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Sample records for non-covalent sumo interaction

  1. A role for non-covalent SUMO interaction motifs in Pc2/CBX4 E3 activity.

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    Jacqueline C Merrill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of proteins by the small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO is an essential process in mammalian cells. SUMO is covalently attached to lysines in target proteins via an enzymatic cascade which consists of E1 and E2, SUMO activating and conjugating enzymes. There is also a variable requirement for non-enzymatic E3 adapter like proteins, which can increase the efficiency and specificity of the sumoylation process. In addition to covalent attachment of SUMO to target proteins, specific non-covalent SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs that are generally short hydrophobic peptide motifs have been identified.Intriguingly, consensus SIMs are present in most SUMO E3s, including the polycomb protein, Pc2/Cbx4. However, a role for SIMs in SUMO E3 activity remains to be shown. We show that Pc2 contains two functional SIMs, both of which contribute to full E3 activity in mammalian cells, and are also required for sumoylation of Pc2 itself. Pc2 forms distinct sub-nuclear foci, termed polycomb bodies, and can recruit partner proteins, such as the corepressor CtBP. We demonstrate that mutation of the SIMs in Pc2 prevents Pc2-dependent CtBP sumoylation, and decreases enrichment of SUMO1 and SUMO2 at polycomb foci. Furthermore, mutational analysis of both SUMO1 and SUMO2 reveals that the SIM-interacting residues of both SUMO isoforms are required for Pc2-mediated sumoylation and localization to polycomb foci.This work provides the first clear evidence for a role for SIMs in SUMO E3 activity.

  2. Characterising non-covalent interactions with the Cambridge Structural Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommerse, J P; Taylor, R

    1997-02-01

    This review describes how the CSD can be used to study non-covalent interactions. Several different types of information may be obtained. First, the relative frequencies of various interactions can be studied; for example, we have shown that the terminal oxygen atoms of phosphate groups accept hydrogen bonds far more often than the linkage oxygens. Secondly, information can be obtained about the geometries of nonbonded contacts; for example, hydrogen bonds to P-O groups rarely form along the extension of the P-O bond, whereas short contacts between oxygen and carbon-bound iodine show a strong preference for linear C-I ... O angles. Thirdly, the CSD can be searched for novel interactions which may be exploited in inhibitor design; for example, the I ... O contacts just mentioned, and N-H ... pi hydrogen bonds. Finally, the CSD can suggest synthetic targets for medicinal chemistry; for example, molecules containing delocalised electron deficient groups such as trimethylammonium, pyridinium, thaizolium and dinitrophenyl have a good chance of binding to an active-site tryptophan. Although the CSD contains small-molecule crystal structures, not protein-ligand complexes, there is considerable evidence that the contacts seen in the two types of structures are similar. We have illustrated this a number of times in the present review and additional evidence has been given previously by Klebe. The major advantages of the CSD are its size, diversity and experimental accuracy. For these reasons, it is a useful tool for modellers engaged in rational inhibitor design.

  3. Binding properties of SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) in yeast.

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    Jardin, Christophe; Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation and interaction play an essential role in many cellular processes. A large number of yeast proteins is known to interact non-covalently with SUMO via short SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), but the structural details of this interaction are yet poorly characterized. In the present work, sequence analysis of a large dataset of 148 yeast SIMs revealed the existence of a hydrophobic core binding motif and a preference for acidic residues either within or adjacent to the core motif. Thus the sequence properties of yeast SIMs are highly similar to those described for human. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the binding preferences for four representative SIM peptides differing in the number and distribution of acidic residues. Furthermore, the relative stability of two previously observed alternative binding orientations (parallel, antiparallel) was assessed. For all SIMs investigated, the antiparallel binding mode remained stable in the simulations and the SIMs were tightly bound via their hydrophobic core residues supplemented by polar interactions of the acidic residues. In contrary, the stability of the parallel binding mode is more dependent on the sequence features of the SIM motif like the number and position of acidic residues or the presence of additional adjacent interaction motifs. This information should be helpful to enhance the prediction of SIMs and their binding properties in different organisms to facilitate the reconstruction of the SUMO interactome.

  4. Nature and consequences of non-covalent interactions between flavonoids and macronutrients in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordenave, Nicolas; Hamaker, Bruce R; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2014-01-01

    Many of the potential health benefits of flavonoids have been associated with their specific chemical and biological properties including their ability to interact and bind non-covalently to macronutrients in foods. While flavonoid-protein interactions and binding have been the subject of intensive study, significantly less is understood about non-covalent interactions with carbohydrates and lipids. These interactions with macronutrients are likely to impact both the flavonoid properties in foods, such as their radical scavenging activity, and the food or beverage matrix itself, including their taste, texture and other sensorial properties. Overall, non-covalent binding of flavonoids with macronutrients is primarily driven by van der Waals interactions. From the flavonoid perspective, these interactions are modulated by characteristics such as degree of polymerization, molecular flexibility, number of external hydroxyl groups, or number of terminal galloyl groups. From the macronutrient standpoint, electrostatic and ionic interactions are generally predominant with carbohydrates, while hydrophobic interactions are generally predominant with lipids and mainly limited to interactions with flavonols. All of these interactions are involved in flavonoid-protein interactions. While primarily associated with undesirable characteristics in foods and beverages, such as astringency, negative impact on macronutrient digestibility and hazing, more recent efforts have attempted to leverage these interactions to develop controlled delivery systems or strategies to enhance flavonoids bioavailability. This paper aims at reviewing the fundamental bases for non-covalent interactions, their occurrence in food and beverage systems and their impact on the physico-chemical, organoleptic and some nutritional properties of food.

  5. Non-covalent Interactions of Graphene with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

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    Zygouri, Panagiota; Potsi, Georgia; Mouzourakis, Eleftherios; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In this mini review we discuss the interactions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with graphene and the experimental approaches developed so far to create novel graphene/PAH hybrids and composite systems. The utilization of these systems in electrical, biomedical and polymer-reinforcement

  6. Alignment of non-covalent interactions at protein-protein interfaces.

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    Hongbo Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study and comparison of protein-protein interfaces is essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between proteins. While there are many methods for comparing protein structures and protein binding sites, so far no methods have been reported for comparing the geometry of non-covalent interactions occurring at protein-protein interfaces. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a method for aligning non-covalent interactions between different protein-protein interfaces. The method aligns the vector representations of van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds based on their geometry. The method has been applied to a dataset which comprises a variety of protein-protein interfaces. The alignments are consistent to a large extent with the results obtained using two other complementary approaches. In addition, we apply the method to three examples of protein mimicry. The method successfully aligns respective interfaces and allows for recognizing conserved interface regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Galinter method has been validated in the comparison of interfaces in which homologous subunits are involved, including cases of mimicry. The method is also applicable to comparing interfaces involving non-peptidic compounds. Galinter assists users in identifying local interface regions with similar patterns of non-covalent interactions. This is particularly relevant to the investigation of the molecular basis of interaction mimicry.

  7. Description of Non-Covalent Interactions in SCC-DFTB Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miriyala, Vijay Madhav; Řezáč, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2017), s. 688-697 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-11321Y Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional tight binding * DFTB3 * non- covalent interactions * dispersion correction * hydrogen bonding correction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.229, year: 2016

  8. Non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 dictates its degradation.

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    Yu Zhao

    Full Text Available GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4. GTPCH1 protein degradation has been reported in animal models of several diseases, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GTPCH1 is degraded remain uncharacterized. Here we report a novel non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTPCH1 in vitro and in vivo. The non-covalent binding of GTPCH1 to polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD results in ubiquitination and degradation. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin in cultured cells accelerated GTPCH1 degradation. In cultured cells and in vitro assays, Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains, but not Lys63-linked chains, interacted with GTPCH1 and targeted it for degradation. Consistently, proteasome inhibition attenuated GTPCH1 degradation. Finally, direct mutagenesis of an isoleucine (Ile131 in the hydrophobic patch of the GTPCH1 UBD affected its ubiquitin binding and the enzyme stability. Taken together, we conclude that GTPCH1 non-covalently interacts with polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain. The polyubiquitin binding directs GTPCH1 ubiquitination and proteasome degradation.

  9. Enhanced SUMOylation of proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif by SUMO-Ubc9 fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Tae; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Matunis, Mike J.; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Identifying new targets for SUMO and understanding the function of protein SUMOylation are largely limited by low level of SUMOylation. It was found recently that Ubc9, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme, is covalently modified by SUMO at a lysine 14 in the N-terminal alpha helix, and that SUMO-modified Ubc9 has enhanced conjugation activity for certain target proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM). Here, we show that, compared to intact Ubc9, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein has higher conjugating activity for SIM-containing targets such as Sp100 and human cytomegalovirus IE2. Assays using an IE2 SIM mutant revealed the requirement of SIM for the enhanced IE2 SUMOylation by SUMO-Ubc9. In pull-down assays with cell extracts, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein bound to more diverse cellular proteins and interacted with some SIM-containing proteins with higher affinities than Ubc9. Therefore, the devised SUMO-Ubc9 fusion will be useful for identifying SIM-containing SUMO targets and producing SUMO-modified proteins.

  10. Stereodynamic tetrahydrobiisoindole “NU-BIPHEP(O”s: functionalization, rotational barriers and non-covalent interactions

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    Golo Storch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stereodynamic ligands offer intriguing possibilities in enantioselective catalysis. “NU-BIPHEPs” are a class of stereodynamic diphosphine ligands which are easily accessible via rhodium-catalyzed double [2 + 2 + 2] cycloadditions. This study explores the preparation of differently functionalized “NU-BIPHEP(O” compounds, the characterization of non-covalent adduct formation and the quantification of enantiomerization barriers. In order to explore the possibilities of functionalization, we studied modifications of the ligand backbone, e.g., with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride. Diastereomeric adducts with Okamoto-type cellulose derivatives and on-column deracemization were realized on the basis of non-covalent interactions. Enantioselective dynamic HPLC (DHPLC allowed for the determination of rotational barriers of ΔG‡298K = 92.2 ± 0.3 kJ mol−1 and 99.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol−1 underlining the stereodynamic properties of “NU-BIPHEPs” and “NU-BIPHEP(Os”, respectively. These results make the preparation of tailor-made functionalized stereodynamic ligands possible and give an outline for possible applications in enantioselective catalysis.

  11. Network Formation via Anion Coordination: Crystal Structures Based on the Interplay of Non-Covalent Interactions

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    Matteo Savastano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis and the structural characterization of new H2L(CF3CO22 (1 and H2L(Ph2PO42 (2 compounds containing the diprotonated form (H2L2+ of the tetrazine-based molecule 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of single crystals of these compounds showed that H2L2+ displays similar binding properties toward both anions when salt bridge interactions are taken into account. Nevertheless, the different shapes, sizes and functionalities of trifluoroacetate and diphenyl phosphate anions define quite different organization patterns leading to the peculiar crystal lattices of 1 and 2. These three-dimensional (3D architectures are self-assembled by a variety of non-covalent forces, among which prominent roles are played by fluorine–π (in 1 and anion–π (in 2 interactions.

  12. Core/Shell Conjugated Polymer/Quantum Dot Composite Nanofibers through Orthogonal Non-Covalent Interactions

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    Brad W. Watson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructuring organic polymers and organic/inorganic hybrid materials and controlling blend morphologies at the molecular level are the prerequisites for modern electronic devices including biological sensors, light emitting diodes, memory devices and solar cells. To achieve all-around high performance, multiple organic and inorganic entities, each designed for specific functions, are commonly incorporated into a single device. Accurate arrangement of these components is a crucial goal in order to achieve the overall synergistic effects. We describe here a facile methodology of nanostructuring conjugated polymers and inorganic quantum dots into well-ordered core/shell composite nanofibers through cooperation of several orthogonal non-covalent interactions including conjugated polymer crystallization, block copolymer self-assembly and coordination interactions. Our methods provide precise control on the spatial arrangements among the various building blocks that are otherwise incompatible with one another, and should find applications in modern organic electronic devices such as solar cells.

  13. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

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    Atay, Z.; Biver, T.; Corti, A.; Eltugral, N.; Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A.; Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M.

    2010-08-01

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdSnp) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Aunp) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Aunp are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdSnp do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO3. As regards the CdSnp/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdSnp external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 ± 0.5) × 105 M-1. On the contrary, concerning Aunp, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdSnp or Aunp. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdSnp to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration ( p resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Aunp neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdSnp can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Aunp.

  14. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Z. [Bogazici University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Biver, T., E-mail: tarita@dcci.unipi.i [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Corti, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Eltugral, N. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdS{sub np}) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Au{sub np}) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Au{sub np} are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdS{sub np} do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}. As regards the CdS{sub np}/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdS{sub np} external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}. On the contrary, concerning Au{sub np}, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdS{sub np} or Au{sub np}. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdS{sub np} to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration (p < 0.005), while longer-time exposure resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Au{sub np} neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdS{sub np} can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Au{sub np}.

  15. Atomic Ensemble Effects and Non-Covalent Interactions at the Electrode–Electrolyte Interface

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    Angel Cuesta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-modified Pt(111 electrodes have been recently employed to study atomic ensemble effects in electrocatalysis. This work, which will be briefly reviewed, reveals that the smallest site required for methanol dehydrogenation and formic acid dehydration is composed of three contiguous Pt atoms. By blocking these trigonal sites, the specific adsorption of anions, such as sulfate and phosphate, can be inhibited, thus increasing the rate of oxygen reduction reaction by one order of magnitude or more. Moreover, alkali metal cations affect hydrogen adsorption on cyanide-modified Pt(111. This effect is attributed to the non-covalent interactions at the electrical double layer between specifically adsorbed anions or dipoles and the alkali metal cations. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effect of the concentration of alkali metal cations. Accordingly, a simple model that reproduces the experimental observations accurately and enables the understanding of the trends in the strength of the interaction between M+ and CNad when moving from Li+ to Cs+, as well as the deviations from the expected trends, is developed. This simple model can also explain the occurrence of super-Nernstian shifts of the equilibrium potential of interfacial proton-coupled electron transfers. Therefore, the model can be generally applied to explain quantitatively the effect of cations on the properties of the electrical double layer. The recently reported effects of alkali metal cations on several electrocatalytic reactions must be mediated by the interaction between these cations and chemisorbed species. As these interactions seem to be adequately and quantitatively described by our model, we expect the model to also be useful to describe, explain, and potentially exploit these effects.

  16. Inter- and intramolecular non-covalent interactions in 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde complexes of copper, silver, and gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Laura; Jääskeläinen, Sirpa; Hirva, Pipsa; Haukka, Matti

    2014-09-01

    Three new imidazole compounds, [CuBr2(mimc)2] (1), [Ag(mimc)2][CF3SO3] (2), and [AuCl3(mimc)] (3) (mimc = 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde), have been synthesized, structurally characterized, and further analyzed using the QTAIM analysis. The compounds exhibit self-assembled 3D networks arising from intermolecular non-covalent interactions such as metallophilic interactions, metal-π contacts, halogens-halogen interactions, and hydrogen bonds. These weak interactions have a strong impact on the coordination sphere of the metal atoms and on the packing of compounds 1, 2, and 3.

  17. Non-covalent interactions between thio-caffeine derivatives and water-soluble porphyrin in ethanol-water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipke, Agnieszka; Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena; Sierakowska, Arleta; Jasiewicz, Beata

    2018-03-01

    To determine the binding interactions and ability to form the non-covalent systems, the association process between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP) and a series of five structurally diverse thio-caffeine analogues has been studied in ethanol and ethanol-water solutions, analyzing its absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra. The porphyrin fluorescence lifetimes in the systems studied were established as well. During the titration with thio-caffeine compounds the slight bathochromic effect and considerable hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret band maximum can be noted. The fluorescence quenching effect observed for interactions in H2TTMePP - thio-caffeine derivative systems, as well as the order of binding and fluorescence quenching constants (of 105-103 mol- 1) suggest the existence of the mechanism of static quenching due to the formation of non-covalent and non-fluorescent stacking complexes. In all the systems studied the phenomenon of the fractional accessibility of the fluorophore for the quencher was observed as well. Additionally, the specific binding interactions, due to the changes in reaction environment polarity, can be observed. It was found that thio-caffeine compounds can quench the porphyrin fluorescence according to the structure of thio-substituent in caffeine molecule. The obtained results can be potentially useful from scientific, therapeutic or environmental points of view.

  18. Scaled MP3 non-covalent interaction energies agree closely with accurate CCSD(T) benchmark data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitonák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Cerný, Jirí; Grimme, Stefan; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-12

    Scaled MP3 interaction energies calculated as a sum of MP2/CBS (complete basis set limit) interaction energies and scaled third-order energy contributions obtained in small or medium size basis sets agree very closely with the estimated CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energies for the 22 H-bonded, dispersion-controlled and mixed non-covalent complexes from the S22 data set. Performance of this so-called MP2.5 (third-order scaling factor of 0.5) method has also been tested for 33 nucleic acid base pairs and two stacked conformers of porphine dimer. In all the test cases, performance of the MP2.5 method was shown to be superior to the scaled spin-component MP2 based methods, e.g. SCS-MP2, SCSN-MP2 and SCS(MI)-MP2. In particular, a very balanced treatment of hydrogen-bonded compared to stacked complexes is achieved with MP2.5. The main advantage of the approach is that it employs only a single empirical parameter and is thus biased by two rigorously defined, asymptotically correct ab-initio methods, MP2 and MP3. The method is proposed as an accurate but computationally feasible alternative to CCSD(T) for the computation of the properties of various kinds of non-covalently bound systems.

  19. Two supramolecular complexes based on polyoxometalates and Co-EDTA units via covalent connection or non-covalent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Chunlin; Xiao, Hanxi [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Cai, Qing [Chemistry Department, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tang, Jianting; Cai, Tiejun [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Deng, Qian, E-mail: dengqian10502@163.com [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Two new 3D network organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes ([Na{sub 6}(CoEDTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 13}]·(H{sub 2}SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40})·xH{sub 2}O)n (1) and [CoH{sub 4}EDTA(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}(SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40})·15H{sub 2}O (2) (H{sub 4}EDTA=Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) have been successfully synthesized by solution method, and characterized by infrared spectrum (IR), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and single{sup −}crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both of the complexes are the supramolecules, but with different liking mode, they are two representative models of supramolecule. complex (1) is a 3D infinite network supramolecular coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through coordinate-covalent bonds. While complex (2) is normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions, such as H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. Both of complex (1) and (2) exhibit good catalytic activities for catalytic oxidation of methanol, when the initial concentration of methanol is 3.0 g m{sup −3}, flow rate is 10 mL min{sup −1}, and the quality of catalyst is 0.2 g, for complex (1) and complex (2) the maximum elimination rates of methanol are 85% (150 °C) and 92% (120 °C), respectively. - Graphical abstract: Two new organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes based on Co-EDTA, and Keggin polyanions have been successfully synthesized with different pH value by solution method. They are attributed to two representative models of supramolecule. Complex(1) is an infinite coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through covalent bonds. Complex (2) is a normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions of H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. - Highlights: • Two supramolecules

  20. Thermal solid-state Z/E isomerization of 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines: effects of non-covalent interactions

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    ZDRAVKO DŽAMBASKI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Configurational isomerization of stereo-defined 5-substituted and unsubstituted 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines (1 in the solid state, giving the Z/E mixtures in various ratios, was investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, X-ray powder crystallography and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The Z/E composition can be rationalized in terms of non-covalent interactions, involving intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and directional non-bonded 1,5-type S×××O interactions. X-Ray powder crystallography, using selected crystalline (Z-4-oxothiazolidine substrates, revealed transformation to the amorphous state during the irreversible Z®E process. A correlation between previous results on the Z/E isomerization in solution and now in the solid state was established.

  1. Preparation and characterization of malonic acid cross-linked chitosan and collagen 3D scaffolds: an approach on non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Tapas; Sailakshmi, G; Gnanamani, A; Mandal, A B

    2012-05-01

    The present study emphasizes the influence of non-covalent interactions on the mechanical and thermal properties of the scaffolds of chitosan/collagen origin. Malonic acid (MA), a bifuncitonal diacid was chosen to offer non-covalent cross-linking. Three dimensional scaffolds was prepared using chitosan at 1.0% (w/v) and MA at 0.2% (w/v), similarly collagen 0.5% (w/v) and MA 0.2% (w/v) and characterized. Results on FT-IR, TGA, DSC, SEM and mechanical properties (tensile strength, stiffness, Young's modulus, etc.) assessment demonstrated the existence of non-covalent interaction between MA and chitosan/collagen, which offered flexibility and high strength to the scaffolds suitable for tissue engineering research. Studies using NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells suggested biocompatibility nature of the scaffolds. Docking simulation study further supports the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions between MA and chitosan/collagen.

  2. Non-Covalent Interactions and Impact of Charge Penetration Effects in Linear Oligoacene Dimers and Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-18

    Non-covalent interactions determine in large part the thermodynamic aspects of molecular packing in organic crystals. Using a combination of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) and classical multipole electrostatics, we describe the interaction potential energy surfaces for dimers of the oligoacene family, from benzene to hexacene. An analysis of these surfaces and a thorough assessment of dimers extracted from the reported crystal structures underline that high-order interactions (i.e., three-body non-additive interactions) must be considered in order to rationalize the details of the crystal structures. A comparison of the SAPT electrostatic energy with the multipole interaction energy demonstrates the importance of the contribution of charge penetration, which is shown to account for up to 50% of the total interaction energy in dimers extracted from the experimental single crystals; in the case of the most stable co-facial model dimers, this contribution is even larger than the total interaction energy. Our results highlight the importance of taking account of charge penetration in studies of the larger oligoacenes.

  3. Effects of non-covalent interactions with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid) on the heat denaturation and solubility of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Jong, G.A.H. de; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The non-covalent interactions between the monomeric phenolic compound chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin were characterized, and their effect on protein properties was examined. 5-CQA had a low affinity for all three proteins, and these interactions

  4. Quantum chemical investigation of attractive non-covalent interactions between halomethanes and rare gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Linda J; Bruce, Duncan W; Karadakov, Peter B

    2012-11-01

    The interaction between rare gas atoms and trifluoromethylhalides and iodomethane is investigated using ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods: MP2, CCSD, B3LYP, M06, M06-L, M06-2X, M06-HF, X3LYP, PBE, B97-D, B3LYP-D3, and M06-L-D3, in combination with the aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVTZ-PP basis sets. A weakly attractive interaction is observed for all complexes, whose strength increases as the rare gas and halogen bond donor become more polarizable, and as the group bound to the halogen bond donor becomes more electron-withdrawing. The separation between iodine and krypton in the complex CF(3)I···Kr, calculated at the MP2 and B3LYP-D3 levels of theory, agrees very well with recent experimental results (Stephens, S. L.; Walker, N. R.; Legon, A. C. J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 135, 224309). Analysis of the ability of theoretical methods to account for the dispersion interaction present in these complexes leads to the conclusion that MP2 and B3LYP-D3, which produce very similar results, are the better performing methods, followed by B97-D and the M06 suite of functionals; the popular B3LYP as well as X3LYP perform poorly and significantly underestimate the interaction strength. The orbitals responsible for the interaction are identified through Edmiston-Ruedenberg localization; it is shown that, by combining the key orbitals, it is possible to observe a molecular orbital picture of a σ-hole interaction.

  5. Non-Covalent Interactions: Complexes of Guanidinium with DNA and RNA Nucleobases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blanco, F.; Kelly, B.; Sanchez-Sanz, Goar; Trujillo, Cristina; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.; Rozas, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 39 (2013), s. 11608-11616 ISSN 1520-6106 Grant - others:Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union(XE) FP7-274988 People Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular -orbital methods * cation-pi interactions * minor-groove binders Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  6. Recognition of anions using urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes: A density functional theory study of non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, Mohd; Lone, Mohsin Y.; Jha, Prakash C.

    2018-02-01

    Designing of new calixarene receptors for the selective binding of anions is an age-old concept; even though expected outcomes from this field are at premature stage. Herein, we have performed quantum chemical calculations to provide structural basis of anion binding with urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes (1, 2, and 3). In particular, spherical halides (F-, Cl-, Br-) and linear anions (CN-, N3-, SCN-) were modelled for calculating binding energies with receptor 1, 2 and 3 followed by their marked IR vibrations; taking the available experimental information into account. We found that the thiourea substitutions have better capability to stabilize the anions. Results have suggested that the structural behaviour of macrocyclic motifs were responsible for displaying the anion binding potentials. Moreover, second order "charge transfer" interactions of n-σ∗NH and n-σ∗OH type along the H-bond axis played critical role in developing hydrogen bonds. The present work also examines the role of non-covalent interactions (NCI) and their effects on thermodynamic and chemical-reactivity descriptors.

  7. Non-Covalent Interactions in the Crystal Structure of Methyl 4-Hydroxy-3-Nitrobenzoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Simpson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Methyl 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzoate, (I, C8H7NO5, crystallizes with two unique molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit of the triclinic unit cell. The space group was assigned as P-1, with lattice parameters a = 0.72831(15, b = 1.0522(2, c = 1.1410(2 nm, α = 83.38(3, β = 80.83(3, γ = 82.02(3°, Z = 4, V = 0.8510(3 nm3, Mr = 197.15, Dc = 1.539 g/m3, µ= 0.131 mm−1, F(000 = 408, R = 0.1002 and wR = 0.2519. In the crystal structure, 12 hydrogen bonding and two p-stacking interactions link the molecules into infinite stacked sheets parallel to (101.

  8. Non-covalent interactions across organic and biological subsets of chemical space: Physics-based potentials parametrized from machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; DiStasio, Robert A.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2018-06-01

    Classical intermolecular potentials typically require an extensive parametrization procedure for any new compound considered. To do away with prior parametrization, we propose a combination of physics-based potentials with machine learning (ML), coined IPML, which is transferable across small neutral organic and biologically relevant molecules. ML models provide on-the-fly predictions for environment-dependent local atomic properties: electrostatic multipole coefficients (significant error reduction compared to previously reported), the population and decay rate of valence atomic densities, and polarizabilities across conformations and chemical compositions of H, C, N, and O atoms. These parameters enable accurate calculations of intermolecular contributions—electrostatics, charge penetration, repulsion, induction/polarization, and many-body dispersion. Unlike other potentials, this model is transferable in its ability to handle new molecules and conformations without explicit prior parametrization: All local atomic properties are predicted from ML, leaving only eight global parameters—optimized once and for all across compounds. We validate IPML on various gas-phase dimers at and away from equilibrium separation, where we obtain mean absolute errors between 0.4 and 0.7 kcal/mol for several chemically and conformationally diverse datasets representative of non-covalent interactions in biologically relevant molecules. We further focus on hydrogen-bonded complexes—essential but challenging due to their directional nature—where datasets of DNA base pairs and amino acids yield an extremely encouraging 1.4 kcal/mol error. Finally, and as a first look, we consider IPML for denser systems: water clusters, supramolecular host-guest complexes, and the benzene crystal.

  9. Non-covalent interactions of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras proto-oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jorge H.; Deligkaris, Christos

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the complementary, but different, effects of physical (non-covalent) and chemical (covalent) mutagen-DNA and carcinogen-DNA interactions is important for understanding possible mechanisms of development and prevention of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. A highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ α]pyrene, namely (+)-anti-BPDE, is known to undergo both physical and chemical complexation with DNA. The major covalent adduct, a promutagenic, is known to be an external (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N2-dGuanosine configuration whose origins are not fully understood. Thus, it is desirable to study the mechanisms of external non-covalent BPDE-DNA binding and their possible relationships to external covalent trans adduct formation. We present a detailed codon-by-codon computational study of the non-covalent interactions of (+)-anti-BPDE with DNA which explains and correctly predicts preferential (+)-anti-BPDE binding at minor groove guanosines. Due to its relevance to carcinogenesis, the interaction of (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras gene has been studied in detail. Present address: Department of Physics, Drury University

  10. Arabidopsis TCP Transcription Factors Interact with the SUMO Conjugating Machinery in Nuclear Foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena J. Mazur

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis more than 400 proteins have been identified as SUMO targets, both in vivo and in vitro. Among others, transcription factors (TFs are common targets for SUMO conjugation. Here we aimed to exhaustively screen for TFs that interact with the SUMO machinery using an arrayed yeast two-hybrid library containing more than 1,100 TFs. We identified 76 interactors that foremost interact with the SUMO conjugation enzyme SCE1 and/or the SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1. These interactors belong to various TF families, which control a wide range of processes in plant development and stress signaling. Amongst these interactors, the TCP family was overrepresented with several TCPs interacting with different proteins of the SUMO conjugation cycle. For a subset of these TCPs we confirmed that the catalytic site of SCE1 is essential for this interaction. In agreement, TCP1, TCP3, TCP8, TCP14, and TCP15 were readily SUMO modified in an E. coli sumoylation assay. Strikingly, these TCP-SCE1 interactions were found to redistribute these TCPs into nuclear foci/speckles, suggesting that these TCP foci represent sites for SUMO (conjugation activity.

  11. SUMO-interacting motifs of human TRIM5α are important for antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Arriagada

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Human TRIM5α potently restricts particular strains of murine leukemia viruses (the so-called N-tropic strains but not others (the B- or NB-tropic strains during early stages of infection. We show that overexpression of SUMO-1 in human 293T cells, but not in mouse MDTF cells, profoundly blocks N-MLV infection. This block is dependent on the tropism of the incoming virus, as neither B-, NB-, nor the mutant R110E of N-MLV CA (a B-tropic switch are affected by SUMO-1 overexpression. The block occurred prior to reverse transcription and could be abrogated by large amounts of restricted virus. Knockdown of TRIM5α in 293T SUMO-1-overexpressing cells resulted in ablation of the SUMO-1 antiviral effects, and this loss of restriction could be restored by expression of a human TRIM5α shRNA-resistant plasmid. Amino acid sequence analysis of human TRIM5α revealed a consensus SUMO conjugation site at the N-terminus and three putative SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs in the B30.2 domain. Mutations of the TRIM5α consensus SUMO conjugation site did not affect the antiviral activity of TRIM5α in any of the cell types tested. Mutation of the SIM consensus sequences, however, abolished TRIM5α antiviral activity against N-MLV. Mutation of lysines at a potential site of SUMOylation in the CA region of the Gag gene reduced the SUMO-1 block and the TRIM5α restriction of N-MLV. Our data suggest a novel aspect of TRIM5α-mediated restriction, in which the presence of intact SIMs in TRIM5α, and also the SUMO conjugation of CA, are required for restriction. We propose that at least a portion of the antiviral activity of TRIM5α is mediated through the binding of its SIMs to SUMO-conjugated CA.

  12. Role of SUMO in RNF4-mediated promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) degradation: sumoylation of PML and phospho-switch control of its SUMO binding domain dissected in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percherancier, Yann; Germain-Desprez, Delphine; Galisson, Frédéric; Mascle, Xavier H; Dianoux, Laurent; Estephan, Patricia; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K; Aubry, Muriel

    2009-06-12

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor acting as the organizer of subnuclear structures called PML nuclear bodies (NBs). Both covalent modification of PML by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) and non-covalent binding of SUMO to the PML SUMO binding domain (SBD) are necessary for PML NB formation and maturation. PML sumoylation and proteasome-dependent degradation induced by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF4, are enhanced by the acute promyelocytic leukemia therapeutic agent, arsenic trioxide (As2O3). Here, we established a novel bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay to dissect and monitor PML/SUMO interactions dynamically in living cells upon addition of therapeutic agents. Using this sensitive and quantitative SUMO BRET assay that distinguishes PML sumoylation from SBD-mediated PML/SUMO non-covalent interactions, we probed the respective roles of covalent and non-covalent PML/SUMO interactions in PML degradation and interaction with RNF4. We found that, although dispensable for As2O3-enhanced PML sumoylation and RNF4 interaction, PML SBD core sequence was required for As2O3- and RNF4-induced PML degradation. As confirmed with a phosphomimetic mutant, phosphorylation of a stretch of serine residues, contained within PML SBD was needed for PML interaction with SUMO-modified protein partners and thus for NB maturation. However, mutation of these serine residues did not impair As2O3- and RNF4-induced PML degradation, contrasting with the known role of these phosphoserine residues for casein kinase 2-promoted PML degradation. Altogether, these data suggest a model whereby sumoylation- and SBD-dependent PML oligomerization within NBs is sufficient for RNF4-mediated PML degradation and does not require the phosphorylation-dependent association of PML with other sumoylated partners.

  13. Lamin A reassembly at the end of mitosis is regulated by its SUMO-interacting motif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriuchi, Takanobu; Kuroda, Masaki; Kusumoto, Fumiya; Osumi, Takashi; Hirose, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Modification of proteins with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO; SUMOylation) is involved in the regulation of various biological processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that noncovalent associations between SUMOylated proteins and co-operative proteins containing SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) are important for the spatiotemporal organization of many protein complexes. In this study, we demonstrate that interactions between lamin A, a major component of the nuclear lamina, and SUMO isoforms are dependent on one of the four SIMs (SIM3) resided in lamin A polypeptide in vitro. Live cell imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that SIM3 is required for accumulation of lamin A on the chromosomes during telophase, and subsequent evaluation of a panel of deletion mutants determined that a 156-amino acid region spanning the carboxyl-terminal Ig-fold domain of lamin A is sufficient for this accumulation. Notably, mutation of SIM3 abrogated the dephosphorylation of mitosis-specific phosphorylation at Ser-22 of lamin A, which normally occurs during telophase, and the subsequent nuclear lamina reorganization. Furthermore, expression of a conjugation-defective SUMO2 mutant, which was previously shown to inhibit endogenous SUMOylation in a dominant-negative manner, also impaired the accumulation of wild type lamin A on telophase chromosomes. These findings suggest that interactions between SIM3 of lamin A and a putative SUMO2-modified protein plays an important role in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina at the end of mitosis. - Highlights: • Lamin A interacts with SUMO2 via a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) in the Ig domain. • SIM3 of lamin A is responsible for chromosomal accumulation during telophase. • A 156-aa region spanning the Ig domain is sufficient for chromosomal accumulation. • Accumulation of lamin A is required for timely dephosphorylation on chromosomes. • A putative SUMO2-modified protein may mediate chromosomal accumulation of lamin

  14. Lamin A reassembly at the end of mitosis is regulated by its SUMO-interacting motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriuchi, Takanobu; Kuroda, Masaki; Kusumoto, Fumiya; Osumi, Takashi; Hirose, Fumiko, E-mail: fhirose@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp

    2016-03-01

    Modification of proteins with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO; SUMOylation) is involved in the regulation of various biological processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that noncovalent associations between SUMOylated proteins and co-operative proteins containing SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) are important for the spatiotemporal organization of many protein complexes. In this study, we demonstrate that interactions between lamin A, a major component of the nuclear lamina, and SUMO isoforms are dependent on one of the four SIMs (SIM3) resided in lamin A polypeptide in vitro. Live cell imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that SIM3 is required for accumulation of lamin A on the chromosomes during telophase, and subsequent evaluation of a panel of deletion mutants determined that a 156-amino acid region spanning the carboxyl-terminal Ig-fold domain of lamin A is sufficient for this accumulation. Notably, mutation of SIM3 abrogated the dephosphorylation of mitosis-specific phosphorylation at Ser-22 of lamin A, which normally occurs during telophase, and the subsequent nuclear lamina reorganization. Furthermore, expression of a conjugation-defective SUMO2 mutant, which was previously shown to inhibit endogenous SUMOylation in a dominant-negative manner, also impaired the accumulation of wild type lamin A on telophase chromosomes. These findings suggest that interactions between SIM3 of lamin A and a putative SUMO2-modified protein plays an important role in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina at the end of mitosis. - Highlights: • Lamin A interacts with SUMO2 via a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) in the Ig domain. • SIM3 of lamin A is responsible for chromosomal accumulation during telophase. • A 156-aa region spanning the Ig domain is sufficient for chromosomal accumulation. • Accumulation of lamin A is required for timely dephosphorylation on chromosomes. • A putative SUMO2-modified protein may mediate chromosomal accumulation of lamin

  15. Investigation of Non-Covalent Interactions of Aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, G2, and M1 with Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Poór

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are widely spread mycotoxins produced mainly by Aspergillus species. Consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated foods and drinks causes serious health risks for people worldwide. It is well-known that the reactive epoxide metabolite of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 forms covalent adducts with serum albumin. However, non-covalent interactions of aflatoxins with human serum albumin (HSA are poorly characterized. Thus, in this study the complex formation of aflatoxins was examined with HSA applying spectroscopic and molecular modelling studies. Our results demonstrate that aflatoxins form stable complexes with HSA as reflected by binding constants between 2.1 × 104 and 4.5 × 104 dm3/mol. A binding free energy value of −26.90 kJ mol−1 suggests a spontaneous binding process between AFB1 and HSA at room-temperature, while the positive entropy change of 55.1 JK−1 mol−1 indicates a partial decomposition of the solvation shells of the interacting molecules. Modeling studies and investigations with site markers suggest that Sudlow’s Site I of subdomain IIA is the high affinity binding site of aflatoxins on HSA. Interaction of AFB1 with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumins was also investigated. Similar stabilities of the examined AFB1-albumin complexes were observed suggesting the low species differences of the albumin-binding of aflatoxins.

  16. Non-Covalent Interactions and Impact of Charge Penetration Effects in Linear Oligoacene Dimers and Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    of charge penetration, which is shown to account for up to 50% of the total interaction energy in dimers extracted from the experimental single crystals; in the case of the most stable co-facial model dimers, this contribution is even larger than the total

  17. Hirshfeld surface analyses and crystal structures of supramolecular self-assembly thiourea derivatives directed by non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Ilkay; Solmaz, Ummuhan; Binzet, Gun; Keskin, Ebru; Arslan, Birdal; Arslan, Hakan

    2018-04-01

    The novel N-(bis(3,5-dimethoxybenzyl)carbamothioyl)-4-R-benzamide (R: H, Cl, CH3 and OCH3) compounds have been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Their crystal structures were also determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Hirshfeld surfaces analysis and their associated two dimensional fingerprint plots of compounds were used as theoretical approach to assess driving force for crystal structure formation via the intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattices of synthesized compounds. The study of X-ray single crystal diffraction and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of the prepared compounds shows that hydrogen bonding and other weaker interactions such as Nsbnd H⋯S, weak Csbnd H⋯S, Csbnd H⋯O, Csbnd H⋯N and Csbnd H···π intermolecular interactions and π-π stacking, among molecules of synthesized compounds participate in a cooperative way to stabilize the supramolecular structures.

  18. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.

    2013-01-01

    We here present amethod to form a noncovalent conjugate of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid aimed to interact with cells over-expressing folate receptors. The bonding was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple, rapid “one pot” synthesis method. The zeta...... a low toxicity of the conjugates in the THP-1 cells. The low toxicity and the cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotube–folic acid by cancer cells suggest their potential use in carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems and in the diagnosis of cancer or tropical diseases such as leishmaniasis....

  19. Crystal structure of a human single domain antibody dimer formed through V(H-V(H non-covalent interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toya Nath Baral

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs derived from human V(H are considered to be less soluble and prone to aggregate which makes it difficult to determine the crystal structures. In this study, we isolated and characterized two anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2 sdAbs, Gr3 and Gr6, from a synthetic human V(H phage display library. Size exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analyses demonstrated that Gr3 is a monomer, but that Gr6 is a strict dimer. To understand this different molecular behavior, we solved the crystal structure of Gr6 to 1.6 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the homodimer assembly of Gr6 closely mimics the V(H-V(L heterodimer of immunoglobulin variable domains and the dimerization interface is dominated by hydrophobic interactions.

  20. Non-Covalent Interactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Sagan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an in-depth, qualitative and quantitative description of non-covalent interactions in the hydrogen storage materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3 was performed by means of the charge and energy decomposition method (ETS-NOCV as well as the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA approach. It was determined that both crystals are stabilized by electrostatically dominated intra- and intermolecular M∙∙∙H–B interactions (M = Li, K. For LiN(CH32BH3 the intramolecular charge transfer appeared (B–H→Li to be more pronounced compared with the corresponding intermolecular contribution. We clarified for the first time, based on the ETS-NOCV and IQA methods, that homopolar BH∙∙∙HB interactions in LiN(CH32BH3 can be considered as destabilizing (due to the dominance of repulsion caused by negatively charged borane units, despite the fact that some charge delocalization within BH∙∙∙HB contacts is enforced (which explains H∙∙∙H bond critical points found from the QTAIM method. Interestingly, quite similar (to BH∙∙∙HB intermolecular homopolar dihydrogen bonds CH∙∙∙HC appared to significantly stabilize both crystals—the ETS-NOCV scheme allowed us to conclude that CH∙∙∙HC interactions are dispersion dominated, however, the electrostatic and σ/σ*(C–H charge transfer contributions are also important. These interactions appeared to be more pronounced in KN(CH32BH3 compared with LiN(CH32BH3.

  1. Predominantly ligand guided non-covalently linked assemblies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JUBARAJ B BARUAH

    2018-05-12

    May 12, 2018 ... Abstract. Various non-covalently linked inorganic self-assemblies formed by the supramolecular interacting .... metal-organic frameworks.59 Inorganic chemists rou- ...... two-dimensional organic–inorganic layered perovskite.

  2. Non-covalent associative structure of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, H. [Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2004-06-01

    The recent progress of non-covalent associative structure of coal and the mechanisms of the carbon disulphide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (CS{sub 2}/NMP) are mixed solvent and the additive addition enhancing the extraction yield of coals are reviewed, and the aggregation behaviour of coal in solid and solution states are presented, and the aggregation behavior of coal in solid and solution states are introduced in this paper. Coal extraction and swelling in organic solvents at room temperature were the most useful methods to understand the associative structure of coal. CS{sub 2}/NMP is a unique solvent to give high extraction yields for some bituminous coals. Some additives such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) can dissociate the stronger interactions among coal molecules and enhance the extraction yields of coal in the mixed solvent. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Non-covalent interactions between {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) with pyridoxine hydrochloride in methanol at T = (298.15, 308.15 and 318.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahman, Dhiraj; Sinha, Biswajit

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Methanolic solution of pyridoxine hydrochloride used as solvent. • {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) used as solute. • Partial molar volumes and viscosity B-coefficients of the solute were determined. • Weak 1:1 association between the complex and pyridoxine hydrochloride found. • Non-covalent interactions and Cu(II) complex acts as a net structure maker in the ternary solutions. - Abstract: Non-covalent interactions between of {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) with pyridoxine hydrochloride in methanol were investigated by a combination of physico-chemical and spectrophotometric methods at T = (298.15, 308.15 and 318.15) K under ambient pressure. From measured density and viscosity data the apparent molar volume (ϕ V ), the slope (S V ∗ ), standard partial molar volume (ϕ V 0 ), standard transfer volume (Δ t ϕ V 0 ), isobaric apparent molar expansibility (ϕ E ), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕ E 0 ), the viscosity B-coefficient, its temperature derivative (∂B/∂T), solvation number (S n ) were calculated and discussed on the basis of specific or non-specific (solute + cosolute) and (solute + solvent) interactions. Thermodynamics of viscous flow were discussed on the basis of the transition state theory. Spectrophotometric results indicated 1:1 (solute + cosolute) interaction between the complex and pyridoxine hydrochloride

  4. A unique SUMO-2-interacting motif within LANA is essential for KSHV latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliang Cai

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIF-1α during latent infection, and HIF-1α reactivates lytic replication under hypoxic stress. However, the mechanism utilized by KSHV to block lytic reactivation with the accumulation of HIF-1α in latency remains unclear. Here, we report that LANA encoded by KSHV contains a unique SUMO-interacting motif (LANA(SIM which is specific for interaction with SUMO-2 and facilitates LANA SUMOylation at lysine 1140. Proteomic and co-immunoprecipitation analysis further reveal that the SUMO-2 modified transcription repressor KAP1 is a critical factor recruited by LANA(SIM. Deletion of LANA(SIM led to functional loss of both LANA-mediated viral episome maintenance and lytic gene silencing. Moreover, hypoxia reduced KAP1 SUMOylation and resulted in dissociation of both KAP1 and Sin3A repressors from LANA(SIM-associated complex. Therefore, the LANA(SIM motif plays an essential role in KSHV latency and is a potential drug target against KSHV-associated cancers.

  5. Multi-step non-covalent pathways to supramolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous organization of building blocks into ordered structures governed by non-covalent interactions, or self-assembly, is a commonly encountered pathway in nature to obtain functional materials. These materials often consist of many different components ordered into intricate structures.

  6. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between cell penetrating peptides and plasmid DNA are important for stable non-covalent complexation and intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Archana; Sangave, Preeti C

    2016-10-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful tools for intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. Delivery of plasmid DNA, a large nucleic acid, poses a challenge for peptide mediated transport. The paper investigates and compares efficacy of five novel peptide designs for complexation of plasmid DNA and subsequent delivery into cells. The peptides were designed to contain reported DNA condensing agents and basic cell penetrating sequences, octa-arginine (R 8 ) and CHK 6 HC coupled to cell penetration accelerating peptides such as Bax inhibitory mutant peptide (KLPVM) and a peptide derived from the Kaposi fibroblast growth factor (kFGF) membrane translocating sequence. A tryptophan rich peptide, an analogue of Pep-3, flanked with CH 3 on either ends was also a part of the study. The peptides were analysed for plasmid DNA complexation, protection of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes against DNase I, serum components and competitive ligands by simple agarose gel electrophoresis techniques. Hemolysis of rat red blood corpuscles (RBCs) in the presence of the peptides was used as a measure of peptide cytotoxicity. Plasmid DNA delivery through the designed peptides was evaluated in two cell lines, human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and (NIH/3 T3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts via expression of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. The importance of hydrophobic sequences in addition to cationic sequences in peptides for non-covalent plasmid DNA complexation and delivery has been illustrated. An alternative to the employment of fatty acid moieties for enhanced gene transfer has been proposed. Comparison of peptides for plasmid DNA complexation and delivery of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes to cells estimated by expression of a reporter gene, SEAP. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. MEL-18 interacts with HSF2 and the SUMO E2 UBC9 to inhibit HSF2 sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Goodson, Michael L; Hong, Yiling; Sarge, Kevin D

    2008-03-21

    In a previous study we found that sumoylation of the DNA-binding protein heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) is up-regulated during mitosis, but the mechanism that mediates this regulation was unknown. Here we show that HSF2 interacts with the polycomb protein MEL-18, that this interaction decreases during mitosis, and that overexpression and RNA interference-mediated reduction of MEL-18 result in decreased and increased HSF2 sumoylation, respectively. Other results suggest that MEL-18 may also function to inhibit the sumoylation of other cellular proteins. The results also show that MEL-18 is able to interact with the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ubiquitin carrier protein (E2) enzyme UBC9 and that MEL-18 inhibits the ability of UBC9 to transfer the SUMO protein to target proteins. Together, the results in this work suggest a mechanism in which MEL-18 bound to HSF2 inhibits its sumoylation by binding to and inhibiting the activity of UBC9 enzymes in the vicinity of HSF2. These results provide an explanation for how mitotic HSF2 sumoylation is regulated and suggest that MEL-18, in contrast to the sumoylation-stimulating activities of the polycomb protein PC2, actually functions like an anti-SUMO ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase (E3), interacting both with HSF2 and the SUMO E2 UBC9 but acting to inhibit UBC9 activity to decrease sumoylation of a target protein, in this case that of HSF2.

  8. On the nature of non-covalent interactions in isomers of 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone dimers - ground- and excited-state properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pandiyan, B. V.; Deepa, Palanisamy; Kolandaivel, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 37 (2014), s. 19928-19940 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogen bonding interactions * density functional theory * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.493, year: 2014

  9. Molecular insight on the non-covalent interactions between carbapenems and uc(l,d)-transpeptidase 2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ONIOM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntombela, Thandokuhle; Fakhar, Zeynab; Ibeji, Collins U.; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E. M.; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2018-05-01

    Tuberculosis remains a dreadful disease that has claimed many human lives worldwide and elimination of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis also remains elusive. Multidrug-resistant TB is rapidly increasing worldwide; therefore, there is an urgent need for improving the current antibiotics and novel drug targets to successfully curb the TB burden. uc(l,d)-Transpeptidase 2 is an essential protein in Mtb that is responsible for virulence and growth during the chronic stage of the disease. Both uc(d,d)- and uc(l,d)-transpeptidases are inhibited concurrently to eradicate the bacterium. It was recently discovered that classic penicillins only inhibit uc(d,d)-transpeptidases, while uc(l,d)-transpeptidases are blocked by carbapenems. This has contributed to drug resistance and persistence of tuberculosis. Herein, a hybrid two-layered ONIOM (B3LYP/6-31G+(d): AMBER) model was used to extensively investigate the binding interactions of LdtMt2 complexed with four carbapenems (biapenem, imipenem, meropenem, and tebipenem) to ascertain molecular insight of the drug-enzyme complexation event. In the studied complexes, the carbapenems together with catalytic triad active site residues of LdtMt2 (His187, Ser188 and Cys205) were treated at with QM [B3LYP/6-31+G(d)], while the remaining part of the complexes were treated at MM level (AMBER force field). The resulting Gibbs free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) for all complexes showed that the carbapenems exhibit reasonable binding interactions towards LdtMt2. Increasing the number of amino acid residues that form hydrogen bond interactions in the QM layer showed significant impact in binding interaction energy differences and the stabilities of the carbapenems inside the active pocket of LdtMt2. The theoretical binding free energies obtained in this study reflect the same trend of the experimental observations. The electrostatic, hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions between the carbapenems and Ldt

  10. Synergistic effect of non-covalent interaction in colloidal nematic liquid crystal doped with magnetic functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalir, Nima; Javadian, Soheila

    2018-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), CNT@Fe3O4, and Fe3O4 nanocomposites were doped to eutectic uniaxial nematic liquid crystal (NLC's) (E5CN7) to improve physiochemical properties such as phase transition temperature, activation energy (Ea), dielectric anisotropy, and electro-optical properties. The thermal study of nematic phase shows a decrease in the nematic to isotropic phase transition temperature as CNT is doped. However, higher doping concentration of CNTs leads to the further increase in transition temperature. The anchoring effect or π-π interaction plays a key role in N-I phase transition. The functionalization of SWCNTs with Fe3O4 diminishes the CNT aggregation while the magnetic susceptibility is increased. The functionalized CNT doping to NLC's decrease significantly the phase transition temperature compared to doping of non-functionalized CNTs. Attractive interaction between guest and host molecules by magnetic and geometry effect increased the enthalpy and entropy of phase transition in the SWCNT@Fe3O4 sample compared to non-functionalized CNT doped system. Also, the Ea values are decreased as SWCNT@Fe3O4 is doped to pure E5CN7. The difference of N-I phase transition temperature was observed in Fe3O4 and CNT@Fe3O4 compared to SWCNT doped systems. Finally, dielectric anisotropy was increased in the doped system compared to pure NLC.

  11. Structure of a SUMO-binding-motif mimic bound to Smt3p–Ubc9p: conservation of a noncovalent Ubiquitin-like protein–E2 complex as a platform for selective interactions within a SUMO pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, David M.; van Waardenburg, Robert C. A. M.; Borg, Laura A.; McGarity, Sierra; Nourse, Amanda; Waddell, M. Brett; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The SUMO ubiquitin-like proteins play regulatory roles in cell division, transcription, DNA repair, and protein subcellular localization. Paralleling other ubiquitin-like proteins, SUMO proteins are proteolytically processed to maturity, conjugated to targets by E1-E2-E3 cascades, and subsequently recognized by specific downstream effectors containing a SUMO-binding motif (SBM). SUMO and its E2 from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, Smt3p and Ubc9p, are encoded by essential genes. Here we describe the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of a noncovalent Smt3p–Ubc9p complex. Unexpectedly, a heterologous portion of the crystallized complex derived from the expression construct mimics an SBM, and binds Smt3p in a manner resembling SBM binding to human SUMO family members. In the complex, Smt3p binds a surface distal from Ubc9's catalytic cysteine. The structure implies that a single molecule of Smt3p cannot bind concurrently to both the noncovalent binding site and the catalytic cysteine of a single Ubc9p molecule. However, formation of higher-order complexes can occur, where a single Smt3p covalently linked to one Ubc9p's catalytic cysteine also binds noncovalently to another molecule of Ubc9p. Comparison with other structures from the SUMO pathway suggests that formation of the noncovalent Smt3p–Ubc9p complex occurs mutually exclusively with many other Smt3p and Ubc9p interactions in the conjugation cascade. By contrast, high-resolution insights into how Smt3p–Ubc9p can also interact with downstream recognition machineries come from contacts with the SBM mimic. Interestingly, the overall architecture of the Smt3p–Ubc9p complex is strikingly similar to recent structures from the ubiquitin pathway. The results imply that noncovalent ubiquitin-like protein–E2 complexes are conserved platforms, which function as parts of larger assemblies involved many protein post-translational regulatory pathways. PMID:17475278

  12. Pro-recombination role of Srs2 protein requires SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) but is independent of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolesar, Peter; Altmannova, Veronika; Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    2016-01-01

    of SIM in asrs2ΔPIMstrain leads to a decrease in recombination, indicating a pro-recombination role of SUMO. Thus SIM has an ambivalent function in Srs2 regulation; it not only mediates interaction with SUMO-PCNA to promote the anti-recombination function but it also plays a PCNA-independent pro......-recombination role, probably by stimulating the formation of recombination complexes. The fact that deletion of PIM suppresses the phenotypes of Srs2 lacking SIM suggests that proper balance between the anti-recombination PCNA-bound and pro-recombination pools of Srs2 is crucial. Notably, sumoylation of Srs2 itself...

  13. Cooperativity of the SUMO and Ubiquitin Pathways in Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Nie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub or SUMO to DNA repair proteins plays critical roles in maintaining genome stability. These structurally related polypeptides can be viewed as distinct road signs, with each being read by specific protein interaction motifs. Therefore, via their interactions with selective readers in the proteome, ubiquitin and SUMO can elicit distinct cellular responses, such as directing DNA lesions into different repair pathways. On the other hand, through the action of the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL family proteins, ubiquitin and SUMO can cooperate in the form of a hybrid signal. These mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains recruit “effector” proteins such as the AAA+ ATPase Cdc48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 complex that contain both ubiquitin and SUMO interaction motifs. This review will summarize recent key findings on collaborative and distinct roles that ubiquitin and SUMO play in orchestrating DNA damage responses.

  14. Characterization of papillomavirus E1 helicase mutants defective for interaction with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradet-Turcotte, Amelie; Brault, Karine; Titolo, Steve; Howley, Peter M.; Archambault, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    The E1 helicase from BPV and HPV16 interacts with Ubc9 to facilitate viral genome replication. We report that HPV11 E1 also interacts with Ubc9 in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Residues in E1 involved in oligomerization (353-435) were sufficient for binding to Ubc9 in vitro, but the origin-binding and ATPase domains were additionally required in yeast. Nuclear accumulation of BPV E1 was shown previously to depend on its interaction with Ubc9 and sumoylation on lysine 514. In contrast, HPV11 and HPV16 E1 mutants defective for Ubc9 binding remained nuclear even when the SUMO pathway was inhibited. Furthermore, we found that K514 in BPV E1 and the analogous K559 in HPV11 E1 are not essential for nuclear accumulation of E1. These results suggest that the interaction of E1 with Ubc9 is not essential for its nuclear accumulation but, rather, depends on its oligomerization and binding to DNA and ATP.

  15. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  16. Role of the SUMO-interacting motif in HIPK2 targeting to the PML nuclear bodies and regulation of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Ki Sa; Lee, Yun-Ah; Kim, Eui Tae; Lee, Seung-Rock; Ahn, Jin-Hyun; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2011-01-01

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a key regulator of various transcription factors including p53 and CtBP in the DNA damage signaling pathway. PML-nuclear body (NB) is required for HIPK2-mediated p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 and induction of apoptosis. Although PML-NB targeting of HIPK2 has been shown, much is not clear about the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 recruitment to PML-NBs. Here we show that HIPK2 colocalizes specifically with PML-I and PML-IV. Mutational analysis showed that HIPK2 recruitment to PML-IV-NBs is mediated by the SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) of both PML-IV and HIPK2. Wild-type HIPK2 associated with SUMO-conjugated PML-IV at a higher affinity than with un-conjugated PML-IV, while the association of a HIPK2 SIM mutant with SUMO-modified PML-IV was impaired. In colony formation assays, HIPK2 strongly suppressed cell proliferation, but HIPK2 SIM mutants did not. In addition, activation and phosphorylation of p53 at the Ser46 residue were impaired by HIPK2 SIM mutants. These results suggest that SIM-mediated HIPK2 targeting to PML-NBs is crucial for HIPK2-mediated p53 activation and induction of apoptosis.

  17. Sumo-dependent substrate targeting of the SUMO protease Ulp1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westerbeck Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the essential small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO protease Ulp1 is responsible for both removing SUMO/Smt3 from specific target proteins and for processing precursor SUMO into its conjugation-competent form. Ulp1 localizes predominantly to nuclear pore complexes but has also been shown to deconjugate sumoylated septins at the bud-neck of dividing cells. How Ulp1 is directed to bud-neck localized septins and other cytoplasmic deconjugation targets is not well understood. Results Using a structure/function approach, we set out to elucidate features of Ulp1 that are required for substrate targeting. To aid our studies, we took advantage of a catalytically inactive mutant of Ulp1 that is greatly enriched at the septin ring of dividing yeast cells. We found that the localization of Ulp1 to the septins requires both SUMO and specific structural features of Ulp1's catalytic domain. Our analysis identified a 218-amino acid, substrate-trapping mutant of the catalytic domain of Ulp1, Ulp1(3(C580S, that is necessary and sufficient for septin localization. We also used the targeting and SUMO-binding properties of Ulp1(3(C580S to purify Smt3-modified proteins from cell extracts. Conclusions Our study provides novel insights into how the Ulp1 SUMO protease is actively targeted to its substrates in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, we found that a substrate-trapping Ulp1(3(C580S interacts robustly with human SUMO1, SUMO2 and SUMO2 chains, making it a potentially useful tool for the analysis and purification of SUMO-modified proteins.

  18. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Pei-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Kung, Hsing-Jien, E-mail: hkung@nhri.org.tw [Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Division of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 35 Keyan Road, Zhunan, Miaoli County 35053, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-29

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  19. Non-covalent interactions in 2-methylimidazolium copper(II) complex (MeImH)2[Cu(pfbz)4]: Synthesis, characterization, single crystal X-ray structure and packing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Pal; Saini, Anju; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Jitendra; Sathishkumar, Ranganathan; Venugopalan, Paloth

    2017-01-01

    A new anionic copper(II) complex, (MeImH)2 [Cu(pfbz)4] (1) where, MeImH = 2-methylimidazolium and pfbz = pentafluorobenzoate has been isolated by reacting copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate, pentafluorobenzoic acid and 2-methylimidazole in ethanol: water mixture in 1:2:2 molar ratio. This complex 1 has been characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, FT-IR) and conductance measurements. The complex salt crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with space group C2/c. Single crystal X-ray structure determination revealed the presence of discrete ions: [Cu(pfbz)4]2- anion and two 2-methylimidazolium cation (C4H7N2)+. The crystal lattice is stabilized by strong hydrogen bonding and F⋯F interactions between cationic-anionic and the anionic-anionic moieties respectively, besides π-π interactions.

  20. Synthesis and non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes rings: new nanomaterials with lectin affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Leal, Manuel Pernía; Khiar, Noureddine; Fernández, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    We present a mild and practical carbon nanotubes rings (CNRs) synthesis from non-covalent functionalized and water-soluble linear single-wall carbon nanotubes. The hemi-micellar–supramolecular self-organization of lactose-based glycolipid 1 on the ring surface, followed by photo-polymerization of the diacetylenic function triggered by UV light afforded the first water-soluble and biocompatible CNRs. The obtained donut-like nanoconstructs expose a high density of lactose moieties on their surface, and are able to engage specific interactions with Arachis hypogea lectin similar to glycoconjugates on the cell membrane. (paper)

  1. Non-covalent interaction between dietary stilbenoids and human serum albumin: Structure-affinity relationship, and its influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Jia, Xueping; Shi, Jian; Xiao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are associated with many benefits for human health, which depend on their bioavailability and bioaccessibility. The stilbenoid-human serum albumin (HSA) interactions are investigated to explore the structure-affinity relationship and influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids. The structure-affinity relationship of the stilbenoids-HSA interaction was found as: (1) the methoxylation enhanced the affinity, (2) an additional hydroxyl group increases the affinity and (3) the glycosylation significantly weakened the affinity. HSA obviously masked the free radical scavenging potential of stilbenoids. The stabilities of stilbenoids in different medium were determined as: HSA solution>human plasma>Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. It appears that the milk enhanced the cell uptake of stilbenoids with multi-hydroxyl groups and weakened the cell uptake of stilbenoids with methoxyl group on EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. The stilbenoids are hardly absorbed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramachandran, Annie M; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Covalent posttranslational modification with SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) modulates functions of a wide range of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Sumoylation affects the activity, interaction properties, subcellular localization and the stability of its substrate proteins. The recent discovery of a novel class of ubiquitin ligases (E3), termed ULS (E3-S) or STUbL, that recognize sumoylated proteins, links SUMO modification to the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Here we review recent insights into the properties and function of these ligases and their roles in regulating sumoylated proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Preventing disulfide bond formation weakens non-covalent forces among lysozyme aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ravi

    Full Text Available Nonnative disulfide bonds have been observed among protein aggregates in several diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cataract and so on. The molecular mechanism by which formation of such bonds promotes protein aggregation is poorly understood. Here in this work we employ previously well characterized aggregation of hen eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL at alkaline pH to dissect the molecular role of nonnative disulfide bonds on growth of HEWL aggregates. We employed time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the size, morphology and non-covalent interaction forces among the aggregates, respectively. These measurements were performed under conditions when disulfide bond formation was allowed (control and alternatively when it was prevented by alkylation of free thiols using iodoacetamide. Blocking disulfide bond formation affected growth but not growth kinetics of aggregates which were ∼50% reduced in volume, flatter in vertical dimension and non-fibrillar in comparison to control. Interestingly, single-molecule force spectroscopy data revealed that preventing disulfide bond formation weakened the non-covalent interaction forces among monomers in the aggregate by at least ten fold, thereby stalling their growth and yielding smaller aggregates in comparison to control. We conclude that while constrained protein chain dynamics in correctly disulfide bonded amyloidogenic proteins may protect them from venturing into partial folded conformations that can trigger entry into aggregation pathways, aberrant disulfide bonds in non-amyloidogenic proteins (like HEWL on the other hand, may strengthen non-covalent intermolecular forces among monomers and promote their aggregation.

  4. Structural analysis of poly-SUMO chain recognition by the RNF4-SIMs domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Camy C-H; Naik, Mandar T; Wang, Szu-Huan; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Chang, Che-Chang; Lin, Li-Ying; Chen, Chia-Lin; Ma, Che; Chang, Chi-Fon; Huang, Tai-Huang

    2014-08-15

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF4 (RING finger protein 4) contains four tandem SIM [SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier)-interaction motif] repeats for selective interaction with poly-SUMO-modified proteins, which it targets for degradation. We employed a multi-faceted approach to characterize the structure of the RNF4-SIMs domain and the tetra-SUMO2 chain to elucidate the interaction between them. In solution, the SIM domain was intrinsically disordered and the linkers of the tetra-SUMO2 were highly flexible. Individual SIMs of the RNF4-SIMs domains bind to SUMO2 in the groove between the β2-strand and the α1-helix parallel to the β2-strand. SIM2 and SIM3 bound to SUMO with a high affinity and together constituted the recognition module necessary for SUMO binding. SIM4 alone bound to SUMO with low affinity; however, its contribution to tetra-SUMO2 binding avidity is comparable with that of SIM3 when in the RNF4-SIMs domain. The SAXS data of the tetra-SUMO2-RNF4-SIMs domain complex indicate that it exists as an ordered structure. The HADDOCK model showed that the tandem RNF4-SIMs domain bound antiparallel to the tetra-SUMO2 chain orientation and wrapped around the SUMO protamers in a superhelical turn without imposing steric hindrance on either molecule.

  5. Synthetic, XRD, non-covalent interactions and solvent dependent nonlinear optical studies of Sulfadiazine-Ortho-Vanillin Schiff base: (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxy- benzylidene) amino)-N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Salim, Muhammad; Khalid, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Khan, Muhammad Usman; Braga, Ataualpa Albert Carmo

    2018-06-01

    In this study, Sulfadiazine-Ortho-Vanillin Schiff base namely (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)amino)sbnd N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide (BS) was synthesized. Chemical characterization and computational studies using different techniques like XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis, NBO, FMO, and MEP have been employed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory to obtain optimized geometry and vibrational wave numbers for (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)amino)sbnd N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide (BS). The DFT optimized geometry supports the experimental XRD parameters. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energies and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces have been executed at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory. NBO analysis has been carried out at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level which not only discovered the hyper conjugative interactions and stability in title molecule but also reconfirmed the existence of Nsbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds between the dimer. The findings of small EHOMO-ELUMO gap shows less hardness and larger softness values which suggested the bioactiveness of the title molecule. Finally, the effect of solvent on nonlinear optical (NLO) properties has been executed using M06-2X level of theory and 6-311 + G (d,p) basis set. The solvent polarity enhanced the NLO response from 3.62 × 10-30 esu to 4.66 × 10-30 esu indicating the considerable NLO character hence in general may have potential applications in the development of non-linear optical materials.

  6. Non-covalent and reversible functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Di Crescenzo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been proposed and actively explored as multipurpose innovative nanoscaffolds for applications in fields such as material science, drug delivery and diagnostic applications. Their versatile physicochemical features are nonetheless limited by their scarce solubilization in both aqueous and organic solvents. In order to overcome this drawback CNTs can be easily non-covalently functionalized with different dispersants. In the present review we focus on the peculiar hydrophobic character of pristine CNTs that prevent them to easily disperse in organic solvents. We report some interesting examples of CNTs dispersants with the aim to highlight the essential features a molecule should possess in order to act as a good carbon nanotube dispersant both in water and in organic solvents. The review pinpoints also a few examples of dispersant design. The last section is devoted to the exploitation of the major quality of non-covalent functionalization that is its reversibility and the possibility to obtain stimuli-responsive precipitation or dispersion of CNTs.

  7. Enzymatic Activity Enhancement of Non-Covalent Modified Superoxide Dismutase and Molecular Docking Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Jun Song

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase was improved in the pyrogallol autoxidation system by about 27%, after interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclo- dextrin and superoxide dismutase. Fluorescence spectrometry was used to study the interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and superoxide dismutase at different temperatures. By doing this, it can be found that these interactions increase fluorescence sensitivity. In the meantime, the synchronous fluorescence intensity revealed the interaction sites to be close to the tryptophan (Trp and tyrosine (Tyr residues of superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to explore the binding mode between the ligands and the receptor. This suggested that HP-β-CD interacted with the B ring, G ring and the O ring and revealed that the lysine (Lys residues enter the nanocavity. It was concluded that the HP-β-CD caused specific conformational changes in SOD by non-covalent modification.

  8. Global SUMO proteome responses guide gene regulation, mRNA biogenesis, and plant stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena eMazur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Small-ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO is a key regulator of abiotic stress, disease resistance and development in plants. The identification of >350 plant SUMO targets has revealed many processes modulated by SUMO and potential consequences of SUMO on its targets. Importantly, highly related proteins are SUMO-modified in plants, yeast, and metazoans. Overlapping SUMO targets include heat-shock proteins, transcription regulators, histones, histone-modifying enzymes, proteins involved in DNA damage repair, but also proteins involved in mRNA biogenesis and nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Proteomics studies indicate key roles for SUMO in gene repression by controlling histone (deacetylation activity at genomic loci. The responsible heavily sumoylated transcriptional repressor complexes are recruited by EAR (Ethylene-responsive element binding factor [ERF]-associated Amphiphilic Repression-motif containing transcription factors in plants. These transcription factors are not necessarily themselves a SUMO target. Conversely, SUMO acetylation prevents binding of downstream partners by preventing binding of SIMs (SUMO-interaction peptide motifs presents in these partners, while SUMO acetylation has emerged as mechanism to recruit specifically bromodomains; bromodomain are generally linked with gene activation. These findings strengthen the idea of a bidirectional sumo-/acetylation switch in gene regulation. Quantitative proteomics has highlighted that global sumoylation provides a dynamic response to protein damage involving SUMO chain-mediated protein degradation, but also SUMO E3 ligase-dependent transcription of HSP (Heat-shock protein genes. With these insights in SUMO function and novel technical advancements, we can now study SUMO dynamics in responses to (abiotic stress in plants.

  9. Non-Covalent Organocatalyzed Domino Reactions Involving Oxindoles: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tecla Gasperi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of spirooxindole architectures with several functionalities and stereogenic centers in bioactive molecules has been appealing for the development of novel methodologies seeking their preparation in high yields and selectivities. Expansion and refinement in the field of asymmetric organocatalysis have made possible the development of straightforward strategies that address these two requisites. In this review, we illustrate the current state-of-the-art in the field of spirooxindole synthesis through the use of non-covalent organocatalysis. We aim to provide a concise overview of very recent methods that allow to the isolation of unique, densely and diversified spirocyclic oxindole derivatives with high structural diversity via the use of cascade, tandem and domino processes.

  10. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  11. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili; Abdurahman, Ayjamal; Gü lseren, Oğuz; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  12. Meiosis and SUMO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lærke Rebekka

    to target proteins can be catalyzed by the SUMO E3 ligase Pli1. In this study we investigate the role of Pli1 and Pmt3 during meiotic differentiation and at repetitive DNA during mitotic growth. Target proteins for Pmt3 are many; however, Pli1 has a meiosis-specic function regulating meiotic recombination...

  13. Identification and molecular properties of SUMO-binding proteins in arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hyeongcheol

    2011-05-20

    Reversible conjugation of the small ubiquitin modifier (SUMO) peptide to proteins (SUMOylation) plays important roles in cellular processes in animals and yeasts. However, little is known about plant SUMO targets. To identify SUMO substrates in Arabidopsis and to probe for biological functions of SUMO proteins, we constructed 6xHis-3xFLAG fused AtSUMO1 (HFAtSUMO1) controlled by the CaMV35S promoter for transformation into Arabidopsis Col-0. After heat treatment, an increased sumoylation pattern was detected in the transgenic plants. SUMO1-modified proteins were selected after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) image analysis and identified using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We identified 27 proteins involved in a variety of processes such as nucleic acid metabolism, signaling, metabolism, and including proteins of unknown functions. Binding and sumoylation patterns were confirmed independently. Surprisingly, MCM3 (At5G46280), a DNA replication licensing factor, only interacted with and became sumoylated by AtSUMO1, but not by SUMO1ΔGG or AtSUMO3. The results suggest specific interactions between sumoylation targets and particular sumoylation enzymes. ©2011 KSMCB.

  14. A Critical SUMO1 Modification of LKB1 Regulates AMPK Activity during Energy Stress

    KAUST Repository

    Ritho, Joan

    2015-07-23

    SUMOylation has been implicated in cellular stress adaptation, but its role in regulating liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a major upstream kinase of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), is unknown. Here, we show that energy stress triggers an increase in SUMO1 modification of LKB1, despite a global reduction in both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 conjugates. During metabolic stress, SUMO1 modification of LKB1 lysine 178 is essential in promoting its interaction with AMPK via a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) essential for AMPK activation. The LKB1 K178R SUMO mutant had defective AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function, inducing death in energy-deprived cells. These results provide additional insight into how LKB1-AMPK signaling is regulated during energy stress, and they highlight the critical role of SUMOylation in maintaining the cell’s energy equilibrium.

  15. A Critical SUMO1 Modification of LKB1 Regulates AMPK Activity during Energy Stress

    KAUST Repository

    Ritho, Joan; Arold, Stefan T.; Yeh, Edward  T.H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation has been implicated in cellular stress adaptation, but its role in regulating liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a major upstream kinase of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), is unknown. Here, we show that energy stress triggers an increase in SUMO1 modification of LKB1, despite a global reduction in both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 conjugates. During metabolic stress, SUMO1 modification of LKB1 lysine 178 is essential in promoting its interaction with AMPK via a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) essential for AMPK activation. The LKB1 K178R SUMO mutant had defective AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function, inducing death in energy-deprived cells. These results provide additional insight into how LKB1-AMPK signaling is regulated during energy stress, and they highlight the critical role of SUMOylation in maintaining the cell’s energy equilibrium.

  16. A putative SUMO interacting motif in the B30.2/SPRY domain of rhesus macaque TRIM5α important for NF-κB/AP-1 signaling and HIV-1 restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Édith Nepveu-Traversy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TRIM5α from the rhesus macaque (TRIM5αRh is a restriction factor that shows strong activity against HIV-1. TRIM5αRh binds specifically to HIV-1 capsid (CA through its B30.2/PRYSPRY domain shortly after entry of the virus into the cytoplasm. Recently, three putative SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs have been identified in the PRYSPRY domain of human and macaque TRIM5α. However, structural modeling of this domain suggested that two of them were buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein, implying that interaction with SUMO was implausible, while the third one was not relevant to restriction. In light of these results, we re-analyzed the TRIM5αRh PRYSPRY sequence and identified an additional putative SIM (435VIIC438 which we named SIM4. This motif is exposed at the surface of the PRYSPRY domain, allowing potential interactions with SUMO or SUMOylated proteins. Introducing a double mutation in SIM4 (V435K, I436K did not alter stability, unlike mutations in SIM1. SIM4-mutated TRIM5αRh failed to bind HIV-1CA and lost the ability to restrict this virus. Accordingly, SIM4 undergoes significant variation among primates and substituting this motif with naturally occurring SIM4 variants affected HIV-1 restriction by TRIM5αRh, suggesting a direct role in capsid recognition. Interestingly, SIM4-mutated TRIM5αRh also failed to activate NF-κB and AP-1-mediated transcription. Although there is no direct evidence that SIM4 is involved in direct interaction with SUMO or a SUMOylated protein, mutating this motif strongly reduced co-localization of TRIM5αRh with SUMO-1 and with PML, a SUMOylated nuclear protein. In conclusion, this new putative SIM is crucial for both direct interaction with incoming capsids and for NF-κB/AP-1 signaling. We speculate that the latter function is mediated by interactions of SIM4 with a SUMOylated protein involved in the NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways.

  17. 2nd SUMO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the conference proceedings of the Simulation of Urban Mobility (SUMO) conference 2014, Berlin. The included research papers cover a wide range of topics in traffic planning and simulation, including open data, vehicular communication, e-mobility, urban mobility, multimodal traffic as well as usage approaches. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.  

  18. The p150 subunit of CAF-1 causes association of SUMO2/3 with the DNA replication foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwada, Junsuke; Tanaka, Niina; Yamaguchi, Yutaro; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Shibahara, Kei-ichi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Hisato

    2010-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-related modifier 2/3 (SUMO2/3) can be post-translationally conjugated to a wide variety of proteins constituting chromatin, the platform for genetic and epigenetic regulation. Nevertheless, it is unclear how SUMO2/3 and SUMO2/3-modified proteins are delivered to the chromatin fibers. Here we report that the largest subunit of chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1), human p150, interacts directly and preferentially with SUMO2/3. Amino acid residue of 98-105 in p150 is essential and sufficient for SUMO2/3 interaction. p150-SUMO2/3 interaction coincided with regions that replicate chromatin fibers, because accumulation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) were detected at foci co-localized with both p150 and SUMO2/3 during the S-phase in a cell line expressing epitope-tagged p150. Although inhibition of SUMO2/3 expression had only a small effect on p150 deposition on the replication sites, depletion of p150 led to delocalization of SUMO2/3 from the replication foci. Furthermore, p150 mutants deficient in SUMO2/3 interaction, caused a major reduction of SUMO2/3 at the replication foci. Thus, our findings suggest an expanded role of p150 as a SUMO2/3-interacting factor, and raise the intriguing possibility that p150 plays a role in promoting delivery of SUMO2/3 or SUMO2/3-modified proteins (or both) on chromatin fibers during replication.

  19. Stable non-covalent labeling of layered silicate nanoparticles for biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Gysell M; Jack, Kevin S; Musumeci, Anthony W; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2016-04-01

    Layered silicate nanoparticles (LSN) are widely used in industrial applications and consumer products. They also have potential benefits in biomedical applications such as implantable devices and for drug delivery. To study how nanomaterials interact with cells and tissues, techniques to track and quantify their movement through different biological compartments are essential. While radiolabels can be very sensitive, particularly for in vivo studies, fluorescent labeling has been preferred in recent years because of the array of methods available to image and quantify fluorescent nanoparticles. However, labeling can be problematic, especially if it alters the physical properties of the nanomaterial. Herein is described a novel non-covalent labeling technique for LSN using readily available fluorescent dimeric cyanine dyes without the need to use excess amounts of dye to achieve labeling, or the need for removal of unbound dye. The approach utilizes the cationic binding properties of layered silicate clays and the multiple quaternary nitrogens associated with the dyes. Preparation of YOYO-1 labeled LSN with optimal dispersion in aqueous media is presented. The utilization of the labeled particles is then demonstrated in cell binding and uptake studies using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The labeled LSN are highly fluorescent, stable and exhibit identical physical properties with respect to the unlabeled nanoparticles. The general approach described here is applicable to other cyanine dyes and may be utilized more widely for labeling nanoparticles that comprise a crystalline plate structure with a high binding capacity. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol from contaminated water using non-covalent imprinted microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Li Xin; Li Yuqi; Qi Jingyao; Bian Jiang; Yuan Yixing

    2009-01-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for selective removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in water was prepared as microspheres by the reverse microemulsion polymerization method based on the non-covalent interactions between 2,4-DCP, oleic acid, and divinylbenzene in acetonitrile. Microspheres have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) studies with evidence of 2,4-DCP linkage in polymer particles and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study their morphological properties. The proper adsorption and selective recognition ability of the MIP were studied by an equilibrium-adsorption method. The MIP showed outstanding affinity towards 2,4-DCP in aqueous solution and the optimum pH value for binding has been found around the neutral range. The molecular recognition of 2,4-DCP was analyzed in detail by using molecular modeling software. In addition, by investigating the variation in the adsorption ability of the MIP, it clearly showed excellent reproducibility. - Molecular imprinting has potential as a remediation technology in water treatment.

  1. Relationships between Cargo, Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cell Type for Uptake of Non-Covalent Complexes into Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea-Anneliese Keller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Modulating signaling pathways for research and therapy requires either suppression or expression of selected genes or internalization of proteins such as enzymes, antibodies, nucleotide binding proteins or substrates including nucleoside phosphates and enzyme inhibitors. Peptides, proteins and nucleotides are transported by fusing or conjugating them to cell penetrating peptides or by formation of non-covalent complexes. The latter is often preferred because of easy handling, uptake efficiency and auto-release of cargo into the live cell. In our studies complexes are formed with labeled or readily detectable cargoes for qualitative and quantitative estimation of their internalization. Properties and behavior of adhesion and suspension vertebrate cells as well as the protozoa Leishmania tarentolae are investigated with respect to proteolytic activity, uptake efficiency, intracellular localization and cytotoxicity. Our results show that peptide stability to membrane-bound, secreted or intracellular proteases varies between different CPPs and that the suitability of individual CPPs for a particular cargo in complex formation by non-covalent interactions requires detailed studies. Cells vary in their sensitivity to increasing concentrations of CPPs. Thus, most cells can be efficiently transduced with peptides, proteins and nucleotides with intracellular concentrations in the low micromole range. For each cargo, cell type and CPP the optimal conditions must be determined separately.

  2. Crystal structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GlgE and complexes with non-covalent inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberger, Jared J.; Veleti, Sri Kumar; Wilson, Brittney N.; Sucheck, Steven J.; Ronning, Donald R. (Toledo)

    2015-08-06

    GlgE is a bacterial maltosyltransferase that catalyzes the elongation of a cytosolic, branched α-glucan. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), inactivation of GlgE (Mtb GlgE) results in the rapid death of the organism due to a toxic accumulation of the maltosyl donor, maltose-1-phosphate (M1P), suggesting that GlgE is an intriguing target for inhibitor design. In this study, the crystal structures of the Mtb GlgE in a binary complex with maltose and a ternary complex with maltose and a maltosyl-acceptor molecule, maltohexaose, were solved to 3.3 Å and 4.0 Å, respectively. The maltohexaose structure reveals a dominant site for α-glucan binding. To obtain more detailed interactions between first generation, non-covalent inhibitors and GlgE, a variant Streptomyces coelicolor GlgEI (Sco GlgEI-V279S) was made to better emulate the Mtb GlgE M1P binding site. The structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S complexed with α-maltose-C-phosphonate (MCP), a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, was solved to 1.9 Å resolution, and the structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S complexed with 2,5-dideoxy-3-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-2,5-imino-D-mannitol (DDGIM), an oxocarbenium mimic, was solved to 2.5 Å resolution. These structures detail important interactions that contribute to the inhibitory activity of these compounds, and provide information on future designs that may be exploited to improve upon these first generation GlgE inhibitors.

  3. Nano-mechanics of Tunable Adhesion using Non Covalent Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Liechti

    2012-09-08

    The objective of this program was to examine, via experiment and atomistic and continuum analysis, coordinated noncovalent bonding over a range of length scales with a view to obtaining modulated, patterned and reversible bonding at the molecular level. The first step in this project was to develop processes for depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing carboxylic acid and amine moieties on Si (111) surfaces and probe tips of an interfacial force microscope (IFM). This allowed the adhesive portion of the interactions between functionalized surfaces to be fully captured in the force-displacement response (force profiles) that are measured by the IFM. The interactionswere extracted in the form of traction-separation laws using combined molecular and continuum stress analyses. In this approach, the results of molecular dynamics analyses of SAMs subjected to simple stress states are used to inform continuum models of their stress-strain behavior. Continuum analyses of the IFM experiment were then conducted, which incorporate the stress-strain behavior of the SAMs and traction-separation relations that represent the interactions between the tip and functionalized Si surface. Agreement between predicted and measured force profiles was taken to imply that the traction-separation relations have been properly extracted. Scale up to larger contact areas was considered by forming Si/SAM/Si sandwiches and then separating them via fracture experiments. The mode 1 traction-separation relations have been extracted using fracture mechanics concepts under mode 1 and mixed-mode conditions. Interesting differences were noted between the three sets of traction-separation relations.

  4. Catalyst recycling via specific non-covalent adsorption on modified silicas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluwer, A.M.; Simons, C.; Knijnenburg, Q.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new strategy for the recycling of a homogeneous hydroformylation catalyst, by selective adsorption of the catalyst to tailor-made supports after a batchwise reaction. The separation of the catalyst from the product mixture is based on selective non-covalent supramolecular

  5. Non-covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures for synthesizing carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Song, Sing I; Song, Ga Young; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanodiamonds provide an important type of substrate for constructing a variety of hybrid nanomaterials. However, their intrinsic chemistry-inert surfaces make it indispensable to pre-functionalize them prior to immobilizing additional components onto their surfaces. Currently developed strategies for functionalizing CNSs include covalent and non-covalent approaches. Conventional covalent treatments often damage the structure integrity of carbon surfaces and adversely affect their physical properties. In contrast, the non-covalent approach offers a non-destructive way to modify CNSs with desired functional surfaces, while reserving their intrinsic properties. Thus far, a number of surface modifiers including aromatic compounds, small-molecular surfactants, amphiphilic polymers, and biomacromolecules have been developed to non-covalently functionalize CNS surfaces. Mediated by these surface modifiers, various functional components such as organic species and inorganic nanoparticles were further decorated onto their surfaces, resulting in versatile carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials with broad applications in chemical engineering and biomedical areas. In this review, the recent advances in the generation of such hybrid nanostructures based on non-covalently functionalized CNSs will be reviewed.

  6. SUMO Signaling by Hypoxic Inactivation of SUMO-Specific Isopeptidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Kunz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification of proteins with ubiquitin-like SUMO modifiers is a tightly regulated and highly dynamic process. The SENP family of SUMO-specific isopeptidases comprises six cysteine proteases. They are instrumental in counterbalancing SUMO conjugation, but their regulation is not well understood. We demonstrate that in hypoxic cell extracts, the catalytic activity of SENP family members, in particular SENP1 and SENP3, is inhibited in a rapid and fully reversible process. Comparative mass spectrometry from normoxic and hypoxic cells defines a subset of hypoxia-induced SUMO1 targets, including SUMO ligases RanBP2 and PIAS2, glucose transporter 1, and transcriptional regulators. Among the most strongly induced targets, we identified the transcriptional co-repressor BHLHE40, which controls hypoxic gene expression programs. We provide evidence that SUMOylation of BHLHE40 is reversed by SENP1 and contributes to transcriptional repression of the metabolic master regulator gene PGC-1α. We propose a pathway that connects oxygen-controlled SENP activity to hypoxic reprogramming of metabolism.

  7. Strategies to balance covalent and non-covalent biomolecule attachment within collagen-GAG biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Jacquelyn C; Gonnerman, Emily A; Bailey, Ryan C; Harley, Brendan A C

    2014-09-01

    Strategies to integrate instructive biomolecular signals into a biomaterial are becoming increasingly complex and bioinspired. While a large majority of reports still use repeated treatments with soluble factors, this approach can be prohibitively costly and difficult to translate in vivo for applications where spatial control over signal presentation is necessary. Recent efforts have explored the use of covalent immobilization of biomolecules to the biomaterial, via both bulk (ubiquitous) as well as spatially-selective light-based crosslinking, as a means to both enhance stability and bioactivity. However, little is known about how processing conditions during immobilization impact the degree of unintended non-covalent interactions, or fouling, that takes place between the biomaterial and the biomolecule of interest. Here we demonstrate the impact of processing conditions for bulk carbodiimide (EDC) and photolithography-based benzophenone (BP) crosslinking on specific attachment vs. fouling of a model protein (Concanavalin A, ConA) within collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds. Collagen source significantly impacts the selectivity of biomolecule immobilization. EDC crosslinking intensity and ligand concentration significantly impacted selective immobilization. For benzophenone photoimmobilization we observed that increased UV exposure time leads to increased ConA immobilization. Immobilization efficiency for both EDC and BP strategies was maximal at physiological pH. Increasing ligand concentration during immobilization process led to enhanced immobilization for EDC chemistry, no impact on BP immobilization, but significant increases in non-specific fouling. Given recent efforts to covalently immobilize biomolecules to a biomaterial surface to enhance bioactivity, improved understanding of the impact of crosslinking conditions on selective attachment versus non-specific fouling will inform the design of instructive biomaterials for applications across tissue

  8. Second-Generation Non-Covalent NAAA Inhibitors are Protective in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Marco; Pontis, Silvia; Fuentes de Arriba, Angel Luis; Realini, Natalia; Torrente, Esther; Armirotti, Andrea; Romeo, Elisa; Di Martino, Simona; Russo, Debora; Pizzirani, Daniela; Summa, Maria; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Ottonello, Giuliana; Busquet, Perrine; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Garcia-Guzman, Miguel; Heim, Roger; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-09-05

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) are endogenous lipid mediators that suppress inflammation. Their actions are terminated by the intracellular cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA). Even though NAAA may offer a new target for anti-inflammatory therapy, the lipid-like structures and reactive warheads of current NAAA inhibitors limit the use of these agents as oral drugs. A series of novel benzothiazole-piperazine derivatives that inhibit NAAA in a potent and selective manner by a non-covalent mechanism are described. A prototype member of this class (8) displays high oral bioavailability, access to the central nervous system (CNS), and strong activity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). This compound exemplifies a second generation of non-covalent NAAA inhibitors that may be useful in the treatment of MS and other chronic CNS disorders. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes: Controlling Chirality Selectivity via Alkyl Groups of Conjugated Co-Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight, Braden; Gifford, Brendan; Kilina, Svetlana

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) play an important role in nanotechnology, including electronics, chemical sensors, and solar cells. Their electronic and optical properties depend on the size and geometry (chirality) of the nanotube. However, one main concern regarding nanotube application in optoelectronic devices is the difficulty of separating them based upon chirality after synthesis, as all known synthesis methods produce more than one chirality simultaneously. To get around this, one method is the functionalization of the CNTs via non-covalent bonding of co-polymers by wrapping them around the tube. We use force field simulations to explore the effects of various structural manipulations to the co-polymer 9,9-dialkylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl bipyridine (PFO-BPY) to find the preferential mechanisms of selective interactions between the PFO-BPY and CNTs of various chiralities. In particular, we focus on the effect of the branching in alkyl side-groups of PFO-BPY on their binding to the CNT surface. We have observed correlations between the side-group structures and their wrapping morphology on the CNT-Polymer interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that the branching in the position closest to the conjugated backboned results in the strongest interaction with all CNT. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (CHE 1413614) and the Center for Computationally-Assisted Science and Technology at NDSU.

  10. The SUMO Pathway in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Debaditya; Dasso, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Mitosis is the stage of the cell cycle during which replicated chromosomes must be precisely divided to allow the formation of two daughter cells possessing equal genetic material. Much of the careful spatial and temporal organization of mitosis is maintained through post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination, of key cellular proteins. Here, we will review evidence that sumoylation, conjugation to the SUMO family of small ubiquitin-like modifiers, also serves essential regulatory roles during mitosis. We will discuss the basic biology of sumoylation, how the SUMO pathway has been implicated in particular mitotic functions, including chromosome condensation, centromere/kinetochore organization and cytokinesis, and what cellular proteins may be the targets underlying these phenomena.

  11. Caspase recruitment domain of procaspase-2 could be a target for SUMO-1 modification through Ubc9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakura, Hiromi; Hayashi, Naoko; Ogino, Shin-ichi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Uehara, Takashi; Nomura, Yasuyuki

    2005-01-01

    To identify the binding proteins that regulate the function of procaspase-2, we screened for proteins using the yeast two-hybrid method and isolated human Ubc9 and SUMO-1 as the candidates. Ubc9 and SUMO-1 interacted with the caspase recruitment domain of procaspase-2 in its N-terminal. We elucidated the covalent modification of procaspase-2 by SUMO-1 in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis. Procaspase-2 and SUMO-1 were co-localized by dot-like structures in the nucleus that are related to promyelocytic leukemia bodies. Interestingly, a conjugation-deficient mutant (K60R) procaspase-2 resulted in a delay of its enzyme maturation (appearance of p12 subunit) compared to that of wild-type. Thus, the modification with SUMO-1 may play a critical role in the nuclear localization and the activation (maturation) of procaspase-2

  12. The effect of non-covalent functionalization on the thermal conductance of graphene/organic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shangchao; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic interfacial thermal resistance at graphene/organic interfaces, as a result of mismatches in the phonon vibrational spectra of the two materials, diminishes the overall heat transfer performance of graphene/organic nanocomposites. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to design alkyl-pyrene molecules that can non-covalently functionalize graphene surfaces in contact with a model organic phase composed of octane. The alkyl-pyrene molecules possess phonon-spectra features of both graphene and octane and, therefore, can serve as phonon-spectra linkers to bridge the vibrational mismatch at the graphene/octane interface. In support of this hypothesis, we find that the best linker candidate can enhance the out-of-plane graphene/organic interfacial thermal conductance by ∼22%, attributed to its capability to compensate the low-frequency phonon mode of graphene. We also find that the length of the alkyl chain indirectly affects the interfacial thermal conductance through different orientations of these chains because they dictate the contribution of the out-of-plane high-frequency carbon–hydrogen bond vibrations to the overall phonon transport. This study advances our understanding of the less destructive non-covalent functionalization method and design principles of suitable linker molecules to enhance the thermal performance of graphene/organic nanocomposites while retaining the intrinsic chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties of pristine graphene. (paper)

  13. Non-covalent conjugation of cutinase from Fusarium sp. ICT SAC1 with pectin for enhanced stability: Process minutiae, kinetics, thermodynamics and structural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, Abhijeet B; Chaudhari, Sandeep A; Singhal, Rekha S

    2017-09-01

    Cutinase, a member of α/β-fold hydrolase family possess potentially diverse applications in several industrial processes and products. The present work aims towards thermo-stabilization of cutinase from novel source Fusarium sp. ICT SAC1 via non-covalent interaction with polysaccharides. Although all six polysaccharides chosen for study enhanced the thermal stability, pectin was found to be most promising. The interaction protocol for cutinase with pectin was optimized sequentially with respect to the ratio of enzyme to pectin, solution pH, and buffer strength. Cutinase-pectin conjugate under optimized conditions (1:12, pH-6.5, 50mM) showed enhanced thermal stability as evident from lower inactivation rate constant, higher half-life and D-value within the 40-55°C. A slender rise in K m and V max values and enhanced thermodynamic parameters of cutinase-pectin conjugate were observed after non-covalent interaction. Entropy values were 1.5-fold higher for cutinase-pectin conjugate at each temperature suggesting an upsurge in number of protein molecules in a transition activated state. Positive values of entropy for both forms of cutinase suggested a rise in disordered conformation. Noticeable conformational changes in cutinase after conjugation with pectin were confirmed by FTIR as well as fluorescence emission spectra. An increment in helix to turn conversion was observed in complexed cutinase vis-à-vis free cutinase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evolution of SUMO Function and Chain Formation in Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña, Enric; Pirone, Lucia; Chafino, Silvia; Pérez, Coralia; Sutherland, James D; Lang, Valérie; Rodriguez, Manuel S; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Blanco, Francisco J; Barrio, Rosa; Martín, David

    2016-02-01

    SUMOylation, the covalent binding of Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) to target proteins, is a posttranslational modification that regulates critical cellular processes in eukaryotes. In insects, SUMOylation has been studied in holometabolous species, particularly in the dipteran Drosophila melanogaster, which contains a single SUMO gene (smt3). This has led to the assumption that insects contain a single SUMO gene. However, the analysis of insect genomes shows that basal insects contain two SUMO genes, orthologous to vertebrate SUMO1 and SUMO2/3. Our phylogenetical analysis reveals that the SUMO gene has been duplicated giving rise to SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 families early in Metazoan evolution, and that later in insect evolution the SUMO1 gene has been lost after the Hymenoptera divergence. To explore the consequences of this loss, we have examined the characteristics and different biological functions of the two SUMO genes (SUMO1 and SUMO3) in the hemimetabolous cockroach Blattella germanica and compared them with those of Drosophila Smt3. Here, we show that the metamorphic role of the SUMO genes is evolutionary conserved in insects, although there has been a regulatory switch from SUMO1 in basal insects to SUMO3 in more derived ones. We also show that, unlike vertebrates, insect SUMO3 proteins cannot form polySUMO chains due to the loss of critical lysine residues within the N-terminal part of the protein. Furthermore, the formation of polySUMO chains by expression of ectopic human SUMO3 has a deleterious effect in Drosophila. These findings contribute to the understanding of the functional consequences of the evolution of SUMO genes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. SUMO-1 promotes association of SNURF (RNF4) with PML nuclear bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haekli, Marika; Karvonen, Ulla; Jaenne, Olli A.; Palvimo, Jorma J.

    2005-01-01

    Small nuclear RING finger protein SNURF (RNF4) is involved in transcriptional and cell growth regulation. We show here that a significant portion of endogenous SNURF localizes to nuclear bodies (NBs) that overlap with or are adjacent to domains containing endogenous promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein and small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO-1). In biochemical assays, SNURF efficiently binds SUMO-1 in a noncovalent fashion. SNURF is also covalently modified by SUMO-1 at nonconsensus attachment sites. Ectopic expression of SUMO-1 markedly enhances the interaction between PML3 (PML IV) and SNURF, but covalent attachment of SUMO-1 to neither protein is required. Moreover, overexpression of PML3, but not PML-L (PML III), abolishes the coactivation function of SNURF in transactivation assays, which parallels the ability of PML3 to recruit SNURF to nuclear bodies. In sum, we have identified SNURF as a novel component in PML bodies and suggest that SUMO-1-facilitated sequestration into these nuclear domains regulates the transcriptional activity of SNURF

  16. Senp1 Is Essential for Desumoylating Sumo1-Modified Proteins but Dispensable for Sumo2 and Sumo3 Deconjugation in the Mouse Embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Sharma

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modification with small ubiquitin-like modifier (Sumo regulates numerous cellular and developmental processes. Sumoylation is dynamic with deconjugation by Sumo-specific proteases (Senps regulating steady-state levels. Different Senps are found in distinct subcellular domains, which may limit their deconjugation activity to colocalizing Sumo-modified proteins. In vitro, Senps can discriminate between the different Sumo paralogs: Sumo1 versus the highly related Sumo2 and Sumo3 (Sumo2/3, which can form poly-Sumo chains. However, a full understanding of Senp specificity in vivo is still lacking. Here, using biochemical and genetic approaches, we establish that Senp1 has an essential, nonredundant function to desumoylate Sumo1-modified proteins during mouse embryonic development. Senp1 specificity for Sumo1 conjugates represents an intrinsic function and not simply a product of colocalization. In contrast, Senp1 has only a limited role in Sumo2/3 desumoylation, although it may regulate Sumo1-mediated termination of poly-Sumo2/3 chains.

  17. SUMO expression shortens the lag phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast growth caused by complex interactive effects of major mixed fermentation inhibitors found in hot-compressed water-treated lignocellulosic hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakody, Lahiru N; Kadowaki, Masafumi; Tsuge, Keisuke; Horie, Kenta; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The complex inhibitory effects of inhibitors present in lignocellulose hydrolysate suppress the ethanol fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the interactive inhibitory effects play important roles in the actual hydrolysate, few studies have investigated glycolaldehyde, the key inhibitor of hot-compressed water-treated lignocellulose hydrolysate. Given this challenge, we investigated the interactive effects of mixed fermentation inhibitors, including glycolaldehyde. First, we confirmed that glycolaldehyde was the most potent inhibitor in the hydrolysate and exerted interactive inhibitory effects in combination with major inhibitors. Next, through genome-wide analysis and megavariate data modeling, we identified SUMOylation as a novel potential mechanism to overcome the combinational inhibitory effects of fermentation inhibitors. Indeed, overall SUMOylation was increased and Pgk1, which produces an ATP molecule in glycolysis by substrate-level phosphorylation, was SUMOylated and degraded in response to glycolaldehyde. Augmenting the SUMO-dependent ubiquitin system in the ADH1-expressing strain significantly shortened the lag phase of growth, released cells from G2/M arrest, and improved energy status and glucose uptake in the inhibitor-containing medium. In summary, our study was the first to establish SUMOylation as a novel platform for regulating the lag phase caused by complex fermentation inhibitors.

  18. ESI-MS study on non-covalent bond complex of rhFKBP12 and new neurogrowth promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hongxia; (王红霞); ZHANG; Xuemin; (张学敏); YANG; Songcheng; (杨松成); XIAO; Junhai; (肖军海); NIE; Aihua; (聂爱华); ZHAO; Liqin; (赵丽琴); LI; Song; (李松)

    2003-01-01

    An ESI-MS method for studying the non-covalent bond complex of rhFKBP12 with its nonimmunosuppressive ligands was developed. The method was used to screen out three compounds capable of binding to rhFKBP12 non-covalently from 52 compounds. By competing binding experiment, the binding site and the relative binding strength of these three compounds 000107, 000308 and A2B12 with rhFKBP12 were measured. All of them have the same binding site as FK506 does. X-ray crystalline diffraction experiment of non-covalent bond complex of 000107, 000308 with rhFKBP12 by Tsinghua University showed the same results. Among them 000308 has good effect on stimulating neurite to grow in chicken sensory neuronal cultures.

  19. Combination of computational methods, adsorption isotherms and selectivity tests for the conception of a mixed non-covalent-semi-covalent molecularly imprinted polymer of vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzio, Kinga; Delépée, Raphaël; Vidal, Richard; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2013-08-06

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for vanillin was prepared by photo initiated polymerization in dichloromethane using a mixed semi-covalent and non-covalent imprinting strategy. Taking polymerisable syringaldehyde as "dummy" template, acrylamide was chosen as functional monomer on B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional theory computational method basis with counterpoise. The binding parameters for the recognition of vanillin on imprinted polymers were studied with three different isotherm models (Langmuir, bi-Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich) and compared. The results indicate an heterogeneity of binding sites. It was found and proved by DFT calculations that the specific binding of vanillin in the cavities is due to non-covalent interactions of the template with the hydroxyphenyl- and the amide-moieties. The binding geometry of vanillin in the MIP cavity was also modelled. The obtained MIP is highly specific for vanillin (with an imprinting factor of 7.4) and was successfully applied to the extraction of vanillin from vanilla pods, red wine spike with vanillin, natural and artificial vanilla sugar with a recovery of 80%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation of non-aggregated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) by non-covalent coating with a block copolymer and proteins for enhancement of intracellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Woo; Lee, Seonju; Jang, Sangmok; Han, Kyu Young; Kim, Younggyu; Hyun, Jaekyung; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are very promising fluorophores for use in biosystems due to their high biocompatibility and photostability. To overcome their tendency to aggregate in physiological solutions, which severely limits the biological applications of FNDs, we developed a new non-covalent coating method using a block copolymer, PEG-b-P(DMAEMA-co-BMA), or proteins such as BSA and HSA. By simple mixing of the block copolymer with FNDs, the cationic DMAEMA and hydrophobic BMA moieties can strongly interact with the anionic and hydrophobic moieties on the FND surface, while the PEG block can form a shell to prevent the direct contact between FNDs. The polymer-coated FNDs, along with BSA- and HSA-coated FNDs, showed non-aggregation characteristics and maintained their size at the physiological salt concentration. The well-dispersed, polymer- or protein-coated FNDs in physiological solutions showed enhanced intracellular uptake, which was confirmed by CLSM. In addition, the biocompatibility of the coated FNDs was expressly supported by a cytotoxicity assay. Our simple non-covalent coating with the block copolymer, which can be easily modified by various chemical methods, projects a very promising outlook for future biomedical applications, especially in comparison with covalent coating or protein-based coating.

  1. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Conjugation Impedes Transcriptional Silencing by the Polycomb Group Repressor Sex Comb on Midleg*

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Matthew; Mallin, Daniel R.; Simon, Jeffrey A.; Courey, Albert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Sex Comb on Midleg (Scm) is a member of the Polycomb group (PcG), a set of transcriptional repressors that maintain silencing of homeotic genes during development. Recent findings have identified PcG proteins both as targets for modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein and as catalytic components of the SUMO conjugation pathway. We have found that the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 binds to Scm and that this interaction, which requires the Scm C-te...

  2. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation impedes transcriptional silencing by the polycomb group repressor Sex Comb on Midleg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew; Mallin, Daniel R; Simon, Jeffrey A; Courey, Albert J

    2011-04-01

    The Drosophila protein Sex Comb on Midleg (Scm) is a member of the Polycomb group (PcG), a set of transcriptional repressors that maintain silencing of homeotic genes during development. Recent findings have identified PcG proteins both as targets for modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein and as catalytic components of the SUMO conjugation pathway. We have found that the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 binds to Scm and that this interaction, which requires the Scm C-terminal sterile α motif (SAM) domain, is crucial for the efficient sumoylation of Scm. Scm is associated with the major Polycomb response element (PRE) of the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx), and efficient PRE recruitment requires an intact Scm SAM domain. Global reduction of sumoylation augments binding of Scm to the PRE. This is likely to be a direct effect of Scm sumoylation because mutations in the SUMO acceptor sites in Scm enhance its recruitment to the PRE, whereas translational fusion of SUMO to the Scm N terminus interferes with this recruitment. In the metathorax, Ubx expression promotes haltere formation and suppresses wing development. When SUMO levels are reduced, we observe decreased expression of Ubx and partial haltere-to-wing transformation phenotypes. These observations suggest that SUMO negatively regulates Scm function by impeding its recruitment to the Ubx major PRE.

  3. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Conjugation Impedes Transcriptional Silencing by the Polycomb Group Repressor Sex Comb on Midleg*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew; Mallin, Daniel R.; Simon, Jeffrey A.; Courey, Albert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Sex Comb on Midleg (Scm) is a member of the Polycomb group (PcG), a set of transcriptional repressors that maintain silencing of homeotic genes during development. Recent findings have identified PcG proteins both as targets for modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein and as catalytic components of the SUMO conjugation pathway. We have found that the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 binds to Scm and that this interaction, which requires the Scm C-terminal sterile α motif (SAM) domain, is crucial for the efficient sumoylation of Scm. Scm is associated with the major Polycomb response element (PRE) of the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx), and efficient PRE recruitment requires an intact Scm SAM domain. Global reduction of sumoylation augments binding of Scm to the PRE. This is likely to be a direct effect of Scm sumoylation because mutations in the SUMO acceptor sites in Scm enhance its recruitment to the PRE, whereas translational fusion of SUMO to the Scm N terminus interferes with this recruitment. In the metathorax, Ubx expression promotes haltere formation and suppresses wing development. When SUMO levels are reduced, we observe decreased expression of Ubx and partial haltere-to-wing transformation phenotypes. These observations suggest that SUMO negatively regulates Scm function by impeding its recruitment to the Ubx major PRE. PMID:21278366

  4. Characterization of the SUMO-binding activity of the myeloproliferative and mental retardation (MYM-type zinc fingers in ZNF261 and ZNF198.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Guzzo

    Full Text Available SUMO-binding proteins interact with SUMO modified proteins to mediate a wide range of functional consequences. Here, we report the identification of a new SUMO-binding protein, ZNF261. Four human proteins including ZNF261, ZNF198, ZNF262, and ZNF258 contain a stretch of tandem zinc fingers called myeloproliferative and mental retardation (MYM-type zinc fingers. We demonstrated that MYM-type zinc fingers from ZNF261 and ZNF198 are necessary and sufficient for SUMO-binding and that individual MYM-type zinc fingers function as SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs. Our binding studies revealed that the MYM-type zinc fingers from ZNF261 and ZNF198 interact with the same surface on SUMO-2 recognized by the archetypal consensus SIM. We also present evidence that MYM-type zinc fingers in ZNF261 contain zinc, but that zinc is not required for SUMO-binding. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies using truncated fragments of ZNF198 revealed that MYM-type zinc fingers of ZNF198 are necessary for localization to PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs. In summary, our studies have identified and characterized the SUMO-binding activity of the MYM-type zinc fingers in ZNF261 and ZNF198.

  5. Photodissociative Cross-Linking of Non-covalent Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Tureček, František

    2018-05-01

    We report a gas-phase UV photodissociation study investigating non-covalent interactions between neutral hydrophobic pentapeptides and peptide ions incorporating a diazirine-tagged photoleucine residue. Phenylalanine (Phe) and proline (Pro) were chosen as the conformation-affecting residues that were incorporated into a small library of neutral pentapeptides. Gas-phase ion-molecule complexes of these peptides with photo-labeled pentapeptides were subjected to photodissociation. Selective photocleavage of the diazirine ring at 355 nm formed short-lived carbene intermediates that underwent cross-linking by insertion into H-X bonds of the target peptide. The cross-link positions were established from collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectra (CID-MS3) providing sequence information on the covalent adducts. Effects of the amino acid residue (Pro or Phe) and its position in the target peptide sequence were evaluated. For proline-containing peptides, interactions resulting in covalent cross-links in these complexes became more prominent as proline was moved towards the C-terminus of the target peptide sequence. The photocross-linking yields of phenylalanine-containing peptides depended on the position of both phenylalanine and photoleucine. Density functional theory calculations were used to assign structures of low-energy conformers of the (GLPMG + GLL*LK + H)+ complex. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectory calculations were used to capture the thermal motion in the complexes within 100 ps and determine close contacts between the incipient carbene and the H-X bonds in the target peptide. This provided atomic-level resolution of potential cross-links that aided spectra interpretation and was in agreement with experimental data. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Non-covalent interactions in anisole-(CO2)(n) (n=1, 2) complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Becucci, M.; Mazzoni, F.; Pietraperzia, G.; Řezáč, Jan; Nachtigallová, Dana; Hobza, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 34 (2017), s. 22749-22758 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * anisole-water complex * equation of state Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  7. Non-covalent O⋅⋅⋅O interactions among isopolyanions using a cis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    2008-05-09

    May 9, 2008 ... T Arumuganathan et al. 298 ... Sodium molybdate dihydrate (1 g, 4⋅13 mmol) was dissolved in 20 mL of ..... Int. Ed. Engl. 32 610; Kroenke Jr J W, John P F and. Anthony M M .... D, Machado A S, Tempete C and Robert-Gero M.

  8. Conformers and non-covalent interactions studied by laser spectroscopies and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Susanne

    2001-07-01

    The model peptides, formanilide and acetanilide, and their weakly bound complexes were studied in the gas-phase using resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) and zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. Both, cis- and trans-isomers of formanilide, were observed under molecular beam conditions. Trans-formanilide displayed predominantly in-plane vibrational excitation indicative of a planar geometry with modest geometry changes upon excitation and ionisation. In cis-formanilide the side-chain is twisted compared to the phenyl plane in the S{sub 0} state, but planar in the S{sub 1} and D{sub 0} states, revealed in characteristic side-chain torsional and out-of-plane bending excitations. Additionally, the ZEKE spectra provide evidence that excess cationic charge is delocalised from the aromatic ring to the side chain. The work on trans-formanilide was extended to its van der Waals complex with Argon with the purpose of investigating the torsional potential of the side-chain and probing charge delocalisation. Complexation of amides with water is of considerable interest since water is not only present as a bulk solvent surrounding a peptide but also attached to specific binding sites in its interior. Evidence was found for the existence of a NH- and CO-bound isomer of trans-formanilide in the neutral, S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}, states, with the ZEKE spectrum of the cationic 'CO-bound' complex indicating a strong preference for the NH binding site. (author)

  9. Aryloxyalkanoic Acids as Non-Covalent Modifiers of the Allosteric Properties of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsattar M. Omar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb modifiers that stereospecifically inhibit sickle hemoglobin polymer formation and/or allosterically increase Hb affinity for oxygen have been shown to prevent the primary pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD, specifically, Hb polymerization and red blood cell sickling. Several such compounds are currently being clinically studied for the treatment of SCD. Based on the previously reported non-covalent Hb binding characteristics of substituted aryloxyalkanoic acids that exhibited antisickling properties, we designed, synthesized and evaluated 18 new compounds (KAUS II series for enhanced antisickling activities. Surprisingly, select test compounds showed no antisickling effects or promoted erythrocyte sickling. Additionally, the compounds showed no significant effect on Hb oxygen affinity (or in some cases, even decreased the affinity for oxygen. The X-ray structure of deoxygenated Hb in complex with a prototype compound, KAUS-23, revealed that the effector bound in the central water cavity of the protein, providing atomic level explanations for the observed functional and biological activities. Although the structural modification did not lead to the anticipated biological effects, the findings provide important direction for designing candidate antisickling agents, as well as a framework for novel Hb allosteric effectors that conversely, decrease the protein affinity for oxygen for potential therapeutic use for hypoxic- and/or ischemic-related diseases.

  10. Covalent and non-covalent chemical engineering of actin for biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saroj; Mansson, Alf

    2017-11-15

    The cytoskeletal filaments are self-assembled protein polymers with 8-25nm diameters and up to several tens of micrometres length. They have a range of pivotal roles in eukaryotic cells, including transportation of intracellular cargoes (primarily microtubules with dynein and kinesin motors) and cell motility (primarily actin and myosin) where muscle contraction is one example. For two decades, the cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor systems have been explored for nanotechnological applications including miniaturized sensor systems and lab-on-a-chip devices. Several developments have also revolved around possible exploitation of the filaments alone without their motor partners. Efforts to use the cytoskeletal filaments for applications often require chemical or genetic engineering of the filaments such as specific conjugation with fluorophores, antibodies, oligonucleotides or various macromolecular complexes e.g. nanoparticles. Similar conjugation methods are also instrumental for a range of fundamental biophysical studies. Here we review methods for non-covalent and covalent chemical modifications of actin filaments with focus on critical advantages and challenges of different methods as well as critical steps in the conjugation procedures. We also review potential uses of the engineered actin filaments in nanotechnological applications and in some key fundamental studies of actin and myosin function. Finally, we consider possible future lines of investigation that may be addressed by applying chemical conjugation of actin in new ways. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Isoelectric focusing of small non-covalent metal species from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Jessica; Hayen, Heiko; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Weber, Günther

    2011-03-01

    IEF is known as a powerful electrophoretic separation technique for amphoteric molecules, in particular for proteins. The objective of the present work is to prove the suitability of IEF also for the separation of small, non-covalent metal species. Investigations are performed with copper-glutathione complexes, with the synthetic ligand ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid (EDDHA) and respective metal complexes (Fe, Ga, Al, Ni, Zn), and with the phytosiderophore 2'-deoxymugineic acid (DMA) and its ferric complex. It is shown that ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid and DMA species are stable during preparative scale IEF, whereas copper-glutathione dissociates considerably. It is also shown that preparative scale IEF can be applied successfully to isolate ferric DMA from real plant samples, and that multidimensional separations are possible by combining preparative scale IEF with subsequent HPLC-MS analysis. Focusing of free ligands and respective metal complexes with di- and trivalent metals results in different pIs, but CIEF is usually needed for a reliable estimation of pI values. Limitations of the proposed methods (preparative IEF and CIEF) and consequences of the results with respect to metal speciation in plants are discussed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The non-covalent decoration of self-assembling protein fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Zahra N; Grundy, Daniel J; Channon, Kevin J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2010-10-01

    The design of self-assembling fibers presents challenges in basic science, and has potential for developing materials for applications in areas such as tissue engineering. A contemporary issue in the field is the construction of multi-component, functionalized systems. Previously, we have developed peptide-based fibers, the SAF system, that comprises two complementary peptides, which affords considerable control over assembly and morphology. Here we present a straightforward route to functionalizing the SAFs with small molecules and, subsequently, other moieties. This is achieved via non-covalent recruitment of charged peptide tags, which offers advantages such as further control, reversibility, and future prospects for developing recombinant tags. We demonstrate the concept by appending fluorescent labels and biotin (and thence gold nanoparticles) to the peptides, and visualising the resulting decorated SAFs by light and electron microscopy. The peptide tags bind in the nm-mum range, and show specificity compared with control peptides, and for the SAFs over similar alpha-helix-based peptide fibers. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bioelectrochemistry of non-covalent immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase on oxidized diamond nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Eduardo; Méndez, Jessica; Fonseca, José J; Griebenow, Kai; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2012-06-01

    Diamond nanoparticles are considered a biocompatible material mainly due to their non-cytotoxicity and remarkable cellular uptake. Model proteins such as cytochrome c and lysozyme have been physically adsorbed onto diamond nanoparticles, proving it to be a suitable surface for high protein loading. Herein, we explore the non-covalent immobilization of the redox enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (E.C.1.1.1.1) onto oxidized diamond nanoparticles for bioelectrochemical applications. Diamond nanoparticles were first oxidized and physically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR and TEM. Langmuir isotherms were constructed to investigate the ADH adsorption onto the diamond nanoparticles as a function of pH. It was found that a higher packing density is achieved at the isoelectric point of the enzyme. Moreover, the relative activity of the immobilized enzyme on diamond nanoparticles was addressed under optimum pH conditions able to retain up to 70% of its initial activity. Thereafter, an ethanol bioelectrochemical cell was constructed by employing the immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase onto diamond nanoparticles, this being able to provide a current increment of 72% when compared to the blank solution. The results of this investigation suggest that this technology may be useful for the construction of alcohol biosensors or biofuel cells in the near future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A non-covalent peptide-based strategy for ex vivo and in vivo oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombez, Laurence; Morris, May C; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The dramatic acceleration in identification of new nucleic acid-based therapeutic molecules such as short interfering RNA (siRNA) and peptide-nucleic acid (PNA) analogues has provided new perspectives for therapeutic targeting of specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. However, the poor cellular uptake of nucleic acids together with the low permeability of the cell membrane to negatively charged molecules remain major obstacles to their clinical development. Several non-viral strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of synthetic short oligonucleotides both in cultured cells and in vivo. Cell-penetrating peptides constitute very promising tools for non-invasive cellular import of oligonucleotides and analogs. We recently described a non-covalent strategy based on short amphiphatic peptides (MPG8/PEP3) that have been successfully applied ex vivo and in vivo for the delivery of therapeutic siRNA and PNA molecules. PEP3 and MPG8 form stable nanoparticles with PNA analogues and siRNA, respectively, and promote their efficient cellular uptake, independently of the endosomal pathway, into a wide variety of cell lines, including primary and suspension lines, without any associated cytotoxicity. This chapter describes easy-to-handle protocols for the use of MPG-8 or PEP-3-nanoparticle technologies for PNA and siRNA delivery into adherent and suspension cell lines as well as in vivo into cancer mouse models.

  15. Identification of SUMO conjugation sites in the budding yeast proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Esteras

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO is an important mechanism regulating protein function. Identification of SUMO conjugation sites on substrates is a challenging task. Here we employed a proteomic method to map SUMO acceptor lysines in budding yeast proteins. We report the identification of 257 lysine residues where SUMO is potentially attached. Amongst the hits, we identified already known SUMO substrates and sites, confirming the success of the approach. In addition, we tested several of the novel substrates using SUMO immunoprecipitation analysis and confirmed that the SUMO acceptor lysines identified in these proteins are indeed bona fide SUMOylation sites. We believe that the collection of SUMO sites presented here is an important resource for future functional studies of SUMOylation in yeast.

  16. Identification of an estrogen receptor α non covalent ubiquitin-binding surface: role in 17β-estradiol-induced transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesiri, Valeria; La Rosa, Piergiorgio; Stano, Pasquale; Acconcia, Filippo

    2013-06-15

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-binding domains (UBDs) located in Ub receptors decode the ubiquitination signal by non-covalently engaging the Ub modification on their binding partners and transduce the Ub signalling through Ub-based molecular interactions. In this way, inducible protein ubiquitination regulates diverse biological processes. The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the pleiotropic effects of the sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2). Fine regulation of E2 pleiotropic actions depends on E2-dependent ERα association with a plethora of binding partners and/or on the E2 modulation of receptor ubiquitination. Indeed, E2-induced ERα polyubiquitination triggers receptor degradation and transcriptional activity, and E2-dependent reduction in ERα monoubiquitination is crucial for E2 signalling. Monoubiquitinated proteins often contain UBDs, but whether non-covalent Ub-ERα binding could occur and play a role in E2-ERα signalling is unknown. Here, we report an Ub-binding surface within the ERα ligand binding domain that directs in vitro the receptor interaction with both ubiquitinated proteins and recombinant Ub chains. Mutational analysis reveals that ERα residues leucine 429 and alanine 430 are involved in Ub binding. Moreover, impairment of ERα association to ubiquitinated species strongly affects E2-induced ERα transcriptional activity. Considering the importance of UBDs in the Ub-based signalling network and the central role of different ERα binding partners in the modulation of E2-dependent effects, our discoveries provide novel insights into ERα activity that could also be relevant for ERα-dependent diseases.

  17. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty

    2015-01-01

    dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO......-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and degraded by the proteasome in response to DNA damage, JARID1C was SUMOylated and recruited to the chromatin to demethylate histone H3K4....

  18. Crystal Structure of the Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Enzyme from Proteus Mirabilis Bound Non-covalently to an Active Site Peptide Ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  19. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun

    2015-07-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC50 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL-1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL-1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer-drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders.

  20. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC_5_0 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL"−"1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL"−"1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer–drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders. (paper)

  1. Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Sloan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Covalent linkage to members of the small ubiquitin-like (SUMO family of proteins is an important mechanism by which the functions of many cellular proteins are regulated. Sumoylation has roles in the control of protein stability, activity and localization, and is involved in the regulation of transcription, gene expression, chromatin structure, nuclear transport and RNA metabolism. Sumoylation is also linked, both positively and negatively, with the replication of many different viruses both in terms of modification of viral proteins and modulation of sumoylated cellular proteins that influence the efficiency of infection. One prominent example of the latter is the widespread reduction in the levels of cellular sumoylated species induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ubiquitin ligase ICP0. This activity correlates with relief from intrinsic immunity antiviral defence mechanisms. Previous work has shown that ICP0 is selective in substrate choice, with some sumoylated proteins such the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML being extremely sensitive, while RanGAP is completely resistant. Here we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis of changes in the cellular SUMO2 proteome during HSV-1 infection. Amongst the 877 potentially sumoylated species detected, we identified 124 whose abundance was decreased by a factor of 3 or more by the virus, several of which were validated by western blot and expression analysis. We found many previously undescribed substrates of ICP0 whose degradation occurs by a range of mechanisms, influenced or not by sumoylation and/or the SUMO2 interaction motif within ICP0. Many of these proteins are known or are predicted to be involved in the regulation of transcription, chromatin assembly or modification. These results present novel insights into mechanisms and host cell proteins that might influence the efficiency of HSV-1 infection.

  2. An Arabidopsis SUMO E3 Ligase, SIZ1, Negatively Regulates Photomorphogenesis by Promoting COP1 Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-29

    COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is a central negative regulator of photomorphogenesis. However, how COP1 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications remains largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification enhances COP1 activity. Loss-of-function siz1 mutant seedlings exhibit a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. SIZ1 physically interacts with COP1 and mediates the sumoylation of COP1. A K193R substitution in COP1 blocks its SUMO modification and reduces COP1 activity in vitro and in planta. Consistently, COP1 activity is reduced in siz1 and the level of HY5, a COP1 target protein, is increased in siz1. Sumoylated COP1 may exhibits higher transubiquitination activity than does non-sumoylated COP1, but SIZ1-mediated SUMO modification does not affect COP1 dimerization, COP1-HY5 interaction, and nuclear accumulation of COP1. Interestingly, prolonged light exposure reduces the sumoylation level of COP1, and COP1 mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of SIZ1. These regulatory mechanisms may maintain the homeostasis of COP1 activity, ensuing proper photomorphogenic development in changing light environment. Our genetic and biochemical studies identify a function for SIZ1 in photomorphogenesis and reveal a novel SUMO-regulated ubiquitin ligase, COP1, in plants.

  3. An Arabidopsis SUMO E3 Ligase, SIZ1, Negatively Regulates Photomorphogenesis by Promoting COP1 Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Xiao-Li; Niu, De; Hu, Zi-Liang; Kim, Dae Heon; Jin, Yin Hua; Cai, Bin; Liu, Peng; Miura, Kenji; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Lin, Rongcheng; Jin, Jing Bo

    2016-01-01

    COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is a central negative regulator of photomorphogenesis. However, how COP1 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications remains largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification enhances COP1 activity. Loss-of-function siz1 mutant seedlings exhibit a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. SIZ1 physically interacts with COP1 and mediates the sumoylation of COP1. A K193R substitution in COP1 blocks its SUMO modification and reduces COP1 activity in vitro and in planta. Consistently, COP1 activity is reduced in siz1 and the level of HY5, a COP1 target protein, is increased in siz1. Sumoylated COP1 may exhibits higher transubiquitination activity than does non-sumoylated COP1, but SIZ1-mediated SUMO modification does not affect COP1 dimerization, COP1-HY5 interaction, and nuclear accumulation of COP1. Interestingly, prolonged light exposure reduces the sumoylation level of COP1, and COP1 mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of SIZ1. These regulatory mechanisms may maintain the homeostasis of COP1 activity, ensuing proper photomorphogenic development in changing light environment. Our genetic and biochemical studies identify a function for SIZ1 in photomorphogenesis and reveal a novel SUMO-regulated ubiquitin ligase, COP1, in plants.

  4. A comprehensive compilation of SUMO proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2016-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are essential for the regulation of several cellular processes and are potential therapeutic targets owing to their involvement in diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer disease. In the past decade, we have witnessed a rapid expansion of proteomic approaches ...

  5. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  6. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2015-08-27

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  7. Analysis list: SUMO2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SUMO2 Blood,Prostate + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/...SUMO2.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/SUMO2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedb...c.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/SUMO2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/SUMO2.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscien...cedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/SUMO2.Prostate.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Blood.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Prostate.gml ...

  8. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Non-covalent attachment of silver nanoclusters onto single-walled carbon nanotubes with human serum albumin as linking molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Galván, Andrés, E-mail: andres.rodriguez@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Física, Dpto. Física Experimental, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer INCan-UNAM, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México, DF 14080 (Mexico); Heredia, Alejandro [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Amelines-Sarria, Oscar; Rivera, Margarita [Instituto de Física, Dpto. Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    The attachment of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the formation of integrated fluorescence sites has attracted much attention due their potential applications as biological probes and nanovectors in theragnosis. Here, we report the preparation through assembly of fluorescent quasi 1-D nanomaterial based on SWNTs and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) non-covalently attached to human serum albumin as biological linker. The fluorescent SWNT–AgNCs–HSA conjugates were characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), fluorescent and UV–vis spectroscopy. The above techniques confirmed that AgNCs were non-covalently attached onto the external surface of SWNTs. In addition, it was observed that the modification did not affect the optical properties of the synthesized AgNCs since the absorption spectra and fluorescence under UV irradiation (λ = 365 nm) remain the same. The effect of the functionalized systems was tested on mammal red blood cells (RBCs) and it was found that their structural integrity was compromised by the conjugates, limiting their biological and medical applications.

  10. Non-covalent attachment of silver nanoclusters onto single-walled carbon nanotubes with human serum albumin as linking molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Galván, Andrés; Heredia, Alejandro; Amelines-Sarria, Oscar; Rivera, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The attachment of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the formation of integrated fluorescence sites has attracted much attention due their potential applications as biological probes and nanovectors in theragnosis. Here, we report the preparation through assembly of fluorescent quasi 1-D nanomaterial based on SWNTs and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) non-covalently attached to human serum albumin as biological linker. The fluorescent SWNT–AgNCs–HSA conjugates were characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), fluorescent and UV–vis spectroscopy. The above techniques confirmed that AgNCs were non-covalently attached onto the external surface of SWNTs. In addition, it was observed that the modification did not affect the optical properties of the synthesized AgNCs since the absorption spectra and fluorescence under UV irradiation (λ = 365 nm) remain the same. The effect of the functionalized systems was tested on mammal red blood cells (RBCs) and it was found that their structural integrity was compromised by the conjugates, limiting their biological and medical applications

  11. Electromagnetic interference shielding and thermal properties of non-covalently functionalized reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Chhetri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO was non-covalently functionalized using sulfanilic acid azocromotrop (SAC followed by hydrazine reduction to achieve SAC functionalized reduced GO (SAC-rGO. Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis and electrical conductivity measurements confirmed the successful functionlization and reduction of GO. The electrical conductivity of ~515 S•m−1 for SAC-rGO was recorded. The non-covalently functionalized reduced GO was subsequently dispersed in epoxy matrix at the loading level of 0.3 to 0.5 wt% to investigate its electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding properties. The morphological and structural characterization of the SAC-rGO/epoxy composites was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy analysis, which revealed the good dispersion of SAC-rGO in the epoxy. The SAC-rGO/epoxy composites showed the EMI shielding of −22.6 dB at the loading of 0.5 wt% SAC-rGO. Dynamical mechanical properties of the composites were studied to establish the reinforcing competency of the SAC-rGO. The storage modulus of the composites was found to increase within the studied temperature. Thermal stability of pure epoxy and its composites were compared by selecting the temperatures at 10 and 50% weight loss, respectively.

  12. Non-covalently anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes with hexa-decafluorinated zinc phthalocyanine as ppb level chemiresistive chlorine sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.; Kumar, Subodh; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.

    2018-01-01

    A cost effective solution assembly method has been explored for preparing zinc(II)1,2,3,4,8,9,10,11,15,16,17,18,22,23,24,25-hexa-decafluoro-29H,31H-phthalocyanine/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH) hybrid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) investigations confirm the non-covalent anchoring of F16ZnPc onto MWCNTs-COOH through п-п stacking interactions. Further, a highly sensitive and selective chemiresistive Cl2 sensor has been fabricated using F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH hybrid. The response of sensor is found to be 21.28% for 2 ppm of Cl2 with a response time of 14 s and theoretical detection limit of the sensor is found down to 0.06 ppb. The improved Cl2 sensing characteristics of hybrid are found to be originated from the synergetic interaction between F16ZnPc and MWCNTs-COOH. The underlying mechanism for improved gas sensing performance of F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH sensor towards Cl2 has been explained using Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies.

  13. Non-Covalent Functionalisation of C30 Fullerene by Pyrrole-n-Carboxylic Acid (n=2, 3): Density Functional Theory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harismah, Kun; Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Ghasemi, Nahid; Nejati, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    For functionalisation of a representative C30 fullerene nanostructure by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (PnCA; n=2, 3) their stabilities and properties were investigated based on density functional theory calculations. Parallel calculations were also done for C60 fullerene as evidence for comparing the results. Non-covalent interactions are considered to make the functionalised structures. In contrast with the spherical shape of C60, the shape of C30 fullerene is elliptical; therefore, the functionalisation processes were done for both axial and equatorial elliptical positions (AC30 and EC30). The results indicated that both the positions of C30 have almost equivalent chances to be functionalised by PnCA; but functionalisation by P2CA is slightly more favourable than P3CA, either for C60. The illustrated molecular orbitals' distributions indicated that the direction of charge transfer could be considered from PnCA counterparts to fullerene counterparts. The molecular properties indicated more reactivity for C30 than for C60 fullerene. Finally, the atomic scale quadrupole coupling constants indicated different roles for N and O atoms of PnCA in the functionalised models.

  14. Non-covalent functionalisation of C{sub 30} fullerene by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (n=2, 3). Density functional theory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harismah, Kun [Univ. Muhammadiyah Surakarta (Indonesia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Mirzaei, Mahmoud [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Bioinformatics Research Center; Ghasemi, Nahid [Islamic Azad Univ., Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Nejati, Mohammad [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2018-04-01

    For functionalisation of a representative C{sub 30} fullerene nanostructure by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (PnCA; n=2, 3) their stabilities and properties were investigated based on density functional theory calculations. Parallel calculations were also done for C{sub 60} fullerene as evidence for comparing the results. Non-covalent interactions are considered to make the functionalised structures. In contrast with the spherical shape of C{sub 60}, the shape of C{sub 30} fullerene is elliptical; therefore, the functionalisation processes were done for both axial and equatorial elliptical positions (AC{sub 30} and EC{sub 30}). The results indicated that both the positions of C{sub 30} have almost equivalent chances to be functionalised by PnCA; but functionalisation by P2CA is slightly more favourable than P3CA, either for C{sub 60}. The illustrated molecular orbitals' distributions indicated that the direction of charge transfer could be considered from PnCA counterparts to fullerene counterparts. The molecular properties indicated more reactivity for C{sub 30} than for C{sub 60} fullerene. Finally, the atomic scale quadrupole coupling constants indicated different roles for N and O atoms of PnCA in the functionalised models.

  15. Host-Guest Complexes of Cyclodextrins and Nanodiamonds as a Strong Non-Covalent Binding Motif for Self-Assembled Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibilla, Frauke; Voskuhl, Jens; Fokina, Natalie A; Dahl, Jeremy E P; Schreiner, Peter R; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2017-11-13

    We report the inclusion of carboxy- and amine-substituted molecular nanodiamonds (NDs) adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane by β-cyclodextrin and γ-cyclodextrin (β-CD and γ-CD), which have particularly well-suited hydrophobicity and symmetry for an optimal fit of the host and guest molecules. We studied the host-guest interactions in detail and generally observed 1:1 association of the NDs with the larger γ-CD cavity, but observed 1:2 association for the largest ND in the series (triamantane) with β-CD. We found higher binding affinities for carboxy-substituted NDs than for amine-substituted NDs. Additionally, cyclodextrin vesicles (CDVs) were decorated with d-mannose by using adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane as non-covalent anchors, and the resulting vesicles were compared with the lectin concanavalin A in agglutination experiments. Agglutination was directly correlated to the host-guest association: adamantane showed lower agglutination than di- or triamantane with β-CDV and almost no agglutination with γ-CDV, whereas high agglutination was observed for di- and triamantane with γ-CDV. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. SUMO: Solar Ultraviolet Monitor and Ozone Nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, L.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Sarkissian, A.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Rogers, D. J.; Bove, P.; Lagage, P. O.; DeWitte, S.

    2014-12-01

    SUMO is an innovative proof-of-concept nanosatellite aiming to measure on the same platform the different components of the Earth radiation budget (ERB), the solar energy input and the energy reemitted at the top of the Earth atmosphere, with a particular focus on the far UV (FUV) part of the spectrum and on the ozone layer. The FUV is the only wavelength band with energy absorbed in the high atmosphere (stratosphere), in the ozone (Herzberg continuum, 200-220 nm) and oxygen bands, and its high variability is most probably at the origin of a climate influence (UV affects stratospheric dynamics and temperatures, altering interplanetary waves and weather patterns both poleward and downward to the lower stratosphere and tropopause). A simultaneous observation of incoming FUV and ozone production would bring an invaluable information on this process of solar-climate forcing. Space instruments have already measured the different components of the ERB but this is the first time that all instruments will operate on the same platform. This characteristic by itself guarantees original scientific results. SUMO is a 3.6 kg, 3W, 10x10x30 cm3 nanosatellite ("3U"), with a "1U" payload of definition has been completed (platform and payload AIT are possible in 24 months). SUMO is proposed for the nanosatellite program of Polytechnic School and CNES (following QB50) for a flight in 2018. Follow-up is 2 fold: on one part more complete measurements using SUMO miniaturized instruments on a larger satellite; on the other part, increase of the coverage in local time and latitude using a constellation of SUMO nanosatellites around the Earth to further geolocalize the Sun influence on our planet. Nanosatellites, with cost and risk limited, are also excellent platforms to evaluate technologies for future missions, e.g. nanotechnology ZnO protection barriers to limit contamination from solar panels in the UV and reduce reflection losses in the visible, or MgZnO solar blind detectors (R

  17. Temperature Scanning Stress Relaxation of an Autonomous Self-Healing Elastomer Containing Non-Covalent Reversible Network Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report about the mechanical relaxation characteristics of an intrinsically self-healable imidazole modified commercial rubber. This kind of self-healing rubber was prepared by melt mixing of 1-butyl imidazole with bromo-butyl rubber (bromine modified isoprene-isobutylene copolymer, BIIR. By this melt mixing process, the reactive allylic bromine of bromo-butyl rubber was converted into imidazole bromide salt. The resulting development of an ionic character to the polymer backbone leads to an ionic association of the groups which ultimately results to the formation of a network structure of the rubber chains. The modified BIIR thus behaves like a robust crosslinked rubber and shows unusual self-healing properties. The non-covalent reversible network has been studied in detail with respect to stress relaxation experiments, scanning electron microscopic and X-ray scattering.

  18. Effect of density variation and non-covalent functionalization on the compressive behavior of carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, A [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Raney, J R; Craig, A E; Daraio, C, E-mail: daraio@caltech.edu [Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-10-21

    Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been proposed for different applications, including electrochemical energy storage and shock-absorbing materials. Understanding their mechanical response, in relation to their structural characteristics, is important for tailoring the synthesis method to the different operational conditions of the material. In this paper, we grow vertically aligned CNT arrays using a thermal chemical vapor deposition system, and we study the effects of precursor flow on the structural and mechanical properties of the CNT arrays. We show that the CNT growth process is inhomogeneous along the direction of the precursor flow, resulting in varying bulk density at different points on the growth substrate. We also study the effects of non-covalent functionalization of the CNTs after growth, using surfactant and nanoparticles, to vary the effective bulk density and structural arrangement of the arrays. We find that the stiffness and peak stress of the materials increase approximately linearly with increasing bulk density.

  19. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.

  20. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.

  1. USP7 is a SUMO deubiquitinase essential for DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecona, Emilio; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Specks, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers regulates DNA replication. We have previously shown that chromatin around replisomes is rich in SUMO and poor in Ub, whereas mature chromatin exhibits an opposite pattern. How this SUMO-rich, Ub-poor environment...... is maintained at sites of DNA replication in mammalian cells remains unexplored. Here we identify USP7 as a replisome-enriched SUMO deubiquitinase that is essential for DNA replication. By acting on SUMO and SUMOylated proteins, USP7 counteracts their ubiquitination. Inhibition or genetic deletion of USP7 leads...... to the accumulation of Ub on SUMOylated proteins, which are displaced away from replisomes. Our findings provide a model explaining the differential accumulation of SUMO and Ub at replication forks and identify an essential role of USP7 in DNA replication that should be considered in the development of USP7...

  2. Leaf phenolics and seaweed tannins : analysis, enzymatic oxidation and non-covalent protein binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, Anne M.

    2017-01-01

    Upon extraction of proteins from sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) and oarweed (Laminaria digitata) for animal food and feed purposes, endogenous phenolics and proteins can interact with each other, which might affect the protein’s applicability. Sugar beet leaf proteins

  3. Structure of the Siz/PIAS SUMO E3 Ligase Siz1 and Determinants Required for SUMO Modification of PCNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.; (SKI)

    2010-01-12

    Siz1 is a founding member of the Siz/PIAS RING family of SUMO E3 ligases. The X-ray structure of an active Siz1 ligase revealed an elongated tripartite architecture comprised of an N-terminal PINIT domain, a central zinc-containing RING-like SP-RING domain, and a C-terminal domain we term the SP-CTD. Structure-based mutational analysis and biochemical studies show that the SP-RING and SP-CTD are required for activation of the E2SUMO thioester, while the PINIT domain is essential for redirecting SUMO conjugation to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at lysine 164, a nonconsensus lysine residue that is not modified by the SUMO E2 in the absence of Siz1. Mutational analysis of Siz1 and PCNA revealed surfaces on both proteins that are required for efficient SUMO modification of PCNA in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Hydrogels Based on Dynamic Covalent and Non Covalent Bonds: A Chemistry Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Picchioni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels based on reversible covalent bonds represent an attractive topic for research at both academic and industrial level. While the concept of reversible covalent bonds dates back a few decades, novel developments continue to appear in the general research area of gels and especially hydrogels. The reversible character of the bonds, when translated at the general level of the polymeric network, allows reversible interaction with substrates as well as responsiveness to variety of external stimuli (e.g., self-healing. These represent crucial characteristics in applications such as drug delivery and, more generally, in the biomedical world. Furthermore, the several possible choices that can be made in terms of reversible interactions generate an almost endless number of possibilities in terms of final product structure and properties. In the present work, we aim at reviewing the latest developments in this field (i.e., the last five years by focusing on the chemistry of the systems at hand. As such, this should allow molecular designers to develop a toolbox for the synthesis of new systems with tailored properties for a given application.

  5. Sacrificial spacer and non-covalent routes toward the molecular imprinting of 'poorly-functionalized' N-heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, N.; Alexander, C.; Davies, S.; Whitcombe, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    A comparison of three different methods for the imprinting of small aromatic heterocycles containing only a single nitrogen atom, for the preparation of specific analytical phases, was carried out. A conventional non-covalent approach to the imprinting of pyridine using methacrylic acid as the functional monomer was compared with two sacrificial spacer methods, in which heterocycles were imprinted as covalent template analogues. The results of binding experiments showed that discrimination based on ligand size was possible when polymers were prepared using a silyl ester-based template. The most selective polymer was able to bind pyridine in preference to quinoline or acridine which is opposite to the trend predicted by the pK HB values for the three ligands. Curve fitting of the isotherm for pyridine binding to this polymer to the Langmuir model gave an approximate K d of 1.1±0.1 mM and a binding site concentration of 57±2 mmol g -1 . Acridine binding did not show saturation behaviour and was non-specific and cooperative in nature

  6. Sacrificial spacer and non-covalent routes toward the molecular imprinting of 'poorly-functionalized' N-heterocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, N.; Alexander, C.; Davies, S.; Whitcombe, M.J

    2004-02-16

    A comparison of three different methods for the imprinting of small aromatic heterocycles containing only a single nitrogen atom, for the preparation of specific analytical phases, was carried out. A conventional non-covalent approach to the imprinting of pyridine using methacrylic acid as the functional monomer was compared with two sacrificial spacer methods, in which heterocycles were imprinted as covalent template analogues. The results of binding experiments showed that discrimination based on ligand size was possible when polymers were prepared using a silyl ester-based template. The most selective polymer was able to bind pyridine in preference to quinoline or acridine which is opposite to the trend predicted by the pK{sub HB} values for the three ligands. Curve fitting of the isotherm for pyridine binding to this polymer to the Langmuir model gave an approximate K{sub d} of 1.1{+-}0.1 mM and a binding site concentration of 57{+-}2 mmol g{sup -1}. Acridine binding did not show saturation behaviour and was non-specific and cooperative in nature.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Subcellular Distribution of the SUMO Conjugation System by Confocal Microscopy Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Abraham; Amenós, Montse; Lois, L Maria

    2016-01-01

    Different studies point to an enrichment in SUMO conjugation in the cell nucleus, although non-nuclear SUMO targets also exist. In general, the study of subcellular localization of proteins is essential for understanding their function within a cell. Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for studying subcellular protein partitioning in living cells, since fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to determine their localization. Subcellular distribution of proteins can be influenced by binding to other biomolecules and by posttranslational modifications. Sometimes these changes affect only a portion of the protein pool or have a partial effect, and a quantitative evaluation of fluorescence images is required to identify protein redistribution among subcellular compartments. In order to obtain accurate data about the relative subcellular distribution of SUMO conjugation machinery members, and to identify the molecular determinants involved in their localization, we have applied quantitative confocal microscopy imaging. In this chapter, we will describe the fluorescent protein fusions used in these experiments, and how to measure, evaluate, and compare average fluorescence intensities in cellular compartments by image-based analysis. We show the distribution of some components of the Arabidopsis SUMOylation machinery in epidermal onion cells and how they change their distribution in the presence of interacting partners or even when its activity is affected.

  8. Do we see what we should see? Describing non-covalent interactions in protein structures including precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Gurusaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of X-ray crystal structure analysis as a technique is to `see where the atoms are'. The results are extensively used by a wide variety of research communities. However, this `seeing where the atoms are' can give a false sense of security unless the precision of the placement of the atoms has been taken into account. Indeed, the presentation of bond distances and angles to a false precision (i.e. to too many decimal places is commonplace. This article has three themes. Firstly, a basis for a proper representation of protein crystal structure results is detailed and demonstrated with respect to analyses of Protein Data Bank entries. The basis for establishing the precision of placement of each atom in a protein crystal structure is non-trivial. Secondly, a knowledge base harnessing such a descriptor of precision is presented. It is applied here to the case of salt bridges, i.e. ion pairs, in protein structures; this is the most fundamental place to start with such structure-precision representations since salt bridges are one of the tenets of protein structure stability. Ion pairs also play a central role in protein oligomerization, molecular recognition of ligands and substrates, allosteric regulation, domain motion and α-helix capping. A new knowledge base, SBPS (Salt Bridges in Protein Structures, takes these structural precisions into account and is the first of its kind. The third theme of the article is to indicate natural extensions of the need for such a description of precision, such as those involving metalloproteins and the determination of the protonation states of ionizable amino acids. Overall, it is also noted that this work and these examples are also relevant to protein three-dimensional structure molecular graphics software.

  9. Scaled MP3 Non-Covalent Interaction Energies Agree Closely with Accurate CCSD(T) Benchmark Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pitoňák, Michal; Neogrady, P.; Černý, Jiří; Grimme, S.; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2009), s. 282-289 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Scaled MP3 * CCSD(T) Benchmark Data * Extended Data Set Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.453, year: 2009

  10. Ultrasensitive Nanoimmunosensor by coupling non-covalent functionalized graphene oxide platform and numerous ferritin labels on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Rashida; Jeong, Bongjin; Choi, Jong-Soon; Rahman, Md Aminur

    2016-06-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical nanostructured immunosensor for a breast cancer biomarker carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) was fabricated using non-covalent functionalized graphene oxides (GO/Py-COOH) as sensor probe and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs)-supported numerous ferritin as labels. The immunosensor was constructed by immobilizing a monoclonal anti-CA 15-3 antibody on the GO modified cysteamine (Cys) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on an Au electrode (Au/Cys) through the amide bond formation between the carboxylic acid groups of GO/Py-COOH and amine groups of anti-CA 15-3. Secondary antibody conjugated MWCNT-supported ferritin labels (Ab2-MWCNT-Ferritin) were prepared through the amide bond formation between amine groups of Ab2 and ferritin and carboxylic acid groups of MWCNTs. The detection of CA 15-3 was based on the enhanced bioelectrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide mediated by hydroquinone (HQ) at the GO/Py-COOH-based sensor probe. The GO/Py-COOH-based sensor probe and Ab2-MWCNT-Ferritin labels were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique, CA 15-3 can be selectively detected as low as 0.01 ± 0.07 U/mL in human serum samples. Additionally, the proposed CA 15-3 immunosensor showed excellent selectivity and better stability in human serum samples, which demonstrated that the proposed immunosensor has potentials in proteomic researches and diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of SUMO2 Target Proteins by the Proteasome in Human Cells Exposed to Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-01-01

    In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role...... of the proteasome in determining the fate of proteins conjugated to SUMO2 when cells are treated with DNA replication stress conditions. We conducted a quantitative proteomic analysis in a U2OS cell line stably expressing SUMO2(Q87R) tagged with StrepHA in the presence or absence of epoxomicin (EPOX), a proteasome...... inhibitor. We identified subgroups of putative SUMO2 targets that were either degraded or stabilized by EPOX upon SUMO2 conjugation in response to replication stress. Interestingly, the subgroup of proteins degraded upon SUMO2 conjugation was enriched in proteins playing roles in DNA damage repair...

  12. Identification and molecular properties of SUMO-binding proteins in arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hyeongcheol; Choi, Wonkyun; Park, Heejin; Cheong, Misun; Koo, Yoonduck; Shin, Gilok; Chung, Woosik; Kim, Woeyeon; Kim, Mingab; Bressan, Ray Anthony; Bohnert, Hans Jü rgen; Lee, Sangyeol; Yun, Daejin

    2011-01-01

    in Arabidopsis and to probe for biological functions of SUMO proteins, we constructed 6xHis-3xFLAG fused AtSUMO1 (HFAtSUMO1) controlled by the CaMV35S promoter for transformation into Arabidopsis Col-0. After heat treatment, an increased sumoylation pattern

  13. USP7 is a SUMO deubiquitinase essential for DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecona, Emilio; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Specks, Julia; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Ruppen, Isabel; Murga, Matilde; Muñoz, Javier; Mendez, Juan; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers regulates various aspects of DNA replication. We previously showed that the chromatin around replisomes is rich in SUMO and depleted in Ub, whereas an opposite pattern is observed in mature chromatin. How this SUMO-rich/Ub-low environment is maintained at sites of DNA replication is not known. Here we identify USP7 as a replisome-enriched SUMO deubiquitinase that is essential for DNA replication. By acting on SUMO and SUMOylated proteins, USP7 counteracts their ubiquitination. Chemical inhibition or genetic deletion of USP7 leads to the accumulation of Ub on SUMOylated proteins, which are displaced to chromatin away from replisomes. Our findings provide a model to explain the differential accumulation of SUMO and Ub at replication forks, and identify an essential role of USP7 in DNA replication that should be taken into account for the use of USP7 inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:26950370

  14. SUMO: operation and maintenance management web tool for astronomical observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujica-Alvarez, Emma; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; García-Vargas, María. Luisa

    2014-08-01

    SUMO is an Operation and Maintenance Management web tool, which allows managing the operation and maintenance activities and resources required for the exploitation of a complex facility. SUMO main capabilities are: information repository, assets and stock control, tasks scheduler, executed tasks archive, configuration and anomalies control and notification and users management. The information needed to operate and maintain the system must be initially stored at the tool database. SUMO shall automatically schedule the periodical tasks and facilitates the searching and programming of the non-periodical tasks. Tasks planning can be visualized in different formats and dynamically edited to be adjusted to the available resources, anomalies, dates and other constrains that can arise during daily operation. SUMO shall provide warnings to the users notifying potential conflicts related to the required personal availability or the spare stock for the scheduled tasks. To conclude, SUMO has been designed as a tool to help during the operation management of a scientific facility, and in particular an astronomical observatory. This is done by controlling all operating parameters: personal, assets, spare and supply stocks, tasks and time constrains.

  15. Structure of the Siz/PIAS SUMO E3 ligase Siz1 and determinants required for SUMO modification of PCNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Siz1 is a founding member of the Siz/PIAS RING family of SUMO E3 ligases. The x-ray structure of an active Siz1 ligase revealed an elongated tripartite architecture comprised of an N-terminal PINIT domain, a central zinc-containing RING-like SP-RING domain, and a C-terminal domain we term the SP-CTD. Structure-based mutational analysis and biochemical studies show that the SP-RING and SP-CTD are required for activation of the E2~SUMO thioester while the PINIT domain is essential for redirecting SUMO conjugation to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at lysine 164, a non-consensus lysine residue that is not modified by the SUMO E2 in the absence of Siz1. Mutational analysis of Siz1 and PCNA revealed surfaces on both proteins that are required for efficient SUMO modification of PCNA in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19748360

  16. Purification of SUMO conjugating enzymes and kinetic analysis of substrate conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMO conjugation to protein substrates requires the concerted action of a dedicated E2 ubiquitin conjugation enzyme (Ubc9) and associated E3 ligases. Although Ubc9 can directly recognize and modify substrate lysine residues that occur within a consensus site for SUMO modification, E3 ligases can redirect specificity and enhance conjugation rates during SUMO conjugation in vitro and in vivo. In this chapter, we will describe methods utilized to purify SUMO conjugating enzymes and model substrates which can be used for analysis of SUMO conjugation in vitro. We will also describe methods to extract kinetic parameters during E3-dependent or E3-independent substrate conjugation. PMID:19107417

  17. Kant e o sumo bem comunitário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Machado Spinelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2012v11n1p37   O que aqui nos propomos fazer é explicitar o conceito de sumo bem enquanto bem comunitário, em que se evidencia um desdobramento da formulação do conceito de sumo bem sob a perspectiva de um bem coletivo. Esse conceito foi apresentado por Kant na terceira parte de A religião nos limites da simples razão, contexto no qual se dedicou a tratar da noção de um progresso moral nos termos de uma comunidade ética.

  18. Interplays between Sumoylation, SUMO-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligases, and the Ubiquitin-Adaptor Protein Ufd1 in Fission Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Julie Bonne

    and the specific molecular interactions and sequence of events linking sumoylation, ubiquitylation and substrate degradation, has been largely uncovered. Using the fission yeast model organism I here present evidence for a role of the Ufd1 (ubiquitinfusion degradation 1) protein, and by extension of the Cdc48-Ufd1...... proteasome mediates direct cross-talk between the two modification systems. By contributing to the dynamic turnover of SUMO conjugated species these SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) fulfills essential roles in both yeast and man. However, the specific sumoylated proteins affected by STUbL activity...... either in STUbL or Ufd1 function. In addition to identifying more than 900 unique sumoylated sites, these efforts revealed a number of proteins with upregulated sumoylation either in STUbL and/or Ufd1 mutant cells. These findings propose specific candidate substrates through which STUbL and Cdc48-Ufd1...

  19. The Sumo World through the gambling cases in 2010 The Sumo World as Seen Through the Gambling Cases of 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Morita

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In summer, 2010, gambling cases of sumo wrestlers and bosses and the connection with the gangsters were reported day after day through mass media. This article chases the summary of a chain of these cases and the correspondence of the Sumo Association for it. The article looks at the present conditions of a unique competition called sumo from these a series of cases. At first, it examines the summary of the illegal gambling case of Ozeki Kotomitsuki, the top of Japanese sumo wrestlers, and the correspondence of Sumo Association and other social organs. It takes up a problem about holding the tournament at Nagoya this summer next. And it relates to dark customs of sumo world that a series of cases are able to happen and tries to explain such customs through the tradition of sumo. While writing this article, the news to ask the self-purification capacity of the Association and to suggest relations with the sumo world and the gangsters are reported every day. The darkness of the sumo world seems to be wide and deep.This article is in Japanese. In summer 2010, a scandal in gambling on baseball matches implicating sumo wrestlers and their bosses was reported day after day by Japanese mass media. This scandal revealed the connections between the sumo world and criminal organizations and lead to unprecedented actions, such as the dismissal of the active Ozeki Kotomitsuki, one of the top Japanese sumo wrestlers, and the suspension of live television broadcasting of the sumo tournament. The reason why the Japanese public instigated mass public debates may relate to the notion that sumo has an intimate association with the gods, reinforced with its special position in Japanese tradition and culture. This article first presents a brief history of sumo and explains its particular characteristics. Then it provides a summary of the chain of events in the baseball gambling scandal and the responses from the Japan Sumo Association. In conjunction with

  20. Principles of ubiquitin and SUMO modifications in DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Steven; Jentsch, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    With the discovery in the late 1980s that the DNA-repair gene RAD6 encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, it became clear that protein modification by ubiquitin conjugation has a much broader significance than had previously been assumed. Now, two decades later, ubiquitin and its cousin SUMO are

  1. Surface functionalization of PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional spacer for active targeting in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamake, S. I.; Raut, S. L.; Ranjan, A. P.; Gryczynski, Z.; Vishwanatha, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the surface functionalization of polymeric PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional chemical crosslinker, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) for targeted cancer therapy. We dissolved BS3 in aqueous solution of PVA during formulation of nanoparticles by a modified solid/oil/water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The non-covalent insertion of BS3 was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curcumin and annexin A2 were used as a model drug and a cell specific target, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized for particle size, zeta potential and surface morphology. The qualitative assessment of antibody attachment was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as confocal microscopy. The optimized formulation showed antibody attachment of 86%. However, antibody attachment was abolished upon blocking the functional groups of BS3. The availability of functional antibodies was evaluated by the presence of a light chain fraction after gel electrophoresis. We further evaluated the in vitro release kinetics of curcumin from antibody coated and uncoated nanoparticles. The release of curcumin is enhanced upon antibody attachment and followed an anomalous release pattern. We also observed that the cellular uptake of nanoparticles was significantly higher in annexin A2 positive cells than in negative cells. Therefore, these results demonstrate the potential use of this method for functionalization as well as to deliver chemotherapeutic agents for treating cancer.

  2. Surface functionalization of PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional spacer for active targeting in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamake, S I; Raut, S L [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Ranjan, A P; Vishwanatha, J K [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Gryczynski, Z, E-mail: jamboor.vishwanatha@unthsc.edu [Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-01-21

    This work reports the surface functionalization of polymeric PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional chemical crosslinker, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) for targeted cancer therapy. We dissolved BS3 in aqueous solution of PVA during formulation of nanoparticles by a modified solid/oil/water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The non-covalent insertion of BS3 was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curcumin and annexin A2 were used as a model drug and a cell specific target, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized for particle size, zeta potential and surface morphology. The qualitative assessment of antibody attachment was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as confocal microscopy. The optimized formulation showed antibody attachment of 86%. However, antibody attachment was abolished upon blocking the functional groups of BS3. The availability of functional antibodies was evaluated by the presence of a light chain fraction after gel electrophoresis. We further evaluated the in vitro release kinetics of curcumin from antibody coated and uncoated nanoparticles. The release of curcumin is enhanced upon antibody attachment and followed an anomalous release pattern. We also observed that the cellular uptake of nanoparticles was significantly higher in annexin A2 positive cells than in negative cells. Therefore, these results demonstrate the potential use of this method for functionalization as well as to deliver chemotherapeutic agents for treating cancer.

  3. It takes two to tango: Ubiquitin and SUMO in the DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bologna, Serena; Ferrari, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of living cells is primarily determined by the genetic information encoded in DNA and gets fully disclosed upon translation. A major determinant of complexity is the reversible post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins, which generates variants displaying distinct biological properties such as subcellular localization, enzymatic activity and the ability to assemble in complexes. Decades of work on phosphorylation have unambiguously proven this concept. In recent years, the covalent attachment of Ubiquitin or Small Ubiquitin-like Modifiers (SUMO) to amino acid residues of target proteins has been recognized as another crucial PTM, re-directing protein fate and protein-protein interactions. This review focuses on the role of ubiquitylation and sumoylation in the control of DNA damage response proteins. To lay the ground, we begin with a description of ubiquitylation and sumoylation, providing established examples of DNA damage response elements that are controlled through these PTMs. We then examine in detail the role of PTMs in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks illustrating hierarchy, cross-talk, synergism or antagonism between phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and sumoylation. We conclude offering a perspective on Ubiquitin and SUMO pathways as targets in cancer therapy. PMID:23781231

  4. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subf......, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology....

  5. A versatile strategy towards non-covalent functionalization of graphene by surface-confined supramolecular self-assembly of Janus tectons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Du

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D, supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces is now well-mastered with several existing examples. However, one remaining challenge to enable future applications in nanoscience is to provide potential functionalities to the physisorbed adlayer. This work reviews a recently developed strategy that addresses this key issue by taking advantage of a new concept, Janus tecton materials. This is a versatile, molecular platform based on the design of three-dimensional (3D building blocks consisting of two faces linked by a cyclophane-type pillar. One face is designed to steer 2D self-assembly onto C(sp2-carbon-based flat surfaces, the other allowing for the desired functionality above the substrate with a well-controlled lateral order. In this way, it is possible to simultaneously obtain a regular, non-covalent paving as well as supramolecular functionalization of graphene, thus opening interesting perspectives for nanoscience applications.

  6. Fabrication and non-covalent modification of highly oriented thin films of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication of the first thin film of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology (rho-ZMOF-1, ([In48(HImDC)96]48-)n) in a highly oriented fashion on a gold-functionalized substrate. The oriented rho-ZMOF-1 film was functionalized by non-covalent modification via post-synthetic exchange of different probe molecules, such as acridine yellow, methylene blue, and Nile red. In addition, encapsulation of a porphyrin moiety was achieved via in situ synthesis and construction of the rho-ZMOF. Adsorption kinetics of volatile organic compounds on rho-ZMOF-1 thin films was also investigated. This study suggests that rho-ZMOF-1 thin films can be regarded as a promising platform for various applications such as sensing and catalysis. This journal is

  7. Viral Mimicry to Usurp Ubiquitin and SUMO Host Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wimmer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modifications (PTMs of proteins include enzymatic changes by covalent addition of cellular regulatory determinants such as ubiquitin (Ub and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO moieties. These modifications are widely used by eukaryotic cells to control the functional repertoire of proteins. Over the last decade, it became apparent that the repertoire of ubiquitiylation and SUMOylation regulating various biological functions is not restricted to eukaryotic cells, but is also a feature of human virus families, used to extensively exploit complex host-cell networks and homeostasis. Intriguingly, besides binding to host SUMO/Ub control proteins and interfering with the respective enzymatic cascade, many viral proteins mimic key regulatory factors to usurp this host machinery and promote efficient viral outcomes. Advanced detection methods and functional studies of ubiquitiylation and SUMOylation during virus-host interplay have revealed that human viruses have evolved a large arsenal of strategies to exploit these specific PTM processes. In this review, we highlight the known viral analogs orchestrating ubiquitin and SUMO conjugation events to subvert and utilize basic enzymatic pathways.

  8. Implication of SUMO E3 ligases in nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Maasa; Kaneoka, Hidenori; Masuda, Yusuke; Ito, Hiroki; Miyake, Katsuhide; Iijima, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    Post-translational modifications alter protein function to mediate complex hierarchical regulatory processes that are crucial to eukaryotic cellular function. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is an important post-translational modification that affects transcriptional regulation, nuclear localization, and the maintenance of genome stability. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a very versatile DNA repair system that is essential for protection against ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The deficiencies in NER function remarkably increase the risk of skin cancer. Recent studies have shown that several NER factors are SUMOylated, which influences repair efficiency. However, how SUMOylation modulates NER has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we performed RNAi knockdown of SUMO E3 ligases and found that, in addition to PIASy, the polycomb protein Pc2 affected the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. PIAS1 affected both the removal of 6-4 pyrimidine pyrimidone photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, whereas other SUMO E3 ligases did not affect the removal of either UV lesion.

  9. Genetic and proteomic evidence for roles of Drosophila SUMO in cell cycle control, Ras signaling, and early pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Nie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMO is a protein modifier that is vital for multicellular development. Here we present the first system-wide analysis, combining multiple approaches, to correlate the sumoylated proteome (SUMO-ome in a multicellular organism with the developmental roles of SUMO. Using mass-spectrometry-based protein identification, we found over 140 largely novel SUMO conjugates in the early Drosophila embryo. Enriched functional groups include proteins involved in Ras signaling, cell cycle, and pattern formation. In support of the functional significance of these findings, sumo germline clone embryos exhibited phenotypes indicative of defects in these same three processes. Our cell culture and immunolocalization studies further substantiate roles for SUMO in Ras signaling and cell cycle regulation. For example, we found that SUMO is required for efficient Ras-mediated MAP kinase activation upstream or at the level of Ras activation. We further found that SUMO is dynamically localized during mitosis to the condensed chromosomes, and later also to the midbody. Polo kinase, a SUMO substrate found in our screen, partially colocalizes with SUMO at both sites. These studies show that SUMO coordinates multiple regulatory processes during oogenesis and early embryogenesis. In addition, our database of sumoylated proteins provides a valuable resource for those studying the roles of SUMO in development.

  10. SUMO-2 and PIAS1 Modulate Insoluble Mutant Huntingtin Protein Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Gire O’Rourke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A key feature in Huntington disease (HD is the accumulation of mutant Huntingtin (HTT protein, which may be regulated by posttranslational modifications. Here, we define the primary sites of SUMO modification in the amino-terminal domain of HTT, show modification downstream of this domain, and demonstrate that HTT is modified by the stress-inducible SUMO-2. A systematic study of E3 SUMO ligases demonstrates that PIAS1 is an E3 SUMO ligase for both HTT SUMO-1 and SUMO-2 modification and that reduction of dPIAS in a mutant HTT Drosophila model is protective. SUMO-2 modification regulates accumulation of insoluble HTT in HeLa cells in a manner that mimics proteasome inhibition and can be modulated by overexpression and acute knockdown of PIAS1. Finally, the accumulation of SUMO-2-modified proteins in the insoluble fraction of HD postmortem striata implicates SUMO-2 modification in the age-related pathogenic accumulation of mutant HTT and other cellular proteins that occurs during HD progression.

  11. SUMO and ubiquitin-dependent XPC exchange drives nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Cuijk, Loes; Van Belle, Gijsbert J.; Turkyilmaz, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    XPC recognizes UV-induced DNA lesions and initiates their removal by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Damage recognition in NER is tightly controlled by ubiquitin and SUMO modifications. Recent studies have shown that the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF111 promotes K63-linked ubiquitylation o...

  12. SUMO-1 is associated with a subset of lysosomes in glial protein aggregate diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mathew B; Goodwin, Jacob; Norazit, Anwar; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane; Gai, Wei Ping; Pountney, Dean L

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendroglial inclusion bodies characterize a subset of neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is characterized by α-synuclein glial cytoplasmic inclusions and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is associated with glial tau inclusions. The ubiquitin homologue, SUMO-1, has been identified in inclusion bodies in MSA, located in discrete sub-domains in α-synuclein-positive inclusions. We investigated SUMO-1 associated with oligodendroglial inclusion bodies in brain tissue from MSA and PSP and in glial cell models. We examined MSA and PSP cases and compared to age-matched normal controls. Fluorescence immunohistochemistry revealed frequent SUMO-1 sub-domains within and surrounding inclusions bodies in both diseases and showed punctate co-localization of SUMO-1 and the lysosomal marker, cathepsin D, in affected brain regions. Cell counting data revealed that 70-75 % of lysosomes in inclusion body-positive oligodendrocytes were SUMO-1-positive consistently across MSA and PSP cases, compared to 20 % in neighbouring inclusion body negative oligodendrocytes and 10 % in normal brain tissue. Hsp90 co-localized with some SUMO-1 puncta. We examined the SUMO-1 status of lysosomes in 1321N1 human glioma cells over-expressing α-synuclein and in immortalized rat oligodendrocyte cells over-expressing the four repeat form of tau following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor, MG132. We also transfected 1321N1 cells with the inherently aggregation-prone huntingtin exon 1 mutant, HttQ74-GFP. Each cell model showed the association of SUMO-1-positive lysosomes around focal cytoplasmic accumulations of α-synuclein, tau or HttQ74-GFP, respectively. Association of SUMO-1 with lysosomes was also detected in glial cells bearing α-synuclein aggregates in a rotenone-lesioned rat model. SUMO-1 labelling of lysosomes showed a major increase between 24 and 48 h post-incubation of 1321N1 cells with MG132 resulting in an increase in a 90 kDa SUMO-1-positive band

  13. Comprehensive Identification of SUMO2/3 Targets and Their Dynamics during Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Julie; Kelstrup, Christian D; Hayward, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis large alterations in cellular structures occur rapidly, which to a large extent is regulated by post-translational modification of proteins. Modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-related protein SUMO2/3 regulates mitotic progression, but few mitotic targets have been...... identified so far. To deepen our understanding of SUMO2/3 during this window of the cell cycle, we undertook a comprehensive proteomic characterization of SUMO2/3 modified proteins in mitosis and upon mitotic exit. We developed an efficient tandem affinity purification strategy of SUMO2/3 modified proteins...... from mitotic cells. Combining this purification strategy with cell synchronization procedures and quantitative mass spectrometry allowed for the mapping of numerous novel targets and their dynamics as cells progressed out of mitosis. This identified RhoGDIα as a major SUMO2/3 modified protein...

  14. Peptide carrier-mediated non-covalent delivery of unmodified cisplatin, methotrexate and other agents via intravenous route to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid pre-clinical evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against brain cancers and other neurological disorders remains largely unattained due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which limits transport of most therapeutic compounds to the brain. A synthetic peptide carrier, K16ApoE, was previously developed that enabled transport of target proteins to the brain by mimicking a ligand-receptor system. The peptide carrier was found to generate transient BBB permeability, which was utilized for non-covalent delivery of cisplatin, methotrexate and other compounds to the brain. APPROACH: Brain delivery of the chemotherapeutics and other agents was achieved either by injecting the carrier peptide and the drugs separately or as a mixture, to the femoral vein. A modification of the method comprised injection of K16ApoE pre-mixed with cetuximab, followed by injection of a 'small-molecule' drug. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven-of-seven different small molecules were successfully delivered to the brain via K16ApoE. Depending on the method, brain uptake with K16ApoE was 0.72-1.1% for cisplatin and 0.58-0.92% for methotrexate (34-50-fold and 54-92 fold greater for cisplatin and methotrexate, respectively, with K16ApoE than without. Visually intense brain-uptake of Evans Blue, Light Green SF and Crocein scarlet was also achieved. Direct intracranial injection of EB show locally restricted distribution of the dye in the brain, whereas K16ApoE-mediated intravenous injection of EB resulted in the distribution of the dye throughout the brain. Experiments with insulin suggest that ligand-receptor signaling intrinsic to the BBB provides a natural means for passive transport of some molecules across the BBB. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the carrier peptide can non-covalently transport various chemotherapeutic agents to the brain. Thus, the method offers an avenue for pre-clinical evaluation of various small and large therapeutic molecules

  15. Novel non-covalent sulfonated multiwalled carbon nanotube from p-toluenesulfonic acid/glucose doped polypyrrole for electrochemical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Q.B.; Gao, B.; Hao, L.; Lu, X.J.; Yang, S.D.; Zhang, X.G. [Nanjing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is considered as one of the most promising electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors due to its environmental stability and fast doping and dedoping capacity. Carbon nanotube (CNT) and PPy hybrids can work synergistically to achieve the advantages of an electric double layer capacitor and faradaic pseudocapacitor. Sulfonation can be used to increase the dispersion of CNTs. In this study, multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) were modified with a high -SOH{sub 3}H loading carbonaceous material. Pyrolle monomers were absorbed on the surface of the MWCNT-SO{sub 3}H composite through strong electron and hydrogen bonding interactions between the -SO{sub 3}H group and the amino group of pyrrole. The pyrrole was then in-situ polymerized on the surface of the MWCNTs with the addition of an initiator. The study showed that the specific capacitance loss of the MWCNTs-SO{sub 3}H/PPy was only 3 per cent after 1000 cycles. Results of the study suggested that the composite is a promising electrode material for electrochemical capacitors. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  16. The nucleolar SUMO-specific protease SMT3IP1/SENP3 attenuates Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Tamotsu, E-mail: nishida@gene.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Human Functional Genomics, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-machiya, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Yamada, Yoshiji [Department of Human Functional Genomics, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-machiya, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. {yields} SMT3IP1 competes with p53 for binding to the central acidic domain of Mdm2. {yields} SMT3IP1 binding to Mdm2 inhibits Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. {yields} We postulate that SMT3IP1 acts as a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway. -- Abstract: SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification plays multiple roles in several cellular processes. Sumoylation is reversibly regulated by SUMO-specific proteases. SUMO-specific proteases have recently been implicated in cell proliferation and early embryogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that a nucleolar SUMO-specific protease, SMT3IP1/SENP3, controls the p53-Mdm2 pathway. We found that SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. Overexpression of SMT3IP1 in cells resulted in the accumulation of Mdm2 in the nucleolus and increased stability of the p53 protein. In addition, SMT3IP1 bound to the acidic domain of Mdm2, which also mediates the p53 interaction, and competed with p53 for binding. Increasing expression of SMT3IP1 suppressed Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Interestingly, the desumoylation activity of SMT3IP1 was not necessary for p53 stabilization. These results suggest that SMT3IP1 is a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway.

  17. The nucleolar SUMO-specific protease SMT3IP1/SENP3 attenuates Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Tamotsu; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. → SMT3IP1 competes with p53 for binding to the central acidic domain of Mdm2. → SMT3IP1 binding to Mdm2 inhibits Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. → We postulate that SMT3IP1 acts as a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway. -- Abstract: SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification plays multiple roles in several cellular processes. Sumoylation is reversibly regulated by SUMO-specific proteases. SUMO-specific proteases have recently been implicated in cell proliferation and early embryogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that a nucleolar SUMO-specific protease, SMT3IP1/SENP3, controls the p53-Mdm2 pathway. We found that SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. Overexpression of SMT3IP1 in cells resulted in the accumulation of Mdm2 in the nucleolus and increased stability of the p53 protein. In addition, SMT3IP1 bound to the acidic domain of Mdm2, which also mediates the p53 interaction, and competed with p53 for binding. Increasing expression of SMT3IP1 suppressed Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Interestingly, the desumoylation activity of SMT3IP1 was not necessary for p53 stabilization. These results suggest that SMT3IP1 is a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway.

  18. Ebola Zaire virus blocks type I interferon production by exploiting the host SUMO modification machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsien Chang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola Zaire virus is highly pathogenic for humans, with case fatality rates approaching 90% in large outbreaks in Africa. The virus replicates in macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs, suppressing production of type I interferons (IFNs while inducing the release of large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines. Although the viral VP35 protein has been shown to inhibit IFN responses, the mechanism by which it blocks IFN production has not been fully elucidated. We expressed VP35 from a mouse-adapted variant of Ebola Zaire virus in murine DCs by retroviral gene transfer, and tested for IFN transcription upon Newcastle Disease virus (NDV infection and toll-like receptor signaling. We found that VP35 inhibited IFN transcription in DCs following these stimuli by disabling the activity of IRF7, a transcription factor required for IFN transcription. By yeast two-hybrid screens and coimmunoprecipitation assays, we found that VP35 interacted with IRF7, Ubc9 and PIAS1. The latter two are the host SUMO E2 enzyme and E3 ligase, respectively. VP35, while not itself a SUMO ligase, increased PIAS1-mediated SUMOylation of IRF7, and repressed Ifn transcription. In contrast, VP35 did not interfere with the activation of NF-kappaB, which is required for induction of many proinflammatory cytokines. Our findings indicate that Ebola Zaire virus exploits the cellular SUMOylation machinery for its advantage and help to explain how the virus overcomes host innate defenses, causing rapidly overwhelming infection to produce a syndrome resembling fulminant septic shock.

  19. Non-covalent doping of graphitic carbon nitride with ultrathin graphene oxide and molybdenum disulfide nanosheets: an effective binary heterojunction photocatalyst under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S W; Yang, L W; Tian, Y; Wei, X L; Ding, J W; Zhong, J X; Chu, Paul K

    2014-10-01

    A proof of concept integrating binary p-n heterojunctions into a semiconductor hybrid photocatalyst is demonstrated by non-covalent doping of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with ultrathin GO and MoS2 nanosheets using a facile sonochemical method. In this unique ternary hybrid, the layered MoS2 and GO nanosheets with a large surface area enhance light absorption to generate more photoelectrons. On account of the coupling between MoS2 and GO with g-C3N4, the ternary hybrid possesses binary p-n heterojunctions at the g-C3N4/MoS2 and g-C3N4/GO interfaces. The space charge layers created by the p-n heterojunctions not only enhance photogeneration, but also promote charge separation and transfer of electron-hole pairs. In addition, the ultrathin MoS2 and GO with high mobility act as electron mediators to facilitate separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs at each p-n heterojunction. As a result, the ternary hybrid photocatalyst exhibits improved photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation compared to other reference materials. The results provide new insights into the large-scale production of semiconductor photocatalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A FRET-based probe for epidermal growth factor receptor bound non-covalently to a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Reina E.; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Fujioka, Aki; Sharma, Alok; Mayer, Bruce J.; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2005-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor plays a pivotal role in a variety of cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. To monitor the EGF receptor (EGFR) activity in living cells, we developed a probe for EGFR activity based on the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Previously, we developed a probe designated as Picchu (Phosphorylation indicator of the CrkII chimeric unit), which detects the tyrosine phosphorylation of the CrkII adaptor protein. We used a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes, WinZipA2 and WinZipB1, to bind Picchu non-covalently to the carboxyl-terminus of the EGFR. Using this modified probe named Picchu-Z, the activity of EGFR was followed in EGF-stimulated Cos7 cells. We found that a high level of tyrosine phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe remained after endocytosis until the point when the EGFR was translocated to the perinuclear region. These findings are in agreement with the previously reported 'signaling endosome' model. Furthermore, by pulse stimulation with EGF and by acute ablation of EGFR activity with AG1478, it was suggested that the phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe, and probably the phosphorylation of EGFR also, underwent a rapid equilibrium (τ 1/2 < 2 min) between the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states in the presence of EGF

  1. SUMO Ligase Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT1 (PIAS1) Is a Constituent Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Body Protein That Contributes to the Intrinsic Antiviral Immune Response to Herpes Simplex Virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James R; Conn, Kristen L; Wasson, Peter; Charman, Matthew; Tong, Lily; Grant, Kyle; McFarlane, Steven; Boutell, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Aspects of intrinsic antiviral immunity are mediated by promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body (PML-NB) constituent proteins. During herpesvirus infection, these antiviral proteins are independently recruited to nuclear domains that contain infecting viral genomes to cooperatively promote viral genome silencing. Central to the execution of this particular antiviral response is the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) signaling pathway. However, the participating SUMOylation enzymes are not fully characterized. We identify the SUMO ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) as a constituent PML-NB protein. We show that PIAS1 localizes at PML-NBs in a SUMO interaction motif (SIM)-dependent manner that requires SUMOylated or SUMOylation-competent PML. Following infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), PIAS1 is recruited to nuclear sites associated with viral genome entry in a SIM-dependent manner, consistent with the SIM-dependent recruitment mechanisms of other well-characterized PML-NB proteins. In contrast to that of Daxx and Sp100, however, the recruitment of PIAS1 is enhanced by PML. PIAS1 promotes the stable accumulation of SUMO1 at nuclear sites associated with HSV-1 genome entry, whereas the accumulation of other evaluated PML-NB proteins occurs independently of PIAS1. We show that PIAS1 cooperatively contributes to HSV-1 restriction through mechanisms that are additive to those of PML and cooperative with those of PIAS4. The antiviral mechanisms of PIAS1 are counteracted by ICP0, the HSV-1 SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, which disrupts the recruitment of PIAS1 to nuclear domains that contain infecting HSV-1 genomes through mechanisms that do not directly result in PIAS1 degradation. Adaptive, innate, and intrinsic immunity cooperatively and efficiently restrict the propagation of viral pathogens. Intrinsic immunity mediated by constitutively expressed cellular proteins represents the first line of intracellular defense against infection. PML

  2. Analysis of Changes in SUMO-2/3 Modification during Breast Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subramonian, Divya; Raghunayakula, Sarita; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-01-01

    SUMOylation is an essential posttranslational modification and regulates many cellular processes. Dysregulation of SUMOylation plays a critical role in metastasis, yet how its perturbation affects this lethal process of cancer is not well understood. We found that SUMO-2/3 modification is greatly...... in metastatic cells. Targets with altered SUMOylation are involved in cell cycle, migration, inflammation, glycolysis, gene expression, and SUMO/ubiquitin pathways, suggesting that perturbations of SUMO-2/3 modification might contribute to metastasis by affecting these processes. Consistent with this, up...... progression and metastasis....

  3. Influence of non-covalent modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the crystallization behaviour of binary blends of polypropylene and polyamide 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Nabaneeta; Panwar, Ajay S; Kumar, Gulshan; Samajdar, I; Bhattacharyya, Arup R

    2015-02-14

    Blends of polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared using different processing strategies in a twin-screw micro-compounder. The effect of MWNTs on the crystallization behaviour of the PP phase and the PA6 phase of the blend has been investigated through non-isothermal crystallization studies by differential scanning calorimetric analysis. Furthermore, the effect of the addition of the compatibilizer (PP-g-MA) and the modification of MWNTs (m-MWNTs) with a non-covalent organic modifier (Li-salt of 6 amino hexanoic acid, Li-AHA) has also been studied in context to the crystallization behaviour of the PP and PA6 phase in the blend. The crystallization studies have indicated a significant increase in bulk crystallization temperature of the PP phase in the blend in the presence of MWNTs. Moreover, the formation of 'trans-lamellar crystalline' structure consisting of PA6 'trans-crystalline lamellae' on MWNTs surface was facilitated in the case of blends prepared via 'protocol 2' as compared to the corresponding blends prepared via 'protocol 1'. Wide angle X-ray diffraction analysis has showed the existence of a β-polymorph of the PP phase due to incorporation of the PA6 phase in the blend. Addition of MWNTs in the blends has facilitated further β-crystalline structure formation of the PP phase. In the presence of m-MWNTs, a higher β-fraction was observed in the PP phase as compared to the blend with pristine MWNTs. Addition of PP-g-MA has suppressed the β-phase formation in the PP phase in the blend. X-ray bulk texture analysis revealed that incorporation of PA6 as well as pristine/modified MWNTs has influenced the extent of orientation of the PP chains towards specific crystalline planes in various blend compositions of PP and PA6.

  4. SENP7 Potentiates cGAS Activation by Relieving SUMO-Mediated Inhibition of Cytosolic DNA Sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP synthase (cGAS, a.k.a. MB21D1, a cytosolic DNA sensor, catalyzes formation of the second messenger 2'3'-cGAMP that activates the stimulator of interferon genes (STING signaling. How the cGAS activity is modulated remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 7 (SENP7 interacted with and potentiated cGAS activation. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO was conjugated onto the lysine residues 335, 372 and 382 of cGAS, which suppressed its DNA-binding, oligomerization and nucleotidyl-transferase activities. SENP7 reversed this inhibition via catalyzing the cGAS de-SUMOylation. Consistently, silencing of SENP7 markedly impaired the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by cGAS-STING axis. SENP7-knockdown mice were more susceptible to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection. SENP7 was significantly up-regulated in patients with SLE. Our study highlights the temporal modulation of the cGAS activity via dynamic SUMOylation, uncovering a novel mechanism for fine-tuning the STING signaling in innate immunity.

  5. The SUMO Ship Detector Algorithm for Satellite Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm Greidanus

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Search for Unidentified Maritime Objects (SUMO is an algorithm for ship detection in satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. It has been developed over the course of more than 15 years, using a large amount of SAR images from almost all available SAR satellites operating in L-, C- and X-band. As validated by benchmark tests, it performs very well on a wide range of SAR image modes (from Spotlight to ScanSAR and resolutions (from 1–100 m and for all types and sizes of ships, within the physical limits imposed by the radar imaging. This paper describes, in detail, the algorithmic approach in all of the steps of the ship detection: land masking, clutter estimation, detection thresholding, target clustering, ship attribute estimation and false alarm suppression. SUMO is a pixel-based CFAR (Constant False Alarm Rate detector for multi-look radar images. It assumes a K distribution for the sea clutter, corrected however for deviations of the actual sea clutter from this distribution, implementing a fast and robust method for the clutter background estimation. The clustering of detected pixels into targets (ships uses several thresholds to deal with the typically irregular distribution of the radar backscatter over a ship. In a multi-polarization image, the different channels are fused. Azimuth ambiguities, a common source of false alarms in ship detection, are removed. A reliability indicator is computed for each target. In post-processing, using the results of a series of images, additional false alarms from recurrent (fixed targets including range ambiguities are also removed. SUMO can run in semi-automatic mode, where an operator can verify each detected target. It can also run in fully automatic mode, where batches of over 10,000 images have successfully been processed in less than two hours. The number of satellite SAR systems keeps increasing, as does their application to maritime surveillance. The open data policy of the EU

  6. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyun-Joo [TissueGene Inc. 9605 Medical Center Dr., Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Yoo, Hae Yong [Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheol Yong, E-mail: choicy@skku.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.

  7. VP6-SUMO Self-Assembly as Nanocarriers for Gastrointestinal Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Palmieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High proteolytic degradation and poor absorption through epithelial barriers are major challenges to successful oral delivery of therapeutics. Nanoparticle platforms can enhance drug stability and extend the residence time in gastrointestinal (GI tract. However, drug delivery systems are often inactivated in acidic environment of stomach or suffer poor absorption from intestinal cells due to the mucus layer. To overcome these issues we developed a drug delivery system constituted by a protein construct made by a Rotavirus capsid protein (VP6 and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO. This chimeric construct allows specificity towards intestinal cells, the Rotavirus natural target, combined by an enhanced stability given by the eukaryotic protein transporter SUMO. Furthermore SUMO can act as a molecular switch that facilitates import/export of its ligand to the nucleus, the hypersensitive subcellular site target of many cell killing therapies. In this paper we show that SUMO-VP6 constructs self-assembly into stable nanocarriers. SUMO-VP6 nanocarriers display ideal features for drug delivery: a small size and high monodispersity, a high stability in different pH conditions and a high uptake in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartment of intestinal cells. These features make SUMO-VP6 nanocarriers a promising novel system for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs.

  8. SUMO: A small unmanned meteorological observer for atmospheric boundary layer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuder, J; Jonassen, M; Mayer, S; Brisset, P; Mueller, M

    2008-01-01

    A new system for atmospheric measurements in the lower troposphere has been developed and successfully tested. The presented Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO) is based on a light-weighted commercially available model airplane, equipped with an autopilot and meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. During the 5 week field campaign FLOHOF (Flow over and around HofsjoUkull) in Central Iceland the system has been successfully tested in July/August 2007. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground. In addition the applicability of SUMO for horizontal surveys up to 4 km away from the launch site has been approved. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under harsh polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m at ground temperatures of -20 deg. C and wind speeds up to 15 m s -1 . With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and its weight of below 600 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas. The direct material costs for one SUMO unit, including airplane, autopilot and sensors are below 1200 Euro. Assuming at least several tenths of flights for each airframe, SUMO provides a cost-efficient measurement system with a large potential to close the existing observational gap of reasonable atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes

  9. SUMO: A small unmanned meteorological observer for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuder, J; Jonassen, M; Mayer, S [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Allegaten 70, 5009 Bergen (Norway); Brisset, P [Ecole Nationale de l' Aviation Civile (ENAC), 7 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse (France); Mueller, M [Orleansstrasse 26a, 31135 Hildesheim (Germany)], E-mail: joachim.reuder@gfi.uib.no, E-mail: pascal.brisset@enac.fr, E-mail: marius.jonassen@gfi.uib.no, E-mail: martin@pfump.org, E-mail: stephanie.mayer@gfi.uib.no

    2008-05-01

    A new system for atmospheric measurements in the lower troposphere has been developed and successfully tested. The presented Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO) is based on a light-weighted commercially available model airplane, equipped with an autopilot and meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. During the 5 week field campaign FLOHOF (Flow over and around HofsjoUkull) in Central Iceland the system has been successfully tested in July/August 2007. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground. In addition the applicability of SUMO for horizontal surveys up to 4 km away from the launch site has been approved. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under harsh polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m at ground temperatures of -20 deg. C and wind speeds up to 15 m s{sup -1}. With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and its weight of below 600 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas. The direct material costs for one SUMO unit, including airplane, autopilot and sensors are below 1200 Euro. Assuming at least several tenths of flights for each airframe, SUMO provides a cost-efficient measurement system with a large potential to close the existing observational gap of reasonable atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes.

  10. Wrestling with Chromosomes: The Roles of SUMO During Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottke, Amanda C; Kim, Hyun-Min; Colaiácovo, Monica P

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized form of cell division required for the formation of haploid gametes and therefore is essential for successful sexual reproduction. Various steps are exquisitely coordinated to ensure accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis, thereby promoting the formation of haploid gametes from diploid cells. Recent studies are demonstrating that an important form of regulation during meiosis is exerted by the post-translational protein modification known as sumoylation. Here, we review and discuss the various critical steps of meiosis in which SUMO-mediated regulation has been implicated thus far. These include the maintenance of meiotic centromeric heterochromatin , meiotic DNA double-strand break repair and homologous recombination, centromeric coupling, and the assembly of a proteinaceous scaffold between homologous chromosomes known as the synaptonemal complex.

  11. Srs2 mediates PCNA-SUMO-dependent inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkovics, Peter; Sebesta, Marek; Kolesar, Peter; Sisakova, Alexandra; Marini, Victoria; Plault, Nicolas; Szukacsov, Valeria; Pinter, Lajos; Haracska, Lajos; Robert, Thomas; Kolesar, Peter; Gangloff, Serge; Krejci, Lumir

    2013-01-01

    Completion of DNA replication needs to be ensured even when challenged with fork progression problems or DNA damage. PCNA and its modifications constitute a molecular switch to control distinct repair pathways. In yeast, SUMOylated PCNA (S-PCNA) recruits Srs2 to sites of replication where Srs2 can disrupt Rad51 filaments and prevent homologous recombination (HR). We report here an unexpected additional mechanism by which S-PCNA and Srs2 block the synthesis-dependent extension of a recombination intermediate, thus limiting its potentially hazardous resolution in association with a cross-over. This new Srs2 activity requires the SUMO interaction motif at its C-terminus, but neither its translocase activity nor its interaction with Rad51. Srs2 binding to S-PCNA dissociates Polδ and Polη from the repair synthesis machinery, thus revealing a novel regulatory mechanism controlling spontaneous genome rearrangements. Our results suggest that cycling cells use the Siz1-dependent SUMOylation of PCNA to limit the extension of repair synthesis during template switch or HR and attenuate reciprocal DNA strand exchanges to maintain genome stability. (authors)

  12. Characterization of the loss of SUMO pathway function on cancer cells and tumor proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyue He

    Full Text Available SUMOylation is a post-translational ubiquitin-like protein modification pathway that regulates important cellular processes including chromosome structure, kinetochore function, chromosome segregation, nuclear and sub-nuclear organization, transcription and DNA damage repair. There is increasing evidence that the SUMO pathway is dysregulated in cancer, raising the possibility that modulation of this pathway may have therapeutic potential. To investigate the importance of the SUMO pathway in the context of cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth, we applied lentivirus-based short hairpin RNAs (shRNA to knockdown SUMO pathway genes in human cancer cells. shRNAs for SAE2 and UBC9 reduced SUMO conjugation activity and inhibited proliferation of human cancer cells. To expand upon these observations, we generated doxycycline inducible conditional shRNA cell lines for SAE2 to achieve acute and reversible SAE2 knockdown. Conditional SAE2 knockdown in U2OS and HCT116 cells slowed cell growth in vitro, and SAE2 knockdown induced multiple terminal outcomes including apoptosis, endoreduplication and senescence. Multinucleated cells became senescent and stained positive for the senescence marker, SA-β Gal, and displayed elevated levels of p53 and p21. In an attempt to explain these phenotypes, we confirmed that loss of SUMO pathway activity leads to a loss of SUMOylated Topoisomerase IIα and the appearance of chromatin bridges which can impair proper cytokinesis and lead to multinucleation. Furthermore, knockdown of SAE2 induces disruption of PML nuclear bodies which may further promote apoptosis or senescence. In an in vivo HCT116 xenograft tumor model, conditional SAE2 knockdown strongly impaired tumor growth. These data demonstrate that the SUMO pathway is required for cancer cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, implicating the SUMO pathway as a potential cancer therapeutic target.

  13. Global-genome Nucleotide Excision Repair Controlled by Ubiquitin/Sumo Modifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eRuethemann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Global-genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER prevents genome instability by excising a wide range of structurally unrelated DNA base adducts and crosslinks induced by chemical carcinogens, ultraviolet (UV radiation or intracellular metabolic by-products. As a versatile damage sensor, xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC protein initiates this generic defense reaction by locating the damage and recruiting the subunits of a large lesion demarcation complex that, in turn, triggers the excision of aberrant DNA by endonucleases. In the very special case of a DNA repair response to UV radiation, the function of this XPC initiator is tightly controlled by the dual action of cullin-type CRL4DDB2 and sumo-targeted RNF111 ubiquitin ligases. This twofold protein ubiquitination system promotes GG-NER reactions by spatially and temporally regulating the interaction of XPC protein with damaged DNA across the nucleosome landscape of chromatin. In the absence of either CRL4DDB2 or RNF111, the DNA excision repair of UV lesions is inefficient, indicating that these two ubiquitin ligases play a critical role in mitigating the adverse biological effects of UV light in the exposed skin.

  14. SUMO modification through rapamycin-mediated heterodimerization reveals a dual role for Ubc9 in targeting RanGAP1 to nuclear pore complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shanshan; Zhang Hong; Matunis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    SUMOs (small ubiquitin-related modifiers) are eukaryotic proteins that are covalently conjugated to other proteins and thereby regulate a wide range of important cellular processes. The molecular mechanisms by which SUMO modification influences the functions of most target proteins and cellular processes, however, remain poorly defined. A major obstacle to investigating the effects of SUMO modification is the availability of a system for selectively inducing the modification or demodification of an individual protein. To address this problem, we have developed a procedure using the rapamycin heterodimerizer system. This procedure involves co-expression of rapamycin-binding domain fusion proteins of SUMO and candidate SUMO substrates in living cells. Treating cells with rapamycin induces a tight association between SUMO and a single SUMO substrate, thereby allowing specific downstream effects to be analyzed. Using RanGAP1 as a model SUMO substrate, the heterodimerizer system was used to investigate the molecular mechanism by which SUMO modification targets RanGAP1 from the cytoplasm to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our results revealed a dual role for Ubc9 in targeting RanGAP1 to NPCs: In addition to conjugating SUMO-1 to RanGAP1, Ubc9 is also required to form a stable ternary complex with SUMO-1 modified RanGAP1 and Nup358. As illustrated by our studies, the rapamycin heterodimerizer system represents a novel tool for studying the molecular effects of SUMO modification

  15. Production of FMDV virus-like particles by a SUMO fusion protein approach in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shu-Mei

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virus-like particles (VLPs are formed by the self-assembly of envelope and/or capsid proteins from many viruses. Some VLPs have been proven successful as vaccines, and others have recently found applications as carriers for foreign antigens or as scaffolds in nanoparticle biotechnology. However, production of VLP was usually impeded due to low water-solubility of recombinant virus capsid proteins. Previous studies revealed that virus capsid and envelope proteins were often posttranslationally modified by SUMO in vivo, leading into a hypothesis that SUMO modification might be a common mechanism for virus proteins to retain water-solubility or prevent improper self-aggregation before virus assembly. We then propose a simple approach to produce VLPs of viruses, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. An improved SUMO fusion protein system we developed recently was applied to the simultaneous expression of three capsid proteins of FMDV in E. coli. The three SUMO fusion proteins formed a stable heterotrimeric complex. Proteolytic removal of SUMO moieties from the ternary complexes resulted in VLPs with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. The method described here can also apply to produce capsid/envelope protein complexes or VLPs of other disease-causing viruses.

  16. Expression, Localization of SUMO-1, and Analyses of Potential SUMOylated Proteins in Bubalus bubalis Spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohi, Rahim Dad; Wang, Li; Hassine, Najla Ben; Cao, Jing; Talpur, Hira Sajjad; Wu, Di; Huang, Chun-Jie; Rehman, Zia-Ur; Bhattarai, Dinesh; Huo, Li-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Mature spermatozoa have highly condensed DNA that is essentially silent both transcriptionally and translationally. Therefore, post translational modifications are very important for regulating sperm motility, morphology, and for male fertility in general. Protein sumoylation was recently demonstrated in human and rodent spermatozoa, with potential consequences for sperm motility and DNA integrity. We examined the expression and localization of small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1) in the sperm of water buffalo ( Bubalus bubalis ) using immunofluorescence analysis. We confirmed the expression of SUMO-1 in the acrosome. We further found that SUMO-1 was lost if the acrosome reaction was induced by calcium ionophore A23187. Proteins modified or conjugated by SUMO-1 in water buffalo sperm were pulled down and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Sixty proteins were identified, including proteins important for sperm morphology and motility, such as relaxin receptors and cytoskeletal proteins, including tubulin chains, actins, and dyneins. Forty-six proteins were predicted as potential sumoylation targets. The expression of SUMO-1 in the acrosome region of water buffalo sperm and the identification of potentially SUMOylated proteins important for sperm function implicates sumoylation as a crucial PTM related to sperm function.

  17. Expression, Localization of SUMO-1, and Analyses of Potential SUMOylated Proteins in Bubalus bubalis Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Dad Brohi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mature spermatozoa have highly condensed DNA that is essentially silent both transcriptionally and translationally. Therefore, post translational modifications are very important for regulating sperm motility, morphology, and for male fertility in general. Protein sumoylation was recently demonstrated in human and rodent spermatozoa, with potential consequences for sperm motility and DNA integrity. We examined the expression and localization of small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1 in the sperm of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis using immunofluorescence analysis. We confirmed the expression of SUMO-1 in the acrosome. We further found that SUMO-1 was lost if the acrosome reaction was induced by calcium ionophore A23187. Proteins modified or conjugated by SUMO-1 in water buffalo sperm were pulled down and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Sixty proteins were identified, including proteins important for sperm morphology and motility, such as relaxin receptors and cytoskeletal proteins, including tubulin chains, actins, and dyneins. Forty-six proteins were predicted as potential sumoylation targets. The expression of SUMO-1 in the acrosome region of water buffalo sperm and the identification of potentially SUMOylated proteins important for sperm function implicates sumoylation as a crucial PTM related to sperm function.

  18. Gas-Phase Enrichment of Multiply Charged Peptide Ions by Differential Ion Mobility Extend the Comprehensiveness of SUMO Proteome Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfammatter, Sibylle; Bonneil, Eric; McManus, Francis P.; Thibault, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a member of the family of ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs) and is involved in important cellular processes, including DNA damage response, meiosis and cellular trafficking. The large-scale identification of SUMO peptides in a site-specific manner is challenging not only because of the low abundance and dynamic nature of this modification, but also due to the branched structure of the corresponding peptides that further complicate their identification using conventional search engines. Here, we exploited the unusual structure of SUMO peptides to facilitate their separation by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and increase the coverage of SUMO proteome analysis. Upon trypsin digestion, branched peptides contain a SUMO remnant side chain and predominantly form triply protonated ions that facilitate their gas-phase separation using FAIMS. We evaluated the mobility characteristics of synthetic SUMO peptides and further demonstrated the application of FAIMS to profile the changes in protein SUMOylation of HEK293 cells following heat shock, a condition known to affect this modification. FAIMS typically provided a 10-fold improvement of detection limit of SUMO peptides, and enabled a 36% increase in SUMO proteome coverage compared to the same LC-MS/MS analyses performed without FAIMS. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Non-Covalent Supported of l-Proline on Graphene Oxide/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: A Novel, Highly Efficient and Superparamagnetically Separable Catalyst for the Synthesis of Bis-Pyrazole Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosadegh Keshavarz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A superparamagnetic graphene oxide/Fe3O4/l-proline nano hybrid that was obtained from the non-covalent immobilization of l-proline on graphene oxide/Fe3O4 nanocomposite was used as a new magnetically separable catalyst for the efficient synthesis of 4,4′-(arylmethylenebis(1H-pyrazol-5-ol derivatives. The prepared heterogeneous catalyst was characterized using FTIR, TGA, DTG, XRD, TEM, SEM, and elemental analysis techniques. Short reaction times (5–15 min, excellent yields (87–98%, and simple experimental procedure with an easy work-up are some of the advantages of the introduced catalyst.

  20. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Wagner, Sebastian A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of proteins modified by SUMO2 in response to DNA replication stress in S phase in human cells. We have identified a panel of 22 SUMO2 targets with increased SUMOylation during DNA replication stress, many of which play key functions within the DNA replication machinery and/or in the cellular response to DNA damage. Interestingly, POLD3 was found modified most significantly in response to a low dose aphidicolin treatment protocol that promotes common fragile site (CFS) breakage. POLD3 is the human ortholog of POL32 in budding yeast, and has been shown to act during break-induced recombinational repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of DNA binding of Sox2 by the SUMO conjugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruzoe, Shu; Ishihara, Ko; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Sugiko; Sekita, Yoko; Aoto, Takahiro; Saitoh, Hisato; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Niwa, Hitoshi; Kawasuji, Michio; Baba, Hideo; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Sox2 is a member of the high mobility group (HMG) domain DNA-binding proteins for transcriptional control and chromatin architecture. The HMG domain of Sox2 binds the DNA to facilitate transactivation by the cooperative transcription factors such as Oct3/4. We report that mouse Sox2 is modified by SUMO at lysine 247. Substitution of the target lysine to arginine lost the sumoylation but little affected transcriptional potential or nuclear localization of Sox2. By contrast with the unmodified form, Sox2 fused to SUMO-1 did not augment transcription via the Fgf4 enhancer in the presence of Oct3/4. Further, SUMO-1-conjugated Sox2 at the lysine 247 or at the carboxyl terminus reduced the binding to the Fgf4 enhancer. These indicate that Sox2 sumoylation negatively regulates its transcriptional role through impairing the DNA binding

  2. Site-specific mapping of the human SUMO proteome reveals co-modification with phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Lyon, David; Young, Clifford

    2017-01-01

    that were co-modified by ubiquitylation, acetylation and methylation. Notably, 9% of the identified SUMOylome occurred proximal to phosphorylation, and numerous SUMOylation sites were found to be fully dependent on prior phosphorylation events. SUMO-proximal phosphorylation occurred primarily in a proline......-directed manner, and inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases dynamically affected co-modification. Collectively, we present a comprehensive analysis of the SUMOylated proteome, uncovering the structural preferences for SUMO and providing system-wide evidence for a remarkable degree of cross-talk between...

  3. Water-soluble light-emitting nanoparticles prepared by non-covalent bond self-assembly of a hydroxyl group functionalized oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) with different water-soluble polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Water-soluble light-emitting nanoparticles were prepared from hydroxyl group functionalized oligos(p-phenyleneethynylene) (OHOPEL) and water-soluble polymers(PEG,PAA,and PG) by non-covalent bond self-assembly.Their structure and optoelectronic properties were investigated through dynamic light scattering(DLS) ,UV and PL spectroscopy.The optical properties of OHOPEL-based water-soluble nanoparticles exhibited the same properties as that found in OHOPEL films,indicating the existence of interchain-aggregation of OHOPELs in the nanoparticles.OHOPEL-based nanoparticles prepared from conjugated oligomers show smaller size and lower dispersity than nanoparticles from conjugated polymers,which means that the structures of water-soluble nanoparticles are linked to the conjugated length.Furthermore,the OHOPEL/PG and OHOPEL/PAA systems produced smaller particles and lower polydispersity than the OHOPEL/PEG system,indicating that there may exist influence of the strength of non-covalent bonds on the size and degree of dispersity of the nanoparticles.

  4. Heterologous SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin chains optimize IκBα degradation and NF-κB activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Aillet

    Full Text Available The NF-κB pathway is regulated by SUMOylation at least at three levels: the inhibitory molecule IκBα, the IKK subunit γ/NEMO and the p52 precursor p100. Here we investigate the role of SUMO-2/3 in the degradation of IκBα and activation of NF-κB mediated by TNFα. We found that under conditions of deficient SUMOylation, an important delay in both TNFα-mediated proteolysis of IκBα and NF-κB dependent transcription occurs. In vitro and ex vivo approaches, including the use of ubiquitin-traps (TUBEs, revealed the formation of chains on IκBα containing SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin after TNFα stimulation. The integration of SUMO-2/3 appears to promote the formation of ubiquitin chains on IκBα after activation of the TNFα signalling pathway. Furthermore, heterologous chains of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin promote a more efficient degradation of IκBα by the 26S proteasome in vitro compared to chains of either SUMO-2/3 or ubiquitin alone. Consistently, Ubc9 silencing reduced the capture of IκBα modified with SUMO-ubiquitin hybrid chains that display a defective proteasome-mediated degradation. Thus, hybrid SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin chains increase the susceptibility of modified IκBα to the action of 26S proteasome, contributing to the optimal control of NF-κB activity after TNFα-stimulation.

  5. Modellering van begrazing in SUMO : verbetering van de vegetatiemodellering in de Natuurplanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Wegman, R.M.A.; Slim, P.A.; Dirksen, J.; Mol-Dijkstra, J.P.; Dobben, van H.F.

    2001-01-01

    In samenwerking met het RIVM en WU wordt het vegetatievoorspellingsmodel SUMO ontwikkeld. Het model vormt een integraal onderdeel met SMART en wordt onder andere gebruikt in de natuurplanner van het RIVM. Om de modellering van de effecten van begrazing op de vegetatieontwikkeling en successie

  6. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO. A new tool for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius; Mayer, Stephanie [Bergen Univ. (Norway). Geophysical Inst.; Brisset, Pascal [Ecole Nationale de l' Aviation Civile (ENAC), Toulouse (France); Mueller, Martin [Martin Mueller Engineering, Hildesheim (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a cost-efficient measurement system with the aim to close the existing observational gap of atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes. The system is highly flexible and has the capability for in-situ ABL measurements with unique spatial and temporal resolution. SUMO is based on a light-weighted styrofoam model airplane, equipped with an autopilot system for autonomous flight missions and in its recent version with meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and a total lift-off weight of 580 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas with limited infrastructure. During several field campaigns in 2007 and 2008 the system has been successfully tested and operated. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground during the FLOHOF (FLOw over and around HOFsjoekull) field campaign in Central Iceland in July/August 2007. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m even at ground temperatures of -20 C and wind speeds up to 15 m s{sup -1}. (orig.)

  7. El sumo bien kantiano: el objeto construído de la ley moral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Villarán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo tiene tres objetivos: a. compilar las críticas planteadas en contra del sumo bien kantiano (un mundo donde la virtud es premiada con felicidad; b. elaborar una revisión crítica de las respectivas defensas; y c. desarrollar una nueva defensa, con énfasis en el problema de derivación (según el cual el sumo bien no se deriva de la ley moral. Respecto al primero punto, el artículo muestra que son al menos cinco los problemas que amenazan la doctrina: heteronomía, derivación, imposibilidad, irrelevancia y dualismo. Respecto al segundo, el artículo revela que las múltiples defensas elaboradas en nombre del sumo bien son fuente, a su vez, de otros problemas, como los de incompletitud, ilusión, injusticia, deslealtad y escisión. Respecto al tercer y principal punto, y empezando por la derivación, el artículo propone ver al sumo bien como el objeto construido de la ley moral. Resuelto el problema de derivación, el artículo ofrece breves respuestas a los otros problemas en juego. El artículo también traduce por primera vez, del inglés al español, fragmentos de importantes publicaciones sobre el sumo bien.

  8. Calculations on Noncovalent Interactions and Databases of Benchmark Interaction Energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2012), s. 663-672 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non-covalent interactions * covalent interactions * quantum chemical approach Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 20.833, year: 2012

  9. Non-covalent association of protein and capsular polysaccharide on bacteria-sized latex beads as a model for polysaccharide-specific humoral immunity to intact Gram-positive extracellular bacteria1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colino, Jesus; Duke, Leah; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2013-01-01

    Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressing type 14 capsular polysaccharide (PPS14) and type III Streptococcus agalactiae containing a PPS14 core capsule identical to PPS14, exhibit non-covalent associations of PPS14 and bacterial protein, in contrast to soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. Both bacteria and conjugates induce murine PPS14-specific IgG responses dependent on CD4+ T cells. Further, secondary immunization with conjugate and S. agalactiae, although not S. pneumoniae, results in a boosted response. However, in contrast to conjugate, PPS14-specific IgG responses to bacteria lack affinity maturation, utilize the 44.1-idiotype and are dependent on marginal zone B cells. To better understand the mechanism underlying this dichotomy we developed a minimal model of intact bacteria in which PPS14 and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) were stably attached to 1 μm (bacteria-sized) latex beads, but not directly linked to each other, in contrast to PPS14-PspA conjugate. PPS14+[PspA] beads, similar to conjugate, induced in mice boosted PPS14-specific IgG secondary responses, dependent on T cells and ICOS-dependent costimulation, and in which priming could be achieved with PspA alone. In contrast to conjugate, but similar to intact bacteria, the primary PPS14-specific IgG response to PPS14+[PspA] beads peaked rapidly, with the secondary response highly enriched for the 44.1-idiotype and lacking affinity maturation. These results demonstrate that non-covalent association in a particle, of polysaccharide and protein, recapitulates essential immunologic characteristics of intact bacteria that are distinct from soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. PMID:23926322

  10. The ROS/SUMO Axis Contributes to the Response of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapeutic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Bossis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs are thought to induce cancer cell death through the generation of DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we report that one of their early effects is the loss of conjugation of the ubiquitin-like protein SUMO from its targets via reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent inhibition of the SUMO-conjugating enzymes. Desumoylation regulates the expression of specific genes, such as the proapoptotic gene DDIT3, and helps induce apoptosis in chemosensitive AMLs. In contrast, chemotherapeutics do not activate the ROS/SUMO axis in chemoresistant cells. However, pro-oxidants or inhibition of the SUMO pathway by anacardic acid restores DDIT3 expression and apoptosis in chemoresistant cell lines and patient samples, including leukemic stem cells. Finally, inhibition of the SUMO pathway decreases tumor growth in mice xenografted with AML cells. Thus, targeting the ROS/SUMO axis might constitute a therapeutic strategy for AML patients resistant to conventional chemotherapies.

  11. Thy1.2 driven expression of transgenic His₆-SUMO2 in the brain of mice alters a restricted set of genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Moritz J; Tirard, Marilyn

    2014-08-05

    Protein SUMOylation is a post-translational protein modification with a key regulatory role in nerve cell development and function, but its function in mammals in vivo has only been studied cursorily. We generated two new transgenic mouse lines that express His6-tagged SUMO1 and SUMO2 driven by the Thy1.2 promoter. The brains of mice of the two lines express transgenic His6-SUMO peptides and conjugate them to substrates in vivo but cytoarchitecture and synaptic organization of adult transgenic mouse brains are indistinguishable from the wild-type situation. We investigated the impact of transgenic SUMO expression on gene transcription in the hippocampus by performing genome wide analyses using microarrays. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in Thy1.2::His6-SUMO1 transgenic mice and only a restricted set of genes were upregulated in Thy1.2::His6-SUMO2 mice. Among these, Penk1 (Preproenkephalin 1), which encodes Met-enkephalin neuropeptides, showed the highest degree of alteration. Accordingly, a significant increase in Met-enkephalin peptide levels in the hippocampus of Thy1.2::His6-SUMO2 was detected, but the expression levels and cellular localization of Met-enkephalin receptors were not changed. Thus, transgenic neuronal expression of His6-SUMO1 or His6-SUMO2 only induces very minor phenotypical changes in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. USP7/HAUSP: A SUMO deubiquitinase at the heart of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Veronique A J; Freire, Raimundo

    2016-09-01

    DNA replication is both highly conserved and controlled. Problematic DNA replication can lead to genomic instability and therefore carcinogenesis. Numerous mechanisms work together to achieve this tight control and increasing evidence suggests that post-translational modifications (phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation) of DNA replication proteins play a pivotal role in this process. Here we discuss such modifications in the light of a recent article that describes a novel role for the deubiquitinase (DUB) USP7/HAUSP in the control of DNA replication. USP7 achieves this function by an unusual and novel mechanism, namely deubiquitination of SUMOylated proteins at the replication fork, making USP7 also a SUMO DUB (SDUB). This work extends previous observations of increased levels of SUMO and low levels of ubiquitin at the on-going replication fork. Here, we discuss this novel study, its contribution to the DNA replication and genomic stability field and what questions arise from this work. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Scavenger receptors mediate the role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila steroidogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Talamillo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval-pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor, the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi-mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues.

  14. Arabidopsis SUMO protease ASP1 positively regulates flowering time partially through regulating FLC stability 

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Luo, Xi; Qu, Gao Ping; Liu, Peng; Jin, Jing Bo

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of flowering is tightly regulated by the endogenous and environment signals, which is crucial for the reproductive success of flowering plants. It is well known that autonomous and vernalization pathways repress transcription of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a focal floral repressor, but how its protein stability is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, we found that mutations in a novel Arabidopsis SUMO protease 1 (ASP1) resulted in a strong late-flowering phenotype under long-days, but to a lesser extent under short-days. ASP1 localizes in the nucleus and exhibited a SUMO protease activity in vitro and in vivo. The conserved Cys-577 in ASP1 is critical for its enzymatic activity, as well as its physiological function in the regulation of flowering time. Genetic and gene expression analyses demonstrated that ASP1 promotes transcription of positive regulators of flowering, such as FT, SOC1 and FD, and may function in both CO-dependent photoperiod pathway and FLC-dependent pathways. Although the transcription level of FLC was not affected in the loss-of-function asp1 mutant, the protein stability of FLC was increased in the asp1 mutant. Taken together, this study identified a novel bona fide SUMO protease, ASP1, which positively regulates transition to flowering at least partly by repressing FLC protein stability.

  15. Interplay between Ubiquitin, SUMO, and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in the Cellular Response to Genotoxic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Stefania; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cells employ a complex network of molecular pathways to cope with endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress. This multilayered response ensures that genomic lesions are efficiently detected and faithfully repaired in order to safeguard genome integrity. The molecular choreography at sites of DNA damage relies heavily on post-translational modifications (PTMs). Protein modifications with ubiquitin and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO have recently emerged as important regulatory means to coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair. Both ubiquitylation and SUMOylation can lead to extensive chain-like protein modifications, a feature that is shared with yet another DNA damage-induced PTM, the modification of proteins with poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Chains of ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR all contribute to the multi-protein assemblies found at sites of DNA damage and regulate their spatio-temporal dynamics. Here, we review recent advancements in our understanding of how ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR coordinate the DNA damage response and highlight emerging examples of an intricate interplay between these chain-like modifications during the cellular response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27148359

  16. Arabidopsis SUMO protease ASP1 positively regulates flowering time partially through regulating FLC stability 

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Xiangxiong

    2016-12-07

    The initiation of flowering is tightly regulated by the endogenous and environment signals, which is crucial for the reproductive success of flowering plants. It is well known that autonomous and vernalization pathways repress transcription of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a focal floral repressor, but how its protein stability is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, we found that mutations in a novel Arabidopsis SUMO protease 1 (ASP1) resulted in a strong late-flowering phenotype under long-days, but to a lesser extent under short-days. ASP1 localizes in the nucleus and exhibited a SUMO protease activity in vitro and in vivo. The conserved Cys-577 in ASP1 is critical for its enzymatic activity, as well as its physiological function in the regulation of flowering time. Genetic and gene expression analyses demonstrated that ASP1 promotes transcription of positive regulators of flowering, such as FT, SOC1 and FD, and may function in both CO-dependent photoperiod pathway and FLC-dependent pathways. Although the transcription level of FLC was not affected in the loss-of-function asp1 mutant, the protein stability of FLC was increased in the asp1 mutant. Taken together, this study identified a novel bona fide SUMO protease, ASP1, which positively regulates transition to flowering at least partly by repressing FLC protein stability.

  17. Functional characterization of DnSIZ1, a SIZ/PIAS-type SUMO E3 ligase from Dendrobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Su, Mengying; Yu, Mengyuan; Zhang, Shengchun; Lai, Jianbin; Yang, Chengwei; Wang, Yaqin

    2015-09-17

    SUMOylation is an important post-translational modification of eukaryotic proteins that involves the reversible conjugation of a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) polypeptide to its specific protein substrates, thereby regulating numerous complex cellular processes. The PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated signal transducers and activators of transcription [STAT]) and SIZ (scaffold attachment factor A/B/acinus/PIAS [SAP] and MIZ) proteins are SUMO E3 ligases that modulate SUMO conjugation. The characteristic features and SUMOylation mechanisms of SIZ1 protein in monocotyledon are poorly understood. Here, we examined the functions of a homolog of Arabidopsis SIZ1, a functional SIZ/PIAS-type SUMO E3 ligase from Dendrobium. In Dendrobium, the predicted DnSIZ1 protein has domains that are highly conserved among SIZ/PIAS-type proteins. DnSIZ1 is widely expressed in Dendrobium organs and has a up-regulated trend by treatment with cold, high temperature and wounding. The DnSIZ1 protein localizes to the nucleus and shows SUMO E3 ligase activity when expressed in an Escherichia coli reconstitution system. Moreover, ectopic expression of DnSIZ1 in the Arabidopsis siz1-2 mutant partially complements several phenotypes and results in enhanced levels of SUMO conjugates in plants exposed to heat shock conditions. We observed that DnSIZ1 acts as a negative regulator of flowering transition which may be via a vernalization-induced pathway. In addition, ABA-hypersensitivity of siz1-2 seed germination can be partially suppressed by DnSIZ1. Our results suggest that DnSIZ1 is a functional homolog of the Arabidopsis SIZ1 with SUMO E3 ligase activity and may play an important role in the regulation of Dendrobium stress responses, flowering and development.

  18. The Role of Wheat and Egg Constituents in the Formation of a Covalent and Non-covalent Protein Network in Fresh and Cooked Egg Noodles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Marlies A; Rombouts, Ine; Nivelle, Mieke A; Delcour, Jan A

    2017-01-01

    Noodles of constant protein content and flour-to-egg protein ratio were made with whole egg, egg white, or egg yolk. The optimal cooking time, water absorption, and cooking loss of salted whole egg noodles was respectively lower and higher than of egg white and egg yolk noodles. However, cooked whole egg noodles showed the best Kieffer-rig extensibility. Differences in noodle properties were linked to protein network formation. Disulfide bonds in whole egg noodles developed faster and to a larger extent during cooking than in egg yolk noodles but slower and to a lower extent than in egg white noodles. The balance between the rate of protein cross-linking and starch swelling determines cooked noodle properties. Ionic and hydrophobic protein interactions increase the optimum cooking time and total work in Kieffer-rig extensibility testing of fresh noodles. Hydrogen bonds and covalent cross-links are probably the main determinants of the extensibility of cooked noodles. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  19. Introduction to a Protein Interaction System Used for Quantitative Evaluation of Biomolecular Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Yamniuk, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of molecular biology is the determination of biomolecular function. This comes largely from a knowledge of the non-covalent interactions that biological small and macro-molecules experience. The fundamental mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the ABRF is to show how solution biophysical tools are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core t...

  20. The hydroxyl functionality and a rigid proximal N are required for forming a novel non-covalent quinine-heme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alumasa, John N; Gorka, Alexander P; Casabianca, Leah B; Comstock, Erica; de Dios, Angel C; Roepe, Paul D

    2011-03-01

    Quinoline antimalarial drugs bind both monomeric and dimeric forms of free heme, with distinct preferences depending on the chemical environment. Under biological conditions, chloroquine (CQ) appears to prefer to bind to μ-oxo dimeric heme, while quinine (QN) preferentially binds monomer. To further explore this important distinction, we study three newly synthesized and several commercially available QN analogues lacking various functional groups. We find that removal of the QN hydroxyl lowers heme affinity, hemozoin (Hz) inhibition efficiency, and antiplasmodial activity. Elimination of the rigid quinuclidyl ring has similar effects, but elimination of either the vinyl or methoxy group does not. Replacing the quinuclidyl N with a less rigid tertiary aliphatic N only partially restores activity. To further study these trends, we probe drug-heme interactions via NMR studies with both Fe and Zn protoporphyrin IX (FPIX, ZnPIX) for QN, dehydroxyQN (DHQN), dequinuclidylQN (DQQN), and deamino-dequinuclidylQN (DADQQN). Magnetic susceptibility measurements in the presence of FPIX demonstrate that these compounds differentially perturb FPIX monomer-dimer equilibrium. We also isolate the QN-FPIX complex formed under mild aqueous conditions and analyze it by mass spectrometry, as well as fluorescence, vibrational, and solid-state NMR spectroscopies. The data elucidate key features of QN pharmacology and allow us to propose a refined model for the preferred binding of QN to monomeric FPIX under biologically relevant conditions. With this model in hand, we also propose how QN, CQ, and amodiaquine (AQ) differ in their ability to inhibit Hz formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SUMO-fusion, purification, and characterization of a (+)-zizaene synthase from Chrysopogon zizanioides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, S.; Frister, T.; Alemdar, S.; Li, Z.; Scheper, T.; Beutel, S.

    2015-01-01

    An uncharacterized plant cDNA coding for a polypeptide presumably having sesquiterpene synthase activity, was expressed in soluble and active form. Two expression strategies were evaluated in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was fused to a highly soluble SUMO domain, in addition to being produced in an unfused form by a cold-shock expression system. Yields up to ∼325 mg/L −1 were achieved in batch cultivations. The 6x-His-tagged enzyme was purified employing an Ni 2+ -IMAC-based procedure. Identity of the protein was established by Western Blot analysis as well as peptide mass fingerprinting. A molecular mass of 64 kDa and an isoelectric point of pI 4.95 were determined by 2D gel electrophoresis. Cleavage of the fusion domain was possible by digestion with specific SUMO protease. The synthase was active in Mg 2+ containing buffer and catalyzed the production of (+)-zizaene (syn. khusimene), a precursor of khusimol, from farnesyl diphosphate. Product identity was confirmed by GC–MS and comparison of retention indices. Enzyme kinetics were determined by measuring initial reaction rates for the product, using varying substrate concentrations. By assuming a Michaelis–Menten model, kinetic parameters of K M  = 1.111 μM (±0.113), v max  = 0.3245 μM min −1 (±0.0035), k cat  = 2.95 min −1 , as well as a catalytic efficiency k cat /K M  = 4.43 × 10 4  M −1 s −1 were calculated. Fusion to a SUMO moiety can substantially increase soluble expression levels of certain hard to express terpene synthases in E. coli. The kinetic data determined for the recombinant synthase are comparable to other described plant sesquiterpene synthases and in the typical range of enzymes belonging to the secondary metabolism. This leaves potential for optimizing catalytic parameters through methods like directed evolution. - Highlights: • Uncharacterized (+)-zizaene synthase from C. zizanoides was cloned and expressed. • Fusion to SUMO and cold-shock induction

  2. SUMO-fusion, purification, and characterization of a (+)-zizaene synthase from Chrysopogon zizanioides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, S.; Frister, T.; Alemdar, S.; Li, Z.; Scheper, T.; Beutel, S., E-mail: beutel@iftc.uni-hannover.de

    2015-03-20

    An uncharacterized plant cDNA coding for a polypeptide presumably having sesquiterpene synthase activity, was expressed in soluble and active form. Two expression strategies were evaluated in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was fused to a highly soluble SUMO domain, in addition to being produced in an unfused form by a cold-shock expression system. Yields up to ∼325 mg/L{sup −1} were achieved in batch cultivations. The 6x-His-tagged enzyme was purified employing an Ni{sup 2+}-IMAC-based procedure. Identity of the protein was established by Western Blot analysis as well as peptide mass fingerprinting. A molecular mass of 64 kDa and an isoelectric point of pI 4.95 were determined by 2D gel electrophoresis. Cleavage of the fusion domain was possible by digestion with specific SUMO protease. The synthase was active in Mg{sup 2+} containing buffer and catalyzed the production of (+)-zizaene (syn. khusimene), a precursor of khusimol, from farnesyl diphosphate. Product identity was confirmed by GC–MS and comparison of retention indices. Enzyme kinetics were determined by measuring initial reaction rates for the product, using varying substrate concentrations. By assuming a Michaelis–Menten model, kinetic parameters of K{sub M} = 1.111 μM (±0.113), v{sub max} = 0.3245 μM min{sup −1} (±0.0035), k{sub cat} = 2.95 min{sup −1}, as well as a catalytic efficiency k{sub cat}/K{sub M} = 4.43 × 10{sup 4} M{sup −1} s{sup −1} were calculated. Fusion to a SUMO moiety can substantially increase soluble expression levels of certain hard to express terpene synthases in E. coli. The kinetic data determined for the recombinant synthase are comparable to other described plant sesquiterpene synthases and in the typical range of enzymes belonging to the secondary metabolism. This leaves potential for optimizing catalytic parameters through methods like directed evolution. - Highlights: • Uncharacterized (+)-zizaene synthase from C. zizanoides was cloned

  3. Nuclear pool of phosphatidylinositol 4 phosphate 5 kinase 1α is modified by polySUMO-2 during apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhargava, Varsha; Bhar, Kaushik; Siddhanta, Anirban, E-mail: asiddhanto@yahoo.com

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Nuclear pool of PIP5K is SUMOylated. •Enhancement of SUMOylated nuclear PIP5K during apoptosis. •Nuclear PIP5K is modified by polySUMO-1 during apoptosis. •Nuclear PIP5K is modified by polySUMO-2 chain during apoptosis. -- Abstract: Phosphatidylinositol 4 phosphate 5 kinase 1α (PIP5K) is mainly localized in the cytosol and plasma membrane. Studies have also indicated its prominent association with nuclear speckles. The exact nature of this nuclear pool of PIP5K is not clear. Using biochemical and microscopic techniques, we have demonstrated that the nuclear pool of PIP5K is modified by SUMO-1 in HEK-293 cells stably expressing PIP5K. Moreover, this SUMOylated pool of PIP5K increased during apoptosis. PolySUMO-2 chain conjugated PIP5K was detected by pull-down experiment using affinity-tagged RNF4, a polySUMO-2 binding protein, during late apoptosis.

  4. Intense Resistance Exercise Promotes the Acute and Transient Nuclear Translocation of Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier (SUMO-1 in Human Myofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gehlert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein sumoylation is a posttranslational modification triggered by cellular stress. Because general information concerning the role of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO proteins in adult skeletal muscle is sparse, we investigated whether SUMO-1 proteins will be subjected to time-dependent changes in their subcellular localization in sarcoplasmic and nuclear compartments of human type I and II skeletal muscle fibers in response to acute stimulation by resistance exercise (RE. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken at baseline (PRE, 15, 30, 60, 240 min and 24 h post RE from 6 male subjects subjected to a single bout of one-legged knee extensions. SUMO-1 localization was determined via immunohistochemistry and confocal laser microscopy. At baseline SUMO-1 was localized in perinuclear regions of myonuclei. Within 15 and up to 60 min post exercise, nuclear SUMO-1 localization was significantly increased (p < 0.01, declining towards baseline levels within 240 min post exercise. Sarcoplasmic SUMO-1 localization was increased at 15 min post exercise in type I and up to 30 min post RE in type II myofibres. The changing localization of SUMO-1 proteins acutely after intense muscle contractions points to a role for SUMO proteins in the acute regulation of the skeletal muscle proteome after exercise.

  5. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 11 (USP11) Deubiquitinates Hybrid Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-Ubiquitin Chains to Counteract RING Finger Protein 4 (RNF4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Schimmel, Joost; Eifler, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    of RNF4 as a counterbalancing factor. In response to DNA damage induced by methyl methanesulfonate, USP11 could counteract RNF4 to inhibit the dissolution of nuclear bodies. Thus, we provide novel insight into cross-talk between ubiquitin and SUMO and uncover USP11 and RNF4 as a balanced SUMO...

  6. Functional Crosstalk between the PP2A and SUMO Pathways Revealed by Analysis of STUbL Suppressor, razor 1-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Nie

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modifications (PTMs provide dynamic regulation of the cellular proteome, which is critical for both normal cell growth and for orchestrating rapid responses to environmental stresses, e.g. genotoxins. Key PTMs include ubiquitin, the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier SUMO, and phosphorylation. Recently, SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs were found to integrate signaling through the SUMO and ubiquitin pathways. In general, STUbLs are recruited to target proteins decorated with poly-SUMO chains to ubiquitinate them and drive either their extraction from protein complexes, and/or their degradation at the proteasome. In fission yeast, reducing or preventing the formation of SUMO chains can circumvent the essential and DNA damage response functions of STUbL. This result indicates that whilst some STUbL "targets" have been identified, the crucial function of STUbL is to antagonize SUMO chain formation. Herein, by screening for additional STUbL suppressors, we reveal crosstalk between the serine/threonine phosphatase PP2A-Pab1B55 and the SUMO pathway. A hypomorphic Pab1B55 mutant not only suppresses STUbL dysfunction, but also mitigates the phenotypes associated with deletion of the SUMO protease Ulp2, or mutation of the STUbL cofactor Rad60. Together, our results reveal a novel role for PP2A-Pab1B55 in modulating SUMO pathway output, acting in parallel to known critical regulators of SUMOylation homeostasis. Given the broad evolutionary functional conservation of the PP2A and SUMO pathways, our results could be relevant to the ongoing attempts to therapeutically target these factors.

  7. SUMO regulates p21Cip1 intracellular distribution and with p21Cip1 facilitates multiprotein complex formation in the nucleolus upon DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Sonia; Abella, Neus; Berciano, Maria T; Tapia, Olga; Jaumot, Montserrat; Freire, Raimundo; Lafarga, Miguel; Agell, Neus

    2017-01-01

    We previously showed that p21Cip1 transits through the nucleolus on its way from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and that DNA damage inhibits this transit and induces the formation of p21Cip1-containing intranucleolar bodies (INoBs). Here, we demonstrate that these INoBs also contain SUMO-1 and UBC9, the E2 SUMO-conjugating enzyme. Furthermore, whereas wild type SUMO-1 localized in INoBs, a SUMO-1 mutant, which is unable to conjugate with proteins, does not, suggesting the presence of SUMOylated proteins at INoBs. Moreover, depletion of the SUMO-conjugating enzyme UBC9 or the sumo hydrolase SENP2 changed p21Cip1 intracellular distribution. In addition to SUMO-1 and p21Cip1, cell cycle regulators and DNA damage checkpoint proteins, including Cdk2, Cyclin E, PCNA, p53 and Mdm2, and PML were also detected in INoBs. Importantly, depletion of UBC9 or p21Cip1 impacted INoB biogenesis and the nucleolar accumulation of the cell cycle regulators and DNA damage checkpoint proteins following DNA damage. The impact of p21Cip1 and SUMO-1 on the accumulation of proteins in INoBs extends also to CRM1, a nuclear exportin that is also important for protein translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleolus. Thus, SUMO and p21Cip1 regulate the transit of proteins through the nucleolus, and that disruption of nucleolar export by DNA damage induces SUMO and p21Cip1 to act as hub proteins to form a multiprotein complex in the nucleolus.

  8. Non-covalent synthesis of organic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the synthesis, characterization and functionalization of hydrogen bonded, box-like assemblies. These assemblies are formed upon mixing bismelamine calix[4]arenes with a complementary barbiturate in apolar solvents. Various techniques for the characterization have been used,

  9. To bend or not to bend – are heteroatom interactions within conjugated molecules effective in dictating conformation and planarity?

    KAUST Repository

    Conboy, Gary; Spencer, Howard J.; Angioni, Enrico; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L.; Findlay, Neil J.; Coles, Simon J.; Wilson, Claire; Pitak, Mateusz B.; Risko, Chad; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Skabara, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the roles of heteroatoms (mainly nitrogen, the halogens and the chalcogens) in dictating the conformation of linear conjugated molecules and polymers through non-covalent intramolecular interactions. Whilst hydrogen bonding is a competitive and sometimes more influential interaction, we provide unambiguous evidence that heteroatoms are able to determine the conformation of such materials with reasonable predictability.

  10. Antioxidative activity and emulsifying properties of cuttlefish skin gelatin–tannic acid complex as influenced by types of interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aewsiri, T.; Benjakul, S.; Visessanguan, W.; Wierenga, P.A.; Gruppen, H.

    2010-01-01

    The non-covalent interaction between cuttlefish skin gelatin and tannic acid was observed in gelatin modified with unoxidized tannic acid at pH 7, whereas covalent interaction was found in gelatin modified with oxidized tannic acid at pH 9. Degree of tannic acid incorporation into gelatin via

  11. To bend or not to bend – are heteroatom interactions within conjugated molecules effective in dictating conformation and planarity?

    KAUST Repository

    Conboy, Gary

    2016-04-26

    We consider the roles of heteroatoms (mainly nitrogen, the halogens and the chalcogens) in dictating the conformation of linear conjugated molecules and polymers through non-covalent intramolecular interactions. Whilst hydrogen bonding is a competitive and sometimes more influential interaction, we provide unambiguous evidence that heteroatoms are able to determine the conformation of such materials with reasonable predictability.

  12. Proof of concept for turbulence measurements with the RPAS SUMO during the BLLAST campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Båserud, Line; Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius O.; Kral, Stephan T.; Paskyabi, Mostafa B.; Lothon, Marie

    2016-10-01

    The micro-RPAS (remotely piloted aircraft system) SUMO (Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer) equipped with a five-hole-probe (5HP) system for turbulent flow measurements was operated in 49 flight missions during the BLLAST (Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) field campaign in 2011. Based on data sets from these flights, we investigate the potential and limitations of airborne velocity variance and TKE (turbulent kinetic energy) estimations by an RPAS with a take-off weight below 1 kg. The integration of the turbulence probe in the SUMO system was still in an early prototype stage during this campaign, and therefore extensive post-processing of the data was required. In order to be able to calculate the three-dimensional wind vector, flow probe measurements were first synchronized with the autopilot's attitude and velocity data. Clearly visible oscillations were detected in the resulting vertical velocity, w, even after correcting for the aircraft motion. The oscillations in w were identified as the result of an internal time shift between the inertial measurement unit (IMU) and the GPS sensors, leading to insufficient motion correction, especially for the vertical wind component, causing large values of σw. Shifting the IMU 1-1.5 s forward in time with respect to the GPS yields a minimum for σw and maximum covariance between the IMU pitch angle and the GPS climb angle. The SUMO data show a good agreement to sonic anemometer data from a 60 m tower for σu, but show slightly higher values for σv and σw. Vertical TKE profiles, obtained from consecutive flight legs at different altitudes, show reasonable results, both with respect to the overall TKE level and the temporal variation. A thorough discussion of the methods used and the identified uncertainties and limitations of the system for turbulence measurements is included and should help the developers and users of other systems with similar problems.

  13. To implicate the private sector in funding: The Kyoto mechanisms and SUMO policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguet, Benoit; Morel, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Internationally set objectives in the fight against climate change cannot be reached without funding from the private sector. Public money, a scarce resource, must be used as best possible, in particular when it has a leverage effect on private funding. In this respect, feedback from the Kyoto Protocol's clean development mechanism is of interest. On the eve of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference, we must ramp up the mobilization of private resources. Smart unconventional monetary (SUMO) policies could help us toward this goal. Several countries have adopted such policies to cope with macro-economic circumstances or systemic risks. Is the destabilization of the climate not a risk of this sort?

  14. Temporal and SUMO-specific SUMOylation contribute to the dynamics of Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and spindle integrity during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Weber Beringui; Hwang, KeumSil; Morris, Patricia L

    2018-02-15

    During mammalian meiosis, Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is essential during cell cycle progression. In oocyte maturation, PLK1 expression is well characterized but timing of posttranslational modifications regulating its activity and subcellular localization are less clear. Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) posttranslational modifier proteins have been detected in mammalian gametes but their precise function during gametogenesis is largely unknown. In the present paper we report for mouse oocytes that both PLK1 and phosphorylated PLK1 undergo SUMOylation in meiosis II (MII) oocytes using immunocytochemistry, immunoprecipitation and in vitro SUMOylation assays. At MII, PLK1 is phosphorylated at threonine-210 and serine-137. MII oocyte PLK1 and phosphorylated PLK1 undergo SUMOylation by SUMO-1, -2 and -3 as shown by individual in vitro assays. Using these assays, forms of phosphorylated PLK1 normalized to PLK1 increased significantly and correlated with SUMOylated PLK1 levels. During meiotic progression and maturation, SUMO-1-SUMOylation of PLK1 is involved in spindle formation whereas SUMO-2/3-SUMOylation may regulate PLK1 activity at kinetochore-spindle attachment sites. Microtubule integrity is required for PLK1 localization with SUMO-1 but not with SUMO-2/3. Inhibition of SUMOylation disrupts proper meiotic bipolar spindle organization and spindle-kinetochore attachment. The data show that both temporal and SUMO-specific-SUMOylation play important roles in orchestrating functional dynamics of PLK1 during mouse oocyte meiosis, including subcellular compartmentalization. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of SUMO-specific protease 2 in reprogramming cellular glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Tang

    Full Text Available Most cancer cells exhibit a shift in glucose metabolic strategy, displaying increased glycolysis even with adequate oxygen supply. SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs de-SUMOylate substrates including HIF1α and p53,two key regulators in cancer glucose metabolism, to regulate their activity, stability and subcellular localization. However, the role of SENPs in tumor glucose metabolism remains unclear. Here we report that SUMO-specific protease 2 (SENP2 negatively regulates aerobic glycolysis in MCF7 and MEF cells. Over-expression of SENP2 reduces the glucose uptake and lactate production, increasing the cellular ATP levels in MCF7 cells, while SENP2 knockout MEF cells show increased glucose uptake and lactate production along with the decreased ATP levels. Consistently, the MCF7 cells over-expressing SENP2 exhibit decreased expression levels of key glycolytic enzymes and an increased rate of glucose oxidation compared with control MCF7 cells, indicating inhibited glycolysis but enhanced oxidative mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, SENP2 over-expressing MCF7 cells demonstrated a reduced amount of phosphorylated AKT, whereas SENP2 knockout MEFs exhibit increased levels of phosphorylated AKT. Furthermore, inhibiting AKT phosphorylation by LY294002 rescued the phenotype induced by SENP2 deficiency in MEFs. In conclusion, SENP2 represses glycolysis and shifts glucose metabolic strategy, in part through inhibition of AKT phosphorylation. Our study reveals a novel function of SENP2 in regulating glucose metabolism.

  16. Targeting of SUMO substrates to a Cdc48-Ufd1-Npl4 segregase and STUbL pathway in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Julie Bonne; Tammsalu, Triin; Jørgensen, Maria Louise Mønster

    2015-01-01

    48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 facilitates this process. However, the extent to which the two pathways overlap, and how substrates are selected, remains unknown. Here we address these questions in fission yeast through proteome-wide analyses of SUMO modification sites. We identify over a thousand sumoylated...... lysines in a total of 468 proteins and quantify changes occurring in the SUMO modification status when the STUbL or Ufd1 pathways are compromised by mutations. The data suggest the coordinated processing of several classes of SUMO conjugates, many dynamically associated with centromeres or telomeres...

  17. The Smc5-Smc6 complex and SUMO modification of Rad52 regulates recombinational repair at the ribosomal gene locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Sunjevaric, Ivana; De Piccoli, Giacomo

    2007-01-01

    at an extranucleolar site. The nucleolar exclusion of Rad52 recombination foci entails Mre11 and Smc5-Smc6 complexes and depends on Rad52 SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) modification. Remarkably, mutations that abrogate these activities result in the formation of Rad52 foci within the nucleolus and cause r...

  18. Stabilization and Structure Calculations for Noncovalent Interactions in Extended Molecular Systems Based on Wave Function and Density Functional Theories

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, K. E.; Pitoňák, Michal; Jurečka, P.; Hobza, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 9 (2010), s. 5023-5063 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non covalent interactions * wave function theories * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 33.033, year: 2010

  19. Soluble expression and purification of the recombinant bioactive peptide precursor BPP-1 in Escherichia coli using a cELP-SUMO dual fusion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shengqi; Zang, Xiangyu; Yang, Zhenquan; Gao, Lu; Yin, Yongqi; Fang, Weiming

    2016-02-01

    A bioactive peptide precursor (BPP-1, 14.3 kDa/115AA), a newly designed polypeptide that may exert a potential antihypertensive effect in vivo, is composed of many different ACE inhibitory peptides and antioxidant peptides tandemly linked according to the restriction sites of gastrointestinal proteases. In this report, we present a novel method to obtain soluble BPP-1 in Escherichia coli using cationic elastin-like polypeptide and SUMO (cELP-SUMO) tags. The cELP-SUMO-tagged fusion protein was expressed in soluble form at 20 °C for 20 h. After purification based on the inverse transition cycling (ITC) method, the purified cELP-SUMO-CFPP fusion protein was subsequently cleaved by a SUMO protease to release the mature BPP-1. After a subsequent simple salt precipitation process, approximately 167.2 mg of recombinant BPP-1 was obtained from 1 l of bacterial culture with at least 92% purity. The molecular mass (Mr) of the recombinant BPP-1 was confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS to equal 14,347. The purified BPP-1 was subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion, and the resulting hydrolysates exhibited notable ACE inhibitory and antioxidant activities in vitro. This report provides the first description of the soluble production of a bioactive peptide multimer with potential ACE inhibitory and antioxidant activities in E. coli using a cELP-SUMO tag. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coxsackievirus B5 induced apoptosis of HeLa cells: Effects on p53 and SUMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Rogerio; Guerra-Sa, Renata; Arruda, Eurico

    2010-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5), a human enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae, is a frequent cause of acute and chronic human diseases. The pathogenesis of enteroviral infections is not completely understood, and the fate of the CVB5-infected cell has a pivotal role in this process. We have investigated the CVB5-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells and found that it happens by the intrinsic pathway by a mechanism dependent on the ubiquitin-proteasome system, associated with nuclear aggregation of p53. Striking redistribution of both SUMO and UBC9 was noted at 4 h post-infection, simultaneously with a reduction in the levels of the ubiquitin-ligase HDM2. Taken together, these results suggest that CVB5 infection of HeLa cells elicit the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis by MDM2 degradation and p53 activation, destabilizing protein sumoylation, by a mechanism that is dependent on a functional ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  1. 新型非共价相互作用——σ-hole作用的研究进展%Research Progress on the New Tept of Non-covale σ-hole Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李巍; 曾艳丽; 孟令鹏

    2015-01-01

    第Ⅳ~Ⅶ主族元素的原子的σ-hole与亲核物质之间的作用,已经成为目前研究弱相互作用的热点问题.该类作用一般表示为RnX…B(n=1,2,3,4),其中X为第Ⅳ~Ⅶ主族元素的原子,B为亲核物质.RX分子σ-hole处静电势最大值(VS,max)与2个因素有关:1)X原子外VS,max值随X原子的电负性增大而减小;2)X原子外Vs,max值随RnX(n=1,2,3,4)分子中X原子sp杂化中p轨道的贡献的增大而增大.

  2. COMPARISON OF NORMALIZED MAXIMUM AEROBIC CAPACITY AND BODY COMPOSITION OF SUMO WRESTLERS TO ATHLETES IN COMBAT AND OTHER SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Beekley

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Sumo wrestling is unique in combat sport, and in all of sport. We examined the maximum aerobic capacity and body composition of sumo wrestlers and compared them to untrained controls. We also compared "aerobic muscle quality", meaning VO2max normalized to predicted skeletal muscle mass (SMM (VO2max /SMM, between sumo wrestlers and controls and among previously published data for male athletes from combat, aerobic, and power sports. Sumo wrestlers, compared to untrained controls, had greater (p < 0.05 body mass (mean ± SD; 117.0 ± 4.9 vs. 56.1 ± 9.8 kg, percent fat (24.0 ± 1.4 vs. 13.3 ± 4.5, fat-free mass (88.9 ± 4.2 vs. 48.4 �� 6.8 kg, predicted SMM (48.2 ± 2.9 vs. 20.6 ± 4.7 kg and absolute VO2max (3.6 ± 1.3 vs. 2.5 ± 0.7 L·min-1. Mean VO2max /SMM (ml·kg SMM-1·min-1 was significantly different (p < 0.05 among aerobic athletes (164.8 ± 18.3, combat athletes (which was not different from untrained controls; 131.4 ± 9.3 and 128.6 ± 13.6, respectively, power athletes (96.5 ± 5.3, and sumo wrestlers (71.4 ± 5.3. There was a strong negative correlation (r = - 0.75 between percent body fat and VO2max /SMM (p < 0.05. We conclude that sumo wrestlers have some of the largest percent body fat and fat-free mass and the lowest "aerobic muscle quality" (VO2max /SMM, both in combat sport and compared to aerobic and power sport athletes. Additionally, it appears from analysis of the relationship between SMM and absolute VO2max for all sports that there is a "ceiling" at which increases in SMM do not result in additional increases in absolute VO2max

  3. Functions of Ubiquitin and SUMO in DNA Replication and Replication Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Néstor; Wong, Ronald P.; Ulrich, Helle D.

    2016-01-01

    Complete and faithful duplication of its entire genetic material is one of the essential prerequisites for a proliferating cell to maintain genome stability. Yet, during replication DNA is particularly vulnerable to insults. On the one hand, lesions in replicating DNA frequently cause a stalling of the replication machinery, as most DNA polymerases cannot cope with defective templates. This situation is aggravated by the fact that strand separation in preparation for DNA synthesis prevents common repair mechanisms relying on strand complementarity, such as base and nucleotide excision repair, from working properly. On the other hand, the replication process itself subjects the DNA to a series of hazardous transformations, ranging from the exposure of single-stranded DNA to topological contortions and the generation of nicks and fragments, which all bear the risk of inducing genomic instability. Dealing with these problems requires rapid and flexible responses, for which posttranslational protein modifications that act independently of protein synthesis are particularly well suited. Hence, it is not surprising that members of the ubiquitin family, particularly ubiquitin itself and SUMO, feature prominently in controlling many of the defensive and restorative measures involved in the protection of DNA during replication. In this review we will discuss the contributions of ubiquitin and SUMO to genome maintenance specifically as they relate to DNA replication. We will consider cases where the modifiers act during regular, i.e., unperturbed stages of replication, such as initiation, fork progression, and termination, but also give an account of their functions in dealing with lesions, replication stalling and fork collapse. PMID:27242895

  4. RNF4 interacts with multiSUMOylated ETV4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Martinez, Elisa; Guo, Baoqiang; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Protein SUMOylation represents an important regulatory event that changes the activities of numerous proteins. Recent evidence demonstrates that polySUMO chains can act as a trigger to direct the ubiquitin ligase RNF4 to substrates to cause their turnover through the ubiquitin pathway. RNF4 uses multiple SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs) to bind to these chains. However, in addition to polySUMO chains, a multimeric binding surface created by the simultaneous SUMOylation of multiple residues on a protein or complex could also provide a platform for the recruitment of multi-SIM proteins like RNF4. Here we demonstrate that multiSUMOylated ETV4 can bind to RNF4 and that a unique combination of SIMs is required for RNF4 to interact with this multiSUMOylated platform. Thus RNF4 can bind to proteins that are either polySUMOylated through a single site or multiSUMOylated on several sites and raises the possibility that such multiSIM-multiSUMO interactions might be more widespread.

  5. Observation of an E2 (Ubc9-homodimer by crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen Y. Alontaga

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications by the small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO, in particular the formation of poly-SUMO-2 and -3 chains, regulates essential cellular functions and its aberration leads to life-threatening diseases (Geoffroy and Hay, 2009 [1]. It was shown previously that the non-covalent interaction between SUMO and the conjugating enzyme (E2 for SUMO, known as Ubc9, is required for poly-SUMO-2/3 chain formation (Knipscheer et al., 2007 [2]. However, the structure of SUMO-Ubc9 non-covalent complex, by itself, could not explain how the poly-SUMO-2/3 chain forms and consequently a Ubc9 homodimer, although never been observed, was proposed for poly-SUMO-2/3 chain formation (Knipscheer et al., 2007 [2]. Here, we solved the crystal structure of a heterotrimer containing a homodimer of Ubc9 and the RWD domain from RWDD3. The asymmetric Ubc9 homodimer is mediated by the N-terminal region of one Ubc9 molecule and a surface near the catalytic Cys of the second Ubc9 molecule (Fig. 1A. This N-terminal surface of Ubc9 that is involved in the homodimer formation also interacts with the RWD domain, the ubiquitin-fold domain of the SUMO activating enzyme (E1, SUMO, and the E3 ligase, RanBP2 (Knipscheer et al., 2007; Tong et al.. 1997; Tatham et al., 2005; Reverter and Lima, 2005; Capili and Lima, 2007; Wang et al., 2009, 2010; Wang and Chen, 2010; Alontaga et al., 2015 [2–10]. The existence of the Ubc9 homodimer in solution is supported by previously published solution NMR studies of rotational correlation time and chemical shift perturbation (Alontaga et al., 2015; Yuan et al., 1999 [10,11]. Site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical analysis suggests that this dimeric arrangement of Ubc9 is likely important for poly-SUMO chain formation (Fig. 1B and C. The asymmetric Ubc9 homodimer described for the first time in this work could provide the critical missing link in the poly-SUMO chain formation mechanism. The data presented here are related

  6. Uncovering SUMOylation Dynamics during Cell-Cycle Progression Reveals FoxM1 as a Key Mitotic SUMO Target Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schimmel, Joost; Eifler, Karolin; Sigurdsson, Jón Otti

    2014-01-01

    Loss of small ubiquitin-like modification (SUMOylation) in mice causes genomic instability due to the missegregation of chromosomes. Currently, little is known about the identity of relevant SUMO target proteins that are involved in this process and about global SUMOylation dynamics during cell......-cycle progression. We performed a large-scale quantitative proteomics screen to address this and identified 593 proteins to be SUMO-2 modified, including the Forkhead box transcription factor M1 (FoxM1), a key regulator of cell-cycle progression and chromosome segregation. SUMOylation of FoxM1 peaks during G2 and M...... relieving FoxM1 autorepression. Cells deficient for FoxM1 SUMOylation showed increased levels of polyploidy. Our findings contribute to understanding the role of SUMOylation during cell-cycle progression....

  7. High-level expression and purification of soluble recombinant FGF21 protein by SUMO fusion in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yadong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a promising drug candidate to combat metabolic diseases. However, high-level expression and purification of recombinant FGF21 (rFGF21 in Escherichia coli (E. coli is difficult because rFGF21 forms inclusion bodies in the bacteria making it difficult to purify and obtain high concentrations of bioactive rFGF21. To overcome this problem, we fused the FGF21 with SUMO (Small ubiquitin-related modifier by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and expressed the fused gene in E. coli BL21(DE3. Results By inducing with IPTG, SUMO-FGF21 was expressed at a high level. Its concentration reached 30% of total protein, and exceeded 95% of all soluble proteins. The fused protein was purified by DEAE sepharose FF and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Once cleaved by the SUMO protease, the purity of rFGF21 by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was shown to be higher than 96% with low endotoxin level (in vivo animal experiments showed that rFGF21 produced by using this method, could decrease the concentration of plasma glucose in diabetic rats by streptozotocin (STZ injection. Conclusions This study demonstrated that SUMO, when fused with FGF21, was able to promote its soluble expression of the latter in E. coli, making it more convenient to purify rFGF21 than previously. This may be a better method to produce rFGF21 for pharmaceutical research and development.

  8. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: Recent developments and applications of a Micro-UAS for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuder, J.; Jonassen, M. O.; Ólafsson, H.

    2012-04-01

    During the last 5 years, the Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a new and flexible tool for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research to be operated as controllable and recoverable atmospheric sounding system for the lowest 4 km above the Earth's surface. In the year 2011 two main technical improvements of the system have been accomplished. The integration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) into the Paparazzi autopilot system has expanded the environmental conditions for SUMO operation to now even allowing incloud flights. In the field of sensor technology the implementation of a 5-hole probe for the determination of the 3 dimensional flow vector impinging the aircraft with a 100 Hz resolution and of a faster Pt1000 based temperature sensor have distinctly enhanced the meteorological measurement capabilities. The extended SUMO version has recently been operated during two field campaigns. The first one in a wind farm close to Vindeby on Lolland, Denmark, was dedicated to the investigation of the effects of wind turbines on boundary layer turbulence. In spite of a few pitfalls related to configuration and synchronisation of the corresponding data logging systems, this campaign provided promising results indicating the capability and future potential of small UAS for turbulence characterization in and around wind farms. The second one, the international BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Transition) field campaign at the foothills of the Pyrenees in Lannemezan, France was focussing on processes related to the afternoon transition of the convective boundary layer. On a calm sunny day during this experiment, the SUMO soundings revealed an unexpected 2°C cooling in the ABL during morning hours. By a comparison with model simulations this cooling can be associated with thermally-driven upslope winds and the subsequent advection of relatively cool air from the lowlands north of the Pyrenees.

  9. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  10. End-joining inhibition at telomeres requires the translocase and polySUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligase Uls1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescasse, Rachel; Pobiega, Sabrina; Callebaut, Isabelle; Marcand, Stéphane

    2013-03-20

    In eukaryotes, permanent inhibition of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway at telomeres ensures that chromosome ends do not fuse. In budding yeast, binding of Rap1 to telomere repeats establishes NHEJ inhibition. Here, we show that the Uls1 protein is required for the maintenance of NHEJ inhibition at telomeres. Uls1 protein is a non-essential Swi2/Snf2-related translocase and a Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier (SUMO)-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligase (STUbL) with unknown targets. Loss of Uls1 results in telomere-telomere fusions. Uls1 requirement is alleviated by the absence of poly-SUMO chains and by rap1 alleles lacking SUMOylation sites. Furthermore, Uls1 limits the accumulation of Rap1 poly-SUMO conjugates. We propose that one of Uls1 functions is to clear non-functional poly-SUMOylated Rap1 molecules from telomeres to ensure the continuous efficiency of NHEJ inhibition. Since Uls1 is the only known STUbL with a translocase activity, it can be the general molecular sweeper for the clearance of poly-SUMOylated proteins on DNA in eukaryotes.

  11. [Noncovalent cation-π interactions--their role in nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Krzysztof; Boratyński, Janusz

    2014-11-07

    Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions--cation-π interactions--is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation-aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  12. Smart unconventional monetary (SUMO) policies: giving impetus to green investment. Climate Report no. 46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, Camille; Morel, Romain

    2014-07-01

    Today, given the amount of investment needed to reach a 2-degree emissions reduction target and the tight budgetary constraints of governments worldwide, public spending alone will not be sufficient alone. Therefore, there is a double need to not only shift private financial flows from 'brown' sectors to 'green' sectors, but also to leverage new sources of financing. Addressing the second challenge, this study reviews three families of proposed funding mechanisms based on unconventional monetary policies targeting 'green' or 'climate' investments. These 'Smart Unconventional Monetary' (or SUMO) policies include: (i) the use of Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) issued by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), (ii) green quantitative easing and (iii) the issuance of Carbon Certificates. Proponents of these mechanisms assert that they have a strong potential to provide substantial low-cost financing for green projects and reduce the risks linked to green investments for private investors. Furthermore, they could have further macro-economic co-benefits in specific circumstances. For example, implemented jointly with appropriate 'demand-side' mechanisms, a SUMO policy mechanism, even if short-term, could help trigger investment, bank lending and growth in Europe and pave the way for a longer-term green policies' framework. Nevertheless, this analysis has identified that the implementation of such mechanisms has a number of challenges to overcome. The first challenge is to convince policy makers that these mechanisms, even if they resort to unconventional monetary policies, will not lead to inflation. The second challenge is the difficulty to reach multilateral agreements in the short run, because of geopolitical and institutional barriers. The third challenge is the necessity to involve the private sector. Furthermore, to facilitate their contribution to low-carbon investment, this analysis suggests that

  13. Self-Healing Supramolecular Hydrogels Based on Reversible Physical Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Strandman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic and reversible polymer networks capable of self-healing, i.e., restoring their mechanical properties after deformation and failure, are gaining increasing research interest, as there is a continuous need towards extending the lifetime and improving the safety and performance of materials particularly in biomedical applications. Hydrogels are versatile materials that may allow self-healing through a variety of covalent and non-covalent bonding strategies. The structural recovery of physical gels has long been a topic of interest in soft materials physics and various supramolecular interactions can induce this kind of recovery. This review highlights the non-covalent strategies of building self-repairing hydrogels and the characterization of their mechanical properties. Potential applications and future prospects of these materials are also discussed.

  14. Association of donor and recipient SUMO4 rs237025 genetic variant with new-onset diabetes mellitus after liver transplantation in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Yibo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhong, Lin; Fan, Junwei; Peng, Zhihai

    2017-09-05

    New-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) is a common complication after liver transplantation (LT). The small ubiquitin-like modifier 4 (SUMO4) rs237025 polymorphism has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association of donor and recipient SUMO4 rs237025 polymorphisms with NODM and the long-term consequences of NODM after LT. A total of 126 liver transplant patients were enrolled in the study. One single nucleotide polymorphism, SUMO4 rs237025, was genotyped in both donors and recipients. Both donor and recipient SUMO4 rs237025 polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with NODM after LT. In multivariate analysis, recipient age>50 years, tacrolimus trough concentrations>10ng/mL at 1month after LT, donor and recipient rs237025 genetic variant, and the combined donor and recipient rs237025 genetic variant were independent predictive factors of NODM. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) analysis indicated the higher predictive ability of the model containing combined donor and recipient rs237025 polymorphisms than the clinical model (p=0.046). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that NODM was related to significantly poorer patient survival in comparison with non-NODM patients (p=0.041). Both donor and recipient SUMO4 rs237025 polymorphisms contribute to the development of NODM after LT and NODM is a frequent complication that negatively affects patient survival. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. SUMO E3 ligase Mms21 prevents spontaneous DNA damage induced genome rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Liang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mms21, a subunit of the Smc5/6 complex, possesses an E3 ligase activity for the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO. Here we show that the mms21-CH mutation, which inactivates Mms21 ligase activity, causes increased accumulation of gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs selected in the dGCR assay. These dGCRs are formed by non-allelic homologous recombination between divergent DNA sequences mediated by Rad52-, Rrm3- and Pol32-dependent break-induced replication. Combining mms21-CH with sgs1Δ caused a synergistic increase in GCRs rates, indicating the distinct roles of Mms21 and Sgs1 in suppressing GCRs. The mms21-CH mutation also caused increased rates of accumulating uGCRs mediated by breakpoints in unique sequences as revealed by whole genome sequencing. Consistent with the accumulation of endogenous DNA lesions, mms21-CH mutants accumulate increased levels of spontaneous Rad52 and Ddc2 foci and had a hyper-activated DNA damage checkpoint. Together, these findings support that Mms21 prevents the accumulation of spontaneous DNA lesions that cause diverse GCRs.

  16. SUMO, System performance assessment for a high-level nuclear waste repository: Mathematical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Miley, T.B.; Engel, D.W.; Chamberlain, P.J. II.

    1992-09-01

    Following completion of the preliminary risk assessment of the potential Yucca Mountain Site by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1988, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL to develop an integrated system model and computer code that provides performance and risk assessment analysis capabilities for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The system model that has been developed addresses the cumulative radionuclide release criteria established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and estimates population risks in terms of dose to humans. The system model embodied in the SUMO (System Unsaturated Model) code will also allow benchmarking of other models being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The system model has three natural divisions: (1) source term, (2) far-field transport, and (3) dose to humans. This document gives a detailed description of the mathematics of each of these three divisions. Each of the governing equations employed is based on modeling assumptions that are widely accepted within the scientific community

  17. Mutation in SUMO E3 ligase, SIZ1, disrupts the mature female gametophyte in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yu

    2012-01-09

    Female gametophyte is the multicellular haploid structure that can produce embryo and endosperm after fertilization, which has become an attractive model system for investigating molecular mechanisms in nuclei migration, cell specification, cell-to-cell communication and many other processes. Previous reports found that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase, SIZ1, participated in many processes depending on particular target substrates and suppression of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation. Here, we report that SIZ1 mediates the reproductive process. SIZ1 showed enhanced expression in female organs, but was not detected in the anther or pollen. A defect in the siz1-2 maternal source resulted in reduced seed-set regardless of high SA concentration within the plant. Moreover, aniline blue staining and scanning electron microscopy revealed that funicular and micropylar pollen tube guidance was arrested in siz1-2 plants. Some of the embryo sacs of ovules in siz1-2 were also disrupted quickly after stage FG7. There was no significant affects of the siz1-2 mutation on expression of genes involved in female gametophyte development- or pollen tube guidance in ovaries. Together, our results suggest that SIZ1 sustains the stability and normal function of the mature female gametophyte which is necessary for pollen tube guidance. © 2012 Ling et al.

  18. Functional characterization of the SIZ/PIAS-type SUMO E3 ligases, OsSIZ1 and OsSIZ2 in rice

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hyeongcheol; Kim, Hun; Koo, Sungcheol; Park, Heejin; Cheong, Misun; Hong, Hyewon; Baek, Dongwon; Chung, Woosik; Kim, Dohhoon; Bressan, Ray Anthony; Lee, Sangyeol; Bohnert, Hans Jü rgen; Yun, Daejin

    2010-01-01

    Sumoylation is a post-translational regulatory process in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes, involving conjugation/deconjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins to other proteins thus modifying their function. The PIAS [protein inhibitor of activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)] and SAP (scaffold attachment factor A/B/acinus/PIAS)/MIZ (SIZ) proteins exhibit SUMO E3-ligase activity that facilitates the conjugation of SUMO proteins to target substrates. Here, we report the isolation and molecular characterization of Oryza sativa SIZ1 (OsSIZ1) and SIZ2 (OsSIZ2), rice homologs of Arabidopsis SIZ1. The rice SIZ proteins are localized to the nucleus and showed sumoylation activities in a tobacco system. Our analysis showed increased amounts of SUMO conjugates associated with environmental stresses such as high and low temperature, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) in rice plants. The expression of OsSIZ1 and OsSIZ2 in siz1-2 Arabidopsis plants partially complemented the morphological mutant phenotype and enhanced levels of SUMO conjugates under heat shock conditions. In addition, ABA-hypersensitivity of siz1-2 seed germination was partially suppressed by OsSIZ1 and OsSIZ2. The results suggest that rice SIZ1 and SIZ2 are able to functionally complement Arabidopsis SIZ1 in the SUMO conjugation pathway. Their effects on the Arabidopsis mutant suggest a function for these genes related to stress responses and stress adaptation. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Functional characterization of the SIZ/PIAS-type SUMO E3 ligases, OsSIZ1 and OsSIZ2 in rice

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hyeongcheol

    2010-06-18

    Sumoylation is a post-translational regulatory process in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes, involving conjugation/deconjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins to other proteins thus modifying their function. The PIAS [protein inhibitor of activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)] and SAP (scaffold attachment factor A/B/acinus/PIAS)/MIZ (SIZ) proteins exhibit SUMO E3-ligase activity that facilitates the conjugation of SUMO proteins to target substrates. Here, we report the isolation and molecular characterization of Oryza sativa SIZ1 (OsSIZ1) and SIZ2 (OsSIZ2), rice homologs of Arabidopsis SIZ1. The rice SIZ proteins are localized to the nucleus and showed sumoylation activities in a tobacco system. Our analysis showed increased amounts of SUMO conjugates associated with environmental stresses such as high and low temperature, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) in rice plants. The expression of OsSIZ1 and OsSIZ2 in siz1-2 Arabidopsis plants partially complemented the morphological mutant phenotype and enhanced levels of SUMO conjugates under heat shock conditions. In addition, ABA-hypersensitivity of siz1-2 seed germination was partially suppressed by OsSIZ1 and OsSIZ2. The results suggest that rice SIZ1 and SIZ2 are able to functionally complement Arabidopsis SIZ1 in the SUMO conjugation pathway. Their effects on the Arabidopsis mutant suggest a function for these genes related to stress responses and stress adaptation. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. SUMO-modified insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) increases cell cycle progression and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingbo; Liu, Hongyu; Waraky, Ahmed; Haglund, Felix; Agarwal, Prasoon; Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena; Warsito, Dudi; Larsson, Olle

    2017-10-01

    Increasing number of studies have shown nuclear localization of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (nIGF-1R) in tumor cells and its links to adverse clinical outcome in various cancers. Any obvious cell physiological roles of nIGF-1R have, however, still not been disclosed. Previously, we reported that IGF-1R translocates to cell nucleus and modulates gene expression by binding to enhancers, provided that the receptor is SUMOylated. In this study, we constructed stable transfectants of wild type IGF1R (WT) and triple-SUMO-site-mutated IGF1R (TSM) using igf1r knockout mouse fibroblasts (R-). Cell clones (R-WT and R-TSM) expressing equal amounts of IGF-1R were selected for experiments. Phosphorylation of IGF-1R, Akt, and Erk upon IGF-1 stimulation was equal in R-WT and R-TSM. WT was confirmed to enter nuclei. TSM did also undergo nuclear translocation, although to a lesser extent. This may be explained by that TSM heterodimerizes with insulin receptor, which is known to translocate to cell nuclei. R-WT proliferated substantially faster than R-TSM, which did not differ significantly from the empty vector control. Upon IGF-1 stimulation G1-S-phase progression of R-WT increased from 12 to 38%, compared to 13 to 20% of R-TSM. The G1-S progression of R-WT correlated with increased expression of cyclin D1, A, and CDK2, as well as downregulation of p27. This suggests that SUMO-IGF-1R affects upstream mechanisms that control and coordinate expression of cell cycle regulators. Further studies to identify such SUMO-IGF-1R dependent mechanisms seem important. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  1. RNF4 interacts with multiSUMOylated ETV4 [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Aguilar-Martinez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein SUMOylation represents an important regulatory event that changes the activities of numerous proteins. Recent evidence demonstrates that polySUMO chains can act as a trigger to direct the ubiquitin ligase RNF4 to substrates to cause their turnover through the ubiquitin pathway. RNF4 uses multiple SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs to bind to these chains. However, in addition to polySUMO chains, a multimeric binding surface created by the simultaneous SUMOylation of multiple residues on a protein or complex could also provide a platform for the recruitment of multi-SIM proteins like RNF4. Here we demonstrate that multiSUMOylated ETV4 can bind to RNF4 and that a unique combination of SIMs is required for RNF4 to interact with this multiSUMOylated platform. Thus RNF4 can bind to proteins that are either polySUMOylated through a single site or multiSUMOylated on several sites and raises the possibility that such multiSIM-multiSUMO interactions might be more widespread.

  2. Weak interactions and cooperativity effects on disiloxane: a look at the building block of silicones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Carlos; Montero-Campillo, M. Merced; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2018-06-01

    The behaviour of disiloxane 1 towards a set of Lewis acids (LA) and Lewis bases (LB) forming complexes through its oxygen and silicon atoms, respectively, was studied at the MP2/aug‧-cc-pVTZ level of theory, exploring a wide variety of non-covalent interactions. Disiloxane is a moderate electron acceptor and a good electron donor, exhibiting in the latter case binding energies up to almost -100 kJ/mol with BeCl2. Cooperativity effects were also analysed by looking at ternary 1:LA:LB complexes. Shorter intermolecular distances than in the corresponding binary complexes and a negative contribution of the three-body term to the binding energy indicate that the non-covalent interactions allowed by disiloxane through its acid and basic centres cooperate between them to reinforce both donor-acceptor pairs. These effects are particularly strong in complexes involving beryllium and triel bonds, but are also relevant for complexes containing hydrogen bonds.

  3. The SUMO project I. A survey of multiple populations in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monelli, M.; Milone, A. P.; Stetson, P. B.; Marino, A. F.; Cassisi, S.; del Pino Molina, A.; Salaris, M.; Aparicio, A.; Asplund, M.; Grundahl, F.; Piotto, G.; Weiss, A.; Carrera, R.; Cebrián, M.; Murabito, S.; Pietrinferni, A.; Sbordone, L.

    2013-05-01

    We present a general overview and the first results of the SUMO project (a SUrvey of Multiple pOpulations in Globular Clusters). The objective of this survey is the study of multiple stellar populations in the largest sample of globular clusters homogeneously analysed to date. To this aim we obtained high signal-to-noise (S/N > 50) photometry for main sequence stars with mass down to ˜0.5 M⊙ in a large sample of clusters using both archival and proprietary U, B, V and I data from ground-based telescopes. In this paper, we focus on the occurrence of multiple stellar populations in 23 clusters. We define a new photometric index, cU, B, I = (U - B) - (B - I), which turns out to be very effective for identifying multiple sequences along the red giant branch (RGB). We found that in the V-cU, B, I diagram all clusters presented in this paper show broadened or multimodal RGBs, with the presence of two or more components. We found a direct connection with the chemical properties of different sequences, which display different abundances of light elements (O, Na, C, N and Al). The cU, B, I index is also a powerful tool for identifying distinct sequences of stars along the horizontal branch and, for the first time in the case of NGC 104 (47 Tuc), along the asymptotic giant branch. Our results demonstrate that (i) the presence of more than two stellar populations is a common feature amongst globular clusters, as already highlighted in previous work; (ii) multiple sequences with different chemical contents can be easily identified by using standard Johnson photometry obtained with ground-based facilities; (iii) in the study of globular cluster multiple stellar populations the cU, B, I index is an alternative to spectroscopy, and has the advantage of larger statistics.

  4. SUMO modification of Stra13 is required for repression of cyclin D1 expression and cellular growth arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaju Wang

    Full Text Available Stra13, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor is involved in myriad biological functions including cellular growth arrest, differentiation and senescence. However, the mechanisms by which its transcriptional activity and function are regulated remain unclear. In this study, we provide evidence that post-translational modification of Stra13 by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO dramatically potentiates its ability to transcriptionally repress cyclin D1 and mediate G(1 cell cycle arrest in fibroblast cells. Mutation of SUMO acceptor lysines 159 and 279 located in the C-terminal repression domain has no impact on nuclear localization; however, it abrogates association with the co-repressor histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1, attenuates repression of cyclin D1, and prevents Stra13-mediated growth suppression. HDAC1, which promotes cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression, antagonizes Stra13 sumoylation-dependent growth arrest. Our results uncover an unidentified regulatory axis between Stra13 and HDAC1 in progression through the G(1/S phase of the cell cycle, and provide new mechanistic insights into regulation of Stra13-mediated transcriptional repression by sumoylation.

  5. The Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 regulates the localization and function of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryrear, Kimberly A.; Guo, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The Really Interesting New Gene (RING) Finger Protein 4 (RNF4) represents a class of ubiquitin ligases that target Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)–modified proteins for ubiquitin modification. To date, the regulatory function of RNF4 appears to be ubiquitin-mediated degradation of sumoylated cellular proteins. In the present study, we show that the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax is a substrate for RNF4 both in vivo and in vitro. We mapped the RNF4-binding site to a region adjacent to the Tax ubiquitin/SUMO modification sites K280/K284. Interestingly, RNF4 modification of Tax protein results in relocalization of the oncoprotein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of RNF4, but not the RNF4 RING mutant, resulted in cytoplasmic enrichment of Tax. The RNF4-induced nucleus-to-cytoplasm relocalization was associated with increased NF-κB–mediated and decreased cAMP Response Element-Binding (CREB)–mediated Tax activity. Finally, depletion of RNF4 by RNAi prevented the DNA damage–induced nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of Tax. These results provide important new insight into STUbL-mediated pathways that regulate the subcellular localization and functional dynamics of viral oncogenes. PMID:22106342

  6. SUMO-Modification of the La Protein Facilitates Binding to mRNA In Vitro and in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Venkatesh; Sommer, Gunhild; Durette, Chantal; Thibault, Pierre; van Niekerk, Erna A; Twiss, Jeffery L; Heise, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein La is involved in several aspects of RNA metabolism including the translational regulation of mRNAs and processing of pre-tRNAs. Besides its well-described phosphorylation by Casein kinase 2, the La protein is also posttranslationally modified by the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO), but the functional outcome of this modification has not been defined. The objective of this study was to test whether sumoylation changes the RNA-binding activity of La. Therefore, we established an in vitro sumoylation assay for recombinant human La and analyzed its RNA-binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. We identified two novel SUMO-acceptor sites within the La protein located between the RNA recognition motif 1 and 2 and we demonstrate for the first time that sumoylation facilitates the RNA-binding of La to small RNA oligonucleotides representing the oligopyrimidine tract (TOP) elements from the 5' untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs encoding ribosomal protein L22 and L37 and to a longer RNA element from the 5' UTR of cyclin D1 (CCND1) mRNA in vitro. Furthermore, we show by RNA immunoprecipitation experiments that a La mutant deficient in sumoylation has impaired RNA-binding activity in cells. These data suggest that modulating the RNA-binding activity of La by sumoylation has important consequences on its functionality.

  7. SUMO-Modification of the La Protein Facilitates Binding to mRNA In Vitro and in Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Kota

    Full Text Available The RNA-binding protein La is involved in several aspects of RNA metabolism including the translational regulation of mRNAs and processing of pre-tRNAs. Besides its well-described phosphorylation by Casein kinase 2, the La protein is also posttranslationally modified by the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO, but the functional outcome of this modification has not been defined. The objective of this study was to test whether sumoylation changes the RNA-binding activity of La. Therefore, we established an in vitro sumoylation assay for recombinant human La and analyzed its RNA-binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. We identified two novel SUMO-acceptor sites within the La protein located between the RNA recognition motif 1 and 2 and we demonstrate for the first time that sumoylation facilitates the RNA-binding of La to small RNA oligonucleotides representing the oligopyrimidine tract (TOP elements from the 5' untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs encoding ribosomal protein L22 and L37 and to a longer RNA element from the 5' UTR of cyclin D1 (CCND1 mRNA in vitro. Furthermore, we show by RNA immunoprecipitation experiments that a La mutant deficient in sumoylation has impaired RNA-binding activity in cells. These data suggest that modulating the RNA-binding activity of La by sumoylation has important consequences on its functionality.

  8. High Resolution X-ray Diffraction Dataset for Bacillus licheniformis Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase-acivicin complex: SUMO-Tag Renders High Expression and Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Shobha; Pal, Ravi Kant; Gupta, Rani; Goel, Manisha

    2017-02-01

    Gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, (GGT) is a ubiquitous protein which plays a central role in glutathione metabolism and has myriad clinical implications. It has been shown to be a virulence factor for pathogenic bacteria, inhibition of which results in reduced colonization potential. However, existing inhibitors are effective but toxic and therefore search is on for novel inhibitors, which makes it imperative to understand the interactions of various inhibitors with the protein in substantial detail. High resolution structures of protein bound to different inhibitors can serve this purpose. Gamma glutamyl transpeptidase from Bacillus licheniformis is one of the model systems that have been used to understand the structure-function correlation of the protein. The structures of the native protein (PDB code 4OTT), of its complex with glutamate (PDB code 4OTU) and that of its precursor mimic (PDB code 4Y23) are available, although at moderate/low resolution. In the present study, we are reporting the preliminary analysis of, high resolution X-ray diffraction data collected for the co-crystals of B. licheniformis, Gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, with its inhibitor, Acivicin. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and diffract X-ray to 1.45 Å resolution. This is the highest resolution data reported for all GGT structures available till now. The use of SUMO fused expression system enhanced yield of the target protein in the soluble fraction, facilitating recovery of protein with high purity. The preliminary analysis of this data set shows clear density for the inhibitor, acivicin, in the protein active site.

  9. The Epstein-Barr virus miR-BHRF1-1 targets RNF4 during productive infection to promote the accumulation of SUMO conjugates and the release of infectious virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification by the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO regulates a variety of cellular functions, and is hijacked by viruses to remodel the host cell during latent and productive infection. Here we have monitored the activity of the SUMO conjugation machinery in cells productively infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. We found that SUMO2/3 conjugates accumulate during the late phase of the productive virus cycle, and identified several viral proteins as bone fide SUMOylation substrates. Analysis of the mechanism involved in the accumulation of SUMOylated proteins revealed upregulation of several components of the SUMO-conjugation machinery and post-transcriptional downregulation of the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4. The latter effect was mediated by selective inhibition of RNF4 protein expression by the viral miR-BHRF1-1. Reconstitution of RNF4 in cells expressing an inducible miR-BHRF1-1 sponge or a miR-BHRF1-1 resistant RNF4 was associated with reduced levels of early and late viral proteins and impaired virus release. These findings illustrate a novel strategy for viral interference with the SUMO pathway, and identify the EBV miR-BHRF1-1 and the cellular RNF4 as regulators of the productive virus cycle.

  10. The Epstein-Barr virus miR-BHRF1-1 targets RNF4 during productive infection to promote the accumulation of SUMO conjugates and the release of infectious virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlin; Callegari, Simone; Masucci, Maria G

    2017-04-01

    Post-translational modification by the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) regulates a variety of cellular functions, and is hijacked by viruses to remodel the host cell during latent and productive infection. Here we have monitored the activity of the SUMO conjugation machinery in cells productively infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We found that SUMO2/3 conjugates accumulate during the late phase of the productive virus cycle, and identified several viral proteins as bone fide SUMOylation substrates. Analysis of the mechanism involved in the accumulation of SUMOylated proteins revealed upregulation of several components of the SUMO-conjugation machinery and post-transcriptional downregulation of the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4. The latter effect was mediated by selective inhibition of RNF4 protein expression by the viral miR-BHRF1-1. Reconstitution of RNF4 in cells expressing an inducible miR-BHRF1-1 sponge or a miR-BHRF1-1 resistant RNF4 was associated with reduced levels of early and late viral proteins and impaired virus release. These findings illustrate a novel strategy for viral interference with the SUMO pathway, and identify the EBV miR-BHRF1-1 and the cellular RNF4 as regulators of the productive virus cycle.

  11. Shaping meiotic chromosomes with SUMO: a feedback loop controls the assembly of the synaptonemal complex in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Tsubouchi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The synaptonemal complex (SC is a meiosis-specific chromosomal structure in which homologous chromosomes are intimately linked through arrays of specialized proteins called transverse filaments (TF. Widely conserved in eukaryote meiosis, the SC forms during prophase I and is essential for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes at meiosis I. However, the basic mechanism overlooking formation and regulation of the SC has been poorly understood. By using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we recently showed that SC formation is controlled through the attachment of multiple molecules of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO to a regulator of TF assembly. Intriguingly, this SUMOylation is activated by TF, implicating the involvement of a positive feedback loop in the control of SC assembly. We discuss the implication of this finding and possible involvement of a similar mechanism in regulating other processes.

  12. The SUMO protease SENP1 is required for cohesion maintenance and mitotic arrest following spindle poison treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Era, Saho [Fondazione IFOM, Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare, IFOM-IEO campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milan (Italy); Radiation Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Abe, Takuya; Arakawa, Hiroshi [Fondazione IFOM, Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare, IFOM-IEO campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milan (Italy); Kobayashi, Shunsuke [Radiation Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Szakal, Barnabas [Fondazione IFOM, Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare, IFOM-IEO campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milan (Italy); Yoshikawa, Yusuke; Motegi, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi [Radiation Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Branzei, Dana, E-mail: dana.branzei@ifom.eu [Fondazione IFOM, Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare, IFOM-IEO campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milan (Italy)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SENP1 knockout chicken DT40 cells are hypersensitive to spindle poisons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spindle poison treatment of SENP1{sup -/-} cells leads to increased mitotic slippage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic slippage in SENP1{sup -/-} cells associates with apoptosis and endoreplication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SENP1 counteracts sister chromatid separation during mitotic arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plk1-mediated cohesion down-regulation is involved in colcemid cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: SUMO conjugation is a reversible posttranslational modification that regulates protein function. SENP1 is one of the six SUMO-specific proteases present in vertebrate cells and its altered expression is observed in several carcinomas. To characterize SENP1 role in genome integrity, we generated Senp1 knockout chicken DT40 cells. SENP1{sup -/-} cells show normal proliferation, but are sensitive to spindle poisons. This hypersensitivity correlates with increased sister chromatid separation, mitotic slippage, and apoptosis. To test whether the cohesion defect had a causal relationship with the observed mitotic events, we restored the cohesive status of sister chromatids by introducing the TOP2{alpha}{sup +/-} mutation, which leads to increased catenation, or by inhibiting Plk1 and Aurora B kinases that promote cohesin release from chromosomes during prolonged mitotic arrest. Although TOP2{alpha} is SUMOylated during mitosis, the TOP2{alpha}{sup +/-} mutation had no obvious effect. By contrast, inhibition of Plk1 or Aurora B rescued the hypersensitivity of SENP1{sup -/-} cells to colcemid. In conclusion, we identify SENP1 as a novel factor required for mitotic arrest and cohesion maintenance during prolonged mitotic arrest induced by spindle poisons.

  13. Cytosolic expression of functional Fab fragments in Escherichia coli using a novel combination of dual SUMO expression cassette and EnBase® cultivation mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, F; Davami, F; Mansouri, K; Agha Amiri, S; Fazel, R; Mahdian, R; Davoudi, N; Enayati, S; Azizi, M; Khalaj, V

    2017-05-08

    The Escherichia coli expression system is highly effective in producing recombinant proteins. However, there are some limitations in this system, especially in obtaining correctly folded forms of some complex proteins such as Fab fragments. To improve the solubility and folding quality of Fab fragments, we have examined the effect of simultaneous application of a SUMO fusion tag, EnBase ® cultivation mode and a redox mutant strain in the E. coli expression system. A bicistronic gene construct was designed to express an antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) Fab fragment as a model system. The construct contained a dual SUMO fusion gene fragment to encode SUMO-tagged heavy and light chains. While the expression of the construct in batch cultures of BL21 or SHuffle ® transformants produced insoluble and unfolded products, the induction of the transformants in EnBase ® medium resulted in soluble and correctly folded Fab fragment, reaching as high as 19% of the total protein in shuffle strain. The functional assays indicated that the biological activity of the target Fab is similar to the commercial anti-VEGF, Lucentis ® . This study demonstrated that the combination of SUMO fusion technology, EnBase ® cultivation system and recruiting a redox mutant of E. coli can efficiently enhance the solubility and productivity of recombinant Fab fragments. The presented strategy provides not only a novel method to produce soluble and active form of an anti-VEGF Fab but also may use in the efficient production of other antibody fragments. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. High-level SUMO-mediated fusion expression of ABP-dHC-cecropin A from multiple joined genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxin; Movahedi, Ali; Wei, Zhiheng; Sang, Ming; Wu, Xiaolong; Wang, Mengyang; Wei, Hui; Pan, Huixin; Yin, Tongming; Zhuge, Qiang

    2016-09-15

    The antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A is a small cationic peptide with potent activity against a wide range of bacterial species. Evidence of antifungal activity has also been suggested; however, evaluation of this peptide has been limited due to the low expression of cecropin proteins in Escherichia coli. To improve the expression level of ABP-dHC-cecropin A in E. coli, tandem repeats of the ABP-dHC-cecropin A gene were constructed and expressed as fusion proteins (SUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin, n = 1, 2, 3, 4) via pSUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin A vectors (n = 1, 2, 3, 4). Comparison of the expression levels of soluble SUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin A fusion proteins (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) suggested that BL21 (DE3)/pSUMO-3ABP-dHC-cecropin A is an ideal recombinant strain for ABP-dHC-cecropin A production. Under the selected conditions of cultivation and isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) induction, the expression level of ABP-dHC-cecropin A was as high as 65 mg/L, with ∼21.3% of the fusion protein in soluble form. By large-scale fermentation, protein production reached nearly 300 mg/L, which is the highest yield of ABP-dHC-cecropin A reported to date. In antibacterial experiments, the efficacy was approximately the same as that of synthetic ABP-dHC-cecropin A. This method provides a novel and effective means of producing large amounts of ABP-dHC-cecropin A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    photographs of the dispersions of amide-functio- nalized DWNTs in dichloromethane and tetrahydro- furan. In figure 3b, we show a TEM image of DWNTs after covalent functionalization. The images are not as sharp after functionalization as in the case of pris- tine nanotubes (figure 3a), and the bundles seem to be intact.

  16. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis of non-covalent complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical Sciences and Technology Division and Academy of Scientific & Innovative Research (AcSIR), ... workers proposed the electrostatic-covalent model of hydrogen bonding. ..... tain degree of electron donation and acceptance occurs.

  17. Re-investigation of slip rate along the southern part of the Sumatran Fault Zone using SuMo GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermawan, I.; Lubis, A. M.; Sahputra, R.; Hill, E.; Sieh, K.; Feng, L.; Salman, R.; Hananto, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Sumatran Fault Zone (SFZ) accommodates a significant component of the strike-slip motion of oblique convergence along the Sumatra subduction zone. Previous studies have suggested that the slip rates of the SFZ increase from south to north. However, recent work shows that the slip rates may not vary along the SFZ [Bradley et al., 2015]. New data are needed to help confirm these results, and to assess slip-rate variability and fault segmentation in more detail. This information is vital for seismic hazard assessment for the region. We have therefore installed and operated the SuMo (Sumatran Fault Monitoring) network, a dense GPS campaign network focused around the SFZ. From 2013-2015 we selected and installed 32 GPS monuments over the southern part of the SFZ. The network comprises of three transects. The first transect is around the location of the great 1900 earthquake, at the Musi segment. Two transects cover the Manna segment, which saw its last great earthquake in 1893, and the Kumering segment, which saw two great earthquakes in 1933 (M 7.5) and 1994 (M 7.0). We have now conducted three GPS campaign surveys for these stations (3-4 days of measurement for each occupation site), and established 5 semi-permanent cGPS stations in the area. The processed data show that the campaigns sites are still too premature to be used for estimating slip rates, but from the preliminary results for the semi-permanent stations we may see our first signal of deformation. More data from future survey campaigns will help us to estimated revised slip rates. In addition to the science goals for our project, we are this year starting a project called "SuMo Goes to School," which will aim to disseminate information on our science to the schools that house the SuMo GPS stations. The SuMo project also achieves capacity building by training students from Bengkulu University in geodesy and campaign GPS survey techniques.

  18. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  19. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. -- Highlights: •Click chemistry detects O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) signals in the nucleus. •OP-Puro accumulates at PML-NBs during abortive proteasome activities. •SUMO and ubiquitin are promiscuously associated with OP-Puro at PML-NBs. •The nucleus may function in immature protein homeostasis.

  20. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-01-01

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. -- Highlights: •Click chemistry detects O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) signals in the nucleus. •OP-Puro accumulates at PML-NBs during abortive proteasome activities. •SUMO and ubiquitin are promiscuously associated with OP-Puro at PML-NBs. •The nucleus may function in immature protein homeostasis.

  1. EXTRAÇÃO DO SUMO DA BETA VULGARIS COMO ALTERNATIVA SUSTENTÁVEL NA PRODUÇÃO DE TINTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camila Ribeiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho apresenta a extração do sumo da beterraba a partir de um método simples ao mais complexo, sendo utilizado apenas a pigmentação arrocheada para a fabricação de tinta natural, sem corantes para que não deteriore o material. Teremos a infusão da beterraba, deixando que aconteça naturalmente por minutos, dias ou semanas, para que possamos obter um pigmento completamente natural, utilizando também um aparelho, cujo nome é soxhlet, tendo a propriedade de extrair o sumo de lipídios em apenas algumas horas, dependendo do tamanho que seja o lipídio utilizado. Após a pigmentação fez necessário a adição de um aglutinante com objetivo de formar uma liga. Tento como resultado uma tinta sem corantes e não prejudicial ao meio ambiente.

  2. New insights into the mechanism of interaction between CO2 and polymers from thermodynamic parameters obtained by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrienko, Anton A; Ewing, Andrew V; Chibiryaev, Andrey M; Agafontsev, Alexander M; Dubkov, Konstantin A; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-03-07

    This work reports new physical insights of the thermodynamic parameters and mechanisms of possible interactions occurring in polymers subjected to high-pressure CO2. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy has been used in situ to determine the thermodynamic parameters of the intermolecular interactions between CO2 and different functional groups of the polymers capable of specific interactions with sorbed CO2 molecules. Based on the measured ATR-FTIR spectra of the polymer samples subjected to high-pressure CO2 (30 bar) at different temperatures (300-340 K), it was possible to characterize polymer-polymer and CO2-polymer interactions. Particularly, the enthalpy and entropy of the formation of the specific non-covalent complexes between CO2 and the hydroxy (-OH), carbonyl (C[double bond, length as m-dash]O) and hydroxyimino ([double bond, length as m-dash]N-OH) functional groups of the polymer samples have been measured. Furthermore, the obtained spectroscopic results have provided an opportunity for the structure of these complexes to be proposed. An interesting phenomenon regarding the behavior of CO2/polymer systems has also been observed. It has been found that only for the polyketone, the value of enthalpy was negative indicating an exothermic process during the formation of the CO2-polymer non-covalent complexes. Conversely, for the polyoxime and polyalcohol samples there is a positive enthalpy determined. This is a result of the initial polymer-polymer interactions requiring more energy to break than is released during the formation of the CO2-polymer complex. The effect of increasing temperature to facilitate the breaking of the polymer-polymer interactions has also been observed. Hence, a mechanism for the formation of CO2-polymer complexes was suggested based on these results, which occurs via a two-step process: (1) the breaking of the existing polymer-polymer interactions followed by (2) the formation of new CO2-polymer non-covalent interactions.

  3. Protein-protein interaction site predictions with three-dimensional probability distributions of interacting atoms on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Tai Chen

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted

  4. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  5. Self-assembly of Hydrazide-based Heterodimers Driven by Hydrogen Bonding and Donor-Acceptor Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG,Dai-Jun; WANG,Peng; LI,Xiao-Qiang; LI,Zhan-Ting

    2006-01-01

    A new series of hydrogen bonding-driven heterodimers have been self-assembled in chloroform from hydrazide-based monomers. Additional intermolecular donor-acceptor interaction between the electron-rich bis(p-phenylene)-34-crown-10 unit and the electron-deficient naphthalene diimide unit has been utilized to increase the stability of the dimmers, and pronounced cooperativity of the two discrete non-covalent forces to stabilize the dimer has been revealed by the quantitative 1H (2D) NMR and UV-Vis experiments.

  6. Spin interactions in Graphene-Single Molecule Magnets Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Aña; Luis, Fernando; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Dressel, Martin; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is a potential component of novel spintronics devices owing to its long spin diffusion length. Besides its use as spin-transport channel, graphene can be employed for the detection and manipulation of molecular spins. This requires an appropriate coupling between the sheets and the single molecular magnets (SMM). Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of graphene-Fe4 SMM hybrids. The Fe4 clusters are anchored non-covalently to the graphene following a diffusion-limited assembly and can reorganize into random networks when subjected to slightly elevated temperature. Molecules anchored on graphene sheets show unaltered static magnetic properties, whilst the quantum dynamics is profoundly modulated. Interaction with Dirac fermions becomes the dominant spin-relaxation channel, with observable effects produced by graphene phonons and reduced dipolar interactions. Coupling to graphene drives the spins over Villain's threshold, allowing the first observation of strongly-perturbative tunneling processes. Preliminary spin-transport experiments at low-temperature are further presented.

  7. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  8. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles produced by a SUMO fusion protein system in Escherichia coli induce potent protective immune responses in guinea pigs, swine and cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious infection in cloven-hoofed animals. The format of FMD virus-like particles (VLP) as a non-replicating particulate vaccine candidate is a promising alternative to conventional inactivated FMDV vaccines. In this study, we explored a prokaryotic system to express and assemble the FMD VLP and validated the potential of VLP as an FMDV vaccine candidate. VLP composed entirely of FMDV (Asia1/Jiangsu/China/2005) capsid proteins (VP0, VP1 and VP3) were simultaneously produced as SUMO fusion proteins by an improved SUMO fusion protein system in E. coli. Proteolytic removal of the SUMO moiety from the fusion proteins resulted in the assembly of VLP with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. Immunization of guinea pigs, swine and cattle with FMD VLP by intramuscular inoculation stimulated the FMDV-specific antibody response, neutralizing antibody response, T-cell proliferation response and secretion of cytokine IFN-γ. In addition, immunization with one dose of the VLP resulted in complete protection of these animals from homologous FMDV challenge. The 50% protection dose (PD50) of FMD VLP in cattle is up to 6.34. These results suggest that FMD VLP expressed in E. coli are an effective vaccine in guinea pigs, swine and cattle and support further development of these VLP as a vaccine candidate for protection against FMDV. PMID:23826638

  9. Over-accumulation of nuclear IGF-1 receptor in tumor cells requires elevated expression of the receptor and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Hua; Lin, Yingbo; Badin, Margherita; Vasilcanu, Daiana; Stroemberg, Thomas [Department of Oncology and Pathology, The Karolinska Institute, Cancer Center Karolinska, SE-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena [Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Sehat, Bita [Department of Oncology and Pathology, The Karolinska Institute, Cancer Center Karolinska, SE-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Larsson, Olle, E-mail: olle.larsson@ki.se [Department of Oncology and Pathology, The Karolinska Institute, Cancer Center Karolinska, SE-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} SUMOylation mediates nuclear translocation of IGF-1R which activates transcription. {yields} Here we show that nuclear IGF-1R over-accumulates in tumor cells. {yields} This requires overexpression of the receptor that is a common feature in tumor cells. {yields} An increased expression of the SUMO ligase Ubc9 seems to be an involved mechanism too. -- Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays crucial roles in tumor cell growth and is overexpressed in many cancers. IGF-1R's trans-membrane kinase signaling pathways have been well characterized. Very recently, we showed that SUMOylation mediates nuclear translocation of the IGF-1R, and that nuclear IGF-1R (nIGF-1R) binds to enhancer regions and activates transcription. We identified three lysine residues in the {beta}-subunit of the receptor and that mutation of these blocks nuclear translocation and gene activation. Furthermore, accumulation of nIGF-1R was proven strongly dependent on the specific SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. Here we show that nIGF-1R originates solely from the cell membrane and that phosphorylation of the core tyrosine residues of the receptor kinase is crucial for nuclear accumulation. We also compared the levels of nIGF-1R, measured as nuclear/membrane ratios, in tumor and normal cells. We found that the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 has 13-fold higher amounts of nIGF-1R than breast epithelial cells (IME) which showed only a small amount of nIGF-1R. In comparison, the total expression of IGF-1R was only 3.7- higher in MCF-7. Comparison of several other tumor and normal cell lines showed similar tumor cell over-accumulation of nIGF-1R, exceeding the total receptor expression substantially. Ectopic overexpression (>10-fold) of the receptor increased nIGF-1R in IME cells but not to that high level as in wild type MCF-7. The levels of Ubc9 were higher in all tumor cell lines, compared to the normal cells, and this probably contributes to over

  10. Over-accumulation of nuclear IGF-1 receptor in tumor cells requires elevated expression of the receptor and the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Hua; Lin, Yingbo; Badin, Margherita; Vasilcanu, Daiana; Stroemberg, Thomas; Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena; Sehat, Bita; Larsson, Olle

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → SUMOylation mediates nuclear translocation of IGF-1R which activates transcription. → Here we show that nuclear IGF-1R over-accumulates in tumor cells. → This requires overexpression of the receptor that is a common feature in tumor cells. → An increased expression of the SUMO ligase Ubc9 seems to be an involved mechanism too. -- Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays crucial roles in tumor cell growth and is overexpressed in many cancers. IGF-1R's trans-membrane kinase signaling pathways have been well characterized. Very recently, we showed that SUMOylation mediates nuclear translocation of the IGF-1R, and that nuclear IGF-1R (nIGF-1R) binds to enhancer regions and activates transcription. We identified three lysine residues in the β-subunit of the receptor and that mutation of these blocks nuclear translocation and gene activation. Furthermore, accumulation of nIGF-1R was proven strongly dependent on the specific SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. Here we show that nIGF-1R originates solely from the cell membrane and that phosphorylation of the core tyrosine residues of the receptor kinase is crucial for nuclear accumulation. We also compared the levels of nIGF-1R, measured as nuclear/membrane ratios, in tumor and normal cells. We found that the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 has 13-fold higher amounts of nIGF-1R than breast epithelial cells (IME) which showed only a small amount of nIGF-1R. In comparison, the total expression of IGF-1R was only 3.7- higher in MCF-7. Comparison of several other tumor and normal cell lines showed similar tumor cell over-accumulation of nIGF-1R, exceeding the total receptor expression substantially. Ectopic overexpression (>10-fold) of the receptor increased nIGF-1R in IME cells but not to that high level as in wild type MCF-7. The levels of Ubc9 were higher in all tumor cell lines, compared to the normal cells, and this probably contributes to over-accumulation of nIGF-1R

  11. Conglutinin binds the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp 160 and inhibits its interaction with cell membrane CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Sørensen, A M; Svehag, S E

    1991-01-01

    The highly glycosylated envelope glycoprotein (gp 160) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the CD4 molecule present on the membrane of CD4+ cells and is involved in the pathobiology of HIV infection. Lectins bind glycoproteins through non-covalent interactions with specific hexose...... residues. The mammalian C-type lectin bovine conglutinin was examined for its ability to interact with recombinant gp160 (rgp160) produced in vaccinia virus-infected BHK21 cells. Specific binding of conglutinin to rgp160 was demonstrated by ELISA. The interaction of bovine conglutinin with rgp160...... of the binding of rgp160 to the CD4 receptor on CEM 13 cells, as demonstrated by FACS analyses. These results indicate that conglutinin may inhibit the infection with HIV-1 through its interaction with the viral envelope glycoprotein....

  12. CRITIC2: A program for real-space analysis of quantum chemical interactions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Johnson, Erin R.; Luaña, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    We present CRITIC2, a program for the analysis of quantum-mechanical atomic and molecular interactions in periodic solids. This code, a greatly improved version of the previous CRITIC program (Otero-de-la Roza et al., 2009), can: (i) find critical points of the electron density and related scalar fields such as the electron localization function (ELF), Laplacian, … (ii) integrate atomic properties in the framework of Bader’s Atoms-in-Molecules theory (QTAIM), (iii) visualize non-covalent interactions in crystals using the non-covalent interactions (NCI) index, (iv) generate relevant graphical representations including lines, planes, gradient paths, contour plots, atomic basins, … and (v) perform transformations between file formats describing scalar fields and crystal structures. CRITIC2 can interface with the output produced by a variety of electronic structure programs including WIEN2k, elk, PI, abinit, Quantum ESPRESSO, VASP, Gaussian, and, in general, any other code capable of writing the scalar field under study to a three-dimensional grid. CRITIC2 is parallelized, completely documented (including illustrative test cases) and publicly available under the GNU General Public License. Catalogue identifier: AECB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECB_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11686949 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 337020731 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 and 90. Computer: Workstations. Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Shared-memory parallelization can be used for most tasks. Classification: 7.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECB_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 157 Nature of problem: Analysis of quantum

  13. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesha R. Hathwar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ...Cπ interactions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. The quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.

  14. The subtle balance of weak supramolecular interactions: The hierarchy of halogen and hydrogen bonds in haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Raatikainen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts: 4-IPhNH3Cl (1, 4-IPhNH3Br (5, 4-IPhNH3H2PO4 (6, 4-ClPhNH3H2PO4 (8, 3-IPyBnCl (9, 3-IPyHCl (10 and 3-IPyH-5NIPA (3-iodopyridinium 5-nitroisophthalate, 13, where hydrogen or/and halogen bonding represents the most relevant non-covalent interactions, has been prepared and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. This series was further complemented by extracting some relevant crystal structures: 4-BrPhNH3Cl (2, CCDC ref. code TAWRAL, 4-ClPhNH3Cl (3, CURGOL, 4-FPhNH3Cl (4, ANLCLA, 4-BrPhNH3H2PO4, (7, UGISEI, 3-BrPyHCl, (11, CIHBAX and 3-ClPyHCl, (12, VOQMUJ from Cambridge Structural Database for sake of comparison. Based on the X-ray data it was possible to highlight the balance between non-covalent forces acting in these systems, where the relative strength of the halogen bonding C–X···A− (X = I, Br or Cl and the ratio between the halogen and hydrogen bonds [C–X···A− : D–H···A−] varied across the series.

  15. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  16. Intermolecular interactions of decamethoxinum and acetylsalicylic acid in systems of various complexity levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Vashchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions between decamethoxinum (DEC and acetylsalicylic acid (ASА have been studied in the phospholipid-containing systems of escalating complexity levels. The host media for these substances were solvents, L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC membranes, and samples of human erythrocytes. Peculiar effects caused by DEC-ASА interaction have been observed in each system using appropriate techniques: (a DEC-ASА non-covalent complexes formation in DPPC-containing systems were revealed by mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization; (b joint DEC-ASА action on DPPC model membranes led to increasing of membrane melting temperature Tm, whereas individual drugs caused pronounced Tm decreasing, which was demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry; (c deceleration of DEC-induced haemolysis of erythrocytes under joint DEC-ASА application was observed by optical microscopy.

  17. Mel-18 interacts with RanGAP1 and inhibits its sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Sarge, Kevin D

    2008-10-17

    Our previous results showed that the polycomb protein mel-18 binds to a protein called HSF2 and inhibits HSF2 sumoylation, thereby functioning as an anti-SUMO E3 factor. This study also suggested that mel-18 regulates the sumoylation of other cellular proteins, but the identities of these other proteins were unknown. Here we show that mel-18 interacts with the RanGAP1 protein and inhibits its sumoylation, and that these activities do not require the RING domain of mel-18. The results also show that RanGAP1 sumoylation is decreased during mitosis, and that this is associated with increased interaction between RanGAP1 and mel-18 during this stage of the cell cycle. Intriguingly, this regulatory relationship is the opposite of that found for mel-18 and HSF2, in which the interaction between these two proteins decreases during mitosis, resulting in elevated HSF2 sumoylation. The results of this study strengthen the conclusion that mel-18 functions as an anti-SUMO E3 factor, and extend its targets to include regulation of the sumoylation of the important cellular protein RanGAP1.

  18. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-08-07

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of "low-cost" electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT methods

  19. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of “low-cost” electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT

  20. Reciprocal carbonyl-carbonyl interactions in small molecules and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Abdur; Saha, Pinaki; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Sukumar, Nagamani; Sarma, Bani Kanta

    2017-07-19

    Carbonyl-carbonyl n→π* interactions where a lone pair (n) of the oxygen atom of a carbonyl group is delocalized over the π* orbital of a nearby carbonyl group have attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to their ability to affect the 3D structure of small molecules, polyesters, peptides, and proteins. In this paper, we report the discovery of a "reciprocal" carbonyl-carbonyl interaction with substantial back and forth n→π* and π→π* electron delocalization between neighboring carbonyl groups. We have carried out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to show the presence of this interaction in both small molecules and proteins. In proteins, these interactions are primarily found in polyproline II (PPII) helices. As PPII are the most abundant secondary structures in unfolded proteins, we propose that these local interactions may have implications in protein folding.Carbonyl-carbonyl π* non covalent interactions affect the structure and stability of small molecules and proteins. Here, the authors carry out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to describe an additional type of carbonyl-carbonyl interaction.

  1. Engaging the Terminal: Promoting Halogen Bonding Interactions with Uranyl Oxo Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Korey P; Kalaj, Mark; Surbella, Robert G; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Cahill, Christopher L

    2017-11-02

    Engaging the nominally terminal oxo atoms of the linear uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) cation in non-covalent interactions represents both a significant challenge and opportunity within the field of actinide hybrid materials. An approach has been developed for promoting oxo atom participation in a range of non-covalent interactions, through judicious choice of electron donating equatorial ligands and appropriately polarizable halogen-donor atoms. As such, a family of uranyl hybrid materials was generated based on a combination of 2,5-dihalobenzoic acid and aromatic, chelating N-donor ligands. Delineation of criteria for oxo participation in halogen bonding interactions has been achieved by preparing materials containing 2,5-dichloro- (25diClBA) and 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid (25diBrBA) coupled with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) (1 and 2), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3-5), 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (terpy) (6-8), or 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (Cl-terpy) (9-10), which have been characterized through single crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman, Infrared (IR), and luminescence spectroscopy, as well as through density functional calculations of electrostatic potentials. Looking comprehensively, these results are compared with recently published analogues featuring 2,5-diiodobenzoic acid which indicate that although inclusion of a capping ligand in the uranyl first coordination sphere is important, it is the polarizability of the selected halogen atom that ultimately drives halogen bonding interactions with the uranyl oxo atoms. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Evaluation of a SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme involved in resistance to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in Solanum peruvianum, through a tomato mottle virus VIGS assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Janeth Esparza-Araiza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm causes bacterial wilt and canker of tomato. Currently, no Solanum lycopersicum resistant varieties are commercially available, but some degree of Cmm resistance has been identified in Solanum peruvianum. Previous research showed up-regulation of a SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme (SCEI transcript in resistant S. peruvianum compared to susceptible S. lycopersicum following infection by Cmm. In order to test the role of SCEI in resistance to Cmm, a fragment of the gene from S. peruvianum was cloned into a novel virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS vector based on the geminivirus Tomato Mottle Virus (ToMoV. Using biolistic inoculation, the ToMoV-based VIGS vector was shown to be effective in S. peruvianum by silencing the magnesium chelatase gene, which resulted in leaf bleaching. The ToMoV_SCEI construct resulted in approx. 61% silencing of SCEI in leaves of S. peruvianum as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. VIGS of SCEI in S. peruvianum resulted in unilateral wilting (15 dpi and subsequent death (20 dpi of the entire plant after Cmm inoculation, whereas empty vector-treated plants only showed wilting in the Cmm-inoculated leaf. SCEI-silenced plants also showed higher Cmm colonization with an average of 4.5 times more damaged tissue compared to the empty vector control plants. SCEI appears to play an important role in the innate immunity of S. peruvianum against Cmm, perhaps through the regulation of WRKY transcription factors, which may lead to expression of proteins involved in salicylic acid-dependent defense responses.

  3. Fusion of the SUMO/Sentrin-specific protease 1 gene SENP1 and the embryonic polarity-related mesoderm development gene MESDC2 in a patient with an infantile teratoma and a constitutional t(12;15)(q13;q25).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, I.M.; Basten-Vreede, L.A.J.; Cheng, J.; Looijenga, L.H.J.; Janssen, H.A.P.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Yeh, E.T.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we identified a patient with an infantile sacrococcygeal teratoma and a constitutional t(12;15)(q13;q25). Here, we show that, as a result of this chromosomal translocation, the SUMO/Sentrin-specific protease 1 gene (SENP1) on chromosome 12 and the embryonic polarity-related mesoderm

  4. The specific cleavage of lactone linkage to open-loop in cyclic lipopeptide during negative ESI tandem mass spectrometry: the hydrogen bond interaction effect of 4-ethyl guaiacol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengzhe Guo

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a valuable tool for the analysis and identification of chemical compounds, particularly proteins and peptides. Lichenysins G, the major cyclic lipopeptide of lichenysin, and the non-covalent complex of lichenysins G and 4-ethylguaiacol were investigated with negative ion ESI tandem mass spectrometry. The different fragmentation mechanisms for these compounds were investigated. Our study shows the 4-ethylguaiacol hydrogen bond with the carbonyl oxygen of the ester group in the loop of lichenysins G. With the help of this hydrogen bond interaction, the ring structure preferentially opens in lactone linkage rather than O-C bond of the ester-group to produce alcohol and ketene. Isothermal titration 1H-NMR analysis verified the hydrogen bond and determined the proportion of subject and ligand in the non-covalent complex to be 1∶1. Theoretical calculations also suggest that the addition of the ligand can affect the energy of the transition structures (TS during loop opening.

  5. Growth factor delivery: How surface interactions modulate release in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William J.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been extensively used to deliver growth factors to induce new bone formation. The pharmacokinetics of growth factor delivery has been a critical regulator of their clinical success. This review will focus on the surface interactions that control the non-covalent incorporation of growth factors into scaffolds and the mechanisms that control growth factor release from clinically relevant biomaterials. We will focus on the delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 from materials currently used in the clinical practice, but also suggest how general mechanisms that control growth factor incorporation and release delineated with this growth factor could extend to other systems. A better understanding of the changing mechanisms that control growth factor release during the different stages of preclinical development could instruct the development of future scaffolds for currently untreatable injuries and diseases. PMID:22433783

  6. Catalysis with Gold Complexes Immobilised on Carbon Nanotubes by π-π Stacking Interactions: Heterogeneous Catalysis versus the Boomerang Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriamont, Charles; Devillers, Michel; Riant, Olivier; Hermans, Sophie

    2013-09-02

    A new pyrene-tagged gold(I) complex has been synthesised and tested as a homogeneous catalyst. First, a simple 1,6-enyne was chosen as a model substrate for cyclisation by using different solvents to optimise the reaction conditions. The non-covalent immobilisation of our pyrene-tagged gold complex onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes through π-π stacking interactions was then explored to obtain a supported homogeneous catalyst. The heterogenised catalyst and its homogeneous counterpart exhibited similar activity in a range of enyne cyclisation reactions. Bearing in mind that π-π interactions are affected by temperature and solvent polarity, the reuse and robustness of the supported homogeneous catalyst was tested to explore the scope and limitations of the recyclability of this catalyst. Under the optimised conditions, recyclability was observed by using the concept of the boomerang effect. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Similarity-transformed perturbation theory on top of truncated local coupled cluster solutions: Theory and applications to intermolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Richard Julian, E-mail: julianazar2323@berkeley.edu; Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    Your correspondents develop and apply fully nonorthogonal, local-reference perturbation theories describing non-covalent interactions. Our formulations are based on a Löwdin partitioning of the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian into a zeroth-order intramonomer piece (taking local CCSD solutions as its zeroth-order eigenfunction) plus a first-order piece coupling the fragments. If considerations are limited to a single molecule, the proposed intermolecular similarity-transformed perturbation theory represents a frozen-orbital variant of the “(2)”-type theories shown to be competitive with CCSD(T) and of similar cost if all terms are retained. Different restrictions on the zeroth- and first-order amplitudes are explored in the context of large-computation tractability and elucidation of non-local effects in the space of singles and doubles. To accurately approximate CCSD intermolecular interaction energies, a quadratically growing number of variables must be included at zeroth-order.

  8. Estrogen receptor alpha and nuclear factor Y coordinately regulate the transcription of the SUMO-conjugating UBC9 gene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibo Ying

    Full Text Available UBC9 encodes a protein that conjugates small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO to target proteins thereby changing their functions. Recently, it was noted that UBC9 expression and activity play a role in breast tumorigenesis and response to anticancer drugs. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the UBC9 gene, we identified and characterized its promoter and cis-elements. Promoter activity was tested using luciferase reporter assays. The binding of transcription factors to the promoter was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, and their functional role was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. UBC9 mRNA and protein levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An increased expression of UBC9 mRNA and protein was found in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 17β-estradiol (E2. Analysis of various deletion mutants revealed a 137 bp fragment upstream of the transcription initiation site to be sufficient for reporter gene transcription. Mutations of putative estrogen receptor α (ER-α (one imperfect estrogen response element, ERE and/or nuclear factor Y (NF-Y binding sites (two CCAAT boxes markedly reduced promoter activity. Similar results were obtained in ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells except that the ERE mutation did not affect promoter activity. Additionally, promoter activity was stimulated upon E2 treatment and overexpression of ER-α or NF-YA in MCF-7 cells. ChIP confirmed direct binding of both transcription factors to the UBC9 promoter in vivo. Furthermore, UBC9 expression was diminished by ER-α and NF-Y siRNAs on the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, we identified the proximal UBC9 promoter and provided evidence that ER-α and NF-Y regulate UBC9 expression on the transcriptional level in response to E2 in MCF-7 cells. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the regulation of UBC9 in ER

  9. Estrogen receptor alpha and nuclear factor Y coordinately regulate the transcription of the SUMO-conjugating UBC9 gene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Shibo; Dünnebier, Thomas; Si, Jing; Hamann, Ute

    2013-01-01

    UBC9 encodes a protein that conjugates small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) to target proteins thereby changing their functions. Recently, it was noted that UBC9 expression and activity play a role in breast tumorigenesis and response to anticancer drugs. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the UBC9 gene, we identified and characterized its promoter and cis-elements. Promoter activity was tested using luciferase reporter assays. The binding of transcription factors to the promoter was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and their functional role was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. UBC9 mRNA and protein levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. An increased expression of UBC9 mRNA and protein was found in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 17β-estradiol (E2). Analysis of various deletion mutants revealed a 137 bp fragment upstream of the transcription initiation site to be sufficient for reporter gene transcription. Mutations of putative estrogen receptor α (ER-α) (one imperfect estrogen response element, ERE) and/or nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) binding sites (two CCAAT boxes) markedly reduced promoter activity. Similar results were obtained in ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells except that the ERE mutation did not affect promoter activity. Additionally, promoter activity was stimulated upon E2 treatment and overexpression of ER-α or NF-YA in MCF-7 cells. ChIP confirmed direct binding of both transcription factors to the UBC9 promoter in vivo. Furthermore, UBC9 expression was diminished by ER-α and NF-Y siRNAs on the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, we identified the proximal UBC9 promoter and provided evidence that ER-α and NF-Y regulate UBC9 expression on the transcriptional level in response to E2 in MCF-7 cells. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the regulation of UBC9 in ER

  10. SUMO-Dependent Synergism Involving Heat Shock Transcription Factors with Functions Linked to Seed Longevity and Desiccation Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Carranco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A transcriptional synergism between HaHSFA9 (A9 and HaHSFA4a (A4a contributes to determining longevity and desiccation tolerance of sunflower (Helianthus annuus, L. seeds. Potential lysine SUMOylation sites were identified in A9 and A4a and mutated to arginine. We show that A9 is SUMOylated in planta at K38. Although we did not directly detect SUMOylated A4a in planta, we provide indirect evidence from transient expression experiments indicating that A4a is SUMOylated at K172. Different combinations of wild type and SUMOylation site mutants of A9 and A4a were analyzed by transient expression in sunflower embryos and leaves. Although most of the precedents in literature link SUMOylation with repression, the A9 and A4a synergism was fully abolished when the mutant forms for both factors were combined. However, the combination of mutant forms of A9 and A4a did not affect the nuclear retention of A4a by A9; therefore, the analyzed mutations would affect the synergism after the mutual interaction and nuclear co-localization of A9 and A4a. Our results suggest a role for HSF SUMOylation during late, zygotic, embryogenesis. The SUMOylation of A9 (or A4a would allow a crucial, synergic, transcriptional effect that occurs in maturing sunflower seeds.

  11. The n→π* Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Robert W; Raines, Ronald T

    2017-08-15

    The carbonyl group holds a prominent position in chemistry and biology not only because it allows diverse transformations but also because it supports key intermolecular interactions, including hydrogen bonding. More recently, carbonyl groups have been found to interact with a variety of nucleophiles, including other carbonyl groups, in what we have termed an n→π* interaction. In an n→π* interaction, a nucleophile donates lone-pair (n) electron density into the empty π* orbital of a nearby carbonyl group. Mixing of these orbitals releases energy, resulting in an attractive interaction. Hints of such interactions were evident in small-molecule crystal structures as early as the 1970s, but not until 2001 was the role of such interactions articulated clearly. These non-covalent interactions were first discovered during investigations into the thermostability of the proline-rich protein collagen, which achieves a robust structure despite a relatively low potential for hydrogen bonding. It was found that by modulating the distance between two carbonyl groups in the peptide backbone, one could alter the conformational preferences of a peptide bond to proline. Specifically, only the trans conformation of a peptide bond to proline allows for an attractive interaction with an adjacent carbonyl group, so when one increases the proximity of the two carbonyl groups, one enhances their interaction and promotes the trans conformation of the peptide bond, which increases the thermostability of collagen. More recently, attention has been paid to the nature of these interactions. Some have argued that rather than resulting from electron donation, carbonyl interactions are a particular example of dipolar interactions that are well-approximated by classical mechanics. However, experimental evidence has demonstrated otherwise. Numerous examples now exist where an increase in the dipole moment of a carbonyl group decreases the strength of its interactions with other carbonyl

  12. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA 20 , poly dT 20 , poly dC 20 and the duplex poly dA 20 :dT 20 . Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their purification using strong

  13. The role of CH/π interactions in the high affinity binding of streptavidin and biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Motoyasu; Ozawa, Tomonaga; Nishio, Motohiro; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    The streptavidin-biotin complex has an extraordinarily high affinity (Ka: 10 15 mol -1 ) and contains one of the strongest non-covalent interactions known. This strong interaction is widely used in biological tools, including for affinity tags, detection, and immobilization of proteins. Although hydrogen bond networks and hydrophobic interactions have been proposed to explain this high affinity, the reasons for it remain poorly understood. Inspired by the deceased affinity of biotin observed for point mutations of streptavidin at tryptophan residues, we hypothesized that a CH/π interaction may also contribute to the strong interaction between streptavidin and biotin. CH/π interactions were explored and analyzed at the biotin-binding site and at the interface of the subunits by the fragment molecular orbital method (FMO) and extended applications: PIEDA and FMO4. The results show that CH/π interactions are involved in the high affinity for biotin at the binding site of streptavidin. We further suggest that the involvement of CH/π interactions at the subunit interfaces and an extended CH/π network play more critical roles in determining the high affinity, rather than involvement at the binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiguang Du

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC basis set. The Pu– O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu–Ligand bonds, like Pu–OH−, show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu–ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu–Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified.

  15. Visible-light sensitization of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond through non-covalent surface modification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krýsová, Hana; Vlčková Živcová, Zuzana; Bartoň, Jan; Petrák, Václav; Nesladek, M.; Cígler, Petr; Kavan, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2015), s. 1165-1172 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-31783S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystallines * visible-light sensitization * boron-doped diamond Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015

  16. Systematic validation and atomic force microscopy of non-covalent short oligonucleotide barcode microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular barcode arrays provide a powerful means to analyze cellular phenotypes in parallel through detection of short (20-60 base unique sequence tags, or "barcodes", associated with each strain or clone in a collection. However, costs of current methods for microarray construction, whether by in situ oligonucleotide synthesis or ex situ coupling of modified oligonucleotides to the slide surface are often prohibitive to large-scale analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that unmodified 20mer oligonucleotide probes printed on conventional surfaces show comparable hybridization signals to covalently linked 5'-amino-modified probes. As a test case, we undertook systematic cell size analysis of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome-wide deletion collection by size separation of the deletion pool followed by determination of strain abundance in size fractions by barcode arrays. We demonstrate that the properties of a 13K unique feature spotted 20 mer oligonucleotide barcode microarray compare favorably with an analogous covalently-linked oligonucleotide array. Further, cell size profiles obtained with the size selection/barcode array approach recapitulate previous cell size measurements of individual deletion strains. Finally, through atomic force microscopy (AFM, we characterize the mechanism of hybridization to unmodified barcode probes on the slide surface. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies push the lower limit of probe size in genome-scale unmodified oligonucleotide microarray construction and demonstrate a versatile, cost-effective and reliable method for molecular barcode analysis.

  17. Rooster comb hyaluronate-protein, a non-covalently linked complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiganos, C P; Vynios, D H; Kalpaxis, D L

    1986-01-01

    Hyaluronate from rooster comb was isolated by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose from tissue extracts and papain digests. The preparations were labelled with [14C]acetic anhydride and subjected to CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation in 4 M-guanidinium chloride in the presence and absence of 4% ZwittergentTM 3-12. A radioactive protein fraction was separated from the hyaluronate when the zwitterionic detergent was also present. The protein could also be separated from the glycosaminoglycan by chromatography on Sepharose CL-6B eluted with the same solvent mixture. The protein fraction contained three protein bands of Mr 15,000-17,000 as assessed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in 0.1% SDS, and seemed to lack lysozyme activity. No evidence of other protein or amino acid(s) covalently linked with the hyaluronate was obtained. The hyaluronate-protein complex may be re-formed upon mixing the components, the extent of its formation depending on the conditions used. The results show that, as in chondrosarcoma [Mason, d'Arville, Kimura & Hascall (1982) Biochem. J. 207, 445-457] and teratocarcinoma cells [Prehm (1983) Biochem. J. 211, 191-198] the rooster comb hyaluronate also is not linked covalently to a core protein. PMID:3741374

  18. Investigating the Non-Covalent Functionalization and Chemical Transformation of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Chun-Hong

    Trend in device miniatures demands capabilities to produce rationally designed patterns in ever-shrinking length scale. The research community has examined various techniques to push the current lithography resolution to sub-10nm scale. One of the ideas is to utilize the natural nanoscale patterns of molecular assemblies. In this thesis, the self-assembling phenomenon of a photoactive molecule on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown on SiC was discussed. This molecular assembly enables manipulation of chemical contrast in nanoscale through UV exposure or atomic layer deposition. Future development of nanoelectronics industry will be fueled by innovations in electronics materials, which could be discovered through covalent modification of graphene. In a study reported in this thesis, silicon is deposited onto EG. After annealing, a new surface reconstruction, identified to be (3x3)-SiC, was formed. Raman spectroscopy finds no signature of graphene after annealing, indicating a complete chemical transformation of graphene. DFT calculations reveal a possible conversion mechanism. Overall, these studies provide insights for future device miniaturization; contribute to the search of novel materials and help bridging the gap between graphene and current silicon-based industrial infrastructures.

  19. Non-Covalent Microgel Particles Containing Functional Payloads: Coacervation of PEG-Based Triblocks via Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cynthia X; Utech, Stefanie; Gopez, Jeffrey D; Mabesoone, Mathijs F J; Hawker, Craig J; Klinger, Daniel

    2016-07-06

    Well-defined microgel particles were prepared by combining coacervate-driven cross-linking of ionic triblock copolymers with the ability to control particle size and encapsulate functional cargos inherent in microfluidic devices. In this approach, the efficient assembly of PEO-based triblock copolymers with oppositely charged end-blocks allows for bioinspired cross-linking under mild conditions in dispersed aqueous droplets. This strategy enables the integration of charged cargos into the coacervate domains (e.g., the loading of anionic model compounds through electrostatic association with cationic end-blocks). Distinct release profiles can be realized by systematically varying the chemical nature of the payload and the microgel dimensions. This mild and noncovalent assembly method represents a promising new approach to tunable microgels as scaffolds for colloidal biomaterials in therapeutics and regenerative medicine.

  20. Size control and surface functionalization of multivalent non-covalent and porous nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinhart-Mejia, R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials for molecular imaging and therapeutics has flourished over the past decade. Controlled assembly and disassembly of nanoparticles is important for applications such as drug delivery systems in order to tune their loading and unloading behavior. Such properties can be

  1. A non-covalent peptide-based carrier for in vivo delivery of DNA mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, May C.; Gros, Edwige; Aldrian-Herrada, Gudrun; Choob, Michael; Archdeacon, John; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    The dramatic acceleration in identification of new nucleic-acid-based therapeutic molecules has provided new perspectives in pharmaceutical research. However, their development is limited by their poor cellular uptake and inefficient trafficking. Here we describe a short amphipathic peptide, Pep-3, that combines a tryptophan/phenylalanine domain with a lysine/arginine-rich hydrophilic motif. Pep-3 forms stable nano-size complexes with peptide-nucleic acid analogues and promotes their efficien...

  2. A non-covalent peptide-based carrier for in vivo delivery of DNA mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, May C; Gros, Edwige; Aldrian-Herrada, Gudrun; Choob, Michael; Archdeacon, John; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    The dramatic acceleration in identification of new nucleic-acid-based therapeutic molecules has provided new perspectives in pharmaceutical research. However, their development is limited by their poor cellular uptake and inefficient trafficking. Here we describe a short amphipathic peptide, Pep-3, that combines a tryptophan/phenylalanine domain with a lysine/arginine-rich hydrophilic motif. Pep-3 forms stable nano-size complexes with peptide-nucleic acid analogues and promotes their efficient delivery into a wide variety of cell lines, including primary and suspension lines, without any associated cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that Pep-3-mediated delivery of antisense-cyclin B1-charged-PNA blocks tumour growth in vivo upon intratumoral and intravenous injection. Moreover, we show that PEGylation of Pep-3 significantly improves complex stability in vivo and consequently the efficiency of antisense cyclin B1 administered intravenously. Given the biological characteristics of these vectors, we believe that peptide-based delivery technologies hold a true promise for therapeutic applications of DNA mimics.

  3. Stability and thermophysical properties of non-covalently functionalized graphene nanoplatelets nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarsam, Wail Sami; Amiri, Ahmad; Kazi, S.N.; Badarudin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The prepared water-based pristine GNPs nanofluids in this research were not stable. • All the surfactants investigated, SDBS, GA, CTAB, and SDS, increased the viscosity. • Thermal conductivity of nanofluids enhanced in the presence of GA, SDBS, and CTAB. • Highest nanofluid stability was obtained using an ultrasonication time of 60 min. • (1–1) SDBS–GNPs nanofluid with 60 min ultrasonication showed the highest stability. - Abstract: A pioneering idea for increasing the thermal performance of heat transfer fluids was to use ultrafine solid particles suspended in the base fluid. Nanofluids, synthesized by mixing solid nanometer sized particles at low concentrations with the base fluid, were used as a new heat transfer fluid and developed a remarkable effect on the thermophysical properties and heat transfer coefficient. For any nanofluid to be usable in heat transfer applications, the main concern is its long-term stability. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of using four different surfactants (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and gum Arabic (GA)), each with three different concentrations, and five ultrasonication times (15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min) on the stability of water-based graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) nanofluids. In addition, the viscosity and thermal conductivity of the highest stability samples were measured at different temperatures. For this aim, nineteen different nanofluids with 0.1 wt% concentration of GNPs were prepared via the two-step method. An ultrasonication probe was utilized to disperse the GNPs in distilled water. UV–vis spectrometry, zeta potential, average particle size, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were helpful in evaluating the stability and characterizing the prepared nanofluids. TEM and zeta potential results were in agreement with the UV–vis measurements. The highest nanofluid stability was obtained at 60-min ultrasonication time. The prepared water-based pristine GNPs nanofluids were not stable, and the stability was improved with the addition of surfactants. The presence of SDBS, SDS, and CTAB surfactants in the nanofluids resulted in excessive foam. The best water-based GNPs nanofluid was selected in terms of better stability, higher thermal conductivity, and lower viscosity. From all the samples that were prepared in this research, the (1–1) SDBS–GNPs sample with 60-min ultrasonication showed the highest stability (82% relative concentration after 60 days), the second better enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid (8.36%), and nearly the lowest viscosity (7.4% higher than distilled water).

  4. Native characterization of nucleic acid motif thermodynamics via non-covalent catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyan; Bae, Jin H.; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-01-01

    DNA hybridization thermodynamics is critical for accurate design of oligonucleotides for biotechnology and nanotechnology applications, but parameters currently in use are inaccurately extrapolated based on limited quantitative understanding of thermal behaviours. Here, we present a method to measure the ΔG° of DNA motifs at temperatures and buffer conditions of interest, with significantly better accuracy (6- to 14-fold lower s.e.) than prior methods. The equilibrium constant of a reaction with thermodynamics closely approximating that of a desired motif is numerically calculated from directly observed reactant and product equilibrium concentrations; a DNA catalyst is designed to accelerate equilibration. We measured the ΔG° of terminal fluorophores, single-nucleotide dangles and multinucleotide dangles, in temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 °C. PMID:26782977

  5. Molecular interactions between (--epigallocatechin gallate analogs and pancreatic lipase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihui Wang

    Full Text Available The molecular interactions between pancreatic lipase (PL and four tea polyphenols (EGCG analogs, like (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, (--gallocatechin gallate (GCG, (--epicatechin gallate (ECG, and (--epigallocatechin (EC, were studied from PL activity, conformation, kinetics and thermodynamics. It was observed that EGCG analogs inhibited PL activity, and their inhibitory rates decreased by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. PL activity at first decreased rapidly and then slowly with the increase of EGCG analogs concentrations. α-Helix content of PL secondary structure decreased dependent on EGCG analogs concentration by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. EGCG, ECG, and EC could quench PL fluorescence both dynamically and statically, while GCG only quenched statically. EGCG analogs would induce PL self-assembly into complexes and the hydrodynamic radii of the complexes possessed a close relationship with the inhibitory rates. Kinetics analysis showed that EGCG analogs non-competitively inhibited PL activity and did not bind to PL catalytic site. DSC measurement revealed that EGCG analogs decreased the transition midpoint temperature of PL enzyme, suggesting that these compounds reduced PL enzyme thermostability. In vitro renaturation through urea solution indicated that interactions between PL and EGCG analogs were weak and non-covalent.

  6. Co-assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles and Lipids into Supramolecular Nanostructures Driven by Anion-π Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhilin; Erbas, Aykut; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C.; Jackman, Joshua A.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Cho, Nam-Joon; Stupp, Samuel I. (Nanyang); (NWU)

    2017-06-01

    Co-assembly of binary systems driven by specific non-covalent interactions can greatly expand the structural and functional space of supramolecular nanostructures. We report here on the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles and fatty acids driven primarily by anion-π interactions. The peptide sequences investigated were functionalized with a perfluorinated phenylalanine residue to promote anion-π interactions with carboxylate headgroups in fatty acids. These interactions were verified here by NMR and circular dichroism experiments as well as investigated using atomistic simulations. Positioning the aromatic units close to the N-terminus of the peptide backbone near the hydrophobic core of cylindrical nanofibers leads to strong anion-π interactions between both components. With a low content of dodecanoic acid in this position, the cylindrical morphology is preserved. However, as the aromatic units are moved along the peptide backbone away from the hydrophobic core, the interactions with dodecanoic acid transform the cylindrical supramolecular morphology into ribbon-like structures. Increasing the ratio of dodecanoic acid to PA leads to either the formation of large vesicles in the binary systems where the anion-π interactions are strong, or a heterogeneous mixture of assemblies when the peptide amphiphiles associate weakly with dodecanoic acid. Our findings reveal how co-assembly involving designed specific interactions can drastically change supramolecular morphology and even cross from nano to micro scales.

  7. Structural Analysis of ‘key’ Interactions in Functional RNA Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of the thesis is to carry out structural bioinformatics study along with usage of advanced quantum chemical methods to look at the structural stability and energetics of RNA building blocks. The main focus of the work described here lies on understanding the reasons behind the intrinsic stability of key interactions in nucleic acids. Crystal structures of RNA molecules exhibit fascinating variety of non-covalent interactions, which play an important role in maintaining the three dimensional structures. An accurate atomic level description of these interactions in the structural building blocks of RNA is a key to understand the structure-function relationship in these molecules. An effort has been made to link the conclusions drawn from quantum chemical computations on RNA base pairs in wide biochemical context of their occurrence in RNA structures. The initial attention was on the impact of natural and non-natural modifications of the nucleic acid bases on the structure and stability of base pairs that they are involved in. In the remaining sections we cover other molecular interactions shaping nucleic acids, as the interaction between ribose and the bases, and the fluoride sensing riboswitch system in order to investigate structure and dynamics of nucleic acids at the atomic level and to gain insight into the physical chemistry behind.

  8. The RING 2.0 web server for high quality residue interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Damiano; Minervini, Giovanni; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-07-08

    Residue interaction networks (RINs) are an alternative way of representing protein structures where nodes are residues and arcs physico-chemical interactions. RINs have been extensively and successfully used for analysing mutation effects, protein folding, domain-domain communication and catalytic activity. Here we present RING 2.0, a new version of the RING software for the identification of covalent and non-covalent bonds in protein structures, including π-π stacking and π-cation interactions. RING 2.0 is extremely fast and generates both intra and inter-chain interactions including solvent and ligand atoms. The generated networks are very accurate and reliable thanks to a complex empirical re-parameterization of distance thresholds performed on the entire Protein Data Bank. By default, RING output is generated with optimal parameters but the web server provides an exhaustive interface to customize the calculation. The network can be visualized directly in the browser or in Cytoscape. Alternatively, the RING-Viz script for Pymol allows visualizing the interactions at atomic level in the structure. The web server and RING-Viz, together with an extensive help and tutorial, are available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/ring. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Structural Analysis of ‘key’ Interactions in Functional RNA Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of the thesis is to carry out structural bioinformatics study along with usage of advanced quantum chemical methods to look at the structural stability and energetics of RNA building blocks. The main focus of the work described here lies on understanding the reasons behind the intrinsic stability of key interactions in nucleic acids. Crystal structures of RNA molecules exhibit fascinating variety of non-covalent interactions, which play an important role in maintaining the three dimensional structures. An accurate atomic level description of these interactions in the structural building blocks of RNA is a key to understand the structure-function relationship in these molecules. An effort has been made to link the conclusions drawn from quantum chemical computations on RNA base pairs in wide biochemical context of their occurrence in RNA structures. The initial attention was on the impact of natural and non-natural modifications of the nucleic acid bases on the structure and stability of base pairs that they are involved in. In the remaining sections we cover other molecular interactions shaping nucleic acids, as the interaction between ribose and the bases, and the fluoride sensing riboswitch system in order to investigate structure and dynamics of nucleic acids at the atomic level and to gain insight into the physical chemistry behind.

  10. Analysis of the spectroscopic characteristics on the binding interaction between tosufloxacin and bovine lactoferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ming; Zhang Luying; Lue Weijun; Cao Huaru

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between tosufloxacin (TELX) and bovine lactoferrin (BLF) in aqueous solution was analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy and absorbance spectra. The binding parameters and energy-transfer efficiency parameters were determined and the mechanism of interaction was discussed. The effect of tosufloxacin acting on the BLF's conformation was detected and the unfolding procedure of BLF induced by tosufloxacin was explored by 'fluorescence phase diagram'. Following experimental data of fluorescence polarization values P and r, the saturation characteristic of such kind of binding reaction was observed for the first time. The interaction between tosufloxacin and BLF influenced by Ni 2+ and Co 2+ were also preliminarily explored in this work. - Research Highlights: →In this paper, a new saturation spectroscopic characteristic of non-covalent binding reaction is proposed. The saturated character of interaction of tosufloxacin binding with bovine lactoferrin is firstly observed by fluorescence polarization spectroscopy. →The unfolding procedure of bovine lactoferrin induced by drug ligand is analyzed by 'fluorescence phase diagram', and it is quantitatively characterized. →The binding parameters and energy-transfer efficiency parameters of bovine lactoferrin-tosufloxacin/tosufloxacin-Co 2+ (Ni 2+ ) system are determined and the mechanism of interaction is discussed.

  11. The Janus Kinase (JAK) FERM and SH2 Domains: Bringing Specificity to JAK-Receptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrao, Ryan; Lupardus, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases essential for signaling in response to cytokines and interferons and thereby control many essential functions in growth, development, and immune regulation. JAKs are unique among tyrosine kinases for their constitutive yet non-covalent association with class I and II cytokine receptors, which upon cytokine binding bring together two JAKs to create an active signaling complex. JAK association with cytokine receptors is facilitated by N-terminal FERM and SH2 domains, both of which are classical mediators of peptide interactions. Together, the JAK FERM and SH2 domains mediate a bipartite interaction with two distinct receptor peptide motifs, the proline-rich "Box1" and hydrophobic "Box2," which are present in the intracellular domain of cytokine receptors. While the general sidechain chemistry of Box1 and Box2 peptides is conserved between receptors, they share very weak primary sequence homology, making it impossible to posit why certain JAKs preferentially interact with and signal through specific subsets of cytokine receptors. Here, we review the structure and function of the JAK FERM and SH2 domains in light of several recent studies that reveal their atomic structure and elucidate interaction mechanisms with both the Box1 and Box2 receptor motifs. These crystal structures demonstrate how evolution has repurposed the JAK FERM and SH2 domains into a receptor-binding module that facilitates interactions with multiple receptors possessing diverse primary sequences.

  12. Optimal definition of inter-residual contact in globular proteins based on pairwise interaction energy calculations, its robustness, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fačkovec, Boris; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2012-10-25

    Although a contact is an essential measurement for the topology as well as strength of non-covalent interactions in biomolecules and their complexes, there is no general agreement in the definition of this feature. Most of the definitions work with simple geometric criteria which do not fully reflect the energy content or ability of the biomolecular building blocks to arrange their environment. We offer a reasonable solution to this problem by distinguishing between "productive" and "non-productive" contacts based on their interaction energy strength and properties. We have proposed a method which converts the protein topology into a contact map that represents interactions with statistically significant high interaction energies. We do not prove that these contacts are exclusively stabilizing, but they represent a gateway to thermodynamically important rather than geometry-based contacts. The process is based on protein fragmentation and calculation of interaction energies using the OPLS force field and relies on pairwise additivity of amino acid interactions. Our approach integrates the treatment of different types of interactions, avoiding the problems resulting from different contributions to the overall stability and the different effect of the environment. The first applications on a set of homologous proteins have shown the usefulness of this classification for a sound estimate of protein stability.

  13. Extractable Bacterial Surface Proteins in Probiotic–Host Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fillipe L. R. do Carmo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Some Gram-positive bacteria, including probiotic ones, are covered with an external proteinaceous layer called a surface-layer. Described as a paracrystalline layer and formed by the self-assembly of a surface-layer-protein (Slp, this optional structure is peculiar. The surface layer per se is conserved and encountered in many prokaryotes. However, the sequence of the corresponding Slp protein is highly variable among bacterial species, or even among strains of the same species. Other proteins, including surface layer associated proteins (SLAPs, and other non-covalently surface-bound proteins may also be extracted with this surface structure. They can be involved a various functions. In probiotic Gram-positives, they were shown by different authors and experimental approaches to play a role in key interactions with the host. Depending on the species, and sometime on the strain, they can be involved in stress tolerance, in survival within the host digestive tract, in adhesion to host cells or mucus, or in the modulation of intestinal inflammation. Future trends include the valorization of their properties in the formation of nanoparticles, coating and encapsulation, and in the development of new vaccines.

  14. Molecular interactions in particular Van der Waals nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungclas, Hartmut; Schmidt, Lothar [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Chemistry Dept.; Komarov, Viacheslav V.; Popova, Anna M. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Chemistry Dept.; Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltzin Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2017-04-01

    A method is presented to analyse the interaction energies in a nanocluster, which is consisting of three neutral molecules bound by non-covalent long range Van der Waals forces. One of the molecules (M{sub 0}) in the nanocluster has a permanent dipole moment, whereas the two other molecules (M{sub 1} and M{sub 2}) are non-polar. Analytical expressions are obtained for the numerical calculation of the dispersion and induction energies of the molecules in the considered nanocluster. The repulsive forces at short intermolecular distances are taken into account by introduction of damping functions. Dispersion and induction energies are calculated for a nanocluster with a definite geometry, in which the polar molecule M{sub 0} is a linear hydrocarbon molecule C{sub 5}H{sub 10} and M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} are pyrene molecules. The calculations are done for fixed distances between the two pyrene molecules. The results show that the induction energies in the considered three-molecular nanocluster are comparable with the dispersion energies. Furthermore, the sum of induction energies in the substructure (M{sub 0}, M{sub 1}) of the considered nanocluster is much higher than the sum of induction energies in a two-molecular nanocluster with similar molecules (M{sub 0}, M{sub 1}) because of the absence of an electrostatic field in the latter case. This effect can be explained by the essential intermolecular induction in the three-molecular nanocluster.

  15. Determination and Quantification of Molecular Interactions in Protein Films: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Hammann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein based films are nowadays also prepared with the aim of replacing expensive, crude oil-based polymers as environmentally friendly and renewable alternatives. The protein structure determines the ability of protein chains to form intra- and intermolecular bonds, whereas the degree of cross-linking depends on the amino acid composition and molecular weight of the protein, besides the conditions used in film preparation and processing. The functionality varies significantly depending on the type of protein and affects the resulting film quality and properties. This paper reviews the methods used in examination of molecular interactions in protein films and discusses how these intermolecular interactions can be quantified. The qualitative determination methods can be distinguished by structural analysis of solutions (electrophoretic analysis, size exclusion chromatography and analysis of solid films (spectroscopy techniques, X-ray scattering methods. To quantify molecular interactions involved, two methods were found to be the most suitable: protein film swelling and solubility. The importance of non-covalent and covalent interactions in protein films can be investigated using different solvents. The research was focused on whey protein, whereas soy protein and wheat gluten were included as further examples of proteins.

  16. Determination and Quantification of Molecular Interactions in Protein Films: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, Felicia; Schmid, Markus

    2014-12-10

    Protein based films are nowadays also prepared with the aim of replacing expensive, crude oil-based polymers as environmentally friendly and renewable alternatives. The protein structure determines the ability of protein chains to form intra- and intermolecular bonds, whereas the degree of cross-linking depends on the amino acid composition and molecular weight of the protein, besides the conditions used in film preparation and processing. The functionality varies significantly depending on the type of protein and affects the resulting film quality and properties. This paper reviews the methods used in examination of molecular interactions in protein films and discusses how these intermolecular interactions can be quantified. The qualitative determination methods can be distinguished by structural analysis of solutions (electrophoretic analysis, size exclusion chromatography) and analysis of solid films (spectroscopy techniques, X-ray scattering methods). To quantify molecular interactions involved, two methods were found to be the most suitable: protein film swelling and solubility. The importance of non-covalent and covalent interactions in protein films can be investigated using different solvents. The research was focused on whey protein, whereas soy protein and wheat gluten were included as further examples of proteins.

  17. In Vitro Interactions between 17β-Estradiol and DNA Result in Formation of the Hormone-DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the role of 17β-estradiol (E2 in reproduction and during the menstrual cycle, it has been shown to modulate numerous physiological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and ion transport in many tissues. The pathways in which estrogens affect an organism have been partially described, although many questions still exist regarding estrogens’ interaction with biomacromolecules. Hence, the present study showed the interaction of four oligonucleotides (17, 20, 24 and/or 38-mer with E2. The strength of these interactions was evaluated using optical methods, showing that the interaction is influenced by three major factors, namely: oligonucleotide length, E2 concentration and interaction time. In addition, the denaturation phenomenon of DNA revealed that the binding of E2 leads to destabilization of hydrogen bonds between the nitrogenous bases of DNA strands resulting in a decrease of their melting temperatures (Tm. To obtain a more detailed insight into these interactions, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was employed. This study revealed that E2 with DNA forms non-covalent physical complexes, observed as the mass shifts for app. 270 Da (Mr of E2 to higher molecular masses. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 can affect biomacromolecules, as circulating oligonucleotides, which can trigger mutations, leading to various unwanted effects.

  18. The S-layer Associated Serine Protease Homolog PrtX Impacts Cell Surface-Mediated Microbe-Host Interactions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brant R. Johnson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Health-promoting aspects attributed to probiotic microorganisms, including adhesion to intestinal epithelia and modulation of the host mucosal immune system, are mediated by proteins found on the bacterial cell surface. Notably, certain probiotic and commensal bacteria contain a surface (S- layer as the outermost stratum of the cell wall. S-layers are non-covalently bound semi-porous, crystalline arrays of self-assembling, proteinaceous subunits called S-layer proteins (SLPs. Recent evidence has shown that multiple proteins are non-covalently co-localized within the S-layer, designated S-layer associated proteins (SLAPs. In Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, SLP and SLAPs have been implicated in both mucosal immunomodulation and adhesion to the host intestinal epithelium. In this study, a S-layer associated serine protease homolog, PrtX (prtX, lba1578, was deleted from the chromosome of L. acidophilus NCFM. Compared to the parent strain, the PrtX-deficient strain (ΔprtX demonstrated increased autoaggregation, an altered cellular morphology, and pleiotropic increases in adhesion to mucin and fibronectin, in vitro. Furthermore, ΔprtX demonstrated increased in vitro immune stimulation of IL-6, IL-12, and IL-10 compared to wild-type, when exposed to mouse dendritic cells. Finally, in vivo colonization of germ-free mice with ΔprtX led to an increase in epithelial barrier integrity. The absence of PrtX within the exoproteome of a ΔprtX strain caused morphological changes, resulting in a pleiotropic increase of the organisms’ immunomodulatory properties and interactions with some intestinal epithelial cell components.

  19. Insights into the fold organization of TIM barrel from interaction energy based structure networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayabaskar, M S; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2012-01-01

    There are many well-known examples of proteins with low sequence similarity, adopting the same structural fold. This aspect of sequence-structure relationship has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically, however with limited success. Most of the studies consider remote homology or "sequence conservation" as the basis for their understanding. Recently "interaction energy" based network formalism (Protein Energy Networks (PENs)) was developed to understand the determinants of protein structures. In this paper we have used these PENs to investigate the common non-covalent interactions and their collective features which stabilize the TIM barrel fold. We have also developed a method of aligning PENs in order to understand the spatial conservation of interactions in the fold. We have identified key common interactions responsible for the conservation of the TIM fold, despite high sequence dissimilarity. For instance, the central beta barrel of the TIM fold is stabilized by long-range high energy electrostatic interactions and low-energy contiguous vdW interactions in certain families. The other interfaces like the helix-sheet or the helix-helix seem to be devoid of any high energy conserved interactions. Conserved interactions in the loop regions around the catalytic site of the TIM fold have also been identified, pointing out their significance in both structural and functional evolution. Based on these investigations, we have developed a novel network based phylogenetic analysis for remote homologues, which can perform better than sequence based phylogeny. Such an analysis is more meaningful from both structural and functional evolutionary perspective. We believe that the information obtained through the "interaction conservation" viewpoint and the subsequently developed method of structure network alignment, can shed new light in the fields of fold organization and de novo computational protein design.

  20. Interactions of diuron with dissolved organic matter from organic amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenot, Mathieu; Dousset, Sylvie; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Andreux, Francis

    2009-07-01

    Diuron is frequently detected in some drinking water reservoirs under the Burgundy vineyards, where organic amendments are applied. The environmental effect of these amendments on pesticide transport is ambiguous: on the one hand it could enhance their retention by increasing soil organic carbon content; on the other hand, dissolved organic matter (DOM) could facilitate their transport. Elutions were performed using columns packed with glass beads in order to investigate DOM-diuron interactions, and the possible co-transport of diuron and DOM. Four organic amendments (A, B, C and D) were tested; C and D were sampled at fresh (F) and mature (M) stages. An increase in diuron leaching was observed only for A and D(F) amendments (up to 16% compared to the DOM-free blank samples), suggesting a DOM effect on diuron transport. These results could be explained by the higher DOM leaching for A and D(F) compared to B, C(F), C(M) and D(M) increasing diuron-DOM interactions. These interactions seem to be related to the aromatic and aliphatic content of the DOM, determining formation of hydrogen and non-covalent bonds. The degree of organic matter maturity does not seem to have any effect with amendment C, while a reduction in diuron leaching is observed between D(F) and D(M). After equilibrium dialysis measurement of diuron-DOM complexes, it appeared that less than 3% of the diuron applied corresponded to complexes with a molecular weight >1000 Da. Complexes <1000 Da could also take part in this facilitated transport.

  1. Influence of hydration on ion-biomolecule interactions: M(+)(indole)(H2O)(n) (M = Na, K; n = 3-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Haochen; Lisy, James M

    2015-10-14

    The indole functional group can be found in many biologically relevant molecules, such as neurotransmitters, pineal hormones and medicines. Indole has been used as a tractable model to study the hydration structures of biomolecules as well as the interplay of non-covalent interactions within ion-biomolecule-water complexes, which largely determine their structure and dynamics. With three potential binding sites: above the six- or five-member ring, and the N-H group, the competition between π and hydrogen bond interactions involves multiple locations. Electrostatic interactions from monovalent cations are in direct competition with hydrogen bonding interactions, as structural configurations involving both direct cation-indole interactions and cation-water-indole bridging interactions were observed. The different charge densities of Na(+) and K(+) give rise to different structural conformers at the same level of hydration. Infrared spectra with parallel hybrid functional-based calculations and Gibbs free energy calculations revealed rich structural insights into the Na(+)/K(+)(indole)(H2O)3-6 cluster ion complexes. Isotopic (H/D) analyses were applied to decouple the spectral features originating from the OH and NH stretches. Results showed no evidence of direct interaction between water and the NH group of indole (via a σ-hydrogen bond) at current levels of hydration with the incorporation of cations. Hydrogen bonding to a π-system, however, was ubiquitous at hydration levels between two and five.

  2. Four faces of the interaction between ions and aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Dóra; Rovó, Petra; Jákli, Imre; Császár, Attila G; Perczel, András

    2017-07-15

    Non-covalent interactions between ions and aromatic rings play an important role in the stabilization of macromolecular complexes; of particular interest are peptides and proteins containing aromatic side chains (Phe, Trp, and Tyr) interacting with negatively (Asp and Glu) and positively (Arg and Lys) charged amino acid residues. The structures of the ion-aromatic-ring complexes are the result of an interaction between the large quadrupole moment of the ring and the charge of the ion. Four attractive interaction types are proposed to be distinguished based on the position of the ion with respect to the plane of the ring: perpendicular cation-π (CP ⊥ ), co-planar cation-π (CP ∥ ), perpendicular anion-π (AP ⊥ ), and co-planar anion-π (AP ∥ ). To understand more than the basic features of these four interaction types, a systematic, high-level quantum chemical study is performed, using the X -  + C 6 H 6 , M +  + C 6 H 6 , X -  + C 6 F 6 , and M +  + C 6 F 6 model systems with X -  = H - , F - , Cl - , HCOO - , CH 3 COO - and M +  = H + , Li + , Na + , NH4+, CH 3 NH3+, whereby C 6 H 6 and C 6 F 6 represent an electron-rich and an electron-deficient π system, respectively. Benchmark-quality interaction energies with small uncertainties, obtained via the so-called focal-point analysis (FPA) technique, are reported for the four interaction types. The computations reveal that the interactions lead to significant stabilization, and that the interaction energy order, given in kcal mol -1 in parentheses, is CP ⊥ (23-37) > AP ⊥ (14-21) > CP ∥ (9-22) > AP ∥ (6-16). A natural bond orbital analysis performed leads to a deeper qualitative understanding of the four interaction types. To facilitate the future quantum chemical characterization of ion-aromatic-ring interactions in large biomolecules, the performance of three density functional theory methods, B3LYP, BHandHLYP, and M06-2X, is tested against the FPA benchmarks

  3. The interaction of the antitoxin DM43 with a snake venom metalloproteinase analyzed by mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Guilherme D; Salbo, Rune; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2012-01-01

    DM43 is a circulating dimeric antitoxin isolated from Didelphis aurita, a South American marsupial naturally immune to snake envenomation. This endogenous inhibitor binds non-covalently to jararhagin, the main hemorrhagic metalloproteinase from Bothrops jararaca snake venom, and efficiently...

  4. Design, synthesis and DNA interactions of a chimera between a platinum complex and an IHF mimicking peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harita; Damian, Mariana S; Alshiekh, Alak; Elmroth, Sofi K C; Diederichsen, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    Conjugation of metal complexes with peptide scaffolds possessing high DNA binding affinity has shown to modulate their biological activities and to enhance their interaction with DNA. In this work, a platinum complex/peptide chimera was synthesized based on a model of the Integration Host Factor (IHF), an architectural protein possessing sequence specific DNA binding and bending abilities through its interaction with a minor groove. The model peptide consists of a cyclic unit resembling the minor grove binding subdomain of IHF, a positively charged lysine dendrimer for electrostatic interactions with the DNA phosphate backbone and a flexible glycine linker tethering the two units. A norvaline derived artificial amino acid was designed to contain a dimethylethylenediamine as a bidentate platinum chelating unit, and introduced into the IHF mimicking peptides. The interaction of the chimeric peptides with various DNA sequences was studied by utilizing the following experiments: thermal melting studies, agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA unwinding experiments, and native and denaturing gel electrophoresis to visualize non-covalent and covalent peptide-DNA adducts, respectively. By incorporation of the platinum metal center within the model peptide mimicking IHF we have attempted to improve its specificity and DNA targeting ability, particularly towards those sequences containing adjacent guanine residues.

  5. How the biotin–streptavidin interaction was made even stronger: investigation via crystallography and a chimaeric tetramer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Claire E.; Koner, Apurba L.; Lowe, Edward D.; Howarth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between SA (streptavidin) and biotin is one of the strongest non-covalent interactions in Nature. SA is a widely used tool and a paradigm for protein–ligand interactions. We previously developed a SA mutant, termed Tr (traptavidin), possessing a 10-fold lower off-rate for biotin, with increased mechanical and thermal stability. In the present study, we determined the crystal structures of apo-Tr and biotin–Tr at 1.5 Å resolution. In apo-SA the loop (L3/4), near biotin's valeryl tail, is typically disordered and open, but closes upon biotin binding. In contrast, L3/4 was shut in both apo-Tr and biotin–Tr. The reduced flexibility of L3/4 and decreased conformational change on biotin binding provide an explanation for Tr's reduced biotin off- and on-rates. L3/4 includes Ser45, which forms a hydrogen bond to biotin consistently in Tr, but erratically in SA. Reduced breakage of the biotin–Ser45 hydrogen bond in Tr is likely to inhibit the initiating event in biotin's dissociation pathway. We generated a Tr with a single biotin-binding site rather than four, which showed a simi-larly low off-rate, demonstrating that Tr's low off-rate was governed by intrasubunit effects. Understanding the structural features of this tenacious interaction may assist the design of even stronger affinity tags and inhibitors. PMID:21241253

  6. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments; Interacao de nanotubos de carbono com segmentos de DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-07-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA{sub 20}, poly dT{sub 20}, poly dC{sub 20} and the duplex poly dA{sub 20}:dT{sub 20}. Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their

  7. Compositing polyetherimide with polyfluorene wrapped carbon nanotubes for enhanced interfacial interaction and conductivity

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2014-06-25

    A novel approach to chemically functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for making superior polyetherimide (PEI) nanocomposites with polyfluorene polymer is presented. In this approach, MWCNTs are non-covalently functionalized with poly(9,9-dioctyfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) through π-π stacking as confirmed by UV-vis, fluorescence, and Raman spectra. Atomic force microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy shows the PFO coated MWCNTs, which provides excellent dispersion of the latter in both solvent and PEI matrix. The strong interaction of PFO with PEI chains, as evidenced from fluorescence spectra, supports the good adhesion of dispersed MWCNTs to PEI leading to stronger interfacial interactions. As a result, the addition of as little as 0.25 wt % of modified MWCNTs to PEI matrix can strongly improve the mechanical properties of the composite (increase of 46% in storage modulus). Increasing the amount of MWCNTs to 2.0 wt % (0.5 wt % PFO loading) affords a great increase of 119% in storage modulus. Furthermore, a sharp decrease of 12 orders of magnitude in volume resistivity of PEI composite is obtained with only 0.5 wt % of PFO modified MWCNT. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  8. Antiparallel Self-Association of a γ,α-Hybrid Peptide: More Relevance of Weak Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Paloth; Kishore, Raghuvansh

    2015-08-01

    To learn how a preorganized peptide-based molecular template, together with diverse weak non-covalent interactions, leads to an effective self-association, we investigated the conformational characteristics of a simple γ,α-hybrid model peptide, Boc-γ-Abz-Gly-OMe. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the existence of a fully extended β-strand-like structure stabilized by two non-conventional C-H⋅⋅⋅O=C intramolecular H-bonds. The 2D (1) H NMR ROESY experiment led us to propose that the flat topology of the urethane-γ-Abz-amide moiety is predominantly preserved in a non-polar environment. The self-association of the energetically more favorable antiparallel β-strand-mimic in solid-state engenders an unusual 'flight of stairs' fabricated through face-to-face and edge-to-edge Ar⋅⋅⋅Ar interactions. In conjunction with FT-IR spectroscopic analysis in chloroform, we highlight that conformationally semi-rigid γ-Abz foldamer in appositely designed peptides may encourage unusual β-strand or β-sheet-like self-association and supramolecular organization stabilized via weak attractive forces. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Interactions of hemin with bovine serum albumin and human hemoglobin: A fluorescence quenching study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2018-03-01

    The binding interactions between hemin (Hmi) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) or human hemoglobin (HHb), respectively, have been examined in aqueous solution at pH = 7.4, applying UV-vis absorption, as well as steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques. Representative results received for both BSA and HHb intrinsic fluorescence proceeding from the interactions with hemin suggest the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes in both the Hmi-BSA and Hmi-HHb systems, with highly possible concurrent formation of a coordinate bond between a group on the protein surface and the metal in Hmi molecule. All the values of calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants point to the involvement of static quenching in both the systems studied. The blue shift in the synchronous fluorescence spectra imply the participation of both tryptophan and tyrosine residues in quenching of BSA and HHb intrinsic fluorescence. Depicted outcomes suggest that hemin is supposedly able to influence the physiological functions of BSA and HHb, the most important blood proteins, particularly in case of its overuse.

  10. The Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway Is Regulated by an Interaction between Ubiquitin and the E2-like Fold Domain of FANCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jennifer A; Frost, Mark G; Carroll, Eilis; Rowe, Michelle L; Howard, Mark J; Sidhu, Ateesh; Chaugule, Viduth K; Alpi, Arno F; Walden, Helen

    2015-08-21

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is essential for the recognition and repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL). Inefficient repair of these ICL can lead to leukemia and bone marrow failure. A critical step in the pathway is the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 by the RING E3 ligase FANCL. FANCL comprises 3 domains, a RING domain that interacts with E2 conjugating enzymes, a central domain required for substrate interaction, and an N-terminal E2-like fold (ELF) domain. The ELF domain is found in all FANCL homologues, yet the function of the domain remains unknown. We report here that the ELF domain of FANCL is required to mediate a non-covalent interaction between FANCL and ubiquitin. The interaction involves the canonical Ile44 patch on ubiquitin, and a functionally conserved patch on FANCL. We show that the interaction is not necessary for the recognition of the core complex, it does not enhance the interaction between FANCL and Ube2T, and is not required for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vitro. However, we demonstrate that the ELF domain is required to promote efficient DNA damage-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vertebrate cells, suggesting an important function of ubiquitin binding by FANCL in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  12. Characterization of the interaction forces in a drug carrier complex of doxorubicin with a drug-binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocheva, Gergana; Ilieva, Nina; Peneva, Kalina; Ivanova, Anela

    2018-04-01

    Polypeptide-based materials are used as building blocks for drug delivery systems aimed at toxicity decrease in chemotherapeutics. A molecular-level approach is adopted for investigating the non-covalent interactions between doxorubicin and a recently synthesized drug-binging peptide as a key part of a system for delivery to neoplastic cells. Molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution at room and body temperature are applied to investigate the structure and the binding modes within the drug-peptide complex. The tryptophans are outlined as the main chemotherapeutic adsorption sites, and the importance of their placement in the peptide sequence is highlighted. The drug-peptide binging energy is evaluated by density functional theory calculations. Principal component analysis reveals comparable importance of several types of interaction for the binding strength. π-Stacking is dominant, but other factors are also significant: intercalation, peptide backbone stacking, electrostatics, dispersion, and solvation. Intra- and intermolecular H-bonding also stabilizes the complexes. The influence of solvent molecules on the binding energy is mild. The obtained data characterize the drug-to-peptide attachment as a mainly attractive collective process with interactions spanning a broad range of values. These results explain with atomistic detail the experimentally registered doxorubicin-binging ability of the peptide and outline the complex as a prospective carrying unit that can be employed in design of drug delivery systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Analysis of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP)-gold nanoparticles behaviour in solution and of their interaction with calf thymus DNA and living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biver, T., E-mail: tarita@dcci.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (Italy); Corti, A. [University of Pisa, Experimental Pathology Department BMIE (Italy); Eltugral, N. [University of Pisa, Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (Italy); Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A. [University of Pisa, Experimental Pathology Department BMIE (Italy); Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M. [University of Pisa, Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    4-(Dimethylamino)pyridine-coated gold nanoparticles (DMAP-Au NPs) were synthesized, characterised and their interaction with DNA and living cells was analysed. Concerning the interaction of the DMAP-Au NPs with DNA, absorbance titrations indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the external surface of the NPs does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be (2.8 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}. Exposure of cultured cells to NPs revealed a dose-dependent effect on cell proliferation which was increased or reduced in dependence of DMAP-Au NPs concentrations. Subcellular localisation by transmission electron microscopy showed mitochondrial and nuclear localisations of NPs, thus suggesting their direct involvement in the mitochondrial alterations observed and a possible direct interaction with cell DNA. These findings clearly indicate that DMAP-Au NPs can strongly interact with living cells and confirm the importance of systematic evaluations of NPs properties, also in the perspective of their arising diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  14. The use of radiolabelled milk proteins to study thermally-induced interactions in milk systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat induced complexes between milk proteins are of considerable importance in determining the heat stability and rennin clottability of milk products. Thiol-disulfide interchange reactions have been suggested as the principal reaction mechanism for complex formation. Studies to data have not adequately established the mechanism and stoichiometry of complex formation in situ in total milk system. Tracer amounts of 14 C-β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin were heated under various conditions. After clotting with rennet, radioactivity retained in the curd was counted to estimate extent of interaction of β-lactoglobulin with casein. 14 C- and 3 H-Methyl labelled proteins were used for the preparation of radiolabelled artificial casein micelles. These micelles with radiolabelled whey proteins were heated and heat-induced complexes were separated on Sephacryl S-300 eluting with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride to break all non-covalent bonds. Further separation of the protein complexes was obtained using CPG-10 or Sephacryl S-1000. The ratios of 3 H to 14 C labelled proteins in the protein complexes suggested that the stoichiometries of k-, α s2 -casein, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin in the heat-induced complexes varied as a function of the heat treatment

  15. Parsing of the free energy of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Khomytova, Nina M. [Department of Physics, Sevastopol National Technical University, Sevastopol 99053, Crimea (Ukraine); Hernandez Santiago, Adrian A.; Tavera, Anna-Maria Cervantes; Alvarado, Julieta Salas [Faculty of Chemical Sciences, Autonomous University of Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Evstigneev, Maxim P., E-mail: max_evstigneev@mail.ru [Department of Physics, Sevastopol National Technical University, Sevastopol 99053, Crimea (Ukraine)

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > A protocol for decomposition of the free energy of aromatic stacking is developed. > The factors stabilizing/destabilizing stacking of aromatic molecules are defined. > Hydrophobic contribution is found to be dominant. - Abstract: We report an analysis of the energetics of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions for 39 non-covalent reactions of self- and hetero-association of 12 aromatic molecules with different structures and charge states. A protocol for computation of the contributions to the total energy from various energetic terms has been developed and the results are consistent with experiment in 92% of all the systems studied. It is found that the contributions from hydrogen bonds and entropic factors are always unfavorable, whereas contributions from van-der-Waals, electrostatic and/or hydrophobic effects may lead to stabilizing or destabilizing factors depending on the system studied. The analysis carried out in this work provides an answer to the questions 'What forces stabilize/destabilize the stacking of aromatic molecules in aqueous-salt solution and what are their relative importance?'

  16. Parsing of the free energy of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Khomytova, Nina M.; Hernandez Santiago, Adrian A.; Tavera, Anna-Maria Cervantes; Alvarado, Julieta Salas; Evstigneev, Maxim P.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → A protocol for decomposition of the free energy of aromatic stacking is developed. → The factors stabilizing/destabilizing stacking of aromatic molecules are defined. → Hydrophobic contribution is found to be dominant. - Abstract: We report an analysis of the energetics of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions for 39 non-covalent reactions of self- and hetero-association of 12 aromatic molecules with different structures and charge states. A protocol for computation of the contributions to the total energy from various energetic terms has been developed and the results are consistent with experiment in 92% of all the systems studied. It is found that the contributions from hydrogen bonds and entropic factors are always unfavorable, whereas contributions from van-der-Waals, electrostatic and/or hydrophobic effects may lead to stabilizing or destabilizing factors depending on the system studied. The analysis carried out in this work provides an answer to the questions 'What forces stabilize/destabilize the stacking of aromatic molecules in aqueous-salt solution and what are their relative importance?'

  17. Tailored protein encapsulation into a DNA host using geometrically organized supramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Andreas; Lill, Pascal; Stegemann, Pierre; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Schöneweiß, Elisa-C.; Merdanovic, Melisa; Gudnason, Daniel; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Gamrad, Lisa; Barcikowski, Stephan; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Birkedal, Victoria; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Ehrmann, Michael; Saccà, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The self-organizational properties of DNA have been used to realize synthetic hosts for protein encapsulation. However, current strategies of DNA-protein conjugation still limit true emulation of natural host-guest systems, whose formation relies on non-covalent bonds between geometrically matching interfaces. Here we report one of the largest DNA-protein complexes of semisynthetic origin held in place exclusively by spatially defined supramolecular interactions. Our approach is based on the decoration of the inner surface of a DNA origami hollow structure with multiple ligands converging to their corresponding binding sites on the protein surface with programmable symmetry and range-of-action. Our results demonstrate specific host-guest recognition in a 1:1 stoichiometry and selectivity for the guest whose size guarantees sufficient molecular diffusion preserving short intermolecular distances. DNA nanocontainers can be thus rationally designed to trap single guest molecules in their native form, mimicking natural strategies of molecular recognition and anticipating a new method of protein caging.

  18. Layered vanadyl (IV) nitroprusside: Magnetic interaction through a network of hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.M. [Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Osiry, H. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Pomiro, F.; Varetti, E.L. [CEQUINOR (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 and 115, 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC – CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Haya de la Torre esq, Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Alejandro, R.R. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Ben Altabef, A. [INQUINOA-UNT-CONICET, Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); and others

    2016-07-15

    The hydrogen bond and π-π stacking are two non-covalent interactions able to support cooperative magnetic ordering between paramagnetic centers. This contribution reports the crystal structure and related magnetic properties for VO[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, which has a layered structure. This solid crystallizes with an orthorhombic unit cell, in the Pna2{sub 1} space group, with cell parameters a=14.1804(2), b=10.4935(1), c=7.1722(8) Å and four molecules per unit cell (Z=4). Its crystal structure was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Neighboring layers remain linked through a network of hydrogen bonds involving a water molecule coordinated to the axial position for the V atom and the unbridged axial NO and CN ligands. An uncoordinated water molecule is found forming a triple bridge between these last two ligands and the coordinated water molecule. The magnetic measurements, recorded down to 2 K, shows a ferromagnetic interaction between V atoms located at neighboring layers, with a Curie-Weiss constant of 3.14 K. Such ferromagnetic behavior was interpreted as resulting from a superexchange interaction through the network of strong OH····O{sub H2O}, OH····N{sub CN}, and OH····O{sub NO} hydrogen bonds that connects neighboring layers. The interaction within the layer must be of antiferromagnetic nature and it was detected close to 2 K. - Graphical abstract: Coordination environment for the metals in vanadyl (II) nitroprusside dihydrate. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystal structure of vanadyl nitroprusside dehydrate. • Network of hydrogen bonds. • Magnetic interactions through a network of hydrogen bonds. • Layered transition metal nitroprussides.

  19. Nanoparticle decoration with surfactants: Molecular interactions, assembly, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Pramanik, Chandrani; Heinz, Ozge; Ding, Yifu; Mishra, Ratan K.; Marchon, Delphine; Flatt, Robert J.; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Llop, Jordi; Moya, Sergio; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-02-01

    Nanostructures of diverse chemical nature are used as biomarkers, therapeutics, catalysts, and structural reinforcements. The decoration with surfactants has a long history and is essential to introduce specific functions. The definition of surfactants in this review is very broad, following its lexical meaning ;surface active agents;, and therefore includes traditional alkyl modifiers, biological ligands, polymers, and other surface active molecules. The review systematically covers covalent and non-covalent interactions of such surfactants with various types of nanomaterials, including metals, oxides, layered materials, and polymers as well as their applications. The major themes are (i) molecular recognition and noncovalent assembly mechanisms of surfactants on the nanoparticle and nanocrystal surfaces, (ii) covalent grafting techniques and multi-step surface modification, (iii) dispersion properties and surface reactions, (iv) the use of surfactants to influence crystal growth, as well as (v) the incorporation of biorecognition and other material-targeting functionality. For the diverse materials classes, similarities and differences in surfactant assembly, function, as well as materials performance in specific applications are described in a comparative way. Major factors that lead to differentiation are the surface energy, surface chemistry and pH sensitivity, as well as the degree of surface regularity and defects in the nanoparticle cores and in the surfactant shell. The review covers a broad range of surface modifications and applications in biological recognition and therapeutics, sensors, nanomaterials for catalysis, energy conversion and storage, the dispersion properties of nanoparticles in structural composites and cement, as well as purification systems and classical detergents. Design principles for surfactants to optimize the performance of specific nanostructures are discussed. The review concludes with challenges and opportunities.

  20. Vanillyl alcohol oxidases produced in Komagataella phaffii contain a highly stable non-covalently bound anionic FAD semiquinone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gygli, G.A.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO) from Penicillium simplicissimum is a covalent flavoprotein that has emerged as a promising biocatalyst for the production of aromatic fine chemicals such as vanillin, coniferyl alcohol and enantiopure 1-(4’-hydroxyphenyl) alcohols. The largescale production of this

  1. Electrospray soft-landing for the construction of non-covalent molecular nanostructures using charged droplets under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jian; Zheng, Qingna; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K; Xiong, Caiqiao; Guan, Cuizhong; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu; Wang, Dong; Wan, Lijun

    2016-11-17

    An electrospray soft-landing (SL) technique was utilized to create 2D nano-networks on HOPG under ambient conditions. A 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexahydroxy-triphenylene close-packing structure was observed by STM instead of unorganized clusters, as well as amine and acid nanostructures. On C 18 H 37 NH 2 networks, C 18 H 37 NH 3 + was identified by XPS analysis revealing retaining of charges on the SL-modified surface.

  2. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  3. The anomalous halogen bonding interactions between chlorine and bromine with water in clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dureckova, Hana; Woo, Tom K; Udachin, Konstantin A; Ripmeester, John A; Alavi, Saman

    2017-10-13

    Clathrate hydrate phases of Cl 2 and Br 2 guest molecules have been known for about 200 years. The crystal structure of these phases was recently re-determined with high accuracy by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In these structures, the water oxygen-halogen atom distances are determined to be shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii, which indicates the action of some type of non-covalent interaction between the dihalogens and water molecules. Given that in the hydrate phases both lone pairs of each water oxygen atom are engaged in hydrogen bonding with other water molecules of the lattice, the nature of the oxygen-halogen interactions may not be the standard halogen bonds characterized recently in the solid state materials and enzyme-substrate compounds. The nature of the halogen-water interactions for the Cl 2 and Br 2 molecules in two isolated clathrate hydrate cages has recently been studied with ab initio calculations and Natural Bond Order analysis (Ochoa-Resendiz et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 145, 161104). Here we present the results of ab initio calculations and natural localized molecular orbital analysis for Cl 2 and Br 2 guests in all cage types observed in the cubic structure I and tetragonal structure I clathrate hydrates to characterize the orbital interactions between the dihalogen guests and water. Calculations with isolated cages and cages with one shell of coordinating molecules are considered. The computational analysis is used to understand the nature of the halogen bonding in these materials and to interpret the guest positions in the hydrate cages obtained from the X-ray crystal structures.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxicity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes derived from dipyridyl triazole ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Di; Wei, Yi; Tang, Jie; Bian, He-Dong; Huang, Fu-Ping; Liang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Four different transition metal complexes containing dipyridyl triazole ligands, namely [Cu(abpt)2Cl2]·2H2O (1), [Cu(abpt)2(ClO4)2] (2), [Co2(abpt)2(H2O)2Cl2]·Cl2·4H2O (3) and [Co2(Hbpt)2(CH3OH)2(NO3)2] (4) have been designed, synthesized and further structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, ESI-MS, elemental analysis, IR and Raman spectroscopy. In these complexes, the both ligands act as bidentate ligands with N, N donors. DNA binding interactions with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) of the ligand and its complexes 1 ~ 4 were investigated via electronic absorption, fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and viscosity measurements as well as confocal Laser Raman spectroscopy. The results show these complexes are able to bind to DNA via the non-covalent mode i.e. intercalation and groove binding or electrostatic interactions. The interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also studied using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods which indicated that fluorescence quenching of BSA by these compounds was the presence of both static and dynamic quenching. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxic effects of the complexes against four cell lines SK-OV-3, HL-7702, BEL7404 and NCI-H460 showed the necessity of the coordination action on the biological properties on the respective complex and that all four complexes exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity.

  5. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in π–π stacking with purine and pyrimidine bases. This can lead to complex formation with DNA subunits, which is an important target in cancer chemotherapy.8. Besides this, non-covalent interaction of palladium complexes with nucleic acids is also possible.9 This type of non-covalent interaction may inhibit the reactiv-.

  6. Supramolecular systems chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattia, Elio; Otto, Sijbren

    The field of supramolecular chemistry focuses on the non-covalent interactions between molecules that give rise to molecular recognition and self-assembly processes. Since most non-covalent interactions are relatively weak and form and break without significant activation barriers, many

  7. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature.

  8. Unraveling origins of the heterogeneous curvature dependence of polypeptide interactions with carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Asis K; Tiwari, Mrityunjay K; Vanka, Kumar; Sengupta, Neelanjana

    2016-02-17

    Emerging nanotechnology has rapidly broadened interfacial prospects of biological molecules with carbon nanomaterials (CNs). A prerequisite for effectively harnessing such hybrid materials is a multi-faceted understanding of their complex interfacial interactions as functions of the physico-chemical characteristics and the surface topography of the individual components. In this article, we address the origins of the curvature dependence of polypeptide adsorption on CN surfaces (CNSs), a phenomenon bearing an acute influence upon the behavior and activity of CN-protein conjugates. Our benchmark molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the amphiphilic full-length amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide demonstrate that protein adsorption is strongest on the concave (inner) CN surface, weakest on the convex (outer) surface, and intermediary on the planar surface, in agreement with recent experimental reports. The curvature effects, however, are found to manifest non-uniformly between the amino acid subtypes. To understand the underlying interplay of the chemical nature of the amino acids and surface topography of the CNs, we performed high-level quantum chemical (QM) calculations with amino acid analogs (AAA) representing their five prominent classes, and convex, concave and planar CN fragments. Molecular electrostatic potential maps reveal pronounced curvature dependence in the mixing of electron densities, and a resulting variance in the stabilization of the non-covalently bound molecular complexes. Interestingly, our study revealed that the interaction trends of the high-level QM calculations were captured well by the empirical force field. The findings in this study have important bearing upon the design of carbon based bio-nanomaterials, and additionally, provide valuable insights into the accuracy of various computational techniques for probing non-bonded interfacial interactions.

  9. DFT study of the interaction between DOTA chelator and competitive alkali metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, E; Skelton, A A; Honarparvar, B

    2017-09-01

    1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetracetic acid (DOTA) is an important chelator for radiolabeling of pharmaceuticals. The ability of alkali metals found in the body to complex with DOTA and compete with radio metal ions can alter the radiolabeling process. Non-covalent interactions between DOTA complexed with alkali metals Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + , are investigated with density functional theory using B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals. Conformational possibilities of DOTA were explored with a varying number of carboxylic pendant arms of DOTA in close proximity to the ions. It is found that the case in which four arms of DOTA are interacting with ions is more stable than other conformations. The objective of this study is to explore the electronic structure properties upon complexation of alkali metals Li + Na + , K + and Rb + with a DOTA chelator. Interaction energies, relaxation energies, entropies, Gibbs free energies and enthalpies show that the stability of DOTA, complexed with alkali metals decreases down the group of the periodic table. Implicit water solvation affects the complexation of DOTA-ions leading to decreases in the stability of the complexes. NBO analysis through the natural population charges and the second order perturbation theory, revealed a charge transfer between DOTA and alkali metals. Conceptual DFT-based properties such as HOMO/LUMO energies, ΔE HOMO-LUMO and chemical hardness and softness indicated a decrease in the chemical stability of DOTA-alkali metal complexes down the alkali metal series. This study serves as a guide to researchers in the field of organometallic chelators, particularly, radiopharmaceuticals in finding the efficient optimal match between chelators and various metal ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide−noble-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, L. F., E-mail: lz@fis.unb.br; Leal, L. A.; Silva, G. M. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Pirani, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 Salvador (Brazil); Gargano, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound complexes of chiral molecules. In this paper we study the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}−Ng (Ng=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) systems providing the radial and the angular dependence of the potential energy surface on the relative position of the Ng atom. We accomplish this by introducing an analytical representation which is able to fit the ab initio energies of these complexes in a wide range of geometries. Our analysis sheds light on the role that the enantiomeric forms and the symmetry of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule play on the resulting barriers and equilibrium geometries. The proposed theoretical framework is useful to study the dynamics of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule, or other systems involving O–O and S–S bonds, interacting by non-covalent forces with atoms or molecules and to understand how the relative orientation of the O–H bonds changes along collisional events that may lead to a hydrogen bond formation or even to selectivity in chemical reactions.

  11. The adsorption-desorption transition of double-stranded DNA interacting with an oppositely charged dendrimer induced by multivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yaoyang; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-05-28

    The adsorption-desorption transition of DNA in DNA-dendrimer solutions is observed when high-valence anions, such as hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions. In the DNA-dendrimer solutions with low-valence anions, dendrimers bind tightly with the V-shaped double-stranded DNA. When high-valence anions, such as pentavalent or hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions, the double-stranded DNA chains can be stretched straightly and the dendrimers are released from the double-stranded DNA chains. In fact, adding high-valence anions to the solutions can change the charge spatial distribution in the DNA-dendrimer solutions, and weaken the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged dendrimers and the oppositely charged DNA chains. Adsorption-desorption transition of DNA is induced by the overcharging of dendrimers. This investigation is capable of helping us understand how to control effectively the release of DNA in gene/drug delivery because an effective gene delivery for dendrimers includes non-covalent DNA-dendrimer binding and the effective release of DNA in gene therapy.

  12. Gene-gene interaction between MSX1 and TP63 in Asian case-parent trios with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongjing; Schwender, Holger; Wang, Mengying; Wang, Hong; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Hongping; Zhou, Zhibo; Li, Jing; Wu, Tao; Beaty, Terri H

    2018-03-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modification, also known as sumoylation, is a crucial post-translational regulatory mechanisms involved in development of the lip and palate. Recent studies reported two sumoylation target genes, MSX1 and TP63, to have achieved genome-wide level significance in tests of association with nonsyndromic clefts. Here, we performed a candidate gene analysis considering gene-gene and gene-environment interaction for SUMO1, MSX1, and TP63 to further explore the etiology of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P). A total of 130 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near SUMO1, MSX1, and TP63 was analyzed among 1,038 Asian NSCL/P trios ascertained through an international consortium. Conditional logistic regression models were used to explore gene-gene (G × G) and gene-environment (G × E) interaction involving maternal environmental tobacco smoke and multivitamin supplementation. Bonferroni correction was used for G × E analysis and permutation tests were used for G × G analysis. While transmission disequilibrium tests and gene-environment interaction analysis showed no significant results, we did find signals of gene-gene interaction between SNPs near MSX1 and TP63. Three pairwise interactions yielded significant p values in permutation tests (rs884690 and rs9290890 with p = 9.34 × 10 -5 and empirical p = 1.00 × 10 -4 , rs1022136 and rs4687098 with p = 2.41 × 10 -4 and empirical p = 2.95 × 10 -4 , rs6819546 and rs9681004 with p = 5.15 × 10 -4 and empirical p = 3.02 × 10 -4 ). Gene-gene interaction between MSX1 and TP63 may influence the risk of NSCL/P in Asian populations. Our study provided additional understanding of the genetic etiology of NSCL/P and underlined the importance of considering gene-gene interaction in the etiology of this common craniofacial malformation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashynska, Vlada, E-mail: vlada@vl.kharkov.ua [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Stepanian, Stepan [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly [Institute of Organic Chemistry of Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudosok korutja, 2, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary); Adamowicz, Ludwik [University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms.

  14. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashynska, Vlada; Stepanian, Stepan; Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms

  15. Instrumental interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The expression instrumental interaction as been introduced by Claude Cadoz to identify a human-object interaction during which a human manipulates a physical object - an instrument - in order to perform a manual task. Classical examples of instrumental interaction are all the professional manual tasks: playing violin, cutting fabrics by hand, moulding a paste, etc.... Instrumental interaction differs from other types of interaction (called symbolic or iconic interactio...

  16. Molecular interactions and thermal transport in ionic liquids with carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, João M P; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A; Pádua, Agílio A H

    2017-07-05

    We used molecular dynamics simulation to study the effect of suspended carbon nanomaterials, nanotubes and graphene sheets, on the thermal conductivity of ionic liquids, an issue related to understanding the properties of nanofluids. One important aspect that we developed is an atomistic model of the interactions between the organic ions and carbon nanomaterials, so we did not rely on existing force fields for small organic molecules or assume simple combining rules to describe the interactions at the liquid/material interface. Instead, we used quantum calculations with a density functional suitable for non-covalent interactions to parameterize an interaction model, including van der Waals terms and also atomic partial charges on the materials. We fitted a n-m interaction potential function with n values of 9 or 10 and m values between 5 and 8, so a 12-6 Lennard-Jones function would not fit the quantum calculations. For the atoms of ionic liquids and carbon nanomaterials interacting among themselves, we adopted existing models from the literature. We studied the imidazolium ionic liquids [C 4 C 1 im][SCN], [C 4 C 1 im][N(CN) 2 ], [C 4 C 1 im][C(CN) 3 ] and [C 4 C 1 im][(CF 3 SO 2 ) 2 N]. Attraction is stronger for cations (than for anions) above and below the π-system of the nanomaterials, whereas anions show stronger attraction for the hydrogenated edges. The ordering of ions around and inside (7,7) and (10,10) single-walled nanotubes, and near a stack of graphene sheets, was analysed in terms of density distribution functions. We verified that anions are found, as well as cations, in the first interfacial layer interacting with the materials, which is surprising given the interaction potential surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the ionic liquids and of composite systems containing one nanotube or one graphene stack in suspension was calculated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. Thermal conductivity was calculated along the axis of the nanotube and

  17. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  18. The impact of electrostatic interactions on ultrafast charge transfer at Ag 29 nanoclusters–fullerene and CdTe quantum dots–fullerene interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ghada H.

    2015-11-09

    A profound understanding of charge transfer (CT) at semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and nanoclusters (NCs) interfaces is extremely important to optimize the energy conversion efficiency in QDs and NCs-based solar cell devices. Here, we report on the ground- and excited-state interactions at the interface of two different bimolecular non-covalent donor-acceptor (D-A) systems using steady-state and femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We systematically investigate the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged fullerene derivative C60-(N,N dimethylpyrrolidinium iodide) (CF) employed as an efficient molecular acceptor and two different donor molecules: Ag29 nanoclusters (NCs) and CdTe quantum dots (QDs). For comparison purposes, we also monitor the interaction of each donor molecule with the neutral fullerene derivative C60-(malonic acid)n, which has minimal electrostatic interactions. Our steady-state and time-resolved data demonstrate that both QDs and NCs have strong interfacial electrostatic interactions and dramatic fluorescence quenching when the CF derivative is present. In other words, our results reveal that only CF can be in close molecular proximity with the QDs and NCs, allowing ultrafast photoinduced CT to occur. It turned out that the intermolecular distances, electronic coupling and subsequently CT from the excited QDs or NCs to fullerene derivatives can be controlled by the interfacial electrostatic interactions. Our findings highlight some of the key variable components for optimizing CT at QDs and NCs interfaces, which can also be applied to other D-A systems that rely on interfacial CT. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016.

  19. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  20. Inhibition of interaction between epigallocatechin-3-gallate and myofibrillar protein by cyclodextrin derivatives improves gel quality under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumeng; Chen, Lin; Lv, Yuanqi; Wang, Shuangxi; Suo, Zhiyao; Cheng, Xingguang; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong; Li, Zhixi; Feng, Xianchao

    2018-06-01

    High levels of polyphenols can interact with myofibrillar proteins (MPs), causing damage to a MP emulsion gel. In this study, β-cyclodextrins were used to reduce covalent and non-covalent interaction between epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and MPs under oxidative stress. The loss of both thiol and free amine groups and the unfolding of MPs caused by EGCG (80 μM/g protein) were significantly prevented by β-cyclodextrins, and the structural stability and solubility were improved. MP emulsion gel treated with EGCG (80 μM/g protein) had the highest cooking loss (68.64%) and gel strength (0.51 N). Addition of β-cyclodextrins significantly reduced cooking loss (26.24-58.20%) and improved gel strength (0.31-0.41 N) of MP emulsion gel jeopardized by EGCG under oxidative stress. Damage to the emulsifying properties of MPs caused by EGCG was significantly prevented by addition of β-cyclodextrins. β-cyclodextrins reduced interaction between EGCG and MPs in the order Methyl-β-cyclodextrin > (2-Hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin > β-cyclodextrin. In absence of EGCG, addition of β-cyclodextrins partly protected MPs from oxidative attack and improved its solubility. It is concluded that β-cyclodextrins does not markedly reduce the antioxidant ability of EGCG according to carbonyl analysis, and can effectively increase EGCG loading to potentially provide more durable antioxidant effect for meat products during processing, transportation and storage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  2. Self-organization, interfacial interaction and photophysical properties of gold nanoparticle complexes derived from resilin-mimetic fluorescent protein rec1-resilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayavan, Sundar; Dutta, Naba K; Choudhury, Namita R; Kim, Misook; Elvin, Christopher M; Hill, Anita J

    2011-04-01

    In this investigation we report the synthesis of optically coupled hybrid architectures based on a new biomimetic fluorescent protein rec1-resilin and nanometer-scale gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in a one-step method using a non-covalent mode of binding protocol. The presence of uniformly distributed fluorophore sequences, -Ser(Thr)-Tyr-Gly- along the molecular structure of rec1-resilin provides significant opportunity to synthesize fluorophore-modified AuNPs bioconjugates with unique photophysical properties. The detailed analyses of the AuNP-bioconjugates, synthesized under different experimental conditions using spectroscopic, microscopic and scattering techniques demonstrate the organizational pathways and the electronic and photophysical properties of the developed AuNP-rec1-resilin bioconjugates. The calculation of the bimolecular quenching constant using the Stern-Volmer equation confirms that the dominant mechanism involved in quenching of fluorescence of rec1-resilin in the presence of AuNP is static. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy was employed to understand the nature of the interfacial interaction between the AuNP and rec1-resilin and its evolution with pH. In such bioconjugates the quenched emission of fluorescence by AuNP on the fluorophore moiety of rec1-resilin in the immediate vicinity of the AuNP has significant potential for fluorescence-based detection schemes, sensors and also can be incorporated into nanoparticle-based devices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  4. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  5. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  6. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  7. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  8. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction as an interp...

  9. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  10. Charge-mediated Fab-Fc interactions in an IgG1 antibody induce reversible self-association, cluster formation, and elevated viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Jayant; Hu, Yue; Esfandiary, Reza; Sathish, Hasige A; Bishop, Steven M; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B; Weis, David D

    Concentration-dependent reversible self-association (RSA) of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) poses a challenge to their pharmaceutical development as viable candidates for subcutaneous delivery. While the role of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) in initiating RSA is well-established, little evidence supports the involvement of the crystallizable fragment (Fc). In this report, a variety of biophysical tools, including hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry, are used to elucidate the protein interface of such non-covalent protein-protein interactions. Using dynamic and static light scattering combined with viscosity measurements, we find that an IgG1 mAb (mAb-J) undergoes RSA primarily through electrostatic interactions and forms a monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium. We provide the first direct experimental mapping of the interface formed between the Fab and Fc domains of an antibody at high protein concentrations. Charge distribution heterogeneity between the positively charged interface spanning complementarity-determining regions CDR3H and CDR2L in the Fab and a negatively charged region in C H 3/Fc domain mediates the RSA of mAb-J. When arginine and NaCl are added, they disrupt RSA of mAb-J and decrease the solution viscosity. Fab-Fc domain interactions between mAb monomers may promote the formation of large transient antibody complexes that ultimately cause increases in solution viscosity. Our findings illustrate how limited specific arrangements of amino-acid residues can cause mAbs to undergo RSA at high protein concentrations and how conserved regions in the Fc portion of the antibody can also play an important role in initiating weak and transient protein-protein interactions.

  11. Synthesis and structure of 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil and its Ni(II) complex: Topological insights and investigation for noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Diptanu; Roy, Subhadip; Purkayastha, Atanu; Bauzá, Antonio; Choudhury, Rupasree; Ganguly, Rakesh; Frontera, Antonio; Misra, Tarun Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The azo-derivative, 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil (HL) containing 6-aminouracil (a biomolecule) and sulfonamide functionality (commonly found in sulfa-drugs), and its Ni(II) complex, NiIIL2 were synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the ligand (HL) consists of an E conformation about the azo-linkage with a nearly planar geometry and the complex possesses distorted square planar geometry. The H-bonded underlying networks of HL and NiIIL2 were topologically classified revealing distinct topological types, namely tts and hxl, respectively. Moreover, topology of molecular packings in HL and NiIIL2 has also been discussed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, at the M06-2X/def2TZVP level of theory, are employed to characterize a great variety of non-covalent interactions that explicitly show the importance of antiparallel stacking interactions established by π--π+ interactions and H-bonds in the self-assembled dimmers in HL and lp-π/C-H⋯π interactions in NiIIL2. The results of NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies evidence that the ligand exists in hydrazone-imine-keto (B) tautomeric form in solution. The ligand absorption bands consist of the overlapping bands of π→π* and n→π* transitions. The complex experiences electronic transitions that consist of basically ILCT in character with some sort of participation of the atomic d-orbitals of the nickel. The pKa value of the ligand is found to be 4.09.

  12. Simple knowledge-based descriptors to predict protein-ligand interactions. Methodology and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissink, J. Willem M.; Verdonk, Marcel L.; Klebe, Gerhard

    2000-11-01

    A new type of shape descriptor is proposed to describe the spatial orientation for non-covalent interactions. It is built from simple, anisotropic Gaussian contributions that are parameterised by 10 adjustable values. The descriptors have been used to fit propensity distributions derived from scatter data stored in the IsoStar database. This database holds composite pictures of possible interaction geometries between a common central group and various interacting moieties, as extracted from small-molecule crystal structures. These distributions can be related to probabilities for the occurrence of certain interaction geometries among different functional groups. A fitting procedure is described that generates the descriptors in a fully automated way. For this purpose, we apply a similarity index that is tailored to the problem, the Split Hodgkin Index. It accounts for the similarity in regions of either high or low propensity in a separate way. Although dependent on the division into these two subregions, the index is robust and performs better than the regular Hodgkin index. The reliability and coverage of the fitted descriptors was assessed using SuperStar. SuperStar usually operates on the raw IsoStar data to calculate propensity distributions, e.g., for a binding site in a protein. For our purpose we modified the code to have it operate on our descriptors instead. This resulted in a substantial reduction in calculation time (factor of five to eight) compared to the original implementation. A validation procedure was performed on a set of 130 protein-ligand complexes, using four representative interacting probes to map the properties of the various binding sites: ammonium nitrogen, alcohol oxygen, carbonyl oxygen, and methyl carbon. The predicted `hot spots' for the binding of these probes were compared to the actual arrangement of ligand atoms in experimentally determined protein-ligand complexes. Results indicate that the version of SuperStar that applies to

  13. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  14. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  15. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  16. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  17. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  18. Hair Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cani , Marie-Paule; Bertails , Florence

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Processing interactions is one of the main challenges in hair animation. Indeed, in addition to the collisions with the body, an extremely large number of contacts with high friction rates are permanently taking place between individual hair strands. Simulating the latter is essential: without hair self-interactions, strands would cross each other during motion or come to rest at the same location, yielding unrealistic behavior and a visible lack of hair volume. This c...

  19. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface

  20. Identification of a novel higher molecular weight isoform of USP7/HAUSP that interacts with the Herpes simplex virus type-1 immediate early protein ICP0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrobus, Robin; Boutell, Chris

    2008-10-01

    The Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) regulatory protein ICP0, a RING-finger E3 ubiquitin ligase, stimulates the onset of viral lytic replication and the reactivation of quiescent viral genomes from latency. Like many ubiquitin ligases ICP0 induces its own ubiquitination, a process that can lead to its proteasome-dependent degradation. ICP0 counteracts this activity by recruiting the cellular ubiquitin-specific protease USP7/HAUSP. Here we show that ICP0 can also interact with a previously unidentified isoform of USP7 (termed here USP7(beta)). This isoform is not a predominantly ubiquitinated, SUMO-modified, or phosphorylated species of USP7 but is constitutively expressed in a number of different cell types. Like USP7, USP7(beta) binds specifically to an electrophilic ubiquitin probe, indicating that it contains an accessible catalytic core with potential ubiquitin-protease activity. The interaction formed between ICP0 and USP7(beta) requires ICP0 to have an intact USP7-binding domain and results in its susceptibility to ICP0-mediated degradation during HSV-1 infection.

  1. Interactive governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob; Peters, B. Guy

    Governance has become one of the most commonly used concepts in contemporary political science. It is, however, often used to mean a variety of different things. This book helps to clarify this conceptual muddle by concentrating on one variety of governance-interactive governance. The authors argue...... that although the state may remain important for many aspects of governing, interactions between state and society represent an important, and perhaps increasingly important, dimension of governance. These interactions may be with social actors such as networks, with market actors or with other governments......, but all these forms represent means of governing involving mixtures of state action with the actions of other entities.This book explores thoroughly this meaning of governance, and links it to broader questions of governance. In the process of explicating this dimension of governance the authors also...

  2. Multiquark interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk'yanov, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    To study multiquark interactions (MQI) the data of experiments confirming the presence of 3q, 6q, 12q states in interacting nuclear nucleons, in hadron- and lepton-nuclear processes at high energies and high momentum transfers are considered. Experimental data on cumulative processes pointing to the existence of MQI are analyzed. Two-channel model of a nucleus (the model of interacting nucleons) in the theory of coupled channels is discussed. The behaviour of form factor of deuteron and NQI (6q) contributions to ed scattering as well as deep inelastic scattering on nuclei are studied. The data known as EMC effect are discussed. It is pointed out that introduction of the notion MQI and consideration of a nucleus as a system of nucleons with a low MQI addition will help to explain such processes as cumulative reactions, form factors of a deuteron and light nuclei, deep inelastic scattering on nuclei

  3. Interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Interaction Region Group addressed the basic questions of how to collide the SLC beams, how to maximize and monitor the luminosity, and how to minimize the detector backgrounds at the interaction region. In practice, five subgroups evolved to study these questions. The final focus group provided three alternative designs to acheive the 1 to 2 micron beam spot size required by the SLC, as well as studying other problems including: eta, eta' matching from the collider arcs, the implementation of soft bends near the interaction region, beam emittance growth, and magnet tolerances in the final focus. The beam position monitor group proposed two devices, a strip line monitor, and a beamstrahlung monitor, to bring the beams into collision. The luminosity monitor group reviewed the possible QED processes that would be insensitive to weak interaction (Z 0 ) effects. The beam dumping group proposed locations for kicker and septum magnets in the final focus that would achieve a high dumping efficiency and would meet the desired beam tolerances at the Moller scattering target in the beam dump line. Working with the Polarization Group, the Moller experiment was designed into the beam dump beam line. A beam dump was proposed that would maintain radiation backgrounds (penetrating muons) at acceptible levels. The detector backgrounds group proposed soft-bend and masking configurations to shield the detector from synchrotron radiation from the hard/soft bends and from the final focus quadrupoles and evaluated the effectiveness of these designs for the three final focus optics designs. Backgrounds were also estimated from: large angle synchrotron radiation, local and distant beam-gas interactions, 2-photon interactions, and from neutrons and backscattered photons from the beamstrahlung dump

  4. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Make cool stuff. If you're a designer or artist without a lot of programming experience, this book will teach you to work with 2D and 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, and electronic circuitry to create all sorts of interesting and compelling experiences -- online and off. Programming Interactivity explains programming and electrical engineering basics, and introduces three freely available tools created specifically for artists and designers: Processing, a Java-based programming language and environment for building projects on the desktop, Web, or mobile phonesArduino, a system t

  5. Interacting binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleton, P.P.; Pringle, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains 15 review articles in the field of binary stars. The subjects reviewed span considerably, from the shortest period of interacting binaries to the longest, symbiotic stars. Also included are articles on Algols, X-ray binaries and Wolf-Rayet stars (single and binary). Contents: Preface. List of Participants. Activity of Contact Binary Systems. Wolf-Rayet Stars and Binarity. Symbiotic Stars. Massive X-ray Binaries. Stars that go Hump in the Night: The SU UMa Stars. Interacting Binaries - Summing Up

  6. Simultaneous membrane interaction of amphipathic peptide monomers, self-aggregates and cargo complexes detected by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Luís; Lehto, Tõnis; Madani, Fatemeh; Radoi, Vlad; Hällbrink, Mattias; Vukojević, Vladana; Langel, Ülo

    2018-02-01

    Peptides able to translocate cell membranes while carrying macromolecular cargo, as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), can contribute to the field of drug delivery by enabling the transport of otherwise membrane impermeable molecules. Formation of non-covalent complexes between amphipathic peptides and oligonucleotides is driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Here we investigate and quantify the coexistence of distinct molecular species in multiple equilibria, namely peptide monomer, peptide self-aggregates and peptide/oligonucleotide complexes. As a model for the complexes, we used a stearylated peptide from the PepFect family, PF14 and siRNA. PF14 has a cationic part and a lipid part, resembling some characteristics of cationic lipids. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) were used to detect distinct molecular entities in solution and at the plasma membrane of live cells. For that, we labeled the peptide with carboxyrhodamine 6G and the siRNA with Cyanine 5. We were able to detect fluorescent entities with diffusional properties characteristic of the peptide monomer as well as of peptide aggregates and peptide/oligonucleotide complexes. Strategies to avoid peptide adsorption to solid surfaces and self-aggregation were developed and allowed successful FCS measurements in solution and at the plasma membrane. The ratio between the detected molecular species was found to vary with pH, peptide concentration and the proximity to the plasma membrane. The present results suggest that the diverse cellular uptake mechanisms, often reported for amphipathic CPPs, might result from the synergistic effect of peptide monomers, self-aggregates and cargo complexes, distributed unevenly at the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hadron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.; Kolar, P.; Kundrat, V.

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain invited lectures and papers presente at the symposium. Attention was devoted to hadron interactions a high energy in QCD, to the structure and decay of hadrons, the production of hadrons and supersymmetric particles in e + e - and ep collisions, to perturbation theory in quantum field theory, and new supersymmetric extensions of relativistic algebra. (Z.J

  8. Interactive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2015, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November/December 2015. The 18 revised full papers and 13 short papers presented together with 9 posters, 9 workshop descriptions, an...

  9. Interactive cinema : engagement and interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vosmeer, M.; Schouten, B.; Mitchell, A.

    2014-01-01

    Technologies that were initially developed to be applied within the domain of video games are currently being used in experiments to explore their meaning and possibilities for cinema and cinema audiences. In this position paper we examine how narrativity, interactivity and engagement are mutually

  10. Interactive Macroeconomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guilmi, Corrado; Gallegati, Mauro; Landini, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Preface; List of tables; List of figures, 1. Introduction; Part I. Methodological Notes and Tools: 2. The state space notion; 3. The master equation; Part II. Applications to HIA Based Models: 4. Financial fragility and macroeconomic dynamics I: heterogeneity and interaction; 5. Financial fragility and macroeconomic Dynamics II: learning; Part III. Conclusions: 6. Conclusive remarks; Part IV. Appendices and Complements: Appendix A: Complements to Chapter 3; Appendix B: Solving the ME to solve the ABM; Appendix C: Specifying transition rates; Index.

  11. Synergistic interaction between gold nanoparticles and nickel phthalocyanine in layer-by-layer (LbL) films: evidence of constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Wagner S; Crespilho, Frank N; Martins, Marccus V A; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Silva, Welter C

    2009-07-07

    The concept of constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) based on the control of non-covalent interactions in supramolecular structures is promising for having a large impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology if adequate nanoscale manipulation methods are used. In this study, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique may be used to produce electroactive electrodes with ITO coated by tetrasulfonated nickel phthalocyanine (NiTsPc) alternated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) incorporating gold nanoparticles (AuNP), in which synergy has been achieved in the interaction between the nanoparticles and NiTsPc. The catalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in multilayer films was investigated using cyclic voltammetry, where oxidation of H(2)O(2) led to increased currents in the PAH-AuNP/NiTsPc films for the electrochemical processes associated with the phthalocyanine ring and nickel at 0.52 and 0.81 V vs. SCE, respectively, while for PAH/NiTsPc films (without AuNP) only the first redox process was affected. In control experiments we found out that the catalytic activity was not solely due to the presence of AuNP, but rather to the nanoparticles inducing NiTsPc supramolecular structures that favored access to their redox sites, thus yielding strong charge transfer. The combined effects of NiTsPc and AuNP, which could only be observed in nanostructured LbL films, point to another avenue to pursue within the CDC paradigm.

  12. Influence of Secondary Interactions on the Structure, Sublimation Thermodynamics, and Solubility of Salicylate:4-Hydroxybenzamide Cocrystals. Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manin, Alex N; Voronin, Alexander P; Shishkina, Anastasia V; Vener, Mikhail V; Churakov, Andrei V; Perlovich, German L

    2015-08-20

    Cocrystal screening of 4-hydroxybenzamide with a number of salicylates (salicylic acid, SA; 4-aminosalicylic acid, PASA; acetylsalicylic acid, ASA; and salicylsalicylic acid, SSA) was conducted to confirm the formation of two cocrystals, [SA+4-OHBZA] (1:1) and [PASA+4-OHBZA] (1:1). Their structures were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and the hydrogen-bond network topology was studied. Thermodynamic characteristics of salicylic acid cocrystal sublimation were obtained experimentally. It was proved that PASA cocrystallization with 4-OHBZA makes the drug more stable and prevents the irreversible process of decarboxylation of PASA resulting in formation of toxic 3-aminophenol. The pattern of non-covalent interactions in the cocrystals is described quantitatively using solid-state density functional theory followed by Bader analysis of the periodic electron density. It has been found that the total energy of secondary interactions between synthon atoms and the side hydroxyl group of the acid molecule in [SA+4-OHBZA] (1:1) and [PASA+4-OHBZA] (1:1) cocrystals is comparable to the energy of the primary acid-amide heterosynthon. The theoretical value of the sublimation enthalpy of [SA+4-OHBZA], 231 kJ/mol, agrees fairly well with the experimental one, 272 kJ/mol. The dissolution experiments with [SA+4-OHBZA] have proved that the relatively large cocrystal stability in relation to the stability of its components has a negative effect on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility. The [PASA+4-OHBZA] (1:1) cocrystal showed an enhancement of apparent solubility compared to that of the corresponding pure active pharmaceutical ingredient, while their intrinsic dissolution rates are comparable.

  13. Interactive Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Governance analysis has exploded in recent years, and it has become nearly impossible to tell what difference the concept and practice of governance makes from those of government and state. In addition governance analysis has been placed more and more in the shadow of the new institutionalisms and...... and growth. However, interactive governance is not a property or effect of institutions; nor does it apply solely to those individuals who seek success above everything else. It is connective more than individualistic or collectivistic in nature; and it manifests a governability capacity which...

  14. Collocated Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Fischer, Joel; Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    interactions. Yet, new challenges abound as people wear and carry more devices than ever, creating fragmented device ecologies at work, and changing the ways we socialise with each other. In this workshop we seek to start a dialogue to look back as well as forward, review best practices, discuss and design......In the 25 years since Ellis, Gibbs, and Rein proposed the time-space taxonomy, research in the ‘same time, same place’ quadrant has diversified, perhaps even fragmented. This one-day workshop will bring together researchers with diverse, yet convergent interests in tabletop, surface, mobile...

  15. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Weak interactions are studied from a phenomenological point of view, by using a minimal number of theoretical hypotheses. Charged-current phenomenology, and then neutral-current phenomenology are discussed. This all is described in terms of a global SU(2) symmetry plus an electromagnetic correction. The intermediate-boson hypothesis is introduced and lower bounds on the range of the weak force are inferred. This phenomenology does not yet reconstruct all the predictions of the conventional SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory. To do that requires an additional assumption of restoration of SU(2) symmetry at asymptotic energies

  16. Strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froissart, Marcel

    1976-01-01

    Strong interactions are introduced by their more obvious aspect: nuclear forces. In hadron family, the nucleon octet, OMEGA - decuplet, and quark triply are successively considered. Pion wave having been put at the origin of nuclear forces, low energy phenomena are described, the force being explained as an exchange of structure corresponding to a Regge trajectory in a variable rotating state instead of the exchange of a well defined particle. At high energies the concepts of pomeron, parton and stratons are introduced, pionization and fragmentation are briefly differentiated [fr

  17. Tuning the non-covalent confinement of Gd(III) complexes in silica nanoparticles for high T1-weighted MR imaging capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Grechkina, Svetlana L; Mustafina, Asiya R; Kholin, Kirill V; Stepanov, Alexey S; Nizameev, Irek R; Ismaev, Ildus E; Kadirov, Marsil K; Zairov, Rustem R; Fattakhova, Alfia N; Amirov, Rustem R; Soloveva, Svetlana E

    2017-01-01

    The present work introduces deliberate synthesis of Gd(III)-doped silica nanoparticles with high relaxivity at magnetic field strengths below 1.5T. Modified microemulsion water-in-oil procedure was used in order to achieve superficial localization of Gd(III) complexes within 40-55nm sized silica spheres. The relaxivities of the prepared nanoparticles were measured at 0.47, 1.41 and 1.5T with the use of both NMR analyzer and whole body NMR scanner. Longitudinal relaxivities of the obtained silica nanoparticles reveal significant dependence on the confinement mode, changing from 4.1 to 49.6mM -1 s -1 at 0.47T when the localization of Gd(III) complexes changes from core to superficial zones of the silica spheres. The results highlight predominant contribution of the complexes located close to silica/water interface to the relaxivity of the nanoparticles. Low effect of blood proteins on the relaxivity in the aqueous colloids of the nanoparticles was exemplified by serum bovine albumin. T 1 - weighted MRI data indicate that the nanoparticles provide strong positive contrast at 1.5T, which along with low cytotoxicity effect make a good basis for their application as contrast agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fabrication and non-covalent modification of highly oriented thin films of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama; Cadiau, Amandine; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication of the first thin film of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology (rho-ZMOF-1, ([In48(HImDC)96]48-)n) in a highly oriented fashion on a gold-functionalized substrate. The oriented rho-ZMOF-1

  19. The semiempirical quantum chemical PM6 method augmented by dispersion and H-bonding correction terms describes reliably various types of non-covalent complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Salahub, D.; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 7 (2009), s. 1749-1760 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : hydrogen bonding * dispersion Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.804, year: 2009

  20. A carrier for non-covalent delivery of functional beta-galactosidase and antibodies against amyloid plaques and IgM to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic intervention of numerous brain-associated disorders currently remains unrealized due to serious limitations imposed by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB. The BBB generally allows transport of small molecules, typically <600 daltons with high octanol/water partition coefficients, but denies passage to most larger molecules. However, some receptors present on the BBB allow passage of cognate proteins to the brain. Utilizing such receptor-ligand systems, several investigators have developed methods for delivering proteins to the brain, a critical requirement of which involves covalent linking of the target protein to a carrier entity. Such covalent modifications involve extensive preparative and post-preparative chemistry that poses daunting limitations in the context of delivery to any organ. Here, we report creation of a 36-amino acid peptide transporter, which can transport a protein to the brain after routine intravenous injection of the transporter-protein mixture. No covalent linkage of the protein with the transporter is necessary. APPROACH: A peptide transporter comprising sixteen lysine residues and 20 amino acids corresponding to the LDLR-binding domain of apolipoprotein E (ApoE was synthesized. Transport of beta-galactosidase, IgG, IgM, and antibodies against amyloid plques to the brain upon iv injection of the protein-transporter mixture was evaluated through staining for enzyme activity or micro single photon emission tomography (micro-SPECT or immunostaining. Effect of the transporter on the integrity of the BBB was also investigated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transporter enabled delivery to the mouse brain of functional beta-galactosidase, human IgG and IgM, and two antibodies that labeled brain-associated amyloid beta plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest the transporter is able to transport most or all proteins to the brain without the need for chemically linking the transporter to a protein. Thus, the approach offers an avenue for rapid clinical evaluation of numerous candidate drugs against neurological diseases including cancer. (299 words.

  1. Crystallization of copper(II) sulfate based minerals and MOF from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    critical nucleus in terms of aggregation of tectons through non-covalent interactions provides chemical insights .... minerals and materials crystallized from the system ... occurs (refer figure 7). obtained from various crystallization studies. Use of.

  2. Multi-Functional Stimuli-Responsive Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Supramolecular polymers based on non-covalent interactions can display a wide array of stimuli-responsive attributes. They can be tailored to change shape, actuate...

  3. Magnetically Separable Fe3O4@DOPA-Pd: A Heterogeneous Catalyst for Aqueous Heck Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetically separable Fe3O4@DOPA-Pd catalyst has been synthesized via anchoring of palladium over dopamine-coated magnetite via non-covalent interaction and the catalyst is utilized for expeditious Heck coupling in aqueous media.

  4. Supramolecular biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webber, Matthew J.; Appel, Eric A.; Meijer, E. W.; Langer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Polymers, ceramics and metals have historically dominated the application of materials in medicine. Yet rationally designed materials that exploit specific, directional, tunable and reversible non-covalent interactions offer unprecedented advantages: they enable modular and generalizable platforms

  5. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    masses using magnetic and electrostatic analysers. ... potential of the molecule lies between 8 and. 12 e V for most of the .... Non-covalent interactions such as protein- protein ... most rugged interface for connecting high pressure liquid ...

  6. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Cu(II) complexes and the effect of non-covalent interactions on their supramolecular framework .... Is dynamic heterogeneity of water in presence of a protein denaturing agent different from that in ... A molecular dynamics simulation study.

  7. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cu(II) complexes and the effect of non-covalent interactions on their supramolecular ... antibacterial agent, in solution: Molecular dynamics simulations, quantum chemical ... Is dynamic heterogeneity of water in presence of a protein denaturing ...

  8. Interactive Workspaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst

    augmented reality, interactive building elements, and mobile devices to support new ways of working in a diversity of application domains with work situations ranging from individual work, through local collaboration, to distributed collaboration. The work situations may take place in offices/project rooms......Many application domains such as architecture, engineering, industrial design, city planning, environmental supervision, health care etc. share the properties of users working collaboratively with complex mixtures of physical and digital materials. Studies in such domains show that it is hard...... to maintain and integrate these heterogeneous materials in traditional desktop computing environments. Our thesis is that pervasive computing technologies can be developed to support a more natural user collaboration in a rich variety of application. This may be achieved by going beyond the traditional...

  9. Electromagnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  10. Electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1980-10-01

    A point of view of the electroweak interaction is presented. It begins phenomenologically and moves in stages toward the conventional gauge theory formalism containing elementary scalar Higgs-fields and then beyond. The purpose in so doing is that the success of the standard SU(2) x U(1) theory in accounting for low energy phenomena need not automatically imply success at high energies. It is deemed unlikely by most theorists that the predicted W +- or Z 0 does not exist or does not have the mass and/or couplings anticipated in the standard model. However, the odds that the standard predictions will work are not 100%. Therefore there is some reason to look at the subject as one would were he forced by a wrong experimental outcome - to go back to fundamentals and ascertain what is the minimal amount of theory necessary to account for the data

  11. Designing "Interaction": How Do Interaction Design Students Address Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlgren, Klas; Ramberg, Robert; Artman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Interaction design is usually described as being concerned with interactions with and through artifacts but independent of a specific implementation. Design work has been characterized as a conversation between the designer and the situation and this conversation poses a particular challenge for interaction design as interactions can be elusive…

  12. SUMO boosts the DNA damage response barrier against cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2010), s. 9-11 ISSN 1535-6108 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/0353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage response * ubiquitylation * sumoylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 26.925, year: 2010

  13. Synthesis of 1D-glyconanomaterials by a hybrid noncovalent-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes: a study of their selective interactions with lectins and with live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernía Leal, M.; Assali, M.; Cid, J. J.; Valdivia, V.; Franco, J. M.; Fernández, I.; Pozo, D.; Khiar, N.

    2015-11-01

    To take full advantage of the remarkable applications of carbon nanotubes in different fields, there is a need to develop effective methods to improve their water dispersion and biocompatibility while maintaining their physical properties. In this sense, current approaches suffer from serious drawbacks such as loss of electronic structure together with low surface coverage in the case of covalent functionalizations, or instability of the dynamic hybrids obtained by non-covalent functionalizations. In the present work, we examined the molecular basis of an original strategy that combines the advantages of both functionalizations without their main drawbacks. The hierarchical self-assembly of diacetylenic-based neoglycolipids into highly organized and compacted rings around the nanotubes, followed by photopolymerization leads to the formation of nanotubes covered with glyconanorings with a shish kebab-type topology exposing the carbohydrate ligands to the water phase in a multivalent fashion. The glyconanotubes obtained are fully functional, and able to establish specific interactions with their cognate receptors. In fact, by taking advantage of this selective binding, an easy method to sense lectins as a working model of toxin detection was developed based on a simple analysis of TEM images. Remarkably, different experimental settings to assess cell membrane integrity, cell growth kinetics and cell cycle demonstrated the cellular biocompatibility of the sugar-coated carbon nanotubes compared to pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes.To take full advantage of the remarkable applications of carbon nanotubes in different fields, there is a need to develop effective methods to improve their water dispersion and biocompatibility while maintaining their physical properties. In this sense, current approaches suffer from serious drawbacks such as loss of electronic structure together with low surface coverage in the case of covalent functionalizations, or instability of

  14. Drug Interaction API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Interaction API is a web service for accessing drug-drug interactions. No license is needed to use the Interaction API. Currently, the API uses DrugBank for its...

  15. Interaction of the N-(3-Methylpyridin-2-ylamide Derivatives of Flurbiprofen and Ibuprofen with FAAH: Enantiomeric Selectivity and Binding Mode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Karlsson

    Full Text Available Combined fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH and cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition is a promising approach for pain-relief. The Flu-AM1 and Ibu-AM5 derivatives of flurbiprofen and ibuprofen retain similar COX-inhibitory properties and are more potent inhibitors of FAAH than the parent compounds. However, little is known as to the nature of their interaction with FAAH, or to the importance of their chirality. This has been explored here.FAAH inhibitory activity was measured in rat brain homogenates and in lysates expressing either wild-type or FAAH(T488A-mutated enzyme. Molecular modelling was undertaken using both docking and molecular dynamics. The (R- and (S-enantiomers of Flu-AM1 inhibited rat FAAH with similar potencies (IC50 values of 0.74 and 0.99 μM, respectively, whereas the (S-enantiomer of Ibu-AM5 (IC50 0.59 μM was more potent than the (R-enantiomer (IC50 5.7 μM. Multiple inhibition experiments indicated that both (R-Flu-AM1 and (S-Ibu-AM5 inhibited FAAH in a manner mutually exclusive to carprofen. Computational studies indicated that the binding site for the Flu-AM1 and Ibu-AM5 enantiomers was located between the acyl chain binding channel and the membrane access channel, in a site overlapping the carprofen binding site, and showed a binding mode in line with that proposed for carprofen and other non-covalent ligands. The potency of (R-Flu-AM1 was lower towards lysates expressing FAAH mutated at the proposed carprofen binding area than in lysates expressing wild-type FAAH.The study provides kinetic and structural evidence that the enantiomers of Flu-AM1 and Ibu-AM5 bind in the substrate channel of FAAH. This information will be useful in aiding the design of novel dual-action FAAH: COX inhibitors.

  16. Designing for mobile interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazzi, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The theme of this PhD project is designing for mobile interaction with devices and services, for the accessing, making, and sharing of information, taking into account the dynamic physical and social settings that embrace this interaction. To narrow down this theme, the whole project focuses...... on the exploitation of social interaction --- in particular among senior citizens --- to enhance and support mobile interaction....

  17. Interaction for visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Tominski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Visualization has become a valuable means for data exploration and analysis. Interactive visualization combines expressive graphical representations and effective user interaction. Although interaction is an important component of visualization approaches, much of the visualization literature tends to pay more attention to the graphical representation than to interaction.The goal of this work is to strengthen the interaction side of visualization. Based on a brief review of general aspects of interaction, we develop an interaction-oriented view on visualization. This view comprises five key as

  18. Designing for Interactional Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Ståhl, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis further defines how to reach Interactional Empowerment through design for users. Interactional Empowerment is an interaction design program within the general area of affective interaction, focusing on the users’ abil­ity to reflect, express themselves and engage in profound meaning-making. This has been explored through design of three systems eMoto, Affective Di­ary and Affective Health, which all mirror users’ emotions or bodily reactions in interaction in some way. From these ...

  19. Interactive pinball business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Gudiksen, Sune Klok

    2012-01-01

    Interaction design expands into new fields. Interaction design and business model innovation is a promising meeting of disciplines: Many businesses see the need to rethink their ways of doing business, and, as business models pose highly dynamic and interactive problems, interaction design has much...... with hypotheses and experiment with scenarios as a way of innovating their business models, and why this is so...... to offer. This paper compares 'tangible business models' in the form of pinball-like contraptions, designed by interaction design students with those developed by groups of professionals around concrete business issues. We will show how the interactive models encourage business people to play...

  20. Interacting dark sector with transversal interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimento, Luis P.; Richarte, Martín G. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2015-03-26

    We investigate the interacting dark sector composed of dark matter, dark energy, and dark radiation for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background by introducing a three-dimensional internal space spanned by the interaction vector Q and solve the source equation for a linear transversal interaction. Then, we explore a realistic model with dark matter coupled to a scalar field plus a decoupled radiation term, analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era and find that our model is consistent with the recent measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropy coming from Planck along with the future constraints achievable by CMBPol experiment.

  1. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  2. The interactive microbial ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, C.P.D.; Bidle, K.D.; Pedrós-Alió, C.; Legrand, C.

    2016-01-01

    Marine microorganisms inhabit diverse environments and interact over different spatial and temporal scales. To fully understand how these interactions shape genome structures, cellular responses, lifestyles, community ecology and biogeochemical cycles, integration of diverse approaches and data is

  3. Health Data Interactive (HDI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Health Data Interactive (HDI) presents a broad range of important public health indicators through an interactive web-based application that provides access to...

  4. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  5. Interacting agents in finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Interacting agents in finance represent a behavioural, agent-based approach in which financial markets are viewed as complex adaptive systems consisting of many boundedly rational agents interacting through simple heterogeneous investment strategies, constantly adapting their behaviour in response

  6. Gaze Interactive Building Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Ahmed, Zaheer; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    We combine eye tracking technology and mobile tablets to support hands-free interaction with digital building instructions. As a proof-of-concept we have developed a small interactive 3D environment where one can interact with digital blocks by gaze, keystroke and head gestures. Blocks may be moved...

  7. Convergence in Multispecies Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Bittleston, Leonora Sophia; Pierce, Naomi E.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Pringle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of convergent evolution and community convergence highlight how selective pressures can shape unrelated organisms or communities in similar ways. We propose a related concept, convergent interactions, to describe the independent evolution of multispecies interactions with similar physiological or ecological functions. A focus on convergent interactions clarifies how natural selection repeatedly favors particular kinds of associations among species. Characterizing convergent inter...

  8. Restricted Variance Interaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortina, Jose M.; Köhler, Tine; Keeler, Kathleen R.

    2018-01-01

    Although interaction hypotheses are increasingly common in our field, many recent articles point out that authors often have difficulty justifying them. The purpose of this article is to describe a particular type of interaction: the restricted variance (RV) interaction. The essence of the RV int...

  9. Weak interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclei provide systems where the strong, electomagnetic, and weak interactions are all present. The current picture of the strong interactions is based on quarks and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The symmetry structure of this theory is SU(3)/sub C/ x SU(2)/sub W/ x U(1)/sub W/. The electroweak interactions in nuclei can be used to probe this structure. Semileptonic weak interactions are considered. The processes under consideration include beta decay, neutrino scattering and weak neutral-current interactions. The starting point in the analysis is the effective Lagrangian of the Standard Model

  10. Media Facades beyond Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    As part of a the research project Digital Urban Living [www.digitalurbanliving.dk], we have taken part in the design of two large-scale installations that employ interactive technologies to facilitate participation and foster social interactions in public, urban settings. We present the two cases......, Aarhus by Light and Projected Poetry, and discuss the future trajectory of our work in this field, as well as some of our findings regarding the challenges of designing large-scale public interactive installations. In doing so, we specifically highlight the possibilities in relation to designing...... for affective experience and engaging interaction that advocate for a long-term interactive experience....

  11. Convergence in Multispecies Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittleston, Leonora S; Pierce, Naomi E; Ellison, Aaron M; Pringle, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The concepts of convergent evolution and community convergence highlight how selective pressures can shape unrelated organisms or communities in similar ways. We propose a related concept, convergent interactions, to describe the independent evolution of multispecies interactions with similar physiological or ecological functions. A focus on convergent interactions clarifies how natural selection repeatedly favors particular kinds of associations among species. Characterizing convergent interactions in a comparative context is likely to facilitate prediction of the ecological roles of organisms (including microbes) in multispecies interactions and selective pressures acting in poorly understood or newly discovered multispecies systems. We illustrate the concept of convergent interactions with examples: vertebrates and their gut bacteria; ectomycorrhizae; insect-fungal-bacterial interactions; pitcher-plant food webs; and ants and ant-plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  13. Grasp interaction with tablets

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents guidelines for a future device type: a tablet that allows ergonomic front- and back-of-device interaction. These guidelines help designers and developers of user interfaces to build ergonomic applications for tablet devices, in particular for devices that enable back-of-device interaction. In addition, manufacturers of tablet devices obtain arguments that back-of-device interaction is a promising extension of the interaction design space and results in increased input capabilities, enriched design possibilities, and proven usability. The guidelines are derived from empirical studies and developed to fit the users’ skills to the way the novel device type is held. Three particular research areas that are relevant to develop design guidelines for tablet interaction are investigated: ergonomic gestures, interaction areas, and pointing techniques.

  14. Quantum interaction. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruza, Peter [Queensland Univ. of Technology, Brisbane (Australia). Faculty of Science and Technology; Sofge, Donald [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States). Naval Research Lab.; Lawless, William [Paine Coll., Augusta, GA (United States); Rijsbergen, Keith van [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Computing Science; Klusch, Matthias (eds.) [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2009, held in Saarbruecken, Germany, in March 2009. The 21 revised full papers presented together with the 3 position papers were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, decision theory, information retrieval, information systems, social interaction, computational linguistics and finance. (orig.)

  15. Food-Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Yar Khan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction, food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction. A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least fooddrug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient.

  16. Quantum interaction. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruza, Peter; Rijsbergen, Keith van

    2009-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2009, held in Saarbruecken, Germany, in March 2009. The 21 revised full papers presented together with the 3 position papers were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, decision theory, information retrieval, information systems, social interaction, computational linguistics and finance. (orig.)

  17. Interactive Strategy-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines an interactive strategy-making model that combines central reasoning with ongoing learning from decentralised responses. The management literature often presents strategy as implementing an optimal plan identified through rational analysis and ascribes potential shortcomings...... to failed communication and execution of the planned actions. However, effective strategy-making comprises both central reasoning from forward-looking planning considerations and decentralised responses to emerging events as interacting elements in a dynamic adaptive system. The interaction between...

  18. Interactions in multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Ren, Dawei; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The recent focus on complex bacterial communities has led to the recognition of interactions across species boundaries. This is particularly pronounced in multispecies biofilms, where synergistic interactions impact the bacterial distribution and overall biomass produced. Importantly, in a number...... of settings, the interactions in a multispecies biofilm affect its overall function, physiology, or surroundings, by resulting in enhanced resistance, virulence, or degradation of pollutants, which is of significant importance to human health and activities. The underlying mechanisms causing these synergistic...

  19. Theory of particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belokurov, V.V.; Shirkov, D.V.

    1986-01-01

    Development and modern state of the theory of elementary particle interactions is described. The main aim of the paper is to give a picture of quantum field theory development in the form easily available for physicists not occupied in this field of science. Besides the outline of chronological development of main representations, the description of renormalization and renorm-groups, gauge theories, models of electro-weak interactions and quantum chromodynamics, the latest investigations related to joining all interactions and supersymmetries is given

  20. Vision-based interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Turk, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In its early years, the field of computer vision was largely motivated by researchers seeking computational models of biological vision and solutions to practical problems in manufacturing, defense, and medicine. For the past two decades or so, there has been an increasing interest in computer vision as an input modality in the context of human-computer interaction. Such vision-based interaction can endow interactive systems with visual capabilities similar to those important to human-human interaction, in order to perceive non-verbal cues and incorporate this information in applications such

  1. Proxemic Mobile Collocated Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés; Quigley, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    and their digital devices (i.e. the proxemic relationships). Building on the ideas of proxemic interactions, this workshop is motivated by the concept of ‘proxemic mobile collocated interactions’, to harness new or existing technologies to create engaging and interactionally relevant experiences. Such approaches......Recent research on mobile collocated interactions has been looking at situations in which collocated users engage in collaborative activities using their mobile devices. However, existing practices fail to fully account for the culturally-dependent spatial relationships between people...... in exploring proxemics and mobile collocated interactions....

  2. Framing interactive methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2011-01-01

    Two paradigms of organization and leadership is outlined and compared. A theoretical model of interactive leadership is developed, combining learning, knowledge flow, leadership and organizational principles....

  3. Two interacting Hofstadter butterflies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, A.; Bellissard, J.; Jacquod, P.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of two interacting particles in a quasiperiodic potential is addressed. Using analytical and numerical methods, we explore the spectral properties and eigenstates structure from the weak to the strong interaction case. More precisely, a semiclassical approach based on noncommutative geometry techniques is used to understand the intricate structure of such a spectrum. An interaction induced localization effect is furthermore emphasized. We discuss the application of our results on a two-dimensional model of two particles in a uniform magnetic field with on-site interaction. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  4. Philosophy of Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanæs, Dag

    2011-01-01

    This is an encyclopedia entry for the Interaction-Design.org free IxD encyclopedia. The topic of the entry is the application of the philosophy of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty to a theory of interactivity. Comments by Don Norman and Eva Hornecker.......This is an encyclopedia entry for the Interaction-Design.org free IxD encyclopedia. The topic of the entry is the application of the philosophy of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty to a theory of interactivity. Comments by Don Norman and Eva Hornecker....

  5. Kinetics of depletion interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, G.A.; Schoot, van der P.P.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Depletion interactions between colloidal particles dispersed in a fluid medium are effective interactions induced by the presence of other types of colloid. They are not instantaneous but built up in time. We show by means of Brownian dynamics simulations that the static (mean-field) depletion force

  6. Curiosity and Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieben, R.; Bekker, M.M.; Schouten, B.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the concepts of curiosity and interaction: how can we elicit curiosity in public spaces through interactive systems? We have developed a model consisting of five curiosity-evoking principles. In an iterative design research approach, we have explored the design implementations of these

  7. Storyboarding Multimedia Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Linda C.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how to include interactivity when designing multimedia-based training (MBT) storyboards is a major key for a successful MBT. Discusses the basic formats of interactions and when to use each format. Describes how to storyboard and areas to address, including: the display area, prompts, branching, programming and graphics notes,…

  8. Designing for Interaction Proxemics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Jens Emil

    2018-01-01

    Design of interactive technology provides opportunities as well as constraints in how a group of users can organize in a shared space. The core argument of interaction proxemics is to consider this in designing for collaboration. In my thesis, I focus on conceptualizing design of ubicomp...

  9. INTERACT Station Catalogue - 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    INTERACT stations are located in all major environmental envelopes of the Arctic providing an ideal platform for studying climate change and its impact on the environment and local communities. Since alpine environments face similar changes and challenges as the Arctic, the INTERACT network also ...... catalogue includes descriptions of 73 research stations included in the network at the time of printing....

  10. Electroweak interactions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1984-06-01

    Topics include: introduction to electroweak theory; the Weinberg-Salam theory for leptons; the Weinberg-Salam theory for hadrons-the GIM mechanism; electron scattering as a probe of the electroweak interaction (observation of PV, the weak interaction for nucleons, and parity violation in atoms); and time reversed invariance and electric dipole moments of nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. 52 references

  11. Elementary particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Ward, B.F.L.; Close, F.E.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses freon bubble chamber experiments exposed to μ + and neutrinos, photon-proton interactions; shower counter simulations; SLD detectors at the Stanford Linear Collider, and the detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider; elementary particle interactions; physical properties of dielectric materials used in High Energy Physics detectors; and Nuclear Physics

  12. Foreign language interactive didactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Moisés Gómez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Foreign Language Interactive Didactics is intended for foreign language teachers and would-be teachers since it is an interpretation of the foreign language teaching-learning process is conceived from a reflexive social interaction. This interpretation declares learning based on interactive tasks that provide learners with opportunities to interact meaningfully among them, as a way to develop interactional competence as objective in itself and as a means to obtain communicative competence. Foreign language interactive didactics claims for the unity of reflection and action while learning the language system and using it to communicate, by means of solving problems presented in interactive tasks. It proposes a kind of teaching that is interactive, developmental, collaborative, holist, cognitive, problematizing, reflexive, student centered, humanist, and with a strong affective component that empower the influencing psychological factors in learning. This conception appears in the book: DIDÁCTICA INTERACTIVA DE LENGUAS (2007 y 2010. The book is used as a textbook for the subject of Didactics that is part of the curriculum in language teachers’ formation of all the pedagogical sciences universities, in Spanish teachers’ formation who are not Spanish speaking people at Havana University, and also as a reference book for postgraduate courses, master’s and doctorate’ s degrees.

  13. Interactive baby feeding bottle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    An interactive baby bottle with an electronic unit is disclosed. The electronic unit comprises a sensor unit configured to sense the heart beat of a person bottle feeding a baby and an actuator unit configured to transmit the sensed heart beat to the baby. The disclosed interactive baby bottle can

  14. Drug interactions with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesslewood, S.; Leung, E.

    1994-01-01

    Considerable information on documented drug and radiopharmaceutical interactions has been assembled in a tabular form, classified by the type of nuclear medicine study. The aim is to provide a rapid reference for nuclear medicine staff to look for such interactions. The initiation of drug chart monitoring or drug history taking of nuclear medicine patients and the reporting of such events are encouraged. (orig.)

  15. Let Social Interaction Flourish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Anny Fritzen

    2016-01-01

    The author describes lessons learned--through a high school project that grouped English language learners with native speakers to create a video--about ways to foster respectful, productive interaction among English learners and peers who are native speakers. The potential benefits of students who are just learning English interacting socially…

  16. Photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief summary of the present status of photon-photon interactions is presented. Stress is placed on the use of two-photon collisions to test present ideas on the quark constituents of hadrons and on the theory of strong interactions

  17. Computations and interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, J.C.M.; Luttik, S.P.; Tilburg, van P.J.A.; Natarajan, R.; Ojo, A.

    2011-01-01

    We enhance the notion of a computation of the classical theory of computing with the notion of interaction. In this way, we enhance a Turing machine as a model of computation to a Reactive Turing Machine that is an abstract model of a computer as it is used nowadays, always interacting with the user

  18. Antiproton-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Several facets of antinucleon-nucleus interactions are explored. The topics treated are: coherent interactions, production of unusual states and particles in the nuclear medium, and the creation of extreme states of matter by antimatter annihilation. It is found that temperatures of the magnitude necessary to achieve the predicted quark-gluon phase transition are obtained. 20 references

  19. Media Facades beyond Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    As part of a the research project Digital Urban Living [www.digitalurbanliving.dk], we have taken part in the design of two large-scale installations that employ interactive technologies to facilitate participation and foster social interactions in public, urban settings. We present the two cases...

  20. Interaction Analysis and Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Edmund

    This paper describes a model that uses interaction analysis as a tool to provide feedback to a teacher in a microteaching situation. The author explains how interaction analysis can be used for teacher improvement, describes the category system used in the model, the data collection methods used, and the feedback techniques found in the model. (JF)

  1. Interaction of atmospheric pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustueva, K A; Sanotsky, I V

    1975-01-01

    In evaluating the health effects of chemical and physical factors, it is of great importance to know the possible interactions between different pollutants. The biological effects of interactions, when present, may be synergistic, antagonistic or additive. Each type of interaction calls for a different evaluation and different practical measures. As yet the understanding of such effects is not clear, probably because of differing definitions of terminology. For example, the combined effect of sulfur dioxide and particulates is interpreted as a synergistic effect; in the author's opinion, this is an aggravating effect. The type of interaction depends on the levels of concentration observed, for example, the synergism shown at high levels of concentration is not always demonstrated for low levels of concentration. In fact there is little evidence of synergistic effects from ambient air pollutant; the more common type of interaction is additive in effect. 12 references.

  2. Diachronic Perspective and Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela; Valente, Andrea

    . An ongoing participatory inquiry is being conducted, to explore deeper forms of learning and communication for historical museums. Our hypothesis is that the diachronic perspective on historical processes, defined as social interaction within the environment through time, is a key missing element....... Although this interaction style may appeal to teachers, as it reminds of school teaching, it has several disadvantages: a dialogue never occurs between adults and children, who listen in silence, hence it becomes hard to evaluate what has being learnt and how deeply, and finally it is not very engaging....... Explorations of more interactive representations of the diachronic perspective, through play and tangible interaction, may foster a dialogue with young visitors. Therefore, a new interactive installation is being designed, intended as a tool to enrich learning, allowing children to experience historical...

  3. Density dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.

    1994-01-01

    An effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is defined by an optimal fit to select on-and half-off-of-the-energy shell t-and g-matrices determined by solutions of the Lippmann-Schwinger and Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equations with the Paris nucleon-nucleon interaction as input. As such, it is seen to better reproduce the interaction on which it is based than other commonly used density dependent effective interactions. The new (medium modified) effective interaction when folded with appropriate density matrices, has been used to define proton- 12 C and proton- 16 O optical potentials. With them elastic scattering data are well fit and the medium effects identifiable. 23 refs., 8 figs

  4. Magnetic interactions between nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2010-01-01

    We present a short overview of the influence of inter-particle interactions on the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. Strong magnetic dipole interactions between ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic particles, that would be superparamagnetic if isolated, can result in a collective state...... of nanoparticles. This collective state has many similarities to spin-glasses. In samples of aggregated magnetic nanoparticles, exchange interactions are often important and this can also lead to a strong suppression of superparamagnetic relaxation. The temperature dependence of the order parameter in samples...... of strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles or goethite grains is well described by a simple mean field model. Exchange interactions between nanoparticles with different orientations of the easy axes can also result in a rotation of the sub-lattice magnetization directions....

  5. Substituent Effects on the Hydrogen Bonding Between Phenolate and HF, H2O and NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    B3LYP/6-31+g(d) calculations were performed on the hydrogen bonded complexes between substituted phenolates and HF, H2O as well as NH3. It was found that some properties of the non-covalent complexes, including the interaction energies, donor-acceptor (host-guest) distances, bond lengths, and vibration frequencies, could show well-defined substituent effects. Thus, from the substituent studies we can not only understand the mechanism of a particular non-covalent interaction better, but also easily predict the interaction energies and structures of a particular non-covalent complex, which might otherwise be very hard or resource-consuming to be known. This means that substituent effect is indeed a useful tool to be used in supramolecular chemistry and therefore, many valuable studies remain to be carried out.

  6. Substituent Effects on the Hydrogen Bonding between 4-Substituted Phenols and HF, H2O, NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程宇辉; 傅尧; 刘磊; 郭庆祥

    2003-01-01

    Density function theory UB3LYP/6-31+g(d) calculations were performed to study the hydrogen bonds between para-substituted phenols and HF, H2O, or NH3. It revealed that many properties of the non-covalent complexes, such as the interaction energies, donor-acceptor distances, bond lengths and vibration frequencies, showed well-defined substituent effects. Therefore, from the substituent effects not only the mechanism of a certain non-covalent interaction can be better understood, but also the interaction energies and structures of a certain non-covalent complex, which otherwise might be very hard or resource-consuming to estimate, can be easily predicted.

  7. Drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladik, W.B.; Ponto, J.A.; Stathis, V.J.

    1985-01-01

    Patients seen in the nuclear medicine department have a wide variety of disorders and, consequently, may be receiving any number of therapeutic drugs. For this reason, nuclear medicine professionals should be aware of the potential effects that these pharmacologic agents may have on the bio-distribution of subsequently administered radiopharmaceuticals, commonly referred to as ''drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions.'' Compared with the quantity of literature written about interactions between various therapeutic drugs, the information available on drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions is scarce. However, there has been increasing interest in this subject, particularly during the past five years. Some of the reported interactions are used intentionally to add a new dimension to the nuclear medicine study and increase its diagnostic capabilities, i.e., pharmacologic intervention. These beneficial ''interactions'' are discussed in detail in several other chapters of this book. Other interactions, however, cause changes in the normal distribution of radiopharmaceuticals, which may interfere with the diagnostic utility of various nuclear medicine procedures. The latter group of interactions is the focus of this chapter

  8. Sketches in Embodied Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Dahl, Sofia; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    and provide a simple example as a design outcome. The variety and the qualities of the initial ideas indicate that this approach might provide a better foundation for our participants, compared to the approaches that focus only on technologies. The interactive sketches were demonstrated at the conference.......We present an approach for teaching and designing embodied interaction based on interactive sketches. We have combined the mover perspective and felt experiences of movement with advanced technologies (multi-agents, physical simulations) in a generative design session. We report our activities...

  9. Interaction university and school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gionara Tauchen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the interaction between universities and middle schools is fundamental for organization and the qualification of the education system, we conducted a qualitative study on twenty public municipal schools of Rio Grande, RS, designed to investigate and understand the effectiveness of university activities (teaching, research and extension in regard to the promotion and strengthening of the interactions between these institutions. We highlight the activities related to Pibid, the Education Observatory, extension, supervised internships, and to undergraduate and postgraduate research. From comprehensions about these activities, we discuss the interaction between school and university.

  10. Multiactivity in Social Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doing more than one thing at the same time – a phenomenon that is often called ‘multitasking’ – is characteristic to many situations in everyday and professional life. Although we all experience it, its real time features remain understudied. Multiactivity in Social Interaction: Beyond multitasking...... by using video recordings of real-life interactions from a range of different contexts, such as medical settings, office workplaces and car driving. With the companion collection Interacting with Objects: Language, materiality, and social activity, the book advances understanding of the complex...

  11. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, Rainer

    1978-01-01

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  12. Intermediate energy electromagnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcon, M.

    1994-11-01

    Polarization measurements in electromagnetic interactions are reviewed. Deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons and muons an polarized targets, photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons on protons, photonuclear reactions, and the electromagnetic structure of the deuteron are discussed. (K.A.)

  13. Intermediate energy electromagnetic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcon, M.

    1994-11-01

    Polarization measurements in electromagnetic interactions are reviewed. Deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons and muons an polarized targets, photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons on protons, photonuclear reactions, and the electromagnetic structure of the deuteron are discussed. (K.A.).

  14. Interaction as Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina

    In this paper we discuss recent developments in interaction design principles for ubiquitous computing environments, specifically implications related to situated and mobile aspects of work. We present 'Interaction through Negotiation' as a general Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) paradigm, aimed...... at ubiquitous/pervasive technology and environments, with focus on facilitating negotiation in and between webs of different artifacts, humans and places. This approach is concerned with the way technology presents itself to us, both as physical entities and as conceptual entities, as well as the relations...... on several extensive empirical case studies, as well as co-operative design-sessions, we present a reflective analysis providing insights into results of the "Interaction through Negotiation" design approach in action. A very promising area of application is exception handling in pervasive computing...

  15. Atomic and Molecular Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field

  16. Elementary particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out

  17. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AS SOCIAL INTERACTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henry; Lima, Patricia; Olsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore how entrepreneurs work with innovation; to explore and develop attention points in understanding entrepreneurship as social processes of interaction between people. Through interviews and engagement with entrepreneurs and key stakeholders, their actual social practices...... entrepreneurship as socially constructed through local interactions between players and identify key themes in these interactions within the organisation, such as leadership, becoming part of the initiative and trust/mistrust. By doing so, this paper contributes to an understanding of entrepreneurship as social...... and the influence on the progress as innovators are explored. It is focused on a new local activity in a Danish town, named the I-factory which has within a year gathered almost 40 entrepreneurs. As a part of the interaction, there were created activities to encourage even more collaboration. We see...

  18. Multiactivity in Social Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doing more than one thing at the same time – a phenomenon that is often called ‘multitasking’ – is characteristic to many situations in everyday and professional life. Although we all experience it, its real time features remain understudied. Multiactivity in Social Interaction: Beyond multitasking...... offers a fresh view to the phenomenon by presenting studies that explore how two or more activities can be related and made co-relevant as people interact with one another. The studies build on the basis that multiactivity is a social, verbal and embodied phenomenon. They investigate multiactivity...... by using video recordings of real-life interactions from a range of different contexts, such as medical settings, office workplaces and car driving. With the companion collection Interacting with Objects: Language, materiality, and social activity, the book advances understanding of the complex...

  19. Chasing Ecological Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordano, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Basic research on biodiversity has concentrated on individual species-naming new species, studying distribution patterns, and analyzing their evolutionary relationships. Yet biodiversity is more than a collection of individual species; it is the combination of biological entities and processes that support life on Earth. To understand biodiversity we must catalog it, but we must also assess the ways species interact with other species to provide functional support for the Tree of Life. Ecological interactions may be lost well before the species involved in those interactions go extinct; their ecological functions disappear even though they remain. Here, I address the challenges in studying the functional aspects of species interactions and how basic research is helping us address the fast-paced extinction of species due to human activities.

  20. Air-Sea Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csanady, G. T.

    2001-03-01

    In recent years air-sea interaction has emerged as a subject in its own right, encompassing small-scale and large-scale processes in both air and sea. Air-Sea Interaction: Laws and Mechanisms is a comprehensive account of how the atmosphere and the ocean interact to control the global climate, what physical laws govern this interaction, and its prominent mechanisms. The topics covered range from evaporation in the oceans, to hurricanes, and on to poleward heat transport by the oceans. By developing the subject from basic physical (thermodynamic) principles, the book is accessible to graduate students and research scientists in meteorology, oceanography, and environmental engineering. It will also be of interest to the broader physics community involved in the treatment of transfer laws, and thermodynamics of the atmosphere and ocean.