viral reactivation observed in space flight and ground-based analogs mediated through the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis resulting in a decreased cell-mediated immune response? How does detection of viral DNA by PCR analysis correlate with infectious virus? How does the amount of virus found during flight compare with viral levels observed in acute/chronic viral illnesses and in control individuals? This expanded study will examine the phenomenon of viral reactivation from the initiating stress through the HPA axis with the accompanying suppression of the immune system resulting in viral reactivation. This information is essential to determine if latent viral reactivation among crewmembers represents a sufficient medical risk to space travel to require the development of suitable countermeasures.

  8. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1-471 of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection.

  9. Myosite virale chez l’enfant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Haley; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Résumé Question J’ai récemment évalué une enfant à ma clinique après qu’elle soit allée à l’urgence, parce qu’elle s’est réveillée un matin et refusait de marcher. Elle se déplaçait plutôt à 4 pattes dans la maison. Les parents ont signalé qu’elle se remettait d’un rhume et je me souviens de cas semblables de myosite durant l’épidémie de grippe H1N1 il y a quelques années. Quelles sont les principales caractéristiques de la myosite à reconnaître? Quelles sont les investigations nécessaires pour confirmer le diagnostic et comment les patients qui en souffrent devraient-ils être traités? Réponse La myosite aiguë bénigne virale chez l’enfant est une apparition soudaine et spontanément résolutive de douleurs dans les extrémités inférieures pendant ou après le rétablissement d’une maladie virale. Elle peut se présenter sous forme d’une démarche sur la pointe des orteils ou du refus de marcher, en raison d’une douleur symétrique bilatérale dans les extrémités inférieures qui se résorbe rapidement, habituellement dans un délai de 3 jours. En règle générale, aucune investigation n’est nécessaire, sauf dans les cas graves pour lesquels un hémogramme de dépistage et une mesure des myoglobines dans l’urine peuvent confirmer le diagnostic et exclure des complications. Une myoglobinurie et des taux élevés de créatine phosphokinase sont rares, mais pourraient faire envisager une admission à l’hôpital. Le pronostic est excellent et la prise en charge inclut le repos et une analgésie.

  10. Viral kinetics of Enterovirus 71 in human habdomyosarcoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Lu; Ya-Qing He; Li-Na Yi; Hong Zan; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Ming-Liang He

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterise the viral kinetics of enterovirus 71 (EV71). METHODS: In this study, human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells were infected with EV71 at different multiplicity of infection (MOI). After infection, the cytopathic effect (CPE) was monitored and recorded using a phase contrast microscope associated with a CCD camera at different time points post viral infection (0, 6, 12, 24 h post infection). Cell growth and viability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in both EV71 infected and mock infected cells at each time point. EV71 replication kinetics in RD cells was determined by measuring the total intracellular viral RNA with real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Also, the intracellular and extracellular virion RNA was isolated and quantified at different time points to analyze the viral package and secretion. The expression of viral protein was determined by analyze the levels of viral structure protein VP1 with Western blotting. RESULTS: EV71 infection induced a significant CPE as early as 6 h post infection (p.i.) in both RD cells infected with high ratio of virus (MOI 10) and low ratio of virus (MOI 1). In EV71 infected cells, the cell growth was inhibited and the number of viable cells was rapidly decreased in the later phase of infection. EV71 virions were uncoated immediately after entry. The intracellular viral RNA began to increase at as early as 3 h p.i. and the exponential increase was found between 3 h to 6 h p.i. in both infected groups. For viral structure protein synthesis, results from western-blot showed that intracellular viral protein VP1 could not be detected until 6 h p.i. in the cells infected at either MOI 1 or MOI 10; and reached the peak at 9 h p.i. in the cells infected with EV71 at both MOI 1 and MOI 10. Simultaneously, the viral package and secretion were also actively processed as the virus underwent rapid replication. The viral package kinetics

  11. Clinical disease severity of respiratory viral co-infection versus single viral infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Asner

    Full Text Available Results from cohort studies evaluating the severity of respiratory viral co-infections are conflicting. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the clinical severity of viral co-infections as compared to single viral respiratory infections.We searched electronic databases and other sources for studies published up to January 28, 2013. We included observational studies on inpatients with respiratory illnesses comparing the clinical severity of viral co-infections to single viral infections as detected by molecular assays. The primary outcome reflecting clinical disease severity was length of hospital stay (LOS. A random-effects model was used to conduct the meta-analyses.Twenty-one studies involving 4,280 patients were included. The overall quality of evidence applying the GRADE approach ranged from moderate for oxygen requirements to low for all other outcomes. No significant differences in length of hospital stay (LOS (mean difference (MD -0.20 days, 95% CI -0.94, 0.53, p = 0.59, or mortality (RR 2.44, 95% CI 0.86, 6.91, p = 0.09 were documented in subjects with viral co-infections compared to those with a single viral infection. There was no evidence for differences in effects across age subgroups in post hoc analyses with the exception of the higher mortality in preschool children (RR 9.82, 95% CI 3.09, 31.20, p<0.001 with viral co-infection as compared to other age groups (I2 for subgroup analysis 64%, p = 0.04.No differences in clinical disease severity between viral co-infections and single respiratory infections were documented. The suggested increased risk of mortality observed amongst children with viral co-infections requires further investigation.

  12. Thousands of Viral Populations Recovered from Peatland Soil Metagenomes Reveal Viral Impacts on Carbon Cycling in Thawing Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, J. B.; Brum, J. R.; Roux, S.; Bolduc, B.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Singleton, C. M.; Boyd, J. A.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Wilson, R.; Trubl, G. G.; Jang, H. B.; Crill, P. M.; Chanton, J.; Saleska, S. R.; Rich, V. I.; Tyson, G. W.; Sullivan, M. B.

    2016-12-01

    Methane and carbon dioxide emissions, which are under significant microbial control, provide positive feedbacks to climate change in thawing permafrost peatlands. Although viruses in marine systems have been shown to impact microbial ecology and biogeochemical cycling through host cell lysis, horizontal gene transfer, and auxiliary metabolic gene expression, viral ecology in permafrost and other soils remains virtually unstudied due to methodological challenges. Here, we identified viral sequences in 208 assembled bulk soil metagenomes derived from a permafrost thaw gradient in Stordalen Mire, northern Sweden, from 2010-2012. 2,048 viral populations were recovered, which genome- and network-based classification revealed to be largely novel, increasing known viral genera globally by 40%. Ecologically, viral communities differed significantly across the thaw gradient and by soil depth. Co-occurring microbial community composition, soil moisture, and pH were predictors of viral community composition, indicative of biological and biogeochemical feedbacks as permafrost thaws. Host prediction—achieved through clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), tetranucleotide frequency patterns, and other sequence similarities to binned microbial population genomes—was able to link 38% of the viral populations to a microbial host. 5% of the implicated hosts were archaea, predominantly methanogens and ammonia-oxidizing Nitrososphaera, 45% were Acidobacteria or Verrucomicrobia (mostly predicted heterotrophic complex carbon degraders), and 21% were Proteobacteria, including methane oxidizers. Recovered viral genome fragments also contained auxiliary metabolic genes involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Together, these data reveal multiple levels of previously unknown viral contributions to biogeochemical cycling, including to carbon gas emissions, in peatland soils undergoing and contributing to climate change. This work represents a significant step

  13. Evolution of viral virulence: empirical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of virulence as a pathogen trait that can evolve in response to selection has led to a large body of virulence evolution theory developed in the 1980-1990s. Various aspects of this theory predict increased or decreased virulence in response to a complex array of selection pressures including mode of transmission, changes in host, mixed infection, vector-borne transmission, environmental changes, host vaccination, host resistance, and co-evolution of virus and host. A fundamental concept is prediction of trade-offs between the costs and benefits associated with higher virulence, leading to selection of optimal virulence levels. Through a combination of observational and experimental studies, including experimental evolution of viruses during serial passage, many of these predictions have now been explored in systems ranging from bacteriophage to viruses of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate hosts. This chapter summarizes empirical studies of viral virulence evolution in numerous diverse systems, including the classic models myxomavirus in rabbits, Marek's disease virus in chickens, and HIV in humans. Collectively these studies support some aspects of virulence evolution theory, suggest modifications for other aspects, and show that predictions may apply in some virus:host interactions but not in others. Finally, we consider how virulence evolution theory applies to disease management in the field.

  14. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Peter J; Winton, James R

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change.

  15. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, James R.; Walker, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change.

  16. Suppression of viral infectivity through lethal defection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande-Pérez, Ana; Lázaro, Ester; Lowenstein, Pedro; Domingo, Esteban; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2005-01-01

    RNA viruses replicate with a very high error rate and give rise to heterogeneous, highly plastic populations able to adapt very rapidly to changing environments. Viral diseases are thus difficult to control because of the appearance of drug-resistant mutants, and it becomes essential to seek mechanisms able to force the extinction of the quasispecies before adaptation emerges. An alternative to the use of conventional drugs consists in increasing the replication error rate through the use of mutagens. Here, we report about persistent infections of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus treated with fluorouracil, where a progressive debilitation of infectivity leading to eventual extinction occurs. The transition to extinction is accompanied by the production of large amounts of RNA, indicating that the replicative ability of the quasispecies is not strongly impaired by the mutagen. By means of experimental and theoretical approaches, we propose that a fraction of the RNA molecules synthesized can behave as a defective subpopulation able to drive the viable class extinct. Our results lead to the identification of two extinction pathways, one at high amounts of mutagen, where the quasispecies completely loses its ability to infect and replicate, and a second one, at lower amounts of mutagen, where replication continues while the infective class gets extinct because of the action of defectors. The results bear on a potential application of increased mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy in that low doses of a mutagenic agent may suffice to drive persistent virus to extinction. PMID:15767582

  17. An Interesting Case of Viral Pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Kelly Marie; de Almeida, Claudia Lace; Kam, April Jacqueline

    2016-05-01

    A previously healthy 14-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of upper respiratory symptoms and 2 syncopal episodes. She was initially febrile, tachycardic, and tachypneic; the initial electrocardiogram showed diffuse T-wave inversions and right atrial enlargement. There was no pericardial effusion on bedside and formal echocardiography; the latter, however, revealed a hyperechogenic pericardium. A viral swab was positive for influenza B. Treatment with intravenous rehydration and ibuprofen was started with good response. The patient went home 24 hours later with the diagnosis of mild pericarditis and syncope likely secondary to dehydration impaired diastolic filling.The incidence of acute pericarditis in previously healthy children is unknown. There are no known case reports of influenza B-associated pericarditis in the pediatric population. There is little high quality evidence to guide the diagnosis and management of pericarditis in children. However, limited data suggest that the typically described presentation of chest pain, pericardial rub, pericardial effusion, and electrocardiogram changes occurs in children. The pediatric population seems to respond well to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  18. Filovirus tropism: Cellular molecules for viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayato eTakada

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In human and nonhuman primates, filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg viruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever.Recently, other animals such as pigs and some species of fruit bats have also been shown to be susceptible to these viruses. While having a preference for some cell types such as hepatocytes, endothelial cells, dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages, filoviruses are known to be pantropic in infection of primates. The envelope glycoprotein (GP is responsible for both receptor binding and fusion of the virus envelope with the host cell membrane. It has been demonstrated that filovirus GP interacts with multiple molecules for entry into host cells, whereas none of the cellular molecules so far identified as a receptor/coreceptor fully explains filovirus tissue tropism and host range. Available data suggest that the mucin-like region (MLR on GP plays an important role in attachment to the preferred target cells, whose infection is likely involved in filovirus pathogenesis, whereas the MLR is not essential for the fundamental function of the GP in viral entry into cells in vitro. Further studies elucidating the mechanisms of cellular entry of filoviruses may shed light on the development of strategies for prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers.

  19. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrsopoulos, N T; Reddy, K R

    2001-02-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses are well-recognized causes for chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and even for hepatocellular carcinoma. Apart from liver disease, these viral infections are known to be associated with a spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations. The prevalence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is relatively low, but it can be associated with significant morbidity and even mortality. An awareness and recognition of these manifestations is of paramount importance in facilitating early diagnosis and in offering treatment. However, treatments are not necessarily effective, and patients may continue with disabling extrahepatic manifestations. Hepatitis B virus has been well recognized as causing a variety of manifestations that include skin rash, arthritis, arthralgia, glomerulonephritis, polyarteritis nodosa, and papular acrodermatitis. More recently, infection with hepatitis C virus has elicited considerable interest for its role in a spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations. Among the best-reported are cryoglobulinemia, glomerulonephritis, high titer of autoantibodies, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, lichen planus, Mooren's corneal ulcer, Sjögren's syndrome, porphyria cutanea tarda, and necrotizing cutaneous vasculitis. The precise pathogenesis of these extrahepatic complications has not been determined, although the majority represent the clinical expression of autoimmune phenomena.

  20. Metagenomic Analysis of the Viral Communities in Fermented Foods▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jin; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Abell, Guy C. J.; Kim, Min-Soo; Roh, Seong Woon; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Viruses are recognized as the most abundant biological components on Earth, and they regulate the structure of microbial communities in many environments. In soil and marine environments, microorganism-infecting phages are the most common type of virus. Although several types of bacteriophage have been isolated from fermented foods, little is known about the overall viral assemblages (viromes) of these environments. In this study, metagenomic analyses were performed on the uncultivated viral communities from three fermented foods, fermented shrimp, kimchi, and sauerkraut. Using a high-throughput pyrosequencing technique, a total of 81,831, 70,591 and 69,464 viral sequences were obtained from fermented shrimp, kimchi and sauerkraut, respectively. Moreover, 37 to 50% of these sequences showed no significant hit against sequences in public databases. There were some discrepancies between the prediction of bacteriophages hosts via homology comparison and bacterial distribution, as determined from 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These discrepancies likely reflect the fact that the viral genomes of fermented foods are poorly represented in public databases. Double-stranded DNA viral communities were amplified from fermented foods by using a linker-amplified shotgun library. These communities were dominated by bacteriophages belonging to the viral order Caudovirales (i.e., Myoviridae, Podoviridae, and Siphoviridae). This study indicates that fermented foods contain less complex viral communities than many other environmental habitats, such as seawater, human feces, marine sediment, and soil. PMID:21183634

  1. Global viral hepatitis elimination by the year 2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available According to a report by Stanaway et al.(1 in 2016, the absolute burden and relative rank of viral hepatitis increased between 1990 and 2013. For example, the number of global deaths due to viral hepatitis increased from 0.89 million to 1.45 million, indicating a need for its reduction. In this connection, on 28 May 2016 the 69th World Health Assembly adopted the global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis for the period 2016–2021,(2 as outlined in the report A69/32 of the Secretariat,(3 with the goal of eliminating viral hepatitis B and C by the year 2030. The global health sector strategy (GHSS on viral hepatitis has constructed a roadmap toward the elimination of viral hepatitis B and C, targeting five priority prevention and treatment interventions. Prevention involves universal hepatitis B immunization of infants, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, increased injection safety and blood safety, and increased harm reduction, the implementation of which will contribute toward universal health coverage, which is the target for Goal 3 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In combination with treatment of chronic hepatitis, the goal is to achieve by the year 2030 a reduction in the incidence of viral hepatitis by 90% and mortality by 65%.(3,4

  2. Prostaglandin E2 As a Modulator of Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Willem J.; O'Neill, Hester G.; Pohl, Carolina H.

    2017-01-01

    Viral infections are a major cause of infectious diseases worldwide. Inflammation and the immune system are the major host defenses against these viral infection. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an eicosanoid generated by cyclooxygenases, has been shown to modulate inflammation and the immune system by regulating the expression/concentration of cytokines. The effect of PGE2 on viral infection and replication is cell type- and virus-family-dependent. The host immune system can be modulated by PGE2, with regards to immunosuppression, inhibition of nitrogen oxide (NO) production, inhibition of interferon (IFN) and apoptotic pathways, and inhibition of viral receptor expression. Furthermore, PGE2 can play a role in viral infection directly by increasing the production and release of virions, inhibiting viral binding and replication, and/or stimulating viral gene expression. PGE2 may also have a regulatory role in the induction of autoimmunity and in signaling via Toll-like receptors. In this review the known effects of PGE2 on the pathogenesis of various infections caused by herpes simplex virus, rotavirus, influenza A virus and human immunodeficiency virus as well the therapeutic potential of PGE2 are discussed. PMID:28261111

  3. Effect of oligonucleotide primers in determining viral variability within hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moya Andrés

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variability in viral populations is usually estimated by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR based methods in which the relative abundance of each amplicon is assumed to be proportional to the frequency of the corresponding template in the initial sample. Although bias in template-to-product ratios has been described before, its relevance in describing viral genetic variability at the intrapatient level has not been fully assessed yet. Results To investigate the role of oligonucleotide design in estimating viral variability within hosts, genetic diversity in hepatitis C virus (HCV populations from eight infected patients was characterised by two parallel PCR amplifications performed with two slightly different sets of primers, followed by cloning and sequencing (mean = 89 cloned sequences per patient. Population genetics analyses of viral populations recovered by pairs of amplifications revealed that in seven patients statistically significant differences were detected between populations sampled with different set of primers. Conclusions Genetic variability analyses demonstrates that PCR selection due to the choice of primers, differing in their degeneracy degree at some nucleotide positions, can eclipse totally or partially viral variants, hence yielding significant different estimates of viral variability within a single patient and therefore eventually producing quite different qualitative and quantitative descriptions of viral populations within each host.

  4. De novo assembly of highly diverse viral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive genetic diversity in viral populations within infected hosts and the divergence of variants from existing reference genomes impede the analysis of deep viral sequencing data. A de novo population consensus assembly is valuable both as a single linear representation of the population and as a backbone on which intra-host variants can be accurately mapped. The availability of consensus assemblies and robustly mapped variants are crucial to the genetic study of viral disease progression, transmission dynamics, and viral evolution. Existing de novo assembly techniques fail to robustly assemble ultra-deep sequence data from genetically heterogeneous populations such as viruses into full-length genomes due to the presence of extensive genetic variability, contaminants, and variable sequence coverage. Results We present VICUNA, a de novo assembly algorithm suitable for generating consensus assemblies from genetically heterogeneous populations. We demonstrate its effectiveness on Dengue, Human Immunodeficiency and West Nile viral populations, representing a range of intra-host diversity. Compared to state-of-the-art assemblers designed for haploid or diploid systems, VICUNA recovers full-length consensus and captures insertion/deletion polymorphisms in diverse samples. Final assemblies maintain a high base calling accuracy. VICUNA program is publicly available at: http://www.broadinstitute.org/scientific-community/science/projects/viral-genomics/ viral-genomics-analysis-software. Conclusions We developed VICUNA, a publicly available software tool, that enables consensus assembly of ultra-deep sequence derived from diverse viral populations. While VICUNA was developed for the analysis of viral populations, its application to other heterogeneous sequence data sets such as metagenomic or tumor cell population samples may prove beneficial in these fields of research.

  5. Viral hepatitis in international travellers: risks and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuroo, Mohammad Sultan

    2003-02-01

    Viral hepatitis is caused by a number of unrelated hepatotrophic viruses, known and unknown. Five hepatitis viruses namely HAV, HBV, HCV, HDV and HEV have been well characterized and the epidemiology and disease pattern of each agent has been defined. In the West, HAV, HBV and HCV are major causes of viral hepatitis. In the East, HEV is the most common cause of viral hepatitis. HAV is ubiquitous in childhood in such countries and accounts for less than 4% of disease in adults. Viral hepatitis becomes a problem to an international traveller when he envisages a journey from low endemic to high endemic area and is susceptible to the infection endemic at his destination. Millions of such potentially susceptible travellers from Europe, the USA, Canada, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand visit endemic areas every year for various reasons. Viral hepatitis is the most common reported immunization-preventable disease among travellers to developing countries. Imported viral hepatitis incapacitates the incumbents for an average of 4-10 weeks. Considering the magnitude of the travel, the number of cases of viral hepatitis and case fatality of around 2%, the disease causes significant morbidity and mortality in such communities. It has been estimated that viral hepatitis occurs 100 times more frequently than typhoid fever and 1,000 times more often than cholera in travellers to developing countries. Hepatitis A is the most common form of viral hepatitis in travellers and cumulative data have shown a risk of 3-6 cases/1,000 persons/month of stay whereas the risk of acquiring hepatitis B is 10 times lower.

  6. Lower respiratory tract viral infections: Diagnostic role of exfoliative cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Girón, Rafael; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2017-07-01

    Viral lower respiratory tract infections (VLRTI) remain one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. For many years, the diagnosis of VLRTI was based on laboratory techniques such as viral isolation in cell culture, antigen detection by direct fluorescent antibody staining, and rapid enzyme immunoassay. Radiological imaging and morphology also play an important role in diagnosing these infections. Exfoliative cytology provides a simple, rapid, inexpensive, and valuable means to diagnose and manage VLRTI. Here we review viral-associated cytomorphological changes seen in exfoliated cells of the lower respiratory tract. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:614-620. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. User cooperation, virality and gaming in a social mobile network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, C; Blazovics, L; Charaf, H

    2012-01-01

    Social networks and mobile systems are both rapidly developing areas nowadays. In this chapter, we will introduce Gedda-Headz, a novel social mobile gaming concept that brings these two areas together. Gedda-Headz is a social mobile network that mainly focuses on multiplayer mobile gaming. First ......, as virality is very important in social networks, we will describe the viral elements of Gedda-Headz. We will also introduce the Gedda-Headz spreader, a novel method to spread the word about the network, increasing the virality further....

  8. Non-Viral Ocular Gene Therapy: Assessment and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to give the general reader a brief overview of the current state of the field of non-viral ocular gene therapy. For multiple reasons the eye is an excellent organ for gene therapy application and while non-viral gene therapy modalities have been around for quite some time; they have only been applied to the eye in the last few years. This review will cover the exciting current trends in non-viral gene therapy and their application to the eye in addition to a brie...

  9. El diagnóstico viral por el laboratorio.

    OpenAIRE

    María del Pilar Crespo

    2009-01-01

    El diagnóstico de las entidades virales es uno de los mayores retos a los que se enfrenta la medicina actual, particularmente en países semejantes a Colombia donde el diagnóstico viral se hace de manera empírica. Durante las últimas décadas, el desarrollo progresivo de nuevas y mejores herramientas para evidenciar las causas de tipo viral, hace posible que estas entidades se puedan descubrir y estudiar no sólo a nivel de laboratorios especializados, sino también en los comunes. Las pruebas di...

  10. Retrospective Evaluation of Low-pH Viral Inactivation and Viral Filtration Data from a Multiple Company Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, John; Clark, Mike; Liu, Shengjiang; Pieracci, John; Gervais, Thomas R; Wilson, Eileen; Galperina, Olga; Li, Xinfang; Roush, David; Zoeller, Konstantin; Brough, Helene; Simpson-Platre, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Considerable resources are spent within the biopharmaceutical industry to perform viral clearance studies, which are conducted for widely used unit operations that are known to have robust and effective retrovirus clearance capability. The collaborative analysis from the members of the BioPhorum Development Group Viral Clearance Working Team considers two common virus reduction steps in biopharmaceutical processes: low-pH viral inactivation and viral filtration. Analysis included eight parameters for viral inactivation and nine for viral filtration. The extensive data set presented in this paper provides the industry with a reference point for establishing robust processes in addition to other protocols available in the literature (e.g., ASTM Std. E2888-12 for low-pH inactivation). In addition, it identifies points of weakness in the existing data set and instructs the design and interpretation of future studies. Included is an abundance of data that would have been difficult to generate individually but collectively will help support modular viral clearance claims.

  11. Phytotherapy of Acute Respiratory Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Ershova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays phytotherapy is increasingly being implemented into medical practice, especially for the prevention and treatment of many diseases. Acute respiratory viral infections are most common in childhood and in adults. Acute rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis, nasopharyngitis and acute laryngitis refer to diseases of the upper respiratory tract. The main reason for respiratory diseases in recurrent respiratory infection child is disorders of mucociliary and immune protection. The therapeutic value of medicinal plants is determined by their biologically active substances. The method of application of phytotherpy is an integral part of traditional medicine. Herbal medicine can be used at home and does not require special equipment. The main indications for the herbal medicine use in pediatrics are the initial stage of the disease as a primary method of treatment due to mild and low toxicity; as a supporting treatment for enhancing the protective forces of the child’s body during the disease deterioration. During the recovery period herbal medicine again occupies a leading position, especially in case of chronic diseases because it can be used for a long time and is well combined with synthetic drugs. The terms of appointment of herbs for children: prescription of medicinal plants for children must be individual according to indications, taking into account the child’s age; it is recommended to take into account the form and nature of the course of the main disease and comorbidities as well; at the initial stage of the treatment it is better to use some medicinal plants or species consisting of 2–3 plants and in the future a more complex composition; therapy with medicinal plants requires a long period to be used use, especially in chronic diseases; in the treatment of chronic diseases a good effect preventive courses of herbal medicine was revealed, which are appointed during seasonal exacerbations; in case of intolerance

  12. Coordinated function of cellular DEAD-box helicases in suppression of viral RNA recombination and maintenance of viral genome integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingkai Chuang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The intricate interactions between viruses and hosts include an evolutionary arms race and adaptation that is facilitated by the ability of RNA viruses to evolve rapidly due to high frequency mutations and genetic RNA recombination. In this paper, we show evidence that the co-opted cellular DDX3-like Ded1 DEAD-box helicase suppresses tombusviral RNA recombination in yeast model host, and the orthologous RH20 helicase functions in a similar way in plants. In vitro replication and recombination assays confirm the direct role of the ATPase function of Ded1p in suppression of viral recombination. We also present data supporting a role for Ded1 in facilitating the switch from minus- to plus-strand synthesis. Interestingly, another co-opted cellular helicase, the eIF4AIII-like AtRH2, enhances TBSV recombination in the absence of Ded1/RH20, suggesting that the coordinated actions of these helicases control viral RNA recombination events. Altogether, these helicases are the first co-opted cellular factors in the viral replicase complex that directly affect viral RNA recombination. Ded1 helicase seems to be a key factor maintaining viral genome integrity by promoting the replication of viral RNAs with correct termini, but inhibiting the replication of defective RNAs lacking correct 5' end sequences. Altogether, a co-opted cellular DEAD-box helicase facilitates the maintenance of full-length viral genome and suppresses viral recombination, thus limiting the appearance of defective viral RNAs during replication.

  13. Viral load of human bocavirus-1 in stools from children with viral diarrhoea in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proenca-Modena, J L; Martinez, M; Amarilla, A A; Espínola, E E; Galeano, M E; Fariña, N; Russomando, G; Aquino, V H; Parra, G I; Arruda, E

    2013-12-01

    Since their discovery, four species of human bocavirus (HBoV) have been described in patients with respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. However, a clear causal association between HBoV-1 and gastroenteritis has not been demonstrated. In this study, we describe the detection and quantification of HBoV-1 in stools from children with acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HBoV-1 genome was detected in 10.6% of stools with frequent association with rotavirus and norovirus. The median of HBoV-1 viral load was 1.88 × 104 genome/ml, lower than previously shown in secretions of patients with respiratory infections, without any obvious association between high viral load and presence of HBoV as single agent. Thus, although HBoV-1 was frequently detected in these patients, there is no clear causal association of this agent with diarrhoea. Indeed, HBoV-1 DNA in stools of patients with gastroenteritis without respiratory symptoms may be a remnant of previous infections or associated with prolonged shedding of virus in the respiratory or digestive tracts.

  14. Liposomal nanocontainers as models for viral infection: monitoring viral genomic RNA transfer through lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Gerhard; Matscheko, Nena M; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Weiss, Victor U; Subirats, Xavier; Kenndler, Ernst; Blaas, Dieter

    2011-08-01

    After uptake into target cells, many nonenveloped viruses undergo conformational changes in the low-pH environment of the endocytic compartment. This results in exposure of amphipathic viral peptides and/or hydrophobic protein domains that are inserted into and either disrupt or perforate the vesicular membranes. The viral nucleic acids thereby gain access to the cytosol and initiate replication. We here demonstrate the in vitro transfer of the single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of human rhinovirus 2 into liposomes decorated with recombinant very-low-density lipoprotein receptor fragments. Membrane-attached virions were exposed to pH 5.4, mimicking the in vivo pH environment of late endosomes. This triggered the release of the RNA whose arrival in the liposomal lumen was detected via in situ cDNA synthesis by encapsulated reverse transcriptase. Subsequently, cDNA was PCR amplified. At a low ratio between virions and lipids, RNA transfer was positively correlated with virus concentration. However, membranes became leaky at higher virus concentrations, which resulted in decreased cDNA synthesis. In accordance with earlier in vivo data, the RNA passes through the lipid membrane without causing gross damage to vesicles at physiologically relevant virus concentrations.

  15. Non viral vectors in gene therapy- an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorth, Murali; Narvekar, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Non-viral vectors are simple in theory but complex in practice. Apart from intra cellular and extracellular barriers, number of other challenges also needs to be overcome in order to increase the effectiveness of non-viral gene transfer. These barriers are categorized as production, formulation and storage. No one-size-fits-all solution to gene delivery, which is why in spite of various developments in liposome, polymer formulation and optimization, new compounds are constantly being proposed and investigated. In this review, we will see in detail about various types of non-viral vectors highlighting promising development and recent advances that had improved the non-viral gene transfer efficiency of translating from "Bench to bedside".

  16. Conditions for viral influence spreading through correlated multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yanqing; Makse, Hernán A

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in network science is to predict how certain individuals are able to initiate new networks to spring up ``new ideas''. Frequently, these changes in trends are triggered by a few innovators who rapidly impose their ideas through ``viral'' influence spreading producing cascades of followers fragmenting an old network to create a new one. Typical examples include the raise of scientific ideas or abrupt changes in social media, like the raise of Facebook.com to the detriment of Myspace.com. How this process arises in practice has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that a condition for sustaining a viral spreading process is the existence of a multiplex correlated graph with hidden ``influence links''. Analytical solutions predict percolation phase transitions, either abrupt or continuous, where networks are disintegrated through viral cascades of followers as in empirical data. Our modeling predicts the strict conditions to sustain a large viral spreading via a scaling form of...

  17. Anti-viral Effect of Caulis Tripterygii Wilfordii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guo-qin

    2005-01-01

    @@ There have appeared more and more antibiotics to antagonize against causative organism, but in comparison few antivirals have. Hence, many viral diseases remain refractory and fatal due to lack of effective medicine.

  18. Description of viral assemblages associated with the Gorgonia ventalina holobiont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, I.; Brown, J. M.; Burge, C. A.; Couch, C. S.; LaBarre, B. A.; Mouchka, M. E.; Naito, M.; Harvell, C. D.

    2012-06-01

    The diversity and function of viruses in coral holobionts has only recently received attention. The non-reef building gorgonian octocoral, Gorgonia ventalina, is a major constituent of Caribbean reefs. We investigated viral communities associated with G. ventalina tissues to understand their role in gorgonian ecology. Pyrosequencing was used to prepare a total of 514,632 sequence reads of DNA- and RNA-based mixed-community viral genomes (metaviromes). RNA viral assemblages were comprised of primarily unidentifiable reads, with most matching host transcripts and other RNA metaviromes. DNA metaviromes were similar between healthy and diseased tissues and comprised of contiguous sequences (contigs) that matched primarily metazoan and bacterial proteins. Only ~5% of contigs matched viral proteins that were primarily cyanophage and viruses of Chlorella and Ostreococcus. Our results confirm that DNA and RNA viruses comprise a component of the gorgonian holobiont, suggesting that they may play a role in the ecology of G. ventalina.

  19. Clinical and biochemical features of acute viral hepatitis | Spearman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical and biochemical features of acute viral hepatitis. ... systemic infection, presents with clinical manifestations relating directly to inflammation of the ... The most important causes of acute and chronic hepatitis are the five hepatotrophic ...

  20. Dynamic Model Visualizing the Process of Viral Plaque Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boriana Marintcheva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Microbiology and Virology courses, viral plaques are often presented to students as the way one can visualize viruses/bacteriophages. While students generally grasp the idea that counting plaques is essentially the same as counting viruses in their sample (assuming that one virus entering the cell is sufficient for productive infection, the process of plaque formation itself remains largely obscure. Many students fail to appreciate that viral plaques are actually a “laboratory-made” phenomenon allowing us to observe and study the growth of lytic viruses. The latter often presents a challenge for the interpretation of experimental data related to viral growth and drug discovery using plaque reduction assay. The hands-on model described here creates an opportunity for students to experience the process of viral plaque formation while engaging multiple senses and creating a lasting impression.  

  1. Early Detection of Viral Hepatitis Can Save Lives - PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-12

    Early detection of viral hepatitis can help prevent liver damage, cirrhosis, and even liver cancer.  Created: 5/12/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/12/2010.

  2. White spot viral disease in penaeid shrimp: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Sangamaheswaran, A.P.; Jeyaseelan, M.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The white spot viral disease in penaeid shrimp affects the development of the global shrimp industry. This paper reviews the viruses that cause the disease, the transmission of the virus, diagnosis and preventive measures.

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) A & B

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) A & B - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  4. The role of the laboratory in outbreak investigation of viral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of the laboratory in outbreak investigation of viral haemorrhagic fever in Nigeria, 2014. ... Pan African Medical Journal ... old female student who attended a private university in Nasarawa state from suspected VHF; presumably Ebola.

  5. Viral infections as controlling factors for the deep biosphere? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, B.; Engelhardt, T.; Sahlberg, M.; Cypionka, H.

    2009-12-01

    The marine deep biosphere represents the largest biotope on Earth. Throughout the last years, we have obtained interesting insights into its microbial community composition. However, one component that was completely overlooked so far is the viral inventory of deep-subsurface sediments. While viral infections were identified to have a major impact on the benthic microflora of deep-sea surface sediments (Danavaro et al. 2008), no studies were performed on deep-biosphere samples, so far. As grazers probably play only a minor role in anoxic and highly compressed deep sediments, viruses might be the main “predators” for indigenous microorganisms. Furthermore, the release of cell components, called “the viral shunt”, could have a major impact on the deep biosphere in providing labile organic compounds to non-infected microorganisms in these generally nutrient depleted sediments. However, direct counting of viruses in sediments is highly challenging due to the small size of viruses and the high background of small particles. Even molecular surveys using “universal” PCR primers that target phage-specific genes fail due to the vast phage diversity. One solution for this problem is the lysogenic viral life cycle as many bacteriophages integrate their DNA into the host genome. It is estimated that up to 70% of cultivated bacteria contain prophages within their genome. Therefore, culture collections (Batzke et al. 2007) represent an archive of the viral composition within the respective habitat. These prophages can be induced to become free phage particles in stimulation experiments in which the host cells are set under certain stress situations such as a treatment with UV exposure or DNA-damaging antibiotics. The study of the viral component within the deep biosphere offers to answer the following questions: To which extent are deep-biosphere populations controlled by viral infections? What is the inter- and intra-specific diversity and the host-specific viral

  6. Health Inequities and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, TB, and STDs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-15

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), discusses health inequities in the United States and how NCHHSTP research, policies, and programs can address them.  Created: 9/15/2010 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 9/15/2010.

  7. Microfluidic large scale integration of viral-host interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Ya'ara; Glick, Yair; Kipper, Sarit; Schwartz, Nika; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron

    2013-06-21

    Viral-host interactions represent potential drug targets for novel antiviral strategies (Flisiak et al., Hepatology, 2008, 47, 817-26). Hence, it is important to establish an adequate platform for identifying and analyzing such interactions. In this review, we discuss bottlenecks in conventional protein-protein interaction methodologies and present the contribution of innovative microfluidic-based technologies towards a solution to these problems with respect to viral-host proteomics.

  8. Impact of xynthia tempest on viral contamination of shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, Marco; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Piquet, Jean-Côme; Noyer, Mathilde; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2012-05-01

    Viral contamination in oyster and mussel samples was evaluated after a massive storm with hurricane wind named "Xynthia tempest" destroyed a number of sewage treatment plants in an area harboring many shellfish farms. Although up to 90% of samples were found to be contaminated 2 days after the disaster, detected viral concentrations were low. A 1-month follow-up showed a rapid decrease in the number of positive samples, even for norovirus.

  9. A burst in the incidence of viral exanthems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maria Salavastru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaccines have a major role in eradication programs of viral diseases. Vaccines against measles, rubella, and varicella are included in the vaccination schedules for children in most countries. Objective: A comparative analysis between 2011 and 2012 was performed to investigate if the number of patients with viral exanthemas reported to our clinic in 2012 was increased. Materials and Methods: Patients were grouped in four categories: rubella, measles, varicella and other viral exanthemas. Results: Between January and April 2011, there were registered 37 cases with viral exanthemas: 69.5% presented with varicella and 30.5% with other viral exanthemas. Between January and April 2012, there were 178 cases registered with viral eruption, of which 37% were of other viral exanthemas, 35.4% rubella, 19.7% measles and 7.9% varicella. The highest incidence was seen in patients aged between 20 and 29 years (52.2%, with 21% having measles, 32.2% rubella, 9% varicella and 37.6% having other exanthemas. In 2012, the number of cases of viral exanthemas increased 5 times, with important outbreaks of new cases of measles and rubella. Conclusions: Although vaccines against measles and rubella were being used since 1979 and 1998 respectively, it was only in 2004, that these vaccines became part of the mandatory vaccination schedule. Although persons under 32 years should be protected against measles infection if they are previously vaccinated, more than 90% of the registered cases of measles occurred in such patients. The patients registered between January and April 2011 were mostly pediatric. Adults also were much more affected with measles, rubella, or varicella viruses in 2012 than in 2011.

  10. Etiology and Rapid Diagnosis of Human Viral Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    Navy-Marine luncheon held in Guayaquil, Ecuador , consisting of raw fish, salad and meats. These findings are consistent with published outbreaks of...N.R.: Human viral gastroenteritis. Microbiological Reviews 48:157-179, 1984. 2. Echeverria, P., Blacklow, N.R., Cukor, G.,Vibulbandhitkit, S...children. New Eng. J. Med. 294:965-972, 1976. 23. Blacklow, N.R. and Cukor, G.: Viral gastroenteritis agents. Manual of Clinical Microbiology , Fourth

  11. Physical non-viral gene delivery methods for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellott, Adam J; Forrest, M Laird; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-03-01

    The integration of gene therapy into tissue engineering to control differentiation and direct tissue formation is not a new concept; however, successful delivery of nucleic acids into primary cells, progenitor cells, and stem cells has proven exceptionally challenging. Viral vectors are generally highly effective at delivering nucleic acids to a variety of cell populations, both dividing and non-dividing, yet these viral vectors are marred by significant safety concerns. Non-viral vectors are preferred for gene therapy, despite lower transfection efficiencies, and possess many customizable attributes that are desirable for tissue engineering applications. However, there is no single non-viral gene delivery strategy that "fits-all" cell types and tissues. Thus, there is a compelling opportunity to examine different non-viral vectors, especially physical vectors, and compare their relative degrees of success. This review examines the advantages and disadvantages of physical non-viral methods (i.e., microinjection, ballistic gene delivery, electroporation, sonoporation, laser irradiation, magnetofection, and electric field-induced molecular vibration), with particular attention given to electroporation because of its versatility, with further special emphasis on Nucleofection™. In addition, attributes of cellular character that can be used to improve differentiation strategies are examined for tissue engineering applications. Ultimately, electroporation exhibits a high transfection efficiency in many cell types, which is highly desirable for tissue engineering applications, but electroporation and other physical non-viral gene delivery methods are still limited by poor cell viability. Overcoming the challenge of poor cell viability in highly efficient physical non-viral techniques is the key to using gene delivery to enhance tissue engineering applications.

  12. Assessing ubiquitination of viral proteins: lessons from flavivirus NS5

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, R. Travis; Best, Sonja M.

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to a substrate protein is a widely used cellular mechanism for control of protein stability and function, modulation of signal transduction pathways and antiviral responses. Identification and characterization of ubiquitinated viral proteins is an important step in understanding novel mechanisms of viral protein regulation as well as elucidating cellular antiviral strategies. Here we describe a protocol to easily detect and characterize the ubiquitination status of ...

  13. Viral Penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    unique categories: vegetative bacterial cells, 54 spores, viruses, and toxins; viruses are the primary concern in this report. Although the 55 viral...most applications the HEPA is adequate, but tolerance for viral penetration is very 71 low, and thus only a few penetrating virions may be enough to...larger particles will be 397 more likely to contain viable virions). Tryptone is reported to protect viruses from 398 desiccation during aerosolization

  14. Novel Procedures for Identification and Characterization of Viral Proteases Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrenberg, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    Viral proteases are often considered to be attractive drug targets because of their crucial function in the viral replication machinery. In order to increase our knowledge of these important targets and to contribute to the discovery and development of new antiviral drugs, the proteases from hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) have been produced and their interactions with inhibitors and fragments have been characterized, using enzyme inhibition and SPR biosensor based in...

  15. Advances of Studies on the Viral Proteins of PRRSV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao; Zongxi; Shi; Zhihai; Lin; Zhemin; Jiao; Peirong; Zhang; Guihong

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome( PRRS) is one of viral diseases with severe reproductive obstacle of pregnant sows and respiratory tract symptoms and higher mortality of piglets as characteristics,which is caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus( PRRSV). PRRS has brought great threats to swine industry in the world. The advances of studies on the viral proteins of PRRSV were reviewed from the genome,non-structural proteins and structural proteins of PRRSV.

  16. Insect symbiotic bacteria harbour viral pathogens for transovarial transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongsheng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Chen, Yong; Liu, Yuyan; Chen, Qian; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Hongyan; Li, Yi; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-03-06

    Many insects, including mosquitoes, planthoppers, aphids and leafhoppers, are the hosts of bacterial symbionts and the vectors for transmitting viral pathogens(1-3). In general, symbiotic bacteria can indirectly affect viral transmission by enhancing immunity and resistance to viruses in insects(3-5). Whether symbiotic bacteria can directly interact with the virus and mediate its transmission has been unknown. Here, we show that an insect symbiotic bacterium directly harbours a viral pathogen and mediates its transovarial transmission to offspring. We observe rice dwarf virus (a plant reovirus) binding to the envelopes of the bacterium Sulcia, a common obligate symbiont of leafhoppers(6-8), allowing the virus to exploit the ancient oocyte entry path of Sulcia in rice leafhopper vectors. Such virus-bacterium binding is mediated by the specific interaction of the viral capsid protein and the Sulcia outer membrane protein. Treatment with antibiotics or antibodies against Sulcia outer membrane protein interferes with this interaction and strongly prevents viral transmission to insect offspring. This newly discovered virus-bacterium interaction represents the first evidence that a viral pathogen can directly exploit a symbiotic bacterium for its transmission. We believe that such a model of virus-bacterium communication is a common phenomenon in nature.

  17. Viral discovery and sequence recovery using DNA microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wang

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of the constant threat posed by emerging infectious diseases and the limitations of existing approaches used to identify new pathogens, there is a great demand for new technological methods for viral discovery. We describe herein a DNA microarray-based platform for novel virus identification and characterization. Central to this approach was a DNA microarray designed to detect a wide range of known viruses as well as novel members of existing viral families; this microarray contained the most highly conserved 70mer sequences from every fully sequenced reference viral genome in GenBank. During an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in March 2003, hybridization to this microarray revealed the presence of a previously uncharacterized coronavirus in a viral isolate cultivated from a SARS patient. To further characterize this new virus, approximately 1 kb of the unknown virus genome was cloned by physically recovering viral sequences hybridized to individual array elements. Sequencing of these fragments confirmed that the virus was indeed a new member of the coronavirus family. This combination of array hybridization followed by direct viral sequence recovery should prove to be a general strategy for the rapid identification and characterization of novel viruses and emerging infectious disease.

  18. Long-Term Care Facilities: A Cornucopia of Viral Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsey, Ann R.; Dallal, Gerard E.; Formica, Maria A.; Andolina, Gloria G.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Leka, Lynette L.; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the frequency and types of respiratory viruses circulating in Boston long-term care facilities (LTCFs) during a 3-year period. Design Observational. Setting Thirty-three Boston-area LTCFs over a 3-year period. Participants Residents of long-term care who had previously participated in a trial of vitamin E supplementation and had paired serum samples available for viral analysis. Measurements Viral antibody titers to eight respiratory viruses (influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza virus serotype three (PIV-3), PIV-2, human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and coronaviruses 229E and OC43) were measured using enzyme immunoassay at baseline and 53 weeks. Infection was defined as a more than quadrupling of viral titers. Clinical data on respiratory illnesses were collected throughout the study period. Results A total of 617 persons were enrolled in the trial. Of these, 382 (62%) had sera available for viral analysis. A total of 204 viral infections were documented in 157 subjects. Serological responses to all eight viruses were documented, with hMPV (12.8%) and coronavirus 229E (10.5%) being the most common and PIV-2 (2.4%) the least common. The occurrence of bronchitis (P = .007), pneumonia (P = .02), and any lower respiratory tract infection (P = .002) was significantly associated with having a viral diagnosis. Conclusion A wide range of respiratory viruses cocirculates in LTCFs and contributes to respiratory illness morbidity in these populations. PMID:18557966

  19. Zika viral dynamics and shedding in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna, Christa E; Lim, So-Yon; Deleage, Claire; Griffin, Bryan D; Stein, Derek; Schroeder, Lukas T; Omange, Robert Were; Best, Katharine; Luo, Ma; Hraber, Peter T; Andersen-Elyard, Hanne; Ojeda, Erwing Fabian Cardozo; Huang, Scott; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Higgs, Stephen; Perelson, Alan S; Estes, Jacob D; Safronetz, David; Lewis, Mark G; Whitney, James B

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Zika virus has been associated with serious neurological complications and fetal abnormalities. However, the dynamics of viral infection, replication and shedding are poorly understood. Here we show that both rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are highly susceptible to infection by lineages of Zika virus that are closely related to, or are currently circulating in, the Americas. After subcutaneous viral inoculation, viral RNA was detected in blood plasma as early as 1 d after infection. Viral RNA was also detected in saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and semen, but transiently in vaginal secretions. Although viral RNA during primary infection was cleared from blood plasma and urine within 10 d, viral RNA was detectable in saliva and seminal fluids until the end of the study, 3 weeks after the resolution of viremia in the blood. The control of primary Zika virus infection in the blood was correlated with rapid innate and adaptive immune responses. We also identified Zika RNA in tissues, including the brain and male and female reproductive tissues, during early and late stages of infection. Re-infection of six animals 45 d after primary infection with a heterologous strain resulted in complete protection, which suggests that primary Zika virus infection elicits protective immunity. Early invasion of Zika virus into the nervous system of healthy animals and the extent and duration of shedding in saliva and semen underscore possible concern for additional neurologic complications and nonarthropod-mediated transmission in humans. PMID:27694931

  20. Viral Advertising: the Relationship between Emotional Content and Ad Forwarding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Madhoushi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available While traditional marketing communication is a kind of marketer-to-consumer communication, viral advertising is consumer-to-consumer communication. Advertisers believe that their messages will be viewed favourably if they have been recommended by a friend or social network’s member. This research aimed to examine the characteristics of viral advertisement. Strategy of the research was experimental. Students of the University of Mazandaran were selected as population of the research. Cluster sampling was applied to select the research sample. Then, the selected sample was equally divided into test and control groups. Four viral and four non-viral ads of unfamiliar brands were shown for test and control group respectively. The data was collected through questionare. Reliablity of the questionare was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and parametric tests including Kolmogorov-Smirnov, one sample T-test, two independent samples T-test and Spearman correlation. The results indicate that there is positive and significant difference between the emotional content of viral ads and non-viral ads. There is positive and significant correlation between emotional content and ad forwarding intention.

  1. Interleukin-10 determines viral clearance or persistence in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David G; Trifilo, Matthew J.; Edelmann, Kurt H.; Teyton, Luc; McGavern, Dorian B; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2008-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are a major health concern. One obstacle inhibiting the clearance of persistent infections is functional inactivation of antiviral T cells. Although such immunosuppression occurs rapidly after infection, the mechanisms that induce the loss of T-cell activity and promote viral persistence are unknown. Herein we document that persistent viral infection in mice results in a significant upregulation of interleukin (IL)-10 by antigen-presenting cells, leading to impaired T-cell responses. Genetic removal of Il10 resulted in the maintenance of robust effector T-cell responses, the rapid elimination of virus and the development of antiviral memory T-cell responses. Therapeutic administration of an antibody that blocks the IL-10 receptor restored T-cell function and eliminated viral infection. Thus, we identify a single molecule that directly induces immunosuppression leading to viral persistence and demonstrate that a therapy to neutralize IL-10 results in T-cell recovery and the prevention of viral persistence. PMID:17041596

  2. Optimizing viral and non-viral gene transfer methods for genetic modification of porcine mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Duch, Mogens R.; Mygind, Tina

    2006-01-01

    -old Danish landrace pigs by Ficoll step gradient separation and polystyrene adherence technique. Vectors expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were transferred to the cells by different non-viral methods and by use of recombinant adeno...... viral and non-viral ex vivo gene delivery systems with respect to gene transfer efficiency, maintenance of transgene expression, and safety issues using primary porcine MSCs as target cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MSCs were purified from bone marrow aspirates from the proximal tibiae of four 3-month...... were evaluated by realtime quantitative RT-PCR and histochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity, respectively. RESULTS: Non-viral gene delivery methods resulted in transient eGFP expression by less than 2% of the cells. Using high titer rAAV-based vector up to 90% of the cells were...

  3. VirSorter: mining viral signal from microbial genomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roux

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Viruses of microbes impact all ecosystems where microbes drive key energy and substrate transformations including the oceans, humans and industrial fermenters. However, despite this recognized importance, our understanding of viral diversity and impacts remains limited by too few model systems and reference genomes. One way to fill these gaps in our knowledge of viral diversity is through the detection of viral signal in microbial genomic data. While multiple approaches have been developed and applied for the detection of prophages (viral genomes integrated in a microbial genome, new types of microbial genomic data are emerging that are more fragmented and larger scale, such as Single-cell Amplified Genomes (SAGs of uncultivated organisms or genomic fragments assembled from metagenomic sequencing. Here, we present VirSorter, a tool designed to detect viral signal in these different types of microbial sequence data in both a reference-dependent and reference-independent manner, leveraging probabilistic models and extensive virome data to maximize detection of novel viruses. Performance testing shows that VirSorter’s prophage prediction capability compares to that of available prophage predictors for complete genomes, but is superior in predicting viral sequences outside of a host genome (i.e., from extrachromosomal prophages, lytic infections, or partially assembled prophages. Furthermore, VirSorter outperforms existing tools for fragmented genomic and metagenomic datasets, and can identify viral signal in assembled sequence (contigs as short as 3kb, while providing near-perfect identification (>95% Recall and 100% Precision on contigs of at least 10kb. Because VirSorter scales to large datasets, it can also be used in “reverse” to more confidently identify viral sequence in viral metagenomes by sorting away cellular DNA whether derived from gene transfer agents, generalized transduction or contamination. Finally, VirSorter is made

  4. The Pacific Ocean virome (POV): a marine viral metagenomic dataset and associated protein clusters for quantitative viral ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria and their viruses (phage) are fundamental drivers of many ecosystem processes including global biogeochemistry and horizontal gene transfer. While databases and resources for studying function in uncultured bacterial communities are relatively advanced, many fewer exist for their viral counterparts. The issue is largely technical in that the majority (often 90%) of viral sequences are functionally 'unknown' making viruses a virtually untapped resource of functional and physiological information. Here, we provide a community resource that organizes this unknown sequence space into 27 K high confidence protein clusters using 32 viral metagenomes from four biogeographic regions in the Pacific Ocean that vary by season, depth, and proximity to land, and include some of the first deep pelagic ocean viral metagenomes. These protein clusters more than double currently available viral protein clusters, including those from environmental datasets. Further, a protein cluster guided analysis of functional diversity revealed that richness decreased (i) from deep to surface waters, (ii) from winter to summer, (iii) and with distance from shore in surface waters only. These data provide a framework from which to draw on for future metadata-enabled functional inquiries of the vast viral unknown.

  5. How to be good at being a virus : Biochemical constraints of viral life-history evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berngruber, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Viral reproduction depends on a careful balance of the viral life-cycle in time and magnitude. Maintenance of this balance is granted by the regulation of viral protein production and protein interactions. Viral evolution therefore hinges on the possibilities to optimize these protein interactions.

  6. The Role of Viral Mutation in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ming WANG; Lin LIU

    2008-01-01

    The quasispecies nature of hepatitis B and C virus (HBV, HCV) plays an important role in the pathogenesis, immune escape and drug resistance during chronic infection. Although there is still a lack of effective treatment for hepatitis C, a series of nucleoside analogs (NA) have been developed for the treatment of hepatitis B. NA resistant HBV mutants can accumulate during prolonged therapy and lead to the failure of anti-HBV therapy. Switching to other sensitive NAs can inhibit the emerged resistant mutants. Therefore, understanding the evolution of viral quasispecies under drug pressure is crucial for the establishment of antiviral strategy and the monitoring of antiviral process. Immune response and escape are complicated process, during which both host and virus factors may play their roles. Further understanding of the interaction and interrelationship between host and these viruses may lead to optimized prevention, diagnosis and treatment for chronic hepatitis.

  7. Exacerbated Leishmaniasis Caused by a Viral Endosymbiont can be Prevented by Immunization with Its Viral Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, Patrik; Hartley, Mary-Anne; Rossi, Matteo; Prevel, Florence; Desponds, Chantal; Utzschneider, Daniel T.; Eren, Remzi-Onur; Zangger, Haroun; Brunner, Livia; Collin, Nicolas; Zehn, Dietmar; Kuhlmann, F. Matthew; Beverley, Stephen M.; Ronet, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a cytoplasmic virus called Leishmaniavirus (LRV) is present in some Leishmania species and acts as a potent innate immunogen, aggravating lesional inflammation and development in mice. In humans, the presence of LRV in Leishmania guyanensis and in L. braziliensis was significantly correlated with poor treatment response and symptomatic relapse. So far, no clinical effort has used LRV for prophylactic purposes. In this context, we designed an original vaccine strategy that targeted LRV nested in Leishmania parasites to prevent virus-related complications. To this end, C57BL/6 mice were immunized with a recombinant LRV1 Leishmania guyanensis viral capsid polypeptide formulated with a T helper 1-polarizing adjuvant. LRV1-vaccinated mice had significant reduction in lesion size and parasite load when subsequently challenged with LRV1+ Leishmania guyanensis parasites. The protection conferred by this immunization could be reproduced in naïve mice via T-cell transfer from vaccinated mice but not by serum transfer. The induction of LRV1 specific T cells secreting IFN-γ was confirmed in vaccinated mice and provided strong evidence that LRV1-specific protection arose via a cell mediated immune response against the LRV1 capsid. Our studies suggest that immunization with LRV1 capsid could be of a preventive benefit in mitigating the elevated pathology associated with LRV1 bearing Leishmania infections and possibly avoiding symptomatic relapses after an initial treatment. This novel anti-endosymbiotic vaccine strategy could be exploited to control other infectious diseases, as similar viral infections are largely prevalent across pathogenic pathogens and could consequently open new vaccine opportunities. PMID:28099431

  8. Metagenomic analysis of viral communities in (hadopelagic sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyzed viral metagenomes (viromes in the sedimentary habitats of three geographically and geologically distinct (hadopelagic environments in the northwest Pacific; the Izu-Ogasawara Trench (water depth = 9,760 m (OG, the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench (10,325 m (MA, and the forearc basin off the Shimokita Peninsula (1,181 m (SH. Virus abundance ranged from 10(6 to 10(11 viruses/cm(3 of sediments (down to 30 cm below the seafloor [cmbsf]. We recovered viral DNA assemblages (viromes from the (hadopelagic sediment samples and obtained a total of 37,458, 39,882, and 70,882 sequence reads by 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencing from the virome libraries of the OG, MA, and SH (hadopelagic sediments, respectively. Only 24-30% of the sequence reads from each virome library exhibited significant similarities to the sequences deposited in the public nr protein database (E-value <10(-3 in BLAST. Among the sequences identified as potential viral genes based on the BLAST search, 95-99% of the sequence reads in each library were related to genes from single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viral families, including Microviridae, Circoviridae, and Geminiviridae. A relatively high abundance of sequences related to the genetic markers (major capsid protein [VP1] and replication protein [Rep] of two ssDNA viral groups were also detected in these libraries, thereby revealing a high genotypic diversity of their viruses (833 genotypes for VP1 and 2,551 genotypes for Rep. A majority of the viral genes predicted from each library were classified into three ssDNA viral protein categories: Rep, VP1, and minor capsid protein. The deep-sea sedimentary viromes were distinct from the viromes obtained from the oceanic and fresh waters and marine eukaryotes, and thus, deep-sea sediments harbor novel viromes, including previously unidentified ssDNA viruses.

  9. Generation of Recombinant Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (rVHSV) Expressing Two Foreign Proteins and Effect of Lengthened Viral Genome on Viral Growth and In Vivo Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a new recombinant VHSV (rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp) was generated by insertion of a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene between N and P genes, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene between P and M genes of VHSV genome, the expression of each heterologous gene in infected cells, and effects of the lengthened recombinant VHSV's genome on the replication ability and in vivo virulence to olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) fingerlings were compared with previously generated rVHSVs (rVHSV-wild, rVHSV-Arfp, and rVHSV-Brfp). The expression of RFP and GFP in cells infected with rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp was verified through fluorescent microscopy and FACS analysis. In the viral growth analysis, rVHSV-Arfp and rVHSV-Brfp showed significantly lower viral titers than rVHSV-wild, and the replication of rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp was significantly decreased compared to that of even rVHSV-Arfp or rVHSV-Brfp. These results suggest that the genome length is a critical factor for the determination of rVHSVs replication efficiency. In the in vivo virulence experiment, the cumulative mortalities of olive flounder fingerlings infected with each rVHSV were inversely proportional to the length of the viral genome, suggesting that decreased viral growth rate due to the lengthened viral genome is accompanied with the decrease of in vivo virulence of rVHSVs. Recombinant viruses expressing multiple foreign antigens can be used for the development of combined vaccines. However, as the present rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp still possesses an ability to kill hosts (although very weakened), researches on the producing more attenuated viruses or propagation-deficient replicon particles are needed to solve safety-related problems.

  10. Konjungtivitis Viral: Diagnosis dan Terapi di Pelayanan Kesehatan Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Sitompul

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Konjungtiva adalah membran mukosa tipis transparan yang melapisi bagian anterior bola mata dan bagian dalam palpebral. Konjungtiva berfungsi sebagai salah satu komponen sistem perlindungan mata dari peradangan dan infeksi. Peradangan konjungtiva disebut konjungtivitis dan infeksi virus merupakan etiologi peradangan akut tersering pada konjungtiva. Virus yang menyebabkan konjungtivitis adalah adenovirus, herpes simpleks, herpes zoster, pox virus, myxovirus, paramyxovirus, dan arbovirus. Konjungtivitis sering terjadi bersama atau sesudah infeksi saluran napas dan umumnya terdapat riwayat kontak dengan pasien konjungtivitis viral. Gejala konjungtivitis viral berupa mata merah, sekret mata berair dan dapat disertai pembesaran kelenjar limfe. Gejala konjungtivitis viral biasanya ringan, dapat sembuh sendiri dan tidak disertai penurunan tajam penglihatan sehingga dapat ditatalaksana di pelayanan kesehatan primer. Meskipun demikian, terdapat kasus-kasus yang bersifat mengancam penglihatan sehingga perlu segera dirujuk ke rumah sakit atau dokter spesialis mata. Konjungtivitis viral sangat menular sehingga pasien perlu mendapat edukasi untuk mengurangi kontak langsung dan tidak langsung agar tidak menjadi sumber infeksi bagi lingkungannya. Konjungtivitis viral dapat sembuh sendiri, namun pemberian air mata buatan, antihistamin topikal, atau kompres dingin berguna untuk meredakan gejala. Terapi antiviral tidak diperlukan untuk konjungtivitis virus, kecuali untuk konjungtivitis herpetik. Kata kunci: epidemi, konjungtivitis, virus.     Viral Conjunctivitis: Diagnosis and Therapy in Primary Health Care   Abstract Conjunctivae is a transparent thin mucosal membrane covering the outer anterior eye and inner palpebrae. This structure is vital for eye defense from inflammation and infection. Inflammation occurring on the conjunctivae is called conjunctivitis and virus is one of the most common etiologic agent. Such viruses are adenovirus, herpes simplex virus

  11. ANTI-VIRAL ACTIVITY OF GLYCIRRHETINIC AND GLYCIRRHIZIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zarubaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a highly contagious human disease. In the course of use of antiviral drugs drug-resistant strains of the virus are formed, resulting in reduced efficiency of the chemotherapy. The review describes the biological activity of glycirrhetinic (GLA and glycirrhizic (GA acids in terms of their use as a therapeutic agent for viral infections. So, these compounds are against a broad spectrum of viruses, including herpes, corona-, alphaand flaviviruses, human immunodeficiency virus, vaccinia virus, poliovirus type I, vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus. These data indicate that anti-viral effect of these compounds is due to several types of activity — direct antiviral effects, effects on cellular proand anti-viral and immunomodulating pathways, in particular by activation of innate immunity system. GA interferes with early steps of the viral reproductive cycle such as virus binding to its receptor, the absorption of the virus by endocytosis or virus decapsidation in the cytoplasm. This is due to the effect of GA-induced reduction of membrane fluidity. Thus, one mechanism for the antiviral activity of GA is that GA molecule increases the rigidity of cellular and viral membranes after incorporation in there. This results in increasing of energy threshold required for the formation of negative curvature at the fusion zones, as well as difficult lateral migration of the virus-receptor complexes. In addition, glycyrrhizin prevents interaction of viral nucleoprotein with cellular protein HMGB1, which is necessary for the viral life cycle. Glycyrrhizin also inhibits the induction of oxidative stress during influenza infection, exhibiting antioxidant properties, which leads to a reduction of virus-induced production of cytokines/chemokines, without affecting the replication of the virus. A wide spectrum of biological activity and effect on various aspects of the viral pathogenesis substantiate the effect of GA and GLA as a component

  12. FEATURES OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE DURING VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Borisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to select using cluster analysis and comparatively characterize immune disorders types in acute and chronic viral infections. Patients with acute and chronic viral infections (n = 896 were examined: 77 patients with acute viral hepatitis B, 94 — chronic viral hepatitis B, 119 — chronic hepatitis C, 531 — recurrent herpes, 75 — human papillomavirus infection. Healthy persons (n = 466 were examined as control. The research of blood lymphocyte phenotype was performed by flow cytometry. Four-color immunophenotyping were used in the following panels: Т-lymphocytes (CD3+CD19–CD16/56–CD45+, Т-helpers (CD3+CD4+CD45+, cytotoxic Т-cells (CD3+CD8+CD45+, NKcells (CD3–CD16/56+CD45+, B-lymphocytes (CD3–CD19+CD16/56+CD45+. Absolute values were obtained on a dualplatform technology using the results of haematological analysis. The immunoglobulin concentrations were determined by ELISA. The clustering was performed by a single linkage method. The number of clusters was determined on the basis of calculating the values of the Euclidean distance between the mean group values. It was found that the parameters, characterizing the functional state of the various parts of the immune system in acute and chronic viral infections, considerable diversity values. Custer analysis allows to allocate 6 immunotypes defined different states of innate and adaptive immunity: characterized by activation of the innate (increasing the number of neutrophils and NK-cells and adaptive immunity humoral response (increasing the concentration of IgG, characterized by hyperreaction of adaptive immunity (a significant increase in the concentration of IgG, discoordinated (multidirectional changes in the values of immunological parameters, immunodeficiency and unresponsiveness (did not differ from the control parameters immunotypes. It is proved that in patients with viral infections most often determined by the

  13. Analysis of viral clearance unit operations for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesegaes, George; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of viral clearance is a critical step in assuring the safety of biotechnology products. We generated a viral clearance database that contains product information, unit operation process parameters, and viral clearance data from monoclonal antibody and antibody-related regulatory submissions to FDA. Here we present a broad overview of the database and resulting analyses. We report that the diversity of model viruses tested expands as products transition to late-phase. We also present averages and ranges of viral clearance results by Protein A and ion exchange chromatography steps, low pH chemical inactivation, and virus filtration, focusing on retro- and parvoviruses. For most unit operations, an average log reduction value (LRV, a measure of clearance power) for retrovirus of >4 log(10) were measured. Cases where clearance data fell outside of the anticipated range (i.e., outliers) were rationally explained. Lastly, a historical analysis did not find evidence of any improvement trend in viral clearance over time. The data collectively suggest that many unit operations in general can reliably clear viruses.

  14. Conditions for Viral Influence Spreading through Multiplex Correlated Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanqing; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental problem in network science is to predict how certain individuals are able to initiate new networks to spring up "new ideas." Frequently, these changes in trends are triggered by a few innovators who rapidly impose their ideas through "viral" influence spreading, producing cascades of followers and fragmenting an old network to create a new one. Typical examples include the rise of scientific ideas or abrupt changes in social media, like the rise of Facebook to the detriment of Myspace. How this process arises in practice has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that a condition for sustaining a viral spreading process is the existence of a multiplex-correlated graph with hidden "influence links." Analytical solutions predict percolation-phase transitions, either abrupt or continuous, where networks are disintegrated through viral cascades of followers, as in empirical data. Our modeling predicts the strict conditions to sustain a large viral spreading via a scaling form of the local correlation function between multilayers, which we also confirm empirically. Ultimately, the theory predicts the conditions for viral cascading in a large class of multiplex networks ranging from social to financial systems and markets.

  15. Anti-Viral Antibody Profiling by High Density Protein Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wiktor, Peter; Kahn, Peter; Brunner, Al; Khela, Amritpal; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Yu, Xiaobo; Magee, Mitch; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Gibson, David; Rooney, Madeleine E; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections elicit anti-viral antibodies and have been associated with various chronic diseases. Detection of these antibodies can facilitate diagnosis, treatment of infection and understanding of the mechanisms of virus associated diseases. In this work, we assayed anti-viral antibodies using a novel high density-nucleic acid programmable protein array (HD-NAPPA) platform. Individual viral proteins were expressed in situ directly from plasmids encoding proteins in an array of microscopic reaction chambers. Quality of protein display and serum response was assured by comparing intra- and inter- array correlation within or between printing batches with average correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. HD-NAPPA showed higher signal to background (S/B) ratio compared with standard NAPPA on planar glass slides and ELISA. Antibody responses to 761 antigens from 25 different viruses were profiled among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common as well as unique antibody reactivity patterns were detected between patients and healthy controls. We believe HD-viral-NAPPA will enable the study of host-pathogen interactions at unprecedented dimensions and elucidate the role of pathogen infections in disease development. PMID:25758251

  16. Metagenomic characterization of viral communities in Goseong Bay, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinik; Park, So Yun; Park, Mirye; Lee, Sukchan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Cho, Won Kyong; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, seawater samples were collected from Goseong Bay, Korea in March 2014 and viral populations were examined by metagenomics assembly. Enrichment of marine viral particles using FeCl3 followed by next-generation sequencing produced numerous sequences. De novo assembly and BLAST search showed that most of the obtained contigs were unknown sequences and only 0.74% of sequences were associated with known viruses. As a result, 138 viruses, including bacteriophages (87%), viruses infecting algae and others (13%) were identified. The identified 138 viruses were divided into 11 orders, 14 families, 34 genera, and 133 species. The dominant viruses were Pelagibacter phage HTVC010P and Roseobacter phage SIO1. The viruses infecting algae, including the Ostreococcus species, accounted for 9.4% of total identified viruses. In addition, we identified pathogenic herpes viruses infecting fishes and giant viruses infecting parasitic acanthamoeba species. This is a comprehensive study to reveal the viral populations in the Goseong Bay using metagenomics. The information associated with the marine viral community in Goseong Bay, Korea will be useful for comparative analysis in other marine viral communities.

  17. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecellier Charles-Henri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to be similarly conserved from plants to insects, even in worms, RNA silencing does influence the replication of mammalian viruses but in a particular mode: micro(miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs naturally implicated in translational control, rather than virus-derived small interfering (siRNAs like in other organisms, are involved. In fact, these recent studies even suggest that RNA silencing may be beneficial for viral replication. Accordingly, several large DNA mammalian viruses have been shown to encode their own miRNAs. Here, we summarize the seminal studies that have implicated RNA silencing in viral infection and compare the different eukaryotic responses.

  18. Autologous antibody capture to enrich immunogenic viruses for viral discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Munnink, Bas B; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; Deijs, Martin; Jonkers, Jiri; Verhoeven, Joost T P; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; de Jong, Menno D; Berkhout, Ben; Loens, Katherine; Kellam, Paul; Bakker, Margreet; Canuti, Marta; Cotten, Matthew; van der Hoek, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of new viruses has been boosted by novel deep sequencing technologies. Currently, many viruses can be identified by sequencing without knowledge of the pathogenicity of the virus. However, attributing the presence of a virus in patient material to a disease in the patient can be a challenge. One approach to meet this challenge is identification of viral sequences based on enrichment by autologous patient antibody capture. This method facilitates identification of viruses that have provoked an immune response within the patient and may increase the sensitivity of the current virus discovery techniques. To demonstrate the utility of this method, virus discovery deep sequencing (VIDISCA-454) was performed on clinical samples from 19 patients: 13 with a known respiratory viral infection and 6 with a known gastrointestinal viral infection. Patient sera was collected from one to several months after the acute infection phase. Input and antibody capture material was sequenced and enrichment was assessed. In 18 of the 19 patients, viral reads from immunogenic viruses were enriched by antibody capture (ranging between 1.5x to 343x in respiratory material, and 1.4x to 53x in stool). Enriched reads were also determined in an identity independent manner by using a novel algorithm Xcompare. In 16 of the 19 patients, 21% to 100% of the enriched reads were derived from infecting viruses. In conclusion, the technique provides a novel approach to specifically identify immunogenic viral sequences among the bulk of sequences which are usually encountered during virus discovery metagenomics.

  19. Use of computer algorithms to reduce viral quasispecies sequence space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, E S; Tyrer, H W

    1995-01-01

    A virus may express multiple simple mutations producing a set of viral subspecies called quasispecies: the quasispecies are considered the same species as the original virus. We are interested in reducing the point mutation space to enumerate that sequence space. We form a point mutation by applying a single bit mutation to a strand of viral DNA. How many differing viruses are possible if we allow any of the base pairs to change along the strand? For a strand of arbitrary length n we see that there is a possible sequence space of 4n-1.4 = 4n combinations. We can further remove identical sequences due to redundant amino acid codon encoding. This requires the use of a computer, but this time the complexity is a product: the number of possible amino acids times the number of codons. This substantial reduction from an exponential complexity O(4n) to a product O(n.amino-acid-number) gives us the complete list of mutant viral entities which are one mutation away from the original. Further reduction is possible, but requires biological insight regarding the viability of the mutation. By recognizing the possible sequence space, prediction can be made toward identifying future viral strains of HIV and influenza (to name two important viral particles), and perhaps develop a predictive intervention.

  20. NK cell subset redistribution during the course of viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eLugli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity that play a critical role in the control of human viral infections. Indeed, given their capability to directly recognize virally infected cells without the need of specific antigen presentation, NK cells are on the first line of defense against these invading pathogens. By establishing cellular networks with a variety of cell types such as dendritic cells, NK cells can also amplify anti-viral adaptive immune responses. In turn, viruses evolved and developed several mechanisms to evade NK cell-mediated immune activity. It has been reported that certain viral diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 as well as cytomegalovirus (CMV infections, are associated with a pathologic redistribution of NK cell subsets in the peripheral blood. In particular, it has been observed the expansion of unconventional CD56neg NK cells, whose effector functions are significantly impaired as compared to that of conventional CD56pos NK cells. In this review, we address the impact of chronic viral infections on the functional and phenotypic perturbations of human NK cell compartment.

  1. Innate immune responses of salmonid fish to viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Bertrand

    2014-04-01

    Viruses are the most serious pathogenic threat to the production of the main aquacultured salmonid species the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and the Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. The viral diseases Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis (IPN), Pancreatic Disease (PD), Infectious Haemorrhagic Necrosis (IHN), Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (VHS), and Infectious Salmon Anaemia (ISA) cause massive economic losses to the global salmonid aquaculture industry every year. To date, no solution exists to treat livestock affected by a viral disease and only a small number of efficient vaccines are available to prevent infection. As a consequence, understanding the host immune response against viruses in these fish species is critical to develop prophylactic and preventive control measures. The innate immune response represents an important part of the host defence mechanism preventing viral replication after infection. It is a fast acting response designed to inhibit virus propagation immediately within the host, allowing for the adaptive specific immunity to develop. It has cellular and humoral components which act in synergy. This review will cover inflammation responses, the cell types involved, apoptosis, antimicrobial peptides. Particular attention will be given to the type I interferon system as the major player in the innate antiviral defence mechanism of salmonids. Viral evasion strategies will also be discussed.

  2. Viral regulation of aquaporin 4, connexin 43, microcephalin and nucleolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S Hossein; Folsom, Timothy D; Reutiman, Teri J; Sidwell, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    The current study investigated whether human influenza viral infection in midpregnancy leads to alterations in proteins involved in brain development. Human influenza viral infection was administered to E9 pregnant Balb/c mice. Brains of control and virally-exposed littermates were subjected to microarray analysis, SDS-PAGE and western blotting at three postnatal stages. Microarray analysis of virally-exposed mouse brains showed significant, two-fold change in expression of multiple genes in both neocortex and cerebellum when compared to sham-infected controls. Levels of mRNA and protein levels of four selected genes were examined in brains of exposed mice. Nucleolin mRNA was significantly decreased in day 0 and day 35 neocortex and significantly increased in day 35 cerebellum. Protein levels were significantly upregulated at days 35 and 56 in neocortex and at day 56 in cerebellum. Connexin 43 protein levels were significantly decreased at day 56 in neocortex. Aquaporin 4 mRNA was significantly decreased in day 0 neocortex. Aquaporin 4 protein levels decreased in neocortex significantly at day 35. Finally, microcephalin mRNA was significantly decreased in day 56 neocortex and protein levels were significantly decreased at 56 cerebellum. These data suggest that influenza viral infection in midpregnancy in mice leads to long-term changes in brain markers for enhanced ribosome genesis (nucleolin), increased production of immature neurons (microcephalin), and abnormal glial-neuronal communication and neuron migration (connexin 43 and aquaporin 4).

  3. Tissue viral load variability in chronic hepatitis C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, L

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Liver biopsy is regarded as the gold standard for assessing disease activity in chronic hepatitis C, but sampling error is a potential limitation. Whether sampling variability applies equally to viral load assessment as it does to histology is uncertain. To examine this, we compared viral load between right- and left-lobe biopsy specimens from patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS: Bilobe biopsies were taken from 16 patients who were serum positive for HCV RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Genotype was identified by reverse line probe hybridization. There was an absence of competing risk factors for infectious and other liver diseases in this patient group. Histology and hepatic viral load were assessed blindly. None of the patients had received antiviral therapy at the time of study. RESULTS: Detection of HCV in right and left lobes was concordant with serum positivity in all cases. The viral load between lobes was highly correlated (p = 0.0003, r = 0.79). In contrast, the histological activity indices of inflammation and fibrosis\\/cirrhosis were poorly correlated between lobes (p = 0.038, r = 0.60, and p = 0.098, r = 0.50, respectively). CONCLUSION: Hepatic viral load variability does not suffer from the same degree of heterogeneity of sampling variability as does histology.

  4. Extracellular Vesicles and Their Convergence with Viral Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurdinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (microvesicles, such as exosomes and shed microvesicles, contain a variety of molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Microvesicles appear mostly to originate from multivesicular bodies or to bud from the plasma membrane. Here, we review the convergence of microvesicle biogenesis and aspects of viral assembly and release pathways. Herpesviruses and retroviruses, amongst others, recruit several elements from the microvesicle biogenesis pathways for functional virus release. In addition, noninfectious pleiotropic virus-like vesicles can be released, containing viral and cellular components. We highlight the heterogeneity of microvesicle function during viral infection, addressing microvesicles that can either block or enhance infection, or cause immune dysregulation through bystander action in the immune system. Finally, endogenous retrovirus and retrotransposon elements deposited in our genomes millions of years ago can be released from cells within microvesicles, suggestive of a viral origin of the microvesicle system or perhaps of an evolutionary conserved system of virus-vesicle codependence. More research is needed to further elucidate the complex function of the various microvesicles produced during viral infection, possibly revealing new therapeutic intervention strategies.

  5. Extracellular Vesicles and Their Convergence with Viral Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdinger, Thomas; Gatson, NaTosha N.; Balaj, Leonora; Kaur, Balveen; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Pegtel, D. Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (microvesicles), such as exosomes and shed microvesicles, contain a variety of molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Microvesicles appear mostly to originate from multivesicular bodies or to bud from the plasma membrane. Here, we review the convergence of microvesicle biogenesis and aspects of viral assembly and release pathways. Herpesviruses and retroviruses, amongst others, recruit several elements from the microvesicle biogenesis pathways for functional virus release. In addition, noninfectious pleiotropic virus-like vesicles can be released, containing viral and cellular components. We highlight the heterogeneity of microvesicle function during viral infection, addressing microvesicles that can either block or enhance infection, or cause immune dysregulation through bystander action in the immune system. Finally, endogenous retrovirus and retrotransposon elements deposited in our genomes millions of years ago can be released from cells within microvesicles, suggestive of a viral origin of the microvesicle system or perhaps of an evolutionary conserved system of virus-vesicle codependence. More research is needed to further elucidate the complex function of the various microvesicles produced during viral infection, possibly revealing new therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:22888349

  6. viruSITE—integrated database for viral genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Matej; Beke, Gabor; Klucar, Lubos

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities and the reservoir of most of the genetic diversity in the Earth's biosphere. Viral genomes are very diverse, generally short in length and compared to other organisms carry only few genes. viruSITE is a novel database which brings together high-value information compiled from various resources. viruSITE covers the whole universe of viruses and focuses on viral genomes, genes and proteins. The database contains information on virus taxonomy, host range, genome features, sequential relatedness as well as the properties and functions of viral genes and proteins. All entries in the database are linked to numerous information resources. The above-mentioned features make viruSITE a comprehensive knowledge hub in the field of viral genomics. The web interface of the database was designed so as to offer an easy-to-navigate, intuitive and user-friendly environment. It provides sophisticated text searching and a taxonomy-based browsing system. viruSITE also allows for an alternative approach based on sequence search. A proprietary genome browser generates a graphical representation of viral genomes. In addition to retrieving and visualising data, users can perform comparative genomics analyses using a variety of tools. Database URL: http://www.virusite.org/ PMID:28025349

  7. Association between living environment and human oral viral ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Ly, Melissa; Boehm, Tobias; Naidu, Mayuri; Salzman, Julia; Pride, David T

    2013-09-01

    The human oral cavity has an indigenous microbiota known to include a robust community of viruses. Very little is known about how oral viruses are spread throughout the environment or to which viruses individuals are exposed. We sought to determine whether shared living environment is associated with the composition of human oral viral communities by examining the saliva of 21 human subjects; 11 subjects from different households and 10 unrelated subjects comprising 4 separate households. Although there were many viral homologues shared among all subjects studied, there were significant patterns of shared homologues in three of the four households that suggest shared living environment affects viral community composition. We also examined CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) loci, which are involved in acquired bacterial and archaeal resistance against invading viruses by acquiring short viral sequences. We analyzed 2 065 246 CRISPR spacers from 5 separate repeat motifs found in oral bacterial species of Gemella, Veillonella, Leptotrichia and Streptococcus to determine whether individuals from shared living environments may have been exposed to similar viruses. A significant proportion of CRISPR spacers were shared within subjects from the same households, suggesting either shared ancestry of their oral microbiota or similar viral exposures. Many CRISPR spacers matched virome sequences from different subjects, but no pattern specific to any household was found. Our data on viromes and CRISPR content indicate that shared living environment may have a significant role in determining the ecology of human oral viruses.

  8. Zika Fetal Neuropathogenesis: Etiology of a Viral Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klase, Zachary A.; Khakhina, Svetlana; Schneider, Adriano De Bernardi; Callahan, Michael V.; Glasspool-Malone, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Zika virus epidemic in the Americas and the observed association with both fetal abnormalities (primary microcephaly) and adult autoimmune pathology (Guillain–Barré syndrome) has brought attention to this neglected pathogen. While initial case studies generated significant interest in the Zika virus outbreak, larger prospective epidemiology and basic virology studies examining the mechanisms of Zika viral infection and associated pathophysiology are only now starting to be published. In this review, we analyze Zika fetal neuropathogenesis from a comparative pathology perspective, using the historic metaphor of “TORCH” viral pathogenesis to provide context. By drawing parallels to other viral infections of the fetus, we identify common themes and mechanisms that may illuminate the observed pathology. The existing data on the susceptibility of various cells to both Zika and other flavivirus infections are summarized. Finally, we highlight relevant aspects of the known molecular mechanisms of flavivirus replication. PMID:27560129

  9. VIRAL HEPATITIS A TO E IN SOUTH MEDITERRANEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa M. Kamal

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral hepatitis represents an important health problem in the South Mediterranean countries, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco.  Emerging natural history and epidemiological information reveal differences in the overall epidemiology, risk factors and modes of transmission of viral hepatitis A, B, C, D, E infections in the South Mediterranean region. The differences in the in incidence and prevalence of viral hepatitis across North African countries is attributed to variations in health care  and sanitation standards, risk factors and immunization strategies. The active continuous population movement through travel, tourism and migration from and to the South Mediterranean countries contribute to the spread of infections due to hepatitis viruses across borders leading to outbreaks and emergence of new patterns of infection or introduction of uncommon genotypes in other countries, particularly in Europe.

  10. Measles viral load may reflect SSPE disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare, slowly progressive neurological disorder caused by the persistent infection with measles virus (MV. Despite much research into SSPE, its pathology remains obscure. We examined autopsy tissues of eight SSPE patients by real time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting to determine viral load. MV N, M and H gene RNA could be detected in the central nervous system (CNS of all patients and in two non-CNS tissues of one patient. The viral burden between patients differed up to four-fold by quantitative PCR and corresponded with detection of MV protein. The level of both viral RNA and antigen in the brain may correlate with disease progression.

  11. Human Lectins and Their Roles in Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Mason

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate recognition of virus proteins is an important component of the immune response to viral pathogens. A component of this immune recognition is the family of lectins; pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that recognise viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs including viral glycoproteins. In this review we discuss the contribution of soluble and membrane-associated PRRs to immunity against virus pathogens, and the potential role of these molecules in facilitating virus replication. These processes are illustrated with examples of viruses including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and Ebola virus (EBOV. We focus on the structure, function and genetics of the well-characterised C-type lectin mannose-binding lectin, the ficolins, and the membrane-bound CD209 proteins expressed on dendritic cells. The potential for lectin-based antiviral therapies is also discussed.

  12. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences...... viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...... fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates...

  13. Viral hepatitis a to e in South mediterranean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Sanaa M; Mahmoud, Sara; Hafez, Tamer; El-Fouly, Runia

    2010-02-10

    Viral hepatitis represents an important health problem in the South Mediterranean countries, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Emerging natural history and epidemiological information reveal differences in the overall epidemiology, risk factors and modes of transmission of viral hepatitis A, B, C, D, E infections in the South Mediterranean region. The differences in the in incidence and prevalence of viral hepatitis across North African countries is attributed to variations in health care and sanitation standards, risk factors and immunization strategies. The active continuous population movement through travel, tourism and migration from and to the South Mediterranean countries contribute to the spread of infections due to hepatitis viruses across borders leading to outbreaks and emergence of new patterns of infection or introduction of uncommon genotypes in other countries, particularly in Europe.

  14. Multiple sclerosis: an example of pathogenic viral interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierz, Walter

    2017-02-28

    A hypothesis is formulated on viral interaction between HHV-6A and EBV as a pathogenic mechanism in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Evidence of molecular and genetic mechanisms suggests a link between HHV-6A infection and EBV activation in the brain of MS patients leading to intrathecal B-cell transformation. Consequent T-cell immune response against the EBV-infected cells is postulated as a pathogenic basis for inflammatory lesion formation in the brain of susceptible individuals. A further link between HHV-6A and EBV involves their induction of expression of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K18-encoded superantigen. Such virally induced T-cell responses might secondarily also lead to local autoimmune phenomena. Finally, research recommendations are formulated for substantiating the hypothesis on several levels: epidemiologically, genetically, and viral expression in the brain.

  15. Cell-based Assays to Identify Inhibitors of Viral Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Neil; Ott, Robert D.; Isaacs, Richard J.; Fang, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Background Antagonizing the production of infectious virus inside cells requires drugs that can cross the cell membrane without harming host cells. Objective It is therefore advantageous to establish intracellular potency of anti-viral drug candidates early in the drug-discovery pipeline. Methods To this end, cell-based assays are being developed and employed in high-throughput drug screening, ranging from assays that monitor replication of intact viruses to those that monitor activity of specific viral proteins. While numerous cell-based assays have been developed and investigated, rapid counter screens are also needed to define the specific viral targets of identified inhibitors and to eliminate nonspecific screening hits. Results/Conclusions Here, we describe the types of cell-based assays being used in antiviral drug screens and evaluate the equally important counter screens that are being employed to reach the full potential of cell-based high-throughput screening. PMID:19750206

  16. Current approaches on viral infection: proteomics and functional validations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eZheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Viruses could manipulate cellular machinery to ensure their continuous survival and thus become parasites of living organisms. Delineation of sophisticated host responses upon virus infection is a challenging task. It lies in identifying the repertoire of host factors actively involved in the viral infectious cycle and characterizing host responses qualitatively and quantitatively during viral pathogenesis. Mass spectrometry based proteomics could be used to efficiently study pathogen-host interactions and virus-hijacked cellular signaling pathways. Moreover, direct host and viral responses upon infection could be further investigated by activity based functional validation studies. These approaches involve drug inhibition of secretory pathway, immunofluorescence staining, dominant negative mutation of protein target, real time PCR, small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown, and molecular cloning studies. In this way, functional validation could gain novel insights into the high-content proteomic dataset in an unbiased and comprehensive way.

  17. Emerging viral diseases of livestock in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2013-12-01

    Emerging and reemerging viral diseases of livestock and human beings are in sharp rise in recent years. Importantly, many of these viruses, including influenza, Hendra, Nipah and corona are of zoonotic importance. Several viral diseases of livestock such as bluetongue, peste des petits ruminants, camel pox, equine infectious anaemia, chicken anaemia and sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever are crossing their traditional boundaries. Emergence of new serotypes and variant forms of viruses as in the case of blue tongue virus, avian infectious bronchitis virus, Newcastle disease virus adds additional level of complexity. The increased incidence of emerging and reemerging viral diseases could be attributed to several factors including deforestation and surge in direct contact of livestock and humans with wild animals and birds. This special issue of "Indian Journal of Virology" is focused on diverse aspects of above diseases: isolation and characterization of viruses, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention measures and vaccine development.

  18. Viral Marketing as Antecedent of Customer-Based Brand Equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinda Esa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze the role of viral marketing on customer-based brand equity. In the proposed model, information of a product provided by viral marketing is analyzed as a source of brand equity and its dimensions. An empirical study was conducted among the young adults (18 to 32 years old in the Malaysian market. Brand equity is analyzed through two types of durable goods namely mobile phone and personal computer. Data were collected from the consumers of mobile phone and personal computer using non probability (mall intercept sampling method. The data collected was analyzed using exploratory factor analysis, reliability test, descriptive statistics and regression analyses. According to the findings, viral marketing shows a positive influence on dimensions of brand equity as well as brand equity.

  19. Combined macroscopic and microscopic detection of viral genes in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A.T.; Gantz, D.; Blum, H.; Stowring, L.; Ventura, P.; Geballe, A.; Moyer, B.; Brahic, M.

    1985-01-15

    A hybridization technique has been devised for detecting and quantitating viral genes in tissues that combines macroscopic and microscopic analyses in the same section. The method is based on dual labeling virus-specific probes with /sup 125/I and /sup 35/S to generate signals that can be detected both with X-ray films and nuclear track emulsions. The regions of increased hybridization evident in the X-ray film serve as a guide to the portion of the section that warrants microscopic examination. Detection of viral RNA in tissues with Visna virus and viral DNA with hepatitis B virus are illustrated, and potential applications of this technique in virology and other disciplines are discussed.

  20. [RNA silencing and viral disease induction in plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Hanako; Masuta, Chikara

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing plays an important role in plant resistance against viruses. As a counter-defense against RNA silencing, plant viruses have evolved RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs). RNA silencing is likely to play a major role in disease development. For example, RSSs have been found to disturb the gene expression controlled by miRNAs in plant tissue and organ development, resulting in plant malformation. Mosaic symptoms, which are typical in virus-infected plants, are actually a consequence of local arms race between host RNA silencing and viral RSSs. In addition, recent studies revealed that viral siRNAs could induce RNA silencing even against a certain host gene and thus a disease symptom through a complementary (homologous) sequence coincidentally found between virus and host gene. RNA silencing is the principal mediator of viral pathogenicity and disease induction and therefore should be exploited as a powerful tool for engineering virus resistance in plants as well as in animals.

  1. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R

    2015-08-21

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents.

  2. Antiviral defense in shrimp: from innate immunity to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Huang, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiaobo; He, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-01

    The culture of penaeid shrimp is rapidly developing as a major business endeavor worldwide. However, viral diseases have caused huge economic loss in penaeid shrimp culture industries. Knowledge of shrimp innate immunity and antiviral responses has made important progress in recent years, allowing the design of better strategies for the prevention and control of shrimp diseases. In this study, we have updated information on shrimp antiviral immunity and interactions between shrimp hosts and viral pathogens. Current knowledge and recent progress in immune signaling pathways (e.g., Toll/IMD-NF-κB and JAK-STAT signaling pathways), RNAi, phagocytosis, and apoptosis in shrimp antiviral immunity are discussed. The mechanism of viral infection in shrimp hosts and the interactions between viruses and shrimp innate immune systems are also analyzed.

  3. Viral hepatitis A, B, and C: grown-up issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, Umid M; Hu, Dale J

    2010-08-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although there are five major and distinct human hepatitis viruses characterized to date--referred to as hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E, respectively--only hepatitis A, B, and C are epidemiologically and clinically relevant for adolescents in North America. The clinical presentation of acute infection with each of these viruses is similar; thus, diagnosis depends on the use of specific serologic markers and viral nucleic acids. This review provides data on the epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of each of these three viral infections, along with points that are important or unique to adolescent patients.

  4. User cooperation, virality and gaming in a social mobile network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, C; Blazovics, L; Charaf, H

    2012-01-01

    Social networks and mobile systems are both rapidly developing areas nowadays. In this chapter, we will introduce Gedda-Headz, a novel social mobile gaming concept that brings these two areas together. Gedda-Headz is a social mobile network that mainly focuses on multiplayer mobile gaming. First we......, as virality is very important in social networks, we will describe the viral elements of Gedda-Headz. We will also introduce the Gedda-Headz spreader, a novel method to spread the word about the network, increasing the virality further....... will thoroughly discuss how users may cooperate with each other in Gedda-Headz, as cooperation is very important in a mobile environment. Among other benefits, it may help users to use services that would otherwise be unreachable for them, or greatly decrease the energy cost of certain activities. Finally...

  5. Cell-Associated Viral Burden Provides Evidence of Ongoing Viral Replication in Aviremic HIV-2-Infected Patients▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rui S.; Tendeiro, Rita; Foxall, Russell B.; Baptista, António P.; Cavaleiro, Rita; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo; Valadas, Emília; Doroana, Manuela; Lucas, Margarida; Antunes, Francisco; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2011-01-01

    Viremia is significantly lower in HIV-2 than in HIV-1 infection, irrespective of disease stage. Nevertheless, the comparable proviral DNA burdens observed for these two infections indicate similar numbers of infected cells. Here we investigated this apparent paradox by assessing cell-associated viral replication. We found that untreated HIV-1-positive (HIV-1+) and HIV-2+ individuals, matched for CD4 T cell depletion, exhibited similar gag mRNA levels, indicating that significant viral transcription is occurring in untreated HIV-2+ patients, despite the reduced viremia (undetectable to 2.6 × 104 RNA copies/ml). However, tat mRNA transcripts were observed at significantly lower levels in HIV-2+ patients, suggesting that the rate of de novo infection is decreased in these patients. Our data also reveal a direct relationship of gag and tat transcripts with CD4 and CD8 T cell activation, respectively. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-2+ patients showed persistent viral replication, irrespective of plasma viremia, possibly contributing to the emergence of drug resistance mutations, persistent hyperimmune activation, and poor CD4 T cell recovery that we observed with these individuals. In conclusion, we provide here evidence of significant ongoing viral replication in HIV-2+ patients, further emphasizing the dichotomy between amount of plasma virus and cell-associated viral burden and stressing the need for antiretroviral trials and the definition of therapeutic guidelines for HIV-2 infection. PMID:21159859

  6. Interval Between Infections and Viral Hierarchy Are Determinants of Viral Interference Following Influenza Virus Infection in a Ferret Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Karen L.; Guarnaccia, Teagan A.; Carolan, Louise A.; Yan, Ada W. C.; Aban, Malet; Petrie, Stephen; Cao, Pengxing; Heffernan, Jane M.; McVernon, Jodie; Mosse, Jennifer; Kelso, Anne; McCaw, James M.; Barr, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Epidemiological studies suggest that, following infection with influenza virus, there is a short period during which a host experiences a lower susceptibility to infection with other influenza viruses. This viral interference appears to be independent of any antigenic similarities between the viruses. We used the ferret model of human influenza to systematically investigate viral interference. Methods. Ferrets were first infected then challenged 1–14 days later with pairs of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, influenza A(H3N2), and influenza B viruses circulating in 2009 and 2010. Results. Viral interference was observed when the interval between initiation of primary infection and subsequent challenge was virus specific and occurred between antigenically related and unrelated viruses. Coinfections occurred when 1 or 3 days separated infections. Ongoing shedding from the primary virus infection was associated with viral interference after the secondary challenge. Conclusions. The interval between infections and the sequential combination of viruses were important determinants of viral interference. The influenza viruses in this study appear to have an ordered hierarchy according to their ability to block or delay infection, which may contribute to the dominance of different viruses often seen in an influenza season. PMID:25943206

  7. Virally vectored vaccine delivery: medical needs, mechanisms, advantages and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2017-08-14

    Vaccines represent one of the most successful chapters in the history of medicine. Over the past decades, the advent of recombinant cDNA technology has enabled the biomedical community to genetically engineer viruses for vaccine delivery purposes. As a starting point, this review evaluates the unmet medical needs, which drive scientists and industry to exploit such fundamentally new technology for human vaccination. The author discusses the molecular functioning, production and safety profile of replication-competent and -deficient viral vector systems, representing two fundamentally distinct classes of "genetic vaccines". Building upon this knowledge, he dissects the immunological mechanisms rendering immune responses to viral vectors qualitatively and quantitatively distinct from those elicited by non-live vaccination approaches. These mechanisms comprise (1) the vectors' innate immune recognition by the host cell, (2) potent priming of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells as a result of dendritic cell targeting and endogenous protein synthesis, (3) conformational antigen display for protective antibody induction as well as (4) prolonged availability of substantial quantities of antigen. Deduced from these features, preferential indications for virally vectored vaccines are discussed, taking into consideration specific medical needs as well as risk-benefit assessments of replicating vector systems. The limitations and challenges in virally vectored vaccination must also be given careful consideration. Pre-existing and vaccination-induced anti-vector immunity can interfere with vaccine immunogenicity and prime-boost vaccination, respectively. Additionally, the requirement for eukaryotic production systems imposes technological as well as regulatory hurdles. Existing strategies to overcome these challenges are outlined. With the recent licensure of the first virally vectored vaccine this review seems timely to herald the introduction of virally vectored vaccines into daily

  8. Diagnostic imaging of viral encephalitis; Bildgebende Diagnostik der Virusenzephalitiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.; Henkes, H.; Kuehne, D. [Alfried-Krupp-Krankenhaus Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Felber, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Innsbruck (Austria). Klinische Abt. der Radiologie I; Jaenisch, W. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuropathologie; Schaper, J. [Klinikum der Univ. Essen (Germany). Zentralinst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2000-11-01

    The diagnostic procedure in viral encephalitis is based on the synopsis of clinical signs and symptoms, serological data, CSF analysis and diagnostic imaging findings. This article summarizes the findings of those viral encephalitides most frequently encountered in Western Europe. MRI is more sensitive than CT for the detection of inflammatory brain lesions due to the higher contrast resolution. The pattern of parenchymal damage is highly specific in only some viral encephalitides (e.g., the frequently hemorrhagic lesions of structures of the limbic system in herpes simples virus type I encephalitis; the symmetric and confluent lesions of the frontal white matter of progressive diffuse leukoencephalopathy in AIDS). In the majority of viral encephalitides MRI demonstrates the location and extension of parenchymal damage. The specific diagnosis in terms of the causative agent is based on serological studies. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnostik viraler Enzephalitiden basiert auf der synoptischen Auswertung klinischer, serologischer, liquoranalytischer und bildgebend erhobener Befunde. In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden die entsprechenden Befunde der haeufigsten in Westeuropa viral verursachten Enzephalitiden dargestellt. Generell ist bei entzuendlichen Laesionen des Hirnparenchyms die Kernspintomographie (MRT) aufgrund ihrer hohen Weichteilkontrastaufloesung der Computertomographie (CT) hinsichtlich der Nachweissensitivitaet ueberlegen. Bei einigen viralen Enzephalitiden ist das kernspintomographisch erfassbare Schaedigungsmuster hochspezifisch. Die gilt z.B. fuer die haeufig haemorrhagischen Laesionen der Strukturen des limbischen Systems bei der Herpes-simplex-Virus-Typ-1-Enzephalitis und fuer die flaechenhaft symmetrischen Marklagerlaesionen bei der progressiven diffusen Leukenzephalopathie bei AIDS-Patienten. Bei der Mehrzahl der viralen Enzephalitiden weist die MRT zwar die Lokalisation und Ausdehnung der Parenchymschaedigung nach, erlaubt jedoch keine sichere

  9. Curation of viral genomes: challenges, applications and the way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Manali

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole genome sequence data is a step towards generating the 'parts list' of life to understand the underlying principles of Biocomplexity. Genome sequencing initiatives of human and model organisms are targeted efforts towards understanding principles of evolution with an application envisaged to improve human health. These efforts culminated in the development of dedicated resources. Whereas a large number of viral genomes have been sequenced by groups or individuals with an interest to study antigenic variation amongst strains and species. These independent efforts enabled viruses to attain the status of 'best-represented taxa' with the highest number of genomes. However, due to lack of concerted efforts, viral genomic sequences merely remained as entries in the public repositories until recently. Results VirGen is a curated resource of viral genomes and their analyses. Since its first release, it has grown both in terms of coverage of viral families and development of new modules for annotation and analysis. The current release (2.0 includes data for twenty-five families with broad host range as against eight in the first release. The taxonomic description of viruses in VirGen is in accordance with the ICTV nomenclature. A well-characterised strain is identified as a 'representative entry' for every viral species. This non-redundant dataset is used for subsequent annotation and analyses using sequenced-based Bioinformatics approaches. VirGen archives precomputed data on genome and proteome comparisons. A new data module that provides structures of viral proteins available in PDB has been incorporated recently. One of the unique features of VirGen is predicted conformational and sequential epitopes of known antigenic proteins using in-house developed algorithms, a step towards reverse vaccinology. Conclusion Structured organization of genomic data facilitates use of data mining tools, which provides opportunities for

  10. Transfusions of blood and blood products and viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wróblewska

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfusions of blood and blood products are commonly used in medicine, but being biological materials they carry a risk of transmitting infections--viral, bacterial, parasitic, as well as prions. Laboratory tests used for screening of donated blood for viral infections at present cannot detect all infectious units. Criteria for selection of blood donors therefore must be very strict, while methods of inactivation of viruses and laboratory assays for detection of their presence must be improved. Indications for blood transfusion should be restricted.

  11. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, Britt Bang

    Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture Olesen N.J.1, Skall H.F.1, Jensen B.B.2, Henriksen N.H.3, Mellergård S.4, H. Korsholm H.5 1National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Aarhus, Denmark 2Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway 3Danish...... Aquaculture Association, Silkeborg, Denmark 4Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Glostrup, Denmark 5Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Vejle, Denmark Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus was first isolated in Denmark in 1962, when more than half of the approximately 800 Danish fish farms...

  12. Genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snow, M.; Bain, N.; Black, J.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders this the m......The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders...

  13. [Viral-bacterial-fungal associations in chronic tonsillitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudima, I A; Vasil'eva, L I; Bragina, L E; Suchkov, I Iu

    2001-01-01

    The microflora of palatal tonsils was studied in 84 children with chronic tonsillitis in comparison with that in the control group of 38 healthy children. In most of the sick children viral-bacterial and less frequently viral-bacterial-fungal associations were detected with the prevalence of reo- and adenoviruses, Epstein-Barr viruses, coagulase negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as peptostreptococci. Adhesive activity and persistence factors among the main bacterial pathogens were shown to be widely prevalent. The depth of the lesion of tonsillar tissue by the infective agents of bacterial and fungal nature, as well as their persistence potential, depended on the taxonomic position of these microorganisms.

  14. Phylogeny of the Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus in European Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cieslak, Michael; Mikkelsen, Susie Sommer; Skall, Helle Frank;

    2016-01-01

    One of the most valuable aquaculture fish in Europe is the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, but the profitability of trout production is threatened by a highly lethal infectious disease, viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), caused by the VHS virus (VHSV). For the past few decades, the subgenogr......One of the most valuable aquaculture fish in Europe is the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, but the profitability of trout production is threatened by a highly lethal infectious disease, viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), caused by the VHS virus (VHSV). For the past few decades...

  15. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation.

  16. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with HCC and none of them presented diabetes mellitus. Our study revealed that there is a

  17. Hepatitis C virus genotypes: A plausible association with viral loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Ghulam Nabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The basic aim of this study was to find out the association of genotypes with host age, gender and viral load. Material and Methods: The present study was conducted at Social Security Hospital, Pakistan. This study included 320 patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection who were referred to the hospital between November 2011 and July 2012. HCV viral detection and genotyping was performed and the association was seen between genotypes and host age, gender and viral load. Results : The analysis revealed the presence of genotypes 1 and 3 with further subtypes 1a, 1b, 3a, 3b and mixed genotypes 1b + 3a, 1b + 3b and 3a + 3b. Viral load quantification was carried out in all 151 HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA positive patients. The genotype 3a was observed in 124 (82.12% patients, 3b was found in 21 (13.91%, 1a was seen in 2 (1.32%, 1b in 1 (0.66%, mixed infection with 1b + 3a in 1 (0.66%, 1b + 3b in 1 (0.66% and 3a + 3b was also found in 1 (0.66% patient. Viral load quantification was carried out in all 151 HCV RNA positive patients and was compared between the various genotypes. The mean viral load in patients infected with genotype 1a was 2.75 × 10 6 , 1b 3.9 × 10 6 , 3a 2.65 × 10 6 , 3b 2.51 × 10 6 , 1b + 3a 3.4 × 106, 1b + 3b 2.7 × 106 and 3a + 3b 3.5 × 10 6 . An association between different types of genotypes and viral load was observed. Conclusion : Further studies should be carried out to determine the association of viral load with different genotypes so that sufficient data is available and can be used to determine the type and duration of therapy needed and predict disease outcome.

  18. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    followed by click assembly and analysis of the read sequence by various techniques. As we demonstrate in this paper, using our new approach, a viral RNA sequence can be detected in less than 2 h without the need for cDNA synthesis or any other enzymatic reactions and with a sensitivity of ... opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  19. Viral protease cleavage of inhibitor of κBα triggers host cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Carlos; Saura, Marta; Padalko, Elizaveta Y.; Lopez-Rivera, Ester; Lizarbe, Tania R.; Lamas, Santiago; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2006-01-01

    Apoptosis is an innate immune response to viral infection that limits viral replication. However, the mechanisms by which cells detect viral infection and activate apoptosis are not completely understood. We now show that during Coxsackievirus infection, the viral protease 3Cpro cleaves inhibitor of κBα (IκBα). A proteolytic fragment of IκBα then forms a stable complex with NF-κB, translocates to the nucleus, and inhibits NF-κB transactivation, increasing apoptosis and decreasing viral replication. In contrast, cells with reduced IκBα expression are more susceptible to viral infection, with less apoptosis and more viral replication. IκBα thus acts as a sensor of viral infection. Cleavage of host proteins by pathogen proteases is a novel mechanism by which the host recognizes and responds to viral infection. PMID:17138672

  20. Anti-viral effect of interferon-alpha on bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentsui, H; Takami, R; Nishimori, T; Murakami, K; Yokoyama, T; Yokomizo, Y

    1998-12-01

    To get basic information to control persistent virus infection among domestic animals by cytokines, the antiviral activity of four natural human cytokines against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was evaluated. Normal bovine peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) and fetal bovine muscular cells (FBMC) were treated with varying doses of human interferon (IFN)-alpha, IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and TNF-beta. The antiviral activity in treated cells was measured by the titration of virus infectivity in comparison with non-treated controls. IFN-alpha significantly suppressed virus growth in both PBML and FBMC. The growth of two cytopathogenic and two noncytopathogenic strains was suppressed in the presence of more than 10(3) u/ml of IFN-alpha. Addition of either TNF-alpha or TNF-beta to IFN-alpha did not potentiate the suppressive effect. IFN-alpha also suppressed the replication of BVDV in PBML from cattle persistently infected with BVDV.

  1. Viral assemblage composition in Yellowstone acidic hot springs assessed by network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Benjamin; Wirth, Jennifer F; Mazurie, Aurélien; Young, Mark J

    2015-10-01

    Understanding of viral assemblage structure in natural environments remains a daunting task. Total viral assemblage sequencing (for example, viral metagenomics) provides a tractable approach. However, even with the availability of next-generation sequencing technology it is usually only possible to obtain a fragmented view of viral assemblages in natural ecosystems. In this study, we applied a network-based approach in combination with viral metagenomics to investigate viral assemblage structure in the high temperature, acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, USA. Our results show that this approach can identify distinct viral groups and provide insights into the viral assemblage structure. We identified 110 viral groups in the hot springs environment, with each viral group likely representing a viral family at the sub-family taxonomic level. Most of these viral groups are previously unknown DNA viruses likely infecting archaeal hosts. Overall, this study demonstrates the utility of combining viral assemblage sequencing approaches with network analysis to gain insights into viral assemblage structure in natural ecosystems.

  2. Epidemiología de las hepatitis virales en México Epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Panduro; Griselda Escobedo Melendez; Fierro,Nora A; Bertha Ruiz Madrigal; Eloy Alfonso Zepeda-Carrillo; Sonia Román

    2011-01-01

    Las hepatitis virales son una de las causas principales de daño hepático en México. En este estudio se analiza el estado actual de las hepatitis virales en México. La Secretaría de Salud informa un total de 192 588 casos de hepatitis virales entre 2000 y 2007. De éstos, 79% corresponden aVHA, 3.3% aVHB, 6% a VHC y 11.7% a casos sin agente etiológico descrito. No obstante, el VHB se podría estar subdiagnosticando, ya que hay zonas de alta endemia en poblaciones indígenas, existen limitaciones ...

  3. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling.

  4. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  5. A Viral Noncoding RNA Complements a Weakened Viral RNA Silencing Suppressor and Promotes Efficient Systemic Host Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flobinus, Alyssa; Hleibieh, Kamal; Klein, Elodie; Ratti, Claudio; Bouzoubaa, Salah; Gilmer, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta macrocarpa depends on viral RNA3, whereas in Nicotiana benthamiana this RNA is dispensable. RNA3 contains a coremin motif of 20 nucleotides essential for the stabilization of noncoding RNA3 (ncRNA3) and for long-distance movement in Beta species. Coremin mutants that are unable to accumulate ncRNA3 also do not achieve systemic movement in Beta species. A mutant virus carrying a mutation in the p14 viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR), unable to move long distances, can be complemented with the ncRNA3 in the lesion phenotype, viral RNA accumulation, and systemic spread. Analyses of the BNYVV VSR mechanism of action led to the identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) pathway as a target of the virus VSR and the assignment of a VSR function to the ncRNA3. PMID:27782046

  6. Immune and viral correlates of "secondary viral control" after treatment interruption in chronically HIV-1 infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Van Gulck

    Full Text Available Upon interruption of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients usually show viral load rebound to pre-treatment levels. Four patients, hereafter referred to as secondary controllers (SC, were identified who initiated therapy during chronic infection and, after stopping treatment, could control virus replication at undetectable levels for more than six months. In the present study we set out to unravel possible viral and immune parameters or mechanisms of this phenomenon by comparing secondary controllers with elite controllers and non-controllers, including patients under HAART. As candidate correlates of protection, virus growth kinetics, levels of intracellular viral markers, several aspects of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell function and HIV neutralizing antibodies were investigated. As expected all intracellular viral markers were lower in aviremic as compared to viremic subjects, but in addition both elite and secondary controllers had lower levels of viral unspliced RNA in PBMC as compared to patients on HAART. Ex vivo cultivation of the virus from CD4+ T cells of SC consistently failed in one patient and showed delayed kinetics in the three others. Formal in vitro replication studies of these three viruses showed low to absent growth in two cases and a virus with normal fitness in the third case. T cell responses toward HIV peptides, evaluated in IFN-γ ELISPOT, revealed no significant differences in breadth, magnitude or avidity between SC and all other patient groups. Neither was there a difference in polyfunctionality of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, as evaluated with intracellular cytokine staining. However, secondary and elite controllers showed higher proliferative responses to Gag and Pol peptides. SC also showed the highest level of autologous neutralizing antibodies. These data suggest that higher T cell proliferative responses and lower replication kinetics might be instrumental in secondary viral control in the absence of

  7. PREVALENCE OF DIFFERENT VIRAL MARKERS IN PATIENTS OF ACUTE VIRAL HEPATITIS IN AND AROUND VISAKHAPATNAM : HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Sree

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute viral hepatitis (AVH is a major public health problem and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. AIM: The aim of the present study is to study the serological profile of acute viral hepatitis in children and adults admitted in King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam and also age and sex distribution of patients suffering from acute viral hepatitis and also comparing the etiological profile by studying serological markers of common viral agents. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Samples were collected from 80 individuals with jaundice and other clinical and biochemical evidences of acute viral hepatitis . They were tested for hepatitis surface antigen, HBcIgM, HAVIgM, HEVIgM, Antibodies to HCV by the enzyme - linked immuno sorbent assay. RESULTS: Out of the 80 viral hepatitis cases (47 adults+33 children. In adults 20(42.5% patients presented HBV (26.96% was identified as the most common cause of acute hepatitis followed by HEV14 (29.8%, HEV+HAV4 (8.5% and HAV 6(12.76%. Co - infections with more than one virus were present in 5cases; HAV - HEV co - infection being the most common. In children 16(48.5% presented with HAV, HAV+HEV11 (33.3%, HEV4 (12.12%, HBV1 (3.03% CONCLUSIONS: Vaccination of adults against hepatitis B is indicated, along with sexual education to decrease the incidence of hepatitis which is found as common etiological agent in adults. The incidence of HAV and HEV in children shows that there is need for improvement in sanitation and food habits.

  8. Sphingosine kinase 1 serves as a pro-viral factor by regulating viral RNA synthesis and nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein complex upon influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Seo

    Full Text Available Influenza continues to pose a threat to humans by causing significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is imperative to investigate mechanisms by which influenza virus manipulates the function of host factors and cellular signal pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that influenza virus increases the expression and activation of sphingosine kinase (SK 1, which in turn regulates diverse cellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of SK suppressed virus-induced NF-κB activation and markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins. Further, SK blockade interfered with activation of Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3, a cofactor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1, to inhibit CRM1-mediated nuclear export of the influenza viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In support of this observation, SK inhibition altered the phosphorylation of ERK, p90RSK, and AKT, which is the upstream signal of RanBP3/CRM1 activation. Collectively, these results indicate that SK is a key pro-viral factor regulating multiple cellular signal pathways triggered by influenza virus infection.

  9. Gene expression regulation in retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by viral RNA and viral/bacterial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Anton; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with systemic and local inflammation. Various studies suggested that viral or bacterial infection may aggravate retinal inflammation in the aged retina. We compared the effects of synthetic viral RNA (poly(I:C)) and viral/bacterial DNA (CpG-ODN) on the expression of genes known to be involved in the development of AMD in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were stimulated with poly(I:C; 500 µg/ml) or CpG-ODN (500 nM). Alterations in gene expression and protein secretion were determined with real-time RT–PCR and ELISA, respectively. Phosphorylation of signal transduction molecules was revealed by western blotting. Results Poly(I:C) induced gene expression of the pattern recognition receptor TLR3, transcription factors (HIF-1α, p65/NF-κB), the angiogenic factor bFGF, inflammatory factors (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, MIP-2), and complement factors (C5, C9, CFB). Poly(I:C) also induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK proteins, and the secretion of bFGF and TNFα from the cells. CpG-ODN induced moderate gene expression of transcription factors (p65/NF-κB, NFAT5) and complement factors (C5, C9), while it had no effect on the expression of various TLR, angiogenic factor, and inflammatory factor genes. The activities of various signal transduction pathways and transcription factors were differentially involved in mediating the poly(I:C)-induced transcriptional activation of distinct genes. Conclusions The widespread effects of viral RNA, and the restricted effects of viral/bacterial DNA, on the gene expression pattern of RPE cells may suggest that viral RNA rather than viral/bacterial DNA induces physiologic alterations of RPE cells, which may aggravate inflammation in the aged retina. The data also suggest that selective inhibition of distinct signal transduction pathways or individual transcription factors may not be effective to inhibit

  10. O papel da fisioterapia respiratória na bronquiolite viral aguda = Role of chest physiotherapy in acute viral bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Luisi,Fernanda

    2008-01-01

    Objetivos: revisar a literatura médica sobre o uso da fisioterapia respiratória em crianças com bronquiolite viral aguda Fonte de dados: revisão, a partir do banco de dados PubMed, Medline e LILACS, de artigos publicados em revistas científicas nacionais e internacionais, bem como dos livros texto mais importantes publicados nos últimos anos Síntese dos dados: a bronquiolite viral aguda é uma infecção muito freqüente em crianças. Apesar da baixa morbidade, representa aproximadamente 75%...

  11. Phylogeny of the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in European aquaculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cieslak, Michael; Mikkelsen, Susie S.; Skall, Helle F.; Baud, Marine; Diserens, Nicolas; Engelsma, Marc Y.; Haenen, Olga L.M.; Mousakhani, Shirin; Panzarin, Valentina; Wahli, Thomas; Olesen, Niels J.; Schütze, Heike

    2016-01-01

    One of the most valuable aquaculture fish in Europe is the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, but the profitability of trout production is threatened by a highly lethal infectious disease, viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), caused by the VHS virus (VHSV). For the past few decades, the subgenogr

  12. Environmental modulation of mucosal immunity : Opportunities in respiratory viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijf, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The exact cause of severe disease in children during primary RSV infections is not completely clear. There is a link with viral load, but differences virus strains do not seem to be the major reason why in some children the disease manifests as a mild cold while others suffer from a severe lower

  13. Hepatitis B viral breakthrough associated with inappropriate preservation of entecavir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabay, Oguz; Tuna, Nazan; Yahyaoglu, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    If virologic breakthrough is observed during chronic hepatitis B treatment, drug resistance or compliance problem should be considered. But in some cases, breakthrough depends on drug preservation conditions. We report the case of a 30-years-old man, who experienced viral breakthrough due to wrong preservation conditions of the drug. PMID:22345891

  14. Quantum virology : improved management of viral infections through quantitative measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalpoe, Jaijant Satishkumar

    2007-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of PCR has strongly supported the increased diagnostic use of nucleic acid detection assays in clinical virology. Particularly the improvements in the ability to quantify target nucleic acid sequences offer new opportunities in the management of viral infections. Real-time PCR

  15. Autonomic Nervous System in Viral Myocarditis: Pathophysiology and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zheng; Li-Sha, Ge; Yue-Chun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis, which is caused by viral infection, can lead to heart failure, malignant arrhythmias, and even sudden cardiac death in young patients. It is also one of the most important causes of dilated cardiomyopathy worldwide. Although remarkable advances in diagnosis and understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of viral myocarditis have been gained during recent years, no standard treatment strategies have been defined as yet. Fortunately, recent studies present some evidence that immunomodulating therapy is effective for myocarditis. The immunomodulatory effect of the autonomic nervous system has raised considerable interest over recent decades. Studying the influence on the inflammation and immune system of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems will not only increase our understanding of the mechanism of disease but could also lead to the identification of potential new therapies for viral myocarditis. Studies have shown that the immunomodulating effect of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system is realized by the release of neurotransmitters to their corresponding receptors (catecholamine for α or β adrenergic receptor, acetylcholine for α7 nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptor). This review will discuss the current knowledge of the roles of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system in inflammation, with a special focus on their roles in viral myocarditis.

  16. Folding of viral envelope glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, L.J.; Anken, E. van

    2000-01-01

    Viral glycoproteins fold and oligomerize in the endoplasmic reticulum of the host cell. They employ the cellular machinery and receive assistance from cellular folding factors. During the folding process, they are retained in the compartment and their structural quality is checked by the quality con

  17. Illuminating structural proteins in viral "dark matter" with metaproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Jennifer R; Ignacio-Espinoza, J Cesar; Kim, Eun-Hae; Trubl, Gareth; Jones, Robert M; Roux, Simon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Rich, Virginia I; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-03-01

    Viruses are ecologically important, yet environmental virology is limited by dominance of unannotated genomic sequences representing taxonomic and functional "viral dark matter." Although recent analytical advances are rapidly improving taxonomic annotations, identifying functional dark matter remains problematic. Here, we apply paired metaproteomics and dsDNA-targeted metagenomics to identify 1,875 virion-associated proteins from the ocean. Over one-half of these proteins were newly functionally annotated and represent abundant and widespread viral metagenome-derived protein clusters (PCs). One primarily unannotated PC dominated the dataset, but structural modeling and genomic context identified this PC as a previously unidentified capsid protein from multiple uncultivated tailed virus families. Furthermore, four of the five most abundant PCs in the metaproteome represent capsid proteins containing the HK97-like protein fold previously found in many viruses that infect all three domains of life. The dominance of these proteins within our dataset, as well as their global distribution throughout the world's oceans and seas, supports prior hypotheses that this HK97-like protein fold is the most abundant biological structure on Earth. Together, these culture-independent analyses improve virion-associated protein annotations, facilitate the investigation of proteins within natural viral communities, and offer a high-throughput means of illuminating functional viral dark matter.

  18. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases--Diversity and Practical Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides to their corresponding monophosphate compounds. dNks also phosphorylate deoxyribonucleoside analogues that are used in the treatment of cancer or viral infections. The study of the mammalian dNKs has therefore always been of gr...

  19. Aptamers in Diagnostics and Treatment of Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Wandtke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are in vitro selected DNA or RNA molecules that are capable of binding a wide range of nucleic and non-nucleic acid molecules with high affinity and specificity. They have been conducted through the process known as SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment. It serves to reach specificity and considerable affinity to target molecules, including those of viral origin, both proteins and nucleic acids. Properties of aptamers allow detecting virus infected cells or viruses themselves and make them competitive to monoclonal antibodies. Specific aptamers can be used to interfere in each stage of the viral replication cycle and also inhibit its penetration into cells. Many current studies have reported possible application of aptamers as a treatment or diagnostic tool in viral infections, e.g., HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HBV (Hepatitis B Virus, HCV (Hepatitis C Virus, SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, H5N1 avian influenza and recently spread Ebola. This review presents current developments of using aptamers in the diagnostics and treatment of viral diseases.

  20. Viral Marketing Determinants of Top Online Shop Brands in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Wardhana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The existence of the internet starts to shifting the purchase as a conventional to online. One of marketing strategies used by online store is viral marketing.The purpose of this study is to find determinant that forms viral marketing based on perceived customers in top brand online store such as lazada.com, olx.com, tokopedia.com, zalora.com, blibli.com, and bhinneka.com. The Research methodology used is the quantitative method with descriptive analysis using factor analysis by a population as 3.271.147 people and the number of sample uses Slovin formulas with confidency level at 95 % obtained as 400 respondents. Based on the result of research, there are twelve factors formed a new factor called viral marketing online store. Based on its priority, those dimensions of viral marketing online store can be sorted as follows: customer recommendation, newsletter, linking strategies, communities, free offer, sweepstakes, list of prospective buyers, chatrooms, reference list, product texts, affiliate programs, dan search engine.

  1. Hepatitis B viral breakthrough associated with inappropriate preservation of entecavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz Karabay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available If virologic breakthrough is observed during chronic hepatitis B treatment, drug resistance or compliance problem should be considered. But in some cases, breakthrough depends on drug preservation conditions. We report the case of a 30-years-old man, who experienced viral breakthrough due to wrong preservation conditions of the drug.

  2. A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillestøl, Reidun K; Redder, Peter; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2006-01-01

    in cells, and that both the mode of inhibition of viral propagation and the mechanism of adding spacer-repeat units to clusters, are dependent on RNAs transcribed from the clusters. Moreover, the putative inhibitory apparatus (piRNA-based) may be evolutionarily related to the interference RNA systems (si...

  3. Effective inhibition of viral reproduction by hydrophobised antiviral antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, A V; Ovcharenko, A V; Melik-Nubarov, N S; Bannikov, A I; Lisok, T P; Klyushnenkova, E V; Cherchenko, N G; Alakhov VYu; Levashov, A V; Kiselev, V I

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for the inhibition of viral reproduction in cells by means of fatty-acylated antiviral antibodies which, in contrast to the unmodified antibodies, have the ability to enter the cells. The potential of this technique is demonstrated in experiments involving inhibition of the reproduction of various strains of influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus.

  4. Methods of treating Parkinson's disease using viral vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankiewicz, Krystof; Cunningham, Janet

    2016-11-15

    Methods of delivering viral vectors, particularly recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) virions, to the central nervous system (CNS) using convection enhanced delivery (CED) are provided. The rAAV virions include a nucleic acid sequence encoding a therapeutic polypeptide. The methods can be used for treating CNS disorders such as for treating Parkinson's Disease.

  5. Recovering full-length viral genomes from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Smits (Saskia); R. Bodewes (Rogier); A. Ruiz-Gonzalez (Aritz); V. Baumgärtner (Volkmar); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A. Schürch (Anita)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractInfectious disease metagenomics is driven by the question: "what is causing the disease?" in contrast to classical metagenome studies which are guided by "what is out there?" In case of a novel virus, a first step to eventually establishing etiology can be to recover a full-length viral

  6. Environmental modulation of mucosal immunity : Opportunities in respiratory viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijf, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The exact cause of severe disease in children during primary RSV infections is not completely clear. There is a link with viral load, but differences virus strains do not seem to be the major reason why in some children the disease manifests as a mild cold while others suffer from a severe lower res

  7. Gamification, Virality and Retention in Educational Online Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya V. Osipov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes gamification, virality and retention in the freemium educational online platform with 40,000 users as an example. Relationships between virality and retention parameters as measurable metrics are calculated and discussed using real examples. Virality and monetization can be both competing and complementary mechanisms for the system growth. The K-growth factor, which combines both virality and retention, is proposed as the metrics of the overall freemium system performance in terms of the user base growth. This approach can be tested using a small number of users to assess the system potential performance. If the K-growth factor is less than one, the product needs further development. If the K-growth factor is greater than one, the system retains existing and attracts new users, thus a large scale market launch can be successful. User attraction and retention mechanics are discussed based on the peer-to-peer online language training platform, which utilizes freemium business model. Key system metrics are derived to assess the future commercial potential and making decisions to either fund an advertising campaign, or continue with project technical improvements. The paper can be of interest to venture capitalists as a method to assess freemium projects.

  8. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, N. J.; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, B. B.

    2013-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus was first isolated in Denmark in 1962, when more than half of the approximately 800 Danish fish farms were considered to be infected. Today, 50 years later, the country obtained status as EU approved VHS free zone. In the years in between very significan...

  9. Analysis of hepatitis C viral dynamics using Latin hypercube sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachpute, Gaurav; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2012-12-01

    We consider a mathematical model comprising four coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to study hepatitis C viral dynamics. The model includes the efficacies of a combination therapy of interferon and ribavirin. There are two main objectives of this paper. The first one is to approximate the percentage of cases in which there is a viral clearance in absence of treatment as well as percentage of response to treatment for various efficacy levels. The other is to better understand and identify the parameters that play a key role in the decline of viral load and can be estimated in a clinical setting. A condition for the stability of the uninfected and the infected steady states is presented. A large number of sample points for the model parameters (which are physiologically feasible) are generated using Latin hypercube sampling. An analysis of the simulated values identifies that, approximately 29.85% cases result in clearance of the virus during the early phase of the infection. Results from the χ2 and the Spearman's tests done on the samples, indicate a distinctly different distribution for certain parameters for the cases exhibiting viral clearance under the combination therapy.

  10. Intrahepatic immune response in chronic viral hepatitis : an immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Tang (Thjon J.)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a 42 nm viral particle and belongs to a family of closely related DNA viruses called the hepadnaviruses. All the hepadnaviruses have similar hepatotropism and life cycles in their hosts. It is an enveloped small circular, partially double stranded

  11. Noninvasive estimation of fibrosis in chronic viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Malene; Barfod, Toke Seierøe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Orskov

    2013-01-01

    In chronic viral hepatitis the liver biopsy helps the clinician to decide when to start treatment and plan follow-up. However, the execution of a liver biopsy is associated with discomfort, and sampling error can lead to misinterpretation. Serum markers and transient elastography (TE) are being...

  12. Noninvasiv vurdering af fibrose ved kronisk viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Malene; Barfod, Toke Seierøe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Orskov

    2013-01-01

    In chronic viral hepatitis the liver biopsy helps the clinician to decide when to start treatment and plan follow-up. However, the execution of a liver biopsy is associated with discomfort, and sampling error can lead to misinterpretation. Serum markers and transient elastography (TE) are being...

  13. Typing of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Takafumi; Kurita, Jun; Sano, Motohiko

    2012-01-01

    Seven mAbs with specific reaction patterns against each of the four genotypes and eight subtypes of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were produced, aiming to establish an immunoassay for typing VHSV isolates according to their genotype. Among the mAbs, VHS-1.24 reacted with all genotypes...

  14. Budget Allocation for Maximizing Viral Advertising in Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo-Lei Zhang; Zhu-Zhong Qian; Wen-Zhong Li; Bin Tang; Xiaoming Fu

    2016-01-01

    Viral advertising in social networks has arisen as one of the most promising ways to increase brand awareness and product sales. By distributing a limited budget, we can incentivize a set of users as initial adopters so that the advertising can start from the initial adopters and spread via social links to become viral. Despite extensive researches in how to target the most influential users, a key issue is often neglected: how to incentivize the initial adopters. In the problem of influence maximization, the assumption is that each user has a fixed cost for being initial adopters, while in practice, user decisions for accepting the budget to be initial adopters are often probabilistic rather than deterministic. In this paper, we study optimal budget allocation in social networks to maximize the spread of viral advertising. In particular, a concave probability model is introduced to characterize each user’s utility for being an initial adopter. Under this model, we show that it is NP-hard to find an optimal budget allocation for maximizing the spread of viral advertising. We then present a novel discrete greedy algorithm with near optimal performance, and further propose scaling-up techniques to improve the time-efficiency of our algorithm. Extensive experiments on real-world social graphs are implemented to validate the effectiveness of our algorithm in practice. The results show that our algorithm can outperform other intuitive heuristics significantly in almost all cases.

  15. Quantitation of viral load using real-time amplification techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesters, H G

    2001-01-01

    Real-time PCR amplification techniques are currently used to determine the viral load in clinical samples for an increasing number of targets. Real-time PCR reduces the time necessary to generate results after amplification. In-house developed PCR and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA

  16. Information Overload and Viral Marketing: Countermeasures and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiesi; Sun, Aaron; Zeng, Daniel

    Studying information diffusion through social networks has become an active research topic with important implications in viral marketing applications. One of the fundamental algorithmic problems related to viral marketing is the Influence Maximization (IM) problem: given an social network, which set of nodes should be considered by the viral marketer as the initial targets, in order to maximize the influence of the advertising message. In this work, we study the IM problem in an information-overloaded online social network. Information overload occurs when individuals receive more information than they can process, which can cause negative impacts on the overall marketing effectiveness. Many practical countermeasures have been proposed for alleviating the load of information on recipients. However, how these approaches can benefit viral marketers is not well understood. In our work, we have adapted the classic Information Cascade Model to incorporate information overload and study its countermeasures. Our results suggest that effective control of information overload has the potential to improve marketing effectiveness, but the targeting strategy should be re-designed in response to these countermeasures.

  17. Massive activation of archaeal defense genes during viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.; Voet, M.; Sismeiro, O.; Dillies, M.A.; Jagla, B.; Coppée, J.Y.; Sezonov, G.; Forterre, P.; Oost, van der J.; Lavigne, R.; Prangishvili, D.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea

  18. Chest physical therapy in acute viral bronchiolitis: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiaux, Guy; Zwaenepoel, Bruno; Louis, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    We describe the various therapies for infant acute viral bronchiolitis and the contradictory results obtained with chest physical therapy. The treatment target is bronchial obstruction, which is a multifactorial phenomenon that includes edema, bronchoconstriction, and increased mucus production, with a clinical grading defined as severe, moderate, or mild. Chest physical therapy is revisited in its various modalities, according to preliminary scoring of the disease.

  19. Interleukin-15 is associated with disease severity in viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, T Ronan; McManus, Ross; Doherty, Derek G; Grealy, Robert; Coulter, Tanya; Smyth, Paul; Blackshields, Gordon; Sheils, Orla; Carr, Michael J; Purandare, Nikhil; Geary, Michael; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Janssen, Riny; Bont, Louis; Slattery, Dubhfeasa; Ryan, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Disease severity in viral bronchiolitis in infancy is difficult to predict and has been linked to host innate immunity. The study aimed to investigate the innate cytokine interleukin-15 (IL-15) as a marker of disease severity.A prospective single-centre observational study was conducted in a university-affiliated paediatric teaching hospital, comparing children (0-18 months) hospitalised for viral bronchiolitis, those admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit with severe disease and healthy age-matched controls. IL-15-related parameters were compared between groups. PCR and microRNA (miRNA) sequencing was undertaken on natural killer (NK) cells collected from study participants.Samples from 88 children with viral bronchiolitis and 43 controls enrolled between 2009 and 2012 were analysed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) IL-15 mRNA expression was significantly higher in those with moderate severity bronchiolitis compared with controls and those with severe disease. Serum IL-15 levels correlated with disease severity. The relative frequency of NK cells in peripheral blood was significantly reduced in participants with bronchiolitis. The NK cell miRNA transcriptome in bronchiolitis was distinct. Targets of de-regulated miRNA were differentially expressed in bronchiolitis, including JAK3, STAT5A and NFKB1 on the IL-15 signalling pathway.IL-15 is associated with disease severity in children hospitalised with viral bronchiolitis.

  20. Viral infections among couples for assisted reproduction in a fertility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-28

    Sep 28, 2012 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Jul-Sep 2013 • Vol 16 • Issue 3 ... Aims: To assess the burden of viral infection among couples that present for ... Materials and Methods: Screening for HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and ... Statistical analysis Used: Statistical Package for Social Sciences was employed.