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Sample records for non-invasive stroke volume

  1. Limitations of stroke volume estimation by non-invasive blood pressure monitoring in hypergravity.

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    Olivier Manen

    Full Text Available Altitude and gravity changes during aeromedical evacuations induce exacerbated cardiovascular responses in unstable patients. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring is difficult to perform in this environment with limited access to the patient. We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of stroke volume estimation by finger photoplethysmography (SVp in hypergravity.Finger arterial blood pressure (ABP waveforms were recorded continuously in ten healthy subjects before, during and after exposure to +Gz accelerations in a human centrifuge. The protocol consisted of a 2-min and 8-min exposure up to +4 Gz. SVp was computed from ABP using Liljestrand, systolic area, and Windkessel algorithms, and compared with reference values measured by echocardiography (SVe before and after the centrifuge runs.The ABP signal could be used in 83.3% of cases. After calibration with echocardiography, SVp changes did not differ from SVe and values were linearly correlated (p<0.001. The three algorithms gave comparable SVp. Reproducibility between SVp and SVe was the best with the systolic area algorithm (limits of agreement -20.5 and +38.3 ml.Non-invasive ABP photoplethysmographic monitoring is an interesting technique to estimate relative stroke volume changes in moderate and sustained hypergravity. This method may aid physicians for aeronautic patient monitoring.

  2. A new electric method for non-invasive continuous monitoring of stroke volume and ventricular volume-time curves

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    Konings Maurits K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper a new non-invasive, operator-free, continuous ventricular stroke volume monitoring device (Hemodynamic Cardiac Profiler, HCP is presented, that measures the average stroke volume (SV for each period of 20 seconds, as well as ventricular volume-time curves for each cardiac cycle, using a new electric method (Ventricular Field Recognition with six independent electrode pairs distributed over the frontal thoracic skin. In contrast to existing non-invasive electric methods, our method does not use the algorithms of impedance or bioreactance cardiography. Instead, our method is based on specific 2D spatial patterns on the thoracic skin, representing the distribution, over the thorax, of changes in the applied current field caused by cardiac volume changes during the cardiac cycle. Since total heart volume variation during the cardiac cycle is a poor indicator for ventricular stroke volume, our HCP separates atrial filling effects from ventricular filling effects, and retrieves the volume changes of only the ventricles. Methods ex-vivo experiments on a post-mortem human heart have been performed to measure the effects of increasing the blood volume inside the ventricles in isolation, leaving the atrial volume invariant (which can not be done in-vivo. These effects have been measured as a specific 2D pattern of voltage changes on the thoracic skin. Furthermore, a working prototype of the HCP has been developed that uses these ex-vivo results in an algorithm to decompose voltage changes, that were measured in-vivo by the HCP on the thoracic skin of a human volunteer, into an atrial component and a ventricular component, in almost real-time (with a delay of maximally 39 seconds. The HCP prototype has been tested in-vivo on 7 human volunteers, using G-suit inflation and deflation to provoke stroke volume changes, and LVot Doppler as a reference technique. Results The ex-vivo measurements showed that ventricular filling

  3. Estimating changes in Stroke Volume by non-invasive pulse-oximetry Pulse Transit Time Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Bokkel-Andela, J.; Poterman, Marieke; Scheeren, Thomas; Kalmar, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Goal of Study:  Pulse wave transit time (PTT), the interval between the R-wave peak on an electrocardiogram (ECG) and arrival of the pulse waves in the periphery (e.g. the finger), is reported to be a reliable estimate for stroke volume[1,2]. In this study, the PTT based on ECG and th

  4. Non-invasive measurement of stroke volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Radionuclide cardiography compared with left ventricular cardioangiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Aldershvile, J;

    2011-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) was determined by first passage radionuclide cardiography and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multigated radionuclide cardiography in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease. The results were evaluated against those obtained by the invasive dye dilution...... or thermodilution and left ventricular cardioangiographic techniques. In a paired comparison the mean difference between the invasive and radionuclide SV was -1 ml (SED 3.1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (p less than 0.01). Radionuclide LVEF values also correlated well with cardioangiographic measurements...

  5. Non-invasive brain stimulation in early rehabilitation after stroke.

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    Blesneag, A V; Popa, L; Stan, A D

    2015-01-01

    The new tendency in rehabilitation involves non-invasive tools that, if applied early after stroke, promote neurorecovery. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation may correct the disruption of cortical excitability and effectively contribute to the restoration of movement and speech. The present paper analyses the results of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) trials, highlighting different aspects related to the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation frequency, transcranial direct current stimulation polarity, the period and stimulation places in acute and subacute ischemic strokes. The risk of adverse events, the association with motor or language recovery specific training, and the cumulative positive effect evaluation are also discussed.

  6. Non invasive brain stimulation to enhance post-stroke recovery

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    Nathalie Kubis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity after stroke remains poorly understood. Patients may improve spontaneously within the first 3 months and then more slowly in the coming year. The first days, decreased edema and reperfusion of the ischemic penumbra may possibly account for these phenomena, but the improvement during the next weeks suggests plasticity phenomena and cortical reorganization of the brain ischemic areas and of more remote areas. Indeed, the injured ischemic motor cortex has a reduced cortical excitability at the acute phase and a suspension of the topographic representation of affected muscles, whereas the contralateral motor cortex has an increased excitability and an enlarged somatomotor representation; furthermore, contralateral cortex exerts a transcallosal interhemispheric inhibition on the ischemic cortex. This results from the imbalance of the physiological reciprocal interhemispheric inhibition of each hemisphere on the other, contributing to worsening of neurological deficit. Cortical excitability is measurable through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and prognosis has been established according to the presence of motor evoked potentials (MEP at the acute phase of stroke, which is predictive of better recovery. Conversely, the lack of response to early stimulation is associated with a poor functional outcome. Non-invasive stimulation techniques such as repetitive TMS (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have the potential to modulate brain cortical excitability with long lasting effects. In the setting of cerebrovascular disease, around 1000 stroke subjects have been included in placebo-controlled trials so far, most often with an objective of promoting motor recovery of the upper limb. High frequency repetitive stimulation (> 3 Hz rTMS, aiming to increase excitability of the ischemic cortex, or low frequency repetitive stimulation (≤ 1 Hz, aiming to reduce excitability of the contralateral homonymous cortex, or

  7. Non-invasive electric current stimulation for restoration of vision after unilateral occipital stroke.

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    Gall, Carolin; Silvennoinen, Katri; Granata, Giuseppe; de Rossi, Francesca; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Brösel, Doreen; Bola, Michał; Sailer, Michael; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J; Rossini, Paolo M; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-07-01

    Occipital stroke often leads to visual field loss, for which no effective treatment exists. Little is known about the potential of non-invasive electric current stimulation to ameliorate visual functions in patients suffering from unilateral occipital stroke. One reason is the traditional thinking that visual field loss after brain lesions is permanent. Since evidence is available documenting vision restoration by means of vision training or non-invasive electric current stimulation future studies should also consider investigating recovery processes after visual cortical strokes. Here, protocols of repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are presented and the European consortium for restoration of vision (REVIS) is introduced. Within the consortium different stimulation approaches will be applied to patients with unilateral occipital strokes resulting in homonymous hemianopic visual field defects. The aim of the study is to evaluate effects of current stimulation of the brain on vision parameters, vision-related quality of life, and physiological parameters that allow concluding about the mechanisms of vision restoration. These include EEG-spectra and coherence measures, and visual evoked potentials. The design of stimulation protocols involves an appropriate sham-stimulation condition and sufficient follow-up periods to test whether the effects are stable. This is the first application of non-invasive current stimulation for vision rehabilitation in stroke-related visual field deficits. Positive results of the trials could have far-reaching implications for clinical practice. The ability of non-invasive electrical current brain stimulation to modulate the activity of neuronal networks may have implications for stroke rehabilitation also in the visual domain.

  8. Non-invasive brain stimulation: an interventional tool for enhancing behavioral training after stroke

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    Maximilian Jonas Wessel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability among adults. Motor deficit is the most common impairment after stroke. Especially, deficits in fine motor skills impair numerous activities of daily life. Re-acquisition of motor skills resulting in improved or more accurate motor performance is paramount to regain function, and is the basis of behavioral motor therapy after stroke. Within the past years, there has been a rapid technological and methodological development in neuroimaging leading to a significant progress in the understanding of the neural substrates that underlie motor skill acquisition and functional recovery in stroke patients. Based on this and the development of novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, new adjuvant interventional approaches that augment the response to behavioral training have been proposed. Transcranial direct current (tDCS, transcranial magnetic (TMS and paired associative (PAS stimulation are noninvasive brain stimulation techniques that can modulate cortical excitability, neuronal plasticity and interact with learning and memory in both healthy individuals and stroke patients. These techniques can enhance the effect of practice and facilitate the retention of tasks that mimic daily life activities. The purpose of the present review is to provide a comprehensive overview of neuroplastic phenomena in the motor system during learning of a motor skill, recovery after brain injury, and of interventional strategies to enhance the beneficial effects of customarily used neurorehabilitation after stroke.

  9. Opportunities for guided multichannel non-invasive transcranial current stimulation in post-stroke rehabilitation

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    Begonya eOtal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability worldwide. Functional outcome depends on stroke location, severity and early intervention. Conventional rehabilitation strategies have limited effectiveness, and new treatments still fail to keep pace, in part due to a lack of understanding of the different stages in brain recovery and the vast heterogeneity in the post-stroke population. Innovative methodologies for restorative neurorehabilitation are required to reduce long-term disability and socioeconomic burden. Neuroplasticity is involved in post-stroke functional disturbances, and also during rehabilitation. Tackling post-stroke neuroplasticity by non-invasive brain stimulation is regarded as promising, but efficacy might be limited because of rather uniform application across patients despite individual heterogeneity of lesions, symptoms and other factors. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS induces and modulates neuroplasticity, and has been shown to be able to improve motor and cognitive functions. tDCS is suited to improve post-stroke rehabilitation outcomes, but effect sizes are often moderate and suffer from variability. Indeed, the location, extent and pattern of functional network connectivity disruption should be considered when determining the optimal location sites for tDCS therapies. Here, we present potential opportunities for neuroimaging-guided tDCS-based rehabilitation strategies after stroke that could be personalized. We introduce innovative multimodal intervention protocols based on multichannel tDCS montages, neuroimaging methods and real-time closed-loop systems to guide therapy. This might help to overcome current treatment limitations in post-stroke rehabilitation and increase our general understanding of adaptive neuroplasticity leading to neural reorganization after stroke.

  10. Cognitive and Neurophysiological Effects of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke Patients after Motor Rehabilitation.

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    D'Agata, Federico; Peila, Elena; Cicerale, Alessandro; Caglio, Marcella M; Caroppo, Paola; Vighetti, Sergio; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Minuto, Alice; Campagnoli, Marcello; Salatino, Adriana; Molo, Maria T; Mortara, Paolo; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two specific Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) paradigms, the repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), in the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with stroke. Short and long term outcomes (after 3 and 6 months, respectively) were evaluated. We measured, at multiple time points, the manual dexterity using a validated clinical scale (ARAT), electroencephalography auditory event related potentials, and neuropsychological performances in patients with chronic stroke of middle severity. Thirty four patients were enrolled and randomized. The intervention group was treated with a NIBS protocol longer than usual, applying a second cycle of stimulation, after a washout period, using different techniques in the two cycles (rTMS/tDCS). We compared the results with a control group treated with sham stimulation. We split the data analysis into three studies. In this first study we examined if a cumulative effect was clinically visible. In the second study we compared the effects of the two techniques. In the third study we explored if patients with minor cognitive impairment have most benefit from the treatment and if cognitive and motor outcomes were correlated. We found that the impairment in some cognitive domains cannot be considered an exclusion criterion for rehabilitation with NIBS. ERP improved, related to cognitive and attentional processes after stimulation on the motor cortex, but transitorily. This effect could be linked to the restoration of hemispheric balance or by the effects of distant connections. In our study the effects of the two NIBS were comparable, with some advantages using tDCS vs. rTMS in stroke rehabilitation. Finally we found that more than one cycle (2-4 weeks), spaced out by washout periods, should be used, only in responder patients, to obtain clinical relevant results.

  11. Fluid Vessel Quantity Using Non-invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

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    Garofalo, Anthony A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  12. Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

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    Garofalo, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  13. A non-invasive method of quantifying pancreatic volume in mice using micro-MRI.

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    Jose L Paredes

    Full Text Available In experimental models of pancreatic growth and recovery, changes in pancreatic size are assessed by euthanizing a large cohort of animals at varying time points and measuring organ mass. However, to ascertain this information in clinical practice, patients with pancreatic disorders routinely undergo non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of the pancreas using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or computed tomography (CT. The aim of the current study was to develop a thin-sliced, optimized sequence protocol using a high field MRI to accurately calculate pancreatic volumes in the most common experimental animal, the mouse. Using a 7 Telsa Bruker micro-MRI system, we performed abdominal imaging in whole-fixed mice in three standard planes: axial, sagittal, and coronal. The contour of the pancreas was traced using Vitrea software and then transformed into a 3-dimensional (3D reconstruction, from which volumetric measurements were calculated. Images were optimized using heart perfusion-fixation, T1 sequence analysis, and 0.2 to 0.4 mm thick slices. As proof of principle, increases in pancreatic volume among mice of different ages correlated tightly with increasing body weight. In summary, this is the first study to measure pancreatic volumes in mice, using a high field 7 Tesla micro-MRI and a thin-sliced, optimized sequence protocol. We anticipate that micro-MRI will improve the ability to non-invasively quantify changes in pancreatic size and will dramatically reduce the number of animals required to serially assess pancreatic growth and recovery.

  14. Lung protection during non-invasive synchronized assist versus volume control in rabbits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mirabella, Lucia; Grasselli, Giacomo; Haitsma, Jack J; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S; Sinderby, Christer; Beck, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    .... For this, we used non-invasive Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NIV-NAVA), with the hypothesis that liberation of upper airways and the ventilator's integration with lung protective reflexes would be equally lung protective...

  15. Induction of neuroplasticity and recovery in post-stroke aphasia by non-invasive brain stimulation

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    Priyanka eShah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke victims tend to prioritize speaking, writing and walking as the three most important rehabilitation goals. Of note is that two of these goals involve communication. This underscores the significance of developing successful approaches to aphasia treatment for the several hundred thousand new aphasia patients each year and over 1 million stroke survivors with chronic aphasia in the U.S. alone. After several years of growth as a research tool, noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS is gradually entering the arena of clinical aphasiology. In this review, we first examine the current state of knowledge of post-stroke language recovery including the contributions from the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Next, we briefly discuss the methods and the physiologic basis of the use of inhibitory and excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS as research tools in patients who experience post-stroke aphasia. Finally, we provide a critical review of the most influential evidence behind the potential use of these two brain stimulation methods as clinical rehabilitative tools.

  16. Non-Invasive Monitoring of CNS MHC-I Molecules in Ischemic Stroke Mice.

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    Xia, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Huanhuan; Wang, Jie; Gao, Xueren; Chen, Jinpeng; Fu, Bo; Shen, Yuqing; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong; Teng, Gaojun

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules in the central nervous system, which are silenced under normal physiological conditions, have been reported to be induced by injury stimulation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether MHC-I molecules could serve as molecular targets for the acute phase of ischemic stroke and to assess whether a high-affinity peptide specific for MHC-I molecules could be applied in the near-infrared imaging of cerebral ischemic mice. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the expression of MHC-I molecules in two mouse models of cerebral ischemic stroke and an in vitro model of ischemia. The NetMHC 4.0 server was used to screen a high-affinity peptide specific for mouse MHC-I molecules. The Rosetta program was used to identify the specificity and affinity of the screened peptide (histocompatibility-2 binding peptide, H2BP). The results demonstrated that MHC-I molecules could serve as molecular targets for the acute phase of ischemic stroke. Cy5.5-H2BP molecular probes could be applied in the near-infrared imaging of cerebral ischemic mice. Research on the expression of MHC-I molecules in the acute phase after ischemia and MHC-I-targeted imaging may not only be helpful for understanding the mechanism of ischemic and hypoxic brain injury and repair but also has potential application value in the imaging of ischemic stroke.

  17. Effectiveness of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Dysphagia Subsequent to Stroke: A Systemic Review and Meta-analysis.

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    Yang, Seung Nam; Pyun, Sung-Bom; Kim, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Rhyu, Byung Joo

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in patients with dysphagia subsequent to stroke. A systematic search of the literature published by Medline (January 1, 1976 through June 21, 2013), EMBASE (January 1, 1985 through June 21, 2013), and the Cochrane Library (January 1, 1987 through June 21, 2013) was conducted for all relevant articles related to NIBS, dysphagia, and cerebrovascular disorders (CVD). Two reviewers (S.N.Y and S.B.P) independently evaluated the eligibility of retrieved data according to the selection criteria and assessed methodological quality of the studies using the 'assessing risk of bias' table recommended in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (version 5.0.2). Six randomized controlled trials (59 intervention groups and 55 placebo groups) were identified as addressing the use of NIBS for dysphagia after CVD and were included in the meta-analysis. The function scale score improvement of dysphagia in patients treated with NIBS was statistically significant compared with that of patients who underwent sham stimulation (standardized mean difference = 1.08, 95 % confidence intervals = 0.29-1.88, p = 0.008; I (2) = 72 %). A subgroup analysis based on the type of intervention (three repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) studies and three transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) studies) revealed a statistically significant beneficial effect of NIBS compared with sham stimulation in the rTMS group, but not in the tDCS group. When the results were examined based on intervention site (ipsilesional vs. contralesional site stimulation), no statistically significant difference was noted between two groups. No complications of NIBS were reported in this analysis.

  18. Non-invasive quantification of peripheral arterial volume distensibility and its non-linear relationship with arterial pressure.

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    Zheng, Dingchang; Murray, Alan

    2009-05-29

    Arterial wall function is associated with different physiological and clinical factors. Changes in arterial pressure cause major changes in the arterial wall. This study presents a simple non-invasive method to quantify arterial volume distensibility changes with different arterial pressures. The electrocardiogram, finger and ear photoplethysmogram were recorded from 15 subjects with the right arm at five different positions (90 degrees , 45 degrees , 0 degrees , -45 degrees and -90 degrees referred to the horizontal level). Arm pulse propagation time was determined by subtracting ear pulse transit time from finger pulse transit time, and was used to obtain arterial volume distensibility. The mean arterial blood pressure with the arm at the horizontal level was acquired, and changes with position were calculated using the hydrostatic principle that blood pressure in the arm is linearly related to its vertical distance from the horizontal level. The mean arm pulse propagation times for the five different positions were 88, 72, 57, 54 and 52ms, with the corresponding mean arterial volume distensibility of 0.234%, 0.158%, 0.099%, 0.088% and 0.083% per mmHg. For all consecutive changes in arm position, arm pulse propagation time and arterial volume distensibility, were significantly different (all probability Ppressure decreased significantly between each consecutive arm position from 90 degrees to -45 degrees (all Ppressure changes from 101 to 58mmHg. In conclusion, the inverse and non-linear relationship between arterial volume distensibility and arterial pressure has been quantified using a simple arm positioning procedure, with the greatest effect at low pressures. This work is an important step in developing a simple non-invasive technique for assessing peripheral arterial volume distensibility.

  19. Quantification of respiratory depression during pre-operative administration of midazolam using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor.

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    Gonzalez Castro, Luis N; Mehta, Jaideep H; Brayanov, Jordan B; Mullen, Gary J

    2017-01-01

    Pre-operative administration of benzodiazepines can cause hypoventilation-a decrease in minute ventilation (MV)-commonly referred to as "respiratory compromise or respiratory depression." Respiratory depression can lead to hypercarbia and / or hypoxemia, and may heighten the risk of other respiratory complications. Current anesthesia practice often places patients at risk for respiratory complications even before surgery, as respiratory monitoring is generally postponed until the patient is in the operating room. In the present study we examined and quantified the onset of respiratory depression following the administration of a single dose of midazolam in pre-operative patients, using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor that reports MV, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate (RR). Impedance-based Respiratory Volume Monitor (RVM) data were collected and analyzed from 30 patients prior to undergoing orthopedic or general surgical procedures. All patients received 2.0 mg of midazolam intravenously at least 20 minutes prior to the induction of anesthesia and the effects of midazolam on the patient's respiratory function were analyzed. Within 15 minutes of midazolam administration, we noted a significant decrease in both MV (average decrease of 14.3% ± 5.9%, pmidazolam administration on clinically significant respiratory parameters (MV, TV and RR) using a non-invasive RVM, uncovering that the respiratory depressive effect of benzodiazepines affect primarily TV rather than RR. Such respiratory monitoring data provide the opportunity for individualizing dosing and adjustment of clinical interventions, especially important in elderly patients. With additional respiratory data, clinicians may be able to better identify and quantify respiratory depression, reduce adverse effects, and improve overall patient safety.

  20. Quantification of respiratory depression during pre-operative administration of midazolam using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Castro, Luis N.; Mehta, Jaideep H.; Brayanov, Jordan B.; Mullen, Gary J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Pre-operative administration of benzodiazepines can cause hypoventilation—a decrease in minute ventilation (MV)—commonly referred to as “respiratory compromise or respiratory depression.” Respiratory depression can lead to hypercarbia and / or hypoxemia, and may heighten the risk of other respiratory complications. Current anesthesia practice often places patients at risk for respiratory complications even before surgery, as respiratory monitoring is generally postponed until the patient is in the operating room. In the present study we examined and quantified the onset of respiratory depression following the administration of a single dose of midazolam in pre-operative patients, using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor that reports MV, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate (RR). Methods Impedance-based Respiratory Volume Monitor (RVM) data were collected and analyzed from 30 patients prior to undergoing orthopedic or general surgical procedures. All patients received 2.0 mg of midazolam intravenously at least 20 minutes prior to the induction of anesthesia and the effects of midazolam on the patient's respiratory function were analyzed. Results Within 15 minutes of midazolam administration, we noted a significant decrease in both MV (average decrease of 14.3% ± 5.9%, pbenzodiazepines affect primarily TV rather than RR. Such respiratory monitoring data provide the opportunity for individualizing dosing and adjustment of clinical interventions, especially important in elderly patients. With additional respiratory data, clinicians may be able to better identify and quantify respiratory depression, reduce adverse effects, and improve overall patient safety. PMID:28235069

  1. Impact of the column hardware volume on resolution in very high pressure liquid chromatography non-invasive investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; McDonald, Thomas; Gilar, Martin

    2015-11-13

    The impact of the column hardware volume (≃ 1.7 μL) on the optimum reduced plate heights of a series of short 2.1 mm × 50 mm columns (hold-up volume ≃ 80-90 μL) packed with 1.8 μm HSS-T3, 1.7 μm BEH-C18, 1.7 μm CSH-C18, 1.6 μm CORTECS-C18+, and 1.7 μm BEH-C4 particles was investigated. A rapid and non-invasive method based on the reduction of the system dispersion (to only 0.15 μL(2)) of an I-class Acquity system and on the corrected plate heights (for system dispersion) of five weakly retained n-alkanophenones in RPLC was proposed. Evidence for sample dispersion through the column hardware volume was also revealed from the experimental plot of the peak capacities for smooth linear gradients versus the corrected efficiency of a weakly retained alkanophenone (isocratic runs). The plot is built for a constant gradient steepness irrespective of the applied flow rates (0.01-0.30 mL/min) and column lengths (2, 3, 5, and 10 cm). The volume variance caused by column endfittings and frits was estimated in between 0.1 and 0.7 μL(2) depending on the applied flow rate. After correction for system and hardware dispersion, the minimum reduced plate heights of short (5 cm) and narrow-bore (2.1mm i.d.) beds packed with sub-2 μm fully and superficially porous particles were found close to 1.5 and 0.7, respectively, instead of the classical h values of 2.0 and 1.4 for the whole column assembly.

  2. Inhibitory non-invasive brain stimulation to homologous language regions as an adjunct to speech and language therapy in post-stroke aphasia: a meta-analysis

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    Begonya eOtal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic communication impairment is common after stroke, and conventional speech and language therapy (SLT strategies have limited effectiveness in post-stroke aphasia. Neurorehabilitation with non-invasive brain stimulation techniques (NIBS ‒ particularly repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS ‒ may enhance the effects of SLT in selected patients. Applying inhibitory NIBS to specific homologous language regions may induce neural reorganization and reduce interhemispheric competition. This mini review highlights randomized controlled trials (RCTs and randomized cross-over trials using low-frequency rTMS or cathodal tDCS over the non-lesioned non-language dominant hemisphere and performs an exploratory meta-analysis of those trials considered combinable. Using a random-effects model, a meta-analysis of nine eligible trials involving 215 participants showed a significant mean effect size of 0.51 (95% CI = 0.24 to 0.79 for the main outcome accuracy of naming in language assessment. No heterogeneity was observed (I2 = 0%. More multicenter RCTs with larger populations and homogenous intervention protocols are required to confirm these and the longer-term effects.

  3. Non-invasive cerebral blood volume measurement during seizures using multi-channel near infrared spectroscopic topography

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    Watanabe, Eiju; Maki, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Fumio; Yamashita, Yuichi; Koizumi, Hideaki; Mayanagi, Yoshiaki

    2000-07-01

    Near infrared spectroscopic topography (NIRS) is widely recognized as a noninvasive method to measure the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) dynamics coupled with neuronal activities. We analyzed the rCBV change in the early phase of epileptic seizures in 12 consecutive patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Seizure was induced by bemegride injection. We used eight-channel NIRS in nine cases and 24 channel in three cases. In all of the cases, rCBV increased rapidly after the seizure onset on the focus side. The increased rCBV was observed for about 30 - 60 s. The NIRS method can be applied to monitor the rCBV change continuously during seizures. Therefore, this method may be combined with ictal SPECT as one of the most reliable noninvasive methods of focus diagnosis.

  4. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana M. Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are unknown. Objectives 1 To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2 to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV. Method Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Results Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19L (p=0.04. No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05L/s (p<0.01, and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06L/s (p<0.01, increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13 versus 69 (SD=10 (p=0.02. Conclusions NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction.

  5. Limitations and pitfalls in measurements of right ventricular stroke volume in an animal model of right heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vildbrad, Mads Dam; Andersen, Asger; Andersen, Thomas Krarup; Axelgaard, Sofie; Holmboe, Sarah; Andersen, Stine; Ringgaard, Steffen; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2015-05-01

    Right heart failure occurs in various heart and pulmonary vascular diseases and may be fatal. We aimed to identify limitations in non-invasive measurements of right ventricular stroke volume in an animal model of right ventricular failure. Data from previous studies randomising rats to pulmonary trunk banding (PTB, n = 33) causing pressure-overload right ventricular failure or sham operation (n = 16) was evaluated retrospectively. We measured right ventricular stroke volume by high frequency echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We found correlation between right ventricular stroke volume measured by echocardiography and MRI in the sham animals (r = 0.677, p = 0.004) but not in the PTB group. Echocardiography overestimated the stroke volume compared to MRI in both groups. Intra- and inter-observer variation did not explain the difference. Technical, physiological and anatomical issues in the pulmonary artery might explain why echocardiography over-estimates stroke volume. Flow acceleration close to the pulmonary artery banding can cause uncertainties in the PTB model and might explain the lack of correlation. In conclusion, we found a correlation in right ventricular stroke volume measured by echocardiography versus MRI in the sham group but not the PTB group. Echocardiography overestimated right ventricular stroke volume compared to MRI.

  6. Non-invasive ventilation for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Fidelma; Bradley, Judy M; Piper, Amanda J

    2017-02-20

    Non-invasive ventilation may be a means to temporarily reverse or slow the progression of respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis by providing ventilatory support and avoiding tracheal intubation. Using non-invasive ventilation, in the appropriate situation or individuals, can improve lung mechanics through increasing airflow and gas exchange and decreasing the work of breathing. Non-invasive ventilation thus acts as an external respiratory muscle. This is an update of a previously published review. To compare the effect of non-invasive ventilation versus no non-invasive ventilation in people with cystic fibrosis for airway clearance, during sleep and during exercise. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We searched the reference lists of each trial for additional publications possibly containing other trials.Most recent search: 08 August 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing a form of pressure preset or volume preset non-invasive ventilation to no non-invasive ventilation used for airway clearance or during sleep or exercise in people with acute or chronic respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis. Three reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion criteria and methodological quality, and extracted data. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 191 participants. Seven trials evaluated single treatment sessions, one evaluated a two-week intervention, one evaluated a six-week intervention and one a three-month intervention. It is only possible to blind trials of airway clearance and overnight ventilatory support to the outcome assessors. In most of the trials we judged there was an unclear risk of bias with regards to blinding due to inadequate descriptions. The six-week trial was the only one judged to have a low risk of bias for all

  7. Continuous stroke volume monitoring by modelling flow from non-invasive measurement of arterial pressure in humans under orthostatic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, M.P.M.; Wesseling, K.H.; Pott, F.; Jenstrup, M.; Goudoever, J. van; Secher, N.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between aortic flow and pressure is described by a three-element model of the arterial input impedance, including continuous correction for variations in the diameter and the compliance of the aorta (Modelflow). We computed the aortic flow from arterial pressure by this model, and

  8. MEAN PLATELET VOLUME AND RISK OF THROMBOTIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasantha Kumar Thankappan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke is a major cause of long term morbidity and mortality. Several factors are known to increase the liability to stroke. Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications, contributing to thrombus formation. Platelet size (mean platelet volume, MPV is a marker and possible determinant of platelet function, large platelets being potentially more reactive. Hence an attempt has-been made to study the association if any between mean platelet volume and thrombotic stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether an association exists between Mean Platelet Volume (MPV and thrombotic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study is a case control study and data was collected at Government Medical College Hospital, Kottayam, Kerala a tertiary care referral centre. The study was carried out among fifty patients diagnosed with thrombotic stroke and presenting to the hospital within forty eight hours of onset of symptoms. Fifty age group and sex matched controls were also recruited. Mean platelet volume was obtained using a SYSMEX automated analyser. RESULTS This study has shown a statistically significant relation between mean platelet volume and risk of thrombotic stroke but no statistically significant correlation between clinical severity of stroke and mean platelet volume. CONCLUSION This study has shown an elevation of MPV in acute phase of thrombotic stroke. Platelet mass was found to be more or less a constant. This study did not find a statistically significant correlation between clinical severity of stroke and mean platelet volume.

  9. In-treatment stroke volume predicts cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnebakken, Mai T; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether lower stroke volume during antihypertensive treatment is a predictor of cardiovascular events independent of left ventricular geometric pattern. Methods: The association between left ventricular stroke volume and combined cardiovascular death, stroke and myocardial infarction......, the prespecified primary study endpoint, was assessed in Cox regression analysis using data from baseline and annual follow-up visits in 855 patients during 4.8 years of randomized losartan-based or atenolol-based treatment in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) echocardiography...... resistance, more concentric left ventricular geometry and impaired diastolic relaxation (all P treatment left ventricular stroke volume indexed for height2.04 was associated...

  10. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery.

  11. Advanced signal processing theory and implementation for sonar, radar, and non-invasive medical diagnostic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stergiopoulos, Stergios

    2009-01-01

    Integrates topics of signal processing from sonar, radar, and medical system technologies by identifying their concept similarities. This book covers non-invasive medical diagnostic system applications, including intracranial ultrasound, a technology that attempts to address non-invasive detection on brain injuries and stroke.

  12. Relationship between stroke volume and pulse pressure during blood volume perturbation: a mathematical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighamian, Ramin; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Arterial pulse pressure has been widely used as surrogate of stroke volume, for example, in the guidance of fluid therapy. However, recent experimental investigations suggest that arterial pulse pressure is not linearly proportional to stroke volume. However, mechanisms underlying the relation between the two have not been clearly understood. The goal of this study was to elucidate how arterial pulse pressure and stroke volume respond to a perturbation in the left ventricular blood volume based on a systematic mathematical analysis. Both our mathematical analysis and experimental data showed that the relative change in arterial pulse pressure due to a left ventricular blood volume perturbation was consistently smaller than the corresponding relative change in stroke volume, due to the nonlinear left ventricular pressure-volume relation during diastole that reduces the sensitivity of arterial pulse pressure to perturbations in the left ventricular blood volume. Therefore, arterial pulse pressure must be used with care when used as surrogate of stroke volume in guiding fluid therapy.

  13. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  14. Influence of health insurance, hospital factors and physician volume on receipt of immediate post-mastectomy reconstruction in women with invasive and non-invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, D L; Richards, C A; Kalinsky, K; Wilde, E T; Lu, Y S; Ascherman, J A; Neugut, A I; Wright, J D

    2012-11-01

    For women with breast cancer who undergo mastectomy, immediate breast reconstruction (IR) offers a cosmetic and psychological advantage. We evaluated the association between demographic, hospital, surgeon and insurance factors and receipt of IR. We conducted a retrospective hospital-based analysis with the Perspective database. Women who underwent a mastectomy for invasive breast cancer (IBC) and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) from 2000 to 2010 were included. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors predictive of IR. Analyses were stratified by age (insurance (OR 3.38) and Medicare (OR 1.66) insurance (vs. self-pay), high surgeon-volume (OR 1.19), high hospital-volume (OR 2.24), and large hospital size (OR 1.20). The results were identical for DCIS, and by age category. The absolute difference between the proportion of patients who received IR with commercial insurance compared to other insurance, increased over time. Immediate in-hospital complication rates were higher for flap reconstruction compared to implant or no reconstruction (15.2, 4.0, and 6.1 %, respectively, P insurance status, hospital size, hospital location, and physician volume strongly predict IR. Public policy should ensure that access to reconstructive surgery is universally available.

  15. Non-invasive light observer

    CERN Document Server

    Morichetti, Francesco; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Sampietro, Marco; Strain, Michael; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Photonic technologies lack non-invasive monitoring tools to inspect the light inside optical waveguides. This is one of the main barriers to large scale of integration, even though photonic platforms are potentially ready to host several thousands of elements on a single chip. Here, we demonstrate non-invasive light observation in silicon photonics devices by exploiting photon interaction with intra-gap energy states localized at the waveguide surface. Light intensity is measured through a ContactLess Integrated Photonic Probe (CLIPP) that introduces no measurable extra-photon absorption and a phase perturbation as low as 0.2 mrad, comparable to thermal fluctuations of less than 3 mK. Multipoint light monitoring is demonstrated with a sensitivity of -30 dBm and a dynamic range of 40 dB. CLIPP technology is simple, inherently CMOS compatible, and scalable to hundreds of probing points per chip. This concept provides a viable way to real-time conditioning and feedback control of densely-integrated photonic syst...

  16. Optimising stroke volume and oxygen delivery in abdominal aortic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, J; Gilsaa, T; Rønholm, E

    2012-01-01

    group, stroke volume was optimised by 250 ml colloid boluses intraoperatively and for the first 6 h post-operatively. The optimisation aimed at an oxygen delivery of 600 ml/min/m(2) in the post-operative period. Haemodynamic data were collected at pre-defined time points, including baseline......BACKGROUND: Post-operative complications after open elective abdominal aortic surgery are common, and individualised goal-directed therapy may improve outcome in high-risk surgery. We hypothesised that individualised goal-directed therapy, targeting stroke volume and oxygen delivery, can reduce......, intraoperatively and post-operatively. Patients were followed up for 30 days. RESULTS: Stroke volume index and oxygen delivery index were both higher in the post-operative period in the intervention group. In this group, 27 of 32 achieved the post-operative oxygen delivery index target vs. 18 of 32 in the control...

  17. A simple physiologic algorithm for managing hemodynamics using stroke volume and stroke volume variation: physiologic optimization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William T

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular volume status and volume responsiveness continue to be important questions for the management of critically ill or injured patients. Goal-directed hemodynamic therapy has been shown to be of benefit to patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, acute lung injury and adult respiratory distress syndrome, and for surgical patients in the operating room. Static measures of fluid status, central venous pressure (CVP), and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) are not useful in predicting volume responsiveness. Stroke volume variation and pulse pressure variation related to changes in stroke volume during positive pressure ventilation predict fluid responsiveness and represent an evolving practice for volume management in the intensive care unit (ICU) or operating room. Adoption of dynamic parameters for volume management has been inconsistent. This manuscript reviews some of the basic physiology regarding the use of stroke volume variation to predict fluid responsiveness in the ICU and operating room. A management algorithm using this physiology is proposed for the critically ill or injured in various settings.

  18. A novel non invasive measurement of hemodynamic parameters: Comparison of single-chamber ventricular and dual-chamber pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M. Pardede

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a cross sectional study to analyze hemodynamic parameters of single-chamber ventricular pacemaker compared with dual-chamber pacemaker by using thoracic electrical bioimpedance monitoring method (Physio Flow™ - a novel simple non-invasive measurement. A total of 48 consecutive outpatients comprised of 27 single chamber pacemaker and 21 dual chamber were analyzed. We measured cardiac parameters: heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac output index, estimated ejection fraction, end diastolic volume, early diastolic function ratio, thoracic fluid index, and systemic parameters: left cardiac work index and systemic vascular resistance index. Baseline characteristic and pacemaker indication were similar in both groups. Cardiac parameters assessment revealed no significant difference between single-chamber pacemaker and dual-chamber pacemaker in heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac index, estimated ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, thoracic fluid index. There was significantly higher early diastolic function ratio in single-chamber pacemaker compared to dual-chamber pacemaker: 92% (10.2-187.7% vs. 100.6% (48.7-403.2%; p=0.006. Systemic parameters assessment revealed significantly higher left cardiac work index in single-chamber group than dual-chamber group 4.9 kg.m/m² (2.8-7.6 kg.m/m² vs. 4.3 kg.m/m² (2.9-7.2 kg.m/m²; p=0.004. There was no significant difference on systemic vascular resistance in single-chamber compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. Single-chamber ventricular pacemaker provides similar stroke volume, cardiac output and left cardiac work, compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. A non-invasive hemodynamic measurement using thoracic electrical bioimpedance is feasible for permanent pacemaker outpatients. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 25-32Keywords: Permanent pacemaker, single chamber, dual chamber, thoracic electrical bioimpedance, hemodynamic parameter

  19. Monitoring high-risk patients: minimally invasive and non-invasive possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Jochen; Grünewald, Matthias; Bein, Berthold

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, there has been considerable progress in the field of less invasive haemodynamic monitoring technologies. Substantial evidence has accumulated, which supports the continuous measurement and optimization of flow-based variables such as stroke volume, that is, cardiac output, in order to prevent occult hypoperfusion and consequently to improve patients' outcome in the perioperative setting. However, there is a striking gap between the developments in haemodynamic monitoring and the increasing evidence to implement defined treatment protocols based on the measured variables, and daily clinical routine. Recent trials have shown that perioperative morbidity and mortality is higher than anticipated. This emphasizes the need for the anaesthesia community to address this issue and promotes the implementation of proven concepts into clinical practice in order to improve patients' outcome, especially in high-risk patients. The advances in minimally invasive and non-invasive monitoring techniques can be seen as a driving force in this respect, as the degree of invasiveness of any monitoring tool determines the frequency of its application, especially in the operating room (OR). From this point of view, we are very confident that some of these minimally invasive and non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring technologies will become an inherent part of our monitoring armamentarium in the OR and in the intensive care unit (ICU).

  20. Non-invasive ventilation with intelligent volume-assured pressure support versus pressure-controlled ventilation: effects on the respiratory event rate and sleep quality in COPD with chronic hypercapnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilius, Georg; Katamadze, Nato; Domanski, Ulrike; Schroeder, Maik; Franke, Karl-Josef

    2017-01-01

    COPD patients who develop chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure have a poor prognosis. Treatment of choice, especially the best form of ventilation, is not well known. This study compared the effects of pressure-controlled (spontaneous timed [ST]) non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and NIV with intelligent volume-assured pressure support (IVAPS) in chronic hypercapnic COPD patients regarding the effects on alveolar ventilation, adverse patient/ventilator interactions and sleep quality. This prospective, single-center, crossover study randomized patients to one night of NIV using ST then one night with the IVAPS function activated, or vice versa. Patients were monitored using polysomnography (PSG) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure (PtcCO2) measurement. Patients rated their subjective experience (total score, 0-45; lower scores indicate better acceptability). Fourteen patients were included (4 females, age 59.4±8.9 years). The total number of respiratory events was low, and similar under pressure-controlled (5.4±6.7) and IVAPS (8.3±10.2) conditions (P=0.064). There were also no clinically relevant differences in PtcCO2 between pressure-controlled and IVAPS NIV (52.9±6.2 versus 49.1±6.4 mmHg). Respiratory rate was lower under IVAPS overall; between-group differences reached statistical significance during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep. Ventilation pressures were 2.6 cmH2O higher under IVAPS versus pressure-controlled ventilation, resulting in a 20.1 mL increase in breathing volume. Sleep efficiency was slightly higher under pressure-controlled ventilation versus IVAPS. Respiratory arousals were uncommon (24.4/h [pressure-controlled] versus 25.4/h [IVAPS]). Overall patient assessment scores were similar, although there was a trend toward less discomfort during IVAPS. Our results show that IVAPS NIV allows application of higher nocturnal ventilation pressures versus ST without affecting sleep quality or inducing ventilation- associated events.

  1. Non-invasive ventilation with intelligent volume-assured pressure support versus pressure-controlled ventilation: effects on the respiratory event rate and sleep quality in COPD with chronic hypercapnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilius G

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Georg Nilius,1,2 Nato Katamadze,1,2 Ulrike Domanski,1 Maik Schroeder,1 Karl-Josef Franke1,2 1HELIOS Klinik Hagen-Ambrock, 2Internal Medicine I, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany Background: COPD patients who develop chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure have a poor prognosis. Treatment of choice, especially the best form of ventilation, is not well known. Objectives: This study compared the effects of pressure-controlled (spontaneous timed [ST] non-invasive ventilation (NIV and NIV with intelligent volume-assured pressure support (IVAPS in chronic hypercapnic COPD patients regarding the effects on alveolar ventilation, adverse patient/ventilator interactions and sleep quality. Methods: This prospective, single-center, crossover study randomized patients to one night of NIV using ST then one night with the IVAPS function activated, or vice versa. Patients were monitored using polysomnography (PSG and transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure (PtcCO2 measurement. Patients rated their subjective experience (total score, 0–45; lower scores indicate better acceptability. Results: Fourteen patients were included (4 females, age 59.4±8.9 years. The total number of respiratory events was low, and similar under pressure-controlled (5.4±6.7 and IVAPS (8.3±10.2 conditions (P=0.064. There were also no clinically relevant differences in PtcCO2 between pressure-controlled and IVAPS NIV (52.9±6.2 versus 49.1±6.4 mmHg. Respiratory rate was lower under IVAPS overall; between-group differences reached statistical significance during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep. Ventilation pressures were 2.6 cmH2O higher under IVAPS versus pressure-controlled ventilation, resulting in a 20.1 mL increase in breathing volume. Sleep efficiency was slightly higher under pressure-controlled ventilation versus IVAPS. Respiratory arousals were uncommon (24.4/h [pressure-controlled] versus 25.4/h [IVAPS]. Overall patient assessment scores were similar

  2. Signal processing technique for non-invasive real-time estimation of cardiac output by inductance cardiography (thoracocardiography).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklar, G B; Kaplan, V; Bloch, K E

    2003-05-01

    Inductance cardiography (thoracocardiography) non-invasively monitors changes in stroke volume by recording ventricular volume curves with an inductive plethysmographic transducer encircling the chest at the level of the heart. Clinical application of this method has been hampered, as data analysis has not been feasible in real time. Therefore a novel, real-time signal processing technique for inductance cardiography has been developed. Its essential concept consists in performance of multiple tasks by several, logically linked signal processing modules that have access to common databases. Based on these principles, a software application was designed that performs acquisition, display, filtering and ECG-triggered ensemble averaging of inductance signals and separates cardiogenic waveforms from noise related to respiration and other sources. The resulting ventricular volume curves are automatically analysed. Performance of the technique for monitoring cardiac output in real time was compared with thermodilution in four patients in an intensive care unit. The bias (mean difference) among 76 paired thoracocardiographic and thermodilution derived changes in cardiac output was 0%; limits of agreement (+/- 2 SD of the bias) were +/- 25%. It is concluded that the proposed signal processing technique for inductance cardiography holds promise for non-invasive, real-time estimation of changes in cardiac output.

  3. Does Stroke Volume Increase During an Incremental Exercise? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Stella S.; Lemes, Brunno; de T. C. de Carvalho, Paulo; N. de Lima, Rafael; S. Bocalini, Danilo; A. S. Junior, José; Arsa, Gisela; A. Casarin, Cezar; L. Andrade, Erinaldo; J. Serra, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac output increases during incremental-load exercise to meet metabolic skeletal muscle demand. This response requires a fast adjustment in heart rate and stroke volume. The heart rate is well known to increase linearly with exercise load; however, data for stroke volume during incremental-load exercise are unclear. Our objectives were to (a) review studies that have investigated stroke volume on incremental load exercise and (b) summarize the findings for stroke volume, primarily at maximal-exercise load. Methods: A comprehensive review of the Cochrane Library’s, Embase, Medline, SportDiscus, PubMed, and Web of Sci-ence databases was carried out for the years 1985 to the present. The search was performed between February and June 2014 to find studies evaluating changes in stroke volume during incremental-load exercise. Controlled and uncontrolled trials were evaluated for a quality score. Results: The stroke volume data in maximal-exercise load are inconsistent. There is evidence to hypothesis that stroke volume increases during maximal-exercise load, but other lines of evidence indicate that stroke volume reaches a plateau under these circumstances, or even decreases. Conclusion: The stroke volume are unclear, include contradictory evidence. Additional studies with standardized reporting for subjects (e.g., age, gender, physical fitness, and body position), exercise test protocols, and left ventricular function are required to clarify the characteristics of stroke volume during incremental maximal-exercise load. PMID:27347221

  4. Non-invasive sensing for food reassurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Consumers and governments are increasingly interested in the safety, authenticity and quality of food commodities. This has driven attention towards non-invasive sensing techniques used for rapid analyzing these commodities. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in, and available alternatives for, food assurance based on non-invasive sensing techniques. The main food quality traits of interest using non-invasive sensing techniques are sensory characteristics, chemical composition, physicochemical properties, health-protecting properties, nutritional characteristics and safety. A wide range of non-invasive sensing techniques, from optical, acoustical, electrical, to nuclear magnetic, X-ray, biosensor, microwave and terahertz, are organized according to physical principle. Some of these techniques are now in a period of transition between experimental and applied utilization and several sensors and instruments are reviewed. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of portable and wearable wireless sensing devices and connecting with mobile networks, thus finding considerable use in a wide range of food assurance applications. The need for an appropriate regulatory framework is emphasized which acts to exclude unwanted components in foods and includes needed components, with sensors as part of a reassurance framework supporting regulation and food chain management. The integration of these sensor modalities into a single technological and commercial platform offers an opportunity for a paradigm shift in food reassurance.

  5. Noninvasively derived stroke volume variation by finger volume clamping can reliably predict fluid responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Jaap Jan; Poterman, Marieke; Struys, Michel; Scheeren, Thomas; Kalmar, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Goal of Study:  Dynamic preload variables derived from the arterial pressure waveform have been shown to accurately predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. One of these variables, stroke volume variation (SVV), can also be obtained noninvasively by the finger

  6. Non-invasive quantification of brain tumor-induced astrogliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baird Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CNS injury including stroke, infection, and tumor growth lead to astrogliosis, a process that involves upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in astrocytes. However, the kinetics of astrogliosis that is related to these insults (i.e. tumor is largely unknown. Results Using transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the regulation of the GFAP promoter (GFAP-luc, we developed a model system to monitor astrogliosis upon tumor growth in a rapid, non-invasive manner. A biphasic induction of astrogliosis was observed in our xenograft model in which an early phase of activation of GFAP was associated with inflammatory response followed by a secondary, long-term upregulation of GFAP. These animals reveal GFAP activation with kinetics that is in parallel with tumor growth. Furthermore, a strong correlation between astrogliosis and tumor size was observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that non-invasive, quantitative bioluminescent imaging using GFAP-luc reporter animal is a useful tool to monitor temporal-spatial kinetics of host-mediated astrogliosis that is associated with glioma and metastatic brain tumor growth.

  7. PEEP in non invasive ventilatory treatment of worsened BPCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure due to exacerbation of chronic pulmonary disease is usually treated with bilevel pressure non invasive ventilation. An high inspiratory pressure is used to improve tidal volume, a lower expiratory pressure is used to neutralize end expiratory positive pressure of patient (PEEPi caused by flow limitation and airway trapping. When ventilators for bilevel pressure ventilation are not available, is useful to administer to patient an external low (5cmH2O positive pressure with simple CPAP systems (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, such as Venturi like flow generator largely available and well known everywhere.

  8. 17q25 Locus is associated with white matter hyperintensity volume in ischemic stroke, but not with lacunar stroke status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Samii, Poneh; Rost, Natalia; Traylor, Matthew; Devan, William; Biffi, Alessandro; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Bevan, Steve; Kanakis, Allison; Valant, Valerie; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Malik, Rainer; Richie, Alexa; Gamble, Dale; Segal, Helen; Parati, Eugenio A; Ciusani, Emilio; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Maguire, Jane; Wardlaw, Joanna; Worrall, Bradford; Bis, Joshua; Wiggins, Kerri L; Longstreth, Will; Kittner, Steve J; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Mosley, Thomas; Falcone, Guido J; Furie, Karen L; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Lau, Benison C; Saleem Khan, Muhammed; Sharma, Pankaj; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Braxton D; Psaty, Bruce M; Sudlow, Cathie; Levi, Christopher; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Rothwell, Peter M; Meschia, James; Dichgans, Martin; Rosand, Jonathan; Markus, Hugh S

    2013-06-01

    Recently, a novel locus at 17q25 was associated with white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on MRI in stroke-free individuals. We aimed to replicate the association with WMH volume (WMHV) in patients with ischemic stroke. If the association acts by promoting a small vessel arteriopathy, it might be expected to also associate with lacunar stroke. We quantified WMH on MRI in the stroke-free hemisphere of 2588 ischemic stroke cases. Association between WMHV and 6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms at chromosome 17q25 was assessed by linear regression. These single-nucleotide polymorphisms were also investigated for association with lacunar stroke in 1854 cases and 51 939 stroke-free controls from METASTROKE. Meta-analyses with previous reports and a genetic risk score approach were applied to identify other novel WMHV risk variants and uncover shared genetic contributions to WMHV in community participants without stroke and ischemic stroke. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 17q25 were associated with WMHV in ischemic stroke, the most significant being rs9894383 (P=0.0006). In contrast, there was no association between any single-nucleotide polymorphism and lacunar stroke. A genetic risk score analysis revealed further genetic components to WMHV shared between community participants without stroke and ischemic stroke. This study provides support for an association between the 17q25 locus and WMH. In contrast, it is not associated with lacunar stroke, suggesting that the association does not act by promoting small-vessel arteriopathy or the same arteriopathy responsible for lacunar infarction.

  9. [Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Ezra, Oranit; Ben-Ari, Ziv

    2015-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a major public health problem, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prognosis and management of chronic liver diseases depend on the amount of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy has long remained the gold standard for assessment of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy is an invasive procedure with associated morbidity, it is rarely the cause for mortality, and has a few limitations. During the past two decades, in an attempt to overcome the limitations of liver biopsy, non-invasive methods for the evaluation of liver fibrosis have been developed, mainly in the field of viral hepatitis. This review will focus on different methods available for non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis including a biological approach which quantifies serum levels of biomarkers of fibrosis and physical techniques which measure liver stiffness by transient elastography, ultrasound or magnetic resonance based elastography, their accuracy, advantages and disadvantages.

  10. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome).

  11. Ultrasonic non invasive techniques for microbiological instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, L.; Sierra, C.; Galán, B.; Resa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Non invasive techniques based on ultrasounds have advantageous features to study, characterize and monitor microbiological and enzymatic reactions. These processes may change the sound speed, viscosity or particle distribution size of the medium where they take place, which makes possible their analysis using ultrasonic techniques. In this work, two different systems for the analysis of microbiological liquid media based on ultrasounds are presented. In first place, an industrial application based on an ultrasonic monitoring technique for microbiological growth detection in milk is shown. Such a system may improve the quality control strategies in food production factories, being able to decrease the time required to detect possible contaminations in packed products. Secondly, a study about the growing of the Escherichia coli DH5 α in different conditions is presented. It is shown that the use of ultrasonic non invasive characterization techniques in combination with other conventional measurements like optical density provides complementary information about the metabolism of these bacteria.

  12. Non-invasive pulmonary function test on Morquio patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubaski, Francyne; Tomatsu, Shunji; Patel, Pravin; Shimada, Tsutomu; Xie, Li; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert; Mackenzie, William G; Theroux, Mary; Bober, Michael B; Oldham, Helen M; Orii, Tadao; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2015-08-01

    In clinical practice, respiratory function tests are difficult to perform in Morquio syndrome patients due to their characteristic skeletal dysplasia, small body size and lack of cooperation of young patients, where in some cases, conventional spirometry for pulmonary function is too challenging. To establish feasible clinical pulmonary endpoints and determine whether age impacts lung function in Morquio patients non-invasive pulmonary tests and conventional spirometry were evaluated. The non-invasive pulmonary tests: impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography in conjunction with conventional spirometry were evaluated in twenty-two Morquio patients (18 Morquio A and 4 Morquio B) (7 males), ranging from 3 to 40 years of age. Twenty-two patients were compliant with non-invasive tests (100%) with the exception of IOS (81.8%-18 patients). Seventeen patients (77.3%) were compliant with spirometry testing. All subjects had normal vital signs at rest including >95% oxygen saturation, end tidal CO2 (38-44 mmHg), and age-appropriate heart rate (mean=98.3, standard deviation=19) (two patients were deviated). All patients preserved normal values in the impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography, although predicted forced expiratory total (72.8±6.9 SE%) decreased with age and was below normal; phase angle (35.5±16.5°), %rib cage (41.6±12.7%), resonant frequency, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced expiratory volume total (110.0±3.2 SE%) were normal and not significantly impacted by age. The proposed non-invasive pulmonary function tests are able to cover a greater number of patients (young patients and/or wheel-chair bound), thus providing a new diagnostic approach for the assessment of lung function in Morquio syndrome which in many cases may be difficult to evaluate. Morquio patients studied herein demonstrated no clinical or functional signs of restrictive and

  13. STROKE VOLUME DYNAMICS IN MALES WITH DIFFERENT FITNESS LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Lavrenčak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke volume (SV is well known as a routine clinical cardiodynamic measure. It represents the amount of blood ejected by the left ventricle in one beat. Our aim in present study was to evaluate, both, the stroke volume dynamics in males with different fitness level and the relationship between maximal SV value measured during graded exercise testing (GXT on treadmill and VO2 max. One hundred male participants of age 43,06 ± 9.03 years, height 175 ± 8.25 cm, body mass 76.94 ± 15.42 kg, BSA 2.01 ± 0,15 m2 and peak oxygen consumption 46.55 ± 7.03 ml kg-1 min-1 volunteered to participate in this study. All tests were performed in Exercise Physiology Laboratory (University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Sport, The group of expirienced recreational runners differed from sedentary or less trained recreational runners in higher cardiac output (Q; 20.92 ± 4.57 vs 16,90 ± 4,34 l · min-1 (p ≤ 0,001, bigger SV: 136,43 ± 34,59 vs 112,04 ± 30,11 ml · beat -1 (p ≤ 0,001 and higher SI: 73,41 ± 13,42 vs 60,66 ± 11,58 ml · beat -1 · m-2 (p ≤ 0,001. Interestingly, both groups reached maximal SV at practically identical level of test (58.62 ± 17.81 % vs 59,85 ± 14,27 % VO2max. Also, the pattern of SV fall according to VO2max in both groups tested, were similar (12.08 ± 6.26 % vs 11,33 ± 6,23 %.

  14. Changes in superior mesenteric artery Doppler waveform during reduction of cardiac stroke volume and hypotension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Perko, Grazyna; Just, S

    1996-01-01

    Influence of stroke volume reduction and hypotension on the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) Doppler waveform was evaluated during head-up tilt-induced central hypovolemia in 11 healthy volunteers. During normotensive reduction in stroke volume, peak systolic velocity (pV), mean velocity, pulsati......Influence of stroke volume reduction and hypotension on the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) Doppler waveform was evaluated during head-up tilt-induced central hypovolemia in 11 healthy volunteers. During normotensive reduction in stroke volume, peak systolic velocity (pV), mean velocity...... of the study indicate that alterations in stroke volume induce consequential changes in the SMA Doppler waveform. These changes originate from both direct influence of stroke volume and/or pressure on blood flow velocity, and alterations in SMA peripheral resistance that follow variations in stroke volume....... Presented interdependencies should be taken into consideration while studying mesenteric physiology with the use of Doppler technique and while interpreting the duplex results in patients suffering from diseases that may influence flow velocity and mimic or obscure Doppler effects of the SMA stenosis....

  15. NON-INVASIVE PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Dey, Sumita Agarwal and Sumedha Sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Aneuploidies are one of the important causes of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Initially screening for aneuploidies started with maternal age risk estimation. Later on, serum testing for biochemical markers and ultrasound markers were added. Women detected to be at high risk for aneuploidies were offered invasive testing. Recently, various methods including non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT by analysis of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA in maternal blood has shown promise for highly accurate detection of common fetal autosomal trisomies. Incorporating these new non-invasive technologies into clinical practice will impact the current prenatal screening paradigm for fetal aneuploidy, in which genetic counselling plays an integral role. The advantage of the technique being elimination of risks such as miscarriage associated with invasive diagnostic procedures. But then this new technique has its own set of technical limitations and ethical issues at present and further research is required before implementation. Data was obtained through a literature search via Pubmed and Google as well as detailed search of our library database.

  16. Non-invasive Evaluation for Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    IWASAKI, Masaki; JIN, Kazutaka; NAKASATO, Nobukazu; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is aimed to remove the brain tissues that are indispensable for generating patient’s epileptic seizures. There are two purposes in the pre-operative evaluation: localization of the epileptogenic zone and localization of function. Surgery is planned to remove possible epileptogenic zone while preserving functional area. Since no single diagnostic modality is superior to others in identifying and localizing the epileptogenic zone, multiple non-invasive evaluations are performed to estimate the location of the epileptogenic zone after concordance between evaluations. Essential components of non-invasive pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy include detailed clinical history, long-term video-electroencephalography monitoring, epilepsy-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and neuropsychological testing. However, a significant portion of drug-resistant epilepsy is associated with no or subtle MRI lesions or with ambiguous electro-clinical signs. Additional evaluations including fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetoencephalography and ictal single photon emission computed tomography can play critical roles in planning surgery. FDG-PET should be registered on three-dimensional MRI for better detection of focal cortical dysplasia. All diagnostic tools are complementary to each other in defining the epileptogenic zone, so that it is always important to reassess the data based on other results to pick up or confirm subtle abnormalities. PMID:27627857

  17. Decrease in shunt volume in patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabst Wolfgang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO there is evidence supporting the hypothesis of a change in right-to-left shunt (RLS over time. Proven, this could have implications for the care of patients with PFO and a history of stroke. The following study addressed this hypothesis in a cohort of patients with stroke and PFO. Methods The RLS volume assessed during hospitalisation for stroke (index event/T0 was compared with the RLS volume on follow-up (T1 (median time between T0 and T1 was 10 months. In 102 patients with a history of stroke and PFO the RLS volume was re-assessed on follow-up using contrast-enhanced transcranial Doppler/duplex (ce-TCD ultrasound. A change in RLS volume was defined as a difference of ≥20 microembolic signals (MES or no evidence of RLS during ce-TCD ultrasound on follow-up. Results There was evidence of a marked reduction in RLS volume in 31/102 patients; in 14/31 patients a PFO was no longer detectable. An index event classified as cryptogenic stroke (P Conclusions RLS volume across a PFO decreases over time, especially in patients with cryptogenic stroke. These may determine the development of new strategies for the management in the secondary stroke prevention.

  18. Non-invasive assessment of phonatory and respiratory dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBlance, G R; Steckol, K F; Cooper, M H

    1991-10-01

    Evaluation of vocal pathology and the accompanying dysphonia should include an assessment of laryngeal structure and mobility as well as respiratory dynamics. Laryngeal structure is best observed through laryngoscopy which provides an accurate assessment of the tissues and their mobility. Respiratory measures of lung volume, air-flow and pressure, and breathing dynamics are typically determined via spirometry and pneumotachography. While the above are traditional invasive procedures which interfere with normal speech production, recent advances in electronic technology have resulted in the development of non-invasive procedures to assess phonatory and respiratory dynamics. These procedures, when used as an adjunct to laryngoscopy, can provide information that is useful in the diagnosis and management of vocal tract dysfunction. The Laryngograph and Computer-Aided Fluency Establishment Trainer, described here, are examples of this new technology.

  19. Stroke volume of the heart and thoracic fluid content during head-up and head-down tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lieshout, J J; Harms, M P M; Pott, F

    2005-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) of the heart depends on the diastolic volume but, for the intact organism, central pressures are applied widely to express the filling of the heart.......The stroke volume (SV) of the heart depends on the diastolic volume but, for the intact organism, central pressures are applied widely to express the filling of the heart....

  20. Arterial Pulse Pressure and Its Association With Reduced Stroke Volume During Progressive Central Hypovolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Measurement of Stroke Volume Stroke volume (SV) was measured noninvasively using thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB). TEB was measured using four...tients who did not die. For the current study, we measured mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), pulse pressure (PP), SV, and muscle sympathetic nerve...hemorrhagic shock. The vital sign monitors placed in emergency transport vehicles provide the medic with routine measures of arterial systolic, diastolic and

  1. Impact of 8-week endurance training on qualitative and quantitative parameters of stroke volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Pustivšek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dynamics of stroke volume during increasing progressive load varies widely among individuals. The data of current studies describing the impact of long-term endurance training on the dynamics of cardiac stroke volume are conflicting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of 8-week endurance training on the dynamics of stroke volume and some quantitative features of cardiac function in recreational female runners.Methods: Measurements were performed in the physiological laboratory at the Institute of Sport, Faculty of Sport in Ljubljana. CosmedK4b2 equipment that allows continuous “on-line”, “breath-by-breath” monitoring of oxygen consumption and gases in exhaled air was used. Cardiac output was calculated by the method described by Stringer et al.Results: The results showed a significant increase in stroke volume at rest and during the first two minutes of the test. Maximum stroke volume did not increase, but there was a decrease in heart rate during maximal stroke volume from 126.65 (± 27.14 to 120.15 (± 26.56 beats per minute. The dynamics of stroke volume in a majority of participants did not change. The most common dynamics of stroke volume before and after test was plateau dynamics. The training resulted in an increase in running endurance and the average increase in running speed during the final test by 4.41 % (± 4.62.Conclusion: The exercise resulted in minimal changes in cardiac function and a significant improvement in endurance parameters.

  2. Assessment of various parameters using simple non-invasive tests in patients with cardiovascular diseases with or without cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Ueda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rehabilitation (CR improves cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD. Simpler techniques are needed for use by physicians in the examination room to assess the usefulness of CR. We enrolled 46 consecutive CVD patients in a CR program (CR group and prospectively followed them for 3 months. We compared them to 18 age-, gender- and body mass index-matched CVD patients without CR (non-CR group. Various parameters were measured at baseline and after 3 months using 3 simple non-invasive tests: severity of atherosclerosis [arterial velocity pulse index and arterial pressure volume index (API] were determined using PASESA®, an autonomic nerve total activity amount index and a coefficient of variation of the R–R interval (CVRR were determined using eHEART®, and peripheral resistance index, pressure rate product, stroke volume and cardiac index were determined using nico®]. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics including percentages (% of ischemic heart disease and heart failure between the non-CR and CR groups. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic BP, heart rate and API at baseline significantly decreased and CVRR at baseline significantly increased after 3 months in the CR group, but not in the non-CR group. In addition, ΔAPI (Δ = the value after 3 months minus the value at baseline was positively associated with ΔSBP in the CR group. In conclusion, CR significantly decreased BP and improved atherosclerosis and sympathetic nerve activity. These findings suggest that simple non-invasive tests may be useful for assessing the effects of CR.

  3. Research Progress of Melodic Intonation Therapy and Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Aphasia after Stroke (review)%旋律音调疗法与非侵入性脑刺激技术在卒中后失语中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米海霞; 张通; 刘丽旭

    2015-01-01

    卒中后语言功能恢复的神经机制仍不明确,目前认为左侧大面积脑损伤的失语患者语言功能恢复主要通过激活右侧半球的同源脑区进而改善言语功能。旋律音调疗法(MIT)可以通过旋律音调和左手拍击激活右侧半球的额颞叶脑区,特别适用于左侧大面积脑损伤的非流利性失语患者的语言康复。非侵入性脑刺激技术(NBS)通过刺激病灶侧或病灶对侧改变脑电活动,已被用于促进卒中后语言功能恢复。兴奋性经颅刺激作用于右侧半球同源性语言功能区联合MIT可一定程度上促进左侧大面积脑损伤的卒中后严重失语患者的语言恢复。未来可尝试将传统的言语治疗联合MIT及外部的经颅刺激(包括经颅直流电刺激及经颅磁刺激)促进语言相关功能区域的激活,从而更大限度地改善脑卒中患者言语功能。%The neuromechanism of language function recovery in patients with aphasia after stroke is still unclear. It is supported that the language function of aphasia after extensive damage of left hemisphere mainly recovered through activating the right hemisphere of ho-mologous regions to improve the function of speech. Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) can be achieved by melody tone and left hand clap to activate the right hemisphere of the frontal temporal lobe, which is particularly applicable to improve language function of non-fluent aphasia patients with large left hemisphere lesion. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques (NBS) changes brain activity through stimulat-ing affected or contralateral side, which has been used to facilitate language functional recovery after stroke. Excitatory transcranial stimula-tion on the right hemisphere homology combined with melodic intonation therapy can promote language recovery of patients with extensive damage of left hemisphere after stroke. It is valuable to combine traditional speech training with MIT and NBS to activate related

  4. [The effect of cerebrolysin in dosage 50 ml on the volume of lesion in ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamalov, N A; Stakhovskaia, L V; Burenchev, D V; Kichuk, I V; Tvorogova, T V; Botsina, A Iu; Smychkov, A S; Kerbikov, O B; Moessler, H; Novak, P; Skvortsova, V I

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to assess safety and efficacy of cerebrolysin used in dosage 50 ml in acute ischemic stroke. Forty-seven patients with ischemic stroke, aged 45-85 years, who were admitted to a clinical unit within the first 12 h after stroke onset were included in the study. A quantitative time-related MRI analysis of the dynamics of neurological deficit revealed the more rapid decrease of stroke volume to the 28th day in the group treated with cerebrolysin (45.4% versus 43.6% in the placebo-group (p cerebrolysin was found. The results of this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study suggest the positive effect of cerebrolysin on the dynamics of volume lesion in patients with ischemic stroke.

  5. Estimating exercise stroke volume from asymptotic oxygen pulse in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, B J; Higgenbotham, M B; Cobb, F C

    1996-12-01

    Noninvasive techniques have been devised to estimate cardiac output (Q) during exercise to obviate vascular cannulation. However, although these techniques are noninvasive, they are commonly not nonintrusive to subjects' spontaneous ventilation and gas-exchange responses. We hypothesized that the exercise stroke volume (SV) and, hence, Q might be accurately estimated simply from the response pattern of two standardly determined variables: O2 uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR). Central to the theory is the demonstration that the product of Q and mixed venous O2 content is virtually constant (k) during steady-state exercise. Thus from the Fick equation, VO2 = Q.CaCO2-k, where CaCO2 is the arterial CO2 content, the O2 pulse (O2-P) equals SV.CaCO2-(k/HR). Because the arterial O2 content (CaO2) is usually relatively constant in normal subjects during exercise, O2-P should change hyperbolically with HR, asymptoting at SV.CaO2. In addition, because the asymptotic O2-P equals the slope (S) of the linear O2-HR relationship, exercise SV may be predicted as S/CaO2. We tested this prediction in 23 normal subjects who underwent a 3-min incremental cycle-ergometer test with direct determination of CaO2 and mixed venous O2 content from indwelling catheters. The predicted SV closely reflected the measured value (r = 0.80). We therefore conclude that, in normal subjects, exercise SV may be estimated simply as five times S of the linear VO2-HR relationship (where 5 is approximately 1/CaO2).

  6. Estimating stroke volume from oxygen pulse during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Piras, Francesco; Chiappori, Paolo; Vitelli, Stefano; Caria, Marcello A; Lobina, Andrea; Milia, Raffaele; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Melis, Franco

    2007-10-01

    This investigation aimed at verifying whether it was possible to reliably assess stroke volume (SV) during exercise from oxygen pulse (OP) and from a model of arterio-venous oxygen difference (a-vO(2)D) estimation. The model was tested in 15 amateur male cyclists performing an exercise test on a cycle-ergometer consisting of a linear increase of workload up to exhaustion. Starting from the analysis of previous published data, we constructed a model of a-vO(2)D estimation (a-vO(2)D(est)) which predicted that the a-vO(2)D at rest was 30% of the total arterial O(2) content (CaO(2)) and that it increased linearly during exercise reaching a value of 80% of CaO(2) at the peak workload (W(max)) of cycle exercise. Then, the SV was calculated by applying the following equation, SV = OP/a-vO(2)D(est), where the OP was assessed as the oxygen uptake/heart rate. Data calculated by our model were compared with those obtained by impedance cardiography. The main result was that the limits of agreement between the SV assessed by impedance cardiography and the SV estimated were between 22.4 and -27.9 ml (+18.8 and -24% in terms of per cent difference between the two SV measures). It was concluded that our model for estimating SV during effort may be reasonably applicable, at least in a healthy population.

  7. Non-invasive diagnostic methods in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    The paper, will present the most important non-invasive methods for diagnostic, in different fields of dentistry. Moreover, the laser-based methods will be emphasis. In orthodontics, 3D laser scanners are increasingly being used to establish database for normative population and cross-sectional growth changes but also to asses clinical outcomes in orthognatic surgical and non-surgical treatments. In prevention the main methods for diagnostic of demineralization and caries detection in early stages are represented by laser fluorescence - Quantitative Light Florescence (QLF); DiagnoDent-system-655nm; FOTI-Fiberoptic transillumination; DIFOTI-Digital Imaging Fiberoptic transillumination; and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). In odontology, Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive real time method used for determining the tooth vitality by monitoring the pulp microcirculation in traumatized teeth, fractured teeth, and teeth undergoing different conservative treatments. In periodontology, recently study shows the ability of LDF to evaluate the health of gingival tissue in periodontal tissue diseases but also after different periodontal treatments.

  8. Very low cerebral blood volume predicts parenchymal hematoma in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermitte, Laure; Cho, Tae-Hee; Ozenne, Brice;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Parenchymal hematoma (PH) may worsen the outcome of patients with stroke. The aim of our study was to confirm the relationship between the volume of very low cerebral blood volume (CBV) and PH using a European multicenter database (I-KNOW). A secondary objective was to exp...

  9. Impact of 5-Hz rTMS over the primary sensory cortex is related to white matter volume in individuals with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Sonia M; Borich, Michael R; Boyd, Lara A

    2014-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that may facilitate mechanisms of motor learning. In a recent single-blind, pseudo-randomized study, we showed that 5-Hz rTMS over ipsilesional primary somatosensory cortex followed by practice of a skilled motor task enhanced motor learning compared with sham rTMS + practice in individuals with chronic stroke. However, the beneficial effect of stimulation was inconsistent. The current study examined how differences in sensorimotor cortex morphology might predict rTMS-related improvements in motor learning in these individuals. High-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired and processed in FreeSurfer using a newly developed automated, whole brain parcellation technique. Gray matter and white matter volumes of the ipsilesional primary somatosensory and motor cortices were extracted. A significant positive association was observed between the volume of white matter in the primary somatosensory cortex and motor learning-related change, exclusively in the group that received active 5-Hz rTMS. A regression model with age, gray matter and white matter volumes as predictors was significant for predicting motor learning-related change in individuals who received active TMS. White matter volume predicted the greatest amount of variance (47.6%). The same model was non-significant when volumes of the primary motor cortex were considered. We conclude that white matter volume in the cortex underlying the TMS coil may be a novel predictor for behavioral response to 5-Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional primary somatosensory followed by motor practice.

  10. Non-Invasive Ocular Rigidity Measurement: A Differential Tonometry Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios T. Detorakis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Taking into account the fact that Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT geometrically deforms the corneal apex and displaces volume from the anterior segment whereas Dynamic Contour Tonometry (DCT does not, we aimed at developing an algorithm for the calculation of ocular rigidity (OR based on the differences in pressure and volume between deformed and non-deformed status according to the general Friedenwald principle of differential tonometry. Methods: To avoid deviations of GAT IOP from true IOP in eyes with corneas different from the “calibration cornea” we applied the previously described Orssengo-Pye algorithm to calculate an error coefficient “C/B”. To test the feasibility of the proposed model, we calculated the OR coefficient (r in 17 cataract surgery candidates (9 males and 8 females. Results: The calculated r according to our model (mean ± SD, range was 0.0174 ± 0.010 (0.0123–0.022 mmHg/μL. A negative statistically significant correlation between axial length and r was detected whereas correlations between r and other biometric parameters examined were statistically not significant. Conclusions: The proposed method may prove a valid non-invasive tool for the measurement method of OR, which could help in introducing OR in the decision-making of the routine clinical practice.

  11. A STUDY OF MEAN PLATELET VOLUME LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandan Muralidharan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Stroke is the most common cause of death after cardiac disease and cancer. This study attempts to identify the significance of mean platelet volume as a risk factor as well as prognostic factor for ischemic stroke patients1 . This may help in early identification of high risk individuals who can be targeted for aggressive acute management and improved secondary prevention measures. AIM OF THE STUDY To assess whether mean platelet volume levels are elevated in ischemic stroke and to assess MPV as independent risk factor and to assess whether the severity and outcome of ischemic stroke correlates with elevated mean platelet volume. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Analytical Case Control Study. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is conducted among 50 ischemic stroke patients who were admitted at Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai from December 2014 to June 2015. After taking detailed history and physical examination and investigations, MPV was determined for Ischemic stroke patients and Modified Rankin scale (MRS at the time of admission was calculated. After 8 weeks of onset of stroke, all the patients were again followed up. Functional outcomes were determined by use of Modified Rankin Scale (MRS2,3. All patients were stratified using MRS2,3 Scale [0-2, 3-4 and 5-6] into three groups. MPV level was correlated with MRS score at the time of admission and again at 8 weeks. Patients with MRS score of 5 and 6 were declared as very poor outcome & MRS of 3 and 4 as poor outcome. Patients with MRS 0, and 1 were considered as good outcome. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS One way ANOVA, Pearson correlation and Chi square test. RESULTS There is no statistically significant difference among the case and control groups with regard to the age or sex composition or smoking or alcoholism. MPV did not vary with diabetes or hypertension. There was a linear relation with MPV and severity of ischemic stroke i.e. as the MPV increases the severity (MRS 2,3of stroke increases

  12. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment for stroke. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  13. Real-time optoacoustic monitoring of stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Hambauer, Sebastian; Krieg, Sandro M.; Lehmberg, Jens; Lindauer, Ute; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing disease progression and identifying possible therapeutic interventions in stroke is greatly aided by the use of longitudinal function imaging studies. In this study, we investigate the applicability of real-time multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) as a tool for non-invasive monitoring of the progression of stroke in the whole brain. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method was used to induce stroke. Mice were imaged under isoflurane anesthesia preoperatively and at several time points during and after the 60-minute occlusion. The animals were sacrificed after 24 hours and their excised brains frozen at -80°C for sectioning. The cryosection were stained using H&E staining to identify the ischemic lesion. Major vessels are readily identifiable in the whole mouse head in the in vivo optoacoustic scans. During ischemia, a reduction in cerebral blood volume is detectable in the cortex. Post ischemia, spectral unmixing of the optoacoustic signals shows an asymmetry of the deoxygenated hemoglobin in the hemisphere affected by MCAO. This hypoxic area was mainly located around the boundary of the ischemic lesion and was therefore identified as the ischemic penumbra. Non-invasive functional MSOT imaging is able to visualize the hypoxic penumbra in brains affected by stroke. Stopping the spread of the infarct area and revitalizing the penumbra is central in stroke research, this new imaging technique may therefore prove to be a valuable tool in the monitoring and developing new treatments.

  14. Non-invasive Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold tremendous therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases. Over the last decade, non-invasive imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted hESCs. This review article will briefly summarize the various techniques used for non-invasive imaging of hESCs, which include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography...

  15. Non-invasive prediction of oesophageal varices in cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sambit Sen; William JH Griffiths

    2008-01-01

    Non-invasive predictors of varices in cirrhosis would reduce the need for screening endoscopies. Platelet count and spleen size have been shown to be useful parameters, in mixed groups of cirrhotics with different aetiologies. We evaluated this in two homogeneous groups with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C and alcohol.Non-invasive predictors appear promising in the former group, but less so in the latter group.

  16. Avaliação clínica não-invasiva de disfagia no AVC: Revisão sistemática Evaluación clínica no invasiva de disfagia en el ACV: Revisión sistemática Non-invasive dysphagia screening for stroke survivors: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Tavares Cardoso

    2011-12-01

    , de bajo costo y fácil acceso, con el objetivo de aumentar los beneficios para la salud. Se siguió la metodología del Cochrane Handbook y se delineó la siguiente pregunta: “ qué métodos de evaluación no invasiva de la disfagia en la persona con ACV existen con validad y fidelidad demostradas?” Se desarrolló una búsqueda de los estudios primarios publicados a partir de 2005 en las bases de datos científicas. Se lograron identificar dos estudios que exponían los resultados de la aplicación de dos escalas distintas usadas en el diagnóstico de disfagia en pacientes con ACV (en fase aguda y/o en rehabilitación, siendo que uno de ellos evaluaba también el riesgo de aspiración. Los resultados prevén beneficios para la salud con la utilización de estas escalas, pese a que sea necesario entrenamiento y realizar estudios posteriores para obtener una muestra significativa.In Portugal, stroke is considered the leading cause of death and disability associated with cognitive and motor sequelae. The incidence of dysphagia ranges from 22% to 65% of patients (Ramsey, Smithard and Kalra, 2003. Several studies reveal that 30 to 40% of institutionalized elderly people have swallowing disorders, which results in a high incidence of complications due to aspiration (World Gastroenterology Organization, 2004. Based on these assumptions, a systematic review was performed to minimize the risk of ad hoc evaluation and by identifying the available low cost and easy access resources in order to enhance health gains. The methodology was guided by Cochrane Handbook and was designed to answer the following question: “What methods of non-invasive evaluation of dysphagia in people with neurological disease with demonstrated validity and reliability are published?” Therefore we conducted a search for primary studies, published since 2005, in the most relevant computerized databases. From that search, we identified two studies with the results of the application of two distinct

  17. Non-invasive bleaching of the human lens by femtosecond laser photolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, L.; Eskildsen, Lars; Poel, Mike van der

    2010-01-01

    were susceptible to photobleaching by a non-invasive procedure and whether this would lead to optical rejuvenation of the lens. Methodology/Principal Findings: Nine human donor lenses were treated with an 800 nm infra-red femtosecond pulsed laser in a treatment zone measuring 1 x 1 x 0.52 mm. After...... laser treatment the age-induced yellow discoloration of the lens was markedly reduced and the transmission of light was increased corresponding to an optical rejuvenation of 3 to 7 years. Conclusions/Significance: The results demonstrate that the age-induced yellowing of the human lens can be bleached...... by a non-invasive procedure based on femtosecond laser photolysis. Cataract is a disease associated with old age. At the current technological stage, lens aging is delayed but with a treatment covering the entire lens volume complete optical rejuvenation is expected. Thus, femtosecond photolysis has...

  18. Improved cardiac filling facilitates the postprandial elevation of stroke volume in Python regius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enok, Sanne; Leite, Gabriella S P C; Leite, Cléo A C; Gesser, Hans; Hedrick, Michael S; Wang, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    To accommodate the pronounced metabolic response to digestion, pythons increase heart rate and elevate stroke volume, where the latter has been ascribed to a massive and fast cardiac hypertrophy. However, numerous recent studies show that heart mass rarely increases, even upon ingestion of large meals, and we therefore explored the possibility that a rise in mean circulatory filling pressure (MCFP) serves to elevate venous pressure and cardiac filling during digestion. To this end, we measured blood flows and pressures in anaesthetized Python regius The anaesthetized snakes exhibited the archetypal tachycardia as well as a rise in both venous pressure and MCFP that fully account for the approximate doubling of stroke volume. There was no rise in blood volume and the elevated MCFP must therefore stem from increased vascular tone, possibly by means of increased sympathetic tone on the veins. Furthermore, although both venous pressure and MCFP increased during volume loading, there was no evidence that postprandial hearts were endowed with an additional capacity to elevate stroke volume. In vitro measurements of force development of paced ventricular strips also failed to reveal signs of increased contractility, but the postprandial hearts had higher activities of cytochrome oxidase and pyruvate kinase, which probably serves to sustain the rise in cardiac work during digestion. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Changes in Stroke Volume Induced by Lung Recruitment Maneuver Predict Fluid Responsiveness in Mechanically Ventilated Patients in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biais, Matthieu; Lanchon, Romain; Sesay, Musa; Le Gall, Lisa; Pereira, Bruno; Futier, Emmanuel; Nouette-Gaulain, Karine

    2017-02-01

    Lung recruitment maneuver induces a decrease in stroke volume, which is more pronounced in hypovolemic patients. The authors hypothesized that the magnitude of stroke volume reduction through lung recruitment maneuver could predict preload responsiveness. Twenty-eight mechanically ventilated patients with low tidal volume during general anesthesia were included. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, stroke volume, and pulse pressure variations were recorded before lung recruitment maneuver (application of continuous positive airway pressure of 30 cm H2O for 30 s), during lung recruitment maneuver when stroke volume reached its minimal value, and before and after volume expansion (250 ml saline, 0.9%, infused during 10 min). Patients were considered as responders to fluid administration if stroke volume increased greater than or equal to 10%. Sixteen patients were responders. Lung recruitment maneuver induced a significant decrease in mean arterial pressure and stroke volume in both responders and nonresponders. Changes in stroke volume induced by lung recruitment maneuver were correlated with those induced by volume expansion (r = 0.56; P recruitment maneuver predicted fluid responsiveness with a sensitivity of 88% (95% CI, 62 to 98) and a specificity of 92% (95% CI, 62 to 99). Pulse pressure variations more than 6% before lung recruitment maneuver discriminated responders with a sensitivity of 69% (95% CI, 41 to 89) and a specificity of 75% (95% CI, 42 to 95). The area under receiver operating curves generated for changes in stroke volume induced by lung recruitment maneuver (0.96; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.99) was significantly higher than that for pulse pressure variations (0.72; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.88; P recruitment maneuver could predict preload responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients in the operating room.

  20. Non-Invasive Optical Blood Glucose Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha C.Pande

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The method for noninvasively blood glucose monitoring system is discussed in this paper. Lot of research work has been done in developing the device which is completely noninvasive to avoid the pros & cons because of frequent pricking. In this paper we are trying to analyze the noninvasive blood glucose measurement study in the near infrared region which is the most suitable region for blood glucose measurement. For this purpose we use a technique which is similar to pulseoximetry based on near infrared spectrometry .An infrared light of particular wavelength is passed through fingertip containing an arterial pulse component are derived,thus minimizing influences of basal components such as resting blood volume,skin, muscle and bone.

  1. Rejuvenecimiento periorbitario no invasivo Non-invasive periorbital rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Muñóz del Olmo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cirujanos plásticos y médicos estéticos se esfuerzan por lograr resultados satisfactorios y estéticos que mejoren o suavicen el paso del tiempo a nivel facial, con un especial interés o énfasis en el área periorbitaria. Un gran número de pacientes consultan para mejorar esta zona, pero por diferentes motivos desean que los procedimientos que se les realicen sean poco invasivos y con resultados rápidos, permitiéndoles así incorporarse lo antes posible a sus actividades cotidianas. Es fundamental el conocimiento de las proporciones faciales y periorbitarias para lograr resultados naturales. El objetivo de la técnica que proponemos es lograr una bioestimulación local de la piel, restaurar los volúmenes y reducir las arrugas de expresión o dinámicas, consiguiendo así una apariencia relajada y juvenil en el paciente.Plastic surgeons and aesthetic doctors are making an effort to reach positive aesthetic results. Their aim is to soften the effects of age on facial features stressing in the periorbital area. Many patients come to improve their facial image on this area, but they are asking for non-invasive and fast procedures to keep on their daily life. It is indispensable the knowledge of facial and periorbital proportions to achieve a more natural effect. The aim of the technique exposed is to achieve a local bioestimulation on skin, to restore volumes and to reduce expression and dynamical wrinkles. The expected result is a relaxing, youthful appearance.

  2. Infarct volume predicts critical care needs in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faigle, Roland; Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Urrutia, Victor C. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wozniak, Amy W. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-26

    Patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVT) for ischemic stroke are monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) or a comparable unit capable of ICU interventions due to the high frequency of standardized neurological exams and vital sign checks. The present study evaluates quantitative infarct volume on early post-IVT MRI as a predictor of critical care needs and aims to identify patients who may not require resource intense monitoring. We identified 46 patients who underwent MRI within 6 h of IVT. Infarct volume was measured using semiautomated software. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were used to determine factors associated with ICU needs. Infarct volume was an independent predictor of ICU need after adjusting for age, sex, race, systolic blood pressure, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and coronary artery disease (odds ratio 1.031 per cm{sup 3} increase in volume, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.004-1.058, p = 0.024). The ROC curve with infarct volume alone achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.766 (95 % CI 0.605-0.927), while the AUC was 0.906 (95 % CI 0.814-0.998) after adjusting for race, systolic blood pressure, and NIHSS. Maximum Youden index calculations identified an optimal infarct volume cut point of 6.8 cm{sup 3} (sensitivity 75.0 %, specificity 76.7 %). Infarct volume greater than 3 cm{sup 3} predicted need for critical care interventions with 81.3 % sensitivity and 66.7 % specificity. Infarct volume may predict needs for ICU monitoring and interventions in stroke patients treated with IVT. (orig.)

  3. Cerebral blood volume affects blood–brain barrier integrity in an acute transient stroke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuning; Kim, Jeong Kon; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Farrar, Christian T; Huang, Paul L; Suh, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Seon Joo; Shim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Hyungjoon; Cho, Gyunggoo; Kim, Young Ro

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient vascular reserve after an ischemic stroke may induce biochemical cascades that subsequently deteriorate the blood–brain barrier (BBB) function. However, the direct relationship between poor cerebral blood volume (CBV) restoration and BBB disruption has not been examined in acute stroke. To quantify BBB integrity at acute stages of transient stroke, in particular for cases in which extravasation of the standard contrast agent (Gd-DTPA) is not observed, we adopted the water exchange index (WEI), a novel magnetic resonance image-derived parameter to estimate the water permeability across the BBB. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and R2 relaxation rate constant were also measured for outlining the tissue abnormality, while fractional CBV and WEI were quantified for assessing vascular alterations. The significantly decreased ADC and R2 in the ischemic cortices did not correlate with the changes in CBV or WEI. In contrast, a strong negative correlation between the ipsilesional WEI and CBV was found, in which stroke mice were clustered into two groups: (1) high WEI and low CBV and (2) normal WEI and CBV. The low CBV observed for mice with a disrupted BBB, characterized by a high WEI, indicates the importance of CBV restoration for maintaining BBB stability in acute stroke. PMID:23462571

  4. Gray matter volume changes in chronic subcortical stroke: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Diao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of lesion side and degree of motor recovery on gray matter volume (GMV difference relative to healthy controls in right-handed subcortical stroke. Structural MRI data were collected in 97 patients with chronic subcortical ischemic stroke and 79 healthy controls. Voxel-wise GMV analysis was used to investigate the effects of lesion side and degree of motor recovery on GMV difference in right-handed chronic subcortical stroke patients. Compared with healthy controls, right-lesion patients demonstrated GMV increase (P < 0.05, voxel-wise false discovery rate correction in the bilateral paracentral lobule (PCL and supplementary motor area (SMA and the right middle occipital gyrus (MOG; while left-lesion patients did not exhibit GMV difference under the same threshold. Patients with complete and partial motor recovery showed similar degree of GMV increase in right-lesion patients. However, the motor recovery was correlated with the GMV increase in the bilateral SMA in right-lesion patients. These findings suggest that there exists a lesion-side effect on GMV difference relative to healthy controls in right-handed patients with chronic subcortical stroke. The GMV increase in the SMA may facilitate motor recovery in subcortical stroke patients.

  5. Assessment of lung function using a non-invasive oscillating gas-forcing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Lei; Clifton, David A; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for monitoring lung function can require complex, or special, gas analysers, and may therefore not be practical in clinical areas such as the intensive care unit (ICU) or operating theatre. The system proposed in this article is a compact and non-invasive system for the measurement and monitoring of lung variables, such as alveolar volume, airway dead space, and pulmonary blood flow. In contrast with conventional methods, the compact apparatus and non-invasive nature of the proposed method could eventually allow it to be used in the ICU, as well as in general clinical settings. We also propose a novel tidal ventilation model using a non-invasive oscillating gas-forcing technique, where both nitrous oxide and oxygen are used as indicator gases. Experimental results are obtained from healthy volunteers, and are compared with those obtained using a conventional continuous ventilation model. Our findings show that the proposed technique can be used to assess lung function, and has several advantages over conventional methods such as compact and portable apparatus, easy usage, and quick estimation of cardiopulmonary variables.

  6. Know your tools - concordance of different methods for measuring brain volume change after ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [The University of Melbourne, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid [The University of Melbourne, The Florey Institute of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Longitudinal brain volume changes have been investigated in a number of cerebral disorders as a surrogate marker of clinical outcome. In stroke, unique methodological challenges are posed by dynamic structural changes occurring after onset, particularly those relating to the infarct lesion. We aimed to evaluate agreement between different analysis methods for the measurement of post-stroke brain volume change, and to explore technical challenges inherent to these methods. Fifteen patients with anterior circulation stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 1 week of onset and at 1 and 3 months. Whole-brain as well as grey- and white-matter volume were estimated separately using both an intensity-based and a surface watershed-based algorithm. In the case of the intensity-based algorithm, the analysis was also performed with and without exclusion of the infarct lesion. Due to the effects of peri-infarct edema at the baseline scan, longitudinal volume change was measured as percentage change between the 1 and 3-month scans. Intra-class and concordance correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement between the different analysis methods. Reduced major axis regression was used to inspect the nature of bias between measurements. Overall agreement between methods was modest with strong disagreement between some techniques. Measurements were variably impacted by procedures performed to account for infarct lesions. Improvements in volumetric methods and consensus between methodologies employed in different studies are necessary in order to increase the validity of conclusions derived from post-stroke cerebral volumetric studies. Readers should be aware of the potential impact of different methods on study conclusions. (orig.)

  7. Arterial compliance in patients with cirrhosis: stroke volume-pulse pressure ratio as simplified index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Fuglsang, Stefan; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2001-01-01

    Arterial function may be altered in patients with cirrhosis. We determined compliance of the arterial tree (C(1)) in relation to systemic and splanchnic hemodynamic derangement and clinical variables. C(1) and the stroke volume-pulse pressure index (SV/PP) were significantly higher (+62% and +40...... predictors of SV/PP (P index seems to reflect abnormalities in the arterial compliance of these patients....

  8. Arterial compliance in patients with cirrhosis: stroke volume-pulse pressure ratio as simplified index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, S; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, E

    2001-01-01

    Arterial function may be altered in patients with cirrhosis. We determined compliance of the arterial tree (C(1)) in relation to systemic and splanchnic hemodynamic derangement and clinical variables. C(1) and the stroke volume-pulse pressure index (SV/PP) were significantly higher (+62% and +40...... predictors of SV/PP (P compliance is elevated in cirrhosis. A simplified SV/PP index seems to reflect abnormalities in the arterial compliance of these patients....

  9. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT ha...

  10. Eyeblink Conditioning: A Non-Invasive Biomarker for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition,…

  11. Non-invasive terahertz field imaging inside parallel plate waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We present a non-invasive broadband air photonic method of imaging of the electric field of THz pulses propagating inside a tapered parallel plate waveguide. The method is based on field-enhanced second harmonic generation of the fundamental laser beam in an external electric field. We apply...

  12. Measuring and modulating the brain with non-invasive stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.A.M

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of the studies in this thesis was the use of non-invasive brain stimulation for measuring and modulating corticospinal excitability and to study the possibility of therapeutic modulation of excitability in some neurological disorders. Brain modulation to reduce the over-excitability

  13. Non-invasive diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mello, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis begins with a focus on non-invasive diagnostic methods for ectopic pregnancy. The heterogeneity found in studies on diagnostic tests for ectopic pregnancy has led to an international recommendation on uniform definitions of early pregnancy complications. Hereafter,

  14. Blood biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Shaikh, Rabia; Farquhar, Cindy; Jordan, Vanessa; Scheffers, Carola S.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M. Louise

    2016-01-01

    Background About 10% of reproductive-aged women suffer from endometriosis, a costly chronic disease causing pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy is the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, but is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, there are no non-invasive or minimally

  15. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  16. Potential diagnostic consequences of applying non-invasive prenatal testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Olav Bjørn; Vogel, I; Ekelund, C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Targeted non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) tests for trisomies 21, 18 and 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies and could be an alternative to traditional karyotyping. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of missing other abnormal karyotypes of probable phenotypic...

  17. New developments in non-invasive coronary imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Riksta

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, and especially ischemic heart disease, is a major concern in Western society. To reduce mortality and morbidity early detection and treatment is important. Ideally, early detection should be non-invasive, fast and cheap. Coronary angiography (CAG) is a reliable technique to

  18. Non-invasive imaging of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold tremendous therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases. Over the last decade, non-invasive imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted hESCs. This review article will briefly summarize the various techniques used for non-invasive imaging of hESCs, which include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and multimodality approaches. Although the focus of this review article is primarily on hESCs, the labeling/tracking strategies described here can be readily applied to other (stem) cell types as well. Non-invasive imaging can provide convenient means to monitor hESC survival, proliferation, function, as well as overgrowth (such as teratoma formation), which could not be readily investigated previously. The requirement for hESC tracking techniques depends on the clinical scenario and each imaging technique will have its own niche in preclinical/clinical research. Continued evolvement of non-invasive imaging techniques will undoubtedly contribute to significant advances in understanding stem cell biology and mechanisms of action.

  19. Non-invasive diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mello, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis begins with a focus on non-invasive diagnostic methods for ectopic pregnancy. The heterogeneity found in studies on diagnostic tests for ectopic pregnancy has led to an international recommendation on uniform definitions of early pregnancy complications. Hereafter,

  20. New developments in non-invasive coronary imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Riksta

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, and especially ischemic heart disease, is a major concern in Western society. To reduce mortality and morbidity early detection and treatment is important. Ideally, early detection should be non-invasive, fast and cheap. Coronary angiography (CAG) is a reliable technique to

  1. Measuring and modulating the brain with non-invasive stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.A.M

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of the studies in this thesis was the use of non-invasive brain stimulation for measuring and modulating corticospinal excitability and to study the possibility of therapeutic modulation of excitability in some neurological disorders. Brain modulation to reduce the over-excitability

  2. Non-invasive assessment of maternal hemodynamics in early pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Zeeman, Gerda G.; Groen, Henk; Roberts, Claire; Dekker, Gus A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Non-invasive assessment of maternal hemodynamics in early pregnancy may be promising in evaluating maternal hemodynamic (mal)adaptation to pregnancy. We explored usage of applanation tonometry and Doppler ultrasound for assessment of cardiac output (CO), systemic vascular resistance (SVR

  3. Stroke Volume and Sympathetic Responses to Lower-Body Negative Pressure Reveal New Insight into Circulatory Shock in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    of SBP and twice DBP by three. 2.4. Measurement of stroke volume Stroke volume was measured noninvasively using tho- racic electrical bioimpedance ...received in revised form 25 February 2004; accepted 26 February 2004 Abstract We measured various hemodynamic responses and muscle sympathetic nerve...responses to central hypovolemia. We measured heart rates, arterial blood pressures, sympathetic neural activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve microneurography), and

  4. Deconstructing autofluorescence: non-invasive detection and monitoring of biochemistry in cells and tissues (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldys, Ewa M.; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Cassano, Juan C.; Sue, Carolyn M.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Pernichery, Sandeep M.; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol; Sutton-Mcdowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.

    2016-03-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous fluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from imaging of native fluorescence has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Multispectral intrinsic fluorescence imaging was applied to patient olfactory neurosphere-derived cells, cell model of a human metabolic disease MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like syndrome). By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations have been detected between living cells in their full morphological context which made it possible to distinguish healthy from diseased cells before and after therapy. Cellular maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant cell subpopulations, in particular a subpopulation with compromised mitochondrial function. The versatility of our method is further illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent.

  5. Non-invasive estimation of the metabolic heat production of breast tumors using digital infrared imaging

    CERN Document Server

    González, Francisco Javier

    2011-01-01

    In this work the metabolic heat generated by breast tumors was estimated indirectly and noninvasively from digital infrared images and numerically simulating a simplified breast model and a cancerous tumor, this parameter can be of clinical importance since it has been related to the doubling volume's time and malignancy for that particular tumor. The results indicate that digital infrared imaging has the potential to estimate in a non-invasive way the malignancy of a tumor by calculating its metabolic heat generation from bioheat thermal transfer models.

  6. Natural allelic variation of the IL-21 receptor modulates ischemic stroke infarct volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Kyu; Keum, Sehoon; Sheng, Huaxin; Warner, David S; Lo, Donald C; Marchuk, Douglas A

    2016-08-01

    Risk for ischemic stroke has a strong genetic basis, but heritable factors also contribute to the extent of damage after a stroke has occurred. We previously identified a locus on distal mouse chromosome 7 that contributes over 50% of the variation in postischemic cerebral infarct volume observed between inbred strains. Here, we used ancestral haplotype analysis to fine-map this locus to 12 candidate genes. The gene encoding the IL-21 receptor (Il21r) showed a marked difference in strain-specific transcription levels and coding variants in neonatal and adult cortical tissue. Collateral vessel connections were moderately reduced in Il21r-deficient mice, and cerebral infarct volume increased 2.3-fold, suggesting that Il21r modulates both collateral vessel anatomy and innate neuroprotection. In brain slice explants, oxygen deprivation (OD) activated apoptotic pathways and increased neuronal cell death in IL-21 receptor-deficient (IL-21R-deficient) mice compared with control animals. We determined that the neuroprotective effects of IL-21R arose from signaling through JAK/STAT pathways and upregulation of caspase 3. Thus, natural genetic variation in murine Il21r influences neuronal cell viability after ischemia by modulating receptor function and downstream signal transduction. The identification of neuroprotective genes based on naturally occurring allelic variations has the potential to inform the development of drug targets for ischemic stroke treatment.

  7. Stroke rates and diving air volumes of emperor penguins: implications for dive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Marshall, Greg; Kooyman, Gerald L; Ponganis, Paul J

    2011-09-01

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri), both at sea and at an experimental dive hole, often have minimal surface periods even after performance of dives far beyond their measured 5.6 min aerobic dive limit (ADL: dive duration associated with the onset of post-dive blood lactate accumulation). Accelerometer-based data loggers were attached to emperor penguins diving in these two different situations to further evaluate the capacity of these birds to perform such dives without any apparent prolonged recovery periods. Minimum surface intervals for dives as long as 10 min were less than 1 min at both sites. Stroke rates for dives at sea were significantly greater than those for dives at the isolated dive hole. Calculated diving air volumes at sea were variable, increased with maximum depth of dive to a depth of 250 m, and decreased for deeper dives. It is hypothesized that lower air volumes for the deepest dives are the result of exhalation of air underwater. Mean maximal air volumes for deep dives at sea were approximately 83% greater than those during shallow (emperor penguins, (b) stroke rate at sea is greater than at the isolated dive hole and, therefore, a reduction in muscle stroke rate does not extend the duration of aerobic metabolism during dives at sea, and (c) a larger diving air volume facilitates performance of deep dives by increasing the total body O(2) store to 68 ml O(2) kg(-1). Although increased O(2) storage and cardiovascular adjustments presumably optimize aerobic metabolism during dives, enhanced anaerobic capacity and hypoxemic tolerance are also essential for longer dives. This was exemplified by a 27.6 min dive, after which the bird required 6 min before it stood up from a prone position, another 20 min before it began to walk, and 8.4 h before it dived again.

  8. Intracranial pressure pulse waveform correlates with aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid stroke volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Robert; Baldwin, Kevin; Fuller, Jennifer; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Bergsneider, Marvin

    2012-11-01

    This study identifies a novel relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume through the cerebral aqueduct and the characteristic peaks of the intracranial pulse (ICP) waveform. ICP waveform analysis has become much more advanced in recent years; however, clinical practice remains restricted to mean ICP, mainly due to the lack of physiological understanding of the ICP waveform. Therefore, the present study set out to shed some light on the physiological meaning of ICP morphological metrics derived by the morphological clustering and analysis of continuous intracranial pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm by investigating their relationships with a well defined physiological variable, i.e., the stroke volume of CSF through the cerebral aqueduct. Seven patients received both overnight ICP monitoring along with a phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) of the cerebral aqueduct to quantify aqueductal stroke volume (ASV). Waveform morphological analysis of the ICP signal was performed by the MOCAIP algorithm. Following extraction of morphological metrics from the ICP signal, nine temporal ICP metrics and two amplitude-based metrics were compared with the ASV via Spearman's rank correlation. Of the nine temporal metrics correlated with the ASV, only the width of the P2 region (ICP-Wi2) reached significance. Furthermore, both ICP pulse pressure amplitude and mean ICP did not reach significance. In this study, we showed the width of the second peak (ICP-Wi2) of an ICP pulse wave is positively related to the volume of CSF movement through the cerebral aqueduct. This finding is an initial step in bridging the gap between ICP waveform morphology research and clinical practice.

  9. The neurophysiology of language: Insights from non-invasive brain stimulation in the healthy human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2015-09-01

    With the advent of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS), a new decade in the study of language has started. NIBS allows for testing the functional relevance of language-related brain activation and enables the researcher to investigate how neural activation changes in response to focal perturbations. This review focuses on the application of NIBS in the healthy brain. First, some basic mechanisms will be introduced and the prerequisites for carrying out NIBS studies of language are addressed. The next section outlines how NIBS can be used to characterize the contribution of the stimulated area to a task. In this context, novel approaches such as multifocal transcranial magnetic stimulation and the condition-and-perturb approach are discussed. The third part addresses the combination of NIBS and neuroimaging in the study of plasticity. These approaches are particularly suited to investigate short-term reorganization in the healthy brain and may inform models of language recovery in post-stroke aphasia.

  10. Impact of changes in systemic vascular resistance on a novel non-invasive continuous cardiac output measurement system based on pulse wave transit time: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hironori; Tsutsui, Masato

    2014-08-01

    The inaccuracy of arterial waveform analysis for measuring continuos cardiac output (CCO) associated with changes in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) has been well documented. A new non-invasive continuous cardiac output monitoring system (esCCO) mainly utilizing pulse wave transit time (PWTT) in place of arterial waveform analysis has been developed. However, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output during changes in SVR remains unclear. After a previous multicenter study on esCCO measurement, we retrospectively identified two cases in which apparent changes in SVR developed in a short period during data collection. In each case, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output and time component of PWTT were analyzed. Recorded data suggest that the time component of PWTT may have a significant impact on the accuracy of estimating stroke volume during changes in SVR. However, further prospective clinical studies are required to test this hypothesis.

  11. Relationship between plasma metalloproteinase-9 levels and volume and severity of infarct in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Recep; Ulvi, Hızır; Özel, Lütfi; Özdemir, Gökhan; Güzelcik, Metin; Aygül, Recep

    2012-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) constitute an endopeptidase family involved in various physiological and pathological processes. It was demonstrated that plasma MMP-9 level was increased in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this study, it was investigated whether there was a relationship between the levels of plasma MMP-9 and the severity of stroke and infarct volume in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A total of 32 patients with acute ischemic stroke, (16 males and 16 females) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Plasma MMP-9 levels were measured using ELISA method. Computed tomography was performed at 48th hour and infarct volume was calculated using the Cavalieri method. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was checked at baseline, 12, 24, and 48th hour. Plasma MMP-9 levels of the patient group at baseline, 12, 24, and 48th hour were found significantly higher compared to the control group (p acute period of ischemic cerebrovascular disease and correlated with the severity of the disease and infarct volume. The definition of the exact role of plasma MMP-9 after ischemic stroke will have important diagnostic implications for stroke and for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating plasma MMP-9.

  12. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  13. Non-invasive matrices in human biomonitoring: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Marta; Castaño, Argelia

    2009-02-01

    Humans and other living organisms are exposed to a variety of chemical pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of anthropogenic activities. Environmental pollutants are incorporated into the organism by different routes and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, which leads to an internal concentration that can induce different alterations, adverse effects and/or diseases. Control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biomonitoring is a very useful tool that can contribute to this aim. Human biomonitoring uses different matrices to measure the target chemicals depending on the chemical, the amount of matrix necessary for the analysis and the detection limit (LOD) of the analytical technique. Blood is the ideal matrix for most chemicals due to its contact with the whole organism and its equilibrium with organs and tissues where chemicals are stored. However, it has an important disadvantage of being an invasive matrix. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of other matrices that are less or non-invasive, such as saliva, urine, meconium, nails, hair, and semen or breast milk. The presence of a chemical in these matrices reflects an exposure, but correlations between levels in non-invasive matrices and blood must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. The development of new biomarkers that are measurable in these matrices will improve non-invasive biomonitoring. This paper reviews studies that measure Cd, Pb, Hg, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), organochlorine pesticides and phthalates in non-invasive matrices, the most used techniques for measurements and what alternative techniques are available.

  14. Applicability of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickmilder Marc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With its inclusion under Action 3 in the Environment and Health Action Plan 2004–2010 of the European Commission, human biomonitoring is currently receiving an increasing amount of attention from the scientific community as a tool to better quantify human exposure to, and health effects of, environmental stressors. Despite the policy support, however, there are still several issues that restrict the routine application of human biomonitoring data in environmental health impact assessment. One of the main issues is the obvious need to routinely collect human samples for large-scale surveys. Particularly the collection of invasive samples from susceptible populations may suffer from ethical and practical limitations. Children, pregnant women, elderly, or chronically-ill people are among those that would benefit the most from non-invasive, repeated or routine sampling. Therefore, the use of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring should be promoted as an ethically appropriate, cost-efficient and toxicologically relevant alternative for many biomarkers that are currently determined in invasively collected matrices. This review illustrates that several non-invasively collected matrices are widely used that can be an valuable addition to, or alternative for, invasively collected matrices such as peripheral blood sampling. Moreover, a well-informed choice of matrix can provide an added value for human biomonitoring, as different non-invasively collected matrices can offer opportunities to study additional aspects of exposure to and effects from environmental contaminants, such as repeated sampling, historical overview of exposure, mother-child transfer of substances, or monitoring of substances with short biological half-lives.

  15. Invasive versus non-invasive diagnosis of renal bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, A; Oprisiu, R; Said, S; Sechet, A; Ghazali, A; Marié, A; el Esper, I; Brazier, M; Achard, J M; Morinière, P

    1997-07-01

    At present, bone histomorphometry remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of the various types of renal bone disease. In the search for a non-invasive method of diagnosis, biochemical serum markers of bone remodelling, in addition to serum intact parathyroid hormone and aluminium determinations, have been proposed as the most reliable tools and are at present widely used in clinical practice. Their respective diagnostic values, as separate items and in combined analysis, are thoroughly discussed in the present review.

  16. Invasive and non-invasive methods for cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavdaniti M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic status monitoring of high-risk surgical patients and critically ill patients inIntensive Care Units is one of the main objectives of their therapeutic management. Cardiac output is one of the mostimportant parameters for cardiac function monitoring, providing an estimate of whole body perfusion oxygen deliveryand allowing for an understanding of the causes of high blood pressure. The purpose of the present review is thedescription of cardiac output measurement methods as presented in the international literature. The articles documentthat there are many methods of monitoring the hemodynamic status of patients, both invasive and non-invasive, themost popular of which is thermodilution. The invasive methods are the Fick method and thermodilution, whereasthe non-invasive methods are oeshophaegeal Doppler, transoesophageal echocardiography, lithium dilution, pulsecontour, partial CO2 rebreathing and thoracic electrical bioimpedance. All of them have their advantages and disadvantages,but thermodilution is the golden standard for critical patients, although it does entail many risks. The idealsystem for cardiac output monitoring would be non-invasive, easy to use, reliable and compatible in patients. A numberof research studies have been carried out in clinical care settings, by nurses as well as other health professionals, for thepurpose of finding a method of measurement that would have the least disadvantages. Nevertheless, the thermodilutiontechnique remains the most common approach in use today.

  17. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Stroke Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Schlaug, Gottfried; Renga, Vijay; Nair, Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    TDCS - Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation - is an emerging technique of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been found useful in examining cortical function in normal subjects and in facilitating treatments of various neurological disorders. A better understanding of adaptive as well as maladaptive post-stroke neuroplasticity and its modulation through non-invasive brain stimulation has opened up experimental treatment options using TDCS for patients recovering from stroke. We will r...

  18. CT angiography and CT perfusion improve prediction of infarct volume in patients with anterior circulation stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Horsch, Alexander D.; Niesten, Joris M.; Luitse, Merel J.A.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, Geert Jan; Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Majoie, Charles B.L.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vos, Jan Albert [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Schonewille, Wouter J. [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Walderveen, Marianne A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Wermer, Marieke J.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands); Duijm, Lucien E.M. [Catharina Hospital, Department of Radiology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Keizer, Koos [Catharina Hospital, Department of Neurology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bot, Joseph C.J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Visser, Marieke C. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lugt, Aad van der [Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Dippel, Diederik W.J. [Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kesselring, F.O.H.W. [Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Hofmeijer, Jeannette [Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Neurology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Lycklama a Nijeholt, Geert J. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Boiten, Jelis [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Neurology, The Hague (Netherlands); Rooij, Willem Jan van [St. Elisabeth Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Kort, Paul L.M. de [St. Elisabeth Hospital, Department of Neurology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Roos, Yvo B.W.E.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijer, Frederick J.A. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pleiter, C.C. [St. Franciscus Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: Dutch acute stroke study (DUST) investigators

    2016-04-15

    We investigated whether baseline CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) in acute ischemic stroke could improve prediction of infarct presence and infarct volume on follow-up imaging. We analyzed 906 patients with suspected anterior circulation stroke from the prospective multicenter Dutch acute stroke study (DUST). All patients underwent baseline non-contrast CT, CTA, and CTP and follow-up non-contrast CT/MRI after 3 days. Multivariable regression models were developed including patient characteristics and non-contrast CT, and subsequently, CTA and CTP measures were added. The increase in area under the curve (AUC) and R{sup 2} was assessed to determine the additional value of CTA and CTP. At follow-up, 612 patients (67.5 %) had a detectable infarct on CT/MRI; median infarct volume was 14.8 mL (interquartile range (IQR) 2.8-69.6). Regarding infarct presence, the AUC of 0.82 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.79-0.85) for patient characteristics and non-contrast CT was improved with addition of CTA measures (AUC 0.85 (95 % CI 0.82-0.87); p < 0.001) and was even higher after addition of CTP measures (AUC 0.89 (95 % CI 0.87-0.91); p < 0.001) and combined CTA/CTP measures (AUC 0.89 (95 % CI 0.87-0.91); p < 0.001). For infarct volume, adding combined CTA/CTP measures (R{sup 2} = 0.58) was superior to patient characteristics and non-contrast CT alone (R{sup 2} = 0.44) and to addition of CTA alone (R{sup 2} = 0.55) or CTP alone (R{sup 2} = 0.54; all p < 0.001). In the acute stage, CTA and CTP have additional value over patient characteristics and non-contrast CT for predicting infarct presence and infarct volume on follow-up imaging. These findings could be applied for patient selection in future trials on ischemic stroke treatment. (orig.)

  19. Non-invasive bleaching of the human lens by femtosecond laser photolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Kessel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Globally, cataract is the leading cause of blindness and impaired vision. Cataract surgery is an attractive treatment option but it remains unavailable in sufficient quantity for the vast majority of the world population living in areas without access to specialized health care. Reducing blindness from cataract requires solutions that can be applied outside operating theatres. Cataract is a protein conformational disease characterized by accumulation of light absorbing, fluorescent and scattering protein aggregates. The aim of the study was to investigate whether these compounds were susceptible to photobleaching by a non-invasive procedure and whether this would lead to optical rejuvenation of the lens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine human donor lenses were treated with an 800 nm infra-red femtosecond pulsed laser in a treatment zone measuring 1x1x0.52 mm. After laser treatment the age-induced yellow discoloration of the lens was markedly reduced and the transmission of light was increased corresponding to an optical rejuvenation of 3 to 7 years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that the age-induced yellowing of the human lens can be bleached by a non-invasive procedure based on femtosecond laser photolysis. Cataract is a disease associated with old age. At the current technological stage, lens aging is delayed but with a treatment covering the entire lens volume complete optical rejuvenation is expected. Thus, femtosecond photolysis has the potential clinical value of replacing invasive cataract surgery by a non-invasive treatment modality that can be placed in mobile units, thus breaking down many of the barriers impeding access to treatment in remote and poor regions of the world.

  20. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how to live with the effects of the stroke so you can be as independent as possible. It may include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and swallowing therapy.Your doctor will decide what kind of rehabilitation will be helpful for you. Rehabilitation can begin ...

  1. Simulation method for cardiac stroke volume estimation by intracardiac electrical impedance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, C; Leviatan, Y; Inbar, G F; Hoekstein, K N

    1992-09-01

    Using the electrical impedance measurement technique to investigate stroke volume estimation, three models of the ventricle were simulated. A four-electrode impedance catheter was used; two electrodes to set up an electric field in the model and the other two to measure the potential difference. A new approach, itself an application of the quasi-static case of a method used to solve electromagnetic field problems, was used to solve the electric field in the model. The behaviour of the estimation is examined with respect to the electrode configuration on the catheter and to catheter location with respect to the ventricle walls. Cardiac stroke volume estimation was found to be robust to catheter location generating a 10 per cent error for an offset of 40 per cent of the catheter from the chamber axis and rotation of 20 degrees with respect to the axis. The electrode configuration has a dominant effect on the sensitivity and accuracy of the estimation. Certain configurations gave high accuracy, whereas in others high sensitivity was found with lower accuracy. This led to the conclusion that the electrode configuration should be carefully chosen according to the desired criteria.

  2. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik;

    Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study was to vali......Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study...... was to validate automated methods for extracting FSV directly from dynamic PET studies for two different tracers and to examine potential scanner hardware bias. Methods: 21 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner (scanner I). In addition, 8...... subjects underwent a dynamic 6 min 15O-water PET scan followed by a 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a GE Discovery ST PET/CT scanner (scanner II). The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic...

  3. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil

    2016-01-01

    to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End......-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke...

  4. An alternative non-invasive treatment for Peyronie's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim A. Claro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Surgical correction of the deformity and plaque caused by Peyronie's disease has some important disadvantages and extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT emerged as a new promising therapy. We evaluated prospectively the efficacy and safety of the association of high dose vitamin E and ESWT as a non-invasive treatment for the disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients 42 to 68 years old (mean = 54 presenting penile deviation and sexual distress caused by Peyronie's disease were treated in a non-invasive manner. The time of penile deviation ranged from 16 to 52 months (mean = 30. All patients had previous unsuccessful treatment for Peyronie's disease. The angulation's deformity of the penis was assessed by photography at home. The patients received vitamin E (l.200 mg daily during 3 months and underwent 3 to 6 sessions (mean = 3 of ESWT (3,000 to 4,000 shockwaves at a power level of l to 2 at 1-week intervals. RESULTS: From 25 patients treated, 16 (64% reported an improvement in penile angulation, with a mean reduction of 21 degrees (10 to 40. Eight patients reported improvement in their spontaneous erections. Overall, the patients presented only minimal bruising at the site of treatment and skin hematoma. Four patients presented urethral bleeding. The mean angulation after treatment in the control group was 48.67 degrees (30 - 70 and in the study group was 24.42 degrees (0 - 70, statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Considering the common complications and the unsatisfactory outcome of the surgical correction for Peyronie's disease, the association of high dose vitamin E and ESWT represents a good option for a non-invasive, effective and safe treatment of the penile deformity.

  5. Towards a smart non-invasive fluid loss measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadevara, N K; Mukhopadhyay, S C; Barrack, L

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a smart wireless sensing non-invasive system for estimating the amount of fluid loss, a person experiences while physical activity is presented. The system measures three external body parameters, Heart Rate, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR, or skin conductance), and Skin Temperature. These three parameters are entered into an empirically derived formula along with the user's body mass index, and estimation for the amount of fluid lost is determined. The core benefit of the developed system is the affluence usage in combining with smart home monitoring systems to care elderly people in ambient assisted living environments as well in automobiles to monitor the body parameters of a motorist.

  6. Cell-baswd non-invasive prenatal testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldbjerg, Niels; Singh, Ripudaman; Christensen, Rikke

    CONTROL ID: 2520273 ABSTRACT FINAL ID: OC06.03 TITLE: Cell based Non-invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) AUTHORS (FIRST NAME, LAST NAME): Niels Uldbjerg2, Ripudaman Singh4, Rikke Christensen3, Palle Schelde4, Ida Vogel1, Else Marie Vestergaard3, Lotte Hatt4, Steen Kølvrå4 INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1....... Department of Clinical Genetics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, none, Denmark. 2. Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. 3. Clinical Genetics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. 4. Arcedi Biotech Aps, Aarhus, Denmark. ABSTRACT BODY: Objectives: NIPT...

  7. Biomechanics of subcellular structures by non-invasive Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Braakman, Sietse

    2016-11-01

    Cellular biomechanics play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Unfortunately, current methods to measure biomechanical properties are invasive and mostly limited to the surface of a cell. As a result, the mechanical behaviour of subcellular structures and organelles remains poorly characterised. Here, we show three-dimensional biomechanical images of single cells obtained with non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin microscopy with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results quantify the longitudinal elastic modulus of subcellular structures. In particular, we found the nucleoli to be stiffer than both the nuclear envelope (p biomechanics and its role in pathophysiology.

  8. Non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation: local and distant effects for motor recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Sook-Lei; Santarnecchi, Emilliano; Buch, Ethan R; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) may enhance motor recovery after neurological injury through the causal induction of plasticity processes. Neurological injury, such as stroke, often results in serious long-term physical disabilities, and despite intensive therapy, a large majority of brain injury survivors fail to regain full motor function. Emerging research suggests that NIBS techniques, such as transcranial magnetic (TMS) and direct current (tDCS) stimulation, in association with customarily used neurorehabilitative treatments, may enhance motor recovery. This paper provides a general review on TMS and tDCS paradigms, the mechanisms by which they operate and the stimulation techniques used in neurorehabilitation, specifically stroke. TMS and tDCS influence regional neural activity underlying the stimulation location and also distant interconnected network activity throughout the brain. We discuss recent studies that document NIBS effects on global brain activity measured with various neuroimaging techniques, which help to characterize better strategies for more accurate NIBS stimulation. These rapidly growing areas of inquiry may hold potential for improving the effectiveness of NIBS-based interventions for clinical rehabilitation.

  9. Prediction of Fluid Responsiveness by a Non-invasive Respiratory Systolic Time Interval Variation Using Heart Sound Signals in Recipients Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-H; Moon, Y-J; Kim, J-W; Song, J-G; Hwang, G-S

    2017-06-01

    The fluid management of cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) is challenging. Phonocardiography, a graphic recording of heart sounds, provides valuable information concerning heart function and hemodynamic condition. We assessed whether the systolic time interval (STI) and its respiratory variation could predict fluid responsiveness in cirrhotic patients undergoing LT. Thirty LT recipients who needed volume expansion were included. The fluid challenge consisted of 500 mL 5% albumin administered over a period of 10 minutes. STI was measured as the time interval between the maximal amplitude of each heart sound corrected with the corresponding RR interval (cSTI). The respiratory variation in STI (STV) induced by mechanical ventilation was calculated. Responders were defined as those showing a ≥10% increase in stroke volume index after volume expansion. In all, 14 of the 30 patients were responders. Significant increases in cSTI were observed after volume expansion in both responders (P fluid loading, whereas STV in non-responders remained unchanged (6.4% ± 2.6% vs 6.4% ± 4.2%, P = .86). A cut-off value of ≥7.5% STV from baseline could predict fluid responsiveness with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.804 (95% confidence interval, 0.618-0.925). Intra-operative STV can predict fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing LT. Beat-to-beat monitoring of STI and STV may be useful as a non-invasive hemodynamic index and for fluid management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of fluid loading with normal saline and 6% hydroxyethyl starch on stroke volume variability and left ventricular volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanda H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirotsugu Kanda,1 Yuji Hirasaki,2 Takafumi Iida,1 Megumi Kanao,1 Yuki Toyama,1 Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Hiroshi Iwasaki,11Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, 2Department of Anatomy, The Jikei University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate changes in stroke volume variability (SVV and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV after a fluid bolus of crystalloid or colloid using real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE and the Vigileo-FloTrac™ system.Materials and methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval, and informed consent from the research participants, 22 patients undergoing scheduled peripheral vascular bypass surgery were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mL of hydroxyethyl starch (HES; HES group, n=11 or normal saline (Saline group, n=11 for fluid replacement therapy. SVV was measured using the Vigileo-FloTrac system. LVEDV, stroke volume, and cardiac output were measured by 3D-TEE. The measurements were performed over 30 minutes before and after the fluid bolus in both groups.Results: SVV significantly decreased after fluid bolus in both groups (HES group, 14.7%±2.6% to 6.9%±2.7%, P<0.001; Saline group, 14.3%±3.9% to 8.8%±3.1%, P<0.001. LVEDV significantly increased after fluid loading in the HES group (87.1±24.0 mL to 99.9±27.2 mL, P<0.001, whereas no significant change was detected in the Saline group (88.8±17.3 mL to 91.4±17.6 mL, P>0.05. Stroke volume significantly increased after infusion in the HES group (50.6±12.5 mL to 61.6±19.1 mL, P<0.01 but not in the Saline group (51.6±13.4 mL to 54.1±12.8 mL, P>0.05. Cardiac output measured by 3D-TEE significantly increased in the HES group (3.5±1.1 L/min to 3.9±1.3 L/min, P<0.05, whereas no significant change was seen in the Saline group (3.4±1.1 L/min to 3.3±1.0 L

  11. Corticospinal activity evoked and modulated by non-invasive stimulation of the intact human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John C

    2014-10-01

    A number of methods have been developed recently that stimulate the human brain non-invasively through the intact scalp. The most common are transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial electric stimulation (TES) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS). They are widely used to probe function and connectivity of brain areas as well as therapeutically in a variety of conditions such as depression or stroke. They are much less focal than conventional invasive methods which use small electrodes placed on or in the brain and are often thought to activate all classes of neurones in the stimulated area. However, this is not true. A large body of evidence from experiments on the motor cortex shows that non-invasive methods of brain stimulation can be surprisingly selective and that adjusting the intensity and direction of stimulation can activate different classes of inhibitory and excitatory inputs to the corticospinal output cells. Here we review data that have elucidated the action of TMS and TES, concentrating mainly on the most direct evidence available from spinal epidural recordings of the descending corticospinal volleys. The results show that it is potentially possible to test and condition specific neural circuits in motor cortex that could be affected differentially by disease, or be used in different forms of natural behaviour. However, there is substantial interindividual variability in the specificity of these protocols. Perhaps in the future it will be possible, with the advances currently being made to model the electrical fields induced in individual brains, to develop forms of stimulation that can reliably target more specific populations of neurones, and open up the internal circuitry of the motor cortex for study in behaving humans.

  12. Infrared thermography: A non-invasive window into thermal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Glenn J

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a non-invasive technique that measures mid to long-wave infrared radiation emanating from all objects and converts this to temperature. As an imaging technique, the value of modern infrared thermography is its ability to produce a digitized image or high speed video rendering a thermal map of the scene in false colour. Since temperature is an important environmental parameter influencing animal physiology and metabolic heat production an energetically expensive process, measuring temperature and energy exchange in animals is critical to understanding physiology, especially under field conditions. As a non-contact approach, infrared thermography provides a non-invasive complement to physiological data gathering. One caveat, however, is that only surface temperatures are measured, which guides much research to those thermal events occurring at the skin and insulating regions of the body. As an imaging technique, infrared thermal imaging is also subject to certain uncertainties that require physical modelling, which is typically done via built-in software approaches. Infrared thermal imaging has enabled different insights into the comparative physiology of phenomena ranging from thermogenesis, peripheral blood flow adjustments, evaporative cooling, and to respiratory physiology. In this review, I provide background and guidelines for the use of thermal imaging, primarily aimed at field physiologists and biologists interested in thermal biology. I also discuss some of the better known approaches and discoveries revealed from using thermal imaging with the objective of encouraging more quantitative assessment.

  13. Non-invasive Respiratory Support in Blunt Chest Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Lobus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To optimize the results of treatment in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF due to lung contusion, by using the methods of non-invasive mask respiratory support. Materials and methods. The study covered 31 patients with severe blunt chest injury, multiple costal fractures, and hypoxemic ARF. The patients underwent assisted ventilation (AV in the CPAP+PSV mode through a facial or nasal mask. Physiological parameters were recorded during non-invasive mask ventilation (NIMV in the stepwise fashion. A control group comprised 25 patients with the similar severity of injury and ARF who were given conventional AV.Results. In 67.7% of the study group patients, NIMV was effective in improving oxygenation and external respiration, without exerting negative hemodynamic effects. Endotracheal intubation and AV could be avoided in these patients. Comparison of the study and control groups revealed a significant reduction in the incidence of secondary pneumonias in the NIMV group and in the duration of treatment. Mask ventilation could decrease mortality from 44% in the control group to 9.7% in the NIMV group.Conclusion. NIMV applied to patients with hypoxemic ARF in the presence of lung contusion improves pulmonary function and, in the bulk of patients, allows endotracheal intubation and AV and consequently their associated complications. When mask ventilation is employed, management of patients becomes shorter and simpler and mortality rates substantially decrease. 

  14. Sleep-related breathing disorders and non-invasive ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Lax

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NPPV was originally used in patients with acute respiratory impairment or exacerbations of chronic respiratory diseases, as an alternative to the endotracheal tube. Over the last thirty years NPPV has been also used at night in patients with stable chronic lung disease such as obstructive sleep apnea, the overlap syndrome (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea, neuromuscular disorders, obesity-hypoventilation syndrome, and in other conditions such as sleep disorders associated with congestive heart failure (Cheyne-Stokes respiration. In this no-systematic review we discuss the different types of NPPV, the specific conditions in which they can be used and the indications, recommendations and evidence supporting the efficacy of NPPV. Optimizing patient acceptance and adherence to non-invasive ventilation treatment is challenging. The treatment of sleep-related disorders is a life-threatening condition. The optimal level of treatment should be determined in a sleep laboratory. Side effects directly affecting the patient’s adherence to treatment are known. The most common are nasopharyngeal symptoms including increased congestion and rhinorrhea; these effects are related to reduced humidity of inspired gas. Humidification of delivered gas may improve these symptoms.

  15. Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of colorectal liver metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pier; Paolo; Mainenti; Federica; Romano; Laura; Pizzuti; Sabrina; Segreto; Giovanni; Storto; Lorenzo; Mannelli; Massimo; Imbriaco; Luigi; Camera; Simone; Maurea

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the few malignant tumors in which synchronous or metachronous liver metastases [colorectal liver metastases(CRLMs)] may be treated with surgery. It has been demonstrated that resection of CRLMs improves the long-term prognosis. On the other hand, patients with un-resectable CRLMs may benefit from chemotherapy alone or in addition to liverdirected therapies. The choice of the most appropriate therapeutic management of CRLMs depends mostly on the diagnostic imaging. Nowadays, multiple non-invasive imaging modalities are available and those have a pivotal role in the workup of patients with CRLMs. Although extensive research has been performed with regards to the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance for the detection of CRLMs, the optimal imaging strategies for staging and follow up are still to be established. This largely due to the progressive technological and pharmacological advances which are constantly improving the accuracy of each imaging modality. This review describes the non-invasive imaging approaches of CRLMs reporting the technical features, the clinical indications, the advantages and the potential limitations of each modality, as well as including some information on the development of new imaging modalities, the role of new contrast media and the feasibility of using parametric image analysis as diagnostic marker of presence of CRLMs.

  16. Use of Doppler ultrasound for non-invasive urodynamic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Ozawa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A totally non-invasive transperineal urodynamic technique using Doppler ultrasonography has been developed. Methods: Since normal urine does not have blood cells, urine was thought not to produce the Doppler effects. However, basic studies confirmed that the decrease of pressure at high velocity (Bernouilli effect caused dissolved gas to form microbubbles, which are detected by Doppler ultrasonography. Subjects sat and the probe was advanced via remote control to achieve gentle contact with the perineal skin. The digital uroflow data signals and the color Doppler ultrasound video images were processed on a personal computer. The flow-velocity curves from two sites; the distal prostatic urethra just above the external sphincter (V1 and the sphincteric urethra (V2 were plotted against time. The parameters of both the pressure-flow studies and the Doppler ultrasound urodynamic studies were compared in men who had various degrees of obstruction. Results: Functional cross-sectional area at prostatic urethra (A1, calculated by Q max /V1, was lower in the group of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO vs. control group. Velocity ratio (VR, which was calculated by V1/V2, was the parameter having the best correlation with BOO index, though A1 had a similar correlation. This method is viable to diagnose the degree of BOO. Conclusions: The development of non-invasive Doppler ultrasound videourodynamics (Doppler UDS will dramatically expand the information on voiding function.

  17. Influence of hemoglobin on non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiliang; Zou, Da; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    Since the abnormal metabolism of bilirubin could lead to diseases in the human body, especially the jaundice which is harmful to neonates. Traditional invasive measurements are difficult to be accepted by people because of pain and infection. Therefore, the real-time and non-invasive measurement of bilirubin is of great significance. However, the accuracy of currently transcutaneous bilirubinometry(TcB) is generally not high enough, and affected by many factors in the human skin, mostly by hemoglobin. In this talk, absorption spectra of hemoglobin and bilirubin have been collected and analyzed, then the Partial Least Squares (PLS) models have been built. By analyzing and comparing the Correlation and Root Mean Square Error of Prediction(RMSEP), the results show that the Correlation of bilirubin solution model is larger than that of the mixture solution added with hemoglobin, and its RMSEP value is smaller than that of mixture solution. Therefore, hemoglobin has influences on the non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing. In next step, it is necessary to investigate how to eliminate the influence.

  18. Non-invasive measurement of oxygen diffusion in model foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Kanishka; Sablani, Shyam S; Tang, Juming; Rasco, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we developed a non-invasive method to determine oxygen diffusivity (DO2) in food gels using an Oxydot luminescence sensor. We designed and fabricated a transparent diffusion cell in order to represent oxygen transfer into foods packaged in an 8-ounce polymeric tray. Oxydots were glued to the sides (side-dot) and bottom (bottom-dot) of the cell and filled with 1, 2, and 3% (w/v) agar gel as a model food. After deoxygenation, local oxygen concentrations in the gels were measured non-invasively at 4, 12 and 22°C. Effective oxygen diffusivities in gels (DO2g) and water (DO2w) were obtained after fitting experimental data to the analytical solution (data from side-dot) and the numerical solution (data from bottom-dot) to Fick's second law. Temperature had significant positive influence (P0.05) was found between the activation energy (Ea) of water and gels (1-3% w/v) for temperatures ranging from 4 to 22°C. We used a combined obstruction and hydrodynamic model to explain why DO2g decreased as gel concentration increased. The method developed in this study can be used to study the oxygen diffusivity in foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-invasive assessment of the liver using imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling Thompson, Camilla; Wang, Haolu; Liu, Xin; Liang, Xiaowen; Crawford, Darrell H.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver disease causes 2,000 deaths in Australia per year and early diagnosis is crucial to avoid progression to cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. There is no ideal method to evaluate liver function. Blood tests and liver biopsies provide spot examinations and are unable to track changes in function quickly. Therefore better techniques are needed. Non-invasive imaging has the potential to extract increased information over a large sampling area, continuously tracking dynamic changes in liver function. This project aimed to study the ability of three imaging techniques, multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, infrared thermography and photoacoustic imaging, in measuring liver function. Collagen deposition was obvious in multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging in fibrosis and cirrhosis and comparable to conventional histology. Infrared thermography revealed a significantly increased liver temperature in hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging and photoacoustic imaging could both track uptake and excretion of indocyanine green in rat liver. These results prove that non-invasive imaging can extract crucial information about the liver continuously over time and has the potential to be translated into clinic in the assessment of liver disease.

  20. Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Romano, Federica; Pizzuti, Laura; Segreto, Sabrina; Storto, Giovanni; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Imbriaco, Massimo; Camera, Luigi; Maurea, Simone

    2015-07-28

    Colorectal cancer is one of the few malignant tumors in which synchronous or metachronous liver metastases [colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs)] may be treated with surgery. It has been demonstrated that resection of CRLMs improves the long-term prognosis. On the other hand, patients with un-resectable CRLMs may benefit from chemotherapy alone or in addition to liver-directed therapies. The choice of the most appropriate therapeutic management of CRLMs depends mostly on the diagnostic imaging. Nowadays, multiple non-invasive imaging modalities are available and those have a pivotal role in the workup of patients with CRLMs. Although extensive research has been performed with regards to the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance for the detection of CRLMs, the optimal imaging strategies for staging and follow up are still to be established. This largely due to the progressive technological and pharmacological advances which are constantly improving the accuracy of each imaging modality. This review describes the non-invasive imaging approaches of CRLMs reporting the technical features, the clinical indications, the advantages and the potential limitations of each modality, as well as including some information on the development of new imaging modalities, the role of new contrast media and the feasibility of using parametric image analysis as diagnostic marker of presence of CRLMs.

  1. Non-invasive means of measuring hepatic fat content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanjeev R Mehta; E Louise Thomas; Jimmy D Bell; Desmond G Johnston; Simon D Taylor-Robinson

    2008-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis affects 20% to 30% of the general adult population in the western world. Currently, the technique of choice for determining hepatic fat deposition and the stage of fibrosis is liver biopsy. However, it is an invasive procedure and its use is limited, particularly in children. It may also be subject to sampling error. Non-invasive techniques such as ultrasound, computerised tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) can detect hepatic steatosis, but currently cannot distinguish between simple steatosis and steatohepatitis, or stage the degree of fibrosis accurately. Ultrasound is widely used to detect hepatic steatosis, but its sensitivity is reduced in the morbidly obese and also in those with small amounts of fatty infiltration. It has been used to grade hepatic fat content, but this is subjective. CT can detect hepatic steatosis, but exposes subjects to ionising radiation, thus limiting its use in longitudinal studies and in children. Recently, magnetic resonance (MR) techniques using chemical shift imaging have provided a quantitative assessment of the degree of hepatic fatty infiltration, which correlates well with liver biopsy results in the same patients. Similarly, in vivo 1H MRS is a fast, safe, non-invasive method for the quantification of intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) levels. Both techniques will be useful tools in future longitudinal clinical studies, either in examining the natural history of conditions causing hepatic steatosis(e.g. non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), or in testing new treatments for these conditions.

  2. Modulation of Untruthful Responses with Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecteau, Shirley; Boggio, Paulo; Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Deceptive abilities have long been studied in relation to personality traits. More recently, studies explored the neural substrates associated with deceptive skills suggesting a critical role of the prefrontal cortex. Here we investigated whether non-invasive brain stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) could modulate generation of untruthful responses about subject’s personal life across contexts (i.e., deceiving on guilt-free questions on daily activities; generating previously memorized lies about past experience; and producing spontaneous lies about past experience), as well as across modality responses (verbal and motor responses). Results reveal that real, but not sham, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the DLPFC can reduce response latency for untruthful over truthful answers across contexts and modality responses. Also, contexts of lies seem to incur a different hemispheric laterality. These findings add up to previous studies demonstrating that it is possible to modulate some processes involved in generation of untruthful answers by applying non-invasive brain stimulation over the DLPFC and extend these findings by showing a differential hemispheric contribution of DLPFCs according to contexts. PMID:23550273

  3. Clinical role of non-invasive assessment of portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Massimo; Di Pascoli, Marco; Sacerdoti, David

    2017-01-07

    Measurement of portal pressure is pivotal in the evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis. The measurement of the hepatic venous pressure gradient represents the reference method by which portal pressure is estimated. However, it is an invasive procedure that requires significant hospital resources, including experienced staff, and is associated with considerable cost. Non-invasive methods that can be reliably used to estimate the presence and the degree of portal hypertension are urgently needed in clinical practice. Biochemical and morphological parameters have been proposed for this purpose, but have shown disappointing results overall. Splanchnic Doppler ultrasonography and the analysis of microbubble contrast agent kinetics with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography have shown better accuracy for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension. A key advancement in the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension has been the introduction in clinical practice of methods able to measure stiffness in the liver, as well as stiffness/congestion in the spleen. According to the data published to date, it appears to be possible to rule out clinically significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis (i.e., hepatic venous pressure gradient ≥ 10 mmHg) with a level of clinically-acceptable accuracy by combining measurements of liver stiffness and spleen stiffness along with Doppler ultrasound evaluation. It is probable that the combination of these methods may also allow for the identification of patients with the most serious degree of portal hypertension, and ongoing research is helping to ensure progress in this field.

  4. Non-invasive volumetric assessment of aortic atheroma: a core laboratory validation using computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammadah, Muhammad; Qintar, Mohammed; Nissen, Steven E; John, Julie St; Alkharabsheh, Saqer; Mobolaji-Lawal, Motunrayo; Philip, Femi; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Babb, Brett; Poliszczuk, Roman; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Schoenhagen, Paul; Nicholls, Stephen J; Puri, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    Aortic atherosclerosis has been linked with worse peri- and post-procedural outcomes following a range of aortic procedures. Yet, there are currently no standardized methods for non-invasive volumetric pan-aortic plaque assessment. We propose a novel means of more accurately assessing plaque volume across whole aortic segments using computed tomography angiography (CTA) imaging. Sixty patients who underwent CTA prior to trans-catheter aortic valve implantation were included in this analysis. Specialized software analysis (3mensio Vascular™, Pie Medical, Maastricht, Netherlands) was used to reconstruct images using a centerline approach, thus creating true cross-sectional aortic images, akin to those images produced with intravascular ultrasonography. Following aortic segmentation (from the aortic valve to the renal artery origin), atheroma areas were measured across multiple contiguous evenly spaced (10 mm) cross-sections. Percent atheroma volume (PAV), total atheroma volume (TAV) and calcium score were calculated. In our populations (age 79.9 ± 8.5 years, male 52 %, diabetes 27 %, CAD 84 %, PVD 20 %), mean ± SD number of cross sections measured for each patient was 35.1 ± 3.5 sections. Mean aortic PAV and TAV were 33.2 ± 2.51 % and 83,509 ± 17,078 mm(3), respectively. Median (IQR) calcium score was 1.5 (0.7-2.5). Mean (SD) inter-observer coefficient of variation and agreement for plaque area among 4 different analysts was 14.1 (5.4), and the mean (95 % CI) Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.79 (0.62-0.89), effectively simulating a Core Laboratory scenario. We provide an initial validation of cross-sectional volumetric aortic atheroma assessment using CTA. This proposed methodology highlights the potential for utilizing non-invasive aortic plaque imaging for risk prediction across a range of clinical scenarios.

  5. Postoperative volume balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, H; Mortensen, C.R.; Secher, Niels H.

    2017-01-01

    In healthy humans, stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) do not increase with expansion of the central blood volume by head-down tilt or administration of fluid. Here, we exposed 85 patients to Trendelenburg's position about one hour after surgery while cardiovascular variables were determined...... non-invasively by Modelflow. In Trendelenburg's position, SV (83 ± 19 versus 89 ± 20 ml) and CO (6·2 ± 1·8 versus 6·8 ± 1·8 l/min; both Pheart rate (75 ± 15 versus 76 ± 14 b min(-1) ) and mean arterial pressure were unaffected (84 ± 15 versus 84 ± 16 mmHg). For the 33 patients......, determination of SV and/or CO in Trendelenburg's position can be used to evaluate whether a patient is in need of IV fluid as here exemplified after surgery....

  6. Stroke Volume During Concomitant Apnea and Exercise: Influence of Gravity and Venous Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Uwe; Drager, Tobias; Steegmanns, Ansgar; Koesterer, Thomas; Linnarsson, Dag

    2008-06-01

    The responses of the cardiovascular system to intensive exercise (hiP) and combined stimuli by hiP and breath-hold (hiP-BH) for 20 s were examined during changing gravity (parabolic flight) and constant gravity (1g). The basic response to microgravity (μg) during low-intensity exercise was an increase in cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume (SV) as a result of augmented venous return. When onset of hiP was superimposed, the initial augmentation of CO and SV were increased further. In contrast, when BH was added, the increases of CO and SV were slowed. We propose that this was due to a transient increase of the pulmonary blood volume with the combination of μg and BH at large lung volume, creating a temporary imbalance between right ventricular input and left ventricular output. In addition, the BH- induced relative bradycardia may have contributed to a prolongation of the right-to- left indirect ventricular interdependence.

  7. Stroke volume variation does not predict fluid responsiveness in patients with septic shock on pressure support ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Faber, T

    2006-01-01

    Stroke volume variation (SVV)--as measured by the pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) system--predicts the cardiac output response to a fluid challenge in patients on controlled ventilation. Whether this applies to patients on pressure support ventilation is unknown....

  8. Validation of a New Method for Stroke Volume Variation Assessment: a Comparaison with the PiCCO Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Papelier, Yves; Cottin, François; Van De Louw, Andry

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel, simple and minimally invasive method for stroke volume variation assessment using arterial blood pressure measurements. The arterial blood pressure signal is reconstructed using a semi-classical signal analysis method allowing the computation of a parameter, called the first systolic invariant INVS1. We show that INVS1 is linearly related to stroke volume. To validate this approach, a statistical comparaison between INVS1 and stroke volume measured with the PiCCO technique was performed during a 15-mn recording in 21 mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care. In 94% of the whole recordings, a strong correlation was estimated by cross-correlation analysis (mean coefficient=0.9) and linear regression (mean coefficient=0.89). Once the linear relation had been verified, a Bland-Altman test showed the very good agreement between the two approaches and their interchangeability. For the remaining 6%, INVS1 and the PiCCO stroke volume were not correlated at all, and this discrepa...

  9. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  10. Quantitative whole body biodistribution of fluorescent-labeled agents by non-invasive tomographic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine O Vasquez

    Full Text Available When small molecules or proteins are injected into live animals, their physical and chemical properties will significantly affect pharmacokinetics, tissue penetration, and the ultimate routes of metabolism and clearance. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT offers the ability to non-invasively image and quantify temporal changes in fluorescence throughout the major organ systems of living animals, in a manner analogous to traditional approaches with radiolabeled agents. This approach is best used with biotherapeutics (therapeutic antibodies, or other large proteins or large-scaffold drug-delivery vectors, that are minimally affected by low-level fluorophore conjugation. Application to small molecule drugs should take into account the significant impact of fluorophore labeling on size and physicochemical properties, however, the presents studies show that this technique is readily applied to small molecule agents developed for far-red (FR or near infrared (NIR imaging. Quantification by non-invasive FMT correlated well with both fluorescence from tissue homogenates as well as with planar (2D fluorescence reflectance imaging of excised intact organs (r²  =  0.996 and 0.969, respectively. Dynamic FMT imaging (multiple times from 0 to 24 h performed in live mice after the injection of four different FR/NIR-labeled agents, including immunoglobulin, 20-50 nm nanoparticles, a large vascular imaging agent, and a small molecule integrin antagonist, showed clear differences in the percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g in liver, kidney, and bladder signal. Nanoparticles and IgG1 favored liver over kidney signal, the small molecule integrin-binding agent favored rapid kidney and bladder clearance, and the vascular agent, showed both liver and kidney clearance. Further assessment of the volume of distribution of these agents by fluorescent volume added information regarding their biodistribution and highlighted the relatively poor

  11. Model based non-invasive estimation of PV loop from echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itu, Lucian; Sharma, Puneet; Georgescu, Bogdan; Kamen, Ali; Suciu, Constantin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a model-based approach for the non-invasive estimation of patient specific, left ventricular PV loops. A lumped parameter circulation model is used, composed of the pulmonary venous circulation, left atrium, left ventricle and the systemic circulation. A fully automated parameter estimation framework is introduced for model personalization, composed of two sequential steps: first, a series of parameters are computed directly, and, next, a fully automatic optimization-based calibration method is employed to iteratively estimate the values of the remaining parameters. The proposed methodology is first evaluated for three healthy volunteers: a perfect agreement is obtained between the computed quantities and the clinical measurements. Additionally, for an initial validation of the methodology, we computed the PV loop for a patient with mild aortic valve regurgitation and compared the results against the invasively determined quantities: there is a close agreement between the time-varying LV and aortic pressures, time-varying LV volumes, and PV loops.

  12. [Non-invasive prenatal testing: challenges for future implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Lidewij; Page-Chrisiaens, G C M L Lieve; Oepkes, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) is an accurate and safe test in which blood from the pregnant woman is used to investigate if the unborn child possibly has trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards' syndrome) or trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome). Since April 2014 the NIPT has been available in the Netherlands as part of the TRIDENT implementation project for those in whom the first trimester combined test showed an elevated risk (> 1:200) of trisomy, or on medical indication, as an alternative to chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis. Since the introduction of the NIPT the use of these invasive tests, which are associated with a risk of miscarriage, has fallen steeply. The NIPT may replace the combined test. Also the number of conditions that is tested for can be increased. Modification of current prenatal screening will require extensive discussion, but whatever the modification, careful counseling remains essential to facilitate pregnant women's autonomous reproductive decision making.

  13. Non-invasive measurement of pressure gradients using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Traberg, Marie Sand; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2013-01-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating 2-D pressure gradients from ultrasound vector velocity data is presented. The method relies on in-plane vector velocity fields acquired using the Transverse Oscillation method. The pressure gradients are estimated by applying the Navier-Stokes equations...... Medical 2202 UltraView Pro Focus scanner. The results are validated through finite element simulations of the carotid flow model where the geometry is determined from MR images. This proof of concept study was conducted at nine ultrasound frames per second. Estimated pressure gradients along...... the longitudinal direction of the constriction varied from 0 kPa/m to 10 kPa/m with a normalized bias of -9.1% for the axial component and -7.9% for the lateral component. The relative standard deviation of the estimator, given in reference to the peak gradient, was 28.4% in the axial direction and 64...

  14. Non-invasive brainstem monitoring: the ocular microtremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James; Timmons, Shelly

    2007-10-01

    The ocular microtremor (OMT) is mediated by the oculomotor area of the brainstem and is altered in several pathologic states, including traumatic brain injury, general anesthesia, brain death, coma, Parkinsonism and multiple sclerosis. The EYETECT tremor monitor is a non-invasive means of measuring the frequency and amplitude of this microscopic tremor. It has been clinically tested in these clinical scenarios and has been found to be a reliable means of detecting the depth of anesthesia, and has been useful in predicting outcome in coma and traumatic brain injury patients and in confirming brain death. This paper reviews the scientific literature on the EYETECT OMT monitor, describes the underlying physiology and discusses the potential for future works and clinical use of this innovative technology.

  15. Neurophotonics: non-invasive optical techniques for monitoring brain functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Caffini, Matteo; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this review is to present the state of the art of neurophotonics, a recently founded discipline lying at the interface between optics and neuroscience. While neurophotonics also includes invasive techniques for animal studies, in this review we focus only on the non-invasive methods that use near infrared light to probe functional activity in the brain, namely the fast optical signal, diffuse correlation spectroscopy, and functional near infrared spectroscopy methods. We also present an overview of the physical principles of light propagation in biological tissues, and of the main physiological sources of signal. Finally, we discuss the open issues in models, instrumentation, data analysis and clinical approaches. PMID:25764252

  16. Non-invasive exploration in an environmentally sensitive world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livo, K.E.; Knepper, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Modern remote sensing provides a means for locating and characterizing exposed mineralized systems in many parts of the world. These capabilities are non-invasive and help target specific areas for more detailed exploration. An example of how remote sensing technology can be used is evident from a study of the Questa Mining District, New Mexico. Analysis of low spectral resolution data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite system clearly shows the regional distribution of two broad mineral groups often associated with mineralized systems: clay-carbonate-sulfate and iron oxides-iron hydroxides. Analysis of high spectral resolution data from the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging System (AVIRIS) shows the occurrence and distribution of many individual mineral species that characterize the pattern of hydrothermally altered rocks in the district.

  17. [Non-invasive brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajo, Gianandrea; Pollak, Pierre; Lüscher, Christian; Benninger, David

    2015-04-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major socio-economic burden increasing with the aging population. In advanced PD, the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses a therapeutic challenge. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) as an alternative therapeutic tool. NIBS could offer an alternative approach for patients at risk who are excluded from surgery and/or to treat refractory symptoms. The treatment of the freezing of gait, a major cause of disability and falls in PD patients, could be enhanced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). A therapeutic study is currently performed at the Department of Neurology at the CHUV.

  18. Eyeblink conditioning: a non-invasive biomarker for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C; Fox, Nathan A

    2015-02-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition, abnormalities in the cerebellum, a region of the brain highly involved in EBC, have been implicated in a number of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the current paper, we review studies that have employed EBC as a biomarker for several neurodevelopmental disorders including fetal alcohol syndrome, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, specific language impairment, and schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the benefits of using such a tool in individuals with ASD.

  19. Non-invasive distress evaluation in preterm newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, C; Bocchi, L; Orlandi, S; Calisti, M; Spaccaterra, L; Donzelli, G P

    2008-01-01

    With the increased survival of very preterm infants, there is a growing concern for their developmental outcomes. Infant cry characteristics reflect the development and possibly the integrity of the central nervous system. In this paper, relationships between fundamental frequency (F(0)) and vocal tract resonance frequencies (F(1)-F(3)) are investigated for a set of preterm newborns, by means of a multi-purpose voice analysis tool (BioVoice), characterised by high-resolution and tracking capabilities. Also, first results about possible distress occurring during cry in preterm newborn infants, as related to the decrease of central blood oxygenation, are presented. To this aim, a recording system (Newborn Recorder) has been developed, that allows synchronised, non-invasive monitoring of blood oxygenation and audio recordings of newborn infant's cry. The method has been applied to preterm newborns at the Intensive Care Unit, A.Meyer Children Hospital, Firenze, Italy.

  20. Non-invasive beamforming add-on module

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2017-02-23

    An embodiment of a non-invasive beamforming add-on apparatus couples to an existing antenna port and rectifies the beam azimuth in the upstream and downstream directions. The apparatus comprises input circuitry that is configured to receive one or more signals from a neighboring node of the linear wireless sensor network; first amplifier circuitry configured to adjust an amplitude of a respective received signal in accordance with a weighting coefficient and invoke a desired phase to a carrier frequency of the received signal thereby forming a first amplified signal; and second amplifier circuitry configured to adjust a gain of the first amplified signal towards upstream and downstream neighbors of the linear wireless sensor in the linear wireless sensor network.

  1. Moral Enhancement Using Non-invasive Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, R. Ryan; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Biomedical enhancement refers to the use of biomedical interventions to improve capacities beyond normal, rather than to treat deficiencies due to diseases. Enhancement can target physical or cognitive capacities, but also complex human behaviors such as morality. However, the complexity of normal moral behavior makes it unlikely that morality is a single capacity that can be deficient or enhanced. Instead, our central hypothesis will be that moral behavior results from multiple, interacting cognitive-affective networks in the brain. First, we will test this hypothesis by reviewing evidence for modulation of moral behavior using non-invasive brain stimulation. Next, we will discuss how this evidence affects ethical issues related to the use of moral enhancement. We end with the conclusion that while brain stimulation has the potential to alter moral behavior, such alteration is unlikely to improve moral behavior in all situations, and may even lead to less morally desirable behavior in some instances. PMID:28275345

  2. Physician liability and non-invasive prenatal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Maeghan; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    Although non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) marks a notable development in the field of prenatal genetic testing, there are some physician liability considerations raised by this technology. As NIPT is still emerging as the standard of care and is just starting to receive provincial funding, the question arises of whether physicians are obligated to disclose the availability of NIPT to eligible patients as part of the physician-patient discussion about prenatal screening and diagnosis. If NIPT is discussed with patients, it is important to disclose the limitations of this technology with respect to its accuracy and the number of disorders that it can detect when compared with invasive diagnostic options. A failure to sufficiently disclose these limitations could leave patients with false assurances about the health of their fetuses and could raise informed consent and liability issues, particularly if a child is born with a disability as a result.

  3. Non-invasive prenatal testing: ethics and policy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstone, Meredith; King, Carol; de Vrijer, Barbra; Nisker, Jeff

    2014-06-01

    New technologies analyzing fetal DNA in maternal blood have led to the wide commercial availability of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). We present here for clinicians the ethical and policy issues related to an emerging practice option. Although NIPT presents opportunities for pregnant women, particularly women who are at increased risk of having a baby with an abnormality or who are otherwise likely to access invasive prenatal testing, NIPT brings significant ethics and policy challenges. The ethical issues include multiple aspects of informed decision-making, such as access to counselling about the possible results of the test in advance of making a decision about participation in NIPT. Policy considerations include issues related to offering and promoting a privately available medical strategy in publicly funded institutions. Ethics and policy considerations merge in NIPT with regard to sex selection and support for persons living with disabilities.

  4. Non-Invasive in vivo Imaging in Small Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real time in vivo molecular imaging in small animal models has become the essential bridge between in vitro data and their translation into clinical applications. The tremendous development and technological progress, such as tumour modelling, monitoring of tumour growth and detection of metastasis, has facilitated translational drug development. This has added to our knowledge on carcinogenesis. The modalities that are commonly used include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Computed Tomography (CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, bioluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging and multi-modality imaging systems. The ability to obtain multiple images longitudinally provides reliable information whilst reducing animal numbers. As yet there is no one modality that is ideal for all experimental studies. This review outlines the instrumentation available together with corresponding applications reported in the literature with particular emphasis on cancer research. Advantages and limitations to current imaging technology are discussed and the issues concerning small animal care during imaging are highlighted.

  5. Non invasive sensing technologies for cultural heritage management and fruition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of the information produced by science and technology for the knowledge of the cultural heritage depends on the quality of the feedback and, consequently, on the "cultural" distance between scientists and end-users. In particular, the solution to this problem mainly resides in the capability of end-users' capability to assess and transform the knowledge produced by diagnostics with regard to: information on both cultural objects and sites (decay patterns, vulnerability, presence of buried archaeological remains); decision making (management plan, conservation project, and excavation plan). From our experience in the field of the cultural heritage and namely the conservation, of monuments, there is a significant gap of information between technologists (geophysicists/physicists/engineers) and end-users (conservators/historians/architects). This cultural gap is due to the difficulty to interpret "indirect data" produced by non invasive diagnostics (i.e. radargrams/thermal images/seismic tomography etc..) in order to provide information useful to improve the historical knowledge (e.g. the chronology of the different phases of a building), to characterise the state of conservation (e.g. detection of cracks in the masonry) and to monitor in time cultural heritage artifacts and sites. The possible answer to this difficulty is in the set-up of a knowledge chain regarding the following steps: - Integrated application of novel and robust data processing methods; - Augmented reality as a tool for making easier the interpretation of non invasive - investigations for the analysis of decay pathologies of masonry and architectural surfaces; - The comparison between direct data (carrots, visual inspection) and results from non-invasive tests, including geophysics, aims to improve the interpretation and the rendering of the monuments and even of the archaeological landscapes; - The use of specimens or test beds for the detection of archaeological features and

  6. Non-invasive brain stimulation in neglect rehabilitation: An update.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Martin Müri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, we review the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS in the rehabilitation of neglect. We found 12 studies including 172 patients (10 TMS studies and 2 tDCS studies fulfilling our search criteria. Activity of daily living (ADL measures such as the Barthel Index or more specifically for neglect, the Catherine Bergego Scale were the outcome measure in 3 studies. Five studies were randomized controlled trials with a follow-up time after intervention of up to 6 weeks. One TMS study fulfilled criteria for Class I and one for Class III evidence.The studies are heterogeneous concerning their methodology, outcome measures, and stimulation parameters making firm comparisons and conclusions difficult. Overall, there are however promising results for theta burst stimulation, suggesting that TMS is a powerful add-on therapy in the rehabilitation of neglect patients.

  7. Non-invasive brain stimulation in neglect rehabilitation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müri, René Martin; Cazzoli, Dario; Nef, Tobias; Mosimann, Urs P; Hopfner, Simone; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the rehabilitation of neglect. We found 12 studies including 172 patients (10 TMS studies and 2 tDCS studies) fulfilling our search criteria. Activity of daily living measures such as the Barthel Index or, more specifically for neglect, the Catherine Bergego Scale were the outcome measure in three studies. Five studies were randomized controlled trials with a follow-up time after intervention of up to 6 weeks. One TMS study fulfilled criteria for Class I and one for Class III evidence. The studies are heterogeneous concerning their methodology, outcome measures, and stimulation parameters making firm comparisons and conclusions difficult. Overall, there are however promising results for theta-burst stimulation, suggesting that TMS is a powerful add-on therapy in the rehabilitation of neglect patients.

  8. Novel non invasive diagnostic strategies in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truta, Anamaria; Popon, Tudor Adrian Hodor; Saraci, George; Ghervan, Liviu; Pop, Ioan Victor

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies worldwide, derived from the urothelium of the urinary bladder and defined by long asymptomatic and atypical clinical picture. Its complex etiopathogenesis is dependent on numerous risk factors that can be divided into three distinct categories: genetic and molecular abnormalities, chemical or environmental exposure and previous genitourinary disorders and family history of different malignancies. Various genetic polymorphisms and microRNA might represent useful diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Genetic and molecular abnormalities - risk factors are represented by miRNA or genetic polymorphisms proved to be part of bladder carcinogenesis such as: genetic mutations of oncogenes TP53, Ras, Rb1 or p21 oncoproteins, cyclin D or genetic polymorhisms of XPD,ERCC1, CYP1B1, NQO1C609T, MDM2SNP309, CHEK2, ERCC6, NRF2, NQO1Pro187Ser polymorphism and microRNA (miR-143, -145, -222, -210, -10b, 576-3p). The aim of our article is to highlight the most recent acquisitions via molecular biomarkers (miRNAs and genetic polymorphisms) involved in bladder cancer in order to provide early diagnosis, precise therapy according to the molecular profile of bladder tumors, as well as to improve clinical outcome, survival rates and life quality of oncological patients. These molecular biomarkers play a key role in bladder carcinogenesis, clinical evolution, prognosis and therapeutic response and explain the molecular mechanisms involved in bladder carcinogenesis; they can also be selected as therapeutic targets in developing novel therapeutic strategies in bladder malignancies. Moreover, the purpose in defining these molecular non invasive biomarkers is also to develop non invasive screening programs in bladder malignancies with the result of decreasing bladder cancer incidence in risk population.

  9. Non-invasive actionable biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current clinical setting, many disease management options are available for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. For metastatic prostate cancer, first-line therapies almost always involve agents designed to inhibit androgen receptor (AR signaling. Castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs that arise following first-line androgen deprivation therapies (ADT may continue to respond to additional lines of AR-targeting therapies (abiraterone and enzalutamide, chemotherapies (docetaxel and cabazitaxel, bone-targeting Radium-223 therapy, and immunotherapy sipuleucel-T. The rapidly expanding therapies for CRPC is expected to transform this lethal disease into one that can be managed for prolonged period of time. In the past 3 years, a number of promising biomarkers that may help to guide treatment decisions have been proposed and evaluated, including androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, a truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain (LBD and mediate constitutively-active AR signaling. Putative treatment selection markers such as AR-V7 may further improve survival benefit of existing therapies and help to accelerate development of new agents for metastatic prostate cancer. In the metastatic setting, it is important to consider compatibility between the putative biomarker with non-invasive sampling. In this review, biomarkers relevant to the setting of metastatic prostate cancer are discussed with respect to a number of key attributes critical for clinical development of non-invasive, actionable markers. It is envisioned that biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer will continue to be discovered, developed, and refined to meet the unmet needs in both standard-of-care and clinical trial settings.

  10. Non-invasive Blood Glucose Quantification Using a Hybrid Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundararajan JAYAPAL

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose levels which result from defects in insulin secretion. It is very important for the diabetics and normal people to have a correct blood glucose level. The HbA1c test is the most preferred test by renowned doctors for glucose quantification. But this test is an invasive one. At present, there are many available techniques for this purpose but these are mostly invasive or minimally non-invasive and most of these are under research. Among the different methods available, the photo acoustic (PA methods provide a reliable solution since the acoustical energy loss is much less compared to the optical or other techniques. Here a novel framework is presented for blood glucose level measurement using a combination of the HbA1c test and a PA method to get an absolutely consistent and precise, non-invasive technique. The setup uses a pulsed laser diode with pulse duration of 5-15 ns and at a repetition rate of 10 Hz as the source. The detector setup is based on the piezoelectric detection. It consists of a ring detector that includes two double ring sensors that are attached to the ring shaped module that can be worn around the finger. The major aim is to detect the photo acoustic signals from the glycated hemoglobin with the least possible error. The proposed monitoring system is designed with extreme consideration to precision and compatibility with the other computing devices. The results obtained in this research have been studied and analyzed by comparing these with those of in-vitro techniques like the HPLC. The comparison has been plotted and it shows a least error. The results also show a positive drive for using this concept as a basis for future extension in quantifying the other blood components.

  11. Stroke volume variation and pleth variability index to predict fluid responsiveness during resection of primary retroperitoneal tumors in Hans Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Q; Mi, W D; Zhang, H

    2012-02-01

    Respiration variation in arterial pulse pressure (ΔPP) and pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform amplitude (ΔPOP) are accurate predictors of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. We hypothesized that stroke volume variation (SVV) and pleth variability index (PVI) can predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients during major surgical procedures in Hans Chinese. This prospective study consisted of fifty-five Hans Chinese patients undergoing resection of primary retroperitoneal tumors (PRPT). During the surgical procedures, hemodynamic data [central venous pressure (CVP), cardiac index (CI), stroke volume index (SVI), SVV, and PVI] were recorded before and after volume expansion (VE) (8 ml•kg-1 of 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4). Fluid responsiveness was defined as an increase in SVI ≥ 10% after VE. Four patients were excluded from analysis for arrhythmia or obvious hemorrhage during VE. Baseline SVV correlated well with baseline PVI and the changes in SVV was correlated with the changes in PVI (p Chinese.

  12. Stroke rehabilitation: recent advances and future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, L; Horgan, F; Hickey, A; Williams, D

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in the acute management of stroke, a large proportion of stroke patients are left with significant impairments. Over the coming decades the prevalence of stroke-related disability is expected to increase worldwide and this will impact greatly on families, healthcare systems and economies. Effective neuro-rehabilitation is a key factor in reducing disability after stroke. In this review, we discuss the effects of stroke, principles of stroke rehabilitative care and predictors of recovery. We also discuss novel therapies in stroke rehabilitation, including non-invasive brain stimulation, robotics and pharmacological augmentation. Many trials are currently underway, which, in time, may impact on future rehabilitative practice.

  13. Stroke rehabilitation: recent advances and future therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, L

    2012-09-27

    Despite advances in the acute management of stroke, a large proportion of stroke patients are left with significant impairments. Over the coming decades the prevalence of stroke-related disability is expected to increase worldwide and this will impact greatly on families, healthcare systems and economies. Effective neuro-rehabilitation is a key factor in reducing disability after stroke. In this review, we discuss the effects of stroke, principles of stroke rehabilitative care and predictors of recovery. We also discuss novel therapies in stroke rehabilitation, including non-invasive brain stimulation, robotics and pharmacological augmentation. Many trials are currently underway, which, in time, may impact on future rehabilitative practice.

  14. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad, C. L.; Marciani, L.; Foley, S.; Totman, J. J.; Wright, J.; Bush, D.; Cox, E. F.; Campbell, E.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug intervention.

  15. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoad, C L [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Marciani, L [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Foley, S [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Totman, J J [Brain and Body Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Wright, J [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Bush, D [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Cox, E F [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Campbell, E [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Spiller, R C [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gowland, P A [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-07

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug interventio000.

  16. Effect of baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) apparent diffusion coefficient lesion volume on functional outcome in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Gao, Pei-yi; Hu, Qing-mao; Lin, Yan; Jing, Li-na; Xue, Jing; Chen, Zhi-jun; Wang, Yong-jun; Liu, Mei-li; Cai, Ye-feng

    2011-06-01

    We explored the relationship between predicted infarct core, predicted ischemic penumbras and predicted final infarct volumes obtained though apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)-based method, as well as other clinical variables, and functional outcome. Patients with acute cerebral ischemic stroke were retrospectively recruited. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was evaluated at baseline and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at day 90. Favorable outcome was defined as an mRS score of 0 to 2, and unfavorable outcome as 3 to 6. Multimodal stroke magnetic resonance imaging was carried out at presentation. The volumes of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) were measured using the regions of interest (ROI) method. The volumes of predicted infarct core, predicted ischemic penumbra and predicted final infarct were obtained by an automated image analysis system based on baseline ADC maps. The association between baseline magnetic resonance imaging volumes, baseline clinical variables, and functional outcome was statistically analyzed. The study included 30 males and 20 females (mean±SD age, 56±10 years). Baseline DWI, PWI and PWI-DWI mismatch volumes were not correlated with day-90 mRS (P>0.05). Predicted infarct core, predicted ischemic penumbra and predicted final infarct through ADC-based method were all correlated with day-90 mRS (PStroke Scale and recanalization also demonstrated a trend toward a favorable outcome. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the area under the curve of predicted final infarct volume and recanalization were higher with statistical significance (PStroke Scale and recanalization may have effect on functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Using non-invasive brain stimulation to augment motor training-induced plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascual-Leone Alvaro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapies for motor recovery after stroke or traumatic brain injury are still not satisfactory. To date the best approach seems to be the intensive physical therapy. However the results are limited and functional gains are often minimal. The goal of motor training is to minimize functional disability and optimize functional motor recovery. This is thought to be achieved by modulation of plastic changes in the brain. Therefore, adjunct interventions that can augment the response of the motor system to the behavioural training might be useful to enhance the therapy-induced recovery in neurological populations. In this context, noninvasive brain stimulation appears to be an interesting option as an add-on intervention to standard physical therapies. Two non-invasive methods of inducing electrical currents into the brain have proved to be promising for inducing long-lasting plastic changes in motor systems: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. These techniques represent powerful methods for priming cortical excitability for a subsequent motor task, demand, or stimulation. Thus, their mutual use can optimize the plastic changes induced by motor practice, leading to more remarkable and outlasting clinical gains in rehabilitation. In this review we discuss how these techniques can enhance the effects of a behavioural intervention and the clinical evidence to date.

  18. Non-Invasive Electrical Brain Stimulation Montages for Modulation of Human Motor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Marco; Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine

    2016-02-04

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation (NEBS) is used to modulate brain function and behavior, both for research and clinical purposes. In particular, NEBS can be applied transcranially either as direct current stimulation (tDCS) or alternating current stimulation (tACS). These stimulation types exert time-, dose- and in the case of tDCS polarity-specific effects on motor function and skill learning in healthy subjects. Lately, tDCS has been used to augment the therapy of motor disabilities in patients with stroke or movement disorders. This article provides a step-by-step protocol for targeting the primary motor cortex with tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a specific form of tACS using an electrical current applied randomly within a pre-defined frequency range. The setup of two different stimulation montages is explained. In both montages the emitting electrode (the anode for tDCS) is placed on the primary motor cortex of interest. For unilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the contralateral forehead while for bilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the opposite primary motor cortex. The advantages and disadvantages of each montage for the modulation of cortical excitability and motor function including learning are discussed, as well as safety, tolerability and blinding aspects.

  19. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M.P.

    1996-08-27

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator is disclosed for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator. 11 figs.

  20. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  1. Differences analysis of invasive and non-invasive blood pressure in patients with hypertension and stroke:a Meta analysis%高血压及休克患者有创与无创血压差异性的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇娇; 高岚; 孙士艳; 李春静

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the best method of monitoring blood pressure in patients with hypertensive or shock. Methods According to the meta-analysis of the studies that compared records the of the invasive and noninvasive blood pressure of the hypertensive and shock patients in Chinese medical journals published, through the Revman5. 1 for metaanalysis. Results The hypertension group had totally retrieved 6 articles, and Meta analysis showed the systolic pressure was WMD=18. 08,95%CI=13. 75-2. 40, and NBP had difference with IBP in systolic pressure that the blood pressure of IBP method was higher than that of NBP;after U test, P <0. 000 1. The diastolic was WMD =4. 36, 95% CI = -2. 963-11. 68 and there was no statistically significant in difference of two methods to measure diastolic pressure. The stroke group was totally retrieved 9 randomized trails with diastolic blood pressure WMD= -13. 79, 95%CI= -16. 7--10. 88 and systolic blood pressure WMD= -8. 67, 95%CI= -10. 53--6. 81; both NBP of diastolic and systolic blood pressure were higher than that of IBP;after U test, P<0. 000 1. Conclusions IBP can reflect the change of hypertension and stroke dynamically, so it can save value time of rescue in clinical.%目的 探讨高血压及休克患者血压监测的最佳方法. 方法 检索中英文医学期刊公开发表的关于高血压及休克患者有创与无创血压监测进行对比的文献,通过Revman 5. 3 软件进行Meta分析. 结果 高血压组共纳入6篇文献,Meta分析结果显示,收缩压WMD=18. 08,95%CI=13. 75~2. 40,无创血压(NBP)与有创血压(IBP)测得收缩压值不同,IBP法高于NBP法,经U检验,P<0. 000 1,结果具有统计学意义. 舒张压WMD=4. 36,95%CI= -2. 963~11. 68,两种方法所测舒张压差异无统计学意义. 休克组共纳入9篇随机对照试验文献,收缩压WMD= -13. 79,95%CI= -16. 7~ -10. 88,舒张压WMD= -8. 67,95%CI= -10. 53~ -6. 81,无论收缩压或舒张压,NBP法测得值均高于IBP法,经U检验,P<0

  2. MO-E-BRD-01: Is Non-Invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiatt, J. [Rhode Island Hospital (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  3. Non-Invasive In Vivo Characterization of Breast Tumors Using Photon Migration Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce J. Tromberg

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM is a noninvasive optical technique that utilizes intensity-modulated, near-infrared (NIR light to quantitatively measure optical properties in thick tissues. Optical properties (absorption, μa, and scattering, μs′, parameters derived from FDPM measurements can be used to construct low-resolution (0.5 to 1 cm functional images of tissue hemoglobin (total, oxy-, and deoxyforms, oxygen saturation, blood volume fraction, water content, fat content and cellular structure. Unlike conventional NIR transillumination, FDPM enables quantitative analysis of tissue absorption and scattering parameters in a single non-invasive measurement. The unique functional information provided by FDPM makes it well-suited to characterizing tumors in thick tissues. In order to test the sensitivity of FDPM for cancer diagnosis, we have initiated clinical studies to quantitatively determine normal and malignant breast tissue optical and physiological properties in human subjects. Measurements are performed using a non-invasive, multi-wavelength, diode-laser FDPM device optimized for clinical studies. Results show that ductal carcinomas (invasive and in situ and benign fibroadenomas exhibit 1.25 to 3-fold higher absorption than normal breast tissue. Within this group, absorption is greatest for measurements obtained from sites of invasive cancer. Optical scattering is approximately 20% greater in pre-menopausal versus post-menopausal subjects due to differences in gland/cell proliferation and collagen/fat content. Spatial variations in tissue scattering reveal the loss of differentiation associated with breast disease progression. Overall, the metabolic demands of hormonal stimulation and tumor growth are detectable using photon migration techniques. Measurements provide quantitative optical property values that reflect changes in tissue perfusion, oxygen consumption, and cell/matrix development.

  4. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation under different inhaled concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in pigs undergoing hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hideaki Oshiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Inhalant anesthesia induces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression, but whether fluid responsiveness is differentially influenced by the inhalant agent and plasma volemia remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in pigs undergoing hemorrhage. METHODS: Twenty-five pigs were randomly anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were registered sequentially at minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M1, 1.25 (M2, and 1.00 (M3. Then, following withdrawal of 30% of the estimated blood volume, these data were registered at a minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M4 and 1.25 (M5. RESULTS: The minimum alveolar concentration increase from 1.00 to 1.25 (M2 decreased the cardiac index and increased the central venous pressure, but only modest changes in mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were observed in all groups from M1 to M2. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure was only observed with desflurane. Following blood loss (M4, pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation and central venous pressure increased (p <0.001 and mean arterial pressure decreased in all groups. Under hypovolemia, the cardiac index decreased with the increase of anesthesia depth in a similar manner in all groups. CONCLUSION: The effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were not different during normovolemia or hypovolemia.

  5. Impedance cardiography: Pulsatile blood flow and the biophysical and electrodynamic basis for the stroke volume equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald P Bernstein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Impedance cardiography (ICG is a branch of bioimpedance pimarily concerned with the determination of left ventricular stroke volume (SV. As implemented, using the transthoracic approach, the technique involves applying a current field longitudinally across a segment of thorax by means of a constant magnitude, high frequency, low amplitude alternating current (AC. By Ohm's Law, the voltage difference measured within the current field is proportional to the electrical impedance Z (Ω. Without ventilatory or cardiac activity, Z is known as the transthoracic, static base impedance Z0. Upon ventricular ejection, a characteristic time dependent cardiac-synchronous pulsatile impedance change is obtained, ΔZ(t, which, when placed electrically in parallel with Z0, constitutes the time-variable total transthoracic impedance Z(t. ΔZ(t represents a dual-element composite waveform, which comprises both the radially-oriented volumetric expansion of and axially-directed forward blood flow within both great thoracic arteries. In its majority, however, ΔZ(t is known to primarily emanate from the ascending aorta. Conceptually, commonly implemented methods assume a volumetric origin for the peak systolic upslope of ΔZ(t, (i.e. dZ/dtmax, with the presumed units of Ω·s-1. A recently introduced method assumes the rapid ejection of forward flowing blood in earliest systole causes significant changes in the velocity-induced blood resistivity variation (Δρb(t, Ωcm·s-1, and it is the peak rate of change of the blood resistivity variation dρb(t/dtmax (Ωcm·s-2 that is the origin of dZ/dtmax. As a consequence of dZ/dtmax peaking in the time domain of peak aortic blood acceleration, dv/dtmax (cm·s-2, it is suggested that dZ/dtmax is an ohmic mean acceleration analog (Ω·s-2 and not a mean flow or velocity surrogate as generally assumed. As conceptualized, the normalized value, dZ/dtmax/Z0, is a dimensionless ohmic mean acceleration equivalent (s-2

  6. Application of optical non-invasive methods in skin physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Darvin, M.; Richter, H.; Antoniou, C.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2008-05-01

    In the present paper the application of optical non-invasive methods in dermatology and cosmetology is discussed. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) are the most promising methods for this application. Using these methods, the analysis of different skin parameters like dryness and oiliness of the skin, the barrier function and the structure of furrows and wrinkles are discussed. Additionally the homogeneity of distribution of topically applied creams, as well as their penetration into the skin were investigated. It is shown that these methods are highly valuable in dermatology for diagnostic and therapy control and for basic research, for instance in the field of structure analysis of hair follicles and sweat glands. The vertical images of the tissue produced by OCT can be easily compared with histological sections. Unfortunately, the resolution of the OCT technique is not high enough to carry out measurements on a cellular level, as is possible by LSM. LSM has the advantage that it can be used for the investigation of penetration and storage processes of topically applied substances, if these substances have fluorescent properties or if they are fluorescent-labelled.

  7. Novel non-invasive protein and peptide drug delivery approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, L; Kleynhans, E; Toit, T Du; Gouws, C; Steyn, D; Steenekamp, J; Viljoen, J; Hamman, J

    2014-01-01

    Protein and peptide based therapeutics are typically administered by injection due to their poor uptake when administered via enteral routes of drug administration. Unfortunately, chronic administration of these drugs through multiple injections presents certain patient related problems and it is difficult to mimic the normal physiological release patterns via this mode of drug administration. A need therefore exists to non-invasively deliver these drugs by means of alternative ways such as via the oral, pulmonary, nasal, transdermal and buccal administration routes. Although some attempts of needle free peptide and protein drug delivery have progressed to the clinical stage, relatively limited success has been achieved in terms of commercially available products. Despite the low frequency of clinical breakthroughs with noninvasive protein drug delivery this far, it remains an active research area with renewed interest not only due to its improved therapeutic potential, but also due to the attractive commercial outcomes it offers. It is the aim of this review article to reflect on the main strategies investigated to overcome the barriers against effective systemic protein drug delivery in different routes of drug administration. Approaches based on chemical modifications and pharmaceutical technologies are discussed with reference to examples of drugs and devices that have shown potential, while attempts that have failed are also briefly outlined.

  8. Non-invasive imaging of microcirculation: a technology review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sam Eriksson,1,2 Jan Nilsson,1,2 Christian Sturesson1,2 1Department of Surgery, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, 2Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden Abstract: Microcirculation plays a crucial role in physiological processes of tissue oxygenation and nutritional exchange. Measurement of microcirculation can be applied on many organs in various pathologies. In this paper we aim to review the technique of non-invasive methods for imaging of the microcirculation. Methods covered are: videomicroscopy techniques, laser Doppler perfusion imaging, and laser speckle contrast imaging. Videomicroscopy techniques, such as orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and sidestream dark-field imaging, provide a plentitude of information and offer direct visualization of the microcirculation but have the major drawback that they may give pressure artifacts. Both laser Doppler perfusion imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging allow non-contact measurements but have the disadvantage of their sensitivity to motion artifacts and that they are confined to relative measurement comparisons. Ideal would be a non-contact videomicroscopy method with fully automatic analysis software. Keywords: laser speckle contrast imaging, sidestream dark-field, orthogonal polarization spectral imaging, laser Dopplerimaging

  9. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders.

  10. Mucositis and non-invasive markers of small intestinal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Butler, Ross N

    2009-05-01

    Mucositis is a common and debilitating side effect of chemotherapy that manifests due to the inability of chemotherapy agents to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. This results in ulcerating lesions lining the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the development of efficacious treatments for small intestinal mucositis has been hindered as the pathobiology of mucositis is still not fully understood. The small intestine is an extensive organ which is largely inaccessible by conventional means. Non-invasive biomarkers such as small intestinal permeability, H(2) breath tests, serum citrulline tests and the (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) have emerged as potential markers of small intestinal function. The SBT is emerging as the more appropriate biomarker to assess chemotherapy-induced mucositis in cancer patients and animal models, where it measures the decrease in sucrase activity associated with villus blunting and crypt disruption. The SBT has been successfully applied to detect mucositis induced by different classes of chemotherapy agents and has been used successfully to monitor small intestinal function with a range of candidate anti-mucositis treatments. We propose the SBT a superior biomarker of small intestinal function that could be successfully applied in clinical practice for monitoring the development of mucositis in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  11. Non-invasive system for monitoring of the manufacturing equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazăre, A. G.; Belu, N.; Ionescu, L. M.; Rachieru, N.; Misztal, A.

    2017-08-01

    The automotive industry is one of the most important industries in the world that concerns the economy and the world culture. High demand has resulted in increasing of the pressure on the production lines. In conclusion, it is required more careful in monitoring of the production equipment not only for maintenance but also for staff safety and to increase the quality of production. In this paper, we propose a solution for non-invasive monitoring of the industrial equipment operation by measuring the current consumption on energy supply lines. Thus, it is determined the utilization schedule of the equipment and operation mode. Based on these measurements, it’s built an activity report for that equipment, available to the quality management and maintenance team. The solution consists of the current measuring equipment, with self-harvesting capabilities and radio transceiver, and an embedded system which run a server. The current measuring equipment will transmit data about consumption of each energy supply network line where is placed the industrial equipment. So, we have an internal measuring radio network. The embedded system will collect data for the equipment and put in a local data base and it will provide via an intranet application. The entire system not requires any supplementary energy supply and interventions in the factory infrastructure. It is experimented in a company from the automotive industries.

  12. Facilitate insight by non-invasive brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Chi

    Full Text Available Our experiences can blind us. Once we have learned to solve problems by one method, we often have difficulties in generating solutions involving a different kind of insight. Yet there is evidence that people with brain lesions are sometimes more resistant to this so-called mental set effect. This inspired us to investigate whether the mental set effect can be reduced by non-invasive brain stimulation. 60 healthy right-handed participants were asked to take an insight problem solving task while receiving transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to the anterior temporal lobes (ATL. Only 20% of participants solved an insight problem with sham stimulation (control, whereas 3 times as many participants did so (p = 0.011 with cathodal stimulation (decreased excitability of the left ATL together with anodal stimulation (increased excitability of the right ATL. We found hemispheric differences in that a stimulation montage involving the opposite polarities did not facilitate performance. Our findings are consistent with the theory that inhibition to the left ATL can lead to a cognitive style that is less influenced by mental templates and that the right ATL may be associated with insight or novel meaning. Further studies including neurophysiological imaging are needed to elucidate the specific mechanisms leading to the enhancement.

  13. An optical approach for non-invasive blood clot testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brill, Alexander; Fine, Ilya; Harmelin, Alon

    2007-02-01

    Physiological blood coagulation is an essential biological process. Current tests for plasma coagulation (clotting) need to be performed ex vivo and require fresh blood sampling for every test. A recently published work describes a new, noninvasive, in vivo approach to assess blood coagulation status during mechanical occlusion1. For this purpose, we have tested this approach and applied a controlled laser beam to blood micro-vessels of the mouse ear during mechanical occlusion. Standard setup for intravital transillumination videomicroscopy and laser based imaging techniques were used for monitoring the blood clotting process. Temporal mechanical occlusion of blood vessels in the observed area was applied to ensure blood flow cessation. Subsequently, laser irradiation was used to induce vascular micro-injury. Changes in the vessel wall, as well as in the pattern of blood flow, predispose the area to vascular thrombosis, according to the paradigm of Virchow's triad. In our experiments, two elements of Virchow's triad were used to induce the process of clotting in vivo, and to assess it optically. We identified several parameters that can serve as markers of the blood clotting process in vivo. These include changes in light absorption in the area of illumination, as well as changes in the pattern of the red blood cells' micro-movement in the vessels where blood flow is completely arrested. Thus, our results indicate that blood coagulation status can be characterized by non-invasive, in vivo methodologies.

  14. Alteration of political belief by non- invasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eChawke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available People generally have imperfect introspective access to the mechanisms underlying their political beliefs, yet can confidently communicate the reasoning that goes into their decision making process. An innate desire for certainty and security in ones beliefs may play an important and somewhat automatic role in motivating the maintenance or rejection of partisan support. The aim of the current study was to clarify the role of the DLPFC in the alteration of political beliefs. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on the association between the DLPFC (a region involved in the regulation of cognitive conflict and error feedback processing and reduced affiliation with opposing political candidates. As such, this study used a method of non- invasive brain simulation (tRNS to enhance activity of the bilateral DLPFC during the incorporation of political campaign information. These findings indicate a crucial role for this region in political belief formation. However, enhanced activation of DLPFC does not necessarily result in the specific rejection of political beliefs. In contrast to the hypothesis the results appear to indicate a significant increase in conservative values regardless of participant’s initial political orientation and the political campaign advertisement they were exposed to.

  15. Alteration of Political Belief by Non-invasive Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawke, Caroline; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    People generally have imperfect introspective access to the mechanisms underlying their political beliefs, yet can confidently communicate the reasoning that goes into their decision making process. An innate desire for certainty and security in ones beliefs may play an important and somewhat automatic role in motivating the maintenance or rejection of partisan support. The aim of the current study was to clarify the role of the DLPFC in the alteration of political beliefs. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on the association between the DLPFC (a region involved in the regulation of cognitive conflict and error feedback processing) and reduced affiliation with opposing political candidates. As such, this study used a method of non-invasive brain simulation (tRNS) to enhance activity of the bilateral DLPFC during the incorporation of political campaign information. These findings indicate a crucial role for this region in political belief formation. However, enhanced activation of DLPFC does not necessarily result in the specific rejection of political beliefs. In contrast to the hypothesis the results appear to indicate a significant increase in conservative values regardless of participant's initial political orientation and the political campaign advertisement they were exposed to.

  16. Photoionization sensors for non-invasive medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, Aleksandr; Rastvorova, Iuliia; Khobnya, Kristina; Podenko, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of biomarkers can help to identify the significant number of diseases: lung cancer, tuberculosis, diabetes, high levels of stress, psychosomatic disorders etc. To implement continuous monitoring of the state of human health, compact VUV photoionization detector with current-voltage measurement is designed by Saint-Petersburg Mining University Plasma Research Group. This sensor is based on the patented method of stabilization of electric parameters - CES (Collisional Electron Spectroscopy). During the operation at atmospheric pressure VUV photoionization sensor measures the energy of electrons, produced in the ionization with the resonance photons, whose wavelength situated in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). A special software was developed to obtain the second-order derivative of the I-U characteristics, taken by the VUV sensor, to construct the energy spectra of the characteristic electrons. VUV photoionization detector has an unique set of parameters: small size (10*10*1 mm), low cost, wide range of recognizable molecules, as well as accuracy, sufficient for using this instrument for the medical purposes. This device can be used for non-invasive medical diagnostics without compromising the quality of life, for control of environment and human life. Work supported by Foundation for Assistance to Small Innovative Enterprises in Science and Technology.

  17. [Non-invasive Genetic Prenatal Testing - A Serious Challenge for Society as a Whole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerres, K

    2015-04-01

    Non-invasive genetic prenatal tests nowadays allow a highly reliable identification of pregnancies with foetal aneuploidies. Due to the general availability of these tests for all pregnant women, non-invasive genetic prenatal testing raises many ethical questions whieh can only be answered by a debate focused on society as a whole.

  18. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring in neonates using bioreactance: a comparison with echocardiography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weisz, Dany E

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring is a potentially useful clinical tool in the neonatal setting. Our aim was to evaluate a new method of non-invasive continuous cardiac output (CO) measurement (NICOM™) based on the principle of bioreactance in neonates.

  19. Imaging the pancreas: from ex vivo to non-invasive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, D; Ahlgren, U

    2008-01-01

    While many recently published reviews have covered non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques, the aim of this review is to focus on current developments in optical imaging technologies for investigating the pancreas. Several of these modalities are being developed into non-invasive, real...

  20. Respiratory-gated electrical impedance tomography: a potential technique for quantifying stroke volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Saaid H.; Murphy, Ethan K.; Halter, Ryan J.

    2016-03-01

    Telemonitoring is becoming increasingly important as the proportion of the population living with cardiovascular disease (CVD) increases. Currently used health parameters in the suite of telemonitoring tools lack the sensitivity and specificity to accurately predict heart failure events, forcing physicians to play a reactive versus proactive role in patient care. A novel cardiac output (CO) monitoring device is proposed that leverages a custom smart phone application and a wearable electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system. The purpose of this work is to explore the potential of using respiratory-gated EIT to quantify stroke volume (SV) and assess its feasibility using real data. Simulations were carried out using the 4D XCAT model to create anatomically realistic meshes and electrical conductivity profiles representing the human thorax and the intrathoracic tissue. A single 5-second period respiration cycle with chest/lung expansion was modeled with end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) heart volumes to evaluate how effective EIT-based conductivity changes represent clinically significant differences in SV. After establishing a correlation between conductivity changes and SV, the applicability of the respiratory-gated EIT was refined using data from the PhysioNet database to estimate the number of useful end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) heart events attained over a 3.3 minute period. The area associated with conductivity changes was found to correlate to SV with a correlation coefficient of 0.92. A window of 12.5% around peak exhalation was found to be the optimal phase of the respiratory cycle from which to record EIT data. Within this window, ~47 useable ED and ES were found with a standard deviation of 28 using 3.3 minutes of data for 20 patients.

  1. Moderate Recovery Unnecessary to Sustain High Stroke Volume during Interval Training. A Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Stanley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the time spent at a high stroke volume (SV is important for improving maximal cardiac function. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of recovery intensity on cardiovascular parameters during a typical high-intensity interval training (HIIT session in fourteen well-trained cyclists. Oxygen consumption (VO2, heart rate (HR, SV, cardiac output (Qc, and oxygenation of vastus lateralis (TSI were measured during a HIIT (3×3-min work period, 2 min of recovery session on two occasions. VO2, HR and Qc were largely higher during moderate-intensity (60% compared with low-intensity (30% (VO2, effect size; ES = +2.6; HR, ES = +2.8; Qc, ES = +2.2 and passive (HR, ES = +2.2; Qc, ES = +1.7 recovery. By contrast, there was no clear difference in SV between the three recovery conditions, with the SV during the two active recovery periods not being substantially different than during exercise (60%, ES = −0.1; 30%, ES = −0.2. To conclude, moderate-intensity recovery may not be required to maintain a high SV during HIIT.

  2. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, Ahmed E. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, University Hospital Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Center for Medical-IT Convergence Technology Research, Advanced Institute of Convergence Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p <.05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. (orig.)

  3. Exercise stroke volume and heart rate response differ in right and left heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groepenhoff, Herman; Westerhof, Nico; Jacobs, Wouter; Boonstra, Anco; Postmus, Piet E; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton

    2010-07-01

    In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), the exercise-induced increase in stroke volume (SV) is limited by the increase in pulmonary artery pressure. In left heart failure (LHF), systemic arterial pressure increases little during exercise, and the SV increase is limited by the left ventricle itself. These differences might be reflected by a dissimilar SV and heart rate (HR) response to exercise, which could have important therapeutic implications, for example in beta-blocker therapy. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that SV and HR responses during exercise are different between PAH and LHF patients. We included 28 PAH and 18 LHF patients (recruited from the heart failure unit) matched on a maximal oxygen uptake of exercise test. Only patients who had not been exposed to beta-blockers were included. Pulmonary arterial hypertension and LHF patient groups had equally impaired exercise tolerance (about 42% of predicted) with a maximal oxygen uptake of 0.80 +/- 0.29 and 0.86 +/- 0.19 L/min. The peak SV response to exercise was significantly lower in PAH patients (-14 mL, P = 0.01); this was compensated by a steeper slope of HR relating to oxygen uptake (0.03 beats/mL, P = 0.001). We conclude that PAH patients have a smaller SV response, but a larger HR response than LHF patients.

  4. Rowing increases stroke volume and cardiac output to a greater extent than cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, P; Ostadal, P; Ostadal, B

    2015-01-01

    Exercise stimulates increases in heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). These adaptive mechanisms are strongly dependent on the type of exercise. Both rowing and cycling are widely used for physical training worldwide; however, evidence regarding the differences in major hemodynamic parameters during rowing and cycling remains insufficient. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to perform either a rowing or cycling exercise. After 20 min rest, the group who had rowed first performed the cycling exercise and vice versa. Exercise was performed at a power-to-weight ratio of 2 W/kg for 2 min. HR, SV, CO and blood pressure (BP) were measured noninvasively using pulse-wave analysis at baseline and immediately after each exercise. HR, SV and CO were significantly higher after exercise than at rest. Whereas HR was comparable between rowing and cycling, SV and CO were significantly higher after rowing than after cycling. BP was comparable among all three measurements. Rowing increased SV and CO to a greater extent than cycling, whereas HR and BP were not influenced by the type of exercise. Our data suggest that rowing leads to more extensive stimulation of cardiac contractility and/or decreases in peripheral vascular resistance compared with cycling.

  5. Stroke volume variation compared with pulse pressure variation and cardiac index changes for prediction of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Aly Soliman

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Baseline stroke volume variation ⩾8.15% predicted fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with acute circulatory failure. The study also confirmed the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness.

  6. Validation of non-invasive haemodynamic methods in patients with liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittain, Jane M; Busk, Troels M; Møller, Søren

    2017-01-01

    , SBP, DBP and HR were measured non-invasively and by femoral artery catheterization. CO was measured non-invasively and by indicator dilution technique. The non-invasive pressure monitoring was considered acceptable with a bias (accuracy) and a SD (precision) not exceeding 5 and 8 mmHg, respectively......Patients with advanced cirrhosis often present a hyperdynamic circulation characterized by a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), and an increase in heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (CO). Accurate assessment of the altered circulation can be performed invasively......; however, due to the disadvantages of this approach, non-invasive methods are warranted. The purpose of this study was to compare continuous non-invasive measurements of haemodynamic variables by the Finometer and the Task Force Monitor with simultaneous invasive measurements. In 25 patients with cirrhosis...

  7. Evaluation of non-invasive multispectral imaging as a tool for measuring the effect of systemic therapy in Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana M Kainerstorfer

    Full Text Available Diffuse multi-spectral imaging has been evaluated as a potential non-invasive marker of tumor response. Multi-spectral images of Kaposi sarcoma skin lesions were taken over the course of treatment, and blood volume and oxygenation concentration maps were obtained through principal component analysis (PCA of the data. These images were compared with clinical and pathological responses determined by conventional means. We demonstrate that cutaneous lesions have increased blood volume concentration and that changes in this parameter are a reliable indicator of treatment efficacy, differentiating responders and non-responders. Blood volume decreased by at least 20% in all lesions that responded by clinical criteria and increased in the two lesions that did not respond clinically. Responses as assessed by multi-spectral imaging also generally correlated with overall patient clinical response assessment, were often detectable earlier in the course of therapy, and are less subject to observer variability than conventional clinical assessment. Tissue oxygenation was more variable, with lesions often showing decreased oxygenation in the center surrounded by a zone of increased oxygenation. This technique could potentially be a clinically useful supplement to existing response assessment in KS, providing an early, quantitative, and non-invasive marker of treatment effect.

  8. Etiske utfordringer med non-invasive prenatale tester (NIPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Hofmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Analyser av cellefritt DNA fra foster i gravide kvinners blod gir nye muligheter innen fosterdiagnostikk: Testene er bedre enn eksisterende tester, de reduserer risikoen og er billigere. Flere land har tatt i bruk disse testene, og Helsedirektoratet i Norge har mottatt søknad om å ta i bruk en test som erstatter tidlig ultralyd og blodprøver. Likevel nøler norske myndigheter. Hvorfor gjør de det? Ett av svarene er at non-invasive prenatale tester fører med seg en rekke faglige og moralske spørsmål og gir flere grunnleggende etiske utfordringer. Denne artikkelen gjennomgår et bredt knippe av de utfordringene som NIPT reiser. Hensikten er å synliggjøre hvorfor NIPT påkaller etisk refleksjon og å bidra til en åpen debatt og en transparent beslutningsprosess. Artikkelen identifiserer fem sentrale og konkrete spørsmål for vurderingen av NIPT.Nøkkelord: non-invasiv prenatal diagnostikk, testing, fravalg, foster, blodprøve, ekspressivisme, statsliberalt dilemma, dilemma, abort, retten til ikke å viteEnglish summary: Ethical challenges with non-invasive prenatal tests (NIPTNon-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT performed with the use of massively parallel sequencing of cell-free DNA (cfDNA testing in maternal plasma gives extended possibilities in prenatal screening. The tests are claimed to be better than existing alternative tests, they reduce the risk, and it is claimed they are cheaper. They have been used in several countries since 2012, and the University Hospital of North Norway has applied to the Directorate of Health to replace first trimester ultrasound and plasma screening with NIPT. The Directorate of Health is reluctant to reply. Why is this? One of the answers may be that NIPT raises a series of professional and moral questions, and poses profound ethical challenges. This article reviews a series of the challenges with NIPT. The aim is to highlight why NIPT calls for ethical reflection and to contribute to an open debate

  9. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive ventilation (NIV in acute respiratory failure (ARF improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs. Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, Pneu - monia, acute lung injury / acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. NIV treatment was CPAP or PSV + PEEP. 12 Pts (18,5% met primary endpoint (NIV failure: 11 Pts (17% needed ETI (5ALI/ARDS p < 0,0001, 6COPD 16,6%, 1 Patient (1,5% died (Pneumonia. No Pts with ACPE failed (p = 0,0027. Secondary endpoints: significant improvement in Respiratory Rate (RR, Kelly Score, pH, PaCO2, PaO2 vs baseline. Median duration of treatment: 16:06 hours: COPD 18:54, ACPE 4:15. Mean length of hospitalisation: 8.66 days. No patients discontinued NIV, no side effects. Results are consistent with literature. Hypoxemic ARF related to ALI/ARDS and pneumonia show worst outcome: it is not advisable to manage these conditions with NIV outside the ICU. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective in a general medical ward if selection of Pts, staff’s training and monitoring are appropriate. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting. According to strong evidences in literature, NIV should be considered a first line and standard treatment in these clinical conditions irrespective of the setting.

  10. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation for Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ludy C.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the use of non-invasive brain stimulation to characterize and potentially treat essential tremor (ET). Studies have used a variety of stimulation coils, paradigms, and target locations to make these observations. We reviewed the literature to compare prior studies and to evaluate the rationale and the methods used in these studies. Methods We performed a systematic literature search of the PubMed database using the terms “transcranial,” “noninvasive,” “brain stimulation,” “transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS),” “transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS),” “transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS),” and “essential tremor.” Results Single pulses of TMS to the primary motor cortex have long been known to reset tremor. Although there are relatively few studies showing alterations in motor cortical physiology, such as motor threshold, short and long intracortical inhibition, and cortical silent period, there may be some evidence of altered intracortical facilitation and cerebello-brain inhibition in ET. Repetitive TMS, theta burst stimulation, tDCS, and tACS have been applied to human subjects with tremor with some preliminary signs of tremor reduction, particularly in those studies that employed consecutive daily sessions. Discussion A variety of stimulation paradigms and targets have been explored, with the increasing rationale an interest in targeting the cerebellum. Rigorous assessment of coil geometry, stimulation paradigm, rationale for selection of the specific anatomic target, and careful phenotypic and physiologic characterization of the subjects with ET undergoing these interventions may be critical in extending these preliminary findings into effective stimulation therapies. PMID:28373927

  11. Non-invasive investigation of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JA Tibble; I Bjarnason

    2001-01-01

    The assessment of inflammatory activity in intestinal disease in man can be done using a variety of different techniques. These range from the use of non - invasive acute phase inflammatory markers measured in plasma such as C reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (both of which give an indirect assessment of disease activity) to the direct assessment of disease activity by intestinal biopsy performed during endoscopy in association with endoscopic scoring systems. Both radiology and endoscopy are conventional for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).However these techniques have severe limitations when it comes to assessing functional components of the disease such as activity and prognosis. Here we briefly review the value of two emerging intestinal function tests. Intestinal permeability, although ideally suited for diagnostic screening for small bowel Crohns disease, appears to give reliable predictive data for imminent relapse of small bowel Crohns disease and it can be used to assess responses to treatment. More significantly it is now clear that single stool assay of neutrophil specific proteins (calprotectin, lactoferrin) give the same quantitative data on intestinal inflammation as the 4 - day faecal excretion of 111lndium labelled white cells. Faecal calprotectin is shown to be increased in over 95% of patients with IBD and correlates with clinical disease activity. It reliably differentiates between patients with IBD and irritable bowel syndrome. More importantly, at a given faecal calprotectin concentration in patients with quiescent IBD,the test has a specificity and sensitivity in excess of 85% in predicting clinical relapse of disease. This suggests that relapse of IBD is closely related to the degree of intestinal inflammation and suggests that targeted treatment at an asymptomatic stage of the disease may be indicated.

  12. Non-invasive investigation in patients with inflammatory joint disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisabetta Dal Pont; Renata DТncá; Antonino Caruso; Giacomo Carlo Sturniolo

    2009-01-01

    Gut inflammation can occur in 30%-60% of patients with spondyloarthropathies. However, the presence of such gut inflammation is underestimated, only 27% of patients with histological evidence of gut inflammation have intestinal symptoms, but subclinical gut inflammation is documented in two-thirds of patients with inflammatory joint disease. There are common genetic and immunological mechanisms behind concomitant inflammation in the joints and intestinal tract. A number of blood tests, e.g. erythrocyte sedimentation rate, orosomucoid, C-reactive protein, and white cell and platelet counts, are probably the most commonly used laboratory markers of inflammatory disease, however, these tests are difficult to interpret in arthropathies associated with gut inflammation, since any increases in their blood levels might be attributable to either the joint disease or to gut inflammation. Consequently, it would be useful to have a marker capable of separately identifying gut inflammation. Fecal proteins, which are indirect markers of neutrophil migration in the gut wall, and intestinal permeability, seem to be ideal for monitoring intestinal inflammation:they are easy to measure non-invasively and are specific for intestinal disease in the absence of gastrointestinal infections.Alongside the traditional markers for characterizing intestinal inflammation, there are also antibodies, in all probability generated by the immune response to microbial antigens and auto-antigens, which have proved useful in establishing the diagnosis and assessing the severity of the condition, as well as the prognosis and the risk of complications. In short, noninvasive investigations on the gut in patients with rheumatic disease may be useful in clinical practice for a preliminary assessment of patients with suspected intestinal disease.

  13. Non-invasive evaluation of facial crestal bone with ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinjab, Khaled; Chung, Ming-Pang; Chiang, Yi-Chen; Wang, Hom-Lay; Giannobile, William V.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Facial crestal bone level and dimension determine function and esthetics of dentition and dental implants. We have previously demonstrated that ultrasound can identify bony and soft tissue structures in the oral cavity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of using ultrasound to measure facial crestal bone level and thickness. Materials and methods A commercially available medical ultrasound scanner, paired with a 14 MHz imaging probe was used to scan dental and periodontal tissues at the mid-facial site of each tooth on 6 fresh cadavers. The alveolar crest level in relation to the cemento-enamel junction and its thickness on ultrasound images were measured and compared to those on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and/or direct measurements on a total of 144 teeth. Results The mean crestal bone level measured by means of ultrasound, CBCT and direct measures was 2.66 ± 0.86 mm, 2.51 ± 0.82 mm, and 2.71 ± 1.04 mm, respectively. The mean crestal bone thickness was 0.71 ± 0.44 mm and 0.74 ± 0.34 mm, measured by means of ultrasound and CBCT, respectively. The correlations of the ultrasound readings to the other two methods were between 0.78 and 0.88. The mean absolute differences in crestal bone height and thickness between ultrasound and CBCT were 0.09 mm (-1.20 to 1.00 mm, p = 0.06) and 0.03 mm (-0.48 to 0.54 mm, p = 0.03), respectively. Conclusion Ultrasound was as accurate in determining alveolar bone level and its thickness as CBCT and direct measurements. Clinical trials will be required to further validate this non-ionizing and non-invasive method for determining facial crestal bone position and dimension. PMID:28178323

  14. The evolution of the cerebral blood volume abnormality in patients with ischemic stroke: a CT perfusion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Esterre, Christopher D.; Lee, Ting Yim (Lawson Health Research Inst., London (Canada); Robarts Research Inst., London (Canada)), email: tlee@robarts.ca; Aviv, Richard I. (Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada))

    2012-05-15

    Background: Accurate identification of the acute infarct core abnormality is important for guiding acute stroke treatment. Abnormality volumes from diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and CT perfusion (CTP)-cerebral blood volume (CBV) are highly correlated. DWI lesions have been shown to be reversible at 24 h. Purpose: To examine the temporal profile of the CT perfusion (CTP)-derived CBV abnormality out to 7 days post ischemic stroke. Material and Methods: Twenty-six patients were included. Group A (n = 13) underwent a noncontrast CT (NCCT), CTP/CT angiography (CTA) within 6 h of stroke onset, CTP/CTA at 24 h, and CTP/NCCT at 5-7 days post stroke. Group B (n = 13) underwent a NCCT, CTP/CTA within 6 h of stroke onset, and NCCT at 5-7 days. Recanalization status was established in all patients. For both groups, infarct volumes were traced on 5-7 day NCCT images and superimposed onto all CTP-CBV functional maps to determine CBV. Group B (n = 13) admission images were used to define CBV infarct thresholds for gray and white matter. CBV-lesion overestimation was determined for Group A using the thresholds from Group B. Results: CBV (ml x 100g- 1; mean +- stdev) for gray/white matter, within confirmed infarcted regions (CBVI) at admission, 24 h, and 5-7 days were 1.82 +- 0.56, 1.56 +- 0.42, 1.75 +- 0.31, and 1.38 +- 0.65, 1.13 +- 0.31, 1.32 +- 0.44, respectively, when averaged over all patients (P > 0.05). Four patients had tissue time-density curves from ischemic lesions (TDCi) with an incomplete contrast medium wash-out phase (truncation) at admission and/or 24 h. Compared to admission, gray matter CBVI was higher at 5-7 days for patients with TDCi truncation (P < 0.05). There were no significant CBVI increases for the eight patients without truncation (P > 0.05). Over-estimation of acute CBV lesion was present in 3/4 (75%) and 1/9 (11%) of patients with/without TDCi truncation, respectively. Conclusion: CTP-derived CBV lesion reversal is associated with TDCi truncation

  15. Peak plasma interleukin-6 and other peripheral markers of inflammation in the first week of ischaemic stroke correlate with brain infarct volume, stroke severity and long-term outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Zoppo Gregory J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral ischaemia initiates an inflammatory response in the brain and periphery. We assessed the relationship between peak values of plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6 in the first week after ischaemic stroke, with measures of stroke severity and outcome. Methods Thirty-seven patients with ischaemic stroke were prospectively recruited. Plasma IL-6, and other markers of peripheral inflammation, were measured at pre-determined timepoints in the first week after stroke onset. Primary analyses were the association between peak plasma IL-6 concentration with both modified Rankin score (mRS at 3 months and computed tomography (CT brain infarct volume. Results Peak plasma IL-6 concentration correlated significantly (p Conclusions These data provide evidence that the magnitude of the peripheral inflammatory response is related to the severity of acute ischaemic stroke, and clinical outcome.

  16. Pilot Study: Estimation of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output from Pulse Wave Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Yurie; Mizogami, Maki; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Steppan, Jochen; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2017-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is increasingly replacing thermodilution pulmonary artery catheters to assess hemodynamics in patients at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity. However, one of the drawbacks of TEE compared to pulmonary artery catheters is the inability to measure real time stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) continuously. The aim of the present proof of concept study was to validate a novel method of SV estimation, based on pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This is a retrospective observational study. We measured pulse transit time by superimposing the radial arterial waveform onto the continuous wave Doppler waveform of the left ventricular outflow tract, and calculated SV (SVPWV) using the transformed Bramwell-Hill equation. The SV measured by TEE (SVTEE) was used as a reference. A total of 190 paired SV were measured from 28 patients. A strong correlation was observed between SVPWV and SVTEE with the coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.71. A mean difference between the two (bias) was 3.70 ml with the limits of agreement ranging from -20.33 to 27.73 ml and a percentage error of 27.4% based on a Bland-Altman analysis. The concordance rate of two methods was 85.0% based on a four-quadrant plot. The angular concordance rate was 85.9% with radial limits of agreement (the radial sector that contained 95% of the data points) of ± 41.5 degrees based on a polar plot. PWV based SV estimation yields reasonable agreement with SV measured by TEE. Further studies are required to assess its utility in different clinical situations.

  17. Adaptive control with self-tuning for non-invasive beat-by-beat blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Masamichi; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamakoshi, Takehiro; Tanaka, Shinobu; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Up to now, we have successfully carried out the non-invasive beat-by-beat measurement of blood pressure (BP) in the root of finger, superficial temporal and radial artery based on the volume-compensation technique with reasonable accuracy. The present study concerns with improvement of control method for this beat-by-beat BP measurement. The measurement system mainly consists of a partial pressurization cuff with a pair of LED and photo-diode for the detection of arterial blood volume, and a digital self-tuning control method. Using healthy subjects, the performance and accuracy of this system were evaluated through comparison experiments with the system using a conventional empirically tuned PID controller. The significant differences of BP measured in finger artery were not showed in systolic (SBP), p=0.52, and diastolic BP (DBP), p=0.35. With the advantage of the adaptive control with self-tuning method, which can tune the control parameters without disturbing the control system, the application area of the non-invasive beat-by-beat measurement method will be broadened.

  18. Non-invasive assessment of in-vitro embryo quality to improve transfer success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Callesen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    embryos before the transfer to a recipient still remains challenging. Presently, the predominant non-invasive technique for selecting viable embryos is based on morphology, where parameters such as rates of cleavage and blastocyst formation as well as developmental kinetics are evaluated mostly...... subjectively. The simple morphological approach is, however, inadequate for the prediction of embryo quality, and several studies have focused on developing new non-invasive methods using molecular approaches based particularly on proteomics, metabolomics and most recently small non-coding RNA, including micro......RNA. This review outlines the potential of several non-invasive in-vitro methods based on analysis of spent embryo culture medium....

  19. Three-dimensional whole-brain perfused blood volume imaging with multimodal CT for evaluation of acute ischaemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J.; Zhang, M.; Cao, Y. [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Ma, Q. [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Chen, J. [Healthcare, Siemens Ltd. China, Beijing (China); Ji, X. [Department of Neurosurgery Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Li, K., E-mail: imaging@yeah.ne [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To determine the diagnostic value of integrating three-dimensional perfused blood volume (3D PBV) with multimodal computed tomography (CT) [non-enhanced CT (NECT), CT perfusion (CTP), and CT angiography (CTA)] in acute ischaemic stroke. Materials and methods: NECT, CTP, and CTA were performed in 25 acute ischaemic stroke patients. The ischaemia detection rate of 3D PBV was compared with the results of baseline NECT and CTP. The correlation of ischaemic lesion volume between 3D PBV, CTP images, and follow-up NECT were analysed. Results: NECT demonstrated ischaemic signs in 12 of 25 patients with proven infarction. CTP maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and time to peak (TTP) all demonstrated perfusion deficits in 21 of 25 patients. However, 3D PBV demonstrated perfusion deficits in all of the 25 patients. Among the 25 patients, a strong correlation was found between PBV and the follow-up NECT infarct (r = 0.858). The correlation between CTP and the follow-up NECT infarct as following: CBF (r = 0.718), CBV (r = 0.785), and TTP (r = 0.569). In 14 thrombolytic patients, strong correlation was found between the ischaemic volume on 3D PBV and follow-up NECT (r = 0.798). Conclusion: In acute stroke patients, the combination of 3D PBV and multimodal CT (NECT, CTP, and CTA) can improve the detection rate of ischaemia and enable assessment of the full extent of ischaemia, which correlates well with follow-up NECT.

  20. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerup, Morten; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Funder, Jonas; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke volume characterizes the giraffe heart. The adaptations result in typical mammalian left ventricular wall tensions, but produce a lowered cardiac output.

  1. Non-invasive brain stimulation enhances the effects of Melodic Intonation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley W. Vines

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Research has suggested that a fronto-temporal network in the right hemisphere may be responsible for mediating Melodic Intonation Therapy’s positive effects on speech recovery. We investigated the potential for a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, to augment the benefits of MIT in patients with non-fluent aphasia by modulating neural activity in the brain during treatment with MIT. The polarity of the current applied to the scalp determines the effects of tDCS on the underlying tissue: anodal tDCS increases excitability, whereas cathodal tDCS decreases excitability. We applied anodal tDCS to the posterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG of the right hemisphere, an area that has been shown to both contribute to singing through the mapping of sounds to ariculatory actions and serve as a key region in the process of recovery from aphasia, particularly in patients with large left hemispheric lesions. The stimulation was applied while patients were treated with MIT by a trained therapist. Six patients with moderate to severe non-fluent aphasia underwent three consecutive days of anodal-tDCS+MIT, and an equivalent series of sham-tDCS+MIT. The two treatment series were separated by one week, and the order in which the treatments were administered was randomized. Compared to the effects of sham-tDCS+MIT, anodal-tDCS+MIT led to significant improvements in fluency of speech. These results support the hypothesis that, as the brain seeks to reorganize and compensate for damage to left-hemisphere language centers, combining anodal-tDCS with MIT may further recovery from post-stroke aphasia by enhancing activity in a right-hemisphere sensorimotor network for articulation.

  2. Use of Advanced Machine-Learning Techniques for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    551-556, 1986. [5] Convertino VA. Endurance exercise training : conditions of enhanced hemodynamic responses and tolerance to LBNP. Med Sci Sports... Muscle sympathetic nerve activity during intense lower body negative pressure to syncope in humans. J Physiol 587:4987-4999, 2009. [17] Deterling...Rickards CA, Lurie KG, and Convertino VA. Breathing through an inspiratory threshold device improves stroke volume during central hypovolemia in humans. J

  3. Fullerenols and glucosamine fullerenes reduce infarct volume and cerebral inflammation after ischemic stroke in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluri, Felix; Grünstein, Dan; Cam, Ertugrul; Ungethuem, Udo; Hatz, Florian; Schäfer, Juliane; Samnick, Samuel; Israel, Ina; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Orts-Gil, Guillermo; Moch, Holger; Zeis, Thomas; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Seeberger, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and is involved in all stages of the ischemic cascade. Fullerene derivatives, such as fullerenol (OH-F) are radical scavengers acting as neuroprotective agents while glucosamine (GlcN) attenuates cerebral inflammation after stroke. We created novel glucosamine-fullerene conjugates (GlcN-F) to combine their protective effects and compared them to OH-F regarding stroke-induced cerebral inflammation and cellular damage. Fullerene derivatives or vehicle was administered intravenously in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) immediately after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Infarct size was determined at day 5 and neurological outcome at days 1 and 5 after tMCAO. CD68- and NeuN-staining were performed to determine immunoreactivity and neuronal survival respectively. Cytokine and toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4) expression was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a significant reduction of infarct volume in both, WKY and SHR that were treated with fullerene derivatives. Treated rats showed an amelioration of neurological symptoms as both OH-F and GlcN-F prevented neuronal loss in the perilesional area. Cerebral immunoreactivity was reduced in treated WKY and SHR. Expression of IL-1β and TLR-4 was attenuated in OH-F-treated WKY rats. In conclusion, OH-F and GlcN-F lead to a reduction of cellular damage and inflammation after stroke, rendering these compounds attractive therapeutics for stroke.

  4. Formerly preeclamptic women with a subnormal plasma volume are unable to maintain a rise in stroke volume during moderate exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardenburg, R.; Spaanderman, M.E.A.; Eijndhoven, H.W. van; Leeuw, P.W. de; Peeters, L.L.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In formerly preeclamptic women with a low plasma volume, the recurrence rate of preeclampsia is higher than in women with a normal prepregnant plasma volume. In a recent study, we demonstrated that the low plasma volume subgroup also had a subnormal venous capacitance. In the present

  5. Formerly preeclamptic women with a subnormal plasma volume are unable to maintain a rise in stroke volume during moderate exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardenburg, R.; Spaanderman, M.E.A.; Eijndhoven, H.W. van; Leeuw, P.W. de; Peeters, L.L.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In formerly preeclamptic women with a low plasma volume, the recurrence rate of preeclampsia is higher than in women with a normal prepregnant plasma volume. In a recent study, we demonstrated that the low plasma volume subgroup also had a subnormal venous capacitance. In the present s

  6. Fiber-based hybrid probe for non-invasive cerebral monitoring in neonatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberger, Matthias; Giovannella, Martina; Pagliazzi, Marco; Weigel, Udo; Durduran, Turgut; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Pifferi, Antonio; Torricelli, Alessandro; Schmitt, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Improved cerebral monitoring systems are needed to prevent preterm infants from long-term cognitive and motor restrictions. Combining advanced near-infrared diffuse spectroscopy measurement technologies, time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) will introduce novel indicators of cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow for neonatology. For non-invasive sensing a fiber-optical probe is used to send and receive light from the infant head. In this study we introduce a new fiber-based hybrid probe that is designed for volume production. The probe supports TRS and DCS measurements in a cross geometry, thus both technologies gain information on the same region inside the tissue. The probe is highly miniaturized to perform cerebral measurements on heads of extreme preterm infants down to head diameters of 6cm. Considerations concerning probe production focus on a reproducible accuracy in shape and precise optical alignment. In this way deviations in measurement data within a series of probes should be minimized. In addition to that, requirements for clinical use like robustness and hygiene are considered. An additional soft-touching sleeve made of FDA compatible silicone allows for a flexible attachment with respect to the individual anatomy of each patient. We present the technical concept of the hybrid probe and corresponding manufacturing methods. A prototype of the probe is shown and tested on tissue phantoms as well as in vivo to verify its operational reliability.

  7. Non-invasive pre-clinical MR imaging of prostate tumor hypoxia for radiation therapy prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek White

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the usefulness of Oxygen-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OE-MRI changes in signal intensity related to oxygen challenge for predicting tumor response to radiation therapy.Methods: Dynamic MR signal changes were acquired using Varian 4.7T small animal MR scanner prior to image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT of small (n = 6 and large subcutaneous (n = 5 prostate tumors in adult male rats. An interleaved blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD and tissue-oxygen level dependent (TOLD data acquisition or (IBT was performed using a baseline of medical air as positive control and using medical oxygen as a breathing challenge. BOLD used a 2-D multi-slice spoiled gradient-echo with multi-echo sequence. TOLD used a 2-D multi-slice spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Voxel changes in signal intensity were determined by a correlation coefficient mapping technique. Irradiation technique planned consisted of 1F × 15 Gy AP/PA or 2F × 7.5 Gy AP/PA to the gross tumor volume (GTV. Tumor growth measurements were recorded over time to assess the response to IGRT.Results: BOLD and TOLD signals variously illustrated positive or negative impulse responses in the tumor ROI due to inhaling medical oxygen. Correlation coefficient mapping demonstrated heterogeneity in tumors after inhaling medical oxygen. BOLD and TOLD signals exhibited increased changes in signal intensities after the first fraction of dose. Multi-fractionation had minimum effect until the second fraction of dose was applied. Tumor growth delays were observed when inhaling medical oxygen during IGRT.Conclusion: OE-MRI is a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide insight to the oxygen status of tumors. Observed increase percent changes in BOLD and TOLD signal intensities after the first fraction of dose suggest tumors experienced reoxygenation. OE-MRI could be used for predicting tumor response to IGRT when using medical oxygen for increasing GTV radiosensitivity, suggesting

  8. Non-invasive assessment of Alzheimer's disease neurofibrillary pathology using 18F-THK5105 PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Mulligan, Rachel S; Harada, Ryuichi; Yates, Paul; Pejoska, Svetlana; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Masters, Colin L; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Rowe, Christopher C; Villemagne, Victor L

    2014-06-01

    neocortex. Notably, unlike 11C-Pittsburgh compound B, 18F-THK5105 retention was significantly correlated with cognitive parameters, hippocampal and whole brain grey matter volumes, which was consistent with findings from previous post-mortem studies showing significant correlations of neurofibrillary tangle density with dementia severity or neuronal loss. From these results, 18F-THK5105 positron emission tomography is considered to be useful for the non-invasive assessment of tau pathology in the living brain. This technique would be applicable to the longitudinal evaluation of tau deposition and allow a better understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Development of a portable non-invasive swallowing and respiration assessment device

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shieh, Wann-Yun; Wang, Chin-Man; Chang, Chia-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    .... Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend...

  10. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Kim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341748501; van Zaane, Bas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311475361; Bosch, Els J; Kalkman, Cor J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/078251818; Peelen, Linda M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314038426

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality. PURPOSE: In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring i

  11. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers-including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group-were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups.

  12. A feasible method for non-invasive measurement of pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Combined use of transthoracic Doppler-echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance. Non-invasive estimation of pulmonary vascular resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chaowu

    2015-12-01

    Translational perspective: In PAH, the non-invasive measurement of PVR is very important in clinical practice. Up to now, however, the widely accepted non-invasive method is still unavailable. Since TTE can estimate (MPAP–PCWP reliably and CMR is the best image modality for the measurement of CO, the combined use of two modalities has the potential to determine PVR non-invasively. In this research, the integrated non-invasive method showed good diagnostic accuracy and repeatability compared with RHC. Therefore, it might be a feasible method for non-invasive measurement of PVR in patients with PAH.

  13. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-invasive acoustic-based monitoring of uranium in solution and H/D ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The primary objective of this project is to adapt existing non-invasive acoustic techniques (Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry and Gaussian-pulse acoustic technique) for the purpose of demonstrating the ability to quantify U or H/D ratios in solution. Furthermore, a successful demonstration will provide an easily implemented, low cost, and non-invasive method for remote and unattended uranium mass measurements for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  16. Insights and Lessons from a Scientific Conference on Non-Invasive Delivery of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savla, Ronak; Mrsny, Randall J; Park, Kinam; Aubert, Isabelle; Stamoran, Cornell

    2017-06-01

    A growing share of the pharmaceutical development pipeline is occupied by macromolecule drugs, which are primarily administered by injection. Despite decades of attempts, non-invasive delivery of macromolecules has seen only a few success stories. Potential benefits of non-invasive administration include better patient acceptance and adherence and potentially better efficacy and safety. Greater inter-disciplinary dialogue and collaboration are integral to realizing these benefits.

  17. The GPVI-Fc fusion protein Revacept improves cerebral infarct volume and functional outcome in stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Goebel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We examined the effect of Revacept, an Fc fusion protein which is specifically linked to the extracellular domain of glycoprotein VI (GPVI, on thrombus formation after vessel wall injury and on experimental stroke in mice. BACKGROUND: Several antiplatelet drugs for the treatment of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke with potent anti-ischemic effects have been developed, but all incur a significant risk of bleeding. METHODS: Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation after endothelial injury was monitored in the carotid artery by intra-vital fluorescence microscopy. The morphological and clinical consequences of stroke were investigated in a mouse model with a one hour-occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. RESULTS: Thrombus formation was significantly decreased after endothelial injury by 1 mg/kg Revacept i.v., compared to Fc only. 1 mg/kg Revacept i.v. applied in mice with ischemic stroke immediately before reperfusion significantly improved functional outcome, cerebral infarct size and edema compared to Fc only. Also treatment with 10 mg/kg rtPA was effective, and functional outcome was similar in both treatment groups. The combination of Revacept with rtPA leads to increased reperfusion compared to treatment with either agent alone. In contrast to rtPA, however, there were no signs of increased intracranial bleeding with Revacept. Both rtPA and Revacept improved survival after stroke compared to placebo treatment. Revacept and vWF bind to collagen and Revacept competitively prevented the binding of vWF to collagen. CONCLUSIONS: Revacept reduces arterial thrombus formation, reduces cerebral infarct size and edema after ischemic stroke, improves functional and prognostic outcome without intracranial bleeding. Revacept not only prevents GPVI-mediated, but probably also vWF-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregate formation. Therefore Revacept might be a potent and safe tool to treat ischemic complications of stroke.

  18. High-volume plasma exchange in a patient with acute liver failure due to non-exertional heat stroke in a sauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Jung; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Sue, Yuh-Mou; Chen, Tzay-Jinn; Cheng, Chung-Yi

    2014-10-01

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition characterized by an increased core body temperature (over 40°C) and a systemic inflammatory response, which may lead to a syndrome of multiple organ dysfunction. Heat stroke may be due to either strenuous exercise or non-exercise-induced exposure to a high environmental temperature. Current management of heat stroke is mostly supportive, with an emphasis on cooling the core body temperature and preventing the development of multiple organ dysfunction. Prognosis of heat stroke depends on the severity of organ involvement. Here, we report a rare case of non-exercise-induced heat stroke in a 73-year-old male patient who was suffering from acute liver failure after prolonged exposure in a hot sauna room. We successfully managed this patient by administering high-volume plasma exchange, and the patient recovered completely after treatment.

  19. A review on the non-invasive evaluation of skeletal muscle oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, A. A. A.; Laili, M. H.; Aziz, N. A.; Laili, A. R.; Salikin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to conduct a feasibility study of non-invasive evaluation in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This non-invasive evaluation could extract many information using a safe non-invasive method regarding to the oxygenation and microcirculation status in human blood muscle. This brief review highlights the progress of the application of NIRS to evaluate skeletal muscle oxygenation in various activity of human nature from the historical point of view to the present advancement. Since the discovery of non-invasive optical method during 1992, there are many non-invasive techniques uses optical properties on human subject such as near infrared spectroscopy NIRS, optical topography, functional near infrared spectroscopy fNIRS and imaging fNIRI. Furthermore, in this paper we discuss the light absorption potential (LAP) towards chromophores content inside human muscle. Modified beer lambert law was studied in order to build a better understanding toward LAP between chromophores under tissue multilayers in human muscle. This paper will describe the NIRS principle and the basis for its proposed used in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This will cover the advantages and limitation of such application. Thus, these non-invasive techniques could open other possibilities to study muscle performance diagnosis.

  20. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation to Enhance Upper Limb Motor Practice Poststroke: A Model for Selection of Cortical Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. Harris-Love

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Motor practice is an essential part of upper limb motor recovery following stroke. To be effective, it must be intensive with a high number of repetitions. Despite the time and effort required, gains made from practice alone are often relatively limited, and substantial residual impairment remains. Using non-invasive brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability prior to practice could enhance the effects of practice and provide greater returns on the investment of time and effort. However, determining which cortical area to target is not trivial. The implications of relevant conceptual frameworks such as Interhemispheric Competition and Bimodal Balance Recovery are discussed. In addition, we introduce the STAC (Structural reserve, Task Attributes, Connectivity framework, which incorporates patient-, site-, and task-specific factors. An example is provided of how this framework can assist in selecting a cortical region to target for priming prior to reaching practice poststroke. We suggest that this expanded patient-, site-, and task-specific approach provides a useful model for guiding the development of more successful approaches to neuromodulation for enhancing motor recovery after stroke.

  1. Chemical Analysis of Whale Breath Volatiles: A Case Study for Non-Invasive Field Health Diagnostics of Marine Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cumeras

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We explored the feasibility of collecting exhaled breath from a moribund gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus for potential non-invasive health monitoring of marine mammals. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC profiling is a relatively new field of research, in which the chemical composition of breath is used to non-invasively assess the health and physiological processes on-going within an animal or human. In this study, two telescopic sampling poles were designed and tested with the primary aim of collecting whale breath exhalations (WBEs. Once the WBEs were successfully collected, they were immediately transferred onto a stable matrix sorbent through a custom manifold system. A total of two large volume WBEs were successfully captured and pre-concentrated onto two Tenax®-TA traps (one exhalation per trap. The samples were then returned to the laboratory where they were analyzed using solid phase micro extraction (SPME and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. A total of 70 chemicals were identified (58 positively identified in the whale breath samples. These chemicals were also matched against a database of VOCs found in humans, and 44% of chemicals found in the whale breath are also released by healthy humans. The exhaled gray whale breath showed a rich diversity of chemicals, indicating the analysis of whale breath exhalations is a promising new field of research.

  2. Prediction of subacute infarct lesion volumes by processing apparent diffusion coefficient maps based on apparent diffusion coefficient cut-off values in patients with acute stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭翔

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of prediction of subacute infarct lesion volumes by processing ADC maps based on ADC cut-off values in patients with acute stroke.Methods MRI was performed in 20 patients with clinically diagnosed acute infarct less than 6 h after stroke onset.The MRI included a DWI and conventional MRI.The follow-up MR examinations of all the patients

  3. Hubungan Kadar High Sensitivity- C Reactive Protein (Hs-Crp) Dengan Volume Infark Dan Outcome Fungsional Pada Pasien Stroke Iskemik Akut

    OpenAIRE

    Aritonang, Minar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : C-reactive protein is the acute phase protein and a well known marker of inflamation. The high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein assay is being increasingly used as a marker for stroke risk assessment, and as a marker for prognostication of ischemic stroke. The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between hs-CRP level with infarct volume and functional outcome in acute ishemic stroke patients. Methods : We conducted a cross-sectional study of 35-acute ischemic ...

  4. Hemi-spatial neglect rehabilitation using non-invasive brain stimulation: or how to modulate the disconnection syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquin-Courtois, S

    2015-09-01

    Hemi-spatial neglect syndrome is common and sometimes long-lasting. It is characterized by a deficit in the use and awareness of one side of space, most often consecutive to a right hemisphere injury, mainly in the parietal region. Acknowledging the different types and all clinical characteristics is essential for an appropriate evaluation and adapted rehabilitation care management, especially as it constitutes a predictive factor of a poor functional prognosis. Some new approaches have been developed in the last fifteen years in the field of hemi-spatial neglect rehabilitation, where non-invasive brain stimulation (TMS and tDCS) holds an important place. Today's approaches of unilateral spatial neglect modulation via non-invasive brain stimulation are essentially based on the concept of inter-hemispheric inhibition, suggesting an over-activation of the contralesional hemisphere due to a decrease of the inhibiting influences of the injured hemisphere. Several approaches may then be used: stimulation of the injured right hemisphere, inhibition of the hyperactive left hemisphere, or a combination of both. Results are promising, but the following complementary aspects must be refined before a more systematic application: optimal stimulation protocol, individual management according to the injured region, intensity, duration and frequency of care management, delay post-stroke before the beginning of treatment, combination of different approaches, as well as prognostic and efficacy criteria. An encouraging perspective for the future is the combination of several types of approaches, which would be largely facilitated by the improvement of fundamental knowledge on neglect mechanisms, which could in the future refine the choice for the most appropriate treatment(s) for a given patient.

  5. The pathophysiology of the aqueduct stroke volume in normal pressure hydrocephalus: can co-morbidity with other forms of dementia be excluded?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, Grant A. [John Hunter Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Newcastle (Australia); Levi, Christopher R.; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C. [Hunter Medical Research Institute, Clinical Neurosciences Program, Newcastle (Australia); Schofield, Peter [James Fletcher Hospital, Neuropsychiatry Unit, Newcastle (Australia)

    2005-10-01

    Variable results are obtained from the treatment of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) by shunt insertion. There is a high correlation between NPH and the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on brain biopsy. There is an overlap between AD and vascular dementia (VaD), suggesting that a correlation exists between NPH and other forms of dementia. This study seeks to (1) understand the physiological factors behind, and (2) define the ability of, the aqueduct stroke volume to exclude dementia co-morbidity. Twenty-four patients from a dementia clinic were classified as having either early AD or VaD on the basis of clinical features, Hachinski score and neuropsychological testing. They were compared with 16 subjects with classical clinical findings of NPH and 12 aged-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects. MRI flow quantification was used to measure aqueduct stroke volume and arterial pulse volume. An arterio-cerebral compliance ratio was calculated from the two volumes in each patient. The aqueduct stroke volume was elevated in all three forms of dementia, with no significant difference noted between the groups. The arterial pulse volume was elevated by 24% in VaD and reduced by 35% in NPH, compared to normal (P=0.05 and P=0.002, respectively), and was normal in AD. There was a spectrum of relative compliance with normal compliance in VaD and reduced compliance in AD and NPH. The aqueduct stroke volume depends on the arterial pulse volume and the relative compliance between the arterial tree and brain. The aqueduct stroke volume cannot exclude significant co-morbidity in NPH. (orig.)

  6. Non-invasive physiological wearable sensor real time monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Alharbi, Samah

    2015-01-01

    This project presents the implementation of reflectance Photoplethysmography (PPG) and thermo-chip sensor-¬based wireless architecture for a human health monitoring system. The thermo-¬‐chip sensor is used to continuously monitor the body temperature, while the reflectance PPG sensor is used to measure the heart rate by an optical technique that senses the blood volume change in the tissues and vessels. The sensors outputs are then given to the signal conditioning circuit used to filter the n...

  7. Multi-modal CT in Stroke Imaging: New Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Carlos J.; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive non-invasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. PMID:19195537

  8. Ability of non-invasive intermittent blood pressure monitoring and a continuous non-invasive arterial pressure monitor (CNAP™) to provide new readings in each 1-min interval during elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T; Telec, N; Dennis, A; Griffiths, J; Buettner, A

    2012-03-01

    We compared the ability of automated non-invasive intermittent oscillometric blood pressure monitoring with a new device, CNAP(TM) (continuous non-invasive arterial pressure) to provide a new blood pressure reading in each 1-min interval between spinal anaesthesia and delivery during caesarean section. We also compared the accuracy of continuous non-invasive arterial pressure readings with non-invasive blood pressure measurements before spinal anaesthesia. Fifty-nine women participated. The non-invasive and continuous non-invasive monitors displayed new blood pressure readings in a mean of 82% (11%) and 83% (13%) (p = 0.97) of the one-minute intervals between spinal anaesthesia and delivery, respectively. Continuous non-invasive arterial pressure was more likely to fail on two or more consecutive minutes (p=0.001). From the pre-spinal readings, the mean bias, defined as non-invasive-continuous non-invasive arterial pressure, and limits of agreement (±2SD mean bias) for systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure respectively were +1.3 (±26.0), -2.9 (±21.8) and +2.6 (±20.4) mmHg. The new monitor has disadvantages compared with conventional non-invasive intermittent blood pressure monitoring. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Non-invasive prenatal testing for single gene disorders: exploring the ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Zuzana; Hill, Melissa; Chitty, Lyn S; Lewis, Celine

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing for single gene disorders is now clearly on the horizon. This new technology offers obvious clinical benefits such as safe testing early in pregnancy. Before widespread implementation, it is important to consider the possible ethical implications. Four hypothetical scenarios are presented that highlight how ethical ideals of respect for autonomy, privacy and fairness may come into play when offering non-invasive prenatal testing for single gene disorders. The first scenario illustrates the moral case for using these tests for 'information only', identifying a potential conflict between larger numbers of women seeking the benefits of the test and the wider social impact of funding tests that do not offer immediate clinical benefit. The second scenario shows how the simplicity and safety of non-invasive prenatal testing could lead to more autonomous decision-making and, conversely, how this could also lead to increased pressure on women to take up testing. In the third scenario we show how, unless strong safeguards are put in place, offering non-invasive prenatal testing could be subject to routinisation with informed consent undermined and that woman who are newly diagnosed as carriers may be particularly vulnerable. The final scenario introduces the possibility of a conflict of the moral rights of a woman and her partner through testing for single gene disorders. This analysis informs our understanding of the potential impacts of non-invasive prenatal testing for single gene disorders on clinical practice and has implications for future policy and guidelines for prenatal care.

  10. Non-invasive monitoring of peripheral perfusion: an exploration of non-invasive peripheral perfusion monitoring for applications in research & healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Blaxter, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The need for real-time, prognostic perfusion data has been widely recognised in clinical practice and academia. Perfusion, the volumetric blood low to tissue, is an important tool for haemodynamic monitoring, since perfusion adequacy is vital to tissue health. Perfusion can serve as both a diagnostic indicator and a fundamental research tool. However, lack of a low cost, easily applied, and non-invasive sensor technology capable of measuring peripheral perfusion in absolute volumetric units i...

  11. CTA collateral score predicts infarct volume and clinical outcome after endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke: a retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elijovich, Lucas; Goyal, Nitin; Mainali, Shraddha; Hoit, Dan; Arthur, Adam S; Whitehead, Matthew; Choudhri, Asim F

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to emergent large-vessel occlusion (ELVO) has a poor prognosis. To examine the hypothesis that a better collateral score on pretreatment CT angiography (CTA) would correlate with a smaller final infarct volume and a more favorable clinical outcome after endovascular therapy (EVT). A retrospective chart review of the University of Tennessee AIS database from February 2011 to February 2013 was conducted. All patients with CTA-proven LVO treated with EVT were included. Recanalization after EVT was defined by Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score ≥2. Favorable outcome was assessed as a modified Rankin Score ≤3. Fifty patients with ELVO were studied. The mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 17 (2-27) and 38 of the patients (76%) received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. The recanalization rate for EVT was 86.6%. Good clinical outcome was achieved in 32% of patients. Univariate predictors of good outcome included good collateral scores (CS) on presenting CTA (p=0.043) and successful recanalization (p=0.02). Multivariate analysis confirmed both good CS (p=0.024) and successful recanalization (p=0.009) as predictors of favorable outcome. Applying results of the multivariate analysis to our cohort we were able to determine the likelihood of good clinical outcome as well as predictors of smaller final infarct volume after successful recanalization. Good CS predict smaller infarct volumes and better clinical outcome in patients recanalized with EVT. These data support the use of this technique in selecting patients for EVT. Poor CS should be considered as an exclusion criterion for EVT as patients with poor CS have poor clinical outcomes despite recanalization. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Finger temperature controller for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Ting, Choon Meng; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-11-01

    Blood glucose level is an important parameter for doctors to diagnose and treat diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is the most promising approach and this involves measurement on the body skin. However it is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environmental and physiological conditions and we found that temperature has important influences on the glucose measurement. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement have been carried out. The in-vitro results show that water temperature has significant influence on water absorption. Since 90% of blood components are water, skin temperature of measurement site has significant influence on blood glucose measurement. Also the skin temperature is related to the blood volume, blood volume inside capillary vessels changes with skin temperature. In this paper the relationship of skin temperature and signal from the skin and inside tissue was studied at different finger temperatures. Our OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) trials results show the laser signals follow the skin temperature trend and the correlation of signal and skin temperature is much stronger than the correlation of signal and glucose concentration. A finger heater device is designed to heat and maintain the skin temperature of measurement site. The heater is controlled by an electronic circuit according to the skin temperature sensed by a thermocouple that is put close to the measurement site. In vivo trials were carried out and the results show that the skin temperature significantly influences the signal fluctuations caused by pulsate blood and the average signal value.

  13. 4D ground penetrating radar measurements as non-invasive means for hydrological process investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas

    2017-04-01

    The missing vision into the subsurface appears to be a major limiting factor for our hydrological process understanding and theory development. Today, hydrology-related sciences have collected tremendous evidence for soils acting as drainage network and retention stores simultaneously in structured and self-organising domains. However, our present observation technology relies mainly on point-scale sensors, which integrate over a volume of unknown structures and is blind for their distribution. Although heterogeneity is acknowledged at all scales, it is rarely seen as inherent system property. At small scales (soil moisture probe) and at large scales (neutron probe) our measurements leave quite some ambiguity. Consequently, spatially and temporally continuous measurement of soil water states is essential for advancing our understanding and development of subsurface process theories. We present results from several irrigation experiments accompanied by 2D and 3D time-lapse GPR for the development of a novel technique to visualise and quantify water dynamics in the subsurface. Through the comparison of TDR, tracer and gravimetric measurement of soil moisture it becomes apparent that all sensor-based techniques are capable to record temporal dynamics, but are challenged to precisely quantify the measurements and to extrapolate them in space. At the same time excavative methods are very limited in temporal and spatial resolution. The application of non-invasive 4D GPR measurements complements the existing techniques and reveals structural and temporal dynamics simultaneously. By consequently increasing the density of the GPR data recordings in time and space, we find means to process the data also in the time-dimension. This opens ways to quantitatively analyse soil water dynamics in complex settings.

  14. Parametrically defined cerebral blood vessels as non-invasive blood input functions for brain PET studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Marie-Claude; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Amano, Shigeko; Gunn, Roger N.; Nahmias, Claude

    2004-03-01

    A non-invasive alternative to arterial blood sampling for the generation of a blood input function for brain positron emission tomography (PET) studies is presented. The method aims to extract the dimensions of the blood vessel directly from PET images and to simultaneously correct the radioactivity concentration for partial volume and spillover. This involves simulation of the tomographic imaging process to generate images of different blood vessel and background geometries and selecting the one that best fits, in a least-squares sense, the acquired PET image. A phantom experiment was conducted to validate the method which was then applied to eight subjects injected with 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA and one subject injected with [11C]CO-labelled red blood cells. In the phantom study, the diameter of syringes filled with an 11C solution and inserted into a water-filled cylinder were estimated with an accuracy of half a pixel (1 mm). The radioactivity concentration was recovered to 100 ± 4% in the 8.7 mm diameter syringe, the one that most closely approximated the superior sagittal sinus. In the human studies, the method systematically overestimated the calibre of the superior sagittal sinus by 2-3 mm compared to measurements made in magnetic resonance venograms on the same subjects. Sources of discrepancies related to the anatomy of the blood vessel were found not to be fundamental limitations to the applicability of the method to human subjects. This method has the potential to provide accurate quantification of blood radioactivity concentration from PET images without the need for blood samples, corrections for delay and dispersion, co-registered anatomical images, or manually defined regions of interest.

  15. Selective radiofrequency therapy as a non-invasive approach for contactless body contouring and circumferential reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajkošová, Kateřina; Machovcová, Alena; Onder, Meltem; Fritz, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the efficacy of non-contact, selective radiofrequency (RF) were evaluated for body contouring as non-invasive fat and circumferential reduction of the abdomen. 40 healthy (36 female, 4 male) subjects showing significant volume of subcutaneous fat tissue on the abdomen and waistline were included. Once a week for 30 minutes, 4 sessions were performed. The applicator was placed on a supplied spacer covering the treatment area. Maximum power was 200W, which induced heat in the fat and connective tissue layer. The homogeneity of heat distribution and temperature of the skin surface were controlled. The circumferential reduction was measured at the baseline and after the last treatment. The photographs and adverse effects were recorded. Participants completed the self-evaluation questionnaires and rated their level of satisfaction. All subjects tolerated the treatments well. The only side effect was mild to moderate erythema. 35 subjects finished the protocol as planned and 5 subjects dropped off due to events not related to the study. 32 subjects had a 1-13 cm decrease in abdominal circumference and 3 subjects did not show significant response (0-1 cm). Most likely, a very thin fat layer was the reason for lack of response (the non-responding group was the thinnest patient group). No significant differences were found between men and women. The average decrease of 4.93 cm was calculated as a result of circumferential reduction statistical evidence. This study demonstrates that the selective RF system designed for contactless deep tissue heating is a painless, safe, and effective treatment for non-surgical body contouring and circumferential fat reduction.

  16. Non-Invasive Mechanic Ventilation Using in Flail Chest, Caused By Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Onat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman admitted our faculty emergency room with shortness of breath, and chest pain after traffic accident’s second hour. She was diagnosed as bilateral multipl rib fractures, left clavicula fracture, and left flail chest by phsical and radiological examinations. She was transfered to Chest Surgery Depatment’s intensive care unit. The patient was undergone non-invasive mask mechanic ventilation support, because of the decreasing of blood oxygen saturation and increasing of arteriel blood partial carbondioxide pressure. The treatment of non-invasive mechanic ventilation was succesfull for ventilation support. With this report, we would like to attentioned that non-invasive mechanic ventilation for blunt chest trauma patients could be used succesfully and could be used instead of endotracheal invasive mechanic ventilation.

  17. Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord, roots and peripheral nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossini, P M; Burke, D; Chen, R

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide an up-date of previous IFCN report on "Non-invasive electrical and magnetic stimulation of the brain, spinal cord and roots: basic principles and procedures for routine clinical application" (Rossini et al., 1994). A new Committee, composed of international experts, some...... of whom were in the panel of the 1994 "Report", was selected to produce a current state-of-the-art review of non-invasive stimulation both for clinical application and research in neuroscience. Since 1994, the international scientific community has seen a rapid increase in non-invasive brain stimulation...... in studying cognition, brain-behavior relationship and pathophysiology of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. New paradigms of stimulation and new techniques have been developed. Furthermore, a large number of studies and clinical trials have demonstrated potential therapeutic applications of non...

  18. Non-invasive Prenatal Testing: Technologies, Clinical Assays and Implementation Strategies for Women's Healthcare Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Amy; Sehnert, Amy J; Bhatt, Sucheta

    2013-06-01

    The field of prenatal genetic testing has exploded with new non-invasive technologies and test options in the past several years. It is challenging for women's healthcare providers to keep up with the multitude of publications and provide patients with the most accurate and up-to-date information possible regarding prenatal testing. In this article, we examine the sequencing technologies that provide the framework for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) and review the major North American NIPT clinical validation studies published in 2011 and 2012. This paper also compares and contrasts the commercially available non-invasive prenatal tests in the United States, discusses clinical implementation recommendations from professional societies and highlights considerations for genetic counseling.

  19. [Next generation sequencing and its applications in non-invasive prenatal testing of aneuploidies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babay, Lilla Éva; Horányi, Dániel; Rigó, János; Nagy, Gyula Richárd

    2015-06-28

    The development of the new generation sequencing techniques brought a new era in the field of DNA sequencing, that also revolutionized the prenatal screening for aneuploidy. In order to provide a more complete view, the authors describe some first generation methods as well as the theoretical and technical background of the next generation methods. In the second part of this review, the authors focuse on non-invasive prenatal testing, which is a fetal cell-free DNA based method requiring advanced sequencing procedures. After discussing the theoretical and technical background, the authors review current application and utility of non-invasive prenatal testing. They conclude that non-invasive prenatal testing is the most effective screening test in high risk pregnancies and its efficiency can be justified in studies involving low risk pregnancies as well.

  20. Intraspecies differenes in phenotypic plasticity: Invasive versus non-invasive populations of Ceratophyllum demersum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Benita; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    in response to growth temperature. Populations of the submerged macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum from New Zealand, where the species is introduced and invasive, and from Denmark, where the species is native and non-invasive, were grown in a common garden setup at temperatures of 12, 18, 25 and 35 ◦C. We...... hypothesized that the phenotypic plasticity in fitness-related traits like growth and photosynthesis were higher in the invasive than in the non-invasive population. The invasive population acclimated to elevated temperatures through increased rates of photosynthesis (range: Pamb: 8–452 mol O2 g−1 DM h−1......High phenotypic plasticity has been hypothesized to affect the invasiveness of plants, as high plasticity may enlarge the breath of environments in which the plants can survive and reproduce. Here we compare the phenotypic plasticity of invasive and non-invasive populations of the same species...

  1. Effects of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall volumes in subjects with stroke compared to healthy controls: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Elis E A; Resqueti, Vanessa R; Lima, Illia N D F; Gualdi, Lucien P; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F

    2017-07-08

    Alterations in respiratory system kinematics in stroke lead to restrictive pattern associated with decreased lung volumes. Chest physical therapy, such as positive expiratory pressure, may be useful in the treatment of these patients; however, the optimum intensity to promote volume and motion changes of the chest wall remains unclear. To assess the effect of different intensities of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall kinematics in subjects with stroke compared to healthy controls. 16 subjects with chronic stroke and 16 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and body mass index were recruited. Chest wall volumes were assessed using optoelectronic plethysmography during quiet breathing, 5 minutes, and recovery. Three different intensities of positive expiratory pressure (10, 15, and 20cmH2O) were administered in a random order with a 30 minutes rest interval between intensities. During positive expiratory pressure, tidal chest wall expansion increased in both groups compared to quiet breathing; however, this increase was not significant in the subjects with stroke (0.41 vs. 1.32L, 0.56 vs. 1.54L, 0.52 vs. 1.8L, at 10, 15, 20cmH2O positive expiratory pressure, for stroke and control groups; pFisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-invasive evaluation of liver cirrhosis using ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, N., E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V.; Cochlin, D.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Robinson, M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Wales (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Ultrasound (US) is essential in both assessment of the potentially cirrhotic liver and surveillance of selected patients with chronic hepatitis as liver biopsy can be misleading or inaccurate in up to 25% of cases. Various techniques are already in routine use, such as grey-scale imaging, Doppler US, and contrast-enhanced US (CEUS), while newer techniques such as elastography and hepatic vein transit time (HVTT) have the potential to exclude patients without significant fibrosis or cirrhosis; however, they are operator dependent and require specific software. Grey-scale imaging may demonstrate changes, such as volume redistribution, capsule nodularity, parenchymal nodularity, and echotexture changes. The Doppler findings in the hepatic and portal veins, hepatic artery, and varices allow assessment of liver cirrhosis. However, the operator needs to be aware of limitations of these techniques. Low mechanical index CEUS plays an important role in the assessment of complications of cirrhosis, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and portal vein thrombus. Optimized US technique is crucial for accurate diagnosis of the cirrhotic liver and its complications.

  3. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Russo

    2015-12-01

    We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  4. Non-Invasive Measurement of Pulsatile Intracranial Pressures Using Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Shuer, Lawrence M.; Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, John H.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1997-01-01

    Early detection of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) will aid clinical decision-making for head trauma, brain tumor and other cerebrovascular diseases. Conventional methods, however, require surgical procedures which take time and are accompanied by increased risk of infection. Accordingly we have developed and refined a new ultrasound device to measure skull movements which are known to occur in conjunction with altered ICP. The principle of this device is based upon pulse phase locked loop (PPLL), which enables us to detect changes in distance on the order of microns between an ultrasound transducer on one side of the skull and the opposite inner surface of the cranium. The present study was designed to verify this measurement technique in cadavera. Transcranial distance was increased in steps of 10 mmHg from zero to 50 mmHg by saline infusion into the lateral ventricle of two cadavera. In separate experiments, pulsations of ICP with the amplitudes of zero to 2 mmHg were generated by rhythmic injections of saline using a syringe. When the ICP was stepwise increased from zero to 50 mmHg, transcranial distance increased in proportion with the ICP increase (y=12 x - 76, r=0.938), where y is changes in transcranial distance in microns and x is ICP in mmHg. In the data recorded while ICP pulsations were generated, fast Fourier transform analysis demonstrated that cranial pulsations were clearly associated with ICP pulsations. The results indicate that changes in transcranial distance is linearly correlated with those in ICP, and also that the PPLL device has sufficient sensitivity to detect transcranial pulsations which occur in association with the cardiac cycle. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsations, we may be able to estimate the pressure-volume index in the cranium. As a result, estimates of intracranial compliance may be possible by using the PPLL device. Further studies are necessary in normal subjects and patients.

  5. Non-Invasive Measurement of Pulsatile Intracranial Pressures Using Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Shuer, Lawrence M.; Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, John H.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1997-01-01

    Early detection of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) will aid clinical decision-making for head trauma, brain tumor and other cerebrovascular diseases. Conventional methods, however, require surgical procedures which take time and are accompanied by increased risk of infection. Accordingly we have developed and refined a new ultrasound device to measure skull movements which are known to occur in conjunction with altered ICP. The principle of this device is based upon pulse phase locked loop (PPLL), which enables us to detect changes in distance on the order of microns between an ultrasound transducer on one side of the skull and the opposite inner surface of the cranium. The present study was designed to verify this measurement technique in cadavera. Transcranial distance was increased in steps of 10 mmHg from zero to 50 mmHg by saline infusion into the lateral ventricle of two cadavera. In separate experiments, pulsations of ICP with the amplitudes of zero to 2 mmHg were generated by rhythmic injections of saline using a syringe. When the ICP was stepwise increased from zero to 50 mmHg, transcranial distance increased in proportion with the ICP increase (y=12 x - 76, r=0.938), where y is changes in transcranial distance in microns and x is ICP in mmHg. In the data recorded while ICP pulsations were generated, fast Fourier transform analysis demonstrated that cranial pulsations were clearly associated with ICP pulsations. The results indicate that changes in transcranial distance is linearly correlated with those in ICP, and also that the PPLL device has sufficient sensitivity to detect transcranial pulsations which occur in association with the cardiac cycle. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsations, we may be able to estimate the pressure-volume index in the cranium. As a result, estimates of intracranial compliance may be possible by using the PPLL device. Further studies are necessary in normal subjects and patients.

  6. Near-infrared oxymeter biosensor prototype for non-invasive in vivo analysis of rat brain oxygenation: effects of drugs of abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, F.; Donini, M.; Bandera, A.; Congestri, F.; Formenti, F.; Sonntag, V.; Heidbreder, C.; Rovati, L.

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of non-invasive analysis of brain activities was studied in the attempt to overcome the major limitation of actual in vivo methodologies, i.e. invasiveness. Optic fibre probes were used as the optical head of a novel, highly sensitive near-infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (CW-NIR) instrument. This prototype was designed for non-invasive analysis of the two main forms of haemoglobin: oxy-haemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-haemoglobin (Hb), chromophores present in biological tissues. It was tested in peripheral tissue (human gastrocnemius muscle) and then reset to perform the measurement on rat brain. In animal studies, the optical head was firmly placed using stereotaxic apparatus upon the sagittal line of the head of anaesthetized adult rats, without any surgery. Then pharmacological treatments with saline (300 µl s.c.) amphetamine (2 mg kg-1) or nicotine (0.4 mg kg-1) were performed. Within 10-20 min amphetamine substantially increased HbO2 and reduced Hb control levels. Nicotine produced a rapid initial increase followed by a decrease in HbO2. In contrast to amphetamine, nicotine treatment also reduced Hb and blood volume. These results support the capacity of our CW-NIR prototype to measure non-invasively HbO2 and Hb levels in the rat brain, that are markers of the degree of tissue oxygenation, thus providing an index of blood levels and therefore of brain metabolism.

  7. Goal-directed intraoperative fluid therapy guided by stroke volume and its variation in high-risk surgical patients : a prospective randomized multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Wiesenack, Christoph; Gerlach, Herwig; Marx, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative hemodynamic optimisation improves postoperative outcome for patients undergoing high-risk surgery (HRS). In this prospective randomized multicentre study we studied the effects of an individualized, goal-directed fluid management based on continuous stroke volume variation (SVV) and st

  8. The role of stroke volume variation in predicting the volume responsiveness of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock%每搏量变异度预测严重感染和感染性休克患者容量反应性的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄磊; 张卫星; 蔡文训; 罗华; 陈映群; 张声

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究每搏量变异度(stroke volume variation,SW)预测严重感染和感染性休克机械通气患者容量反应性的价值.方法 前瞻观察性研究,对2009年1月至2010年3月北京大学深圳医院ICU严重感染和感染性休克机械通气患者28例进行容量负荷试验.超声心输出量监测仪无创监测心脏指数(cardiac index,CI)、每搏输出量指数(stroke volume index,SVI)、外周血管阻力(systemic vascular resistance,SVR)、SVV等血流动力学指标.根据容量负荷试验前后CI增加值是否大于12%分为有反应组和无反应组,组间比较应用两独立样本t检验;容量负荷试验前后比较应用配对t检验;受试者工作特征曲线评价SVV、中心静脉压(central venous pressure,CVP)以及容量负荷试验前后CVP变化值(△CVP)预测容量反应性的价值.结果 容量负荷试验前,有反应组SW高于无反应组[(18.2±4.7)%和(12.7±4.2)%,P=0.003];而CVP两组差异无统计学意义[(10.2±4.0)cmH2O和(10.8±4.8)cmH2O,P>0.05].容量负荷试验后,有反应组△CVP低于无反应组[(2.9±3.1)cmH2O和(5.3±2.7)cmH2O,P=0.037].SVV、CVP和△CVP的曲线下面积(AUC)分别是0.836(95%CI:0.680~0.992,P=0.003)、0.549(95%CI:0.329~0.768,P=0.662)和0.762(95%CI:0.570~0.953,P=0.019).SVV为15.5%时预测容量反应性的敏感度和特异度分别是84.6%和80%.结论 SVV预测严重感染和感染性休克机械通气患者的容量反应性具有良好价值,明显优于CVP、△CVP等传统指标.%Objective To assess the role of stroke volume variation (SVV) in predicting the volume responsiveness of mechanically ventilated patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Method A total of 28 mechanically ventilated patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were admitted from January 2009 to March 2010. Every patient was treated with volume loading test. Cardiac index (CI), stroke volume index (SVI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and SVV were measured non-invasively by

  9. TSPO imaging in stroke: from animal models to human subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Boutin, Hervé; Pinborg, Lars H.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a major health problem in developed countries and neuroinflammation has emerged over the last 2 decades as major contributor to the pathophysiological processes of brain damage following stroke. PET imaging of the translocator 18 kDa protein (TSPO) provides a unique non-invasive point of access to neuroinflammatory processes and more specifically microglial and astrocytic reaction after stroke in both animal models and patients. Here, we are reviewing both the experimental and ...

  10. Trial by Dutch Laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing. Part II - Women's Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schendel, Rachel V; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Catia M; de Boer, Marjon A; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H; van Langen, Irene M; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; van Maarle, Merel C; Macville, Merryn V E; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preferences and decision-making amongst high-risk pregnant women offered a choice between Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), invasive testing or no further testing. METHODS: Nationwide implementation study (TRIDENT) offering NIPT as contingent screening test for women at in

  11. Trial by Dutch Laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing. : Part II - Women's Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schendel, Rachel V; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Catia M; de Boer, Marjon A; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H; van Langen, Irene M; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; van Maarle, Merel C; Macville, Merryn V E; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preferences and decision-making amongst high-risk pregnant women offered a choice between Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), invasive testing or no further testing. METHODS: Nationwide implementation study (TRIDENT) offering NIPT as contingent screening test for women at in

  12. Liver breath tests non-invasively predict higher stages of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portincasa, Piero; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Lauterburg, Bernhard H.; Palmieri, Vincenzo O.; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Stellaard, Frans

    2006-01-01

    Effectively assessing subtle hepatic metabolic functions by novel non-invasive tests might be of clinical utility in scoring NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) and in identifying altered metabolic pathways. The present study was conducted on 39 (20 lean and 19 obese) hypertransaminasemic pati

  13. Emerging technologies for non-invasive quantification of physiological oxygen transport in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, P; Taguchi, M; Burrs, S L; Hauser, B A; Salim, W W A W; Claussen, J C; McLamore, E S

    2013-09-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in plant metabolism, stress response/signaling, and adaptation to environmental changes (Lambers and Colmer, Plant Soil 274:7-15, 2005; Pitzschke et al., Antioxid Redox Signal 8:1757-1764, 2006; Van Breusegem et al., Plant Sci 161:405-414, 2001). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), by-products of various metabolic pathways in which oxygen is a key molecule, are produced during adaptation responses to environmental stress. While much is known about plant adaptation to stress (e.g., detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant production), the link between ROS metabolism, O2 transport, and stress response mechanisms is unknown. Thus, non-invasive technologies for measuring O2 are critical for understanding the link between physiological O2 transport and ROS signaling. New non-invasive technologies allow real-time measurement of O2 at the single cell and even organelle levels. This review briefly summarizes currently available (i.e., mainstream) technologies for measuring O2 and then introduces emerging technologies for measuring O2. Advanced techniques that provide the ability to non-invasively (i.e., non-destructively) measure O2 are highlighted. In the near future, these non-invasive sensors will facilitate novel experimentation that will allow plant physiologists to ask new hypothesis-driven research questions aimed at improving our understanding of physiological O2 transport.

  14. Non-invasive monitoring of endocrine status in laboratory primates: methods, guidelines and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heistermann, M.

    2010-11-01

    During the past three decades, non-invasive methods for assessing physiological, in particular endocrine, status have revolutionized almost all areas of primatology, including behavioural ecology, reproductive biology, stress research, conservation and last but not least management of primates in captivity where the technology plays an integral role in assisting the husbandry, breeding and welfare of many species. Non-invasive endocrine methods make use of the fact that hormones circulating in blood are secreted into saliva or deposited in hair and are eliminated from the body via urinary and faecal excretion. The choice of which matrix to use for hormonal assessment depends on a range of factors, including the type of information required, the measurement techniques involved, species differences in hormone metabolism and route of excretion and the practicality of sample collection. However, although sample collection is usually relatively easy, analysing hormones from these non-invasively collected samples is not as easy as many people think, particularly not when dealing with a new species. In this respect, the importance of a careful validation of each technique is essential in order to generate meaningful and accurate results. This paper aims to provide an overview of the available non-invasive endocrine-based methodologies, their relative merits and their potential areas of application for assessing endocrine status in primates, with special reference to captive environments. In addition, general information is given about the most important aspects and caveats researchers have to be aware of when using these methodologies.

  15. Recent Advances in Non-Invasive Delivery of Macromolecules using Nanoparticulate Carriers System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadab, Md; Haque, Shadabul; Sheshala, Ravi; Meng, Lim Wei; Meka, Venkata Srikanth; Ali, Javed

    2017-01-01

    The drug delivery of macromolecules such as proteins and peptides has become an important area of research and represents the fastest expanding share of the market for human medicines. The most common method for delivering macromolecules is parenterally. However parenteral administration of some therapeutic macromolecules has not been effective because of their rapid clearance from the body. As a result, most macromolecules are only therapeutically useful after multiple injections, which causes poor compliance and systemic side effects. Therefore, there is a need to improve delivery of therapeutic macromolecules to enable non-invasive delivery routes, less frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery, and improved drug targeting to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. Non-invasive administration routes such as intranasal, pulmonary, transdermal, ocular and oral delivery have been attempted intensively by formulating macromolecules into nanoparticulate carriers system such as polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles. This review discusses barriers to drug delivery and current formulation technologies to overcome the unfavorable properties of macromolecules via non-invasive delivery (mainly intranasal, pulmonary, transdermal oral and ocular) with a focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems. This review also provided a summary and discussion of recent data on non-invasive delivery of macromolecules using nanoparticulate formulations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. A NEW NON-INVASIVE DEVICE TO MONITOR CORE TEMPERATURE ON EARTH AND IN SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanns-Christian Gunga

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of the core body temperature (cbt is fundamental to the study of human temperature regulation. As standard sites for the placement of cbt measurement sensors have been used: the rectum, the bladder, the esophagus, the nasopharynx and the acoustic meatus. Nevertheless those measurement sites exhibit limited applicability under field conditions, in rescue operations or during peri- and postoperative long-term core temperature monitoring. There is, indeed, a high demand for a reliable, non-invasive, easy to handle telemetric device. But the ideal non-invasive measurement of core temperature has to meet requirements such as i a convenient measurement site, ii no bias through environmental conditions, and iii a high sensitivity of the sensor regarding time shift and absolute temperature value. Recently, together with the Draegerwerke AG we have developed a new heat flux measurement device (so-called "Double Sensor" as a non-invasive cbt sensor aiming to meet the requirements described above. Four recent studies in humans will be summarized and discussed to show the applicability of this new non-invasive method to monitor core temperature under different environmental and clinical settings on Earth and in space.

  17. Cardiac abnormalities assessed by non-invasive techniques in patients with newly diagnosed idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2015-01-01

    inflammatory myopathies (IIM) by means of non-invasive techniques. METHODS: Fourteen patients with IIM (8 polymyositis, 4 dermatomyositis, 2 cancer-associated dermatomyositis) and 14 gender- and age- matched healthy control subjects were investigated. Participant assessments included a cardiac questionnaire...

  18. Non-invasive method of field imaging in parallel plate waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We present a new non-invasive air-photonic-based method of terahertz (THz) field imaging inside a parallel plate waveguide. The method is based on THz field-enhanced second harmonic generation of the fundamental laser beam in an external electric field. We also demonstrate the direct measurements...

  19. Non-invasive ambient pressure estimation using non-linear ultrasound contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup

    Many attempts to find a non-invasive procedure to measure the blood pressure locally in the body have been made. This dissertation focuses on the approaches which utilize highly compressible ultrasound contrast agents as ambient pressure sensors. The literature within the topic has been reviewed...

  20. Non-invasive versus invasive mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loretta YC Yam; Alfred YF Chan; Thomas MT Cheung; Eva LH Tsui; Jane CK Chan; Vivian CW Wong

    2005-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome is frequently complicated by respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. We aimed to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation against invasive mechanical ventilation treating respiratory failure in this disease. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted on all respiratory failure patients identified from the Hong Kong Hospital Authority Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Database. Intubation rate, mortality and secondary outcome of a hospital utilizing non-invasive ventilation under standard infection control conditions (NIV Hospital) were compared against 13 hospitals using solely invasive ventilation (IMV Hospitals). Multiple logistic regression analyses with adjustments for confounding variables were performed to test for association between outcomes and hospital groups. Results Both hospital groups had comparable demographics and clinical profiles, but NIV Hospital (42 patients) had higher lactate dehydrogenase ratio and worse radiographic score on admission and ribavirin-corticosteroid commencement. Compared to IMV Hospitals (451 patients), NIV Hospital had lower adjusted odds ratios for intubation (0.36, 95% CI 0.164-0.791, P=0.011) and death (0.235, 95% CI 0.077-0.716, P=0.011), and improved earlier after pulsed steroid rescue. There were no instances of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome among health care workers due to the use of non-invasive ventilation.Conclusion Compared to invasive mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation as initial ventilatory support for acute respiratory failure in the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome appeared to be associated with reduced intubation need and mortality.

  1. Non-invasive imaging in detecting myocardial viability: Myocardial function versus perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal A. Elfigih

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is the most prevalent and single most common cause of morbidity and mortality [1] with the resulting left ventricular (LV dysfunction an important complication. The distinction between viable and non-viable myocardium in patients with LV dysfunction is a clinically important issue among possible candidates for myocardial revascularization. Several available non-invasive techniques are used to detect and assess ischemia and myocardial viability. These techniques include echocardiography, radionuclide images, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and recently myocardial computed tomography perfusion imaging. This review aims to distinguish between the available non-invasive imaging techniques in detecting signs of functional and perfusion viability and identify those which have the most clinical relevance in detecting myocardial viability in patients with CAD and chronic ischemic LV dysfunction. The most current available studies showed that both myocardial perfusion and function based on non-invasive imaging have high sensitivity with however wide range of specificity for detecting myocardial viability. Both perfusion and function imaging modalities provide complementary information about myocardial viability and no optimum single imaging technique exists that can provide very accurate diagnostic and prognostic viability assessment. The weight of the body of evidence suggested that non-invasive imaging can help in guiding therapeutic decision making in patients with LV dysfunction.

  2. Ultraweak photon emission as a non-invasive health assessment: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ives, J.A.; Wijk, E.P.A. van; Bat, N.; Crawford, C.; Walter, A.; Jonas, W.B.; Wijk, R. van; Greef, J. van der

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review (SR) of the peer reviewed scientific literature on ultraweak photon emissions (UPE) from humans. The question was: Can ultraweak photon emissions from humans be used as a non-invasive health assessment? A systematic search was conducted across eight relevant database

  3. Non Invasive Biomedical Analysis - Breath Networking Session at PittCon 2011, Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This was the second year that our breath colleagues organized a networking session at the Pittsburgh Conference and Exposition or ''PittCon'' (http://www.pincon.org/).This time it was called "Non-invasive Biomedical Analysis" to broaden the scope a bit, but the primary focus rema...

  4. Non-invasive continuous core temperature measurement by zero heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, L.P.J.; Klewer, J.; Haan, A. de; Koning, J.J. de; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable continuous core temperature measurement is of major importance for monitoring patients. The zero heat flux method (ZHF) can potentially fulfil the requirements of non-invasiveness, reliability and short delay time that current measurement methods lack. The purpose of this study was to deter

  5. Non-Invasive Study of Nerve Fibres using Laser Interference Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, A. R.; Brazhe, N. A.; Rodionova, N. N.;

    2008-01-01

    information non-invasively about the internal structure of different regions of a nerve fibre. We also analyse the temporal variations in the internal optical properties in order to detect the rhythmic activity in the nerve fibre at different time scales and to shed light on the underlying biological...

  6. [18F]FLT PET for non-invasive assessment of tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Björkling, Fredrik; Madsen, Jacob;

    2012-01-01

    3'-deoxy-3'-[¹⁸F]fluorothymidine ([18F]FLT) is a tracer used to assess cell proliferation in vivo. The aim of the study was to use [18F]FLT positron emission tomography (PET) to study non-invasively early anti-proliferative effects of the experimental chemotherapeutic agent TP202377 in both sensi...... sensitive and resistant tumors....

  7. Microgradients in bacterial colonies : use of fluorescence ratio imaging : a non-invasive technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malakar, P.K.; Brocklehurst, T.F.; Mackie, A.R.; Wilson, P.D.G.; Zwietering, M.H.; Riet, K. van 't

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescence ratio imaging is a non-invasive technique for studying the formation of microgradients in immobilised bacterial colonies. These gradients can be quantified easily when combined with the gel cassette system designed at the Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK. Colonies of

  8. Invasive versus Non Invasive Methods Applied to Mummy Research: Will This Controversy Ever Be Solved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Moissidou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the application of non invasive techniques to mummified remains have shed new light on past diseases. The virtual inspection of a corpse, which has almost completely replaced classical autopsy, has proven to be important especially when dealing with valuable museum specimens. In spite of some very rewarding results, there are still many open questions. Non invasive techniques provide information on hard and soft tissue pathologies and allow information to be gleaned concerning mummification practices (e.g., ancient Egyptian artificial mummification. Nevertheless, there are other fields of mummy studies in which the results provided by non invasive techniques are not always self-explanatory. Reliance exclusively upon virtual diagnoses can sometimes lead to inconclusive and misleading interpretations. On the other hand, several types of investigation (e.g., histology, paleomicrobiology, and biochemistry, although minimally invasive, require direct contact with the bodies and, for this reason, are often avoided, particularly by museum curators. Here we present an overview of the non invasive and invasive techniques currently used in mummy studies and propose an approach that might solve these conflicts.

  9. Current Directions in Non-Invasive Low Intensity Electric Brain Stimulation for Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Sack, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive stimulation of the human brain to improve depressive symptoms is increasingly finding its way in clinical settings as a viable form of somatic treatment. Following successful modulation of neural excitability with subsequent antidepressant effects, neural polarization by administrating

  10. Non-invasive imaging of kupffer cell status using radiolabelled mannosylated albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahajan, V.; Hartimath, S.; Comley, R.; Stefan-Gueldner, M.; Roth, A.; Poelstra, K.; Reker-Smit, C.; Kamps, J.; Dierckx, R.; de Vries, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Kupffer cells are responsible for maintaining liver homeostasis and have a vital role in chronic hepatotoxicity and various liver diseases. Positron Imaging Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique that allows quantification and visualization of biochemical processes

  11. Liver breath tests non-invasively predict higher stages of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portincasa, Piero; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Lauterburg, Bernhard H.; Palmieri, Vincenzo O.; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Stellaard, Frans

    Effectively assessing subtle hepatic metabolic functions by novel non-invasive tests might be of clinical utility in scoring NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) and in identifying altered metabolic pathways. The present study was conducted on 39 (20 lean and 19 obese) hypertransaminasemic

  12. Non-invasive dendrochronology of late-medieval objects in Oslo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daly, Aoife; Streeton, Noëlle L.W.

    2017-01-01

    A technique for non-invasive dendrochronological analysis of oak was developed for archaeological material, using an industrial CT scanner. Since 2013, this experience has been extended within the scope of the research project ‘After the Black Death: Painting and Polychrome Sculpture in Norway...

  13. Non-invasive monitoring of living cell culture by lensless digital holography imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxin Wang; Dayong Wang; Jie Zhao; Yishu Yang; Xiangqian Xiao; Huakun Cui

    2011-01-01

    @@ A non-invasive detection method for the status analysis of cell culture is presented based on digital holography technology.Lensless Fourier transform digital holography (LFTDH) configuration is developed for living cell imaging without prestaining.Complex amplitude information is reconstructed by a single inverse fast Fourier transform, and the phase aberration is corrected through the two-step phase subtraction method.The image segmentation is then applied to the automatic evaluation of confluency.Finally,the cervical cancer cell TZMbl is employed for experimental validation, and the results demonstrate that LFTDH imaging with the corresponding image post-processing can provide an automatic and non-invasive approach for monitoring living cell culture.%A non-invasive detection method for the status analysis of cell culture is presented based on digital holography technology. Lensless Fourier transform digital holography (LFTDH) configuration is developed for living cell imaging without prestaining. Complex amplitude information is reconstructed by a single inverse fast Fourier transform, and the phase aberration is corrected through the two-step phase subtraction method. The image segmentation is then applied to the automatic evaluation of confluency. Finally,the cervical cancer cell TZMbl is employed for experimental validation, and the results demonstrate that LFTDH imaging with the corresponding image post-processing can provide an automatic and non-invasive approach for monitoring living cell culture.

  14. Molecular Insights on the Transition of Non-invasive DCIS to Invasive ductal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dihua YU

    2009-01-01

    @@ More than 90% of breast cancer-related deaths are caused by metastasis not primary tumor. To effectively reduce cancer mortality, it is extremely im-portant to predict the risk of, and to intervene in, the critical transition from non-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to life-threatening invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC).

  15. Application of quantum dot nanoparticles for potential non-invasive bio-imaging of mammalian spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various obstacles are encountered by mammalian spermatozoa during their journey through the female genital tract, and only few or none will reach the site of fertilization. Currently, there are limited technical approaches for non-invasive investigation of spermatozoa migration after insemination. A...

  16. EAPD interim seminar and workshop in Brussels May 9 2015 Non-invasive caries treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; van Palenstein Helderman, W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim This was to collect information for the 9th European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry Interim Seminar and Workshops to discuss the state of art on non-invasive caries therapy to be used if possible to formulate clinical guidelines by European experts in paediatric dentistry Methods Based on syste

  17. Factors affecting the clinical use of non-invasive prenatal testing: a mixed methods systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirton, Heather; Patch, Christine

    2013-06-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing has been in clinical use for a decade; however, there is evidence that this technology will be more widely applied within the next few years. Guidance is therefore required to ensure that the procedure is offered in a way that is evidence based and ethically and clinically acceptable. We conducted a systematic review of the current relevant literature to ascertain the factors that should be considered when offering non-invasive prenatal testing in a clinical setting. We undertook a systematic search of relevant databases, journals and reference lists, and from an initial list of 298 potential papers, identified 11 that were directly relevant to the study. Original data were extracted and presented in a table, and the content of all papers was analysed and presented in narrative form. Four main themes emerged: perceived attributes of the test, regulation and ethical issues, non-invasive prenatal testing in practice and economic considerations. However, there was a basic difference in the approach of actual or potential service users, who were very positive about the benefits of the technology, compared with other research participants, who were concerned with the potential moral and ethical outcomes of using this testing method. Recommendations for the appropriate use of non-invasive prenatal testing are made.

  18. The clinical utility of non-invasive prenatal testing in pregnancies with ultrasound anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulen, Lean; Faas, Brigitte H W; Feenstra, Ilse; van Vugt, John M G; Bekker, Mireille N

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the application of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) as an alternative to invasive diagnostic prenatal testing for pregnancies with abnormal ultrasound findings. METHOD: A retrospective analysis was performed of 251 single and multiple pregnancies at high

  19. Clinical utility of non-invasive prenatal testing in pregnancies with ultrasound anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulen, L.; Faas, B.H.W.; Feenstra, I.; Vugt, J.M.G. van; Bekker, M.N.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the application of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) as an alternative to invasive diagnostic prenatal testing in pregnancies with abnormal ultrasound findings. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of 251 singleton and multiple pregnancies at high risk for fetal

  20. Current Directions in Non-Invasive Low Intensity Electric Brain Stimulation for Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Sack, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive stimulation of the human brain to improve depressive symptoms is increasingly finding its way in clinical settings as a viable form of somatic treatment. Following successful modulation of neural excitability with subsequent antidepressant effects, neural polarization by administrating

  1. NIPTRIC : an online tool for clinical interpretation of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Johansson, Lennart F; de Boer, Eddy N; Boon, Elles M J; Suijkerbuijk, Ron F; Bouman, Katelijne; Bilardo, Catia M; Swertz, Morris A; Dijkstra, Martijn; van Langen, Irene M; Sinke, Richard J; Te Meerman, Gerard J

    2016-01-01

    To properly interpret the result of a pregnant woman's non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT), her a priori risk must be taken into account in order to obtain her personalised a posteriori risk (PPR), which more accurately expresses her true likelihood of carrying a foetus with trisomy. Our aim was to de

  2. Non-invasive measurement of adrenal response after standardized exercise tests in prepubertal children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijsman, Sigrid M.; Koers, Nicoline F.; Bocca, Gianni; van der Veen, Betty S.; Appelhof, Maaike; Kamps, Arvid W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of non-invasive evaluation of adrenal response in healthy prepubertal children by standardized exercise tests. Methods: On separate occasions, healthy prepubertal children performed a submaximal cycling test, a maximal cycling test, and a 20-m shuttle-run test

  3. The influence of different shavers on the skin quantified by non-invasive reflectance confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodijk, F.M.; Zanelli, G.; Geerligs, M.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Peppelman, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of personal care devices on skin is mainly assessed using subjective tools. However, new objective, accurate non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques have been developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) in quantifying

  4. Non-invasive imaging of kupffer cell status using radiolabelled mannosylated albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahajan, V.; Hartimath, S.; Comley, R.; Stefan-Gueldner, M.; Roth, A.; Poelstra, K.; Reker-Smit, C.; Kamps, J.; Dierckx, R.; de Vries, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Kupffer cells are responsible for maintaining liver homeostasis and have a vital role in chronic hepatotoxicity and various liver diseases. Positron Imaging Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique that allows quantification and visualization of biochemical processes

  5. Non Invasive Biomedical Analysis - Breath Networking Session at PittCon 2011, Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This was the second year that our breath colleagues organized a networking session at the Pittsburgh Conference and Exposition or ''PittCon'' (http://www.pincon.org/).This time it was called "Non-invasive Biomedical Analysis" to broaden the scope a bit, but the primary focus rema...

  6. Non-invasive in-vivo imaging of stem cells after transplantation in cardiovascular tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    no improvements. To better understand the underlying mechanisms of these results, a reverse translation from bedside to bench has been opened. Non-invasive cell tracking after implantation has a pivotal role in this translation. Imaging based methods can help elucidate important issues such as retention...

  7. Smartphone spectrometer for non-invasive diffuse reflectance spectroscopy based hemoglobin sensing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Perry S.

    2016-10-01

    Fiber-optic based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is shown to be a highly specific and highly sensitive method for non-invasive detection of various cancers (e.g. cervical and oral) as well as many other diseases. Fiber-optic DRS diagnosis relies on non-invasive biomarker detection (e.g. oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin) and can be done without the need for sophisticated laboratory analysis of samples. Thus, it is highly amenable for clinical adoption especially in resource scarce regions that have limited access to such developed laboratory infrastructure. Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of fiber-optic DRS, such systems remain cost prohibitive in many of these regions, mainly due to the use of bulky and expensive spectrometers. Here, a fiber-optic DRS system is coupled to a smartphone spectrometer and is proposed as a low-cost solution for non-invasive tissue hemoglobin sensing. The performance of the system is assessed by measuring tissue phantoms with varying hemoglobin concentrations. A DRS retrieval algorithm is used to extract hemoglobin parameters from the measurements and determine the accuracy of the system. The results are then compared with those of a previously reported fiber-optic DRS system which is based on a larger more expensive spectrometer system. The preliminary results are encouraging and indicate the potential of the smartphone spectrometer as a viable low-cost option for non-invasive tissue hemoglobin sensing.

  8. Experimental bifurcation analysis of an impact oscillator - Tuning a non-invasive control scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bureau, Emil; Schilder, Frank; Santos, Ilmar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a non-invasive, locally stabilizing control scheme necessary for an experimental bifurcation analysis. Our test-rig comprises a harmonically forced impact oscillator with hardening spring nonlinearity controlled by electromagnetic actuators, and serves as a prototype for electromag...

  9. Intravenous administration of human umbilical cord blood-derived AC133+ endothelial progenitor cells in rat stroke model reduces infarct volume: magnetic resonance imaging and histological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Asm; Knight, Robert A; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Ewing, James R; Shankar, Adarsh; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Ali, Meser M; Arbab, Ali S; Janic, Branislava

    2013-09-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) hold enormous therapeutic potential for ischemic vascular diseases. Previous studies have indicated that stem/progenitor cells derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) improve functional recovery in stroke models. Here, we examined the effect of hUCB AC133+ EPCs on stroke development and resolution in a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) rat model. Since the success of cell therapies strongly depends on the ability to monitor in vivo the migration of transplanted cells, we also assessed the capacity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo the magnetically labeled cells that were administered. Animals were subjected to transient MCAo and 24 hours later injected intravenously with 10(7) hUCB AC133+ EPCs. MRI performed at days 1, 7, and 14 after the insult showed accumulation of transplanted cells in stroke-affected hemispheres and revealed that stroke volume decreased at a significantly higher rate in cell-treated animals. Immunohistochemistry analysis of brain tissues localized the administered cells in the stroke-affected hemispheres only and indicated that these cells may have significantly affected the magnitude of endogenous proliferation, angiogenesis, and neurogenesis. We conclude that transplanted cells selectively migrated to the ischemic brain parenchyma, where they exerted a therapeutic effect on the extent of tissue damage, regeneration, and time course of stroke resolution.

  10. Potential role of blood microRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers for early detection of asymptomatic coronary atherosclerosis in obese children with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Ahmed; Elimam, Dalia; He, Fang; Peng, Jing; Yin, Fei

    2012-12-01

    The pandemic of the childhood obesity represent a major public health problem all over the world. This leads to detection of many health conditions that were previously considered an adulthood diseases. The rise in the prevalence of the obesity and overweight among children means that the world will face an explosion in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS), which increases the risk of atherosclerotic disease and death in adulthood. The atherosclerotic process has proved to develop silently for decades during childhood and adolescence before the cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke occur. This means that obese children especially with MS could have heart attacks and suffer from heart disease in an age when they should be very healthy, but most of these data either derived from autopsy findings or studies that confirmed the presence of peripheral atherosclerosis. Very early detection of coronary atherosclerosis in obese children with metabolic syndrome through a non invasive method will be of great importance, allowing for early therapeutic intervention. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) is considered a major scientific breakthrough in the last years; recent studies have suggested a potentially important role of miRNAs in the control of diversity aspects of cardiac functions in health and disease including coronary atherosclerosis. Moreover, circulating miRNAs profiles recently used as a non-invasive biomarker for diagnosis of multiple cardiovascular diseases. The identification of distinct circulating miRNA profiles may impact the development of specific miRNAs as biomarkers in pediatric cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we postulate that some of these circulating miRNAs may be a potential biomarker for early non-invasive diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis in very early asymptomatic stage in obese children with metabolic syndrome, giving an excellent chance to fight against the first killer in the adult population in

  11. A non-invasive exploitation of energy conservation potentials using ultrasonics. Non-invasive diagnostics; Mit Ultraschall eingriffsfrei Energieeinsparpotenziale erschliessen. Nichtinvasive Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, Joerg [Flexim GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Energy conservation is profitable. The independent energy efficiency service provider Eta Cube (Frankfurt, Federal Republic of Germany) provides an intelligent energy optimization which is financed by consumption cuts. A non-invasive measuring clamp-on ultrasonic system is used in order to determine the efficiency potential in the preparation of hot water and domestic water as well as for the air conditioning of buildings. The Fluxus F601 Double Energy from Flexim Flexible Industriemesstechnik GmbH (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) determines the performance and efficiency of thermal consumers without interruption of the supply.

  12. Pulmonary intravascular blood volume changes through the cardiac cycle in healthy volunteers studied by cardiovascular magnetic resonance measurements of arterial and venous flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Hakan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to present a novel method for using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR to non-invasively quantify the variation in pulmonary blood volume throughout the cardiac cycle in humans. Methods 10 healthy volunteers (7 males, 3 female, age range 21-32 years were studied. The blood flow in the pulmonary artery and all pulmonary veins was quantified during free breathing using phase contrast velocity encoded CMR. The difference in flow between the pulmonary artery and the pulmonary veins was integrated to calculate the change in pulmonary blood volume throughout the cardiac cycle. Results The stroke volumes in the pulmonary artery and the sum of the pulmonary veins were (mean ± SEM 103 ± 6 ml and 95 ± 6 ml, respectively. The pulmonary blood volume variation (PBVV was 48 ± 5 ml, and the PBVV expressed as percent of the pulmonary artery stroke volume was 46 ± 3%. The maximum increase in pulmonary blood volume occurred 310 ± 12 ms after the R-wave from the ECG (32 ± 2% of the cardiac cycle. PBVV did not correlate to change in cross-sectional area in the pulmonary artery (R2 = 0.03, p = 0.66. Conclusion It is feasible to non-invasively quantify the change in pulmonary blood volume during the cardiac cycle in humans using CMR. The average pulmonary blood volume variation in healthy volunteers was approximately 50 ml and this was approximately 50% of the stroke volume. Further studies are needed to assess the utility of the pulmonary blood volume variation as a measure for identifying cardiac and pulmonary vascular disease.

  13. Non-Invasive Ultrasonic Diagnosing and Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure/Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    related to cardiovascular parameters. ICP VI, Eds. Miller JD, Teasdale GM, Rowan JO, Galbraith SL, Mendelow AD. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 290...Galbraith AD Mendelow (Springer Berlin Heidelberg) 305-309 43. Hayashi M, Handa Y, Kobayashi H, Kawano H, Ishii H, Hirose S (1991). Plateau-wave...Galbraith SL, Mendelow AD Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. 151-155 72. Maeda M, Tanaka K, Nishimur S, Matsuura S (1986). Pressure wave-like changes in

  14. Reliability and validity of non-invasive determined haemoglobin mass and blood volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagoni, Nazzareno; Andersen, Andreas Breenfeldt; Oberholzer, Laura

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method used for the determination of haemoglobin mass (Hbmass ) is associated with blood sample analysis (in this study: Radiometer ABL800). As an alternative hereto the aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of a portable and non-invas...

  15. A systematic approach for the accurate non-invasive estimation of blood glucose utilizing a novel light-tissue interaction adaptive modelling scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybynok, V O; Kyriacou, P A [City University, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges of the 21st century. The obesity epidemic, sedentary lifestyles and an ageing population mean prevalence of the condition is currently doubling every generation. Diabetes is associated with serious chronic ill health, disability and premature mortality. Long-term complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations, make the greatest contribution to the costs of diabetes care. Many of these long-term effects could be avoided with earlier, more effective monitoring and treatment. Currently, blood glucose can only be monitored through the use of invasive techniques. To date there is no widely accepted and readily available non-invasive monitoring technique to measure blood glucose despite the many attempts. This paper challenges one of the most difficult non-invasive monitoring techniques, that of blood glucose, and proposes a new novel approach that will enable the accurate, and calibration free estimation of glucose concentration in blood. This approach is based on spectroscopic techniques and a new adaptive modelling scheme. The theoretical implementation and the effectiveness of the adaptive modelling scheme for this application has been described and a detailed mathematical evaluation has been employed to prove that such a scheme has the capability of extracting accurately the concentration of glucose from a complex biological media.

  16. Clinical applications of non-invasive imaging techniques in suspected coronary artery disease and in acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nucifora, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities play a crucial role in the diagnostic process and clinical management of patients without known coronary artery disease and patients with acute myocardial infarction. The first part of the thesis discusses the use of non-invasive imaging modalities (including

  17. (19)F-heptuloses as tools for the non-invasive imaging of GLUT2-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaisse, Willy J; Zhang, Ying; Louchami, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Suitable analogs of d-mannoheptulose are currently considered as possible tools for the non-invasive imaging of pancreatic islet insulin-producing cells. Here, we examined whether (19)F-heptuloses could be used for non-invasive imaging of GLUT2-expressing cells. After 20 min incubation, the uptake...

  18. NON-INVASIVE IMAGING OF CORONARY ARTERY WITH 16-SLICE SPIRAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu-hua Zhang; Wen-bin Mou; Li-Ren Zhang; Wen-ling Zhu; Chao Ni; Hua Ren; Hong-quan Yu; Qi Miao; Qi Fang; Zheng-yu Jin; Dong-jing Li; Song-bai Lin; Shu-yang Zhang; Ling-yan Kong; Yun Wang; Lin-hui Wang; Wen-min Zhao

    2004-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of 16-slice spiral CT in the demonstration of coronary artery and in the diagnose of coronary artery stenosis.Methods Plain and enhanced CT scans were performed with a 16-slice CT scanner (Sensation 16, Siemens, Germany)in 230 patients with suspected coronary heart disease (CHD). Parameters of the plain scan were: 120 kV, 133 mA, slice collimation 16 mm×1.5 mm, rotation time 0.42 seconds, increment 1.5 mm, and slice width 3 mm. Parameters of the enhanced scan were: 120 kV, 500 mA, slice collimation 16 mm×0.75 mm, rotation time 0.42 seconds, increment 0.5 mm, and slice width 1 mm. Enhanced CT scan was performed with a rapid intravenous injection of 100 mL iothalamate meglumine (Ultravist)(370 mgI/mL) or Omnipaque (350mgI/mL) and 30 mL 0.9% NaC1 chaser bolus at a flow rate of 3.5 mL/s. Calcium scoring with plain scan images and two and three dimensional reconstruction with enhanced scan images were made in all cases,among which 30 cases underwent conventional coronary angiography. Demonstration of coronary arteries and their stenosis were evaluated and the factors that might influence the image quality were analyzed.Results Coronary calcium scores were calculated and coronary artery was demonstrated in our study. In the evaluation of image quality with volume rendering technique (VRT) images, 78.3% of the images were of the first class, 12.2% the second class, and 9.6% the third class. Multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) and maximal intensity projection (MIP) were better than VRT in the demonstration of small branches. The image quality was related to the heart rate, with or without arrhythmia,and breath-hold ability of patients. Comparative study of the stenosis of coronary arteries in 30 cases showed that the sensitivity and specificity of 16-slice coronary CT angiography (CTA) to diagnose significant stenosis were 95.8% and 94.8% respectively.Conclusion As a non-invasive and quick method, 16-slice coronary CTA is sensitive and

  19. Associations of Ischemic Lesion Volume With Functional Outcome in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: 24-Hour Versus 1-Week Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucker, Amber; Boers, Anna M; Bot, Joseph C J; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Lingsma, Hester F; Yoo, Albert J; van Zwam, Wim H; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van der Lugt, Aad; Dippel, Diederik W J; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2017-05-01

    Ischemic lesion volume (ILV) on noncontrast computed tomography at 1 week can be used as a secondary outcome measure in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Twenty-four-hour ILV on noncontrast computed tomography has greater availability and potentially allows earlier estimation of functional outcome. We aimed to assess lesion growth 24 hours after stroke onset and compare the associations of 24-hour and 1-week ILV with functional outcome. We included 228 patients from MR CLEAN trial (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands), who received noncontrast computed tomography at 24-hour and 1-week follow-up on which ILV was measured. Relative and absolute lesion growth was determined. Logistic regression models were constructed either including the 24-hour or including the 1-week ILV. Ordinal and dichotomous (0-2 and 3-6) modified Rankin scale scores were, respectively, used as primary and secondary outcome measures. Median ILV was 42 mL (interquartile range, 21-95 mL) and 64 mL (interquartile range: 30-120 mL) at 24 hours and 1 week, respectively. Relative lesion growth exceeding 30% occurred in 121 patients (53%) and absolute lesion growth exceeding 20 mL occurred in 83 patients (36%). Both the 24-hour and 1-week ILVs were similarly significantly associated with functional outcome (both P<0.001). In the logistic analyses, the areas under the curve of the receiver-operator characteristic curves were similar: 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.90) and 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.91) for including the 24-hour and 1-week ILV, respectively. Growth of ILV is common 24-hour poststroke onset. Nevertheless, the 24-hour ILV proved to be a valuable secondary outcome measure as it is equally strongly associated with functional outcome as the 1-week ILV. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN10888758. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Normovolemia defined according to cardiac stroke volume in healthy supine humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Kehlet, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both hypovolemia and a fluid overload are detrimental for outcome in surgical patients but the effort to establish normovolemia is hampered by the lack of an operational clinical definition. Manipulating the central blood volume on a tilt table demonstrates that the flat part...

  1. The Effect of Pre-Nutrition of Hydroalcoholic Extracts of Origanum vulgare on Infarct Volume and Neurologic Deficits in a Rat Stroke Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    meysam Foroozandeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Basic and clinical studies have shown that the production of free radicals was one of the main factors leading to the injury after stroke. In this study we investigated the effect of hydroalcoholic extracts of Origanum vulgare on infarct volume and neurological deficits in a rat stroke model. Methods: In this experimental study 35 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, each containing 7 animals. First group (control received distilled water, while other three treatment groups received oral Origanum vulgare extract by gavage for 30 days (50, 75 and 100 mg/kg/day, respectively. These groups were subjected to 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion 2 hours after the last dose of Origanum extracts and followed by 24 hrs reperfusion. After 24 hrs, the infarct volume and neurologic deficits were evaluated in the groups. Sham operated groups (n=7 did not receive Marjoram and brain ischemia. Results: The hydroalcoholic extract of Origanum reduced the infarct volume and neurologic deficits in all treatment groups compared to control group. Conclusion: It seems that Origanum vulgare extract can exert the neuroprotective effect against stroke damage by reducing infarct volume and neurological disorders.

  2. Magneto-electric nano-particles for non-invasive brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yue

    Full Text Available This paper for the first time discusses a computational study of using magneto-electric (ME nanoparticles to artificially stimulate the neural activity deep in the brain. The new technology provides a unique way to couple electric signals in the neural network to the magnetic dipoles in the nanoparticles with the purpose to enable a non-invasive approach. Simulations of the effect of ME nanoparticles for non-invasively stimulating the brain of a patient with Parkinson's Disease to bring the pulsed sequences of the electric field to the levels comparable to those of healthy people show that the optimized values for the concentration of the 20-nm nanoparticles (with the magneto-electric (ME coefficient of 100 V cm(-1 Oe(-1 in the aqueous solution is 3 × 10(6 particles/cc, and the frequency of the externally applied 300-Oe magnetic field is 80 Hz.

  3. Non-invasive determination of the complete elastic moduli of spider silks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Akhenblit, Paul; McKiernan, Keri; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2013-03-01

    Spider silks possess nature’s most exceptional mechanical properties, with unrivalled extensibility and high tensile strength. Unfortunately, our understanding of silks is limited because the complete elastic response has never been measured—leaving a stark lack of essential fundamental information. Using non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin light scattering, we obtain the entire stiffness tensors (revealing negative Poisson’s ratios), refractive indices, and longitudinal and transverse sound velocities for major and minor ampullate spider silks: Argiope aurantia, Latrodectus hesperus, Nephila clavipes, Peucetia viridans. These results completely quantify the linear elastic response for all possible deformation modes, information unobtainable with traditional stress-strain tests. For completeness, we apply the principles of Brillouin imaging to spatially map the elastic stiffnesses on a spider web without deforming or disrupting the web in a non-invasive, non-contact measurement, finding variation among discrete fibres, junctions and glue spots. Finally, we provide the stiffness changes that occur with supercontraction.

  4. Early predictors of success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, D; Prasad, Bnbm; Tampi, P S; Ramprasad, R

    2011-10-01

    Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) has emerged as a significant advancement in the management of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure requiring ventilation therapy (respiratory rate [RR] of > 30 breaths per minutes, PaCO2 > 55 mmHg and arterial pH intubation was evaluated. Of the 100 patients, 76 (76%) showed improvement in clinical parameters and ABG. There was improvement in HR and RR, pH, and PCO2 within the first hour in the success group and these parameters continued to improve even after four and 24 hours of NIPPV treatment. Out of 24 (24%) patients who failed to respond, 13 (54%) needed endotracheal intubation within one hour. The failure group had higher baseline HR than the success group. Improvement in HR, RR, pH, and PCO2 one hour after putting the patient on NIPPV predicts success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure.

  5. Evaluation of four non-invasive methods for examination and characterization of pressure ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E.S.; Karlsmark, T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcers are globally of major concern and there is need for research in the pathogenesis for early intervention. Early studies have suggested existence of a hypo-echogenic subepidermal layer at the location of pressure ulcers, visualized by ultrasound scans. As a continuation......, we here report on usability of four non-invasive techniques for evaluation of pressure ulcers. Methods: Fifteen pressure ulcers in stage 0-IV were examined using four different non-invasive techniques [redness index, skin temperature, skin elasticity (i.e. retraction time), and ultrasound scanning...... at all pressure ulcers, but none at the reference points. The skin retraction time was often higher at the location of a pressure ulcer than at the reference location. We found no correlation between the stage of the ulcers and temperature, redness index, subepidermal layer thickness, or retraction time...

  6. Non-invasive monitoring and control in silicon photonics by CMOS integrated electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Grillanda, Stefano; Morichetti, Francesco; Ciccarella, Pietro; Annoni, Andrea; Ferrari, Giorgio; Strain, Michael; Sorel, Marc; Sampietro, Marco; Melloni, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    As photonics breaks away from today's device level toward large scale of integration and complex systems-on-a-chip, concepts like monitoring, control and stabilization of photonic integrated circuits emerge as new paradigms. Here, we show non-invasive monitoring and feedback control of high quality factor silicon photonics resonators assisted by a transparent light detector directly integrated inside the cavity. Control operations are entirely managed by a CMOS microelectronic circuit, hosting many parallel electronic read-out channels, that is bridged to the silicon photonics chip. Advanced functionalities, such as wavelength tuning, locking, labeling and swapping are demonstrated. The non-invasive nature of the transparent monitor and the scalability of the CMOS read-out system offer a viable solution for the control of arbitrarily reconfigurable photonic integrated circuits aggregating many components on a single chip.

  7. A non-invasive method of qualitative and quantitative measurement of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, S T; Gilbert, L M

    1981-09-01

    Methods for quick qualitative and quantitative evaluation of drug intake are needed, especially during emergency situations such as drug overdose and alcohol intoxication. The electronystagmograph was used in an attempt to develop a non-invasive method for identification of drug intake, and to study the effects of alcohol and other drugs on the vestibular system. Results of the study reveal that alcohol, diazepam, opiates, barbiturates, cocaine, marijuana, and hallucinogenic drugs produce a characteristic printout pattern which can be evaluated qualitatively. This method is a practical, non-invasive, objective procedure that provides rapid assessment of quality of drug intake. Its potential uses are extensive, including such possibilities as evaluation of drug intake in emergency drug overdose situations, monitoring anesthesia during surgery, evaluating drug intake in women about to deliver, (as well as the effects on the newborn), and determining whether or not persons who are being tested on a polygraph are under the influence of drugs.

  8. Feasibility of non-invasive optical blood-glucose detection using overtone circular dichroism

    CERN Document Server

    Hokr, Brett H; Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most debilitating and costly diseases currently plaguing humanity. It is a leading cause of death and dismemberment in the world, and we know how to treat it. Accurate, continuous monitoring and control of blood glucose levels via insulin treatments are widely known to mitigate the majority of detrimental effects caused by the disease. The primary limitation of continuous glucose monitoring is patient non-compliance due to the unpleasant nature of "finger-stick" testing methods. This limitation can be largely, or even completely, removed by non-invasive testing methods. In this report, we demonstrate the vibrational overtone circular dichroism properties of glucose and analyze its use as a method of non-invasive glucose monitoring, capable of assuaging this trillion dollar scourge.

  9. Non-invasive imaging using reporter genes altering cellular water permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Wu, Di; Davis, Hunter C.; Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    2016-12-01

    Non-invasive imaging of gene expression in live, optically opaque animals is important for multiple applications, including monitoring of genetic circuits and tracking of cell-based therapeutics. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable such monitoring with high spatiotemporal resolution. However, existing MRI reporter genes based on metalloproteins or chemical exchange probes are limited by their reliance on metals or relatively low sensitivity. Here we introduce a new class of MRI reporters based on the human water channel aquaporin 1. We show that aquaporin overexpression produces contrast in diffusion-weighted MRI by increasing tissue water diffusivity without affecting viability. Low aquaporin levels or mixed populations comprising as few as 10% aquaporin-expressing cells are sufficient to produce MRI contrast. We characterize this new contrast mechanism through experiments and simulations, and demonstrate its utility in vivo by imaging gene expression in tumours. Our results establish an alternative class of sensitive, metal-free reporter genes for non-invasive imaging.

  10. A holistic multimodal approach to the non-invasive analysis of watercolour paintings

    CERN Document Server

    Kogou, Sotiria; Bellesia, Sonia; Burgio, Lucia; Bailey, Kate; Brooks, Charlotte; Liang, Haida

    2015-01-01

    A holistic approach using non-invasive multimodal imaging and spectroscopic techniques to study the materials (pigments, drawing materials and paper) and painting techniques of watercolour paintings is presented. The non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques include VIS-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and multispectral imaging, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The three spectroscopic techniques complement each other in pigment identification. Multispectral imaging (near infrared bands), OCT and micro-Raman complement each other in the visualisation and identification of the drawing material. OCT probes the microstructure and light scattering properties of the substrate while XRF detects the elemental composition that indicates the sizing methods and the filler content. The multiple techniques were applied in a study of forty six 19th century Chinese export watercolours from the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) and the Royal Hort...

  11. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, B M; O' Flynn, B; Mathewson, A, E-mail: brian.mccarthy@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  12. Striving for habitual well-being in non-invasive ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Grøfte, Thorbjørn;

    2013-01-01

    . A constant comparative classic grounded theory study was performed. Methods. Data collection consisted of participant observation during the treatment of 21 patients undergoing non-invasive ventilation, followed by interviews with 11 of the patients after treatment completion. Data were collected from...... December 2009 to January 2012. Results. A substantive theory of striving for habitual well-being was developed. The theory included three phases: initiation, transition, and determination. Each phase contained a set of subcategories to indicate the dimensions of and variations in the participants......’ behaviour. Conclusions. The substantive theory revealed that the patients’ behaviour was related to their breathlessness, sensation of being restrained by the mask and head gear, and the side effects of non-invasive ventilation. Relevance to clinical practice. This inter-relationship should be addressed...

  13. [CD147 expression in non-invasive and invasive breast carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Saki; Sakurai, Kenichi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Hara, Yukiko; Maeda, Tetsuyo; Hirano, Tomohisa; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Amano, Sadao; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi

    2014-10-01

    CD147 is a multifunctional membrane glycoprotein involved in tumor invasion, and is overexpressed in many solid tumors. However, the role of CD147 in breast cancer is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate CD147 expression in non-invasive and invasive ductal carcinomas. We recruited 156 breast cancer patients who underwent radical operations at our hospital up until 2002. We performed immunohistochemistry on their tumor specimens, and compared these data with clinicopathological factors. We divided the patients into two groups: group A was comprised of non-invasive ductal carcinomas and group B, invasive ductal carcinomas. The CD147-positive rate was 62.8% for all patients and was higher in group B than group A. In all cases, the CD147-positive rate correlated with clinical stage, number of metastatic lymph nodes, and tumor size. These results implied that CD147 may be involved in the process of breast cancer invasion.

  14. Imaging and finite element analysis: a methodology for non-invasive characterization of aortic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamini, Vittoria; Creane, Arthur P; Kerskens, Christian M; Lally, Caitríona

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the mechanical properties of arterial tissues usually involves an invasive procedure requiring tissue removal. In this work we propose a non-invasive method to perform a biomechanical analysis of cardiovascular aortic tissue. This method is based on combining medical imaging and finite element analysis (FEA). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was chosen since it presents relatively low risks for human health. A finite element model was created from the MRI images and loaded with systolic physiological pressures. By means of an optimization routine, the structural material properties were changed until average strains matched those measured by MRI. The method outlined in this work produced an estimate of the in situ properties of cardiovascular tissue based on non-invasive image datasets and finite element analysis.

  15. Non-invasive discrimination between pancreatic islets and exocrine cells using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Li, Ge; Hao, Mingming; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we propose a non-invasive method to distinguish pancreatic islet cells from exocrine cell clusters using multiphoton (MP) imaging. We demonstrate the principle of distinguishing them based on autofluorescence. The results show that MP imaging has a potential to distinguish pancreatic islets from exocrine cells. This ability to distinguish the two cell types could have many applications, such as the examination of fresh pancreatic biopsies when staining is not possible or desirable.

  16. Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in healthy humans reduces sympathetic nerve activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, JA; Mary, DA; Witte, KK; Greenwood, JP; Deuchars, SA; Deuchars, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is currently used to treat refractory epilepsy and is being investigated as a potential therapy for a range of conditions, including heart failure, tinnitus, obesity and Alzheimer's disease. However, the invasive nature and expense limits the use of VNS in patient populations and hinders the exploration of the mechanisms involved. Objective: We investigated a non-invasive method of VNS through electrical stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagu...

  17. Composite Biomarkers For Non-invasive Screening, Diagnosis And Prognosis Of Colorectal Cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-09-11

    The present invention concerns particular biomarkers for diagnosing and/or prognosticating colorectal cancer, in particular in a non-invasive manner. The methods and compositions concern analysis of methylation patterns of one or more genes from a set of 29 genes identified as described herein. In certain embodiments, the gene set includes at least P15.INK4b, SST, GAS7, CNRIP1, and PIK3CG.

  18. Fetal cells in maternal blood: state of the art for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, S S; O'Donoghue, K; Choolani, M

    2003-09-01

    In Singapore, 1 in 5 pregnancies occur in mothers > 35 years old and genetic diseases, such as thalassaemia, are common. Current methods for the diagnosis of aneuploidy and monogenic disorders require invasive testing by amniocentesis, chorion villus biopsy or fetal blood sampling. These tests carry a procedure-related risk of miscarriage that is unacceptable to many couples. Development of non-invasive methods for obtaining intact fetal cells would allow accurate prenatal diagnosis for aneuploidy and single gene disorders, without the attendant risks associated with invasive testing, and would increase the uptake of prenatal diagnosis by women at risk. Isolation of fetal erythroblasts from maternal blood should allow accurate non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of both aneuploidies and monogenic disorders. Expression of gamma-globin in maternal erythroblasts and the inability to locate fetal erythroblasts reliably in all pregnancies have prevented its clinical application. In the absence of a highly specific fetal cell marker, enrichment, identification and diagnosis--the 3 components of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis--have clearly defined objectives. Since fetal cells are rare in maternal blood, the sole purpose of enrichment is yield--to recover as many fetal cells as possible--even if purity is compromised at this stage. In contrast, the primary goal of identification is specificity; absolute certainty of fetal origin is required at this stage if the ultimate objective of diagnosis, accuracy, is to be achieved. This review summarises the current state of the art of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis using fetal erythroblasts enriched from maternal blood.

  19. Non-invasive parameters as predictors of high risk of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Andrea Peñaloza-Posada

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: The presence of large esophageal varices is the most important predictive risk factor for the occurrence of VB, independently of the class of Child-Pugh. Additionally, the portal vein diameter ≥ 13 mm is a non-invasive parameter related to high risk of VB. Therefore, these factors could be used as predictors of high risk of VB when the measure of HPVG is not available.

  20. Comparing the Validity of Non-Invasive Methods in Measuring Thoracic Kyphosis and Lumbar Lordosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Yousefi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the purpose of this article is to study the validity of each of the non-invasive methods (flexible ruler, spinal mouse, and processing the image versus the one through-Ray radiation (the basic method and comparing them with each other.Materials and Methods: for evaluating the validity of each of these non-invasive methods, the thoracic Kyphosis and lumber Lordosis angle of 20 students of Birjand University (age mean and standard deviation: 26±2, weight: 72±2.5 kg, height: 169±5.5 cm through fours methods of flexible ruler, spinal mouse, and image processing and X-ray.Results: the results indicated that the validity of the methods including flexible ruler, spinal mouse, and image processing in measuring the thoracic Kyphosis and lumber Lordosis angle respectively have an adherence of 0.81, 0.87, 0.73, 0.76, 0.83, 0.89 (p>0.05. As a result, regarding the gained validity against the golden method of X-ray, it could be stated that the three mentioned non-invasive methods have adequate validity. In addition, the one-way analysis of variance test indicated that there existed a meaningful relationship between the three methods of measuring the thoracic Kyphosis and lumber Lordosis, and with respect to the Tukey’s test result, the image processing method is the most precise one.Conclusion as a result, this method could be used along with other non-invasive methods as a valid measuring method.

  1. The role of invasive and non-invasive procedures in diagnosing fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, Bilgul; Vanli, Ersin; Yemisen, Mucahit; Balkan, Ilker Inanc; Dagtekin, Hilal; Ozaras, Resat; Saltoglu, Nese; Mert, Ali; Ozturk, Recep; Tabak, Fehmi

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of fever of unknown origin has changed because of the recent advances in and widespread use of invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tools. However, undiagnosed patients still constitute a significant number. To determine the etiological distribution and role of non-invasive and invasive diagnostic tools in the diagnosis of fever of unknown origin. One hundred patients who were hospitalized between June 2001 and 2009 with a fever of unknown origin were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from the patients' medical records retrospectively. Fifty three percent of the patients were male, with a mean age of 45 years. The etiology of fever was determined to be infectious diseases in 26, collagen vascular diseases in 38, neoplastic diseases in 14, miscellaneous in 2 and undiagnosed in 20 patients. When the etiologic distribution was analyzed over time, it was noted that the rate of infectious diseases decreased, whereas the rate of rheumatological and undiagnosed diseases relatively increased because of the advances in imaging and microbiological studies. Seventy patients had a definitive diagnosis, whereas 10 patients had a possible diagnosis. The diagnoses were established based on clinical features and non-invasive tests for 61% of the patients and diagnostic benefit was obtained for 49% of the patients undergoing invasive tests. Biopsy procedures contributed a rate of 42% to diagnoses in patients who received biopsies. Clinical features (such as detailed medical history-taking and physical examination) may contribute to diagnoses, particularly in cases of collagen vascular diseases. Imaging studies exhibit certain pathologies that guide invasive studies. Biopsy procedures contribute greatly to diagnoses, particularly for malignancies and infectious diseases that are not diagnosed by non-invasive procedures.

  2. Rheoencephalography (REG) as a Non-Invasive Monitoring Alternative for the Assessment of Brain Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    bioimpedance (rheoencephalography - REG) measurement as a non-invasive, continuous method for assessing the status of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in combat...Dunster KR, Colditz PB, Ward LC. Noninvasive measurement of cerebral bioimpedance for detection of cerebral edema in the neonatal piglet. Brain Res...REG measurements and DC impedance (Ro) were recorded simultaneously on a portable IBM compatible computer using CODAS (DATAQ, Inc., Akron, OH) data

  3. Entrainment of Perceptually Relevant Brain Oscillations by Non-Invasive Rhythmic Stimulation of the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Thut, Gregor; Schyns, Philippe G.; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The notion of driving brain oscillations by directly stimulating neuronal elements with rhythmic stimulation protocols has become increasingly popular in research on brain rhythms. Induction of brain oscillations in a controlled and functionally meaningful way would likely prove highly beneficial for the study of brain oscillations, and their therapeutic control. We here review conventional and new non-invasive brain stimulation protocols as to their suitability for controlled intervention in...

  4. Utility of Transcutaneous Capnography for Optimization of Non-Invasive Ventilation Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhajed, Prashant N; Gehrer, Simone; Pandey, Kamlesh V; Vaidya, Preyas J; Leuppi, Joerg D; Tamm, Michael; Strobel, Werner

    2016-09-01

    Nocturnal Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NPPV) is the treatment of choice in patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure due to hypoventilation. Continuous oxygen saturation measured with a pulse oximeter provides a surrogate measure of arterial oxygen saturation but does not completely reflect ventilation. Currently, Partial Pressure of Arterial (PaCO2) measured by arterial blood analysis is used for estimating the adequacy of ventilatory support and serves as the gold standard. To examine the safety, feasibility and utility of cutaneous capnography to re-titrate the non-invasive positive pressure ventilation settings in patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure due to hypoventilation. Twelve patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure prospectively underwent complete polysomnography and cutaneous capnography measurement on the ear lobe. Non-invasive ventilation pressures were adjusted with the aim of normalizing cutaneous carbon dioxide or at least reducing it by 10 to 15 mmHg. Sensor drift for cutaneous carbon dioxide of 0.7 mmHg per hour was integrated in the analysis. Mean baseline cutaneous carbon dioxide was 45.4 ± 6.5 mmHg and drift corrected awake value was 45.1 ± 8.3 mmHg. The correlation of baseline cutaneous carbon dioxide and the corrected awake cutaneous carbon dioxide with arterial blood gas values were 0.91 and 0.85 respectively. Inspiratory positive airway pressures were changed in nine patients (75%) and expiratory positive airway pressures in eight patients (66%). Epworth sleepiness score before and after the study showed no change in five patients, improvement in six patients and deterioration in one patient. Cutaneous capnography is feasible and permits the optimization of non-invasive ventilation pressure settings in patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure due to hypoventilation. Continuous cutaneous capnography might serve as an important additional tool to complement diurnal

  5. Liver fibrosis can be assessed by non-invasive ultrasound elastography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielsen, Peter; Wilkens, Rune; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael;

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and assessment of liver fibrosis is of great importance for initiating treatment and starting hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance in patients with established cirrhosis. Liver biopsy is still considered the gold standard for liver fibrosis staging, however; it is far from perfect. Non......-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis is becoming more available and is well tolerated. This review describes the feasibility and reliability of two elastography methods: transient elastography and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse-elastography....

  6. Non-invasive, Focused Ultrasound-Facilitated Gene Delivery for Optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shutao; Kugelman, Tara; Buch, Amanda; Herman, Mathieu; Han, Yang; Karakatsani, Maria Eleni; Hussaini, S. Abid; Duff, Karen; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2017-01-01

    Optogenetics, a widely used technique in neuroscience research, is often limited by its invasive nature of application. Here, we present a noninvasive, ultrasound-based technique to introduce optogenetic channels into the brain by temporarily opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We demonstrate the efficiency of the method developed and evaluate the bioactivity of the non-invasively introduced channelrhodopsin channels by performing stimulation in freely behaving mice.

  7. Non-invasive blood glucose detection system based on conservation of energy method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Yong-Bo; Chen, Hong-Bo; Yin, Shi-Min; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    The most common method used for minimizing the occurrence of diabetes complications is frequent glucose testing to adjust the insulin dose. However, using blood glucose (BG) meters presents a risk of infection. It is of great importance to develop non-invasive BG detection techniques. To realize high-accuracy, low-cost and continuous glucose monitoring, we have developed a non-invasive BG detection system using a mixed signal processor 430 (MSP430) microcontroller. This method is based on the combination of the conservation-of-energy method with a sensor integration module, which collects physiological parameters, such as the blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), blood flow velocity and heart rate. New methods to detect the basal metabolic rate (BMR) and BV are proposed, which combine the human body heat balance and characteristic signals of photoplethysmography as well dual elastic chambers theory. Four hundred clinical trials on real-time non-invasive BG monitoring under suitable experiment conditions were performed on different individuals, including diabetic patients, senior citizens and healthy adults. A multisensory information fusion model was applied to process these samples. The algorithm (we defined it as DCBPN algorithm) applied in the model combines a decision tree and back propagation neural network, which classifies the physiological and environmental parameters into three categories, and then establishes a corresponding prediction model for the three categories. The DCBPN algorithm provides an accuracy of 88.53% in predicting the BG of new samples. Thus, this system demonstrates a great potential to reliably detect BG values in a non-invasive setting.

  8. Prognostic value of non-invasive stress testing for coronary artery disease in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigvava, Tamar; Zamani, Seyedeh Mahsa; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Gebker, Rolf; Pieske, Burkert; Kelle, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in obese patients remains a challenge but can have substantial prognostic implications for this patient group. Until now, sufficient data was not available on which to base the selection of the imaging modality in obese patients. The decision on which imaging modality to use should therefore follow the general guidelines. In this article, the authors discuss the prognostic value of the different non-invasive stress testing methods for CAD in obese patients.

  9. EAPD interim seminar and workshop in Brussels May 9 2015 Non-invasive caries treatment

    OpenAIRE

    van Loveren, C.; van Palenstein Helderman, W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim This was to collect information for the 9th European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry Interim Seminar and Workshops to discuss the state of art on non-invasive caries therapy to be used if possible to formulate clinical guidelines by European experts in paediatric dentistry Methods Based on systematic reviews and additional papers were assessed for methods to prevent caries initiation and caries progression both in the state of pre-cavitation and cavitation without invasive technologies. R...

  10. Non-invasive method of determination of thermoelectric materials figure of merit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashcheulov А. А.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric effects arising in a sample placed in a measuring oscillating loop have been studied. It has been shown that asymmetric character of flowing current results in a volumetric bundle of induced Foucault currents and regions of Peltier heat release by thermoelectric sample which leads to increasing of irreversible heat losses recorded by measuring oscillating loop. The presence of this effect has caused the emergence of ingenious non-invasive method for recording of thermoelectric materials figure of merit.

  11. NON INVASIVE THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING OF PROPRANOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE BY REVERSE IONTOPHORESIS

    OpenAIRE

    Saini Vipin; Nair Anroop; Goel Ankit

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is highly required for drugs possessing narrow therapeutic index as a slight variation in the therapeutic range could result in no or low clinical efficiency or causes significant side effects or high risk of toxicity. In recent days, reverse iontophoresis technique has been attempted for the non invasive drug monitoring. Typically, it applies a low electric current through a pair of skin electrodes to promote the transport of both charged and neutral molecul...

  12. [Isolated left ventricular muscular diverticulum in an adult. Value of non-invasive examinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeman, A; Bellorini, M; Lefevre, T; Lévy, M; Loiret, J; Huerta, F; Thébault, B; Funck, F

    1997-10-01

    The authors report a case of ventriculum in a 45 year old women investigated for chest pain. This was a congenital muscular left ventricular diverticulum confirmed by a complete imaging series including echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, angio-scintigraphy and conventional angiography. This diverticulum was unusual due to the fact that there was no associated congenital disease and that it was discovered in an adult. The authors review the literature and discuss the value of non-invasive imaging procedures.

  13. Gene profiles between non-invasive and invasive colon cancer using laser microdissection and polypeptide analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Shui Zhu; Hua Guo; Ming-Quan Song; Guo-Qiang Chen; Qun Sun; Qiang Zhang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of differential gene expression profiles of target cell between non-invasive submucosal and invasive advanced tumor in colon carcinoma using laser microdissection (LMD) in combination with polypeptide analysis.METHODS: Normal colon tissue samples from 20 healthy individuals and 30 cancer tissue samples from early non-invasive colon cancer cells were obtained. The cells from these samples were used LMD independently after P27-based amplification. aRNA from advanced colon cancer cells and metastatic cancer cells of 40 cases were applied to LMD and polypeptide analysis, semiquantitative reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical assays were used to verify the results of microarray and further identify differentially expressed genes in non-invasive early stages of colon cancer.RESULTS: Five gene expressions were changed in colon carcinoma cells compared with that of controls. Of the five genes, three genes were downregulated and two were upregulated in invasive submucosal colon carcinoma compared with non-invasive cases. The results were confirmed at the level of aRNA and gene expression. Five genes were further identified as differentially expressed genes in the majority of cases (50%, 25/40) in progression of colon cancer, and their expression patterns of which were similar to tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes.CONCLUSION: This study suggested that combined use of polypeptide analysis might identify early expression profiles of five differential genes associated with the invasion of colon cancer. These results reveal that this gene may be a marker of submucosal invasion in early colon cancer.

  14. Non-invasive assessment of endothelial function. Intra and inter-observer variability

    OpenAIRE

    Sotomayor González,Arturo; Kostine,Andrea; Gómez-Flores,Jorge R; Márquez, Manlio F; Hermosillo,Antonio G; Verdejo París,Juan; Iturralde Torres,Pedro; Colin Lizalde,Luis; Nava Townsend,Santiago; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives: Non-invasive evaluation of endothelial function with high resolution ultrasound has become a widely accepted tool in determination of high risk subjects for early atherosclerosis. Despite its simple appearance, ultrasonographic assessment of brachial artery changes, is technically challenging and has a significant learning curve. In the present study, we evaluate the intra and inter-observer variability in assessing peripheral endothelial function with high resoluti...

  15. SNP-based non-invasive prenatal testing detects sex chromosome aneuploidies with high accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Banjevic, Milena; Ryan, Allison; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Hill, Matthew; Hall, Megan P.; Westemeyer, Margaret; Saucier, Jennifer; Demko, Zachary; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a single nucleotide polymorphism- and informatics-based non-invasive prenatal test that detects sex chromosome aneuploidies early in pregnancy. Methods Fifteen aneuploid samples, including thirteen 45,X, two 47,XXY, and one 47,XYY, along with 185 euploid controls, were analyzed. Cell-free DNA was isolated from maternal plasma, amplified in a single multiplex PCR assay that targeted 19,488 polymorphic loci covering chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y, and sequenced. Sequencing results were analyzed using a Bayesian-based maximum likelihood statistical method to determine copy number of interrogated chromosomes, calculating sample-specific accuracies. Results Of the samples that passed a stringent quality control metric (93%), the algorithm correctly identified copy number at all five chromosomes in all 187 samples, for 934/935 correct calls as early as 9.4 weeks of gestation. We detected 45,X with 91.7% sensitivity (CI: 61.5-99.8%) and 100% specificity (CI: 97.9-100%), and 47,XXY and 47,XYY. The average calculated accuracy was 99.78%. Conclusion This method non-invasively detected 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XYY fetuses from cfDNA isolated from maternal plasma with high calculated accuracies, and thus offers a non-invasive method with the potential to function as a routine screen allowing for early prenatal detection of rarely diagnosed yet commonly occurring sex aneuploidies. PMID:23712453

  16. Non-invasive Estimation of Pressure Gradients in Pulsatile Flow using Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Traberg, Marie Sand

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates how pressure gradients in a pulsatile flow environment can be measured non-invasively using ultrasound. The presented set-up is based on vector velocity fields measured on a blood mimicking fluid moving at a peak flow rate of 1 ml/s through a constricted vessel. Fields of ...... and standard deviation of 10% and 13%, respectively, relative to peak estimated gradient. The paper concludes that maps of pressure gradients can be measured non-invasively using ultrasound with a precision of more than 85%......This paper investigates how pressure gradients in a pulsatile flow environment can be measured non-invasively using ultrasound. The presented set-up is based on vector velocity fields measured on a blood mimicking fluid moving at a peak flow rate of 1 ml/s through a constricted vessel. Fields...... of pressure gradients are calculated using the Navier-Stokes equations. Flow data are acquired to a depth of 3 cm using directional synthetic aperture flow imaging on a linear array transducer producing 1500 image frames of velocity estimates per second. Scans of a carotid bifurcation phantom with a 70...

  17. Non-invasive monitoring of Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine efficacy using biophotonic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz M Alam

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes infection of the nasopharynx represents a key step in the pathogenic cycle of this organism and a major focus for vaccine development, requiring robust models to facilitate the screening of potentially protective antigens. One antigen that may be an important target for vaccination is the chemokine protease, SpyCEP, which is cell surface-associated and plays a role in pathogenesis. Biophotonic imaging (BPI can non-invasively characterize the spatial location and abundance of bioluminescent bacteria in vivo. We have developed a bioluminescent derivative of a pharyngeal S. pyogenes strain by transformation of an emm75 clinical isolate with the luxABCDE operon. Evaluation of isogenic recombinant strains in vitro and in vivo confirmed that bioluminescence conferred a growth deficit that manifests as a fitness cost during infection. Notwithstanding this, bioluminescence expression permitted non-invasive longitudinal quantitation of S. pyogenes within the murine nasopharynx albeit with a detection limit corresponding to approximately 10(5 bacterial colony forming units (CFU in this region. Vaccination of mice with heat killed streptococci, or with SpyCEP led to a specific IgG response in the serum. BPI demonstrated that both vaccine candidates reduced S. pyogenes bioluminescence emission over the course of nasopharyngeal infection. The work suggests the potential for BPI to be used in the non-invasive longitudinal evaluation of potential S. pyogenes vaccines.

  18. Non-Invasive Nanoparticle Imaging Technologies for Cosmetic and Skin Care Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynlee L. Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology field is growing at an unprecedented rate. This is resulting in significant benefits in skin care products and formulations. Likewise, imaging technology is also advancing. The convergence of these fields offers a unique opportunity to observe and quantify the interactions of nanoparticles within cosmetic and skin care formulations. More importantly, imaging technology holds tremendous promise for understanding how formulated nanoparticles interact with our skin. Imaging technologies can be broken into two major groups that include those that require invasive sample collection and processing (e.g., electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy and those that can be used in non-invasive data collection settings. Fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography fall into the latter category and are the focus of this review in the context of skin care product and cosmetics testing. Cosmetic and skin care product testing is most informative when carried out in volunteers. This makes invasive or disruptive analysis techniques unfeasible and supports the use of non-invasive imaging technologies. The combination of non-invasive imaging and minimally invasive microbiopsy sampling for combined imaging and molecular data is the future of skin care product testing.

  19. Prediction of oesophageal varices in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis by non-invasive markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lili; Li, Hanwei; Han, Jun; Zhang, Weihui

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Preliminary data suggested that non-invasive methods could be useful to assess presence of oesophageal varices (OV) in liver cirrhosis. The primary objectives were to investigate non-invasive markers for diagnosing and grading OV in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Material and methods This study included a total of 106 consecutive treatment-naive patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Results of physical examination, blood tests, and abdominal ultrasound scan (USS) were measured. Performance of non-invasive markers for OV was expressed as sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV), accuracy, and area under the curve (AUC). Results Oesophageal varices were found in 54 (50.9%) and large OV in 28 of the 106 patients. Variables found to differ significantly between patients with any grade or large and without OV included increased spleen length, increased portal vein diameter, low platelet count, and low levels of albumin or low γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP) values. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve showed that spleen length (cutoff = 156.0) had AUC 0.753 (95% CI: 0.657–0.849), and high NPV (82.1%) to exclude any grade OV. Large OV could be excluded with NPV 70.6% by spleen length. Conclusions Predictive risk factors that use readily available laboratory results and ultrasound scan results may reliably identify esophageal varices in patients with PBC. PMID:28261290

  20. The Book of Kells: A non-invasive MOLAB investigation by complementary spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, B.; Daveri, A.; Clementi, C.; Romani, A.; Bioletti, S.; Brunetti, B.; Sgamellotti, A.; Miliani, C.

    2013-11-01

    This paper highlights the efficacy of non-invasive portable spectroscopy for assessing the execution technique and constituent materials in one of the most important medieval manuscripts, the Book of Kells. An aimed campaign of in situ measurements by the MObile LABoratory (MOLAB) has analyzed its elemental composition and vibrational and electronic molecular properties. The ample analytical toolbox has afforded complementary diagnostic information of the pigment palette permitting the characterization of both inorganic and organic materials as pigments and dyes in the white, purple, blue, red, orange, green and black areas. In particular, the novel widespread use of calcinated gypsum (anhydrite) as both a white pigment and in correlation to the organic dyes in this manuscript has been noted. The non-invasive identification of the organic dye orchil is significant considering its rare non invasive detection in medieval manuscripts. Finally the occurrence of particular alterations of the organic black areas giving rise to calcium carboxylate and calcium oxalate has been specifically highlighted. Importantly, this work elaborates complex aspects of the employed painting materials which have given rise to numerous significant points of interest for a more elaborate understanding of this Irish treasure.

  1. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  2. Retinal functional imager (RFI): non-invasive functional imaging of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganekal, S

    2013-01-01

    Retinal functional imager (RFI) is a unique non-invasive functional imaging system with novel capabilities for visualizing the retina. The objective of this review was to show the utility of non-invasive functional imaging in various disorders. Electronic literature search was carried out using the websites www.pubmed.gov and www.google.com. The search words were retinal functional imager and non-invasive retinal imaging used in combination. The articles published or translated into English were studied. The RFI directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, metabolic responses to photic activation and generates capillary perfusion maps (CPM) that provides retinal vasculature detail similar to flourescein angiography. All of these parameters stand in a direct relationship to the function and therefore the health of the retina, and are known to be degraded in the course of retinal diseases. Detecting changes in retinal function aid early diagnosis and treatment as functional changes often precede structural changes in many retinal disorders.

  3. Hyperspectral imaging coupled with chemometric analysis for non-invasive differentiation of black pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlebda, Damian K.; Majda, Alicja; Łojewski, Tomasz; Łojewska, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    Differentiation of the written text can be performed with a non-invasive and non-contact tool that connects conventional imaging methods with spectroscopy. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a relatively new and rapid analytical technique that can be applied in forensic science disciplines. It allows an image of the sample to be acquired, with full spectral information within every pixel. For this paper, HSI and three statistical methods (hierarchical cluster analysis, principal component analysis, and spectral angle mapper) were used to distinguish between traces of modern black gel pen inks. Non-invasiveness and high efficiency are among the unquestionable advantages of ink differentiation using HSI. It is also less time-consuming than traditional methods such as chromatography. In this study, a set of 45 modern gel pen ink marks deposited on a paper sheet were registered. The spectral characteristics embodied in every pixel were extracted from an image and analysed using statistical methods, externally and directly on the hypercube. As a result, different black gel inks deposited on paper can be distinguished and classified into several groups, in a non-invasive manner.

  4. Non-invasive, transient determination of the core temperature of a heat-generating solid body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Dean; Sarkar, Daipayan; Jain, Ankur

    2016-11-01

    While temperature on the surface of a heat-generating solid body can be easily measured using a variety of methods, very few techniques exist for non-invasively measuring the temperature inside the solid body as a function of time. Measurement of internal temperature is very desirable since measurement of just the surface temperature gives no indication of temperature inside the body, and system performance and safety is governed primarily by the highest temperature, encountered usually at the core of the body. This paper presents a technique to non-invasively determine the internal temperature based on the theoretical relationship between the core temperature and surface temperature distribution on the outside of a heat-generating solid body as functions of time. Experiments using infrared thermography of the outside surface of a thermal test cell in a variety of heating and cooling conditions demonstrate good agreement of the predicted core temperature as a function of time with actual core temperature measurement using an embedded thermocouple. This paper demonstrates a capability to thermally probe inside solid bodies in a non-invasive fashion. This directly benefits the accurate performance prediction and control of a variety of engineering systems where the time-varying core temperature plays a key role.

  5. Optimized intravenous Flat Detector CT for non-invasive visualization of intracranial stents: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struffert, Tobias; Kloska, Stephan; Engelhorn, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Ott, Sabine; Doelken, Marc; Saake, Marc; Köhrmann, Martin; Doerfler, Arnd

    2011-02-01

    As stents for treating intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis may develop in-stent re-stenosis (ISR) in up to 30%, follow-up imaging is mandatory. Residual stenosis (RS) is not rare. We evaluated an optimised Flat Detector CT protocol with intravenous contrast material application (i.v. FD-CTA) for non-invasive follow-up. In 12 patients with intracranial stents, follow-up imaging was performed using i.v. FD-CTA. MPR, subtracted MIP and VRT reconstructions were used to correlate to intra-arterial angiography (DSA). Two neuroradiologists evaluated the images in anonymous consensus reading and calculated the ISR or RS. Correlation coefficients and a Wilcoxon test were used for statistical analysis. In 4 patients, no stenosis was detected. In 6 patients RS and in two cases ISR by intima hyperplasia perfectly visible on MPR reconstructions of i.v. FD-CTA were detected. Wilcoxon's test showed no significant differences between the methods (p > 0.05). We found a high correlation with coefficients of the pairs DSA/ FD-CT MIP r = 0.91, DSA/ FD-CT MPR r = 0.82 and FD-CT MIP/ FD-CT MPR r = 0.8. Intravenous FD-CTA could clearly visualise the stent and the lumen, allowing ISR or RS to be recognised. FD-CTA provides a non-invasive depiction of intracranial stents and might replace DSA for non-invasive follow-up imaging.

  6. Non-invasive, transient determination of the core temperature of a heat-generating solid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Dean; Sarkar, Daipayan; Jain, Ankur

    2016-11-02

    While temperature on the surface of a heat-generating solid body can be easily measured using a variety of methods, very few techniques exist for non-invasively measuring the temperature inside the solid body as a function of time. Measurement of internal temperature is very desirable since measurement of just the surface temperature gives no indication of temperature inside the body, and system performance and safety is governed primarily by the highest temperature, encountered usually at the core of the body. This paper presents a technique to non-invasively determine the internal temperature based on the theoretical relationship between the core temperature and surface temperature distribution on the outside of a heat-generating solid body as functions of time. Experiments using infrared thermography of the outside surface of a thermal test cell in a variety of heating and cooling conditions demonstrate good agreement of the predicted core temperature as a function of time with actual core temperature measurement using an embedded thermocouple. This paper demonstrates a capability to thermally probe inside solid bodies in a non-invasive fashion. This directly benefits the accurate performance prediction and control of a variety of engineering systems where the time-varying core temperature plays a key role.

  7. Research of transmissive near infrared spectroscopy for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenming; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Yasheng; Shao, Liwei; Huang, Dehuang

    2016-10-01

    Near infrared (NIR) has prospectively applied in non-invasive blood glucose measurement due to glucose absorption among the 1.0-2.5m spectral bands. However, this significant technology is hard to be developed because of other blood components and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this work, we presented a non-invasive glucose measurement system using Fourier transform spectrometer which will work in fingertips or other human body tissues. A refrigerated InGaAs detector with high quantum efficiency performing well in the range of 1.0-1.7μm wavelength is used to acquire transmissive radiation. Preliminary experiment investigations were set up to test glucose levels of aqueous solutions with different concentrations. The analytical modeling of the interferogram data is based on arithmetic Fourier transform and supported by the curvilineal characterization. Experimental results show the variation of light intensity among different glucose concentrations and emphasize the obvious absorption of glucose in NIR wave-range. This study confirms the suitability that NIR can be developed in non-invasive glucose measurement.

  8. Multi-scale simulations predict responses to non-invasive nerve root stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hirata, Akimasa; Terao, Yasuo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Established biophysical neurone models have achieved limited success in reproducing electrophysiological responses to non-invasive stimulation of the human nervous system. This is related to our insufficient knowledge of the induced electric currents inside the human body. Despite the numerous research and clinical applications of non-invasive stimulation, it is still unclear which internal sites are actually affected by it. Approach. We performed multi-scale computer simulations that, by making use of advances in computing power and numerical algorithms, combine a microscopic model of electrical excitation of neurones with a macroscopic electromagnetic model of the realistic whole-body anatomy. Main results. The simulations yield responses consistent with those experimentally recorded following magnetic and electrical motor root stimulation in human subjects, and reproduce the observed amplitudes and latencies for a wide variety of stimulation parameters. Significance. Our findings demonstrate that modern computational techniques can produce detailed predictions about which and where neurones are activated, leading to improved understanding of the physics and basic mechanisms of non-invasive stimulation and enabling potential new applications that make use of improved targeting of stimulation.

  9. Scanning superlens microscopy for non-invasive large field-of-view visible light nanoscale imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Wen, Yangdong; Yu, Peng; Liu, Zhu; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-12-01

    Nanoscale correlation of structural information acquisition with specific-molecule identification provides new insight for studying rare subcellular events. To achieve this correlation, scanning electron microscopy has been combined with super-resolution fluorescent microscopy, despite its destructivity when acquiring biological structure information. Here we propose time-efficient non-invasive microsphere-based scanning superlens microscopy that enables the large-area observation of live-cell morphology or sub-membrane structures with sub-diffraction-limited resolution and is demonstrated by observing biological and non-biological objects. This microscopy operates in both non-invasive and contact modes with ~200 times the acquisition efficiency of atomic force microscopy, which is achieved by replacing the point of an atomic force microscope tip with an imaging area of microspheres and stitching the areas recorded during scanning, enabling sub-diffraction-limited resolution. Our method marks a possible path to non-invasive cell imaging and simultaneous tracking of specific molecules with nanoscale resolution, facilitating the study of subcellular events over a total cell period.

  10. Evolution of Volume and Signal Intensity on Fluid-attenuated Inversion Recovery MR Images after Endovascular Stroke Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federau, Christian; Mlynash, Michael; Christensen, Soren; Zaharchuk, Greg; Cha, Brannon; Lansberg, Maarten G; Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To analyze both volume and signal evolution on magnetic resonance (MR) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images between the images after endovascular therapy and day 5 (which was the prespecified end point for infarct volume in the Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution [DEFUSE 2] trial) in a subset of patients enrolled in the DEFUSE 2 study. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the local ethics committee at all participating sites. Informed written consent was obtained from all patients. In this post hoc analysis of the DEFUSE 2 study, 35 patients with FLAIR images acquired both after endovascular therapy (median time after symptom onset, 12 hours) and at day 5 were identified. Patients were separated into two groups based on the degree of reperfusion achieved on time to maximum greater than 6-second perfusion imaging (≥90% vs <90%). After coregistration and signal normalization, lesion volumes and signal intensity were assessed by using FLAIR imaging for the initial lesion (ie, visible after endovascular therapy) and the recruited lesion (the additional lesion visible on day 5, but not visible after endovascular therapy). Statistical significance was assessed by using Wilcoxon signed-rank, Mann-Whitney U, and Fisher exact tests. Results All 35 patients had FLAIR lesion growth between the after-revascularization examination and day 5. Median lesion growth was significantly larger in patients with <90% reperfusion (27.85 mL) compared with ≥90% (8.12 mL; P = .003). In the initial lesion, normalized signal did not change between after endovascular therapy (median, 1.60) and day 5 (median, 1.58) in the ≥90% reperfusion group (P = .97), but increased in the <90% reperfusion group (from 1.60 to 1.73; P = .01). In the recruited lesion, median normalized signal increased significantly in both groups between after endovascular therapy and day 5 (after endovascular therapy, from 1.19 to 1.56, P

  11. Non-invasive technology that improves cardiac function after experimental myocardial infarction: Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkady Uryash

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI may produce significant inflammatory changes and adverse ventricular remodeling leading to heart failure and premature death. Pharmacologic, stem cell transplantation, and exercise have not halted the inexorable rise in the prevalence and great economic costs of heart failure despite extensive investigations of such treatments. New therapeutic modalities are needed. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz is a non-invasive technology that increases pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium thereby producing several beneficial cardiovascular effects as demonstrated in animal models, normal humans and patients with heart disease. pGz upregulates endothelial derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and its phosphorylation (p-eNOS to improve myocardial function in models of myocardial stunning and preconditioning. Here we test whether pGz applied chronically after focal myocardial infarction in rats improves functional outcomes from MI. Focal MI was produced by left coronary artery ligation. One day after ligation animals were randomized to receive daily treatments of pGz for four weeks (MI-pGz or serve as controls (MI-CONT, with an additional group as non-infarction controls (Sham. Echocardiograms and invasive pressure volume loop analysis were carried out. Infarct transmurality, myocardial fibrosis, and markers of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined along with protein analysis of eNOS, p-eNOS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS.At four weeks, survival was 80% in MI-pGz vs 50% in MI-CONT (p< 0.01. Ejection fraction and fractional shortening and invasive pressure volume relation indices of afterload and contractility were significantly better in MI-pGz. The latter where associated with decreased infarct transmurality and decreased fibrosis along with increased eNOS, p-eNOS. Additionally, MI-pGz had significantly lower levels of iNOS, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and higher level of anti

  12. Non-Invasive Technology That Improves Cardiac Function after Experimental Myocardial Infarction: Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlansky, Paul; Altamirano, Francisco; Lopez, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) may produce significant inflammatory changes and adverse ventricular remodeling leading to heart failure and premature death. Pharmacologic, stem cell transplantation, and exercise have not halted the inexorable rise in the prevalence and great economic costs of heart failure despite extensive investigations of such treatments. New therapeutic modalities are needed. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz) is a non-invasive technology that increases pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium thereby producing several beneficial cardiovascular effects as demonstrated in animal models, normal humans and patients with heart disease. pGz upregulates endothelial derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and its phosphorylation (p-eNOS) to improve myocardial function in models of myocardial stunning and preconditioning. Here we test whether pGz applied chronically after focal myocardial infarction in rats improves functional outcomes from MI. Focal MI was produced by left coronary artery ligation. One day after ligation animals were randomized to receive daily treatments of pGz for four weeks (MI-pGz) or serve as controls (MI-CONT), with an additional group as non-infarction controls (Sham). Echocardiograms and invasive pressure volume loop analysis were carried out. Infarct transmurality, myocardial fibrosis, and markers of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined along with protein analysis of eNOS, p-eNOS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).At four weeks, survival was 80% in MI-pGz vs 50% in MI-CONT (p< 0.01). Ejection fraction and fractional shortening and invasive pressure volume relation indices of afterload and contractility were significantly better in MI-pGz. The latter where associated with decreased infarct transmurality and decreased fibrosis along with increased eNOS, p-eNOS. Additionally, MI-pGz had significantly lower levels of iNOS, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and higher level of anti

  13. Continuous stroke volume estimation from aortic pressure using zero dimensional cardiovascular model: proof of concept study from porcine experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Kamoi

    Full Text Available Accurate, continuous, left ventricular stroke volume (SV measurements can convey large amounts of information about patient hemodynamic status and response to therapy. However, direct measurements are highly invasive in clinical practice, and current procedures for estimating SV require specialized devices and significant approximation.This study investigates the accuracy of a three element Windkessel model combined with an aortic pressure waveform to estimate SV. Aortic pressure is separated into two components capturing; 1 resistance and compliance, 2 characteristic impedance. This separation provides model-element relationships enabling SV to be estimated while requiring only one of the three element values to be known or estimated. Beat-to-beat SV estimation was performed using population-representative optimal values for each model element. This method was validated using measured SV data from porcine experiments (N = 3 female Pietrain pigs, 29-37 kg in which both ventricular volume and aortic pressure waveforms were measured simultaneously.The median difference between measured SV from left ventricle (LV output and estimated SV was 0.6 ml with a 90% range (5th-95th percentile -12.4 ml-14.3 ml. During periods when changes in SV were induced, cross correlations in between estimated and measured SV were above R = 0.65 for all cases.The method presented demonstrates that the magnitude and trends of SV can be accurately estimated from pressure waveforms alone, without the need for identification of complex physiological metrics where strength of correlations may vary significantly from patient to patient.

  14. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... communicate with your child’s doctor. Symptoms of a Stroke Stroke is an injury to part of the ...

  15. Non-invasive optical detection of glucose in cell culture nutrient medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin the development of a non-invasive optical sensor for measuring glucose concentration in the output medium of cell cultures grown in a unique NASA bioreactor referred to as an integrated rotating-wall vessel (IRWV). The input, a bovine serum based nutrient media, has a known glucose concentration. The cells within the bioreactor digest a portion of the glucose. Thus, the non-invasive optical sensor is needed to monitor the decrease in glucose due to cellular consumption since the critical parameters for sustained cellular productivity are glucose and pH. Previous glucose sensing techniques have used chemical reactions to quantify the glucose concentration. Chemical reactions, however, cannot provide for continuous, real time, non-invasive measurement as is required in this application. Our effort while in the fellowship program was focused on the design, optical setup, and testing of one bench top prototype non-invasive optical sensor using a mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy technique. Glucose has a fundamental vibrational absorption peak in the mid-infrared wavelength range at 9.6 micron. Preliminary absorption data using a CO2 laser were collected at this wavelength for water based glucose solutions at different concentrations and one bovine serum based nutrient medium (GTSF) with added glucose. The results showed near linear absorption responses for the glucose-in-water data with resolutions as high at 108 mg/dl and as low as 10 mg/dl. The nutrient medium had a resolution of 291 mg/dl. The variability of the results was due mainly to thermal and polarization drifts of the laser while the decrease in sensitivity to glucose in the nutrient medium was expected due to the increase in the number of confounders present in the nutrient medium. A multispectral approach needs to be used to compensate for these confounders. The CO2 laser used for these studies was wavelength tunable (9.2 to 10.8 micrometers), however

  16. Lowering bronchoaspiration rate in an acute stroke unit by means of a 2 volume/3 texture dysphagia screening test with pulsioximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocho, D; Sagales, M; Cobo, M; Homs, I; Serra, J; Pou, M; Perez, G; Pujol, G; Tantinya, S; Bao, P; Aloy, A; Sabater, R; Gendre, J; Otermin, P

    During acute stroke, 30% of all patients present dysphagia and 50% of that subgroup will experience bronchoaspiration. Our aim was to compare mortality and bronchoaspiration rates associated with the water test compared to those associated with a 2 volume/3 texture test controlled with pulse oximetry (2v/3t-P test) in our stroke unit. Over a 5-year period, we performed a prospective analysis of all consecutive acute ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised in the Stroke Unit. Dysphagia was evaluated using the water test between 2008 and 2010 (group 0 or G0), and the 2v/3t-P test (group 1 or G1) between 2011 and 2012. We analysed demographic data, vascular risk factors, neurological deficit on the NIHSS, aetiological subtype according to TOAST criteria, clinical subtype according to the Oxfordshire classification, prevalence of dysphagia, percentage of patients with bronchoaspiration, and mortality. We examined 418 patients with acute stroke (G0=275, G1=143). There were significant differences between the 2 groups regarding the percentage of patients with TACI (17% in G0 vs. 29% in G1, P=.005) and median NIHSS score (4 points in G0 vs. 7 points in G1, P=.003). Since adopting the new swallowing test, we detected a non-significant increase in the percentage of dysphagia (22% in G0 vs. 25% in G1, P=.4), lower mortality (1.7% in G0 vs. 0.7% in G1, P=.3) and a significant decrease in the bronchoaspiration rate (6.2% in G0 vs. 2.1% in G1, P=.05). Compared to the water test used for dysphagia screening, the new 2v/3t-P test lowered bronchoaspiration rates in acute stroke patients. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-invasive clinical parameters for the prediction of urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction: analysis using causal Bayesian networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myong Kim

    Full Text Available To identify non-invasive clinical parameters to predict urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH using causal Bayesian networks (CBN.From October 2004 to August 2013, 1,381 eligible BPH patients with complete data were selected for analysis. The following clinical variables were considered: age, total prostate volume (TPV, transition zone volume (TZV, prostate specific antigen (PSA, maximum flow rate (Qmax, and post-void residual volume (PVR on uroflowmetry, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS. Among these variables, the independent predictors of BOO were selected using the CBN model. The predictive performance of the CBN model using the selected variables was verified through a logistic regression (LR model with the same dataset.Mean age, TPV, and IPSS were 6.2 (±7.3, SD years, 48.5 (±25.9 ml, and 17.9 (±7.9, respectively. The mean BOO index was 35.1 (±25.2 and 477 patients (34.5% had urodynamic BOO (BOO index ≥40. By using the CBN model, we identified TPV, Qmax, and PVR as independent predictors of BOO. With these three variables, the BOO prediction accuracy was 73.5%. The LR model showed a similar accuracy (77.0%. However, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the CBN model was statistically smaller than that of the LR model (0.772 vs. 0.798, p = 0.020.Our study demonstrated that TPV, Qmax, and PVR are independent predictors of urodynamic BOO.

  18. Validation of a Novel Collection Device for Non-Invasive Urine Sampling from Free-Ranging Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Michelle Danish

    Full Text Available Recent advances in non-invasively collected samples have opened up new and exciting opportunities for wildlife research. Different types of samples, however, involve different limitations and certain physiological markers (e.g., C-peptide, oxytocin can only be reliably measured from urine. Common collection methods for urine to date work best for arboreal animals and large volumes of urine. Sufficient recovery of urine is thus still difficult for wildlife biologists, particularly for terrestrial and small bodied animals. We tested three collection devices (two commercially available saliva swabs, Salivette synthetic and cotton, and cotton First aid swabs against a control to permit the collection of small volumes of urine from the ground. We collected urine samples from captive and wild macaques, and humans, measured volume recovery, and analyzed concentrates of selected physiological markers (creatinine, C-peptide, and neopterin. The Salivette synthetic device was superior to the two alternative devices. Concentrations of creatinine, absolute C-peptide, C-peptide per creatinine, absolute neopterin, and neopterin per creatinine measured in samples collected with this device did not differ significantly from the control and were also strongly correlated to it. Fluid recovery was also best for this device. The least suitable device is the First aid collection device; we found that while absolute C-peptide and C-peptide per creatinine concentrations did not differ significantly from the control, creatinine concentrations were significantly lower than the control. In addition, these concentrations were either not or weakly correlated to the control. The Salivette cotton device provided intermediate results, although these concentrations were strongly correlated to the control. Salivette synthetic swabs seem to be useful devices for the collection of small amounts of urine from the ground destined for the assessment of physiological parameters. They

  19. Validation of a Novel Collection Device for Non-Invasive Urine Sampling from Free-Ranging Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Lisa Michelle; Heistermann, Michael; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in non-invasively collected samples have opened up new and exciting opportunities for wildlife research. Different types of samples, however, involve different limitations and certain physiological markers (e.g., C-peptide, oxytocin) can only be reliably measured from urine. Common collection methods for urine to date work best for arboreal animals and large volumes of urine. Sufficient recovery of urine is thus still difficult for wildlife biologists, particularly for terrestrial and small bodied animals. We tested three collection devices (two commercially available saliva swabs, Salivette synthetic and cotton, and cotton First aid swabs) against a control to permit the collection of small volumes of urine from the ground. We collected urine samples from captive and wild macaques, and humans, measured volume recovery, and analyzed concentrates of selected physiological markers (creatinine, C-peptide, and neopterin). The Salivette synthetic device was superior to the two alternative devices. Concentrations of creatinine, absolute C-peptide, C-peptide per creatinine, absolute neopterin, and neopterin per creatinine measured in samples collected with this device did not differ significantly from the control and were also strongly correlated to it. Fluid recovery was also best for this device. The least suitable device is the First aid collection device; we found that while absolute C-peptide and C-peptide per creatinine concentrations did not differ significantly from the control, creatinine concentrations were significantly lower than the control. In addition, these concentrations were either not or weakly correlated to the control. The Salivette cotton device provided intermediate results, although these concentrations were strongly correlated to the control. Salivette synthetic swabs seem to be useful devices for the collection of small amounts of urine from the ground destined for the assessment of physiological parameters. They thus provide new

  20. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted hollow fiber membranes for osteoblasts culture and non-invasive harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Meiling; Liu, Tianqing; Song, Kedong; Ge, Dan; Li, Xiangqin

    2015-10-01

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM) culture system is one of the most important bioreactors for the large-scale culture and expansion of therapeutic cells. However, enzymatic and mechanical treatments are traditionally applied to harvest the expanded cells from HFMs, which inevitably causes harm to the cells. In this study, thermo-responsive cellulose acetate HFMs for cell culture and non-invasive harvest were prepared for the first time via free radical polymerization in the presence of cerium (IV). ATR-FTIR and elemental analysis results indicated that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was covalently grafted on HFMs successfully. Dynamic contact angle measurements at different temperatures revealed that the magnitude of volume phase transition was decreased with increasing grafted amount of PNIPAAm. And the amount of serum protein adsorbed on HFMs surface also displayed the same pattern. Meanwhile osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs at 37 °C. And Calcein-AM/PI staining, AB assay, ALP activity and OCN protein expression level all showed that PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs had good cell compatibility. After incubation at 20 °C for 120 min, the adhering cells on PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs turned to be round and detached after being gently pipetted. These results suggest that thermo-responsive HFMs are attractive cell culture substrates which enable cell culture, expansion and the recovery without proteolytic enzyme treatment for the application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  1. Two-dimensional speckle tracking as a non-invasive tool for identification of myocardial fibrosis in Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Johannes; Niemann, Markus; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad; Wanner, Christoph; Ertl, Georg; Weidemann, Frank

    2013-06-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to analyse myocardial deformation in patients with Fabry disease (FD) in order to evaluate speckle tracking as a method for non-invasive determination of myocardial fibrosis. Myocardial fibrosis is common in Fabry cardiomyopathy and is associated with disease progression and severe prognosis. In 101 consecutive Fabry patients (39.8 ± 12.9 years; 42 males), the quantitative measurement of myocardial fibrosis with magnetic resonance imaging was compared with regional myocardial deformation assessed by speckle-tracking imaging. Patients were analysed in relation to per cent of late-enhancement (LE)-positive areas of left-ventricular (LV) mass. Fifty-two patients (51%) displayed LE with a mean volume of 1.2 ± 1.8% of total LV mass. Predominantly basal lateral and posterior segments were affected. Patients with LE had lower global systolic longitudinal strain than those without (LE -14.8 ± 3.5% and -18.9 ± 2.1%, respectively; P speckle tracking, was predominantly caused by basal posterior (P = 0.049) and lateral (P = 0.005) segments and global systolic strain correlated with the amount of LE (r = 0.543; P 2%, n = 22) showed the lowest deformation values (-5.9 ± 8.4%) in basal postero-lateral segments when compared with those with mild (Speckle tracking can be used as a tool for the indirect evaluation of LE in FD.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray microtransections: a non invasive approach for epileptic seizures arising from eloquent cortical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyatos, B.; Nemoz, C.; Chabrol, T.; Potez, M.; Bräuer, E.; Renaud, L.; Pernet-Gallay, K.; Estève, F.; David, O.; Kahane, P.; Laissue, J. A.; Depaulis, A.; Serduc, R.

    2016-06-01

    Synchrotron-generated X-ray (SRX) microbeams deposit high radiation doses to submillimetric targets whilst minimizing irradiation of neighboring healthy tissue. We developed a new radiosurgical method which demonstrably transects cortical brain tissue without affecting adjacent regions. We made such image-guided SRX microtransections in the left somatosensory cortex in a rat model of generalized epilepsy using high radiation doses (820 Gy) in thin (200 μm) parallel slices of tissue. This procedure, targeting the brain volume from which seizures arose, altered the abnormal neuronal activities for at least 9 weeks, as evidenced by a decrease of seizure power and coherence between tissue slices in comparison to the contralateral cortex. The brain tissue located between transections stayed histologically normal, while the irradiated micro-slices remained devoid of myelin and neurons two months after irradiation. This pre-clinical proof of concept highlights the translational potential of non-invasive SRX transections for treating epilepsies that are not eligible for resective surgery.

  3. Localization for the Non-Invasive Detecting Capsule in GI Tract Utilizing Permanent Magnet and Magnetoresistive Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wen-hui; YAN Guo-zheng; GUO Xu-dong

    2007-01-01

    The paper reports the localization principle and method for the capsule in the non-invasive detecting system of gastrointestinal (GI) tract utilizing one permanent and three magnetoresistive sensors. When the capsule is localized in practice, the permanent magnet is fixed inside the capsule, and the four magnetoresistive sensors are installed outside body. The permanent magnet's coordinate values can be solved by the magnetic dipole theory and optimum iterated method. The experiment shows the localization distance can reach 300 mm by employing the HMCI023 magnetoresistive sensors and the NdFeB45 φ9 mm × 5 mm permanent magnet, and the errors of single coordinate direction and radius vector are 0 - 58 mm and 0.1-62.9 mm respectively. The localization precision is acceptable basically, and it has some possibilities improving the precision and distance in the future. Moreover, the localization system makes the localization be reality because of decreasing the number of sensors, and it economizes the capsule's volume because of decreasing the permanent magnet's dimension, too.

  4. Proposed Application of Fast Fourier Transform in Near Infra Red Based Non Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenie, R. P.; Iskandar, J.; Kurniawan, A.; Rustami, E.; Syafutra, H.; Nurdin, N. M.; Handoyo, T.; Prabowo, J.; Febryarto, R.; Rahayu, M. S. K.; Damayanthi, E.; Rimbawan; Sukandar, D.; Suryana, Y.; Irzaman; Alatas, H.

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide emergence of glycaemic status related health disorders, such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome, is growing in alarming rate. The objective was to propose new methods for non invasive blood glucose level measurement system, based on implementation of Fast Fourier Transform methods. This was an initial-lab-scale-research. Data on non invasive blood glucose measurement are referred from Scopus, Medline, and Google Scholar, from 2011 until 2016, and was used as design references, combined with in house verification. System was developed in modular fashion, based on aforementioned compiled references. Several preliminary tests to understand relationship between LED and photo-diode responses have been done. Several references were used as non invasive blood glucose measurement tools design basis. Solution is developed in modular fashion. we have proven different sensor responses to water and glucose. Human test for non invasive blood glucose level measurement system is needed.

  5. Non-invasive plant growth measurements for detection of blue-light dose response of stem elongation in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig

    2012-01-01

    . In the present study a non-invasive plant growth sensor (PlantEye, Phenospex B.V, Heerlen, NL) was tested in analysing changes in diurnal stem elongation patterns and plant height in response to the spectral quality of the light environment. Plants were grown in four different LED supplemental lighting...... treatments with 0%, 12.5%, 18.5% and 22.5% blue light under greenhouse conditions in winter (18 h day/4 h night). The non-invasive measurements were carried out automatically every four hour with three repetitions, and supported by manual measurements of plant height every third day. A strong linear relation...... between the non-invasive measurements and manual measurements of plant height was achieved, and a blue-light dose-response showing a decrease in plant height in relation to an increase in blue light was demonstrated. However, the non-invasive plant growth sensor was not able to distinguish between diurnal...

  6. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer II. Radiotherapy of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-01-15

    . Randomized clinical trials and a huge number of mostly observational studies have unanimously demonstrated that RT significantly reduces recurrence risks of ipsilateral DCIS as well as invasive breast cancer independent of patient age in all subgroups. The recommended total dose is 50 Gy administered as whole breast irradiation (WBI) in single fractions of 1.8 or 2.0 Gy given on 5 days weekly. Retrospective data indicate a possible beneficial effect of an additional tumor bed boost for younger patients. Prospective clinical trials of different dose-volume concepts (hypofractionation, accelerated partial breast irradiation, boost radiotherapy) are still ongoing. Postoperative radiotherapy permits breast conservation for the majority of women by halving local recurrence as well as reducing progression rates into invasive cancer. New data confirmed this effect in all patient subsets - even in low risk subgroups (LoE 1a). (orig.) [German] Aktualisierung und Ergaenzung der 2007 von der DEGRO-Expertengruppe Mammakarzinom publizierten Leitlinie zur Radiotherapie (RT) des Mammakarzinoms. Aufgrund der zunehmenden klinischen Relevanz nicht-invasiver epithelialer Neoplasien der Brust wurde diesen in der aktuellen Version ein eigenes Kapitel gewidmet. Schwerpunkte der hier vorgelegten Empfehlungen sind - in Ergaenzung zu den S3-Leitlinien der Deutschen Krebsgesellschaft von 2012 - die Indikation und Technik der postoperativen RT nach brusterhaltender Operation. Die DEGRO-Expertengruppe fuehrte eine Literaturrecherche aktueller klinisch kontrollierter Studien, systematischer Reviews und Metaanalysen, orientiert an den Kriterien der evidenzbasierten Medizin, im Hinblick auf neue Aspekte gegenueber 2005 und 2007 durch. Die Recherche umfasst die Zeitspanne 2008 bis September 2012 und erstreckte sich auf in PubMed und Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) gelisteten Publikationen. Suchbegriffe waren ''non invasive breast cancer'', ''ductal carcinoma in situ

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Showed a Differential Signature between Invasive and Non-invasive Corticotrophinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Leonardo Jose Tadeu; Lerario, Antonio Marcondes; de Castro, Margaret; Martins, Clarissa Silva; Bronstein, Marcello Delano; Machado, Marcio Carlos; Trarbach, Ericka Barbosa; Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson

    2017-01-01

    ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism caused by a pituitary adenoma [Cushing’s disease (CD)] is the most common cause of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. CD is often associated with several morbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis/bone fractures, secondary infections, and increased cardiovascular mortality. While the majority (≈80%) of the corticotrophinomas visible on pituitary magnetic resonance imaging are microadenomas (MICs, hypopituitarism and visual defects. Given the clinical and molecular heterogeneity of corticotrophinomas, the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of genetic differential expression between MIC and MAC, including the invasiveness grade as a criterion for categorizing these tumors. In this study, were included tumor samples from patients with clinical, laboratorial, radiological, and histopathological diagnosis of hypercortisolism due to an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma. Differential gene expression was studied using an Affymetrix microarray platform in 12 corticotrophinomas, classified as non-invasive MIC (n = 4) and MAC (n = 5), and invasive MAC (n = 3), according to modified Hardy criteria. Somatic mutations in USP8 were also investigated, but none of the patients exhibited USP8 variants. Differential expression analysis demonstrated that non-invasive MIC and MAC have a similar genetic signature, while invasive MACs exhibited a differential expression profile. Among the genes differentially expressed, we highlighted CCND2, ZNF676, DAPK1, and TIMP2, and their differential expression was validated through quantitative real-time PCR in another cohort of 15 non-invasive and 3 invasive cortocotrophinomas. We also identified potential biological pathways associated with growth and invasiveness, TGF-β and G protein signaling pathways, DNA damage response pathway, and pathways associated with focal adhesion. Our study revealed a differential pattern of genetic signature in a subgroup of MAC

  8. Non-invasive brain-to-brain interface (BBI: establishing functional links between two brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Schik Yoo

    Full Text Available Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is capable of modulating the neural activity of specific brain regions, with a potential role as a non-invasive computer-to-brain interface (CBI. In conjunction with the use of brain-to-computer interface (BCI techniques that translate brain function to generate computer commands, we investigated the feasibility of using the FUS-based CBI to non-invasively establish a functional link between the brains of different species (i.e. human and Sprague-Dawley rat, thus creating a brain-to-brain interface (BBI. The implementation was aimed to non-invasively translate the human volunteer's intention to stimulate a rat's brain motor area that is responsible for the tail movement. The volunteer initiated the intention by looking at a strobe light flicker on a computer display, and the degree of synchronization in the electroencephalographic steady-state-visual-evoked-potentials (SSVEP with respect to the strobe frequency was analyzed using a computer. Increased signal amplitude in the SSVEP, indicating the volunteer's intention, triggered the delivery of a burst-mode FUS (350 kHz ultrasound frequency, tone burst duration of 0.5 ms, pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz, given for 300 msec duration to excite the motor area of an anesthetized rat transcranially. The successful excitation subsequently elicited the tail movement, which was detected by a motion sensor. The interface was achieved at 94.0±3.0% accuracy, with a time delay of 1.59±1.07 sec from the thought-initiation to the creation of the tail movement. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a computer-mediated BBI that links central neural functions between two biological entities, which may confer unexplored opportunities in the study of neuroscience with potential implications for therapeutic applications.

  9. Detection of fetal mutations causing hemoglobinopathies by non-invasive prenatal diagnosis from maternal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E D′Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies enables couples at risk to have a healthy child. Currently used fetal sampling procedures are invasive with some risk of miscarriage. A non-invasive approach to obtain fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA for diagnosis would eliminate this risk. Aim: To develop and evaluate a non-invasive prenatal diagnostic approach for hemoglobinopathies using cell-free fetal DNA circulating in the maternal plasma. Settings and Design: Couples referred to us for prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies where the maternal and paternal mutations were different were included in the study. Materials and Methods: Maternal peripheral blood was collected at different periods of gestation before the invasive fetal sampling procedure was done. The blood was centrifuged to isolate the plasma and prepare DNA. A size separation approach was used to isolate fetal DNA. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based protocols were developed for detection of the presence or absence of the paternal mutation. Results and Conclusions: There were 30 couples where the parental mutations were different. Of these, in 14 cases the paternal mutation was absent and in 16 cases it was present in the fetus. Using cell-free fetal DNA from maternal plasma, the absence of the paternal mutation was accurately determined in 12 of the 14 cases and the presence of the paternal mutation was correctly identified in 12 of the 16 cases. Thus, this non-invasive approach gave comparable results to those obtained by the conventional invasive fetal sampling methods in 24 cases giving an accuracy of 80.0%. Although the nested PCR approach enabled amplification of small quantities of cell-free DNA from maternal plasma at different periods of gestation after size separation to eliminate the more abundant maternal DNA, an accurate diagnosis of the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the fetus was not possible in all cases to make it clinically

  10. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  11. Does non-invasive brain stimulation improve cognition in major depressive disorder? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, Gabriel; Selingardi, Priscila M L; Moreno, Marina L; Veronezi, Beatriz P; Brunoni, Andre R

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques, such as repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have been increasingly used in different contexts to improve cognitive performance and ameliorate depression symptoms. Considering that major depression is usually accompanied by cognitive deficits, NIBS technique could be also helpful to improve cognition in depressed patients. In this systematic review, we researched for articles published in PubMed/MEDLINE from the first date available to June 2014 that assessed cognitive performance in patients with depression before and after NIBS. Out of 191 references, 25 (16 for rTMS and 9 for tDCS) studies matched our eligibility criteria. Non-invasive brain stimulation interventions, such as rTMS and tDCS seem to be a promising tool for cognitive enhancement in MDD, although several issues and biases (e.g., blinding issues, tests without correction for multiple comparisons, placebo effects and exploratory analyses, practice effects) hinder us to conclude that NIBS technique improve cognition in patients with depression. We discussed possible shortcomings of the included studies, such as the use of different depression treatment protocols, the possibility that some findings were false-positive results of the employed cognitive tasks and whether cognition improvement could have been an epiphenomenon secondary to depression improvement. To conclude, whereas these non-pharmacological, non-invasive techniques are particularly appealing for cognitive improvement in depression, further studies are still warranted to disentangle whether NIBS technique induce positive effects on cognition beyond their antidepressant effects.

  12. Highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer mutations using single molecule, third generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giancarlo; Patrignani, Andrea; Poveda, Lucy; Hoehn, Frederic; Scholtka, Bettina; Schlapbach, Ralph; Garvin, Alex M

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents one of the most prevalent and lethal malignant neoplasms and every individual of age 50 and above should undergo regular CRC screening. Currently, the most effective preventive screening procedure to detect adenomatous polyps, the precursors to CRC, is colonoscopy. Since every colorectal cancer starts as a polyp, detecting all polyps and removing them is crucial. By exactly doing that, colonoscopy reduces CRC incidence by 80%, however it is an invasive procedure that might have unpleasant and, in rare occasions, dangerous side effects. Despite numerous efforts over the past two decades, a non-invasive screening method for the general population with detection rates for adenomas and CRC similar to that of colonoscopy has not yet been established. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies have yet to be successfully applied to this problem, because the detection of rare mutations has been hindered by the systematic biases due to sequencing context and the base calling quality of NGS. We present the first study that applies the high read accuracy and depth of single molecule, real time, circular consensus sequencing (SMRT-CCS) to the detection of mutations in stool DNA in order to provide a non-invasive, sensitive and accurate test for CRC. In stool DNA isolated from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, we are able to detect mutations at frequencies below 0.5% with no false positives. This approach establishes a foundation for a non-invasive, highly sensitive assay to screen the population for CRC and the early stage adenomas that lead to CRC.

  13. Non invasive fibrosis biomarkers reduce but not substitute the need for liver biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giada Sebastiani; Alfredo Alberti

    2006-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are very common worldwide,particularly those linked to viral hepatitis and to alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver. Their natural history is variable and long-term evolution differs in individual patients. Optimised clinical management of compensated chronic liver diseases requires precise definition of the stage of liver fibrosis, the main determinant of prognosis and of most therapeutic decisions. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for assessment of hepatic fibrosis.However, it is invasive with possible complications,costly and prone to sampling errors. Many non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis have been recently proposed and assessed in the clinical setting as surrogates of liver biopsy. Direct markers are based on biochemical parameters directly linked to fibrogenesis while indirect markers use simple or more sophisticated parameters that correlate with liver fibrosis stages. Non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis have been tested in different forms of chronic liver disease and showed variable diagnostic performance, but accuracy rarely was above 75%-80%. Better results were obtained when markers were combined. On this line, we have recently proposed a set of algorithms that combine sequentially indirectnon-invasive markers of liver fibrosis, reaching 90%-95%diagnostic accuracy with significant reduction in the need for liver biopsy. Based on available evidence, it can be anticipated that non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis and their combined use will soon become a most useful tool in the clinical management of many forms of chronic liver disease. However, their implementation is expected to reduce, but not to completely eliminate, the need for liver biopsy.

  14. Non-Invasive Prenatal Diagnosis of Lethal Skeletal Dysplasia by Targeted Capture Sequencing of Maternal Plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Dan

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cell-free foetal DNA in the plasma of pregnant women, many non-invasive prenatal testing assays have been developed. In the area of skeletal dysplasia diagnosis, some PCR-based non-invasive prenatal testing assays have been developed to facilitate the ultrasound diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias that are caused by de novo mutations. However, skeletal dysplasias are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases, the PCR-based method is hard to detect multiple gene or loci simultaneously, and the diagnosis rate is highly dependent on the accuracy of the ultrasound diagnosis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using targeted capture sequencing to detect foetal de novo pathogenic mutations responsible for skeletal dysplasia.Three families whose foetuses were affected by skeletal dysplasia and two control families whose foetuses were affected by other single gene diseases were included in this study. Sixteen genes related to some common lethal skeletal dysplasias were selected for analysis, and probes were designed to capture the coding regions of these genes. Targeted capture sequencing was performed on the maternal plasma DNA, the maternal genomic DNA, and the paternal genomic DNA. The de novo pathogenic variants in the plasma DNA data were identified using a bioinformatical process developed for low frequency mutation detection and a strict variant interpretation strategy. The causal variants could be specifically identified in the plasma, and the results were identical to those obtained by sequencing amniotic fluid samples. Furthermore, a mean of 97% foetal specific alleles, which are alleles that are not shared by maternal genomic DNA and amniotic fluid DNA, were identified successfully in plasma samples.Our study shows that capture sequencing of maternal plasma DNA can be used to non-invasive detection of de novo pathogenic variants. This method has the potential to be used to facilitate the prenatal diagnosis

  15. Non-invasive assessment of adrenocortical function in captive Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganswindt, Stefanie B; Myburgh, Jan G; Cameron, Elissa Z; Ganswindt, Andre

    2014-11-01

    The occurrence of stress-inducing factors in captive crocodilians is a concern, since chronic stress can negatively affect animal health and reproduction, and hence production. Monitoring stress in wild crocodiles could also be beneficial for assessing the state of health in populations which are potentially threatened by environmental pollution. In both cases, a non-invasive approach to assess adrenocortical function as a measure of stress would be preferable, as animals are not disturbed during sample collection, and therefore sampling is feedback-free. So far, however, such a non-invasive method has not been established for any crocodilian species. As an initial step, we therefore examined the suitability of two enzyme-immunoassays, detecting faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGMs) with a 11β,21-diol-20-one and 5β-3α-ol-11-one structure, respectively, for monitoring stress-related physiological responses in captive Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus). An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge was performed on 10 sub-adult crocodiles, resulting in an overall increase in serum corticosterone levels of 272% above the pre-injection levels 5h post-injection. Saline-treated control animals (n=8) showed an overall increase of 156% in serum corticosterone levels 5h post-administration. Faecal samples pre- and post-injection could be obtained from three of the six individually housed crocodiles, resulting in FGM concentrations 136-380% above pre-injection levels, always detected in the first sample collected post-treatment (7-15 days post-injection). FGM concentrations seem comparatively stable at ambient temperatures for up to 72 h post-defaecation. In conclusion, non-invasive hormone monitoring can be used for assessing adrenocortical function in captive Nile crocodiles based on FGM analysis.

  16. Contribution of mechanical unloading to trabecular bone loss following non-invasive knee injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew J; Diko, Sindi; Baehr, Leslie M; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C; Christiansen, Blaine A

    2016-10-01

    Development of osteoarthritis commonly involves degeneration of epiphyseal trabecular bone. In previous studies, we observed 30-44% loss of epiphyseal trabecular bone (BV/TV) from the distal femur within 1 week following non-invasive knee injury in mice. Mechanical unloading (disuse) may contribute to this bone loss; however, it is unclear to what extent the injured limb is unloaded following injury, and whether disuse can fully account for the observed magnitude of bone loss. In this study, we investigated the contribution of mechanical unloading to trabecular bone changes observed following non-invasive knee injury in mice (female C57BL/6N). We investigated changes in gait during treadmill walking, and changes in voluntary activity level using Open Field analysis at 4, 14, 28, and 42 days post-injury. We also quantified epiphyseal trabecular bone using μCT and weighed lower-limb muscles to quantify atrophy following knee injury in both ground control and hindlimb unloaded (HLU) mice. Gait analysis revealed a slightly altered stride pattern in the injured limb, with a decreased stance phase and increased swing phase. However, Open Field analysis revealed no differences in voluntary movement between injured and sham mice at any time point. Both knee injury and HLU resulted in comparable magnitudes of trabecular bone loss; however, HLU resulted in considerably more muscle loss than knee injury, suggesting another mechanism contributing to bone loss following injury. Altogether, these data suggest that mechanical unloading likely contributes to trabecular bone loss following non-invasive knee injury, but the magnitude of this bone loss cannot be fully explained by disuse. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1680-1687, 2016.

  17. Comparison between invasive and non-invasive blood pressure in young, middle and old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Peng

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to compare simultaneous invasive and non-invasive blood pressure (IBP and NIBP) measurements in young, middle and old age using the data from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC II) database. In total, 23,679 blood pressure measurements were extracted from 742 patients, divided into three groups of young, middle and old age. IBP-NIBP differences in systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) were 0.1 ± 16.5 mmHg/11.0 ± 12.2 mmHg in young age, -2.9 ± 19.8 mmHg/6.9 ± 17.5 mmHg in middle age and -3.2 ± 29.3 mmHg/8.5 ± 19.8 mmHg in old age. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of invasive systolic blood pressure (ISBP)-non-invasive systolic blood pressure (NISBP) differences increased from young to middle then to old age, and the SD of invasive diastolic blood pressure (IDBP)-non-invasive diastolic blood pressure (NIDBP) differences also increased with age. In young, middle and old age, the correlation coefficients were 0.86, 0.79 and 0.53, respectively, between ISBP and NISBP, and 0.78, 0.78 and 0.41 between IDBP and NIDBP. In conclusion, IBP showed good correlation with NIBP in each age category. The agreement between IBP and NIBP measurements was influenced by age category.

  18. The immunological response created by interstitial and non-invasive laser immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; West, Connor L.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is an innovative cancer modality that uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to treat late-stage, metastatic cancers. LIT can be performed through either interstitial or non-invasive laser irradiation. Although LIT is still in development, recent clinical trials have shown that it can be used to successfully treat patients with late-stage breast cancer and melanoma. The development of LIT has been focused on creating an optimal immune response created by irradiating the tumor. One important factor that could enhance the immune response is the duration of laser irradiation. Irradiating the tumor for a shorter or longer amount of time could weaken the immune response created by LIT. Another factor that could weaken this immune response is the proliferation of regulatory T cells (TRegs) in response to the laser irradiation. However, low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) can help suppress the proliferation of TRegs and help create a more optimal immune response. An additional factor that could weaken the effectiveness of LIT is the selectivity of the laser. If LIT is performed non-invasively, then deeply embedded tumors and highly pigmented skin could cause an uneven temperature distribution inside the tumor. To solve this problem, an immunologically modified carbon nanotube system was created by using an immunoadjuvant known as glycated chitosan (GC) as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. In this preliminary study, tumor-bearing rats were treated with LIT either interstitially by an 805-nm laser with GC and low-dose CY, or non-invasively by a 980-nm laser with SWNT-GC. The goal was to observe the effects of CY on the immune response induced by LIT and to also determine the effect of irradiation duration for

  19. Stability of ischemic core volume during the initial hours of acute large vessel ischemic stroke in a subgroup of mechanically revascularized patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finitsis, Stephanos [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Neuroradiologie, Hamburg (Germany); Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Neuroradiology Department, Ahepa Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Kemmling, Andrea; Fiehler, Jens; Brekenfeld, Caspar [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Neuroradiologie, Hamburg (Germany); Havemeister, Stephanie; Thomalla, Goetz [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Kopf- und Neurozentrum, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    This study aimed to relate growth of the infarct core with time to recanalization in patients receiving mechanical recanalization in whom the time of recanalization is known. We analyzed data from patients with anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke who underwent mechanical recanalization. Demographic and angiographic characteristics, initial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) infarct volume, time-to-peak defect volume, revascularization grade, 24-48 h nonenhanced computed tomography (CT) infarct volume, symptom onset to recanalization time, diffusion-weighted imaging to recanalization time, and discharge National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores were compared between minimal and substantial infarct growth groups. Substantial infarct growth was defined as an increase of infarct volume >10 cm{sup 3} assessed by subtracting initial ADC infarct core volume from infarct volume at 24-48 h CT. Of 25 patients, 9 had minimal infarct growth (median 0 cm{sup 3}, interquartile range (IQR) -3 to 5 cm{sup 3}) and 16 had substantial infarct growth (median 103 cm{sup 3}, IQR 48-132 cm{sup 3}). Patients with minimal infarct growth had a median time from symptom onset to recanalization of 329 min (IQR 314-412 min) and a median time from imaging to recanalization of 231 min (IQR 198-309 min). On univariate analysis, minimal infarct growth was related to male gender (p = 0.04), smaller initial ADC volume (p = 0.04), higher recanalization grade (p < 0.001), and lower discharge NIHSS (p = 0.04) and mRS grades (p = 0.04). There was no or minimal infarct core growth in at least one third of patients despite an exceptionally long median time from magnetic resonance imaging to recanalization of almost 4 h. (orig.)

  20. Non-invasive ventilation used as an adjunct to airway clearance treatments improves lung function during an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Dwyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: During an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis, is non-invasive ventilation beneficial as an adjunct to the airway clearance regimen? Design: Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty adults with moderate to severe cystic fibrosis lung disease and who were admitted to hospital for an acute exacerbation. Intervention: Comprehensive inpatient care (control group compared to the same care with the addition of non-invasive ventilation during airway clearance treatments from Day 2 of admission until discharge (experimental group. Outcome measures: Lung function and subjective symptom severity were measured daily. Fatigue was measured at admission and discharge on the Schwartz Fatigue Scale from 7 (no fatigue to 63 (worst fatigue points. Quality of life and exercise capacity were also measured at admission and discharge. Length of admission and time to next hospital admission were recorded. Results: Analysed as the primary outcome, the experimental group had a greater rate of improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 than the control group, but this was not statistically significant (MD 0.13% predicted per day, 95% CI –0.03 to 0.28. However, the experimental group had a significantly higher FEV1 at discharge than the control group (MD 4.2% predicted, 95% CI 0.1 to 8.3. The experimental group reported significantly lower levels of fatigue on the Schwartz fatigue scale at discharge than the control group (MD 6 points, 95% CI 1 to 11. There was no significant difference between the experimental and control groups in subjective symptom severity, quality of life, exercise capacity, length of hospital admission or time to next hospital admission. Conclusion: Among people hospitalised for an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis, the use of non-invasive ventilation as an adjunct to the airway clearance regimen significantly improves FEV1 and fatigue. Trial

  1. Non-invasive index of liver fibrosis induced by alcohol, thioacetamide and schistosomal infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Beltagy Doha M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non invasive approaches will likely be increasing utilized to assess liver fibrosis. This work provides a new non invasive index to predict liver fibrosis induced in mice. Methods Fibrosis was generated by thioacetamide (TAA, chronic intake of ethanol, or infection with S. mansoni in 240 mice. Both progression and regression of fibrosis (after treatment with silymarin and/or praziquantel were monitored. The following methods were employed: (i The METAVIR system was utilized to grade and stage liver inflammation and fibosis; (ii Determination of hepatic hydroxyproline and collagen; and (iii Derivation of a new hepatic fibrosis index from the induced changes, and its prospective validation in a group of 70 mice. Results The index is composed of 4 serum variable including total proteins, γ-GT, bilirubin and reduced glutathione (GSH, measured in diseased, treated and normal mice. These parameters were highly correlated with both the histological stage and the grade. They were combined in a logarithmic formula, which non-invasively scores the severity of liver fibrosis through a range (0 to 2, starting with healthy liver (corresponding to stage 0 to advanced fibrosis (corresponding stage 3.Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC for the accuracy of the index to predict the histological stages demonstrated that the areas under the curve (AUC were 0.954, 0.979 and 0.99 for index values corresponding to histological stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Also, the index was correlated with stage and grade, (0.947 and 0.859, respectively. The cut off values that cover the range between stages 0-1, 1-2 and 2-3 are 0.4, 1.12 and 1.79, respectively. The results in the validation group confirmed the accuracy of the test. The AUROC was 0.869 and there was good correlation with the stage of fibrosis and grade of inflammation. Conclusion The index fulfils the basic criteria of non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis since it is liver

  2. Using of Telomerase Enzyme in Urine as a Non invasive Marker for Cancer Bladder Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza A Hassan*, Fawzia A . El- Sheshtawey** , Seliem A. Seliem

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary bladder cancer is one of the major health problem all over the world. Cystoscopy remains the gold standard for identifying bladder cancer but it is invasive and expensive, therefore, a simple, non invasive test for detecting bladder cancer would be helpful. Several biomarkers for bladder cancer have been used, but no single marker has been accurate and conclusive. Aim: The current study aimed to measure telomerase enzyme in urine as a useful non invasive marker for detection of bladder cancer. Methods : Forty eight patients ( 39 males and 9 females were included, They are complaining of urinary symptoms and undergo cystoscopy with biopsy of bladder lesions and histopathological examination. They were divided into groups: Group I: 16 patients ( 11 males and 5 females have benign urologic conditions. Group II: 32 patients (28 males and 4 females have proven bladder cancer patients underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor or cystoscopy with biopsy of bladder lesions. Also, 15 apparently healthy volunteers with matched age and sex with patients were served as a control group. All subjects were submitted to laboratory estimation of the following in urine: urinary creatinine, urine cytology, telomerase enzyme in urine by telomerase PCR and complete urine examination. Results : The results of this study revealed that a highly significant increase in the frequency of cytolological positive cases for tumor cells in malignant group than each of benign group and healthy subjects, while no significant difference was detected between benign group and healthy subjects. The frequency of telomerase in urine was significantly higher in malignant group than each of benign group and healthy subjects, while no significant difference was detected between benign group and healthy subjects. The telomerase activity has sensitivity of 90.6% for diagnosis of cancer bladder with 93.7% for specificity and PPV was 96.6%, NPV was 83.3% and

  3. Intercomparison of techniques for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of methods are presently available for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass of both normal individuals and patients with metabolic disorders. Chief among these methods are radiographic techniques such as radiogrammetry, photon absorptiometry, computer tomography, Compton scattering and neutron activation analysis. In this review, the salient features of the bone measurement techniques are discussed along with their accuracy and precision. The advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques for measuring bone mass are summarized. Where possible, intercomparisons are made of the various techniques.

  4. CARDIAC TRANSPLANT REJECTION AND NON-INVASIVE COMON CAROTID ARTERY WALL FUNCTIONAL INDICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft rejection would entail an increase in certain blood biomarkers and active substances derived from activated inflammatory cells which could influence entire vascular endothelial function and deteriorate arterial wall stiffness. We propose that carotid wall functional indices measured with non-invasive ultrasound could we valuable markers of the subclinical cardiac allograft rejection. Aim. Our goal was to analyze the clinical utility of functional common carotid wall (CCW variables measured with high-resolution Doppler ultrasound as a non-invasive screening tool for allograft rejection in cardiac transplant patients (pts. Methods. One hundred and seventy one pts included 93 cardiac recipients, 30 dilated cardiomyopathy waiting list pts, and 48 stable coronary artery disease (SCAD pts without decompensated heart failure were included. Along with resistive index (Ri, pulsative index (Pi, and CCW intima-media thickness (IMT, CCW rigidity index (iRIG was estimated using empirical equation. Non-invasive evaluation was performed in cardiac transplant recipients prior the endomyo- cardial biopsy. Results. Neither of Ri, Pi, or CCW IMT were different in studied subgroups. iRIG was signifi- cantly lower in SCAD pts when compared to the dilated cardiomyopathy subgroup. The later had similar values with cardiac transplant recipients without rejection. Antibody-mediated and cellular rejection were found in 22 (23.7% and 17 (18.3% cardiac recipients, respectively. Mean iRIG in pts without rejection was significantly lower in comparison to antibody-mediated rejection and cell-mediated (5514.7 ± 2404.0 vs 11856.1 ± 6643.5 and 16071.9 ± 10029.1 cm/sec2, respectively, p = 0.001. Area under ROC for iRIG was 0.90 ± 0.03 units2. Analysis showed that iRIG values above estimated treshold 7172 cm/sec2 suggested relative risk of any type of rejection 17.7 (95%CI = 6.3–49.9 sensitivity 80.5%, specificity – 81.1%, negative predictive value – 84

  5. Accurate non-invasive image-based cytotoxicity assays for cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brouwer Jaap

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CloneSelect™ Imager system is an image-based visualisation system for cell growth assessment. Traditionally cell proliferation is measured with the colorimetric MTT assay. Results Here we show that both the CloneSelect Imager and the MTT approach result in comparable EC50 values when assaying the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and oxaliplatin on various cell lines. However, the image-based technique was found non-invasive, considerably quicker and more accurate than the MTT assay. Conclusions This new image-based technique has the potential to replace the cumbersome MTT assay when fast, unbiased and high-throughput cytotoxicity assays are requested.

  6. Non-invasive electrocardiogram detection of in vivo zebrafish embryos using electric potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon-Morales, E.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Aviles-Espinosa, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this letter, we report the continuous detection of the cardiac electrical activity in embryonic zebrafish using a non-invasive approach. We present a portable and cost-effective platform based on the electric potential sensing technology, to monitor in vivo electrocardiogram activity from the zebrafish heart. This proof of principle demonstration shows how electrocardiogram measurements from the embryonic zebrafish may become accessible by using electric field detection. We present preliminary results using the prototype, which enables the acquisition of electrophysiological signals from in vivo 3 and 5 days-post-fertilization zebrafish embryos. The recorded waveforms show electrocardiogram traces including detailed features such as QRS complex, P and T waves.

  7. Non-invasive evaluation of arrhythmic risk in dilated cardiomyopathy:From imaging to electrocardiographic measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo; Iacoviello; Francesco; Monitillo

    2014-01-01

    Malignant ventricular arrhythmias are a major adverse event and worsen the prognosis of patients affected by ischemic and non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.The main parameter currently used to stratify arrhythmic risk and guide decision making towards the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is the evaluation of the left ventricular ejection fraction.However,this strategy is characterized by several limitations and consequently additional parameters have been suggested in order to improve arrhythmic risk stratification.The aim of this review is to critically revise the prognostic significance of non-invasive diagnostic tools in order to better stratify the arrhythmic risk prognosis of dilated cardiomyopathy patients.

  8. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: postpartum decompensation and use of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorello, G; Cubillos, J; McDonald, M; Balki, M

    2014-02-01

    The utility of a non-invasive cardiac output monitor (NICOM™) in guiding the peripartum management and identification of postpartum complications in a patient with severe peripartum cardiomyopathy is reported. A 31-year-old nulliparous woman at 35 weeks of gestation presented with a three-week history of worsening dyspnea and progressive functional deterioration. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction with an ejection fraction peripartum cardiomyopathy. We suggest that use of NICOM™ be extended into the postpartum period to detect signs of cardiac decompensation in such patients.

  9. Luminescent Tension-Indicating Orthopedic Strain Gauges for Non-Invasive Measurements Through Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Jeffrey (Inventor); Rogalski, Melissa (Inventor); Anderson, Dakota (Inventor); Heath, Jonathon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Strain gauges that can provide information with regard to the state of implantable devices are described. The strain gauges can exhibit luminescence that is detectable through living tissue, and the detectable luminescent emission can vary according to the strain applied to the gauge. A change in residual strain of the device can signify a loss of mechanical integrity and/or loosening of the implant, and this can be non-invasively detected either by simple visual detection of the luminescent emission or through examination of the emission with a detector such as a spectrometer or a camera.

  10. Retromolar Intubation:An alternative non invasive technique for airway management in maxillofacial trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uthkarsha Lokesh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Airway management during surgery in patients with complex maxillofacial trauma has always been a challenge for anesthesiologists, as the surgeon and the anesthesiologist share the same limited space. The necessity of intraoperative restoration of dental occlusion by intermaxillary fixation (IMF makes the presence of oral endotracheal tube unfeasible.The purpose of our study is to evaluate the Retromolar intubation is non-invasive technique of securing airway in patients with panfacial trauma. It avoids the complications of submental intubation and tracheostomy.This review article emphasizes on the use of the retromolar intubation technique in certain cases of maxillofacial trauma

  11. Non-medical applications of non invasive prenatal testing: ethical issues and apllicabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Tasinato, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining material for foetal molecular analysis without the need of invasive procedures has been a long wished improvement of practice in prenatal diagnostics. The demonstration of the presence of foetal cells and circulating foetal free-DNA in a sample of mother-to-be’s blood promised that a non-invasive approach for prenatal diagnostics is near to becoming a reality. The presence of foetal cells (albeit in low numbers) in maternal blood has been known since 1893, when...

  12. Open source non-invasive prenatal testing platform and its performance in a public health laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter; Richter, Stine R; Balslev-Harder, Marie

    2016-01-01

    : The pipeline correctly detected 27/27 trisomy 21, 4/4 trisomy 18, and 3/3 trisomy 13 fetuses. Neither false negatives nor false positives (chromosomes 13, 18, and 21) were observed in our validation dataset. Fetal sex was identified correctly in all but one triploid fetus (172/173). SeqFF showed a strong......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to introduce non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal autosomal trisomies and gender in a Danish public health setting, using semi-conductor sequencing and published open source scripts for analysis. METHODS: Plasma-derived DNA from a total of 375...

  13. Non-invasive epigenetic detection of fetal trisomy 21 in first trimester maternal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyae Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Down syndrome (DS is the most common known aneuploidy, caused by an extra copy of all or part of chromosome 21. Fetal-specific epigenetic markers have been investigated for non-invasive prenatal detection of fetal DS. The phosphodiesterases gene, PDE9A, located on chromosome 21q22.3, is completely methylated in blood (M-PDE9A and unmethylated in the placenta (U-PDE9A. Therefore, we estimated the accuracy of non-invasive fetal DS detection during the first trimester of pregnancy using this tissue-specific epigenetic characteristic of PDE9A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nested, case-control study was conducted using maternal plasma samples collected from 108 pregnant women carrying 18 DS and 90 normal fetuses (each case was matched with 5 controls according to gestational weeks at blood sampling. All pregnancies were singletons at or before 12 weeks of gestation between October 2008 and May 2009. The maternal plasma levels of M-PDE9A and U-PDE9A were measured by quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. M-PDE9A and U-PDE9A levels were obtained in all samples and did not differ between male and female fetuses. M-PDE9A levels did not differ between the DS cases and controls (1854.3 vs 2004.5 copies/mL; P = 0.928. U-PDE9A levels were significantly elevated in women with DS fetuses compared with controls (356.8 vs 194.7 copies/mL, P<0.001. The sensitivities of U-PDE9A level and the unmethylation index of PDE9A for non-invasive fetal DS detection were 77.8% and 83.3%, respectively, with a 5% false-positive rate. In the risk assessment for fetal DS, the adjusted odds ratios of U-PDE9A level and UI were 46.2 [95% confidence interval: 7.8-151.6] and 63.7 [95% confidence interval: 23.2-206.7], respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that U-PDE9A level and the unmethylation index of PDE9A may be useful biomarkers for non-invasive fetal DS detection during the first trimester of pregnancy, regardless of fetal

  14. A new index for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naohiro; Ichino; Keisuke; Osakabe; Toru; Nishikawa; Hiroko; Sugiyama; Miho; Kato; Shiho; Kitahara; Senju; Hashimoto; Naoto; Kawabe; Masao; Harata; Yoshifumi; Nitta; Michihito; Murao; Takuji; Nakano; Yuko; Arima; Hiroaki; Shimazaki; Koji; Suzuki; Kentaro; Yoshioka

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To construct and evaluate a new non-invasive fibrosis index for assessment of the stage of liver f ibrosis. METHODS:A new f ibrosis index (Fibro-Stiffness index) was developed in 165 of 285 patients with chronic hepatitis C, and was validated in the other 120 patients where liver biopsy was performed. Its usefulness was compared with liver stiffness (LS) measured by FibroScan, the aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index, the Forns index and the FibroIndex. RESULTS: The Fibro-Stiffness index consists of...

  15. Control of a team of micro-robots for non-invasive medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Perrard, Christophe; Andreff, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the control and the synchronisation of a team of micro-robots that performs a non-invasive surgical act into a human body. These micro-robots are very small sized (from ten to some hundred microns). A single unit embeds the minimum of computing power and memory (minimalist electronics) to run a very light program, such as a finite-state machine. The mass effect of the joined micro-robots will allow to achieve the mission through a satisfactory way...

  16. Non-invasive treatment in pain therapy with the iontophoretic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Desio

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available From January 2001 to December 2003, 52 patients, 31 females and 21 males, aged between 19 and 78 years, underwent iontophoresis; they all had acute lumbar ischialgia or hiparthrosis; each cycle consisted of 4 consecutive applications in successive days. The 88% of patients (n = 46 had a positive outcome; in 12% (n = 6, pain with characteristics similar to that before treatment arouse again. No patient showed a worsening or side effects on long term. The validity and the advantages of the technique indicate that the iontophoresis is a useful non-invasive and non-traumatic therapeutic presidium, which allows direct drug use in painful area.

  17. Non-invasive cardiac mapping in clinical practice: Application to the ablation of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Rémi; Shah, Ashok J; Hocini, Mélèze; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Cochet, Hubert; Sacher, Frédéric; Bear, Laura; Duchateau, Josselin; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) started to demonstrate its efficiency in clinical settings. The initial application to localize focal ventricular arrhythmias such as ventricular premature beats was probably the easiest to challenge and validates the concept. Our clinical experience in using this non-invasive mapping technique to identify the sources of electrical disorders and guide catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats) and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome) is described here.

  18. Online estimation of respiratory mechanics in non-invasive pressure support ventilation: a bench model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueeny, Qestra; Tassaux, Didier; Vignaux, Laurence; Jolliet, Philippe; Schindhelm, Klaus; Redmond, Stephen; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    An online algorithm for determining respiratory mechanics in patients using non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in pressure support mode was developed and embedded in a ventilator system. Based on multiple linear regression (MLR) of respiratory data, the algorithm was tested on a patient bench model under conditions with and without leak and simulating a variety of mechanics. Bland-Altman analysis indicates reliable measures of compliance across the clinical range of interest (± 11-18% limits of agreement). Resistance measures showed large quantitative errors (30-50%), however, it was still possible to qualitatively distinguish between normal and obstructive resistances. This outcome provides clinically significant information for ventilator titration and patient management.

  19. Method for Non-Invasive Determination of Chemical Properties of Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul W. (Inventor); Jones, Alan (Inventor); Thomas, Nathan A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for non-invasively determining a chemical property of an aqueous solution is provided. The method provides the steps of providing a colored solute having a light absorbance spectrum and transmitting light through the colored solute at two different wavelengths. The method further provides the steps of measuring light absorbance of the colored solute at the two different transmitted light wavelengths, and comparing the light absorbance of the colored solute at the two different wavelengths to determine a chemical property of an aqueous solution.

  20. Non-Invasive Microwave Sensors for Biomedical Applications: New Design Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic operation principles of non-invasive microwave sensors are summarized in this work, with specific emphasis on health-care systems applications. Design criteria to achieve reliable results in terms of biological parameters detection are specifically highlighted. In particular, the importance to adopt accurate frequency models for the complex permittivity (in terms of both dielectric constant as well as loss tangent in the synthesis procedure of the microwave sensor is clearly motivated. Finally, an application example of the outlined new perspectives in the framework of glucose monitoring to face diabete disease is deeply discussed.

  1. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  2. Non-invasive studies of multiphase flow in process equipment. Positron emission particle tracking technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, B. V.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Chang, Y.-F.; Kosinski, P.; Hoffmann, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is a novel experimental technique for non-invasive inspection of industrial fluid/particle flows. The method is based on the dynamic positioning of a positron-emitting, flowing object (particle) performed through the sensing of annihilation events and subsequent numerical treatment to determine the particle position. The present paper shows an integrated overview of PEPT studies which were carried out using a new PET scanner in the Bergen University Hospital to study multiphase flows in different geometric configurations.

  3. Non-invasive optical mapping of the piglet brain in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Gratton, Enrico; Hueber, Dennis; Rosenfeld, Warren; Maulik, Dev; Stubblefield, Phillip; Stankovic, Mikjan

    1999-04-01

    We have performed non-invasive, real-time optical mapping of the piglet brain during a subcortical injection of autologous blood. The time resolution of the optical maps is 192 ms, thus allowing us to generate a real-time video of the growing subcortical hematoma. The increased absorption at the site of blood injection is accompanied by a decreased absorption at the contralateral brain side. This contralateral decrease in the optical absorption and the corresponding time traces of the cerebral hemoglobin parameters are consistent with a reduced cerebral blood flow caused by the increased intracranial pressure.

  4. Modeling the pelvic region for non-invasive pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moszkowski Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA of electric current distribution in the pelvis minor may help to assess the usability of non-invasive surface stimulation for continuous pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring. FEA requires generation of quality volumetric tetrahedral mesh geometry. This study proposes the generation of a suitable mesh based on MRI data. The resulting volumetric mesh models the autonomous nerve structures at risk during total mesorectal excision. The model also contains the bone, cartilage, fat, skin, muscle tissues of the pelvic region, and a set of electrodes for surface stimulation. The model is ready for finite element analysis of the discrete Maxwell’s equations.

  5. Non-invasive Estimation of Pressure Changes along a Streamline using Vector Velocity Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Traberg, Marie Sand;

    2015-01-01

    estimator is evaluated by comparing its results to a 3-D numerical simulation model. The study showed pressure drops across the constricted phantom varying from -5 Pa to 7 Pa with a standard deviation of 4%. The proposed method had a normalised rootmean-square error of 10% in reference to the simulation......A non-invasive method for estimating pressure changes along a streamline using ultrasound is presented. The suggested method estimates pressure gradients from 2-D vector velocity fields. Changes in pressure are derived using a model based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Scans of a carotid...

  6. WISE-2005: developing a non-invasive method to monitor cardiovascular deconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, N; Fischer, D; Greaves, D K; Hughson, R L

    2007-07-01

    We have determined the gain of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex (CPBR) by measuring the central venous pressure (CVP) by venous catheter and calculating the total peripheral resistance (TPR) from mean arterial pressure (MAP) by Finometer and cardiac output (QD) by Doppler ultrasound. We tested the hypothesis that the BeatScope software of the Finometer, which calculates cardiac stroke volume (SVF) and cardiac output (QF) from the arterial pulse wave, could provide data with which to estimate CVP and TPR. The estimate of QF was linearly related to QD with a correction factor. Further, we found linear relationships between CVP and SVF that allowed us to establish a prediction of CVP from the SVF as the new input to the CPBR. To test the ability of this method to monitor changes in CPBR we are testing the subjects of the WISE-2005 study before and after 50-days of bed rest. We conclude that the TPR can be assessed with the Finometer and without any invasive method to record the CVP.

  7. Non-Invasive In Vivo Imaging and Quantification of Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Rats Using Cells Expressing Far-Red Fluorescence Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Christensen

    Full Text Available Non-invasive in vivo imaging is emerging as an important tool for basic and preclinical research. Near-infrared (NIR fluorescence dyes and probes have been used for non-invasive optical imaging since in the NIR region absorption and auto fluorescence by body tissue is low, thus permitting for greater penetration depths and high signal to noise ratio. Currently, cell tracking systems rely on labeling cells prior to injection or administering probes targeting the cell population of choice right before imaging. These approaches do not enable imaging of tumor growth, as the cell label is diluted during cell division. In this study we have developed cell lines stably expressing the far-red fluorescence protein E2-Crimson, thus enabling continuous detection and quantification of tumor growth. In a xenograft rat model, we show that E2-Crimson expressing cells can be detected over a 5 week period using optical imaging. Fluorescence intensities correlated with tumor volume and weight and allowed for a reliable and robust quantification of the entire tumor compartment. Using a novel injection regime, the seeding of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in the lungs in a rat model was established and verified.

  8. Non-Invasive In Vivo Imaging and Quantification of Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Rats Using Cells Expressing Far-Red Fluorescence Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jon; Vonwil, Daniel; Shastri, V Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging is emerging as an important tool for basic and preclinical research. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence dyes and probes have been used for non-invasive optical imaging since in the NIR region absorption and auto fluorescence by body tissue is low, thus permitting for greater penetration depths and high signal to noise ratio. Currently, cell tracking systems rely on labeling cells prior to injection or administering probes targeting the cell population of choice right before imaging. These approaches do not enable imaging of tumor growth, as the cell label is diluted during cell division. In this study we have developed cell lines stably expressing the far-red fluorescence protein E2-Crimson, thus enabling continuous detection and quantification of tumor growth. In a xenograft rat model, we show that E2-Crimson expressing cells can be detected over a 5 week period using optical imaging. Fluorescence intensities correlated with tumor volume and weight and allowed for a reliable and robust quantification of the entire tumor compartment. Using a novel injection regime, the seeding of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in the lungs in a rat model was established and verified.

  9. The clot burden score, the Boston Acute Stroke Imaging Scale, the cerebral blood volume ASPECTS, and two novel imaging parameters in the prediction of clinical outcome of ischemic stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolytic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillanpaa, Niko; Hakomaki, Jari; Lahteela, Arto; Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo [Tampere University Hospital, Medical Imaging Center, Tampere (Finland); Saarinen, Jukka T.; Numminen, Heikki; Elovaara, Irina [Tampere University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Tampere (Finland); Rusanen, Harri [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Oulu (Finland)

    2012-07-15

    Recently two classification methods based on the location and the extent of thrombosis detected with CT angiography have been introduced: the Boston Acute Stroke Imaging Scale (BASIS) and the clot burden score (CBS). We studied the performance of BASIS and CBS in predicting good clinical outcome (mRS {<=}2 at 90 days) in an acute (<3 h) stroke cohort treated with intravenous thrombolytic therapy. Eighty-three consecutive patients who underwent multimodal CT were analyzed. Binary logistic regression model was used to assess how BASIS, CBS, and cerebral blood volume (CBV) ASPECTS predict favorable clinical outcome. Diagnostic sensitivities and specificities were calculated and compared. Patients with low CBS and CBV ASPECTS scores and major strokes according to BASIS had significantly higher admission NIHSS scores, larger perfusion defects, and more often poor clinical outcome. In logistic regression analysis, CBV ASPECTS, CBS and BASIS were significantly associated with the clinical outcome. The performance of BASIS improved when patients with thrombosis of the M2 segment of the middle cerebral artery were classified as having minor stroke (M1-BASIS). In the anterior circulation, the sum of CBS and CBV ASPECTS (CBSV) proved to be the most robust predictor of favorable outcome. CBV ASPECTS and CBS had high sensitivity but moderate to poor specificity while BASIS was only moderately sensitive and specific. CBS, BASIS, and CBV ASPECTS are statistically robust and sensitive but unspecific predictors of good clinical outcome. Two new derived imaging parameters, CBSV and M1-BASIS, share these properties and may have increased prognostic value. (orig.)

  10. States of low pulmonary blood flow can be detected non-invasively at the bedside measuring alveolar dead space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusman, Gerardo; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Paez, Gabriel; Alvarez, Jorge; Bohm, Stephan H

    2012-06-01

    We tested whether the ratio of alveolar dead space to alveolar tidal volume (VD(alv)/VT(alv)) can detect states of low pulmonary blood flow (PBF) in a non-invasive way. Fifteen patients undergoing cardiovascular surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were studied. CPB is a technique that excludes the lungs from the general circulation. The weaning of CPB is a model that manipulates PBF in vivo because each time blood flow through the CPB decreases, expected PBF (ePBF) increases. Patients were liberated from CPB in steps of 20 % every 2' starting from 100 % CPB (very low ePBF) to 0 % CPB (100 % ePBF). During constant ventilation, volumetric capnograms were recorded and Bohr's dead space ratio (VD(Bohr)/VT), VD(alv)/VT(alv) and the ratio of airway dead space to tidal volume (VD(aw)/VT) were calculated. Before CPB, VD(Bohr)/VT was 0.36 ± 0.05, VD(aw)/VT 0.21 ± 0.04 and VD(alv)/VT(alv) 0.18 ± 0.06 (mean ± SD). During weaning from CPB, VD(aw)/VT remained unchanged while VD(Bohr)/VT and VD(alv)/VT(alv) decreased with increasing ePBF. At CPB of 80, 60, 40 and 20 % VD(Bohr)/VT was 0.64 ± 0.06, 0.55 ± 0.06, 0.47 ± 0.05 and 0.40 ± 0.04, respectively; p alveolar component of VD(Bohr)/VT increased in proportion to the deficit in lung perfusion.

  11. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T. Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  12. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Manzano-Szalai

    Full Text Available In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i milk allergy, ii peanut allergy and iii egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour.

  13. Non-Invasive Ventilation in Patients with Heart Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Hugo Souza; dos Reis, Helena França Correia; Lima, Melissa Santos; Gomes Neto, Mansueto

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) may perfect respiratory and cardiac performance in patients with heart failure (HF). The objective of the study to establish, through systematic review and meta-analysis, NIV influence on functional capacity of HF patients. A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized studies was carried out through research of databases of Cochrane Library, SciELO, Pubmed and PEDro, using the key-words: heart failure, non-invasive ventilation, exercise tolerance; and the free terms: bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and functional capacity (terms were searched for in English and Portuguese) using the Boolean operators AND and OR. Methodological quality was ensured through PEDro scale. Weighted averages and a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. The meta-analysis was done thorugh the software Review Manager, version 5.3 (Cochrane Collaboration). Four randomized clinical trials were included. Individual studies suggest NIV improved functional capacity. NIV resulted in improvement in the distance of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) (68.7m 95%CI: 52.6 to 84.9) in comparison to the control group. We conclude that the NIV is an intervention that promotes important effects in the improvement of functional capacity of HF patients. However, there is a gap in literature on which are the most adequate parameters for the application of this technique. PMID:28099587

  14. Non-invasive serial casting to treat idiopathic toe walking in an 18-month old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Rice, Tracy; Pergami, Paola; Mandich, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic toe walking is characterized by persistent toe walking in the absence of clinically diagnosed neuromuscular disease. Treatment options in children diagnosed with idiopathic toe walking include: observation, physical therapy, serial casting, or Achilles tendon (heel cord) lengthening surgery. In this case report, we present a non-invasive serial casting protocol to treat severe and persistent toe walking in an 18-month old child, diagnosed as an idiopathic toe walker following neurological examination. A series of below knee casts was used to provide a consistent stretch to the plantar flexor muscles. Upon removal of each set of casts, passive range of motion at the ankles was measured with a goniometer. Four sets of casts, each lasting approximately one week, increased passive ankle dorsiflexion to 10° of neutral and established a heel-toe walking gait. Improvements in ankle range of motion and gait were maintained upon repeated examinations at 3, 7, and 12 months post-casting. These results demonstrate that non-invasive procedures, such as serial casting, can be successful in very young children diagnosed as idiopathic toe walkers. Early identification and intervention for this diagnosis may eliminate the need for invasive surgeries and associated risks in this population.

  15. Non-invasive diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Leon A; Feldstein, Ariel E

    2011-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the USA and many other parts of the world. Its prevalence continues to rise; currently affecting about one in four adults and 10% of children in the USA. NAFLD represents a wide spectrum of conditions ranging from fatty liver, which in general follows a benign, no-progressive clinical course, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more serious form of NAFLD that may progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Currently, the diagnosis of NASH requires an invasive liver biopsy with drawbacks of sampling and interpretation error. Clinical risk factors for NASH include diabetes and the metabolic syndrome; however, these are not sufficiently predictive of the condition by themselves. Routine liver enzyme levels are not reliable; however, novel plasma hepatocyte cell death markers either alone or in combination with clinical risk factors are potential non-invasive diagnostic tools for the future. This review provides a concise overview of the role non-invasive diagnostic tools for the differentiation of fatty liver from NASH as well as for the determination of presence and extent of fibrosis.

  16. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants.

  17. Non-invasive monitoring for living cell culture with lensless Fourier transform digital holography microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxin; Wang, Dayong; Zhao, Jie; Li, Yan; Meng, Puhui; Wan, Yuhong; Jiang, Zhuqing

    2010-08-01

    The number of cells is commonly employed to describe the cell viability and the status of cell culture in a certain extent. An automatic and non-invasive detecting method for the status analysis of cell culture is developed based on digital holography microscopy (DHM) technology. Digital holographic imaging can retrieve quantitative information of object wavefront by the numerical reconstruction from a single digital hologram recorded by a detector such as CCD or CMOS camera, which is especially suitable for the morphology detection of the transparent or semi-transparent cells. In this contribution, the lensless Fourier transform (LFT) based holography configuration is designed for cell imaging without prestaining, and the amplitude and phase of living cells can be reconstructed by digital reconstruction and phase unwrapped algorithms. Then the image filtering and segmentation are combined for the automatic evaluation of the level of confluency. In imaging experiments, the culture status of the cervical cancer cell TZMbl is detected, and the results demonstrate that digital holography microscopy provides a feasible non-invasive method for monitoring the living cell culture.

  18. Development of a Portable Non-Invasive Swallowing and Respiration Assessment Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Yun Shieh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a condition that happens when a person cannot smoothly swallow food from the mouth to the stomach. It causes malnourishment in patients, or can even cause death due to aspiration pneumonia. Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend. In this study, we aimed to integrate the timing and pattern monitoring of respiration and swallowing by using a portable and non-invasive approach which can be applied at the bedside in hospitals or institutions, or in a home environment. In this approach, we use a force sensing resistor (FSR to detect the motions of the thyroid cartilage in the pharyngeal phase. We also use the surface electromyography (sEMG to detect the contraction of the submental muscle in the oral phase, and a nasal cannula to detect nasal airflow for respiration monitoring during the swallowing process. All signals are received and processed for swallowing event recognition. A total of 19 volunteers participated in the testing and over 57 measurements were made. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively distinguish the swallowing function in people of different ages and genders.

  19. Development of a portable non-invasive swallowing and respiration assessment device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Wann-Yun; Wang, Chin-Man; Chang, Chia-Shuo

    2015-05-27

    Dysphagia is a condition that happens when a person cannot smoothly swallow food from the mouth to the stomach. It causes malnourishment in patients, or can even cause death due to aspiration pneumonia. Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend. In this study, we aimed to integrate the timing and pattern monitoring of respiration and swallowing by using a portable and non-invasive approach which can be applied at the bedside in hospitals or institutions, or in a home environment. In this approach, we use a force sensing resistor (FSR) to detect the motions of the thyroid cartilage in the pharyngeal phase. We also use the surface electromyography (sEMG) to detect the contraction of the submental muscle in the oral phase, and a nasal cannula to detect nasal airflow for respiration monitoring during the swallowing process. All signals are received and processed for swallowing event recognition. A total of 19 volunteers participated in the testing and over 57 measurements were made. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively distinguish the swallowing function in people of different ages and genders.

  20. Development of a Portable Non-Invasive Swallowing and Respiration Assessment Device †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Wann-Yun; Wang, Chin-Man; Chang, Chia-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a condition that happens when a person cannot smoothly swallow food from the mouth to the stomach. It causes malnourishment in patients, or can even cause death due to aspiration pneumonia. Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend. In this study, we aimed to integrate the timing and pattern monitoring of respiration and swallowing by using a portable and non-invasive approach which can be applied at the bedside in hospitals or institutions, or in a home environment. In this approach, we use a force sensing resistor (FSR) to detect the motions of the thyroid cartilage in the pharyngeal phase. We also use the surface electromyography (sEMG) to detect the contraction of the submental muscle in the oral phase, and a nasal cannula to detect nasal airflow for respiration monitoring during the swallowing process. All signals are received and processed for swallowing event recognition. A total of 19 volunteers participated in the testing and over 57 measurements were made. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively distinguish the swallowing function in people of different ages and genders. PMID:26024414

  1. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of myocardial apoptosis and necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flotats, Albert; Carrio, Ignasi [Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2003-04-01

    Myocardial necrosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular disorders and can result from different myocardial insults. Its non-invasive identification and localisation therefore may help in the diagnosis of these disorders, as well as in prognosis and assessment of treatment response. Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is important in the spectrum of myocardial damage since it is gradually becoming more apparent that cell death may begin as apoptosis and not as necrosis. First attempts to directly visualise the area of myocardial necrosis were based on recognition of myocardial infarction with ''hot spot imaging agents'' in patients with chest pain. Since then, the study of myocardial necrosis with gamma imaging agents has gone beyond the detection of myocardial infarction, and attempts have been made to diagnose other cardiovascular disorders associated with cardiac cell death such as heart transplant rejection, myocarditis, cardiotoxicity and cardiomyopathies. Traditionally, two hot spot imaging agents have been used for the detection of myocardial necrosis, {sup 99m}Tc-pyrophosphate and {sup 111}In-antimyosin. In addition, preliminary studies have demonstrated promising results with {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate. Recently, {sup 99m}Tc-annexin V has been successfully used for non-invasive gamma imaging of apoptosis after acute myocardial infarction, acute myocardial ischaemia, acute cardiac allograft rejection and malignant intracardiac tumours. This review article focusses on the characteristics of these different myocardial necrotic and apoptotic markers and compares their role in the assessment of myocardial damage. (orig.)

  2. Pneumococci in biofilms are non-invasive: implications on nasopharyngeal colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Paul Gilley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the human nasopharynx asymptomatically. Invasive pneumococcal disease develops following bacterial aspiration into the lungs. Pneumococci within the nasopharynx exist as biofilms, a growth phenotype characterized by surface attachment, encasement within an extracellular matrix, and antimicrobial resistance. Experimental evidence indicates that biofilm pneumococci are attenuated versus their planktonic counterpart. Biofilm pneumococci failed to cause invasive disease in experimentally challenged mice and in vitro were shown to be non-invasive despite being hyper-adhesive. This attenuated phenotype corresponds with observations that biofilm pneumococci elicit significantly less cytokine and chemokine production from host cells than their planktonic counterparts. Microarray and proteomic studies show that pneumococci within biofilms have decreased metabolism, less capsular polysaccharide, and reduced production of the pore-forming toxin pneumolysin. Biofilm pneumococci are predominately in the transparent phenotype, which has elevated cell wall phosphorylcholine, an adhesin subject to C-reactive protein mediated opsonization. Herein, we review these changes in virulence, interpret their impact on colonization and transmission, and discuss the notion that non-invasive biofilms are principal lifestyle of S. pneumoniae.

  3. Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Non-Invasive Diabetes Sensing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaram, Prashanth; Owens, Dawn; Aceros, Juan

    2014-04-21

    Blood glucose monitoring is considered the gold standard for diabetes diagnostics and self-monitoring. However, the underlying process is invasive and highly uncomfortable for patients. Furthermore, the process must be completed several times a day to successfully manage the disease, which greatly contributes to the massive need for non-invasive monitoring options. Human serums, such as saliva, sweat, breath, urine and tears, contain traces of glucose and are easily accessible. Therefore, they allow minimal to non-invasive glucose monitoring, making them attractive alternatives to blood measurements. Numerous developments regarding noninvasive glucose detection techniques have taken place over the years, but recently, they have gained recognition as viable alternatives, due to the advent of nanotechnology-based sensors. Such sensors are optimal for testing the amount of glucose in serums other than blood thanks to their enhanced sensitivity and selectivity ranges, in addition to their size and compatibility with electronic circuitry. These nanotechnology approaches are rapidly evolving, and new techniques are constantly emerging. Hence, this manuscript aims to review current and future nanomaterial-based technologies utilizing saliva, sweat, breath and tears as a diagnostic medium for diabetes monitoring.

  4. Non-invasive multimodal functional imaging of the intestine with frozen micellar naphthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Jeon, Mansik; Rich, Laurie J.; Hong, Hao; Geng, Jumin; Zhang, Yin; Shi, Sixiang; Barnhart, Todd E.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Huizinga, Jan D.; Seshadri, Mukund; Cai, Weibo; Kim, Chulhong; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2014-08-01

    There is a need for safer and improved methods for non-invasive imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Modalities based on X-ray radiation, magnetic resonance and ultrasound suffer from limitations with respect to safety, accessibility or lack of adequate contrast. Functional intestinal imaging of dynamic gut processes has not been practical using existing approaches. Here, we report the development of a family of nanoparticles that can withstand the harsh conditions of the stomach and intestine, avoid systemic absorption, and provide good optical contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The hydrophobicity of naphthalocyanine dyes was exploited to generate purified ∼20 nm frozen micelles, which we call nanonaps, with tunable and large near-infrared absorption values (>1,000). Unlike conventional chromophores, nanonaps exhibit non-shifting spectra at ultrahigh optical densities and, following oral administration in mice, passed safely through the gastrointestinal tract. Non-invasive, non-ionizing photoacoustic techniques were used to visualize nanonap intestinal distribution with low background and remarkable resolution, and enabled real-time intestinal functional imaging with ultrasound co-registration. Positron emission tomography following seamless nanonap radiolabelling allowed complementary whole-body imaging.

  5. Triple non-invasive diagnostic test for exclusion of common bile ducts stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of a preoperative "triple non-invasive diagnostic test" for diagnosis and/or exclusion of common bile duct stones.METHODS: All patients with symptomatic gallstone disease, operated on by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from March 2004 to March 2006 were studied retrospectively. Two hundred patients were included and reviewed by using a triple diagnostic test including:patient's medical history, routine liver function tests and routine ultrasonography. All patients were followed up 2-24 mo after surgery to evaluate the impact of triple diagnostic test.RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were identified to have common bile duct stones. Lack of history of stones,negative laboratory tests and normal ultrasonography alone was proven to exclude common bile duct stones in some patients. However, a combination of these three components (triple diagnostic), was proven to be the most statistically significant test to exclude common bile duct stones in patients with gallstone disease.CONCLUSION: Using a combination of routinely used diagnostic components as triple diagnostic modality would increase the diagnostic accuracy of common bile duct stones preoperatively. This triple non-invasive test is recommended for excluding common bile duct stones and to identify patients in need for other investigations.

  6. Non-invasive spectroscopy of transfusable red blood cells stored inside sealed plastic blood-bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, K; Atkins, C G; Chen, D; Schulze, H G; Devine, D V; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2016-03-07

    After being separated from (donated) whole blood, red blood cells are suspended in specially formulated additive solutions and stored (at 4 °C) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood-bags until they are needed for transfusion. With time, the prepared red cell concentrate (RCC) is known to undergo biochemical changes that lower effectiveness of the transfusion, and thus regulations are in place that limit the storage period to 42 days. At present, RCC is not subjected to analytical testing prior to transfusion. In this study, we use Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) to probe, non-invasively, the biochemistry of RCC inside sealed blood-bags. The retrieved spectra compare well with conventional Raman spectra (of sampled aliquots) and are dominated by features associated with hemoglobin. In addition to the analytical demonstration that SORS can be used to retrieve RCC spectra from standard clinical blood-bags without breaking the sterility of the system, the data reveal interesting detail about the oxygenation-state of the stored cells themselves, namely that some blood-bags unexpectedly contain measurable amounts of deoxygenated hemoglobin after weeks of storage. The demonstration that chemical information can be obtained non-invasively using spectroscopy will enable new studies of RCC degeneration, and points the way to a Raman-based instrument for quality-control in a blood-bank or hospital setting.

  7. Non-invasive temperature measurement by using phase changes in electromagnetic waves in a cavity resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Yasutoshi; Ohwada, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of hyperthermia treatment, a novel method of non-invasive measurement of changes in body temperature is proposed. The proposed method is based on phase changes with temperature in electromagnetic waves in a heating applicator and the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. An image of the temperature change inside a body is reconstructed by applying a computed tomography algorithm. This method can be combined easily with a heating applicator based on a cavity resonator and can be used to treat cancer effectively while non-invasively monitoring the heating effect. In this paper the phase change distributions of electromagnetic waves with temperature changes are measured experimentally, and the accuracy of reconstruction is discussed. The phase change distribution is reconstructed by using a prototype system with a rectangular aluminum cavity resonator that can be rotated 360° around an axis of rotation. To make measurements without disturbing the electromagnetic field distribution, an optical electric field sensor is used. The phase change distribution is reconstructed from 4-projection data by using a simple back-projection algorithm. The paper demonstrates that the phase change distribution can be reconstructed. The difference between phase changes obtained experimentally and by numerical analysis is about 20% and is related mainly to the limited signal detection sensitivity of electromagnetic waves. A temperature change inside an object can be reconstructed from the measured phase changes in a cavity resonator.

  8. Application of magnetic resonance elastography as a non-invasive technique for diagnosis of liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Minglei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, liver biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis and grading of liver fibrosis, but its limitations have been widely acknowledged. The non-invasive detection methods are needed in clinical practice, and at present, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE is a hot research topic. This article reviews the advances in the clinical application of MRE in related fields, and studies have shown that MRE has a high diagnostic value due to its high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis and grading of liver fibrosis and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve as high as 0.95. Compared with serological and other imaging diagnostic methods, MRE can determine fibrosis stage more accurately and has good reproducibility and objectivity. MRE can be widely applied in all patients except those with hemochromatosis, with special advantages in the diagnosis for patients with obesity and ascites, and can make up for the disadvantages of other methods. This article points out that MRE may become the best non-invasive method for the assessment of liver fibrosis, especially advanced fibrosis.

  9. The biological basis of non-invasive strategies for selection of human oocytes and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lynette

    2003-01-01

    There is a need for more accurate embryo selection in human assisted reproduction, if the goal of reducing the number of embryos used in embryo transfer is to be realized. Furthermore, any selection strategy should be non-invasive if the embryos are to be used in embryo transfer. Currently, the strategy is selection by one to three parameters in the cleaving- and blastocyst-stage embryo, sometimes with additional pronuclear selection. It is clear that no one system is ideal, as the vast majority of transferred embryos do not implant. As the health of the embryo is largely dictated by the originating gametes, the very early events in oocyte development should be considered. This review will point to the early biological events in the unfertilized and fertilized oocyte that can be scored non-invasively and which can have a profound effect on the later developmental stages. Using a sequential scoring system, with emphasis on the oocyte, a system for selecting the most viable single embryo for transfer may hopefully be achieved.

  10. Non-Invasive Glucose Measurement by Use of Metabolic Heat Conformation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Li

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A non-invasive glucose measurement system based on the method of metabolic heat conformation (MHC is presented in this paper. This system consists of three temperature sensors, two humidity sensors, an infrared sensor and an optical measurement device. The glucose level can be deduced from the quantity of heat dissipation, blood flow rate of local tissue and degree of blood oxygen saturation. The methodology of the data process and the measurement error are also analyzed. The system is applied in a primary clinical test. Compared with the results of a commercial automated chemistry analyzer, the correlation coefficient of the collected data from the system is 0.856. Result shows that the correlation coefficient improves when the factor of heat dissipated by evaporation of the skin is added in. A non-invasive method of measuring the blood flow rate of local tissue by heat transmission between skin and contacted conductor is also introduced. Theoretical derivation and numerical simulation are completed as well. The so-called normalized difference mean (NDM is chosen to express the quantity of the blood flow rate. The correlation coefficient between the blood flow rates by this method and the results of a Doppler blood flow meter is equal to 0.914.

  11. Distribution of emm types in invasive and non-invasive group A and G streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähäkuopus, S; Vuento, R; Siljander, T; Syrjänen, J; Vuopio, J

    2012-06-01

    Our study describes the emm type distributions of invasive and non-invasive group A streptococci (GAS) and group G streptococci (GGS) strains in one of the biggest Health Districts in Finland. A total of 571 GAS or GGS were recovered from patients with invasive or non-invasive infections during a 1-year period in 2008-2009 in Pirkanmaa Health District in Finland. We describe here the emm type distributions of GAS and GGS collected from throat (n = 246), pus (n = 217), deep tissue (n = 56) and blood (n = 52). The most common emm types among GAS were emm77, emm1, emm28, emm89 and emm12. Among GGS, the most common emm types were stG480, stG643, stG6, stC6979 and stG485. Some emm types were found to associate with certain infection focus. In GAS, emm77 associated with pus isolates, whereas emm1 and emm12 were more frequent among throat isolates. In GGS, stG480 was more commonly found from throat isolates.

  12. Non invasive methods for genetic analysis applied to ecological and behavioral studies in Latino-America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana González

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Documenting the presence and abundance of the neotropical mammals is the first step for understanding their population ecology, behavior and genetic dynamics in designing conservation plans. The combination of field research with molecular genetics techniques are new tools that provide valuable biological information avoiding the disturbance in the ecosystems, trying to minimize the human impact in the process to gather biological information. The objective of this paper is to review the available non invasive sampling techniques that have been used in Neotropical mammal studies to apply to determine the presence and abundance, population structure, sex ratio, taxonomic diagnostic using mitochondrial markers, and assessing genetic variability using nuclear markers. There are a wide range of non invasive sampling techniques used to determine the species identification that inhabit an area such as searching for tracks, feces, and carcasses. Other useful equipment is the camera traps that can generate an image bank that can be valuable to assess species presence and abundance by morphology. With recent advances in molecular biology, it is now possible to use the trace amounts of DNA in feces and amplify it to analyze the species diversity in an area, and the genetic variability at intraspecific level. This is particularly helpful in cases of sympatric and cryptic species in which morphology failed to diagnose the taxonomic status of several species of brocket deer of the genus Mazama.

  13. A novel non-invasive diagnostic sampling technique for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslimi, Yasaman; Sadeghipour, Pardis; Habibzadeh, Sima; Mashayekhi, Vahid; Mortazavi, Hossien; Müller, Ingrid; Lane, Majella E; Kropf, Pascale; Rafati, Sima

    2017-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is important for chemotherapy and epidemiological studies. Common approaches for Leishmania detection involve the invasive collection of specimens for direct identification of amastigotes by microscopy and the culturing of promastigotes from infected tissues. Although these techniques are highly specific, they require highly skilled health workers and have the inherent risks of all invasive procedures, such as pain and risk of bacterial and fungal super-infection. Therefore, it is essential to reduce discomfort, potential infection and scarring caused by invasive diagnostic approaches especially for children. In this report, we present a novel non-invasive method, that is painless, rapid and user-friendly, using sequential tape strips for sampling and isolation of DNA from the surface of active and healed skin lesions of CL patients. A total of 119 patients suspected of suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis with different clinical manifestations were recruited and samples were collected both from their lesions and from uninfected areas. In addition, 15 fungal-infected lesions and 54 areas of healthy skin were examined. The duration of sampling is short (less than one minute) and species identification by PCR is highly specific and sensitive. The sequential tape stripping sampling method is a sensitive, non-invasive and cost-effective alternative to traditional diagnostic assays and it is suitable for field studies as well as for use in health care centers.

  14. Injury and repair in perinatal brain injury: Insights from non-invasive MR perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Pia

    2015-03-01

    Injury to the developing brain remains an important complication in critically ill newborns, placing them at risk for future neurodevelopment impairments. Abnormal brain perfusion is often a key mechanism underlying neonatal brain injury. A better understanding of how alternations in brain perfusion can affect normal brain development will permit the development of therapeutic strategies that prevent and/or minimize brain injury and improve the neurodevelopmental outcome of these high-risk newborns. Recently, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging of the brain has been successfully applied to the neonatal brain, which is known to be smaller and have lower brain perfusion compared to older children and adults. This article will present an overview of the potential role of non-invasive perfusion imaging by MRI to study maturation, injury, and repair in perinatal brain injury and demonstrate why this perfusion sequence is an important addition to current neonatal imaging protocols, which already include different sequences to assess the anatomy and metabolism of the neonatal brain.

  15. Breath analysis as a potential and non-invasive frontier in disease diagnosis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jorge; Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Cavaco, Carina; Taunk, Khushman; Rapole, Srikanth; Dhakne, Rahul; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu; Câmara, José S

    2015-01-09

    Currently, a small number of diseases, particularly cardiovascular (CVDs), oncologic (ODs), neurodegenerative (NDDs), chronic respiratory diseases, as well as diabetes, form a severe burden to most of the countries worldwide. Hence, there is an urgent need for development of efficient diagnostic tools, particularly those enabling reliable detection of diseases, at their early stages, preferably using non-invasive approaches. Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach relying only on the characterisation of volatile composition of the exhaled breath (EB) that in turn reflects the volatile composition of the bloodstream and airways and therefore the status and condition of the whole organism metabolism. Advanced sampling procedures (solid-phase and needle traps microextraction) coupled with modern analytical technologies (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, e-noses, etc.) allow the characterisation of EB composition to an unprecedented level. However, a key challenge in EB analysis is the proper statistical analysis and interpretation of the large and heterogeneous datasets obtained from EB research. There is no standard statistical framework/protocol yet available in literature that can be used for EB data analysis towards discovery of biomarkers for use in a typical clinical setup. Nevertheless, EB analysis has immense potential towards development of biomarkers for the early disease diagnosis of diseases.

  16. Acute changes in liver tumour perfusion measured non-invasively with arterial spin labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S Peter; Ramasawmy, Rajiv; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; Wells, Jack A; Robson, Mathew; Rajkumar, Vineeth; Lythgoe, Mark F; Pedley, R Barbara; Walker-Samuel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive measures of tumour vascular perfusion are desirable, in order to assess response to vascular targeting (or modifying) therapies. In this study, hepatic arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated to measure acute changes in perfusion of colorectal cancer in the liver, in response to vascular disruption therapy with OXi4503. Methods: SW1222 and LS174T tumours were established in the liver of MF1 nu/nu mice via intrasplenic injection. Perfusion and R2* MRI measurements were acquired with an Agilent 9.4T horizontal bore scanner, before and at 90 min after 40 mg kg−1 OXi4503. Results: A significant decrease in SW1222 tumour perfusion was observed (−43±33%, Pchange in tumour perfusion and the proximity to large vessels, with pre-treatment blood flow predictive of subsequent response. Histological evaluation confirmed the onset of necrosis and evidence of heterogeneous response between tumour deposits. Conclusions: Hepatic ASL-MRI can detect acute response to targeted tumour vascular disruption entirely non-invasively. Hepatic ASL of liver tumours has potential for use in a clinical setting. PMID:27031853

  17. Targets and probes for non-invasive imaging of β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodal, Andreas; Behe, Martin [Paul Scherrer Institut, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institut, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    β-cells, located in the islets of the pancreas, are responsible for production and secretion of insulin and play a crucial role in blood sugar regulation. Pathologic β-cells often cause serious medical conditions affecting blood glucose level, which severely impact life quality and are life-threatening if untreated. With 347 million patients, diabetes is one of the most prevalent diseases, and will continue to be one of the largest socioeconomic challenges in the future. The diagnosis still relies mainly on indirect methods like blood sugar measurements. A non-invasive diagnostic imaging modality would allow direct evaluation of β-cell mass and would be a huge step towards personalized medicine. Hyperinsulinism is another serious condition caused by β-cells that excessively secrete insulin, like for instance β-cell hyperplasia and insulinomas. Treatment options with drugs are normally not curative, whereas curative procedures usually consist of the resection of affected regions for which, however, an exact localization of the foci is necessary. In this review, we describe potential tracers under development for targeting β-cells with focus on radiotracers for PET and SPECT imaging, which allow the non-invasive visualization of β-cells. We discuss either the advantages or limitations for the various tracers and modalities. This article concludes with an outlook on future developments and discuss the potential of new imaging probes including dual probes that utilize functionalities for both a radioactive and optical moiety as well as for theranostic applications. (orig.)

  18. Non-invasive optical detection of HBV based on serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zuci; Wang, Qiwen; Weng, Cuncheng; Lin, Xueliang; Lin, Yao; Feng, Shangyuan

    2016-10-01

    An optical method of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for non-invasive detection of hepatitis B surface virus (HBV). Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an established serological marker that is routinely used for the diagnosis of acute or chronic hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection. Utilizing SERS to analyze blood serum for detecting HBV has not been reported in previous literature. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of serum samples: one group for 50 HBV patients and the other group for 50 healthy volunteers. Blood serum samples are collected from healthy control subjects and patients diagnosed with HBV. Furthermore, principal components analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were employed to differentiate HBV patients from healthy volunteer and achieved sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 74.0%. This exploratory work demonstrates that SERS serum analysis combined with PCA-LDA has tremendous potential for the non-invasive detection of HBV.

  19. Evaluation of optical coherence tomography as a non-invasive diagnostic tool in cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, Monika; Strese, Helene; Alawi, Seyed Arash; Meinke, Martina C; Fluhr, Joachim W; Burbach, Guido J; Krah, Martin; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The monitoring of wound-healing processes is indispensable for the therapeutic effectiveness and improved care of chronic wounds. Histological sections provide the best morphological assessment of wound recovery, but cause further tissue destruction and increase the risk of infection. Therefore, it is reasonable to apply a diagnostic tool that allows a non-invasive and reliable observation of morphological changes in wound healing. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique for in vivo evaluation of skin diseases with a resolution close to histopathology. The aim of this study was to investigate whether OCT is suited to display the phases of wound healing. For this purpose, six patients with chronic wounds were objectively characterized by OCT during a period of 2 weeks. Comparable results between histological findings and OCT were achieved. OCT allowed the detection of partial loss of the epidermis, vasoconstriction, vasodilatation and epithelialization. Consequently, OCT could be a potential non-invasive diagnostic tool for the characterization and monitoring of cutaneous wound-healing processes over time. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Non-invasive aerosol delivery and transport of gold nanoparticles to the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raliya, Ramesh; Saha, Debajit; Chadha, Tandeep S.; Raman, Baranidharan; Biswas, Pratim

    2017-01-01

    Targeted delivery of nanoscale carriers containing packaged payloads to the central nervous system has potential use in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Moreover, understanding of the bio-interactions of the engineered nanoparticles used for tissue-specific delivery by non-invasive delivery approaches are also of paramount interest. Here, we have examined this issue systematically in a relatively simple invertebrate model using insects. We synthesized 5 nm, positively charged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and targeted their delivery using the electrospray aerosol generator. Our results revealed that after the exposure of synthesized aerosol to the insect antenna, AuNPs reached the brain within an hour. Nanoparticle accumulation in the brain increased linearly with the exposure time. Notably, electrophysiological recordings from neurons in the insect brain several hours after exposure did not show any significant alterations in their spontaneous and odor-evoked spiking properties. Taken together, our findings reveal that aerosolized delivery of nanoparticles can be an effective non-invasive approach for delivering nanoparticles to the brain, and also presents an approach to monitor the short-term nano-biointeractions. PMID:28300204

  1. Research on the multiple linear regression in non-invasive blood glucose measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianming; Chen, Zhencheng

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive blood glucose measurement sensor and the data process algorithm based on the metabolic energy conservation (MEC) method are presented in this paper. The physiological parameters of human fingertip can be measured by various sensing modalities, and blood glucose value can be evaluated with the physiological parameters by the multiple linear regression analysis. Five methods such as enter, remove, forward, backward and stepwise in multiple linear regression were compared, and the backward method had the best performance. The best correlation coefficient was 0.876 with the standard error of the estimate 0.534, and the significance was 0.012 (sig. regression equation was valid. The Clarke error grid analysis was performed to compare the MEC method with the hexokinase method, using 200 data points. The correlation coefficient R was 0.867 and all of the points were located in Zone A and Zone B, which shows the MEC method provides a feasible and valid way for non-invasive blood glucose measurement.

  2. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of calcium signaling in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Rogers

    Full Text Available Rapid and transient elevations of Ca(2+ within cellular microdomains play a critical role in the regulation of many signal transduction pathways. Described here is a genetic approach for non-invasive detection of localized Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+] rises in live animals using bioluminescence imaging (BLI. Transgenic mice conditionally expressing the Ca(2+-sensitive bioluminescent reporter GFP-aequorin targeted to the mitochondrial matrix were studied in several experimental paradigms. Rapid [Ca(2+] rises inside the mitochondrial matrix could be readily detected during single-twitch muscle contractions. Whole body patterns of [Ca(2+] were monitored in freely moving mice and during epileptic seizures. Furthermore, variations in mitochondrial [Ca(2+] correlated to behavioral components of the sleep/wake cycle were observed during prolonged whole body recordings of newborn mice. This non-invasive imaging technique opens new avenues for the analysis of Ca(2+ signaling whenever whole body information in freely moving animals is desired, in particular during behavioral and developmental studies.

  3. Non-invasive screening of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in children using a dipstick immunocapture assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodinová, M; Trefilová, E; Honzík, T; Tesařová, M; Zeman, J; Hansíková, H

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) deficiency is among the most common childhood mitochondrial disorders. The diagnosis of this deficiency is complex, and muscle biopsy is used as the gold standard of diagnosis. Our aim was to minimize the patient burden and to test the use of a dipstick immunocapture assay (DIA) to determine the amount of CIV in non-invasively obtained buccal epithelial cells. Buccal smears were obtained from five children with Leigh syndrome including three children exhibiting a previously confirmed CIV deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts and two children who were clinical suspects for CIV deficiency; the smear samples were analysed using CI and CIV human protein quantity dipstick assay kits. Samples from five children of similar age and five adults were used as controls. Analysis of the controls demonstrated that only samples of buccal cells that were frozen for a maximum of 4 h after collection provide accurate results. All three patients with confirmed CIV deficiency due to mutations in the SURF1 gene exhibited significantly lower amounts of CIV than the similarly aged controls; significantly lower amounts were also observed in two new patients, for whom later molecular analysis also confirmed pathologic mutations in the SURF1 gene. We conclude that DIA is a simple, fast and sensitive method for the determination of CIV in buccal cells and is suitable for the screening of CIV deficiency in non-invasively obtained material from children who are suspected of having mitochondrial disease.

  4. Reactivity of dogs' brain oscillations to visual stimuli measured with non-invasive electroencephalography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miiamaaria V Kujala

    Full Text Available Studying cognition of domestic dogs has gone through a renaissance within the last decades. However, although the behavioral studies of dogs are beginning to be common in the field of animal cognition, the neural events underlying cognition remain unknown. Here, we employed a non-invasive electroencephalography, with adhesive electrodes attached to the top of the skin, to measure brain activity of from 8 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris while they stayed still to observe photos of dog and human faces. Spontaneous oscillatory activity of the dogs, peaking in the sensors over the parieto-occipital cortex, was suppressed statistically significantly during visual task compared with resting activity at the frequency of 15-30 Hz. Moreover, a stimulus-induced low-frequency (~2-6 Hz suppression locked to the stimulus onset was evident at the frontal sensors, possibly reflecting a motor rhythm guiding the exploratory eye movements. The results suggest task-related reactivity of the macroscopic oscillatory activity in the dog brain. To our knowledge, the study is the first to reveal non-invasively measured reactivity of brain electrophysiological oscillations in healthy dogs, and it has been based purely on positive operant conditional training, without the need for movement restriction or medication.

  5. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry.

  6. Trojan Horse Strategy for Non-invasive Interference of Clock Gene in the Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Laura; Perrigault, Mickael; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Marcel, Anjara; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Tran, Damien

    2017-08-01

    RNA interference is a powerful method to inhibit specific gene expression. Recently, silencing target genes by feeding has been successfully carried out in nematodes, insects, and small aquatic organisms. A non-invasive feeding-based RNA interference is reported here for the first time in a mollusk bivalve, the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In this Trojan horse strategy, the unicellular alga Heterocapsa triquetra is the food supply used as a vector to feed oysters with Escherichia coli strain HT115 engineered to express the double-stranded RNA targeting gene. To test the efficacy of the method, the Clock gene, a central gene of the circadian clock, was targeted for knockout. Results demonstrated specific and systemic efficiency of the Trojan horse strategy in reducing Clock mRNA abundance. Consequences of Clock disruption were observed in Clock-related genes (Bmal, Tim1, Per, Cry1, Cry2, Rev.-erb, and Ror) and triploid oysters were more sensitive than diploid to the interference. This non-invasive approach shows an involvement of the circadian clock in oyster bioaccumulation of toxins produced by the harmful alga Alexandrium minutum.

  7. Optical coherence tomography: a non-invasive technique applied to conservation of paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Haida; Gomez Cid, Marta; Cucu, Radu; Dobre, George; Kudimov, Boris; Pedro, Justin; Saunders, David; Cupitt, John; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2005-06-01

    It is current practice to take tiny samples from a painting to mount and examine in cross-section under a microscope. However, since conservation practice and ethics limit sampling to a minimum and to areas along cracks and edges of paintings, which are often unrepresentative of the whole painting, results from such analyses cannot be taken as representative of a painting as a whole. Recently in a preliminary study, we have demonstrated that near-infrared Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be used directly on paintings to examine the cross-section of paint and varnish layers without contact and the need to take samples. OCT is an optical interferometric technique developed for in vivo imaging of the eye and biological tissues; it is essentially a scanning Michelson's interferometer with a "broad-band" source that has the spatial coherence of a laser. The low temporal coherence and high spatial concentration of the source are the keys to high depth resolution and high sensitivity 3D imaging. The technique is non-invasive and non-contact with a typical working distance of 2 cm. This non-invasive technique enables cross-sections to be examined anywhere on a painting. In this paper, we will report new results on applying near-infrared en-face OCT to paintings conservation and extend the application to the examination of underdrawings, drying processes, and quantitative measurements of optical properties of paint and varnish layers.

  8. Diagnostic and prognostic utility of non-invasive imaging indiabetes management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging technologies are acquiring an increasingrelevance to assist clinicians in diagnosis and to guidemanagement and therapeutic treatment of patients,thanks to their non invasive and high resolution properties.Computed tomography, magnetic resonanceimaging, and ultrasonography are the most usedimaging modalities to provide detailed morphologicalreconstructions of tissues and organs. In addition, theuse of contrast dyes or radionuclide-labeled tracerspermits to get functional and quantitative informationabout tissue physiology and metabolism in normal anddisease state. In recent years, the development ofmultimodal and hydrid imaging techniques is comingto be the new frontier of medical imaging for thepossibility to overcome limitations of single modalitiesand to obtain physiological and pathophysiologicalmeasurements within an accurate anatomical framework.Moreover, the employment of molecular probes,such as ligands or antibodies, allows a selective in vivotargeting of biomolecules involved in specific cellularprocesses, so expanding the potentialities of imagingtechniques for clinical and research applications. Thisreview is aimed to give a survey of characteristicsof main diagnostic non-invasive imaging techniques.Current clinical appliances and future perspectives ofimaging in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment ofdiabetic complications affecting different organ systemswill be particularly addressed.

  9. Fur: A non-invasive approach to monitor metal exposure in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernout, Béatrice V; McClean, Colin J; Arnold, Kathryn E; Walls, Michael; Baxter, Malcolm; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel assessment of the use of fur as a non-invasive proxy to biomonitor metal contamination in insectivorous bats. Concentrations of metals (cadmium, copper, lead and zinc) were measured using ICP-MS in tissues (kidneys, liver, stomach and stomach content, bones and fur) obtained from 193 Pipistrellus pipistrellus/pygmaeus bats. The bats were collected across a gradient of metal pollution in England and Wales. The utility of small samples of fur as an indicator of metal exposure from the environment was demonstrated with strong relationships obtained between the concentrations of non-essential metals in fur with concentrations in stomach content, kidneys, liver and bones. Stronger relationships were observed for non-essential metals than for essential metals. Fur analyses might therefore be a useful non-invasive proxy for understanding recent, as well as long term and chronic, metal exposure of live animals. The use of fur may provide valuable information on the level of endogenous metal exposure and contamination of bat populations and communities.

  10. Modelling, verification, and calibration of a photoacoustics based continuous non-invasive blood glucose monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Praful P; Sanki, Pradyut K; Sarangi, Satyabrata; Banerjee, Swapna

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the use of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) at an excitation wavelength of 905 nm for making continuous non-invasive blood glucose measurements. The theoretical background of the measurement technique is verified through simulation. An apparatus is fabricated for performing photoacoustic measurements in vitro on glucose solutions and in vivo on human subjects. The amplitude of the photoacoustic signals measured from glucose solutions is observed to increase with the solution concentration, while photoacoustic amplitude obtained from in vivo measurements follows the blood glucose concentration of the subjects, indicating a direct proportionality between the two quantities. A linear calibration method is applied separately on measurements obtained from each individual in order to estimate the blood glucose concentration. The estimated glucose values are compared to reference glucose concentrations measured using a standard glucose meter. A plot of 196 measurement pairs taken over 30 normal subjects on a Clarke error grid gives a point distribution of 82.65% and 17.35% over zones A and B of the grid with a mean absolute relative deviation (MARD) of 11.78% and a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 15.27 mg/dl (0.85 mmol/l). The results obtained are better than or comparable to those obtained using photoacoustic spectroscopy based methods or other non-invasive measurement techniques available. The accuracy levels obtained are also comparable to commercially available continuous glucose monitoring systems.

  11. Non-invasive structural and biomechanical imaging of the developing embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jitao; Wu, Chen; Raghunathan, Raksha; Larin, Kirill V.; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2017-02-01

    Embryos undergo dramatic changes in size, shape, and mechanical properties during development, which is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors. Quantifying mechanical properties of different embryonic tissues may represent good metrics for the embryonic health and proper development. Alternations and structure coupled with biomechanical information may provide a way for early diagnosis and drug treatment of various congenital diseases. Many methods have been developed to determine the mechanical properties of the embryo, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), ultrasound elastography (UE), and optical coherent elastography (OCE). However, AFM is invasive and time-consuming. While UE and OCE are both non-invasive methods, the spatial resolutions are limited to mm to sub-mm, which is not enough to observe the details inside the embryo. Brillouin microscopy can potentially enable non-invasive measurement of the mechanical properties of a sample by measuring the spectra of acoustically induced light scattering therein. It has fast speed ( 0.1 second per point) and high resolution (sub-micron), and thus has been widely investigated for biomedical application, such as single cell and tissue. In this work, we utilized this technique to characterize the mechanical property of an embryo. A 2D elasticity imaging of the whole body of an E8 embryo was acquired by a Brillouin microscopy, and the stiffness changes between different organs (such as brain, heart, and spine) were shown. The elasticity maps were correlated with structural information provided by OCT.

  12. Non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Gary J W; Gronowski, Ann M; Zhao, Zhen

    2014-01-20

    The identification of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in maternal circulation has made non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) possible. Maternal plasma cell free DNA is a mixture of maternal and fetal DNA, of which, fetal DNA represents a minor population in maternal plasma. Therefore, methods with high sensitivity and precision are required to detect and differentiate fetal DNA from the large background of maternal DNA. In recent years, technical advances in the molecular analysis of fetal DNA (e.g., digital PCR and massively parallel sequencing (MPS)) has enabled the successful implementation of noninvasive testing into clinical practice, such as fetal sex assessment, RhD genotyping, and fetal chromosomal aneuploidy detection.With the ability to decipher the entire fetal genome from maternal plasma DNA, we foresee that an increased number of non-invasive prenatal tests will be available for detecting many single-gene disorders in the near future. This review briefly summarizes the technical aspects of the NIPT and application of NIPT in clinical practice.

  13. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  14. A non-invasive study of alopecia in Japanese macaques Macaca fuscata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    This article provides information on the phenomenon of alopecia in Japanese macaques, Macaca fuscata, in various environments and proposes a 3-step scoring system for a quantitative assessment of hair loss. Results suggest that alopecia is commonly observed in Japanese macaques, with 20.5% of individuals showing head alopecia and 4.7% showing back alopecia across eight study groups. Alopecia was more commonly observed in adult females (30.8% individuals showing head alopecia and 15.3% showing back alopecia) than in other age-sex classes. Seasonal variation of back alopecia was noted, in particular, individuals with patchy back hair were more frequently observed in winter than in summer. Seasonal variation was not observed in head hair. The distribution of alopecia was also different among study groups. The wild population generally had better hair condition than provisioned populations and captive populations. The present study used a non-invasive alopecia scoring system which can be a useful, rapid and non-invasive tool to monitor animal health and well-being at a population level.

  15. Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Non-Invasive Diabetes Sensing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Makaram

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Blood glucose monitoring is considered the gold standard for diabetes diagnostics and self-monitoring. However, the underlying process is invasive and highly uncomfortable for patients. Furthermore, the process must be completed several times a day to successfully manage the disease, which greatly contributes to the massive need for non-invasive monitoring options. Human serums, such as saliva, sweat, breath, urine and tears, contain traces of glucose and are easily accessible. Therefore, they allow minimal to non-invasive glucose monitoring, making them attractive alternatives to blood measurements. Numerous developments regarding noninvasive glucose detection techniques have taken place over the years, but recently, they have gained recognition as viable alternatives, due to the advent of nanotechnology-based sensors. Such sensors are optimal for testing the amount of glucose in serums other than blood thanks to their enhanced sensitivity and selectivity ranges, in addition to their size and compatibility with electronic circuitry. These nanotechnology approaches are rapidly evolving, and new techniques are constantly emerging. Hence, this manuscript aims to review current and future nanomaterial-based technologies utilizing saliva, sweat, breath and tears as a diagnostic medium for diabetes monitoring.

  16. Robust, non-invasive methods for metering groundwater well extraction in remote environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulovic, Nevenka; Keir, Greg; McIntyre, Neil

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying the rate of extraction from groundwater wells can be essential for regional scale groundwater management and impact assessment. This is especially the case in regions heavily dependent on groundwater such as the semi-arid Surat and Bowen Basins in Queensland, Australia. Of the 30 000+ groundwater wells in this area, the majority of which are used for stock watering and domestic purposes, almost none have flow metering devices installed. As part of a research project to estimate regional groundwater extraction, we have undertaken a small scale flow metering program on a selected set of wells. Conventional in-line flow meters were unsuitable for our project, as both non-invasiveness and adaptability / suitability to a variety of discharge pipe characteristics was critical. We describe the use of two metering technologies not widely used in groundwater applications, non-invasive, clamp-on ultrasonic transit time flow meters and tipping bucket flow meters, as semi-permanent installations on discharge pipes of various artesian and sub-artesian groundwater wells. We present examples of detailed extraction rate time-series, which are of particular value in developing predictive models of water well extraction in data limited areas where water use dynamics and drivers are poorly understood. We conclude by discussing future project trajectories, which include expansion of the monitoring network through development of novel metering techniques and telemetry across large areas of poor connectivity.

  17. Non-invasive tissue temperature measurements based on quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, S H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Cerussi, A E; Tromberg, B J [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine 92612, CA (United States); Merritt, S I [Masimo Corporation, 40 Parker, Irvine, CA 92618 (United States); Ruth, J, E-mail: bjtrombe@uci.ed [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 210 S. 33rd Street, Room 240, Skirkanich Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-07-07

    We describe the development of a non-invasive method for quantitative tissue temperature measurements using Broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). Our approach is based on well-characterized opposing shifts in near-infrared (NIR) water absorption spectra that appear with temperature and macromolecular binding state. Unlike conventional reflectance methods, DOS is used to generate scattering-corrected tissue water absorption spectra. This allows us to separate the macromolecular bound water contribution from the thermally induced spectral shift using the temperature isosbestic point at 996 nm. The method was validated in intralipid tissue phantoms by correlating DOS with thermistor measurements (R = 0.96) with a difference of 1.1 {+-} 0.91 {sup 0}C over a range of 28-48 {sup 0}C. Once validated, thermal and hemodynamic (i.e. oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration) changes were measured simultaneously and continuously in human subjects (forearm) during mild cold stress. DOS-measured arm temperatures were consistent with previously reported invasive deep tissue temperature studies. These results suggest that DOS can be used for non-invasive, co-registered measurements of absolute temperature and hemoglobin parameters in thick tissues, a potentially important approach for optimizing thermal diagnostics and therapeutics.

  18. Non-Invasive Detection of Anaemia Using Digital Photographs of the Conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Shaun; Thompson, Oliver; Hirst, Evan; Goossens, Louise; George, Anup; Weinkove, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Anaemia is a major health burden worldwide. Although the finding of conjunctival pallor on clinical examination is associated with anaemia, inter-observer variability is high, and definitive diagnosis of anaemia requires a blood sample. We aimed to detect anaemia by quantifying conjunctival pallor using digital photographs taken with a consumer camera and a popular smartphone. Our goal was to develop a non-invasive screening test for anaemia. The conjunctivae of haemato-oncology in- and outpatients were photographed in ambient lighting using a digital camera (Panasonic DMC-LX5), and the internal rear-facing camera of a smartphone (Apple iPhone 5S) alongside an in-frame calibration card. Following image calibration, conjunctival erythema index (EI) was calculated and correlated with laboratory-measured haemoglobin concentration. Three clinicians independently evaluated each image for conjunctival pallor. Conjunctival EI was reproducible between images (average coefficient of variation 2.96%). EI of the palpebral conjunctiva correlated more strongly with haemoglobin concentration than that of the forniceal conjunctiva. Using the compact camera, palpebral conjunctival EI had a sensitivity of 93% and 57% and specificity of 78% and 83% for detection of anaemia (haemoglobin anaemia. Erythema index of the palpebral conjunctiva calculated from images taken with a compact camera or mobile phone correlates with haemoglobin and compares favourably to clinician assessment for prediction of anaemia. If confirmed in further series, this technique may be useful for the non-invasive screening for anaemia.

  19. The non-invasive documentation of coronary microcirculation impairment: role of transthoracic echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galderisi Maurizio

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transthoracic Doppler echocardiographic-derived coronary flow reserve is an useful hemodynamic index to assess dysfunction of coronary microcirculation. Isolated coronary microvascular abnormalities are overt by reduced coronary flow reserve despite normal epicardial coronary arteries. These abnormalities may occur in several diseases (arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, syndrome X, aortic valve disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The prognostic role of impaired microvascular coronary flow reserve has been shown unfavourable especially in hypertrophic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathies. Coronary flow reserve reduction may be reversible, for instance after regression of left ventricular hypertrophy subsequent to valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis, after anti-hypertensive treatment or using cholesterol lowering drugs. Coronary flow reserve may increase by 30% or more after pharmacological therapy and achieve normal level >3.0. In contrast to other non invasive tools as positron emission tomography, very expensive and associated with radiation exposure, transthoracic Doppler-derived coronary flow reserve is equally non invasive but cheaper, very accessible and prone to a reliable exploration of coronary microvascular territories, otherwise not detectable by invasive coronary angiography, able to visualize only large epicardial arteries.

  20. High-precision, non-invasive anti-microvascular approach via concurrent ultrasound and laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zizhong; Zhang, Haonan; Mordovanakis, Aghapi; Paulus, Yannis M.; Liu, Qinghuai; Wang, Xueding; Yang, Xinmai

    2017-01-01

    Antivascular therapy represents a proven strategy to treat angiogenesis. By applying synchronized ultrasound bursts and nanosecond laser irradiation, we developed a novel, selective, non-invasive, localized antivascular method, termed photo-mediated ultrasound therapy (PUT). PUT takes advantage of the high native optical contrast among biological tissues and can treat microvessels without causing collateral damage to the surrounding tissue. In a chicken yolk sac membrane model, under the same ultrasound parameters (1 MHz at 0.45 MPa and 10 Hz with 10% duty cycle), PUT with 4 mJ/cm2 and 6 mJ/cm2 laser fluence induced 51% (p = 0.001) and 37% (p = 0.018) vessel diameter reductions respectively. With 8 mJ/cm2 laser fluence, PUT would yield vessel disruption (90%, p cavitation may play a role in PUT. In conclusion, PUT holds significant promise as a novel non-invasive antivascular method with the capability to precisely target blood vessels.

  1. Updated scar management practical guidelines: non-invasive and invasive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstrey, Stan; Middelkoop, Esther; Vranckx, Jan Jeroen; Bassetto, Franco; Ziegler, Ulrich E; Meaume, Sylvie; Téot, Luc

    2014-08-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids can be aesthetically displeasing and lead to severe psychosocial impairment. Many invasive and non-invasive options are available for the plastic (and any other) surgeon both to prevent and to treat abnormal scar formation. Recently, an updated set of practical evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids was developed by an international group of 24 experts from a wide range of specialities. An initial set of strategies to minimize the risk of scar formation is applicable to all types of scars and is indicated before, during and immediately after surgery. In addition to optimal surgical management, this includes measures to reduce skin tension, and to provide taping, hydration and ultraviolet (UV) protection of the early scar tissue. Silicone sheeting or gel is universally considered as the first-line prophylactic and treatment option for hypertrophic scars and keloids. The efficacy and safety of this gold-standard, non-invasive therapy has been demonstrated in many clinical studies. Other (more specialized) scar treatment options are available for high-risk patients and/or scars. Pressure garments may be indicated for more widespread scarring, especially after burns. At a later stage, more invasive or surgical procedures may be necessary for the correction of permanent unaesthetic scars and can be combined with adjuvant measures to achieve optimal outcomes. The choice of scar management measures for a particular patient should be based on the newly updated evidence-based recommendations taking individual patient and wound characteristics into consideration.

  2. Breath Analysis as a Potential and Non-Invasive Frontier in Disease Diagnosis: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a small number of diseases, particularly cardiovascular (CVDs, oncologic (ODs, neurodegenerative (NDDs, chronic respiratory diseases, as well as diabetes, form a severe burden to most of the countries worldwide. Hence, there is an urgent need for development of efficient diagnostic tools, particularly those enabling reliable detection of diseases, at their early stages, preferably using non-invasive approaches. Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach relying only on the characterisation of volatile composition of the exhaled breath (EB that in turn reflects the volatile composition of the bloodstream and airways and therefore the status and condition of the whole organism metabolism. Advanced sampling procedures (solid-phase and needle traps microextraction coupled with modern analytical technologies (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, e-noses, etc. allow the characterisation of EB composition to an unprecedented level. However, a key challenge in EB analysis is the proper statistical analysis and interpretation of the large and heterogeneous datasets obtained from EB research. There is no standard statistical framework/protocol yet available in literature that can be used for EB data analysis towards discovery of biomarkers for use in a typical clinical setup. Nevertheless, EB analysis has immense potential towards development of biomarkers for the early disease diagnosis of diseases.

  3. [What non invasive haemodynamic assessment in paediatric intensive care unit in 2009?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, O; Guichoux, J; Villega, F; Orliaguet, G

    2010-03-01

    The haemodynamic assessment of the patients is a daily activity in paediatric intensive care unit. It completes and is guided by the clinical examination. The will to develop the least invasive possible coverage of the patients is a constant concern. The haemodynamic monitoring, all the more if it is invasive, ceaselessly has to put in balance the profit and the risk of beginning this technique at a fragile patient. In the last three decades, numerous non-invasive haemodynamic tools were developed. The ideal one must be reliable, reproducible, with a time of fast, easily useful answer, with a total harmlessness, cheap and allowing a monitoring continues. Among all the existing tools (oesophageal Doppler ultrasound method, transthoracic echocardiography, NICO, thoracic impedancemetry, plethysmography, sublingual capnography), no one allies all these qualities. We can consider that the transthoracic echocardiography gets closer to most of these objectives. We shall blame it for its cost and for the fact that it is an intermittent monitoring but both in the diagnosis and in the survey, it has no equal among the non-invasive tools of haemodynamic assessment from part the quality and the quantity of the obtained information. The learning of the basic functions (contractility evaluation, cardiac output, cardiac and the vascular filling) useful for the start of a treatment is relatively well-to-do. We shall miss the absence of training in this tool in France in its paediatric and neonatal specificity within the university or interuniversity framework.

  4. Differences in cap formation between invasive Entamoeba histolytica and non-invasive Entamoeba dispar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Castañón, Guadalupe; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2012-07-01

    The rapid redistribution of surface antigen-antibody complexes in trophozoites of the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, in a process known as capping, has been considered as a means of the parasite to evade the host immune response. So far, capping has been documented in the invasive E. histolytica, whereas the mobility of surface components in the non-invasive Entamoeba dispar is not known. E. dispar does not induce liver lesions in rodent experimental models, in contrast to the liver abscesses produced by E. histolytica in the same animal model. We have therefore analyzed the mobility of surface receptors to the lectin concanavalin A and of Rab11, a membrane-associated protein, in both species of Entamoebae by confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The great majority of E. histolytica trophozoites became morphologically polarized through the formation of well-defined caps at the posterior pole of the parasite. Actin colocalized with the lectin caps. Antibodies against the membrane protein Rab 11 also produced capping. In striking contrast, in E. dispar, the mobility of concanavalin A surface receptors was restricted to the formation of irregular surface patches that did no progress to constitute well-defined caps. Also, anti-Rab 11 antibodies did not result in capping in E. dispar. Whether the failure of E. dispar to efficiently mobilize surface molecules in response to lectin or antibodies as shown in the present results is related to its non-invasive character represents an interesting hypothesis requiring further analysis.

  5. A Non-invasive Prenatal Diagnosis Method: Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Dundar Yenilmez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal diagnosis for genetic diseases nowadays is still carried out by invasive procedures such as chorionic villus sampling, amniocentesis or cordocentesis. These techniques, however, accompanied with risk of fetal losses. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis tests based on the analysis of fetal DNA in maternal plasma have potential to be a safer alternative to invasive methods. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis has been a long-standing research theme in prenatal medicine. The discovery of cell-free fetal nucleic acids in maternal plasma in 1997 has opened new possibilities for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. The measurement and detection of fetal DNA in maternal plasma and serum has led to clinical applications for the identification of fetal aneuploidies, pre-eclamptic pregnancies, noninvasive diagnosis of fetal Rhesus D genotype and some single gene disorders. The detection of fetal DNA sequences is a reality and could reduce the risk of invasive techniques for certain fetal disorders in the near future. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 317-334

  6. Non-invasive, serum DNA pregnancy testing leading to incidental discovery of cancer: a good thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Vinay

    2015-11-01

    Cell-free DNA for perinatal screening is a growing industry. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is based on the premise that foetal DNA is able to cross the placental barrier and enter the mother's circulation, where it can be examined for chromosomal abnormalities, such as trisomy 13, 18 or 21. Such tests are expected to be widely used by pregnant women, with the annual market expected to surpass $1 billion. Recently, a number of case reports have emerged in the haematology-oncology literature. The routine use of NIPT has led to the discovery of maternal neoplasms. Most writers have concluded that this is yet another benefit of the test; however, a closer examination of the cases reveals that this incidental detection may not improve patient outcomes. In some cases, early detection provides lead time bias, but does not change the ultimate clinical outcome, and in other cases, detection constitutes earlier knowledge of a cancer whose natural history cannot be altered. Here, we explore in detail cases where cancer was incidentally discovered among women undergoing routine non-invasive pregnancy testing, and investigate whether or not these women were benefitted by the discovery.

  7. Non-Invasive Glucose Measurement by Use of Metabolic Heat Conformation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao; Wang, Dongsheng; Li, Junfeng

    2008-05-21

    A non-invasive glucose measurement system based on the method of metabolic heat conformation (MHC) is presented in this paper. This system consists of three temperature sensors, two humidity sensors, an infrared sensor and an optical measurement device. The glucose level can be deduced from the quantity of heat dissipation, blood flow rate of local tissue and degree of blood oxygen saturation. The methodology of the data process and the measurement error are also analyzed. The system is applied in a primary clinical test. Compared with the results of a commercial automated chemistry analyzer, the correlation coefficient of the collected data from the system is 0.856. Result shows that the correlation coefficient improves when the factor of heat dissipated by evaporation of the skin is added in. A non-invasive method of measuring the blood flow rate of local tissue by heat transmission between skin and contacted conductor is also introduced. Theoretical derivation and numerical simulation are completed as well. The so-called normalized difference mean (NDM) is chosen to express the quantity of the blood flow rate. The correlation coefficient between the blood flow rates by this method and the results of a Doppler blood flow meter is equal to 0.914.

  8. Goal-directed fluid optimization based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopy lobectomy operations: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This pilot study was designed to utilize stroke volume variation and cardiac index to ensure fluid optimization during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomies. METHODS: Eighty patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomy were randomized into either a goal-directed therapy group or a control group. In the goal-directed therapy group, the stroke volume variation was controlled at 10%±1%, and the cardiac index was controlled at a minimum of 2.5 L.min-1.m-2. In the control group, the MAP was maintained at between 65 mm Hg and 90 mm Hg, heart rate was maintained at between 60 BPM and 100 BPM, and urinary output was greater than 0.5 mL/kg-1/h-1. The hemodynamic variables, arterial blood gas analyses, total administered fluid volume and side effects were recorded. RESULTS: The PaO2/FiO2-ratio before the end of one-lung ventilation in the goal-directed therapy group was significantly higher than that of the control group, but there were no differences between the goal-directed therapy group and the control group for the PaO2/FiO2-ratio or other arterial blood gas analysis indices prior to anesthesia. The extubation time was significantly earlier in the goal-directed therapy group, but there was no difference in the length of hospital stay. Patients in the control group had greater urine volumes, and they were given greater colloid and overall fluid volumes. Nausea and vomiting were significantly reduced in the goal-directed therapy group. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrated that an optimization protocol, based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index obtained with a FloTrac/Vigileo device, increased the PaO2/FiO2-ratio and reduced the overall fluid volume, intubation time and postoperative complications (nausea and vomiting in thoracic surgery patients requiring one-lung ventilation.

  9. A feasible method for non-invasive measurement of pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Combined use of transthoracic Doppler-echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance. Non-invasive estimation of pulmonary vascular resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chaowu; Xu, Zhongying; Jin, Jinglin; Lv, Jianhua; Liu, Qiong; Zhu, Zhenhui; Pang, Kunjing; Shi, Yisheng; Fang, Wei; Wang, Yang

    2015-12-07

    Transthoracic Doppler-echocardiography (TTE) can estimate mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) reliably, and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is the best modality for non-invasive measurement of cardiac output (CO). We speculated that the combined use of TTE and CMR could provide a feasible method for non-invasive measurement of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Right heart catheterization (RHC) was undertaken in 77 patients (17M/60F) with PAH, and simultaneous TTE was carried out to evaluate MPAP, PCWP and CO. Within 2 days, CO was measured again with CMR in similar physiological status. Then, PVR was calculated with the integrated non-invasive method: TTE-derived (MPAP-PCWP)/CMR-derived CO and the isolated TTE method: TTE-derived (MPAP-PCWP)/TTE-derived CO, respectively. The PVR calculated with integrated non-invasive method correlated well with RHC-calculated PVR (r = 0.931, 95% confidence interval 0.893 to 0.956). Between the integrated non-invasive PVR and RHC-calculated PVR, the Bland-Altman analysis showed the satisfactory limits of agreement (mean value: - 0.89 ± 2.59). In comparison, the limits of agreement were less satisfactory between TTE-calculated PVR and RHC-calculated PVR (mean value: - 1.80 ± 3.33). Furthermore, there were excellent intra- and inter-observer correlations for the measurements of TTE and CMR (P measurement of PVR is very important in clinical practice. Up to now, however, the widely accepted non-invasive method is still unavailable. Since TTE can estimate (MPAP-PCWP) reliably and CMR is the best image modality for the measurement of CO, the combined use of two modalities has the potential to determine PVR non-invasively. In this research, the integrated non-invasive method showed good diagnostic accuracy and repeatability compared with RHC. Therefore, it might be a feasible method for non-invasive measurement of PVR in patients

  10. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT: a dual-tracer and dual-scanner validation in patients with heart valve disease

    OpenAIRE

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Kero, Tanja; Örndahl, Lovisa Holm; Kim, Won Yong; Bjerner, Tomas; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Wiggers, Henrik; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Sörensen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated method for extracting forward stroke volume (FSV) using indicator dilution theory directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies for two different tracers and scanners. METHODS: 35 subjects underwent a dynamic (11)C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic (15)O-water PET and (11)C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET...

  11. Structured telephone support or non-invasive telemonitoring for patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Sally C; Clark, Robyn A; Dierckx, Riet; Prieto-Merino, David; Cleland, John G F

    2015-10-31

    Specialised disease management programmes for heart failure aim to improve care, clinical outcomes and/or reduce healthcare utilisation. Since the last version of this review in 2010, several new trials of structured telephone support and non-invasive home telemonitoring have been published which have raised questions about their effectiveness. To review randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of structured telephone support or non-invasive home telemonitoring compared to standard practice for people with heart failure, in order to quantify the effects of these interventions over and above usual care. We updated the searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology AsseFssment Database (HTA) on the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO), Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S) on Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), AMED, Proquest Theses and Dissertations, IEEE Xplore and TROVE in January 2015. We handsearched bibliographies of relevant studies and systematic reviews and abstract conference proceedings. We applied no language limits. We included only peer-reviewed, published RCTs comparing structured telephone support or non-invasive home telemonitoring to usual care of people with chronic heart failure. The intervention or usual care could not include protocol-driven home visits or more intensive than usual (typically four to six weeks) clinic follow-up. We present data as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcomes included all-cause mortality, all-cause and heart failure-related hospitalisations, which we analysed using a fixed-effect model. Other outcomes included length of stay, health-related quality of life, heart failure knowledge and self care, acceptability and cost; we described and tabulated these. We performed meta-regression to assess homogeneity (the

  12. Enhancing motor performance improvement by personalizing non-invasive cortical stimulation with concurrent functional near-infrared spectroscopy and multi-modal motor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Bilal; Hodics, Timea; Hervey, Nathan; Kondraske, George; Stowe, Ann; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive cortical stimulation technique that can facilitate task specific plasticity that can improve motor performance. Current tDCS interventions uniformly apply a chosen electrode montage to a subject population without personalizing electrode placement for optimal motor gains. We propose a novel perturbation tDCS (ptDCS) paradigm for determining a personalized electrode montage in which tDCS intervention yields maximal motor performance improvements during stimulation. PtDCS was applied to ten healthy adults and five stroke patients with upper hemiparesis as they performed an isometric wrist flexion task with their non-dominant arm. Simultaneous recordings of torque applied to a stationary handle, muscle activity by electromyography (EMG), and cortical activity by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during ptDCS helped interpret how cortical activity perturbations by any given electrode montage related to changes in muscle activity and task performance quantified by a Reaction Time (RT) X Error product. PtDCS enabled quantifying the effect on task performance of 20 different electrode pair montages placed over the sensorimotor cortex. Interestingly, the electrode montage maximizing performance in all healthy adults did not match any of the ones being explored in current literature as a means of improving the motor performance of stroke patients. Furthermore, the optimal montage was found to be different in each stroke patient and the resulting motor gains were very significant during stimulation. This study supports the notion that task-specific ptDCS optimization can lend itself to personalizing the rehabilitation of patients with brain injury.

  13. A holistic multimodal approach to the non-invasive analysis of watercolour paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogou, Sotiria; Lucian, Andrei; Bellesia, Sonia; Burgio, Lucia; Bailey, Kate; Brooks, Charlotte; Liang, Haida

    2015-11-01

    A holistic approach using non-invasive multimodal imaging and spectroscopic techniques to study the materials (pigments, drawing materials and paper) and painting techniques of watercolour paintings is presented. The non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques include VIS-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and multispectral imaging, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The three spectroscopic techniques complement each other in pigment identification. Multispectral imaging (near-infrared bands), OCT and micro-Raman complement each other in the visualisation and identification of the drawing material. OCT probes the micro-structure and light scattering properties of the substrate, while XRF detects the elemental composition that indicates the sizing methods and the filler content. The multiple techniques were applied in a study of forty-six nineteenth-century Chinese export watercolours from the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) and the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) to examine to what extent the non-invasive analysis techniques employed complement each other and how much useful information about the paintings can be extracted to address art conservation and history questions. A micro-destructive technique of micro-fade spectrometry was used to assess the vulnerability of the paintings to light exposure. Most of the paint and paper substrates were found to be more stable than ISO Blue Wool 3. The palette was found to be composed of mostly traditional Chinese pigments. While the synthetic pigment, Prussian blue, made in Europe, was found on some of the paintings, none was found on the RHS paintings accurately recorded as being between 1817 and 1831 even though it is known that Prussian blue was imported to China during this period. The scale insect dyes, lac and cochineal, were detected on nearly every painting including those that fall within the identified date range. Cochineal is known to have

  14. Non-invasive evaluation of physiological stress in an iconic Australian marsupial: the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Edward J; Webster, Koa; Nicolson, Vere; Mucci, Al; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-15

    Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) are the only extant representatives of Australia's unique marsupial family Phascolarctidae and were listed as nationally Vulnerable in 2012. Causes of mortality are diverse, although the disease chlamydiosis, dog attacks, collisions with cars, and loss of habitat represent the principal reasons for the continued species decline. Koala breeding facilities in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia have been established for conservation and tourism. Non-invasive monitoring of physiological stress is important for determining the sub-lethal effects of environmental stressors on the well-being, reproduction and survival of Koalas in Zoos and also in the wild. In this study, we developed a faecal cortisol metabolite (FCM) enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) for monitoring physiological stress in Koalas from two established Zoos in Australia and also within a free-living sub-population from Queensland. Biological validation of the FCM EIA was done using an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge. We discovered excretory lag-times of FCM of 24 h in females (n=2) and 48 h in male (n=2) Koalas in response to the ACTH challenge. FCM levels showed an episodic and delayed peak response lasting up to 9 days post ACTH challenge. This finding should be taken into consideration when designing future experiments to study the impacts of short-term (acute) and chronic stressors on the Koalas. Laboratory validations were done using parallelism and recovery checks (extraction efficiency) of the cortisol standard against pooled Koala faecal extracts. Greater than 99% recovery of the cortisol standard was obtained as well as a parallel displacement curve against Koala faecal extracts. FCM levels of the captive Koalas (n=10 males and 13 females) significantly differed by sex, reproductive condition (lactating versus non-lactating Koalas) and the handling groups. Handled male Koalas had 200% higher FCM levels than their non-handled counterparts, while females

  15. Non-invasive measurements of exhaled NO and CO associated with methacholine responses in mice

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    Ameredes Bill T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO in exhaled breath are considered obtainable biomarkers of physiologic mechanisms. Therefore, obtaining their measures simply, non-invasively, and repeatedly, is of interest, and was the purpose of the current study. Methods Expired NO (ENO and CO (ECO were measured non-invasively using a gas micro-analyzer on several strains of mice (C57Bl6, IL-10-/-, A/J, MKK3-/-, JNK1-/-, NOS-2-/- and NOS-3-/- with and without allergic airway inflammation (AI induced by ovalbumin systemic sensitization and aerosol challenge, compared using independent-sample t-tests between groups, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA within groups over time of inflammation induction. ENO and ECO were also measured in C57Bl6 and IL-10-/- mice, ages 8–58 weeks old, the relationship of which was determined by regression analysis. S-methionyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC, and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP were used to inhibit neuronal/constitutive NOS-1 and heme-oxygenase, respectively, and alter NO and CO production, respectively, as assessed by paired t-tests. Methacholine-associated airway responses (AR were measured by the enhanced pause method, with comparisons by repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc testing. Results ENO was significantly elevated in naïve IL-10-/- (9–14 ppb and NOS-2-/- (16 ppb mice as compared to others (average: 5–8 ppb, whereas ECO was significantly higher in naïve A/J, NOS-3-/- (3–4 ppm, and MKK3-/- (4–5 ppm mice, as compared to others (average: 2.5 ppm. As compared to C57Bl6 mice, AR of IL-10-/-, JNK1-/-, NOS-2-/-, and NOS-3-/- mice were decreased, whereas they were greater for A/J and MKK3-/- mice. SMTC significantly decreased ENO by ~30%, but did not change AR in NOS-2-/- mice. SnPP reduced ECO in C57Bl6 and IL-10-/- mice, and increased AR in NOS-2-/- mice. ENO decreased as a function of age in IL-10-/- mice, remaining unchanged in C57Bl6 mice. Conclusion These results are

  16. Non-invasive haemodynamic assessments using Innocor during standard graded exercise tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Piero; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac output (Q) and stroke volume (V(S)) represent primary determinants of cardiovascular performance and should therefore be determined for performance diagnostics purposes. Since it is unknown, whether measurements of Q and V(S) can be performed by means of Innocor during standard graded exercise tests (GXTs), and whether current GXT stages are sufficiently long for the measurements to take place, we determined Q and V(S) at an early and late point in time on submaximal 2 min GXT stages. 16 male cyclists (age 25.4 +/- 2.9 years, body mass 71.2 +/- 5.0 kg) performed three GXTs and we determined Q and V(S) after 46 and 103 s at 69, 77, and 85% peak power. We found that the rebreathings could easily be incorporated into the GXTs and that Q and V(S) remained unchanged between the two points in time on the same GXT stage (69% peak power, Q: 18.1 +/- 2.1 vs. 18.2 +/- 2.3 l min(-1), V(S): 126 +/- 18 vs. 123 +/- 21 ml; 77% peak power, Q: 20.7 +/- 2.6 vs. 21.0 +/- 2.3 l min(-1), V(S): 132 +/- 18 vs. 131 +/- 18 ml; 85% peak power, Q: 21.6 +/- 2.4 vs. 21.8 +/- 2.7 l min(-1), V(S): 131 +/- 17 vs. 131 +/- 22 ml). We conclude that Innocor may be a useful device for assessing Q and V(S) during GXTs, and that the adaptation of Q and V(S) to exercise-to-exercise transitions at moderate to high submaximal power outputs is fast enough for 1 and 2 min GXT stage durations.

  17. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy as method of choice for non-invasive and automated detection of microbial growth in media fills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, David; Roesti, David; Zuber, Ulrich; Sacher, Meik; Duncan, Derek; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Braissant, Olivier

    2017-05-15

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was evaluated on its potential to detect bacterial growth of contaminated media fill vials. The target was a replacement/ automation of the traditional visual media fill inspection. TDLAS was used to determine non-invasively O2 and/or CO2 changes in headspaces of such vials being induced by metabolically active microorganisms. Four different vial formats, 34 microorganisms (inoculation volumeTDLAS functionality for a replacement of the visual media fill inspection is given and that investing in further validation and implementation studies is valuable. Nevertheless, some small but vincible challenges remain to have this technology in practical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted hollow fiber membranes for osteoblasts culture and non-invasive harvest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Meiling, E-mail: zhuangmeiling2006@126.com; Liu, Tianqing, E-mail: liutq@dlut.edu.cn; Song, Kedong, E-mail: kedongsong@dlut.edu.cn; Ge, Dan, E-mail: gedan@dlut.edu.cn; Li, Xiangqin, E-mail: xiangqinli@163.com

    2015-10-01

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM) culture system is one of the most important bioreactors for the large-scale culture and expansion of therapeutic cells. However, enzymatic and mechanical treatments are traditionally applied to harvest the expanded cells from HFMs, which inevitably causes harm to the cells. In this study, thermo-responsive cellulose acetate HFMs for cell culture and non-invasive harvest were prepared for the first time via free radical polymerization in the presence of cerium (IV). ATR-FTIR and elemental analysis results indicated that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was covalently grafted on HFMs successfully. Dynamic contact angle measurements at different temperatures revealed that the magnitude of volume phase transition was decreased with increasing grafted amount of PNIPAAm. And the amount of serum protein adsorbed on HFMs surface also displayed the same pattern. Meanwhile osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs at 37 °C. And Calcein-AM/PI staining, AB assay, ALP activity and OCN protein expression level all showed that PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs had good cell compatibility. After incubation at 20 °C for 120 min, the adhering cells on PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs turned to be round and detached after being gently pipetted. These results suggest that thermo-responsive HFMs are attractive cell culture substrates which enable cell culture, expansion and the recovery without proteolytic enzyme treatment for the application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs exhibited thermoresponsive characteristic. • The OB cells could adhere and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs. • PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs do not significantly impact ALP activity and OCN protein expression level of OB cells. • Cell could be detached from PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs when temperature decreased from 37 °C to 20 °C.

  19. Long-term non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in severe stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong; LIANG Bin-miao; XU Zhi-bo; TANG Yong-jiang; WANG Ke; XIAO Jun; YI Qun; SUN Jian; FENG Yu-lin

    2011-01-01

    Background The evidence for non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) used in patients with severe stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is insufficient.The aim of the meta-analysis was to assess the treatment effects of long-term NIPPV on gas change,lung function,health-related quality of life (HRQL),survival and mortality in severe stable COPD patients.Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and crossover studies comparing the treatment effects of NIPPV with conventional therapy were identified from electronic databases and reference lists from January 1995 to August 2010.Two reviewers independently assessed study quality.Data were combined using Review Manager 5.0.Both pooled effects and 95% confidence intervals were calculated.Results Five RCTs and one randomized crossover study with a total of 383 severe stable COPD patients were included.NIPPV improved gas change significantly when using a higher inspiratory positive airway pressures.The weighted mean difference (WMD) for the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in artery (PaCO2) was -3.52 (-5.26,-1.77) mmHg and for the partial pressure of oxygen in artery (PaO2) 2.84 (0.23,5.44) mmHg.There were significant improvements in dyspnea and sleep quality,but gained no benefits on lung function.The standardized mean difference (SMD) for the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)was 0.00 (0.29,0.29).And the benefits for exercise tolerance,mood,survival and mortality remained unclear.Conclusions Patients with severe stable COPD can gain some substantial treatment benefits when using NIPPV,especially improvements in gas change,dyspnea and sleep quality.Studies of high methodological quality with large population,especially those based on a higher inspiratory positive airway pressures are required to provide more evidences.

  20. System for monitoring of green roof performance: use of weighing roof segment and non-invasive visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinkova, Vladmira; Dohnal, Michal; Picek, Tomas; Sacha, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the performance of technogenic substrates for green roofs is a significant task in the framework of sustainable urban planning and water/energy management. The potential retention and detention of the anthropogenic, light weight soil systems and their temporal soil structure changes are of major importance. A green roof test segment was built to investigate the benefits of such anthropogenic systems. Adaptable low-cost system allows long-term monitoring of preferred characteristics. Temperature and water balance measurements complemented with meteorological observations and knowledge of physical properties of the substrates provide basis for detailed analysis of thermal and hydrological regime in green roof systems. The first results confirmed the benefits of green roof systems. The reduction of temperature fluctuations as well as rainfall runoff was significant. Depending on numerous factors such substrate material or vegetation cover the test green roof suppressed the roof temperature amplitude for the period analyzed. The ability to completely prevent (light rainfall events) or reduce and delay (medium and heavy rainfall events) the peak runoff was also analyzed. Special attention is being paid to the assessment of soil structural properties related to possible aggregation/disaggregation, root growth, weather conditions and associated structural changes using non-invasive imaging method. X-ray computed microtomography of undisturbed soil samples (taken from experimental segments) is used for description of pore space geometry, evaluation of surface to volume ratio, additionally for description of cracks and macropores as a product of soil flora and fauna activity. The information from computed tomography imaging will be used for numerical modeling of water flow in variable saturated porous media. The research was realized as a part of the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings supported by the EU and with financial support from the Czech