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Sample records for non-covalent interactions studied

  1. Study of the non-covalent interactions of ginsenosides and lysozyme using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Fu, Qiang; Cui, Meng; Xing, Junpeng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2015-11-15

    Ginsenosides are an important class of natural products extracted from ginseng that possess various important biological activities. Studies of interactions of ginsenosides with proteins are essential for comprehensive understanding of the biological activities of ginsenosides. In this study, the interactions of ginsenosides with lysozyme were investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Both protopanaxadiol-type and protopanaxatriol-type ginsenosides were chosen to explore the interactions of ginsenosides towards lysozyme near the physiological conditions by direct ESI-MS, respectively. Comparative experiments were conducted to confirm the interactions were specific. In addition, the dissociation constants of ginsenoside-lysozyme complexes were determined by a ESI-MS titration strategy. The results showed ginsenosides bound to lysozyme at the stoichiometries of 1:1 and 2:1. The association constants of ginsenosides to lysozyme were in the order of Re>Rd>Rf>Rg2 >Rg3 . According to their structures, the binding affinities associated with the type of aglycone and the type and the number of sugar moieties linked on the aglycone. It has been demonstrated that ESI-MS is a powerful tool to probe the non-covalent interactions between lysozyme and ginsenosides. These results provide insights into the interaction of ginsenosides with lysozyme at the molecular level. The developed strategy could be applied to determine the interactions of proteins with other natural products. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Guanidine-phosphate non-covalent interaction in LAP crystal growth solution evidenced from spectroscopy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Zhang, G. H.; Wang, X. Q.; Zhu, L. Y.; Xu, D.

    2015-09-01

    The similar L-arginine molecule aggregation has been found in L-arginine (LA) and L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) aqueous solutions. The special fluorescence emission at 380 nm of LA aggregates in LAP solution has been found, compared with the emission of LA solution at 415 nm, which has an obvious blue shift. By comparing the fluorescence spectra of several solutions for L-arginine and L-lysine salts, the interaction between phosphate and guanidine in LAP solution was considered to be the cause of its special fluorescence emission. Meanwhile, when LAP molecule formed in solution, the fluorescence emission wavelength and the UV absorption intensity at 296 nm of L-arginine solutions have mutated. Therefore, the group interaction involved by guanidine has changed the fluorescence properties of L-arginine aggregates in LAP solution, indicating that the specific interaction between phosphate and guanidine exists in LAP molecule.

  3. Recognition of anions using urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes: A density functional theory study of non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, Mohd; Lone, Mohsin Y.; Jha, Prakash C.

    2018-02-01

    Designing of new calixarene receptors for the selective binding of anions is an age-old concept; even though expected outcomes from this field are at premature stage. Herein, we have performed quantum chemical calculations to provide structural basis of anion binding with urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes (1, 2, and 3). In particular, spherical halides (F-, Cl-, Br-) and linear anions (CN-, N3-, SCN-) were modelled for calculating binding energies with receptor 1, 2 and 3 followed by their marked IR vibrations; taking the available experimental information into account. We found that the thiourea substitutions have better capability to stabilize the anions. Results have suggested that the structural behaviour of macrocyclic motifs were responsible for displaying the anion binding potentials. Moreover, second order "charge transfer" interactions of n-σ∗NH and n-σ∗OH type along the H-bond axis played critical role in developing hydrogen bonds. The present work also examines the role of non-covalent interactions (NCI) and their effects on thermodynamic and chemical-reactivity descriptors.

  4. Non Covalent Interactions and Internal Dynamics in Adducts of Freons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminati, Walther; Gou, Qian; Evangelisti, Luca; Feng, Gang; Spada, Lorenzo; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2014-06-01

    The complexation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) with atmospheric water and pollutants of the atmosphere affects their reactivity and it seems to accelerate, for example, the decomposition rate of freons in the atmosphere [1]. For this reason we characterized shapes, stabilities, nature of the non-covalent interactions, structures and internal dynamics of a number of complexes of CFCs with water and of their dimers or oligomers by rotational spectroscopy. It has been found that hydrogenated CFCs form adducts with other molecules through weak hydrogen bonds (WHBs). Their C-H groups can act as proton donors, enhanced by the electron withdrawing of the halogen atoms, interacting with the electron rich regions of the partner molecules [2]. Also in adducts or oligomers of hydrogenated CFCs the monomer units are held together by nets of WHBs [3]. When CFCs are perhalogenated, the positive electrostatic region ("σ-hole") can interact electrostatically with negative sites of another, or of the same molecular entity, giving rise, according to IUPAC, to the so called halogen bond (HaB). However, it has been observed that when the perhalogenated CFCs has a Π electron system, a lone pair•••Π interaction (Bürgi-Dunitz) is favoured [4]. We describe here the HaBs that CF4 and CF3Cl form with a variety of partner molecules such as water, ammonia, dimethyl ether, etc. Important spectroscopic features outline strong dynamics effects taking place in this kind of complex. References [1] V. Vaida, H. G. Kjaergaard, K. J. Feierabend, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 22 (2003) 203. [2] See, for example: W. Caminati, S. Melandri, A. Maris, P. Ottaviani, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45 (2006) 2438. [3] G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, I. Cacelli, L. Carbonaro, G. Prampolini, W. Caminati, Chem. Commun. 50 (2014) 171. [4] Q. Gou, G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, W. Caminati, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52 (2013) 52 11888.

  5. Non-Covalent Interaction: Revealed by Rotational Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Gou, Qian

    2014-01-01

    The pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy have been applied to several molecular complexes involving H2O, freons, methane, carboxylic acids, and rare gas. The obtained results showcase the suitability of this technique for studying the intermolecular interactions. The rotational spectra of three water adducts of halogenated organic molecules, i.e. chlorotrifluoroethylene, isoflurane and alfa,alfa,alfa,-trifluoroanisole, have been investigated. It has been found that, the halo...

  6. Stereodynamic tetrahydrobiisoindole “NU-BIPHEP(O”s: functionalization, rotational barriers and non-covalent interactions

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    Golo Storch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stereodynamic ligands offer intriguing possibilities in enantioselective catalysis. “NU-BIPHEPs” are a class of stereodynamic diphosphine ligands which are easily accessible via rhodium-catalyzed double [2 + 2 + 2] cycloadditions. This study explores the preparation of differently functionalized “NU-BIPHEP(O” compounds, the characterization of non-covalent adduct formation and the quantification of enantiomerization barriers. In order to explore the possibilities of functionalization, we studied modifications of the ligand backbone, e.g., with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride. Diastereomeric adducts with Okamoto-type cellulose derivatives and on-column deracemization were realized on the basis of non-covalent interactions. Enantioselective dynamic HPLC (DHPLC allowed for the determination of rotational barriers of ΔG‡298K = 92.2 ± 0.3 kJ mol−1 and 99.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol−1 underlining the stereodynamic properties of “NU-BIPHEPs” and “NU-BIPHEP(Os”, respectively. These results make the preparation of tailor-made functionalized stereodynamic ligands possible and give an outline for possible applications in enantioselective catalysis.

  7. Description of Non-Covalent Interactions in SCC-DFTB Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miriyala, Vijay Madhav; Řezáč, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2017), s. 688-697 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-11321Y Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional tight binding * DFTB3 * non-covalent interactions * dispersion correction * hydrogen bonding correction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.229, year: 2016

  8. Non-covalent O⋅⋅⋅O interactions among isopolyanions using a cis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    2008-05-09

    May 9, 2008 ... N–H⋅⋅⋅O and C–H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds, in which the protonated organic cation plays a significant role. The crystal structure also reveals an unusual cluster–cluster (non-covalent O⋅⋅⋅O) interaction using cis-. (MoO2} moieties of the isopolyanion. N–H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds, originated from ...

  9. Atomic Ensemble Effects and Non-Covalent Interactions at the Electrode–Electrolyte Interface

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    Angel Cuesta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-modified Pt(111 electrodes have been recently employed to study atomic ensemble effects in electrocatalysis. This work, which will be briefly reviewed, reveals that the smallest site required for methanol dehydrogenation and formic acid dehydration is composed of three contiguous Pt atoms. By blocking these trigonal sites, the specific adsorption of anions, such as sulfate and phosphate, can be inhibited, thus increasing the rate of oxygen reduction reaction by one order of magnitude or more. Moreover, alkali metal cations affect hydrogen adsorption on cyanide-modified Pt(111. This effect is attributed to the non-covalent interactions at the electrical double layer between specifically adsorbed anions or dipoles and the alkali metal cations. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effect of the concentration of alkali metal cations. Accordingly, a simple model that reproduces the experimental observations accurately and enables the understanding of the trends in the strength of the interaction between M+ and CNad when moving from Li+ to Cs+, as well as the deviations from the expected trends, is developed. This simple model can also explain the occurrence of super-Nernstian shifts of the equilibrium potential of interfacial proton-coupled electron transfers. Therefore, the model can be generally applied to explain quantitatively the effect of cations on the properties of the electrical double layer. The recently reported effects of alkali metal cations on several electrocatalytic reactions must be mediated by the interaction between these cations and chemisorbed species. As these interactions seem to be adequately and quantitatively described by our model, we expect the model to also be useful to describe, explain, and potentially exploit these effects.

  10. Advances in oral controlled drug delivery: the role of drug-polymer and interpolymer non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Simona; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Elviri, Lisa; Sandri, Giuseppina; Caramella, Carla; Bettini, Ruggero

    2015-03-01

    After more than four decades of intense research, oral controlled drug delivery systems (DDSs) still represent a topic of major interest for pharmaceutical scientist and formulators. This can be explained in part by considering the economic value of oral DDSs whose market accounts for more than half of the overall drug delivery market. Polymeric systems based on drug-polymer non-covalent interaction represent a limited, but growing part of the field. Despite the large amount of literature and published reviews covering specific aspects, there is still need for a review of the relevant literature providing a general picture of the topic. The present review aims at presenting the latest findings in drug-polymer and interpolymer non-covalent interactions in oral controlled delivery while providing a specific perspective and a critical point of view, particularly on the tools and methods used for the study of these DDSs. Four main sections are considered: i) ionic interactions between drugs and polymers; ii) interpolymer complexes; iii) hydrogen bond; and iv) hydrophobic interactions. The largest part of the scientific literature deals with systems based on drug-polymer ionic interactions while hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction though, very promising, are more difficult to exploit, and therefore less studied. An accurate and exhaustive representation of the specific role of the chemical functions in establishing predictable interactions between drug and polymers is still required.

  11. Core/Shell Conjugated Polymer/Quantum Dot Composite Nanofibers through Orthogonal Non-Covalent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad W. Watson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructuring organic polymers and organic/inorganic hybrid materials and controlling blend morphologies at the molecular level are the prerequisites for modern electronic devices including biological sensors, light emitting diodes, memory devices and solar cells. To achieve all-around high performance, multiple organic and inorganic entities, each designed for specific functions, are commonly incorporated into a single device. Accurate arrangement of these components is a crucial goal in order to achieve the overall synergistic effects. We describe here a facile methodology of nanostructuring conjugated polymers and inorganic quantum dots into well-ordered core/shell composite nanofibers through cooperation of several orthogonal non-covalent interactions including conjugated polymer crystallization, block copolymer self-assembly and coordination interactions. Our methods provide precise control on the spatial arrangements among the various building blocks that are otherwise incompatible with one another, and should find applications in modern organic electronic devices such as solar cells.

  12. Non-covalent interactions between thio-caffeine derivatives and water-soluble porphyrin in ethanol-water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipke, Agnieszka; Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena; Sierakowska, Arleta; Jasiewicz, Beata

    2018-03-01

    To determine the binding interactions and ability to form the non-covalent systems, the association process between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP) and a series of five structurally diverse thio-caffeine analogues has been studied in ethanol and ethanol-water solutions, analyzing its absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra. The porphyrin fluorescence lifetimes in the systems studied were established as well. During the titration with thio-caffeine compounds the slight bathochromic effect and considerable hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret band maximum can be noted. The fluorescence quenching effect observed for interactions in H2TTMePP - thio-caffeine derivative systems, as well as the order of binding and fluorescence quenching constants (of 105-103 mol- 1) suggest the existence of the mechanism of static quenching due to the formation of non-covalent and non-fluorescent stacking complexes. In all the systems studied the phenomenon of the fractional accessibility of the fluorophore for the quencher was observed as well. Additionally, the specific binding interactions, due to the changes in reaction environment polarity, can be observed. It was found that thio-caffeine compounds can quench the porphyrin fluorescence according to the structure of thio-substituent in caffeine molecule. The obtained results can be potentially useful from scientific, therapeutic or environmental points of view.

  13. Microsolvation and the Effects of Non-Covalent Interactions on Intramolecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foguel, Lidor; Vealey, Zachary; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Physicochemical processes brought about by non-covalent interactions between neighboring molecules are undeniably of crucial importance in the world around us, being responsible for effects ranging from the subtle (yet precise) control of biomolecular recognition events to the very existence of condensed phases. Of particular interest is the differential ability of distinct non-covalent forces, such as those mediated by dispersion-dominated aryl (π-π) coupling and electrostatically-driven hydrogen bonding, to affect unimolecular transformations by altering potential surface topographies and the nature of reaction coordinates. A concerted experimental and computational investigation of "microsolvation" (solvation at the molecular level) has been undertaken to elucidate the site-specific coupling between solute and solvent degrees of freedom, as well as attendant consequences for the efficiency and pathway of intrinsic proton-transfer dynamics. Targeted species have been synthesized in situ under "cold" supersonic free-jet expansion conditions (T_{rot} ≈ 1-2K) by complexing an active (proton-transfer) substrate with various ligands (e.g., water isotopologs and benzene derivatives) for which competing interaction mechanisms can lead to unique binding motifs. A series of fluorescence-based spectroscopic measurements have been performed on binary adducts formed with the prototypical 6-hydroxy-2-formylfulvene (HFF) system, where a quasi-linear intramolecular O-H...O bond and a zero-point energy that straddles the proton-transfer barrier crest synergistically yield the largest tunneling-induced splitting ever reported for the ground electronic state of an isolated neutral molecule. Such characteristics afford a localized metric for unraveling incipient changes in unimolecular reactivity, with comparison of experimentally observed and quantum-chemical predicted rovibronic landscapes serving to discriminate complexes built upon electrostatic (hydrogen-bonding) and

  14. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Z.; Biver, T.; Corti, A.; Eltugral, N.; Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A.; Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M.

    2010-08-01

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdSnp) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Aunp) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Aunp are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdSnp do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO3. As regards the CdSnp/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdSnp external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 ± 0.5) × 105 M-1. On the contrary, concerning Aunp, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdSnp or Aunp. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdSnp to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration ( p resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Aunp neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdSnp can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Aunp.

  15. Non-covalent synthesis of calix[4]arene-capped porphyrins in polar solvents via ionic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiammengo, R.; Timmerman, P.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Versluis, Kees; Heck, Albert J.R.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    Non-covalent synthesis of calix[4]arene capped porphyrins can be achieved in polar solvents (up to 45% molar fraction of water) via ionic interaction. Thus tetracationic meso-tetrakis(N-alkylpyridinium-3-yl) porphyrins 1a–d and tetra anionic 25,26,27,28-tetrakis(2-ethoxyethoxy)-calix[4]arene

  16. Non-Covalent Interactions and Impact of Charge Penetration Effects in Linear Oligoacene Dimers and Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-18

    Non-covalent interactions determine in large part the thermodynamic aspects of molecular packing in organic crystals. Using a combination of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) and classical multipole electrostatics, we describe the interaction potential energy surfaces for dimers of the oligoacene family, from benzene to hexacene. An analysis of these surfaces and a thorough assessment of dimers extracted from the reported crystal structures underline that high-order interactions (i.e., three-body non-additive interactions) must be considered in order to rationalize the details of the crystal structures. A comparison of the SAPT electrostatic energy with the multipole interaction energy demonstrates the importance of the contribution of charge penetration, which is shown to account for up to 50% of the total interaction energy in dimers extracted from the experimental single crystals; in the case of the most stable co-facial model dimers, this contribution is even larger than the total interaction energy. Our results highlight the importance of taking account of charge penetration in studies of the larger oligoacenes.

  17. Inter- and intramolecular non-covalent interactions in 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde complexes of copper, silver, and gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Laura; Jääskeläinen, Sirpa; Hirva, Pipsa; Haukka, Matti

    2014-09-01

    Three new imidazole compounds, [CuBr2(mimc)2] (1), [Ag(mimc)2][CF3SO3] (2), and [AuCl3(mimc)] (3) (mimc = 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde), have been synthesized, structurally characterized, and further analyzed using the QTAIM analysis. The compounds exhibit self-assembled 3D networks arising from intermolecular non-covalent interactions such as metallophilic interactions, metal-π contacts, halogens-halogen interactions, and hydrogen bonds. These weak interactions have a strong impact on the coordination sphere of the metal atoms and on the packing of compounds 1, 2, and 3.

  18. Supramolecular catalysis. Part 1: non-covalent interactions as a tool for building and modifying homogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Matthieu; Ballester, Pablo; Vidal-Ferran, Anton; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2014-03-07

    Supramolecular catalysis is a rapidly expanding discipline which has benefited from the development of both homogeneous catalysis and supramolecular chemistry. The properties of classical metal and organic catalysts can now be carefully tailored by means of several suitable approaches and the choice of reversible interactions such as hydrogen bond, metal-ligand, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The first part of these two subsequent reviews will be dedicated to catalytic systems for which non-covalent interactions between the partners of the reaction have been designed although mimicking enzyme properties has not been intended. Ligand, metal, organocatalyst, substrate, additive, and metal counterion are reaction partners that can be held together by non-covalent interactions. The resulting catalysts possess unique properties compared to analogues lacking the assembling properties. Depending on the nature of the reaction partners involved in the interactions, distinct applications have been accomplished, mainly (i) the building of bidentate ligand libraries (intra ligand-ligand), (ii) the building of di- or oligonuclear complexes (inter ligand-ligand), (iii) the alteration of the coordination spheres of a metal catalyst (ligand-ligand additive), and (iv) the control of the substrate reactivity (catalyst-substrate). More complex systems that involve the cooperative action of three reaction partners have also been disclosed. In this review, special attention will be given to supramolecular catalysts for which the observed catalytic activity and/or selectivity have been imputed to non-covalent interaction between the reaction partners. Additional features of these catalysts are the easy modulation of the catalytic performance by modifying one of their building blocks and the development of new catalytic pathways/reactions not achievable with classical covalent catalysts.

  19. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  20. Thermal solid-state Z/E isomerization of 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines: effects of non-covalent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKO DŽAMBASKI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Configurational isomerization of stereo-defined 5-substituted and unsubstituted 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines (1 in the solid state, giving the Z/E mixtures in various ratios, was investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, X-ray powder crystallography and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The Z/E composition can be rationalized in terms of non-covalent interactions, involving intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and directional non-bonded 1,5-type S×××O interactions. X-Ray powder crystallography, using selected crystalline (Z-4-oxothiazolidine substrates, revealed transformation to the amorphous state during the irreversible Z®E process. A correlation between previous results on the Z/E isomerization in solution and now in the solid state was established.

  1. Covalent and Non-Covalent DNA-Gold-Nanoparticle Interactions: New Avenues of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnerero, Jose M; Jimenez-Ruiz, Aila; Castillo, Paula M; Prado-Gotor, Rafael

    2017-01-04

    The interactions of DNA, whether long, hundred base pair chains or short-chained oligonucleotides, with ligands play a key role in the field of structural biology. Its biological activity not only depends on the thermodynamic properties of DNA-ligand complexes, but can and often is conditioned by the formation kinetics of those complexes. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles have long been known to present excellent biocompatibility with biomolecules and are themselves remarkable for their structural, electronic, magnetic, optical and catalytic properties, radically different from those of their counterpart bulk materials, and which make them an important asset in multiple applications. Therefore, thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the interactions of DNA with nanoparticles acting as small ligands are key for a better understanding of those interactions to allow for their control and modulation and for the opening of new venues of research in nanomedicine, analytic and biologic fields. The interactions of gold nanoparticles with both DNA polymers and their smaller subunits; special focus is placed on those interactions taking place with nonfunctionalized gold nanoparticles are reviewed in the present work. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Effects of non-covalent interactions with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid) on the heat denaturation and solubility of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Jong, G.A.H. de; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The non-covalent interactions between the monomeric phenolic compound chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin were characterized, and their effect on protein properties was examined. 5-CQA had a low affinity for all three proteins, and these interactions

  3. Insight into the Interaction between DNA Bases and Defective Graphenes: Covalent or Non-covalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Eustache, Darnashley; Wang, Yixuan

    2013-01-01

    Although some metal clusters and molecules were found to more significantly bind to defective graphenes than to pristine graphenes, exhibiting chemisorptions on defective graphenes, the present investigation shows that the adsorption of DNA bases on mono- and di-vacant defective graphenes does not show much difference from that on pristine graphene, and is still dominantly driven by noncovalent interactions. In the present study the adsorptions of the nucleobases, adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine, (G), and thymine (T) on pristine and defective graphenes, are fully optimized using a hybrid-meta GGA density functional theory (DFT), M06-2X/6-31G*, and the adsorption energies are then refined with both M06-2X and B97-D/6-311++G**. Graphene is modeled as nano-clusters of C72H24, C71H24, and C70H24 for pristine, mono- and divacant defective graphenes, respectively, supplemented by a few larger ones. The result shows that guanine has the maximum adsorption energy in all of the three adsorption systems; and the sequence of the adsorption strength is G>A>T>C on the pristine and di-vacant graphene and G>T>A>C on the mono-vacant graphene. In addition, the binding energies of the DNA bases with the pristine graphene are less than the corresponding ones with di-vacant defective graphene; however, they are greater than those of mono-vacant graphene with guanine and adenine, while it is dramatic that the binding energies of mono-vacant graphene with thymine and cytosine appear larger than those of pristine graphene. PMID:24215998

  4. Non-Covalent Interactions: Complexes of Guanidinium with DNA and RNA Nucleobases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blanco, F.; Kelly, B.; Sanchez-Sanz, Goar; Trujillo, Cristina; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.; Rozas, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 39 (2013), s. 11608-11616 ISSN 1520-6106 Grant - others:Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union(XE) FP7-274988 People Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular -orbital methods * cation-pi interactions * minor-groove binders Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  5. Non-Covalent Interactions in the Crystal Structure of Methyl 4-Hydroxy-3-Nitrobenzoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Simpson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Methyl 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzoate, (I, C8H7NO5, crystallizes with two unique molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit of the triclinic unit cell. The space group was assigned as P-1, with lattice parameters a = 0.72831(15, b = 1.0522(2, c = 1.1410(2 nm, α = 83.38(3, β = 80.83(3, γ = 82.02(3°, Z = 4, V = 0.8510(3 nm3, Mr = 197.15, Dc = 1.539 g/m3, µ= 0.131 mm−1, F(000 = 408, R = 0.1002 and wR = 0.2519. In the crystal structure, 12 hydrogen bonding and two p-stacking interactions link the molecules into infinite stacked sheets parallel to (101.

  6. Non-covalent conjugation of cutinase from Fusarium sp. ICT SAC1 with pectin for enhanced stability: Process minutiae, kinetics, thermodynamics and structural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, Abhijeet B; Chaudhari, Sandeep A; Singhal, Rekha S

    2017-09-01

    Cutinase, a member of α/β-fold hydrolase family possess potentially diverse applications in several industrial processes and products. The present work aims towards thermo-stabilization of cutinase from novel source Fusarium sp. ICT SAC1 via non-covalent interaction with polysaccharides. Although all six polysaccharides chosen for study enhanced the thermal stability, pectin was found to be most promising. The interaction protocol for cutinase with pectin was optimized sequentially with respect to the ratio of enzyme to pectin, solution pH, and buffer strength. Cutinase-pectin conjugate under optimized conditions (1:12, pH-6.5, 50mM) showed enhanced thermal stability as evident from lower inactivation rate constant, higher half-life and D-value within the 40-55°C. A slender rise in K m and V max values and enhanced thermodynamic parameters of cutinase-pectin conjugate were observed after non-covalent interaction. Entropy values were 1.5-fold higher for cutinase-pectin conjugate at each temperature suggesting an upsurge in number of protein molecules in a transition activated state. Positive values of entropy for both forms of cutinase suggested a rise in disordered conformation. Noticeable conformational changes in cutinase after conjugation with pectin were confirmed by FTIR as well as fluorescence emission spectra. An increment in helix to turn conversion was observed in complexed cutinase vis-à-vis free cutinase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation of Non-Covalent Interactions of Aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, G2, and M1 with Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Poór

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are widely spread mycotoxins produced mainly by Aspergillus species. Consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated foods and drinks causes serious health risks for people worldwide. It is well-known that the reactive epoxide metabolite of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 forms covalent adducts with serum albumin. However, non-covalent interactions of aflatoxins with human serum albumin (HSA are poorly characterized. Thus, in this study the complex formation of aflatoxins was examined with HSA applying spectroscopic and molecular modelling studies. Our results demonstrate that aflatoxins form stable complexes with HSA as reflected by binding constants between 2.1 × 104 and 4.5 × 104 dm3/mol. A binding free energy value of −26.90 kJ mol−1 suggests a spontaneous binding process between AFB1 and HSA at room-temperature, while the positive entropy change of 55.1 JK−1 mol−1 indicates a partial decomposition of the solvation shells of the interacting molecules. Modeling studies and investigations with site markers suggest that Sudlow’s Site I of subdomain IIA is the high affinity binding site of aflatoxins on HSA. Interaction of AFB1 with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumins was also investigated. Similar stabilities of the examined AFB1-albumin complexes were observed suggesting the low species differences of the albumin-binding of aflatoxins.

  8. Experimental and Computational Studies on Non-Covalent Imprinted Microspheres as Recognition System for Nicotinamide Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Vasapollo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted microspheres obtained by precipitation polymerization using nicotinamide (nia as template have been prepared and characterised by SEM. How various experimental parameters can affect microsphere morphology, reaction yield and re-binding capacity have been evaluated. Pre-polymerization interactions between template and functional monomer in chloroform and MeCN have been studied by 1H-NMR. The results suggest that the interaction between nia and methacrylic acid (MAA is mainly based on hydrogen-bonding between amide protons and MAA. Computational density functional theory (DFT studies on MAA-nia complexes have been also performed to better understand hydrogen-bonding interactions. The imprinted activity of the microspheres, synthesized in chloroform or acetonitrile (MeCN, has been evaluated by spectrophotometric analysis of nia solutions when chloroform or MeCN are used as incubation solvents. The results suggest that MeCN interferes with hydrogen bonding between template and MAA during either the polymerization step or re-binding process as also observed from theoretical results. Finally, the selectivity towards selected nia analogues has been also confirmed.

  9. Assessment of density functionals and paucity of non-covalent interactions in aminoylyne complexes of molybdenum and tungsten [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2M≡EN(SiMe3)(R)] (E = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb): a dispersion-corrected DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Krishna K; Patidar, Pankaj; Bariya, Pankaj K; Patidar, Sunil K; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-07-14

    Electronic, molecular structure and bonding energy analyses of the metal-aminosilylyne, -aminogermylyne, -aminostannylyne and -aminoplumbylyne complexes [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2M[triple bond, length as m-dash]EN(SiMe3)(Ph)] (M = Mo, W) and [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2Mo[triple bond, length as m-dash]GeN(SiMe3)(Mes)] have been investigated at DFT, DFT-D3 and DFT-D3(BJ) levels using BP86, PBE, PW91, RPBE, TPSS and M06-L functionals. The performance of metaGGA functionals for the geometries of aminoylyne complexes is better than GGA functionals. Significant dispersion interactions between OH, EC(O) and EH pairs appeared in the dispersion-corrected geometries. The non-covalent distances of these interactions follow the order DFT > DFT-D3(BJ) > DFT-D3. The values of Nalewajski-Mrozek bond order (1.22-1.52) and Pauling bond order (2.23-2.59) of the optimized structures at BP86/TZ2P indicate the presence of multiple bonds between metal and E atoms. The overall electronic charges transfer from transition-metal fragments to ligands. The topological analysis based on QTAIM has been performed to determine the analogy of non-covalent interactions. The strength of M[triple bond, length as m-dash]EN(SiMe3)(R) bonds has been evaluated by energy decomposition analysis. The electrostatic interactions are almost equal to orbital interactions. The M ← E σ-donation is smaller than the M → E π-back donation. Upon going from E = Si to E = Pb, the M-E bond orders decrease as Si > Ge > Sn > Pb, consistent with the observed geometry trends. The M-E uncorrected bond dissociation energies vary with the density functionals as RPBE DFT-D3 dispersion corrections to the BDEs correspond to the BP86 functional, ranging between 5.6-8.1 kcal mol(-1), which are smaller than the DFT-D3(BJ) dispersion corrections (10.1-12.0 kcal mol(-1)). The aryl substituents on nitrogen have an insignificant effect on M-E-N bending. The bending of the M-E-N bond angle has been discussed in terms of Jahn-Teller distortion. The

  10. Non covalent assembly of coordination superstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Khlobystov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The main topic of this work is the design of discrete and polymeric multi-component coordination structures using non-covalent interactions between organic and inorganic molecular components. All of the structures described herein are based on transition metal cations and N-donor heterocyclic bis-exodentate ligands with different geometries and various spacer functionalities. The predominant method used for the structural characterisation of the complexes was single crystal X-ray crystallography. X-ray powder diffraction, IR and NMR spectroscopies and TEM and AFM imaging were used to characterise the bulk products from the reactions. Chapter 1 is a comparative review of non-covalent interactions relevant to coordination superstructures and covers the latest developments in the area of crystal engineering and supramolecular chemistry. The nature, geometry and relative energy of the non-covalent interactions are considered in detail in order to reveal their influence on the structure and properties of complexes...

  11. Preparation and characterization of PEGylated multiwall carbon nanotubes as covalently conjugated and non-covalent drug carrier: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibizadeh, Mina; Rostamizadeh, Kobra; Dalali, Naser; Ramazani, Ali

    2017-05-01

    In this study, PEGylated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-based drug delivery system was developed. Ibuprofen as a model drug was loaded by physical and chemical method. The surface functionalization of nanotubes was carried out by enrichment of acylated groups. In order to synthesis PEGylated MWNTs, hydrophilic diamino-polyethylene glycol was covalently linked to the MWNTs surface via amidation reaction. Finally, ibuprofen was chemically and physically loaded on the PEGylated MWNTs. The resultants were characterized by FTIR, AFM, and DLS techniques. Cytotoxicity of PEGylated MWNTs were examined by MTT assay and the results revealed that PEG functionalized nanotubes did not show significant detrimental effects on the viability of L929 Cells. The percent of drug loading for chemically and physically drug payload carrier were determined to be 52.5% and 38%, respectively. The release of ibuprofen from covalently conjugated and non-covalent drug loaded PEGylated MWNTs at pH=7.4, and 5.3 were investigated, as well. From the results, it was found that chemically loaded MWNTs showed much sustained release behavior compared to the physically loaded one, especially at pH=5.3. The kinetic of drug release was also investigated. The results strongly suggest that the chemically conjugated PEGylated MWNTs could be used as controlled release system for various drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of charge transfer interaction and the chemical physics behind effective fulleropyrrolidine/porphyrin non-covalent interaction in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Ashis; Santhosh, Kotni; Bauri, Ajoy; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2014-01-01

    The present paper reports the photophysical insights on supramolecular interaction of a monoporphyrin derivative, namely, 1, with C60 pyrrolidine tris-acid ethyl ester (PyC60) in toluene and benzonitrile. The ground state interaction between PyC60 and 1 is facilitated through charge transfer interaction. Both UV-Vis and steady state measurements elicit almost similar magnitude of binding constant for the PyC60/1 complex in toluene and benzonitrile, viz., 6825 and 6540 dm(3 )mol(-1), respectively. Life time measurement evokes that rate of charge separation is fast in benzonitrile. Both hybrid-DFT and DFT calculations provide very good support in favor of electronic charge-separation in PyC60/1 system in vacuo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis of non-covalent complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and acceptor atoms due to complex formation) and interaction energy, Eint for a large variety of the non- covalent dimers in the categories HB, DHB, and XB. The MESP based eDA concept proposed by Mohan and. Suresh has unified the HB, DHB, and XB non-covalent complexes in a single category, the eDA complex.61.

  14. Hirshfeld surface analyses and crystal structures of supramolecular self-assembly thiourea derivatives directed by non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Ilkay; Solmaz, Ummuhan; Binzet, Gun; Keskin, Ebru; Arslan, Birdal; Arslan, Hakan

    2018-04-01

    The novel N-(bis(3,5-dimethoxybenzyl)carbamothioyl)-4-R-benzamide (R: H, Cl, CH3 and OCH3) compounds have been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Their crystal structures were also determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Hirshfeld surfaces analysis and their associated two dimensional fingerprint plots of compounds were used as theoretical approach to assess driving force for crystal structure formation via the intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattices of synthesized compounds. The study of X-ray single crystal diffraction and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of the prepared compounds shows that hydrogen bonding and other weaker interactions such as Nsbnd H⋯S, weak Csbnd H⋯S, Csbnd H⋯O, Csbnd H⋯N and Csbnd H···π intermolecular interactions and π-π stacking, among molecules of synthesized compounds participate in a cooperative way to stabilize the supramolecular structures.

  15. Dispersion-Corrected Spin-Component-Scaled Double-Hybrid Density Functional Theory: Implementation and Performance for Non-covalent Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Loïc M; Baldridge, Kim K

    2017-06-13

    The implementation of 300 combinations of generalized gradient approximation/local density approximation exchange-correlation dispersion-corrected spin-component-scaled double-hybrid (DSD) density functional theory (DFT) methods has been carried out and the performance assessed against several DFT and post-Hartree-Fock methods, enabling further advancements toward the long-standing challenge of accurate prediction of interaction energies and associated properties. The resulting framework is flexible and has been further extended to include the resolution of identity (RI) approximation for solving the critical four-center two-electron repulsion integrals in the basis of the Kohn-Sham orbitals for cost effectiveness. To evaluate the performance of this set of new cost-effective methods, denoted as RI-DSD-DFTs, seven validation data sets were designed to cover a broad range of non-covalent interactions with characteristic stabilizing contributions. Inclusion of the perturbative treatment of correlation effects is shown to significantly improve the description of weak interactions. The set of DSD-DFTs provide interaction energies with root-mean-square deviations and mean absolute errors within 0.5 kcal/mol. The cost-effective RI-DSD-DFT counterparts deviate by less than 0.18 kcal/mol on average with only 2% of the computational cost.

  16. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.

    2013-01-01

    We here present amethod to form a noncovalent conjugate of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid aimed to interact with cells over-expressing folate receptors. The bonding was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple, rapid “one pot” synthesis method. The zeta p...

  17. Non-Covalent Interactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Sagan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an in-depth, qualitative and quantitative description of non-covalent interactions in the hydrogen storage materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3 was performed by means of the charge and energy decomposition method (ETS-NOCV as well as the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA approach. It was determined that both crystals are stabilized by electrostatically dominated intra- and intermolecular M∙∙∙H–B interactions (M = Li, K. For LiN(CH32BH3 the intramolecular charge transfer appeared (B–H→Li to be more pronounced compared with the corresponding intermolecular contribution. We clarified for the first time, based on the ETS-NOCV and IQA methods, that homopolar BH∙∙∙HB interactions in LiN(CH32BH3 can be considered as destabilizing (due to the dominance of repulsion caused by negatively charged borane units, despite the fact that some charge delocalization within BH∙∙∙HB contacts is enforced (which explains H∙∙∙H bond critical points found from the QTAIM method. Interestingly, quite similar (to BH∙∙∙HB intermolecular homopolar dihydrogen bonds CH∙∙∙HC appared to significantly stabilize both crystals—the ETS-NOCV scheme allowed us to conclude that CH∙∙∙HC interactions are dispersion dominated, however, the electrostatic and σ/σ*(C–H charge transfer contributions are also important. These interactions appeared to be more pronounced in KN(CH32BH3 compared with LiN(CH32BH3.

  18. A machine learning correction for DFT non-covalent interactions based on the S22, S66 and X40 benchmark databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ting; Li, Hongzhi; Li, Wenze; Li, Lin; Fang, Chao; Li, Hui; Hu, LiHong; Lu, Yinghua; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Non-covalent interactions (NCIs) play critical roles in supramolecular chemistries; however, they are difficult to measure. Currently, reliable computational methods are being pursued to meet this challenge, but the accuracy of calculations based on low levels of theory is not satisfactory and calculations based on high levels of theory are often too costly. Accordingly, to reduce the cost and increase the accuracy of low-level theoretical calculations to describe NCIs, an efficient approach is proposed to correct NCI calculations based on the benchmark databases S22, S66 and X40 (Hobza in Acc Chem Rev 45: 663-672, 2012; Řezáč et al. in J Chem Theory Comput 8:4285, 2012). A novel type of NCI correction is presented for density functional theory (DFT) methods. In this approach, the general regression neural network machine learning method is used to perform the correction for DFT methods on the basis of DFT calculations. Various DFT methods, including M06-2X, B3LYP, B3LYP-D3, PBE, PBE-D3 and ωB97XD, with two small basis sets (i.e., 6-31G* and 6-31+G*) were investigated. Moreover, the conductor-like polarizable continuum model with two types of solvents (i.e., water and pentylamine, which mimics a protein environment with ε = 4.2) were considered in the DFT calculations. With the correction, the root mean square errors of all DFT calculations were improved by at least 70 %. Relative to CCSD(T)/CBS benchmark values (used as experimental NCI values because of its high accuracy), the mean absolute error of the best result was 0.33 kcal/mol, which is comparable to high-level ab initio methods or DFT methods with fairly large basis sets. Notably, this level of accuracy is achieved within a fraction of the time required by other methods. For all of the correction models based on various DFT approaches, the validation parameters according to OECD principles (i.e., the correlation coefficient R (2), the predictive squared correlation coefficient q (2) and [Formula

  19. How do non-covalent complexes dissociate in droplets? A case study of the desolvation of dsDNA from a charged aqueous nanodrop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharawy, Mahmoud; Consta, Styliani

    2015-10-14

    We present the desolvation mechanism of a double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (dsDNA) from an aqueous nanodrop studied by using atomistic molecular dynamics methods. The central theme of this study is the stability of a non-covalently bound complex, in general, and that of a dsDNA in particular, in a droplet environment. Among the factors that may affect the stability of a complex in an evaporating droplet we examine the increase in ion concentration and the distinct droplet morphologies arising from the charge-induced instability. We explore in detail a large set of aqueous nanodrops with excess negative charge, which comprise a dsDNA and Na(+), Cl(-) ions at various concentrations. We find that for a square of the charge to volume ratio above that of the Rayleigh limit the droplet attains distinct "spiky" morphologies that disperse the charge in larger volume relative to that of the spherical drop. Moreover, it is found that it is possible for a non-covalent complex to remain associated in an unstable droplet as long as there is enough solvent to accommodate the instability. In the presence of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, the Na(+) ions form adducts with the double helical DNA in the minor groove, which help stabilise the duplex state in the gas phase. The negative ions may be released from the droplet. In a DNA-containing droplet with a net charge that is less negative than 50% of the dsDNA charge, the DNA maintains a double-stranded state in the gas phase. Several of our findings are in good agreement with experiments, while the spiky droplet morphology due to the charge-induced instability calls for new experiments. The results shed light on the association properties of complexes of macromolecules in droplet environments, which are critical intermediates in electrospray ionisation experiments.

  20. Synergistic effect of non-covalent interaction in colloidal nematic liquid crystal doped with magnetic functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalir, Nima; Javadian, Soheila

    2018-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), CNT@Fe3O4, and Fe3O4 nanocomposites were doped to eutectic uniaxial nematic liquid crystal (NLC's) (E5CN7) to improve physiochemical properties such as phase transition temperature, activation energy (Ea), dielectric anisotropy, and electro-optical properties. The thermal study of nematic phase shows a decrease in the nematic to isotropic phase transition temperature as CNT is doped. However, higher doping concentration of CNTs leads to the further increase in transition temperature. The anchoring effect or π-π interaction plays a key role in N-I phase transition. The functionalization of SWCNTs with Fe3O4 diminishes the CNT aggregation while the magnetic susceptibility is increased. The functionalized CNT doping to NLC's decrease significantly the phase transition temperature compared to doping of non-functionalized CNTs. Attractive interaction between guest and host molecules by magnetic and geometry effect increased the enthalpy and entropy of phase transition in the SWCNT@Fe3O4 sample compared to non-functionalized CNT doped system. Also, the Ea values are decreased as SWCNT@Fe3O4 is doped to pure E5CN7. The difference of N-I phase transition temperature was observed in Fe3O4 and CNT@Fe3O4 compared to SWCNT doped systems. Finally, dielectric anisotropy was increased in the doped system compared to pure NLC.

  1. On the nature of non-covalent interactions in isomers of 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone dimers - ground- and excited-state properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pandiyan, B. V.; Deepa, Palanisamy; Kolandaivel, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 37 (2014), s. 19928-19940 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogen bonding interactions * density functional theory * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.493, year: 2014

  2. Solvent-dependent dihydrogen/dihydride stability for [Mo(CO)(Cp*)H(2)(PMe(3))(2)](+)[BF(4)](-) determined by multiple solvent...anion...cation non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dub, Pavel A; Belkova, Natalia V; Filippov, Oleg A; Daran, Jean-Claude; Epstein, Lina M; Lledós, Agustí; Shubina, Elena S; Poli, Rinaldo

    2010-01-04

    Low-temperature (200 K) protonation of [Mo(CO)(Cp*)H(PMe(3))(2)] (1) by Et(2)OHBF(4) gives a different result depending on a subtle solvent change: The dihydrogen complex [Mo(CO)(Cp*)(eta(2)-H(2))(PMe(3))(2)](+) (2) is obtained in THF, whereas the tautomeric classical dihydride [Mo(CO)(Cp*)(H)(2)(PMe(3))(2)](+) (3) is the only observable product in dichloromethane. Both products were fully characterised (nu(CO) IR; (1)H, (31)P, (13)C NMR spectroscopies) at low temperature; they lose H(2) upon warming to 230 K at approximately the same rate (ca. 10(-3) s(-1)), with no detection of the non-classical form in CD(2)Cl(2), to generate [Mo(CO)(Cp*)(FBF(3))(PMe(3))(2)] (4). The latter also slowly decomposes at ambient temperature. One of the decomposition products was crystallised and identified by X-ray crystallography as [Mo(CO)(Cp*)(FHFBF(3))(PMe(3))(2)] (5), which features a neutral HF ligand coordinated to the transition metal through the F atom and to the BF(4) (-) anion through a hydrogen bond. The reason for the switch in relative stability between 2 and 3 was probed by DFT calculations based on the B3LYP and M05-2X functionals, with inclusion of anion and solvent effects by the conductor-like polarisable continuum model and by explicit consideration of the solvent molecules. Calculations at the MP4(SDQ) and CCSD(T) levels were also carried out for calibration. The calculations reveal the key role of non-covalent anion-solvent interactions, which modulate the anion-cation interaction ultimately altering the energetic balance between the two isomeric forms.

  3. Unveiling the non-covalent interactions of molecular homodimers by dispersion-corrected DFT calculations and collision-induced broadening of ro-vibrational transitions: application to (CH2F2)2 and (SO2)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasinato, Nicola; Grimme, Stefan

    2015-02-28

    Thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of molecular complexes featuring non-covalent interactions, such as van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds, are of fundamental interest in many fields, ranging from chemistry and biology to nanotechnology. In the present work the homodimers of difluoromethane (CH2F2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are investigated theoretically using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3) and experimentally by tunable diode laser (TDL) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The dissociation energies of (CH2F2)2 and (SO2)2 are determined experimentally from the broadening of the ro-vibrational transitions of the corresponding monomers collisionally perturbed by a range of damping gases. The resulting dissociation energies are 2.79 ± 0.32 and 2.62 ± 0.16 kcal mol(-1) for the CH2F2 and SO2 dimers, respectively. Six to nine different stationary points on the PES of the two complexes are investigated theoretically at the DFT-D3 level, retrieving the corresponding dissociation energies, structures and rotational constants. Computations are carried out by employing six different density functionals (BLYP, TPSS, B3LYP, PBE0, TPSSh, and PW6B95) in conjunction with def2-TZVP and in a few cases def2-QZVP basis sets. DFT-D3 dissociation energies are benchmarked against reference values from CCSD(T)/CBS computations, and furthermore compared to experimental ones. A very good agreement between theory and experiment is attained, showing that DFT-D3 provides a significant improvement over standard DFT. This work shows that dissociation energies of homodimers can be consistently derived from collisional broadening cross sections and that interaction energies at various DFT-D3 levels (nearly) reach the accuracy of highly correlated wavefunction methods.

  4. Enzymatic Activity Enhancement of Non-Covalent Modified Superoxide Dismutase and Molecular Docking Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Jun Song

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase was improved in the pyrogallol autoxidation system by about 27%, after interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclo- dextrin and superoxide dismutase. Fluorescence spectrometry was used to study the interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and superoxide dismutase at different temperatures. By doing this, it can be found that these interactions increase fluorescence sensitivity. In the meantime, the synchronous fluorescence intensity revealed the interaction sites to be close to the tryptophan (Trp and tyrosine (Tyr residues of superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to explore the binding mode between the ligands and the receptor. This suggested that HP-β-CD interacted with the B ring, G ring and the O ring and revealed that the lysine (Lys residues enter the nanocavity. It was concluded that the HP-β-CD caused specific conformational changes in SOD by non-covalent modification.

  5. Hydrogen scrambling in non-covalent complexes of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzel, Maciej; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2012-12-15

    Mass spectrometry analysis combined with hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX-MS) is arising as a tool for quick analysis of native protein conformation. However, during collision-induced dissociation (CID) the spatial distribution of deuterium is not always conserved. It is therefore important to find out how hydrogen scrambling occurs--this study concentrates on the possibility of scrambling between amino acid residues spatially close together, but not connected by covalent bonds. Peptides used in this study were synthesized by Fmoc strategy. Deuteration occurred in ammonia formate solution in D(2)O. Non-covalent complexes consisting of a deuterated and a non-deuterated peptide were analyzed by electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR-MS) with quadrupole mass filter. Low-energy CID was used for complex dissociation. The complexes were isolated on a quadrupole and subjected to CID to cause dissociation. The deuterium distribution before and after the dissociation of a non-covalent complex to its components was measured. The study revealed that no significant scrambling occurred between the constituents of the complexes--the degree of scrambling did not exceed 10%. The results obtained for the complexes should be similar to those for protein parts spatially close together--hydrogen scrambling between them should be negligible. The knowledge that almost all the scrambling occurs along peptide chains gives a better insight into the mechanism of HDX inside a protein. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Non-Covalent Interactions and Internal Dynamics in Pyridine-Ammonia a Combined Quantum-Chemical and Microwave Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Lorenzo; Tasinato, Nicola; Vazart, Fanny; Barone, Vincenzo; Caminati, Walther; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    The 1:1 complex of ammonia with pyridine has been characterized by using state-of-the-art quantum-chemical computations combined with pulsed-jet Fourier-Transform microwave spectroscopy. The computed potential energy landscape pointed out the formation of a stable σ-type complex, which has been confirmed experimentally: the analysis of the rotational spectrum showed the presence of only one 1:1 pyridine - ammonia adduct. Each rotational transition is split into several components due to the internal rotation of NH_3 around its C_3 axis and to the hyperfine structure of both ^{14}N quadrupolar nuclei, thus providing the unequivocal proof that the two molecules form a σ-type complex involving both a N-H\\cdotsN and a C-H\\cdotsN hydrogen bond. The dissociation energy (BSSE and ZPE corrected) has been estimated to be 11.5 kJ\\cdotmol^{-1}. This work represents the first application of an accurate, yet efficient computational scheme, designed for the investigation of small biomolecules, to a molecular cluster.

  7. Non-covalent pomegranate (Punica granatum) hydrolyzable tannin-protein complexes modulate antigen uptake, processing and presentation by a T-cell hybridoma line co-cultured with murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Carballo, Sergio; Haas, Linda; Vestling, Martha; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2016-12-01

    In this work we characterize the interaction of pomegranate hydrolyzable tannins (HT) with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) and determine the effects of non-covalent tannin-protein complexes on macrophage endocytosis, processing and presentation of antigen. We isolated HT from pomegranate and complex to HEL, the resulting non-covalent tannin-protein complex was characterized by gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS. Finally, cell culture studies and confocal microscopy imaging were conducted on the non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes to evaluate its effect on macrophage antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T-cell hybridomas. Our results indicate that non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes modulate uptake, processing and antigen presentation by mouse peritoneal macrophages. After 4 h of pre-incubation, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected in the co-cultures treated with HEL alone, whereas a non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL complex had already reached maximum IL-2 expression. Pomegranate HT may increase rate of endocytose of HEL and subsequent expression of IL-2 by the T-cell hybridomas.

  8. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-covalent functionalization of DWNTs has been carried out by using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyoxyethylene(40)nonylphenyl ether (IGPAL), both of which enable solubilization in aqueous media. These functionalized DWNTs have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, IR and Raman ...

  9. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) have been functionalized by both covalent and non-covalent means. Covalent functionalization has been carried out by attaching an aliphatic amide function to DWNTs which enable solubilization in non-polar solvents. Solubilization in non-polar sol- vents has also been ...

  10. Stable non-covalent labeling of layered silicate nanoparticles for biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Gysell M; Jack, Kevin S; Musumeci, Anthony W; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2016-04-01

    Layered silicate nanoparticles (LSN) are widely used in industrial applications and consumer products. They also have potential benefits in biomedical applications such as implantable devices and for drug delivery. To study how nanomaterials interact with cells and tissues, techniques to track and quantify their movement through different biological compartments are essential. While radiolabels can be very sensitive, particularly for in vivo studies, fluorescent labeling has been preferred in recent years because of the array of methods available to image and quantify fluorescent nanoparticles. However, labeling can be problematic, especially if it alters the physical properties of the nanomaterial. Herein is described a novel non-covalent labeling technique for LSN using readily available fluorescent dimeric cyanine dyes without the need to use excess amounts of dye to achieve labeling, or the need for removal of unbound dye. The approach utilizes the cationic binding properties of layered silicate clays and the multiple quaternary nitrogens associated with the dyes. Preparation of YOYO-1 labeled LSN with optimal dispersion in aqueous media is presented. The utilization of the labeled particles is then demonstrated in cell binding and uptake studies using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The labeled LSN are highly fluorescent, stable and exhibit identical physical properties with respect to the unlabeled nanoparticles. The general approach described here is applicable to other cyanine dyes and may be utilized more widely for labeling nanoparticles that comprise a crystalline plate structure with a high binding capacity. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-covalent interaction between dietary stilbenoids and human serum albumin: Structure-affinity relationship, and its influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Jia, Xueping; Shi, Jian; Xiao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are associated with many benefits for human health, which depend on their bioavailability and bioaccessibility. The stilbenoid-human serum albumin (HSA) interactions are investigated to explore the structure-affinity relationship and influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids. The structure-affinity relationship of the stilbenoids-HSA interaction was found as: (1) the methoxylation enhanced the affinity, (2) an additional hydroxyl group increases the affinity and (3) the glycosylation significantly weakened the affinity. HSA obviously masked the free radical scavenging potential of stilbenoids. The stabilities of stilbenoids in different medium were determined as: HSA solution>human plasma>Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. It appears that the milk enhanced the cell uptake of stilbenoids with multi-hydroxyl groups and weakened the cell uptake of stilbenoids with methoxyl group on EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. The stilbenoids are hardly absorbed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis and non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes rings: new nanomaterials with lectin affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Leal, Manuel Pernía; Khiar, Noureddine; Fernández, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    We present a mild and practical carbon nanotubes rings (CNRs) synthesis from non-covalent functionalized and water-soluble linear single-wall carbon nanotubes. The hemi-micellar–supramolecular self-organization of lactose-based glycolipid 1 on the ring surface, followed by photo-polymerization of the diacetylenic function triggered by UV light afforded the first water-soluble and biocompatible CNRs. The obtained donut-like nanoconstructs expose a high density of lactose moieties on their surface, and are able to engage specific interactions with Arachis hypogea lectin similar to glycoconjugates on the cell membrane. (paper)

  13. Crystal structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GlgE and complexes with non-covalent inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberger, Jared J.; Veleti, Sri Kumar; Wilson, Brittney N.; Sucheck, Steven J.; Ronning, Donald R. (Toledo)

    2015-08-06

    GlgE is a bacterial maltosyltransferase that catalyzes the elongation of a cytosolic, branched α-glucan. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), inactivation of GlgE (Mtb GlgE) results in the rapid death of the organism due to a toxic accumulation of the maltosyl donor, maltose-1-phosphate (M1P), suggesting that GlgE is an intriguing target for inhibitor design. In this study, the crystal structures of the Mtb GlgE in a binary complex with maltose and a ternary complex with maltose and a maltosyl-acceptor molecule, maltohexaose, were solved to 3.3 Å and 4.0 Å, respectively. The maltohexaose structure reveals a dominant site for α-glucan binding. To obtain more detailed interactions between first generation, non-covalent inhibitors and GlgE, a variant Streptomyces coelicolor GlgEI (Sco GlgEI-V279S) was made to better emulate the Mtb GlgE M1P binding site. The structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S complexed with α-maltose-C-phosphonate (MCP), a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, was solved to 1.9 Å resolution, and the structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S complexed with 2,5-dideoxy-3-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-2,5-imino-D-mannitol (DDGIM), an oxocarbenium mimic, was solved to 2.5 Å resolution. These structures detail important interactions that contribute to the inhibitory activity of these compounds, and provide information on future designs that may be exploited to improve upon these first generation GlgE inhibitors.

  14. Non-Covalent Organocatalyzed Domino Reactions Involving Oxindoles: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tecla Gasperi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of spirooxindole architectures with several functionalities and stereogenic centers in bioactive molecules has been appealing for the development of novel methodologies seeking their preparation in high yields and selectivities. Expansion and refinement in the field of asymmetric organocatalysis have made possible the development of straightforward strategies that address these two requisites. In this review, we illustrate the current state-of-the-art in the field of spirooxindole synthesis through the use of non-covalent organocatalysis. We aim to provide a concise overview of very recent methods that allow to the isolation of unique, densely and diversified spirocyclic oxindole derivatives with high structural diversity via the use of cascade, tandem and domino processes.

  15. Combination of computational methods, adsorption isotherms and selectivity tests for the conception of a mixed non-covalent-semi-covalent molecularly imprinted polymer of vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzio, Kinga; Delépée, Raphaël; Vidal, Richard; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2013-08-06

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for vanillin was prepared by photo initiated polymerization in dichloromethane using a mixed semi-covalent and non-covalent imprinting strategy. Taking polymerisable syringaldehyde as "dummy" template, acrylamide was chosen as functional monomer on B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional theory computational method basis with counterpoise. The binding parameters for the recognition of vanillin on imprinted polymers were studied with three different isotherm models (Langmuir, bi-Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich) and compared. The results indicate an heterogeneity of binding sites. It was found and proved by DFT calculations that the specific binding of vanillin in the cavities is due to non-covalent interactions of the template with the hydroxyphenyl- and the amide-moieties. The binding geometry of vanillin in the MIP cavity was also modelled. The obtained MIP is highly specific for vanillin (with an imprinting factor of 7.4) and was successfully applied to the extraction of vanillin from vanilla pods, red wine spike with vanillin, natural and artificial vanilla sugar with a recovery of 80%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  17. Hemicyanine dyes derived from 2,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indolium as candidates for non-covalent protein probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabatc, Janina; Jurek, Katarzyna; Kostrzewska, Katarzyna; Orzeł, Łukasz

    2015-10-10

    Non-covalent interaction of hemicyanine dyes, derivatives of 2,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indolium with bovine serum albumin has been studied by spectral method. For this purpose, three hemicyanine dyes containing N-(2-carboxyethyl)-2,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indolium moiety were synthesized and their UV/Vis and fluorescence spectra, aggregation, photostability and association with bovine serum albumin were studied. The hemicyanine dyes with 2-ethylcarboxylic group was found to interact with bovine serum albumin, which is probably due to negative charge on the dye molecule at the expense of the carboxylic group and the ability to form hydrogen bonds with albumin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-covalent ligand conjugation to biotinylated DNA nanoparticles using TAT peptide genetically fused to monovalent streptavidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenchao; Fletcher, David; van Heeckeren, Rolf Christiaan; Davis, Pamela B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA nanoparticles (DNA NPs), which self-assemble from DNA plasmids and poly-L-lysine (pLL)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block copolymers, transfect several cell types in vitro and in vivo with minimal toxicity and immune response. To further enhance the gene transfer efficiency of DNA NP and control its tropism, we established a strategy to efficiently attach peptide ligands to DNA NPs. The non-covalent biotin–streptavidin (SA) interaction was used for ligand conjugation to overcome problems associated with covalent conjugation methods. A fusion protein of SA with the HIV-1 TAT peptide was cloned, expressed, purified and attached to biotinylated DNA NPs. A modified SA system with tetrameric structure but monovalent biotin binding capacity was adopted and shown to reduce the aggregation of biotinylated DNA NPs compared to neutravidin. Compared to unmodified DNA NPs, TAT modified DNA NPs significantly enhanced in vitro gene transfer, particularly at low DNA concentrations. Studies of cellular uptake and cellular distribution of the DNA NPs indicated that attaching TAT enhanced binding of DNA NPs to cell surface but not internalization at high DNA concentrations. In vivo studies showed that TAT modified DNA NPs mediated equal level of gene transfer to the mouse airways via the luminal route compared to unmodified DNA NPs. PMID:22845840

  19. Non-covalent modification of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) by coiled-coil technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christian; Perozzo, Remo; Borchard, Gerrit

    2016-09-10

    We present here an approach to non-covalently combine an engineered model protein with a PEGylated peptide via coiled-coil binding. To this end a fusion protein of G-CSF and the peptide sequence (JunB) was created-one sequence of JunB was expressed at the N-terminal of GCSF. JunB is able to bind to the peptide sequence cFos, which was in turn covalently linked to a chain of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The selected peptide sequences are leucine zipper motives from transcription factors and are known to bind to each other specifically by formation of a super secondary structure called coiled-coil. The binding between PEGylated peptides of various molecular weights and the modified protein was assessed by isothermal calorimetry (ITC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence anisotropy. Our findings show that the attachment of 2 and 5kDa PEG does not interfere with coiled-coil formation and thus binding of peptide to fusion protein. With this work we successfully demonstrate the non-covalent binding of a model moiety (PEG) to a protein through coiled-coil interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nano-mechanics of Tunable Adhesion using Non Covalent Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Liechti

    2012-09-08

    The objective of this program was to examine, via experiment and atomistic and continuum analysis, coordinated noncovalent bonding over a range of length scales with a view to obtaining modulated, patterned and reversible bonding at the molecular level. The first step in this project was to develop processes for depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing carboxylic acid and amine moieties on Si (111) surfaces and probe tips of an interfacial force microscope (IFM). This allowed the adhesive portion of the interactions between functionalized surfaces to be fully captured in the force-displacement response (force profiles) that are measured by the IFM. The interactionswere extracted in the form of traction-separation laws using combined molecular and continuum stress analyses. In this approach, the results of molecular dynamics analyses of SAMs subjected to simple stress states are used to inform continuum models of their stress-strain behavior. Continuum analyses of the IFM experiment were then conducted, which incorporate the stress-strain behavior of the SAMs and traction-separation relations that represent the interactions between the tip and functionalized Si surface. Agreement between predicted and measured force profiles was taken to imply that the traction-separation relations have been properly extracted. Scale up to larger contact areas was considered by forming Si/SAM/Si sandwiches and then separating them via fracture experiments. The mode 1 traction-separation relations have been extracted using fracture mechanics concepts under mode 1 and mixed-mode conditions. Interesting differences were noted between the three sets of traction-separation relations.

  1. Non-covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures for synthesizing carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Song, Sing I; Song, Ga Young; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanodiamonds provide an important type of substrate for constructing a variety of hybrid nanomaterials. However, their intrinsic chemistry-inert surfaces make it indispensable to pre-functionalize them prior to immobilizing additional components onto their surfaces. Currently developed strategies for functionalizing CNSs include covalent and non-covalent approaches. Conventional covalent treatments often damage the structure integrity of carbon surfaces and adversely affect their physical properties. In contrast, the non-covalent approach offers a non-destructive way to modify CNSs with desired functional surfaces, while reserving their intrinsic properties. Thus far, a number of surface modifiers including aromatic compounds, small-molecular surfactants, amphiphilic polymers, and biomacromolecules have been developed to non-covalently functionalize CNS surfaces. Mediated by these surface modifiers, various functional components such as organic species and inorganic nanoparticles were further decorated onto their surfaces, resulting in versatile carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials with broad applications in chemical engineering and biomedical areas. In this review, the recent advances in the generation of such hybrid nanostructures based on non-covalently functionalized CNSs will be reviewed.

  2. Electromagnetic interference shielding and thermal properties of non-covalently functionalized reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Chhetri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO was non-covalently functionalized using sulfanilic acid azocromotrop (SAC followed by hydrazine reduction to achieve SAC functionalized reduced GO (SAC-rGO. Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis and electrical conductivity measurements confirmed the successful functionlization and reduction of GO. The electrical conductivity of ~515 S•m−1 for SAC-rGO was recorded. The non-covalently functionalized reduced GO was subsequently dispersed in epoxy matrix at the loading level of 0.3 to 0.5 wt% to investigate its electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding properties. The morphological and structural characterization of the SAC-rGO/epoxy composites was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy analysis, which revealed the good dispersion of SAC-rGO in the epoxy. The SAC-rGO/epoxy composites showed the EMI shielding of −22.6 dB at the loading of 0.5 wt% SAC-rGO. Dynamical mechanical properties of the composites were studied to establish the reinforcing competency of the SAC-rGO. The storage modulus of the composites was found to increase within the studied temperature. Thermal stability of pure epoxy and its composites were compared by selecting the temperatures at 10 and 50% weight loss, respectively.

  3. Photophysical properties of porphyrinoid sensitizers non-covalently bound to host molecules; models for photodynamic therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lang, Kamil; Mosinger, Jiří; Wagnerová, Dana Marie

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 248, 3-4 (2004), s. 321-350 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0634; GA ČR GA203/02/0420; GA ČR GA203/02/1483 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : non-covalent binding * porphyrin * excited states Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.446, year: 2004

  4. Host-Guest Complexes of Cyclodextrins and Nanodiamonds as a Strong Non-Covalent Binding Motif for Self-Assembled Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibilla, Frauke; Voskuhl, Jens; Fokina, Natalie A; Dahl, Jeremy E P; Schreiner, Peter R; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2017-11-13

    We report the inclusion of carboxy- and amine-substituted molecular nanodiamonds (NDs) adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane by β-cyclodextrin and γ-cyclodextrin (β-CD and γ-CD), which have particularly well-suited hydrophobicity and symmetry for an optimal fit of the host and guest molecules. We studied the host-guest interactions in detail and generally observed 1:1 association of the NDs with the larger γ-CD cavity, but observed 1:2 association for the largest ND in the series (triamantane) with β-CD. We found higher binding affinities for carboxy-substituted NDs than for amine-substituted NDs. Additionally, cyclodextrin vesicles (CDVs) were decorated with d-mannose by using adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane as non-covalent anchors, and the resulting vesicles were compared with the lectin concanavalin A in agglutination experiments. Agglutination was directly correlated to the host-guest association: adamantane showed lower agglutination than di- or triamantane with β-CDV and almost no agglutination with γ-CDV, whereas high agglutination was observed for di- and triamantane with γ-CDV. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes: Controlling Chirality Selectivity via Alkyl Groups of Conjugated Co-Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight, Braden; Gifford, Brendan; Kilina, Svetlana

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) play an important role in nanotechnology, including electronics, chemical sensors, and solar cells. Their electronic and optical properties depend on the size and geometry (chirality) of the nanotube. However, one main concern regarding nanotube application in optoelectronic devices is the difficulty of separating them based upon chirality after synthesis, as all known synthesis methods produce more than one chirality simultaneously. To get around this, one method is the functionalization of the CNTs via non-covalent bonding of co-polymers by wrapping them around the tube. We use force field simulations to explore the effects of various structural manipulations to the co-polymer 9,9-dialkylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl bipyridine (PFO-BPY) to find the preferential mechanisms of selective interactions between the PFO-BPY and CNTs of various chiralities. In particular, we focus on the effect of the branching in alkyl side-groups of PFO-BPY on their binding to the CNT surface. We have observed correlations between the side-group structures and their wrapping morphology on the CNT-Polymer interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that the branching in the position closest to the conjugated backboned results in the strongest interaction with all CNT. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (CHE 1413614) and the Center for Computationally-Assisted Science and Technology at NDSU.

  6. Tailored Ahp-cyclodepsipeptides as Potent Non-covalent Serine Protease Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köcher, Steffen; Rey, Juliana; Bongard, Jens; Tiaden, André N; Meltzer, Michael; Richards, Peter J; Ehrmann, Michael; Kaiser, Markus

    2017-07-10

    The S1 serine protease family is one of the largest and most biologically important protease families. Despite their biomedical significance, generic approaches to generate potent, class-specific, bioactive non-covalent inhibitors for these enzymes are still limited. In this work, we demonstrate that Ahp-cyclodepsipeptides represent a suitable scaffold for generating target-tailored inhibitors of serine proteases. For efficient synthetic access, we developed a practical mixed solid- and solution-phase synthesis that we validated through performing the first chemical synthesis of the two natural products Tasipeptin A and B. The suitability of the Ahp-cyclodepsipeptide scaffold for tailored inhibitor synthesis is showcased by the generation of the most potent human HTRA protease inhibitors to date. We anticipate that our approach may also be applied to other serine proteases, thus opening new avenues for a systematic discovery of serine protease inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. DNA Linked To Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Covalent Versus Non-Covalent Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, C.-L.; Nguyen, K.; Lyonnais, S.; Streiff, S.; Campidelli, S.; Goux-Capes, L.; Bourgoin, J.-P.; Filoramo, A.

    2008-10-01

    Nanometer-scale structures represent a novel and intriguing field, where scientists and engineers manipulate materials at the atomic and molecular scale levels to produce innovative materials. Carbon nanotubes constitute a relatively new class of materials exhibiting exceptional mechanical and electronic properties and were found to be promising candidates for molecular electronics, sensing or biomedical applications. Considering the bottom-up strategy in nanotechnology, the combination of the recognition properties of DNA with the electronic properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) seems to be a promising approach for the future of electronics. With the aim to assemble DNA with SWNTs, two complementary strategies have been envisioned: the covalent linkage of DNA on carboxylic groups of SWNTs under classical coupling condition and the non-covalent approach based on biotin-streptavidin molecular recognition properties. Here, we present and compare the results that we obtained with these two different methods; we want to objectively show the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

  8. Non-Covalent Binding of DNA to Carbon Nanotubes Controlled by Biological Recognition Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goux-Capes, Laurence; Filoramo, Arianna; Cote, Denis; Valentin, Emmanuel; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Patillon, Jean-Nöel

    2004-09-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) occupy a special place within molecular electronics. Indeed, they exist as semiconducting or metallic wires and have been used to demonstrate molecular devices like transistors, diodes or SET (single electron transistor). However, the future of this class of SWNT-based devices is strictly related to the development of a bottom-up self-assembly technique. The exceptional recognition properties of DNA molecule make it an ideal candidate for this task. Here, we describe a non-covalent method to connect carbon nanotubes to DNA strands using the streptavidin/biotin complex. Control experiments show that in absence of biotin, the DNA strand do not bind to SWNT. The binding of SWNT to DNA strand has also been carefully checked by washing experiments, showing the strength of the DNA anchorage on SWNTs. Combining this approach with molecular combing enable us to align nanotubes on substrate.

  9. Preparation and properties of electro-conductive fabrics based on polypyrrole: covalent vs. non-covalent attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, N. C.; Anavi, D.; Milanovich, M.; Popowski, Y.; Frid, L.; Amir, E.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-conductive fabrics were prepared via in situ oxidative polymerization of pyrrole (Py) in the presence of unmodified and chemically modified cotton fabrics. Chemical modification of cotton fabric was achieved by covalent attachment of a bifunctional linker molecule to the surface of the fabric, followed by incorporation of a monomer unit onto the linker. The fabrics were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. Furthermore, the effect of Py concentration on the degree of polypyrrole (PPy) grafting, surface morphology, electrical resistivity, and laundering durability were studied for both types of cotton fabrics. Reductions of several orders of magnitude in surface and volume electrical resistivities were observed for both non-covalently and covalently linked cotton-PPy systems, whereas the effect of covalent pre-treatment of the fabric was stronger at low Py concentration. On the other hand, at higher monomer concentration, the electrical properties and laundering durability of the fabrics we comparable for both unmodified and chemically pre-treated cotton fabrics, indicating that only a small fraction of PPy chains were chemically grafted onto the fabric surface with the majority of the polymer being connected to the fabric through hydrogen bonds.

  10. Non-covalent interactions in anisole-(CO2)(n) (n=1, 2) complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Becucci, M.; Mazzoni, F.; Pietraperzia, G.; Řezáč, Jan; Nachtigallová, Dana; Hobza, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 34 (2017), s. 22749-22758 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * anisole-water complex * equation of state Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  11. Non-covalent O⋅⋅⋅O interactions among isopolyanions using a cis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    2008-05-09

    May 9, 2008 ... and acts as the cation in stabi- lizing the octamolybdate anion in 1. Compound 1 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P–1 with a = 9⋅925(3), b = 10⋅020(3), c = 10⋅414(3) Å, α = 88⋅811(4), β = 64⋅907(4), γ = 89⋅506(4)°, Z = 1. An in- teresting three-dimensional supramolecular structure, having ...

  12. The non-covalent decoration of self-assembling protein fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Zahra N; Grundy, Daniel J; Channon, Kevin J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2010-10-01

    The design of self-assembling fibers presents challenges in basic science, and has potential for developing materials for applications in areas such as tissue engineering. A contemporary issue in the field is the construction of multi-component, functionalized systems. Previously, we have developed peptide-based fibers, the SAF system, that comprises two complementary peptides, which affords considerable control over assembly and morphology. Here we present a straightforward route to functionalizing the SAFs with small molecules and, subsequently, other moieties. This is achieved via non-covalent recruitment of charged peptide tags, which offers advantages such as further control, reversibility, and future prospects for developing recombinant tags. We demonstrate the concept by appending fluorescent labels and biotin (and thence gold nanoparticles) to the peptides, and visualising the resulting decorated SAFs by light and electron microscopy. The peptide tags bind in the nm-mum range, and show specificity compared with control peptides, and for the SAFs over similar alpha-helix-based peptide fibers. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bioelectrochemistry of non-covalent immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase on oxidized diamond nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Eduardo; Méndez, Jessica; Fonseca, José J; Griebenow, Kai; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2012-06-01

    Diamond nanoparticles are considered a biocompatible material mainly due to their non-cytotoxicity and remarkable cellular uptake. Model proteins such as cytochrome c and lysozyme have been physically adsorbed onto diamond nanoparticles, proving it to be a suitable surface for high protein loading. Herein, we explore the non-covalent immobilization of the redox enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (E.C.1.1.1.1) onto oxidized diamond nanoparticles for bioelectrochemical applications. Diamond nanoparticles were first oxidized and physically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR and TEM. Langmuir isotherms were constructed to investigate the ADH adsorption onto the diamond nanoparticles as a function of pH. It was found that a higher packing density is achieved at the isoelectric point of the enzyme. Moreover, the relative activity of the immobilized enzyme on diamond nanoparticles was addressed under optimum pH conditions able to retain up to 70% of its initial activity. Thereafter, an ethanol bioelectrochemical cell was constructed by employing the immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase onto diamond nanoparticles, this being able to provide a current increment of 72% when compared to the blank solution. The results of this investigation suggest that this technology may be useful for the construction of alcohol biosensors or biofuel cells in the near future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-Covalent Photo-Patterning of Gelatin Matrices Using Caged Collagen Mimetic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Hoa San, Boi; L. Kessler, Julian; Hwan Kim, Jin; Xu, Qingguo; Hanes, Justin; Yu, Seungju Michael

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in photolithography have enabled us to spatially encode biochemical cues in biocompatible platforms such as synthetic hydrogels. Conventional patterning works through photo-activated chemical reactions on inert polymer networks. However, these techniques cannot be directly applied to protein hydrogels without chemically altering the protein scaffolds. To this end, we developed a non-covalent photo-patterning strategy for gelatin (denatured collagen) hydrogels utilizing a caged collagen mimetic peptide (caged CMP) which binds to gelatin strands through UV activated, triple helix hybridization. Here we present 2D and 3D photo-patterning of gelatin hydrogels enabled by the caged CMPs as well as creation of concentration gradients of CMPs. We show that photo-patterning of PEG-conjugated caged CMPs can be used to spatially control cell adhesion on gelatin films. CMP’s specificity for binding to gelatin allows patterning of almost any synthetic or natural gelatin-containing matrix, such as zymograms, gelatin-methacrylate hydrogels, and even a corneal tissue. Since the CMP is a chemically and biologically inert peptide which is proven to be an ideal carrier for bioactive molecules, our patterning method provides a radically new tool for immobilizing drugs to natural tissues and for functionalizing scaffolds for complex tissue formation. PMID:25476588

  15. Identification of an estrogen receptor α non covalent ubiquitin-binding surface: role in 17β-estradiol-induced transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesiri, Valeria; La Rosa, Piergiorgio; Stano, Pasquale; Acconcia, Filippo

    2013-06-15

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-binding domains (UBDs) located in Ub receptors decode the ubiquitination signal by non-covalently engaging the Ub modification on their binding partners and transduce the Ub signalling through Ub-based molecular interactions. In this way, inducible protein ubiquitination regulates diverse biological processes. The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the pleiotropic effects of the sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2). Fine regulation of E2 pleiotropic actions depends on E2-dependent ERα association with a plethora of binding partners and/or on the E2 modulation of receptor ubiquitination. Indeed, E2-induced ERα polyubiquitination triggers receptor degradation and transcriptional activity, and E2-dependent reduction in ERα monoubiquitination is crucial for E2 signalling. Monoubiquitinated proteins often contain UBDs, but whether non-covalent Ub-ERα binding could occur and play a role in E2-ERα signalling is unknown. Here, we report an Ub-binding surface within the ERα ligand binding domain that directs in vitro the receptor interaction with both ubiquitinated proteins and recombinant Ub chains. Mutational analysis reveals that ERα residues leucine 429 and alanine 430 are involved in Ub binding. Moreover, impairment of ERα association to ubiquitinated species strongly affects E2-induced ERα transcriptional activity. Considering the importance of UBDs in the Ub-based signalling network and the central role of different ERα binding partners in the modulation of E2-dependent effects, our discoveries provide novel insights into ERα activity that could also be relevant for ERα-dependent diseases.

  16. Buckling Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized with Carbene under Physical Adsorption of Polymer Chains: a Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajori, S.; Haghighi, S.; Ansari, R.

    2017-12-01

    The buckling analysis of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance for the better understanding of mechanical behavior of nanocomposites. The buckling behavior of carbene-functionalized CNTs (cfCNTs) under physical adsorption of polymer chains (cfCNTs/polymers) is studied in this paper by the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this regard, to investigate the interactions between non-covalent polymer chains and cfCNTs, two different non-covalent functional groups, i.e. polycarbonate (PC) and polypropylene (PP), are selected. The findings are compared with those of pure CNTs under the physical adsorption of polymer chains (pCNTs/polymers). The obtained results show that at a given weight percentage of non-covalent functional groups, the gyration radius of cfCNTs/polymers is higher than that of pCNTs/polymers. Furthermore, an increase in the critical buckling force of cfCNTs/polymers is dependent on the type of non-covalent polymer chains. For cfCNTs/PC and cfCNTs/PP, the critical buckling force is respectively lower and higher than that of pCNTs/polymers for the similar weight percentage of non-covalent functional groups. In addition, it is found that the critical buckling strain of cfCNTs/polymers is smaller than that of pCNTs/polymers for the same weight percentage of non-covalent polymer chains.

  17. Fabrication and non-covalent modification of highly oriented thin films of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication of the first thin film of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology (rho-ZMOF-1, ([In48(HImDC)96]48-)n) in a highly oriented fashion on a gold-functionalized substrate. The oriented rho-ZMOF-1 film was functionalized by non-covalent modification via post-synthetic exchange of different probe molecules, such as acridine yellow, methylene blue, and Nile red. In addition, encapsulation of a porphyrin moiety was achieved via in situ synthesis and construction of the rho-ZMOF. Adsorption kinetics of volatile organic compounds on rho-ZMOF-1 thin films was also investigated. This study suggests that rho-ZMOF-1 thin films can be regarded as a promising platform for various applications such as sensing and catalysis. This journal is

  18. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2015-08-27

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  19. Non-covalent attachment of silver nanoclusters onto single-walled carbon nanotubes with human serum albumin as linking molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Galván, Andrés, E-mail: andres.rodriguez@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Física, Dpto. Física Experimental, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer INCan-UNAM, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México, DF 14080 (Mexico); Heredia, Alejandro [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Amelines-Sarria, Oscar; Rivera, Margarita [Instituto de Física, Dpto. Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    The attachment of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the formation of integrated fluorescence sites has attracted much attention due their potential applications as biological probes and nanovectors in theragnosis. Here, we report the preparation through assembly of fluorescent quasi 1-D nanomaterial based on SWNTs and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) non-covalently attached to human serum albumin as biological linker. The fluorescent SWNT–AgNCs–HSA conjugates were characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), fluorescent and UV–vis spectroscopy. The above techniques confirmed that AgNCs were non-covalently attached onto the external surface of SWNTs. In addition, it was observed that the modification did not affect the optical properties of the synthesized AgNCs since the absorption spectra and fluorescence under UV irradiation (λ = 365 nm) remain the same. The effect of the functionalized systems was tested on mammal red blood cells (RBCs) and it was found that their structural integrity was compromised by the conjugates, limiting their biological and medical applications.

  20. Phytochemical, spectroscopic and density functional theory study of Diospyrin, and non-bonding interactions of Diospyrin with atmospheric gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazl-i-Sattar; Ullah, Zakir; Ata-ur-Rahman; Rauf, Abdur; Tariq, Muhammad; Tahir, Asif Ali; Ayub, Khurshid; Ullah, Habib

    2015-04-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and phytochemical study of a natural product, Diospyrin (DO) have been carried out. A suitable level of theory was developed, based on correlating the experimental and theoretical data. Hybrid DFT method at B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) level of theory is employed for obtaining the electronic, spectroscopic, inter-molecular interaction and thermodynamic properties of DO. The exact structure of DO is confirmed from the nice validation of the theory and experiment. Non-covalent interactions of DO with different atmospheric gases such as NH3, CO2, CO, and H2O were studied to find out its electroactive nature. The experimental and predicted geometrical parameters, IR and UV-vis spectra (B3LYP/6-31+G (d,p) level of theory) show excellent correlation. Inter-molecular non-bonding interaction of DO with atmospheric gases is investigated through geometrical parameters, electronic properties, charge analysis, and thermodynamic parameters. Electronic properties include, ionization potential (I.P.), electron affinities (E.A.), electrostatic potential (ESP), density of states (DOS), HOMO, LUMO, and band gap. All these characterizations have corroborated each other and confirmed the presence of non-covalent nature in DO with the mentioned gases.

  1. Phytochemical, spectroscopic and density functional theory study of Diospyrin, and non-bonding interactions of Diospyrin with atmospheric gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazl-i-Sattar; Ullah, Zakir; Ata-ur-Rahman; Rauf, Abdur; Tariq, Muhammad; Tahir, Asif Ali; Ayub, Khurshid; Ullah, Habib

    2015-04-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) and phytochemical study of a natural product, Diospyrin (DO) have been carried out. A suitable level of theory was developed, based on correlating the experimental and theoretical data. Hybrid DFT method at B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) level of theory is employed for obtaining the electronic, spectroscopic, inter-molecular interaction and thermodynamic properties of DO. The exact structure of DO is confirmed from the nice validation of the theory and experiment. Non-covalent interactions of DO with different atmospheric gases such as NH3, CO2, CO, and H2O were studied to find out its electroactive nature. The experimental and predicted geometrical parameters, IR and UV-vis spectra (B3LYP/6-31+G (d,p) level of theory) show excellent correlation. Inter-molecular non-bonding interaction of DO with atmospheric gases is investigated through geometrical parameters, electronic properties, charge analysis, and thermodynamic parameters. Electronic properties include, ionization potential (I.P.), electron affinities (E.A.), electrostatic potential (ESP), density of states (DOS), HOMO, LUMO, and band gap. All these characterizations have corroborated each other and confirmed the presence of non-covalent nature in DO with the mentioned gases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Leaf phenolics and seaweed tannins : analysis, enzymatic oxidation and non-covalent protein binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, Anne M.

    2017-01-01

    Upon extraction of proteins from sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) and oarweed (Laminaria digitata) for animal food and feed purposes, endogenous phenolics and proteins can interact with each other, which might affect the protein’s applicability. Sugar beet leaf proteins might become

  3. Quantifying Na(I)-insulin and K(I)-insulin non-covalent complexes by ESI-MS method and calculation of their equilibrium constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülfen, Mustafa; Özdemir, Abdil; Lin, Jung-Lee; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the dissociation and formation equilibrium constants of Na(I)-insulin and K(I)-insulin complexes have been calculated after the quantifying them on ESI mass spectrometer. The ESI-MS spectra of the complexes were measured by using the solvents as 50% MeOH in water and 100% water. The effect of pH on the Na(I)-insulin and K(I)-insulin complex formation were examined. Serial binding of Na(I) and K(I) ions to the insulin molecule were observed in the ESI-MS measurements. The first formation equilibrium constants were calculated as K f1 : 5.48×10 3 1/M for Na(I)-insulin complex and K f1 : 4.87×10 3 1/M for K(I)-insulin in water. The binding capability of Na(I) ions to insulin molecule is higher than the capability of K(I) ions. In case of a comparison together with Ca(II)-insulin and Mg(II)-insulin, the formation equilibrium constants (K f1 ) are in order of Ca(II)-insulin>Mg(II)-insulin>Na(I)-insulin>K(I)-insulin in water. The results showed that Na(I) and K(I) ions are involved in the formation of the non-covalent complexes with insulin molecule, since high extracellular and intracellular concentrations of them in the body. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrogels Based on Dynamic Covalent and Non Covalent Bonds: A Chemistry Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Picchioni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels based on reversible covalent bonds represent an attractive topic for research at both academic and industrial level. While the concept of reversible covalent bonds dates back a few decades, novel developments continue to appear in the general research area of gels and especially hydrogels. The reversible character of the bonds, when translated at the general level of the polymeric network, allows reversible interaction with substrates as well as responsiveness to variety of external stimuli (e.g., self-healing. These represent crucial characteristics in applications such as drug delivery and, more generally, in the biomedical world. Furthermore, the several possible choices that can be made in terms of reversible interactions generate an almost endless number of possibilities in terms of final product structure and properties. In the present work, we aim at reviewing the latest developments in this field (i.e., the last five years by focusing on the chemistry of the systems at hand. As such, this should allow molecular designers to develop a toolbox for the synthesis of new systems with tailored properties for a given application.

  5. A molecular dynamics study on the buckling behavior of cross-linked functionalized carbon nanotubes under physical adsorption of polymer chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajori, S.; Ansari, R.; Haghighi, S.

    2018-01-01

    The buckling behavior of cross-linked functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with polyethylene (PE) chains under physical adsorption of polymers (cfCNTs/polymer) is studied by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the results are compared with those for the pure CNTs under the physical adsorption of polymers. Considering non-covalent functionalization, the effect of type of functional group, i.e. aramid and PE chains, on the interactions between polymers and cfCNTs is investigated. Based on the results, the gyration radius of cfCNTs/polymer increases by raising the weight percentage of non-covalent polymer chains. Also, the simulation results for most cases demonstrate that the gyration radius of cfCNTs/polymer is larger than that of pure CNTs/polymer for the similar weight percentage of non-covalent polymer chains. Moreover, the critical buckling force and the critical buckling strain of the cfCNTs/polymer are lower than those of pure CNT/polymer for the similar weight percentage of non-covalent polymer chains, although some exceptions can be observed. Besides, by raising the weight percentage of non-covalent polymer chains, the critical buckling force cfCNTs/polymer increases for a specific weight percentage of cross-linked PE chains.

  6. Do we see what we should see? Describing non-covalent interactions in protein structures including precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Gurusaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of X-ray crystal structure analysis as a technique is to `see where the atoms are'. The results are extensively used by a wide variety of research communities. However, this `seeing where the atoms are' can give a false sense of security unless the precision of the placement of the atoms has been taken into account. Indeed, the presentation of bond distances and angles to a false precision (i.e. to too many decimal places is commonplace. This article has three themes. Firstly, a basis for a proper representation of protein crystal structure results is detailed and demonstrated with respect to analyses of Protein Data Bank entries. The basis for establishing the precision of placement of each atom in a protein crystal structure is non-trivial. Secondly, a knowledge base harnessing such a descriptor of precision is presented. It is applied here to the case of salt bridges, i.e. ion pairs, in protein structures; this is the most fundamental place to start with such structure-precision representations since salt bridges are one of the tenets of protein structure stability. Ion pairs also play a central role in protein oligomerization, molecular recognition of ligands and substrates, allosteric regulation, domain motion and α-helix capping. A new knowledge base, SBPS (Salt Bridges in Protein Structures, takes these structural precisions into account and is the first of its kind. The third theme of the article is to indicate natural extensions of the need for such a description of precision, such as those involving metalloproteins and the determination of the protonation states of ionizable amino acids. Overall, it is also noted that this work and these examples are also relevant to protein three-dimensional structure molecular graphics software.

  7. Electronic structure theory based study of proline interacting with gold nano clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sandhya; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-10-01

    Interaction between metal nanoparticles and biomolecules is important from the view point of developing and designing biosensors. Studies on proline tagged with gold nanoclusters are reported here using density functional theory (DFT) calculations for its structural, electronic and bonding properties. Geometries of the complexes are optimized using the PBE1PBE functional and mixed basis set, i. e., 6-311++G for the amino acid and SDD for the gold clusters. Equilibrium configurations are analyzed in terms of interaction energies, molecular orbitals and charge density. The complexes associated with cluster composed of an odd number of Au atoms show higher stability. Marked decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gaps is observed on complexation. Major components of interaction between the two moieties are: the anchoring N-Au and O-Au bond; and the non covalent interactions between Au and N-H or O-H bonds. The electron affinities and vertical ionization potentials for all complexes are calculated. They show an increased value of electron affinity and ionization potential on complexation. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis reveals a charge transfer between the donor (proline) and acceptor (gold cluster). The results indicate that the nature of interaction between the two moieties is partially covalent. Our results will be useful for further experimental studies and may be important for future applications.

  8. N-Epoxypropyl poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) covalently and non-covalently coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for PVC reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fangwei; Qu, Rongjun; Jia, Xinhua; Sun, Changmei; Sun, Hushan; An, Kai; Mu, Yinglei; Ji, Chunnuan; Yin, Ping; Zhang, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA) coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PPTA-MWNTs) showed an enhancement effect on the yield strength and Young's modulus of PVC composite films, but no improvement in toughness. In this paper, MWNTs were covalently and non-covalently coated by N-epoxypropyl PPTA (PPTA-ECH) to prepare PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-NH2-x and PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-x, which were used as additives to reinforce PVC composite films. It was found that the maximum yield strength, Young's modulus, and toughness of PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-NH2-x/PVC composite films increased by 227.84%, 201.56%, and 589.96%, respectively, in comparison to pure PVC, while those of PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-x/PVC composite films increased by 215.08%, 153.13%, and 540.81%, respectively. The maximum yield strength, maximum Young's modulus, and maximum toughness of both PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-NH2-x/PVC and PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-x/PVC showed significant improvement as compared to PPTA-MWNTs/PVC composite film and PPTA-MWNTs-NH2/PVC. This indicates that N-epoxypropyl PPTA covalently and non-covalently coated MWNTs are promising additives for reinforcing PVC.

  9. Surface functionalization of PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional spacer for active targeting in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamake, S I; Raut, S L [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Ranjan, A P; Vishwanatha, J K [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Gryczynski, Z, E-mail: jamboor.vishwanatha@unthsc.edu [Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-01-21

    This work reports the surface functionalization of polymeric PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional chemical crosslinker, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) for targeted cancer therapy. We dissolved BS3 in aqueous solution of PVA during formulation of nanoparticles by a modified solid/oil/water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The non-covalent insertion of BS3 was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curcumin and annexin A2 were used as a model drug and a cell specific target, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized for particle size, zeta potential and surface morphology. The qualitative assessment of antibody attachment was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as confocal microscopy. The optimized formulation showed antibody attachment of 86%. However, antibody attachment was abolished upon blocking the functional groups of BS3. The availability of functional antibodies was evaluated by the presence of a light chain fraction after gel electrophoresis. We further evaluated the in vitro release kinetics of curcumin from antibody coated and uncoated nanoparticles. The release of curcumin is enhanced upon antibody attachment and followed an anomalous release pattern. We also observed that the cellular uptake of nanoparticles was significantly higher in annexin A2 positive cells than in negative cells. Therefore, these results demonstrate the potential use of this method for functionalization as well as to deliver chemotherapeutic agents for treating cancer.

  10. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of Anion-pi Interactions: Binding Strength and Anion Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Sun, Zhenrong; Wang, Xue B.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed in theory and confirmed to exist, anion–π interactions have been recognized as new and important non-covalent binding forces. Despite extensive theoretical studies, numerous crystal structural identifications, and a plethora of solution phase investigations, intrinsic anion–π interaction strengths that are free from complications of condensed phases’ environments, have not been directly measured in the gas phase. Herein we present a joint photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical study on this subject, in which tetraoxacalix[2]arene[2]triazine 1, an electron-deficient and cavity self-tunable macrocyclic was used as a charge-neutral molecular host to probe its interactions with a series of anions with distinctly different shapes and charge states (spherical halides Cl⁻, Br⁻, I⁻, linear thiocyanate SCN⁻, trigonal planar nitrate NO₃⁻, pyramidic iodate IO₃⁻, and tetrahedral sulfate SO₄²⁻). The binding energies of the resultant gaseous 1:1 complexes (1•Cl⁻,1•Br⁻, 1•I⁻, 1•SCN⁻, 1•NO₃⁻, 1•IO₃⁻ and 1•SO₄²⁻) were directly measured experimentally, exhibiting substantial non-covalent interactions with pronounced anion specific effects. The binding strengths of Cl⁻, NO₃⁻, IO₃⁻ with 1 are found to be strongest among all singly charged anions, amounting to ca. 30 kcal/mol, but only about 40% of that between 1 and SO₄²⁻. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that all anions reside in the center of the cavity of 1 with anion–π binding motif in the complexes’ optimized structures, where 1 is seen to be able to self-regulate its cavity structure to accommodate anions of different geometries and three-dimensional shapes. Electron density surface and natural bond orbital charge distribution analysis further support anion–π binding formation. The calculated binding energies of the anions and 1 nicely reproduce the experimentally estimated electron binding energy increase. This work

  11. High level theoretical study of binding and of the potential energy surface in benzene-hydride system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coletti, Cecilia, E-mail: ccoletti@unich.it [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Re, Nazzareno [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: In-plane minimum geometries for benzene-H{sup -} non-covalent adducts: linear adduct (left) with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to one aromatic hydrogen; bifurcated adduct (right), with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to two adjacent aromatic hydrogens. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical study on covalent and non-covalent binding in benzene-hydride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two non-covalent stable adducts were characterized in the in-plane geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant sections of the potential energy surface were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of a very stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion upon covalent binding to carbon. - Abstract: High level ab initio calculations were performed on the interaction of the hydride anion with benzene, a system of potential interest for modelling the interactions occurring in hydrogen rich planetary atmospheres. We investigated both non-covalent and covalent binding, exploring the complete basis set limit using highly correlated MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Two non-covalent minima on the potential energy surface have been characterized, and found to correspond to moderately strong hydrogen bonding interactions. To gain further insight on the nature of binding, the total interaction energy was decomposed into its physically meaningful components and selected sections of the potential energy surface were calculated. Moreover, we found that H{sup -} can easily covalently bind to one of the carbon atoms of benzene to form a stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion, a global minimum on the potential energy surface, characterized by a puckered geometry, with a carbon atom bending out of the benzene plane. A slightly less stable planar C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} structure was also identified, corresponding to the transition state for the flipping motion of the puckered species.

  12. Pyruvate-sensitive AOX exists as a non-covalently associated dimer in the homeothermic spadix of the skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus renifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Yoshihiko; Kato, Yoshiaki; Abe, Yukie; Ito, Takanori; Ito-Inaba, Yasuko; Morohashi, Miyuki; Ito, Yuka; Ichikawa, Megumi; Matsukawa, Kazushige; Otsuka, Minoru; Koiwa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Kikukatsu

    2007-12-22

    The cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase (AOX) is a homodimeric protein whose activity can be regulated by the oxidation/reduction state and by alpha-keto acids. To further clarify the role of AOX in the skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus renifolius, we have performed expression and functional analyses of the encoding gene. Among the various tissues in the skunk cabbage, SrAOX transcripts were found to be specifically expressed in the thermogenic spadix. Moreover, our data demonstrate that the SrAOX protein exists as a non-covalently associated dimer in the thermogenic spadix, and is more sensitive to pyruvate than to other carboxylic acids. Our results suggest that the pyruvate-mediated modification of SrAOX activity plays a significant role in thermoregulation in the skunk cabbage.

  13. A versatile strategy towards non-covalent functionalization of graphene by surface-confined supramolecular self-assembly of Janus tectons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Du

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D, supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces is now well-mastered with several existing examples. However, one remaining challenge to enable future applications in nanoscience is to provide potential functionalities to the physisorbed adlayer. This work reviews a recently developed strategy that addresses this key issue by taking advantage of a new concept, Janus tecton materials. This is a versatile, molecular platform based on the design of three-dimensional (3D building blocks consisting of two faces linked by a cyclophane-type pillar. One face is designed to steer 2D self-assembly onto C(sp2-carbon-based flat surfaces, the other allowing for the desired functionality above the substrate with a well-controlled lateral order. In this way, it is possible to simultaneously obtain a regular, non-covalent paving as well as supramolecular functionalization of graphene, thus opening interesting perspectives for nanoscience applications.

  14. Alecto 2 - interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, J.P.; Clouet d'Orval, Ch.; Mougniot, J.C.; Penet, F.

    1965-01-01

    Weak interactions were experimentally studies with the tank of the critical assembly Alecto II and one, two or three bottles containing solutions of various concentrations. In particular, was studied the validity of certain classical assumptions, shielding effects, screening and semi-reflexion effects, importance of thermal coupling. The method of the 'k eff , solid angle' is shown to apply to such a system. The determination by divergence and pulsed neutron technique of the reactivity related to a millimeter of solution level affords the obtention of critical heights in terms of reactivity. (authors) [fr

  15. Interactions of hemin with bovine serum albumin and human hemoglobin: A fluorescence quenching study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2018-03-01

    The binding interactions between hemin (Hmi) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) or human hemoglobin (HHb), respectively, have been examined in aqueous solution at pH = 7.4, applying UV-vis absorption, as well as steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques. Representative results received for both BSA and HHb intrinsic fluorescence proceeding from the interactions with hemin suggest the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes in both the Hmi-BSA and Hmi-HHb systems, with highly possible concurrent formation of a coordinate bond between a group on the protein surface and the metal in Hmi molecule. All the values of calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants point to the involvement of static quenching in both the systems studied. The blue shift in the synchronous fluorescence spectra imply the participation of both tryptophan and tyrosine residues in quenching of BSA and HHb intrinsic fluorescence. Depicted outcomes suggest that hemin is supposedly able to influence the physiological functions of BSA and HHb, the most important blood proteins, particularly in case of its overuse.

  16. Peptide carrier-mediated non-covalent delivery of unmodified cisplatin, methotrexate and other agents via intravenous route to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid pre-clinical evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against brain cancers and other neurological disorders remains largely unattained due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which limits transport of most therapeutic compounds to the brain. A synthetic peptide carrier, K16ApoE, was previously developed that enabled transport of target proteins to the brain by mimicking a ligand-receptor system. The peptide carrier was found to generate transient BBB permeability, which was utilized for non-covalent delivery of cisplatin, methotrexate and other compounds to the brain. APPROACH: Brain delivery of the chemotherapeutics and other agents was achieved either by injecting the carrier peptide and the drugs separately or as a mixture, to the femoral vein. A modification of the method comprised injection of K16ApoE pre-mixed with cetuximab, followed by injection of a 'small-molecule' drug. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven-of-seven different small molecules were successfully delivered to the brain via K16ApoE. Depending on the method, brain uptake with K16ApoE was 0.72-1.1% for cisplatin and 0.58-0.92% for methotrexate (34-50-fold and 54-92 fold greater for cisplatin and methotrexate, respectively, with K16ApoE than without. Visually intense brain-uptake of Evans Blue, Light Green SF and Crocein scarlet was also achieved. Direct intracranial injection of EB show locally restricted distribution of the dye in the brain, whereas K16ApoE-mediated intravenous injection of EB resulted in the distribution of the dye throughout the brain. Experiments with insulin suggest that ligand-receptor signaling intrinsic to the BBB provides a natural means for passive transport of some molecules across the BBB. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the carrier peptide can non-covalently transport various chemotherapeutic agents to the brain. Thus, the method offers an avenue for pre-clinical evaluation of various small and large therapeutic molecules

  17. Nonclinical pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characterisation of somapacitan: A reversible non-covalent albumin-binding growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Peter; Andersen, Henrik Sune; Behrens, Carsten; Fels, Johannes Josef; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Rischel, Christian; Johansen, Nils Langeland

    2017-08-01

    Somapacitan is an albumin-binding growth hormone derivative intended for once weekly administration, currently in clinical development for treatment of adult as well as juvenile GH deficiency. Nonclinical in vivo pharmacological characterisation of somapacitan was performed to support the clinical trials. Here we present the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of somapacitan in rats, minipigs, and cynomolgus monkeys. Pharmacokinetic studies investigating exposure, absorption, clearance, and bioavailability after single intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration were performed in all species. A dose-response study with five dose levels and a multiple dose pharmacodynamic study with four once weekly doses was performed in hypophysectomised rats to evaluate the effect of somapacitan on growth and IGF-I production. Pharmacokinetic profiles indicated first order absorption from the subcutaneous tissue after s.c. injections for somapacitan in all three species. Apparent terminal half-lives were 5-6h in rats, 10-12h in minipigs, and 17-20h in monkeys. Somapacitan induced a dose-dependent growth in hypophysectomised rats (ppharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of somapacitan showed similar pharmacokinetic properties, with no absorption-limited elimination, increased clearance and increased and sustained levels of IGF-I in plasma for up to 10days after a single dose administration in all three species. Somapacitan induced a dose-dependent increase in body weight and IGF-I levels in hypophysectomised rats. Multiple dosing of somapacitan in hypophysectomised rats suggested a linear growth for the first 3-4days in each weekly dosing interval, whereas daily hGH dosing showed linear growth for approximately two weeks before reaching a plateau level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The use of radiolabelled milk proteins to study thermally-induced interactions in milk systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat induced complexes between milk proteins are of considerable importance in determining the heat stability and rennin clottability of milk products. Thiol-disulfide interchange reactions have been suggested as the principal reaction mechanism for complex formation. Studies to data have not adequately established the mechanism and stoichiometry of complex formation in situ in total milk system. Tracer amounts of 14 C-β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin were heated under various conditions. After clotting with rennet, radioactivity retained in the curd was counted to estimate extent of interaction of β-lactoglobulin with casein. 14 C- and 3 H-Methyl labelled proteins were used for the preparation of radiolabelled artificial casein micelles. These micelles with radiolabelled whey proteins were heated and heat-induced complexes were separated on Sephacryl S-300 eluting with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride to break all non-covalent bonds. Further separation of the protein complexes was obtained using CPG-10 or Sephacryl S-1000. The ratios of 3 H to 14 C labelled proteins in the protein complexes suggested that the stoichiometries of k-, α s2 -casein, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin in the heat-induced complexes varied as a function of the heat treatment

  19. Noncovalent cation-π interactions – their role in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Fink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions – cation-π interactions – is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation–aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  20. Mass Spectrometric and Spectrofluorometric Studies of the Interaction of Aristolochic Acids with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Hu, Qin; Chan, Wan

    2015-10-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent carcinogen and nephrotoxin and is associated with the development of “Chinese herb nephropathy” and Balkan endemic nephropathy. Despite decades of research, the specific mechanism of the observed nephrotoxicity has remained elusive and the potential effects on proteins due to the observed toxicity of AA are not well-understood. To better understand the pharmacotoxicological features of AA, we investigated the non-covalent interactions of AA with proteins. The protein-binding properties of AA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were characterized using spectrofluorometric and mass spectrometric (MS) techniques. Moreover, the protein-AA complexes were clearly identified by high-resolution MS analyses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence of non-covalently bound protein-AA complexes. An analysis of the spectrofluorometric data by a modified Stern-Volmer plot model also revealed that both aristolochic acid I (AAI) and aristolochic acid II (AAII) were bound to BSA and lysozyme in 1:1 stoichiometries. A significantly stronger protein binding property was observed in AAII than in AAI as evidenced by the spectrofluorometric and MS analyses, which may explain the observed higher mutagenicity of AAII.

  1. A theoretical study on the interaction of aromatic amino acids with graphene and single walled carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Chinagandham; Majumder, Chiranjib; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-03-28

    In this study we have investigated the interaction of phenylalanine (Phe), histidine (His), tyrosine (Tyr), and tryptophan (Tryp) molecules with graphene and single walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with an aim to understand the effect of curvature on the non-covalent interaction. The calculations are performed using density functional theory and the Moller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) within linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approach. Using these methods, the equilibrium configurations of these complexes were found to be very similar, i.e., the aromatic rings of the amino acids prefer to orient in parallel with respect to the plane of the substrates, which bears the signature of weak pi-pi interactions. The binding strength follows the trend: Hisinteractions, we have calculated the polarizability of the aromatic motifs of the amino acids. Remarkably, we find excellent correlation between the polarizability and the strength of the interaction; the higher the polarizability, greater is the binding strength. Moreover, we have analyzed the electronic densities of state spectrum before and after adsorption of the amino acid moieties. The results reveal that the Fermi level of the free CNT is red-shifted by the adsorption of the amino acids and the degree of shift is consistent with the trend in polarizability of these molecules.

  2. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  3. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashynska, Vlada; Stepanian, Stepan; Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms

  4. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashynska, Vlada, E-mail: vlada@vl.kharkov.ua [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Stepanian, Stepan [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly [Institute of Organic Chemistry of Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudosok korutja, 2, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary); Adamowicz, Ludwik [University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms.

  5. Interactions between plant proteins/enzymes and other food components, and their effects on food quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chenyan; Zhao, Guanghua; Ning, Yong

    2017-05-24

    Plant proteins are the main sources of dietary protein for humans, especially for vegetarians. There are a variety of components with different properties coexisting in foodstuffs, so the interactions between these components are inevitable to occur, thereby affecting food quality. Among these interactions, the interplay between plant proteins/enzymes from fruits and vegetables, cereals, and legumes and other molecules plays an important role in food quality, which recently has gained a particular scientific interest. Such interactions not only affect the appearances of fruits and vegetables and the functionality of cereal products but also the nutritive properties of plant foods. Non-covalent forces, such as hydrogen bond, hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, and van der Waals forces, are mainly responsible for these interactions. Future outlook is highlighted with aim to suggest a research line to be followed in further studies.

  6. Calculations on Noncovalent Interactions and Databases of Benchmark Interaction Energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2012), s. 663-672 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non-covalent interactions * covalent interactions * quantum chemical approach Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 20.833, year: 2012

  7. The Hydroxyl Functionality and a Rigid Proximal N are Required for Forming a Novel Non-Covalent Quinine-Heme Complex†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alumasa, John N.; Gorka, Alexander P.; Casabianca, Leah B.; Comstock, Erica; de Dios, Angel C.; Roepe, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Quinoline antimalarial drugs bind both monomeric and dimeric forms of free heme, with distinct preferences depending on the chemical environment. Under biological conditions, chloroquine (CQ) appears to prefer to bind to μ-oxo dimeric heme, while quinine (QN) preferentially binds monomer. To further explore this important distinction, we study three newly synthesized and several commercially available QN analogues lacking various functional groups. We find that removal of the QN hydroxyl lowers heme affinity, hemozoin (Hz) inhibition efficiency, and antiplasmodial activity. Elimination of the rigid quinuclidyl ring has similar effects, but elimination of either the vinyl or methoxy group does not. Replacing the quinuclidyl N with a less rigid tertiary aliphatic N only partially restores activity. To further study these trends, we probe drug-heme interactions via NMR studies with both Fe and Zn protoporphyrin IX (FPIX, ZnPIX) for QN, dehydroxyQN (DHQN), dequinuclidylQN (DQQN), and deamino-dequinuclidylQN (DADQQN). Magnetic susceptibility measurements in the presence of FPIX demonstrate that these compounds differentially perturb FPIX monomer-dimer equilibrium. We also isolate the QN-FPIX complex formed under mild aqueous conditions and analyze it by mass spectrometry, as well as fluorescence, vibrational, and solid state NMR spectroscopies. The data elucidate key features of QN pharmacology and allow us to propose a refined model for the preferred binding of QN to monomeric FPIX under biologically relevant conditions. With this model in hand, we also propose how QN, CQ, and amodiaquine (AQ) differ in their ability to inhibit Hz formation. PMID:20864177

  8. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, W.A. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  9. DNA binding properties, histidine interaction and cytotoxicity studies of water soluble ruthenium(ii) terpyridine complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazić, Dejan; Arsenijević, Aleksandar; Puchta, Ralph; Bugarčić, Živadin D; Rilak, Ana

    2016-03-21

    In this study, two representatives of previously synthesized ruthenium(ii) terpyridine complexes, i.e., [Ru(Cl-tpy)(en)Cl][Cl] (1) and [Ru(Cl-tpy)(dach)Cl][Cl] (2), were chosen and a detailed study of the kinetic parameters of their reactivity toward l-histidine (l-His), using the UV-Vis and (1)H NMR techniques, was developed. The inner molecular rearrangement from N3-coordinated l-His to the N1 bound isomer, observable in the NMR data, was corroborated by DFT calculations favoring N1 coordination by nearly 4 kcal mol(-1). These two ruthenium(ii) terpyridine complexes were investigated for their interactions with DNA employing UV-Vis spectroscopy, DNA viscosity measurements and fluorescence quenching measurements. The high binding constants obtained in the DNA binding studies (Kb = 10(4)-10(5) M(-1)) suggest a strong binding of the complexes to calf thymus (CT) DNA. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) showed that the complexes can displace DNA-bound EB, suggesting strong competition with EB (Ksv = 1.5-2.5 × 10(4) M(-1)). In fact, the results indicate that these complexes can bind to DNA covalently and non-covalently. In order to gain insight of the behavior of a neutral compound, besides the four previously synthesized cationic complexes [Ru(Cl-tpy)(en)Cl][Cl] (1), [Ru(Cl-tpy)(dach)Cl][Cl] (2), [Ru(Cl-tpy)(bpy)Cl][Cl] (3) and [Ru(tpy)Cl3] (P2), a new complex, [Ru(Cl-tpy)(pic)Cl] (4), was used in the biological studies. Their cytotoxicity was investigated against three different tumor cell lines, i.e., A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), HCT116 (human colon carcinoma cell line), and CT26 (mouse colon carcinoma cell line), by the MTT assay. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher activity than complexes 3, 4 and P2 against all the selected cell lines. The results on in vitro anticancer activity confirmed that only compounds that hydrolyze the monodentate ligand at a reasonable rate show moderate activity, provided that the chelate ligand is a hydrogen bond

  10. Spectroscopic, electrochemical and molecular docking study of the binding interaction of a small molecule 5H-naptho[2,1-f][1,2] oxathieaphine 2,2-dioxide with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Mondal, Shovan; Singh, Bula

    2017-08-01

    The interaction of 5H-naptho[2,1-f][1,2]oxathieaphine2,2-dioxide (NOTD) with calf thymus DNA in Tris-HCl buffer at physiological pH was investigated with the help of various spectroscopic and electrochemical methods along with molecular docking study. Studying the non-covalent binding interaction of a neutral fluorophore with ctDNA has become an active field of research at the interface between medicinal chemistry and biological science. NOTD is known for its various toxicological, skin sensitization, and antiviral properties. Still, to date, its interaction style with ctDNA is not well elucidated. UV-vis absorption, fluorescence emission and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) suggest the complex formation between NOTD and ctDNA with binding constant value in the order of 3.12-4.1(×10 4 )M -1 . Binding nature of NOTD with ctDNA is affirmed from the DNA helix melting experiment, comparative displacement assay using known DNA intercalator, cyclic voltammetry and finally molecular docking study. It was evident from experimental result that the probe NOTD binds with ctDNA in groove binding mode as manifested by a decrease in iodide quenching effect, spectral change in CD, a substantial increase in denaturing temperature in DNA and change in potential value. Furthermore, the molecular docking study insisted the above mentioned experimental result in a very affectionate way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effect of Hydration on the Cation-π Interaction Between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6-31G(d,p) basis set reveal a qualitative trend in the relative affinity of different cations for benzene and water in these complexes. The π–cloud thickness values for benzene have also been estimated for these systems. Keywords. Cation-π interaction; π-thickness; non-covalent interaction; hydration; alkali and alkaline earth.

  12. Introduction to a Protein Interaction System Used for Quantitative Evaluation of Biomolecular Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Yamniuk, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of molecular biology is the determination of biomolecular function. This comes largely from a knowledge of the non-covalent interactions that biological small and macro-molecules experience. The fundamental mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the ABRF is to show how solution biophysical tools are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core t...

  13. Enzyme-induced gelation of extensively hydrolyzed whey proteins by alcalase: comparison with the plastein reaction and characterization of interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Dany; Gauthier, Sylvie F; Otter, Don E; Foegeding, E Allen

    2003-09-24

    Extensive hydrolysis of whey protein isolate by Alcalase 2.4L produces a gel. The objectives of this study were to compare enzyme-induced gelation with the plastein reaction by determining the types of interactions involved in gelation. The average chain length of the peptides did not increase during hydrolysis and reached a plateau after 30 min to be approximately 4 residues, suggesting that the gel was formed by small molecular weight peptides held together by non-covalent interactions. The enzyme-induced gel network was stable over a wide range of pH and ionic strength and, therefore, showed some similarities with the plastein reaction. Disulfide bonds were not involved in the gel network. The gelation seems to be caused by physical aggregation, mainly via hydrophobic interactions with hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions playing a minor role.

  14. New mixed ligand palladium(II) complexes based on the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate and bioactive nitrogen-donor ligands: Synthesis, structural characterization, binding interactions with DNA and BSA, in vitro cytotoxicity studies and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Leila; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Tavakol, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    The complexes [Pd(valp)2(imidazole)2] (1), [Pd(valp)2(pyrazine)2] (2) (valp is sodium valproate) have been synthesized and characterized using IR, 1H NMR, 13C{1H} NMR and UV-Vis spectrometry. The interaction of complexes with CT-DNA has been investigated using spectroscopic tools and viscosity measurement. In each case, the association constant (Kb) was deduced from the absorption spectral study and the number of binding sites (n) and the binding constant (K) were calculated from relevant fluorescence quenching data. As a result, a non-covalent interaction between the metal complex and DNA was suggested, which could be assigned to an intercalative binding. In addition, the interaction of 1 and 2 was ventured with bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the help of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Through these techniques, the apparent association constant (Kapp) and the binding constant (K) could be calculated for each complex. Evaluation of cytotoxic activity of the complexes against four different cancer cell lines proved that the complexes exhibited cytotoxic specificity and significant cancer cell inhibitory rate. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to provide more evidence about the observed data. The majority of trans isomers were supported not only by energies, but also by the similarity of its calculated IR frequencies, UV adsorptions and NMR chemical shifts to the experimental values.

  15. Granule-stored MUC5B mucins are packed by the non-covalent formation of N-terminal head-to-head tetramers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; Nilsson, Harriet E; Recktenwald, Christian V; Ermund, Anna; Ridley, Caroline; Meiss, Lauren N; Bähr, Andrea; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Wine, Jeffrey J; Koeck, Philip J B; Thornton, David J; Hebert, Hans; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2018-04-13

    Most MUC5B mucin polymers in the upper airways of humans and pigs are produced by submucosal glands. MUC5B forms N-terminal covalent dimers that are further packed into larger assemblies because of low pH and high Ca 2+ in the secretory granule of the mucin-producing cell. We purified the recombinant MUC5B N-terminal covalent dimer and used single-particle electron microscopy to study its structure under intracellular conditions. We found that, at intragranular pH, the dimeric MUC5B organized into head-to-head noncovalent tetramers where the von Willebrand D1-D2 domains hooked into each other. These N-terminal tetramers further formed long linear complexes from which, we suggest, the mucin domains and their C termini project radially outwards. Using conventional and video microscopy, we observed that, upon secretion into the submucosal gland ducts, a flow of bicarbonate-rich fluid passes the mucin-secreting cells. We suggest that this unfolds and pulls out the MUC5B assemblies into long linear threads. These further assemble into thicker mucin bundles in the glandular ducts before emerging at the gland duct opening. We conclude that the combination of intracellular packing of the MUC5B mucin and the submucosal gland morphology creates an efficient machine for producing linear mucin bundles. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Density functional theory and phytochemical study of 8-hydroxyisodiospyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Zakir; Ata-ur-Rahman; Fazl-i-Sattar; Rauf, Abdur; Yaseen, Muhammad; Hassan, Waseem; Tariq, Muhammad; Ayub, Khurshid; Tahir, Asif Ali; Ullah, Habib

    2015-09-01

    Comprehensive theoretical and experimental studies of a natural product, 8-hydroxyisodiospyrin (HDO) have been carried out. Based on the correlation of experimental and theoretical data, an appropriate computational model was developed for obtaining the electronic, spectroscopic, and thermodynamic parameters of HDO. First of all, the exact structure of HDO is confirmed from the nice correlation of theory and experiment, prior to determination of its electroactive nature. Hybrid density functional theory (DFT) is employed for all theoretical simulations. The experimental and predicted IR and UV-vis spectra [B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory] have excellent correlation. Inter-molecular non-covalent interaction of HDO with different gases such as NH3, CO2, CO, H2O is investigated through geometrical counterpoise (gCP) i.e., B3LYP-gCP-D3/6-31G∗ method. Furthermore, the inter-molecular interaction is also supported by geometrical parameters, electronic properties, thermodynamic parameters and charge analysis. All these characterizations have corroborated each other and confirmed the electroactive nature (non-covalent interaction ability) of HDO for the studied gases. Electronic properties such as Ionization Potential (IP), Electron Affinities (EA), electrostatic potential (ESP), density of states (DOS), HOMO, LUMO, and band gap of HDO have been estimated for the first time theoretically.

  17. CRITIC2: A program for real-space analysis of quantum chemical interactions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Johnson, Erin R.; Luaña, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    We present CRITIC2, a program for the analysis of quantum-mechanical atomic and molecular interactions in periodic solids. This code, a greatly improved version of the previous CRITIC program (Otero-de-la Roza et al., 2009), can: (i) find critical points of the electron density and related scalar fields such as the electron localization function (ELF), Laplacian, … (ii) integrate atomic properties in the framework of Bader’s Atoms-in-Molecules theory (QTAIM), (iii) visualize non-covalent interactions in crystals using the non-covalent interactions (NCI) index, (iv) generate relevant graphical representations including lines, planes, gradient paths, contour plots, atomic basins, … and (v) perform transformations between file formats describing scalar fields and crystal structures. CRITIC2 can interface with the output produced by a variety of electronic structure programs including WIEN2k, elk, PI, abinit, Quantum ESPRESSO, VASP, Gaussian, and, in general, any other code capable of writing the scalar field under study to a three-dimensional grid. CRITIC2 is parallelized, completely documented (including illustrative test cases) and publicly available under the GNU General Public License. Catalogue identifier: AECB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECB_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11686949 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 337020731 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 and 90. Computer: Workstations. Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Shared-memory parallelization can be used for most tasks. Classification: 7.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECB_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 157 Nature of problem: Analysis of quantum

  18. Non-covalent synthesis of organic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the synthesis, characterization and functionalization of hydrogen bonded, box-like assemblies. These assemblies are formed upon mixing bismelamine calix[4]arenes with a complementary barbiturate in apolar solvents. Various techniques for the characterization have been used,

  19. Non-covalent PEGylation of therapeutic proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cette thèse en sciences pharmaceutiques se penchait sur la stabilisation des protéines thérapeutiques en solutions. Cette classe de médicaments possède quelques avantages par rapport aux petites molécules. L’avantage le plus important est qu’ils ont le potentiel d’avoir une affinité et une spécificité supérieure contre leur cible. La principale problématique avec les formulations de protéines thérapeutiques réside dans leur faible stabilité due à leur structure tertiaire qui est dynamique et ...

  20. Synthesis, characterization, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxicity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes derived from dipyridyl triazole ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Di; Wei, Yi; Tang, Jie; Bian, He-Dong; Huang, Fu-Ping; Liang, Hong

    2016-06-15

    Four different transition metal complexes containing dipyridyl triazole ligands, namely [Cu(abpt)2Cl2]·2H2O (1), [Cu(abpt)2(ClO4)2] (2), [Co2(abpt)2(H2O)2Cl2]·Cl2·4H2O (3) and [Co2(Hbpt)2(CH3OH)2(NO3)2] (4) have been designed, synthesized and further structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, ESI-MS, elemental analysis, IR and Raman spectroscopy. In these complexes, the both ligands act as bidentate ligands with N, N donors. DNA binding interactions with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) of the ligand and its complexes 1~4 were investigated via electronic absorption, fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and viscosity measurements as well as confocal Laser Raman spectroscopy. The results show these complexes are able to bind to DNA via the non-covalent mode i.e. intercalation and groove binding or electrostatic interactions. The interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also studied using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods which indicated that fluorescence quenching of BSA by these compounds was the presence of both static and dynamic quenching. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxic effects of the complexes against four cell lines SK-OV-3, HL-7702, BEL7404 and NCI-H460 showed the necessity of the coordination action on the biological properties on the respective complex and that all four complexes exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Conglutinin binds the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp 160 and inhibits its interaction with cell membrane CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Sørensen, A M; Svehag, S E

    1991-01-01

    The highly glycosylated envelope glycoprotein (gp 160) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the CD4 molecule present on the membrane of CD4+ cells and is involved in the pathobiology of HIV infection. Lectins bind glycoproteins through non-covalent interactions with specific hexose...

  2. To bend or not to bend – are heteroatom interactions within conjugated molecules effective in dictating conformation and planarity?

    KAUST Repository

    Conboy, Gary

    2016-04-26

    We consider the roles of heteroatoms (mainly nitrogen, the halogens and the chalcogens) in dictating the conformation of linear conjugated molecules and polymers through non-covalent intramolecular interactions. Whilst hydrogen bonding is a competitive and sometimes more influential interaction, we provide unambiguous evidence that heteroatoms are able to determine the conformation of such materials with reasonable predictability.

  3. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  4. Intermolecular interactions of decamethoxinum and acetylsalicylic acid in systems of various complexity levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Vashchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions between decamethoxinum (DEC and acetylsalicylic acid (ASА have been studied in the phospholipid-containing systems of escalating complexity levels. The host media for these substances were solvents, L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC membranes, and samples of human erythrocytes. Peculiar effects caused by DEC-ASА interaction have been observed in each system using appropriate techniques: (a DEC-ASА non-covalent complexes formation in DPPC-containing systems were revealed by mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization; (b joint DEC-ASА action on DPPC model membranes led to increasing of membrane melting temperature Tm, whereas individual drugs caused pronounced Tm decreasing, which was demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry; (c deceleration of DEC-induced haemolysis of erythrocytes under joint DEC-ASА application was observed by optical microscopy.

  5. Magnetic, structural and computational studies on transition metal complexes of a neurotransmitter, histamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaştaş, Gökhan; Paşaoğlu, Hümeyra; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the transition metal complexes of histamine (His) prepared with oxalate (Ox), that is, [Cu(His)(Ox)(H 2O)], [Zn(His)(Ox)(H 2O)] (or [Zn(His)(Ox)]·(H 2O)), [Cd(His)(Ox)(H 2O) 2] and [Co(His)(Ox)(H 2O)], are investigated experimentally and computationally as part of ongoing studies on the mode of complexation, the tautomeric form and non-covalent interactions of histamine in supramolecular structures. The structural properties of prepared complexes are experimentally studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and computationally by density functional theory (DFT). The magnetic properties of the complexes are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. The [Cu(His)(Ox)(H 2O)] complex has a supramolecular structure constructed by two different non-covalent interactions as hydrogen bond and C-H⋯π interactions. EPR studies on [Cu(His)(Ox)(H 2O)], Cu 2+-doped [Zn(His)(Ox)(H 2O)] and [Cd(His)(Ox)(H 2O) 2] complexes show that the paramagnetic centers have axially symmetric g values. It is also found that the ground state of the unpaired electrons in the complexes is dominantly d and unpaired electrons' life time is spent over this orbital.

  6. Two-dimensional Al hydroxide interaction with cancerous cell membrane building units: Complexed free energy and orientation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, A. A.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-09-01

    The application of hierarchical nanoparticles based on metal hydroxides in biomedicine, including anticancer therapy and medical imaging, is a rapidly developing field. Low-dimensional aluminum oxyhydroxide nanomaterials (AlOOH-NM) are quite promising base to develop hybrid theranostic nano-agents with core-shell architecture, which is determined by AlOOH-NMs physicochemical properties such as: large specific surface area, pH-dependent charge, amphoteric behavior, high surface density of polar groups capable to form non-covalent bonds, low or null cytotoxicity and biocompatibility. Characterization of the system behavior within interface between NM and plasmatic membrane is crucial for the understanding of nano-agent—cell interaction. In the present work the complex in silico study including the free energy estimation and orientation analysis of phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) lipids interacting with AlOOH nanosheet was conducted to understand the effect of such nanomaterial on cancerous cell plasmatic membrane.

  7. Reciprocal carbonyl-carbonyl interactions in small molecules and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Abdur; Saha, Pinaki; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Sukumar, Nagamani; Sarma, Bani Kanta

    2017-07-19

    Carbonyl-carbonyl n→π* interactions where a lone pair (n) of the oxygen atom of a carbonyl group is delocalized over the π* orbital of a nearby carbonyl group have attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to their ability to affect the 3D structure of small molecules, polyesters, peptides, and proteins. In this paper, we report the discovery of a "reciprocal" carbonyl-carbonyl interaction with substantial back and forth n→π* and π→π* electron delocalization between neighboring carbonyl groups. We have carried out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to show the presence of this interaction in both small molecules and proteins. In proteins, these interactions are primarily found in polyproline II (PPII) helices. As PPII are the most abundant secondary structures in unfolded proteins, we propose that these local interactions may have implications in protein folding.Carbonyl-carbonyl π* non covalent interactions affect the structure and stability of small molecules and proteins. Here, the authors carry out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to describe an additional type of carbonyl-carbonyl interaction.

  8. A heuristic approach to evaluate peri interactions versus intermolecular interactions in an overcrowded naphthalene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Tayur N. Guru

    2017-01-01

    Octachloronaphthalene (OCN), a serious environmental pollutant, has been investigated by charge density analysis to unravel several unexplored factors responsible for steric overcrowding. The topological features of the enigmatic peri interactions contributing to steric overcrowding are qualified and quantified from experimental and theoretical charge-density studies. A new facet in the fundamental understanding of peri interactions is revealed by NCI (non-covalent interaction) analysis. The potential role of these interactions in deforming the molecular geometry and subsequent effect on aromaticity are substantiated from NICS (Nuclear Independent Chemical Shift) and QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) calculations. The eye-catching dissimilarity in the out-of-plane twisting of OCN renders the molecule in an asymmetric geometry in the crystalline phase compared with symmetric geometry in the optimized solvated phase. This is uniquely characterized by their molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), respectively, and is explained in terms of conflict between two opposing forces – peri interactions, and symbiotic intermolecular Cl⋯Cl and Cl⋯π contacts. PMID:28250940

  9. Stabilization and Structure Calculations for Noncovalent Interactions in Extended Molecular Systems Based on Wave Function and Density Functional Theories

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, K. E.; Pitoňák, Michal; Jurečka, P.; Hobza, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 9 (2010), s. 5023-5063 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non covalent interactions * wave function theories * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 33.033, year: 2010

  10. Study of 12C interactions at HISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.

    1982-12-01

    Single-particle inclusive measurements in high-energy nuclear physics have provided the foundation for a number of models of interacting nuclear fluids. Such measurements yield information on the endpoints of the evolution of highly excited nuclear systems. However, they suffer from the fact that observed particles can be formed in a large number of very different evolutionary paths. To learn more about how interactions proceed we have performed a series of experiments in which all fast nuclear fragments are analyzed for each individual interaction. These experiments were performed at the LBL Bevalac HISS (Heavy Ion Spectrometer System) facility where we studied the interaction of 1 GeV/nuc 12C nuclei with targets of C, CH 2 , Cu, and U. In this paper we describe HISS and present some preliminary results of the experiment

  11. How accurate is the description of ligand-protein interactions by a hybrid QM/MM approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollar, Jakub; Frecer, Vladimir

    2017-12-12

    During the last decades, the application of hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods has been extended to the field of drug design. In principle, the approximate QM/MM approach offers a more complete description of drug-receptor non-covalent interactions. This is especially true when charge or proton transfer, chelation of metal ions or strong polarization of ligand and protein or surface chemical groups are involved. The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of calculated non-covalent ligand-protein interaction energies ([Formula: see text]) obtained by the hybrid QM/MM approach employed in QSite/Jaguar of Schrödinger's Small-Molecule Drug Discovery Suite on a set of small-molecule model systems when compared to rigorous QM calculations. The QM/MM approach was used at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory with 6-31G* basis set, hybrid B3LYP functional and OPLS-2005 force field (DFT-B3LYP/6-31G*//OPLS-2005), a popular combination frequently used in studies on larger and complex biological systems such as drug-receptor complexes. In this work, we did not attempt to compute the most precise interaction energies of the model systems. We rather tried to assess the performance of the approximate QM/MM vs. full QM approach at the same computationally accessible level. For effective use of the QM/MM approach it is essential to select an appropriate QM region of the studied systems. To aid the selection of specific protein residues or functional groups to be included in the QM region, we evaluated the effect of its size, composition and symmetry on the accuracy of the QM/MM calculated [Formula: see text]. This was performed by means of a set of model clusters with well-defined configurations, which mimic the basic types of non-covalent interactions in proteins. Based on these systematic quantitative comparisons, recommendations for the addition of chemical groups or protein residues into the QM region are proposed for the popular

  12. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  13. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  14. [Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Dulce Maria; Portella, Jean Cristtus; Bianchi e Silva, Laura

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this experience report is to present the Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions (Laboratório de Estudos Semióticos nas Interações de Cuidado - LESIC). The lab was set up at the Nursing School of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil in 2010. It has the purpose of providing didactic and pedagogical updates, based on the Theory developed by the Paris School of Semiotics, that enable the increase of knowledge and interactive/observational skills regarding the nature and mastery of human care.

  15. A Study of Multiplicities in Hadronic Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Tristan, Nora Patricia; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2006-02-01

    Using data from the SELEX (Fermilab E781) experiment obtained with a minimum-bias trigger, we study multiplicity and angular distributions of secondary particles produced in interactions in the experimental targets. We observe interactions of {Sigma}{sup -}, proton, {pi}{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +}, at beam momenta between 250 GeV/c and 650 GeV/c, in copper, polyethylene, graphite, and beryllium targets. We show that the multiplicity and angular distributions for meson and baryon beams at the same momentum are identical. We also show that the mean multiplicity increases with beam momentum, and presents only small variations with the target material.

  16. Systems interaction study of a Westinghouse PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, R.; Hanan, N.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Xue, D.; Bozoki, G.; Fresco, A.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents methods and findings of a systems interaction study of Indian Point 3. The study was carried out in support of the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-17 on Systems Interactions. Fault tree methods were employed. Among the study's findings is a single active failure in the low pressure injection function; this discovery led to a plant modification. In addition to providing support to the staff in resolving USI A-17, the project discovered an important new class of failure modes which led the utility to implement a hardware modification. The scope of the project is indicated, key features of the method are highlighted findings are discussed, and comments are offered on the usefulness of this type of, principal study. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. The receptor is believed to exist as a homodimer due to covalent and non-covalent interactions between the two amino terminal domains (ATDs). It is well established that agonist binding to family C...... receptors takes place at the ATD and that this causes the ATD dimer to twist. However, very little is known about the translation of the ATD dimer twist into G-protein coupling to the 7 transmembrane moieties (7TMs) of these receptor dimers. In this study we have attempted to delineate the agonist......-induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  18. DNA Interaction Studies of Selected Polyamine Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szumilak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of polyamine conjugates with DNA double helix has been studied. Binding properties were examined by ethidium bromide (EtBr displacement and DNA unwinding/topoisomerase I/II (Topo I/II activity assays, as well as dsDNA thermal stability studies and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Genotoxicity of the compounds was estimated by a comet assay. It has been shown that only compound 2a can interact with dsDNA via an intercalative binding mode as it displaced EtBr from the dsDNA-dye complex, with Kapp = 4.26 × 106 M−1; caused an increase in melting temperature; changed the circular dichroism spectrum of dsDNA; converted relaxed plasmid DNA into a supercoiled molecule in the presence of Topo I and reduced the amount of short oligonucleotide fragments in the comet tail. Furthermore, preliminary theoretical study has shown that interaction of the discussed compounds with dsDNA depends on molecule linker length and charge distribution over terminal aromatic chromophores.

  19. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA 20 , poly dT 20 , poly dC 20 and the duplex poly dA 20 :dT 20 . Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their purification using strong

  20. Activity and stability studies of platinized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as fuel cell electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Borghei, Maryam; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2015-01-01

    A non-covalent functionalization for multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been used as an alternative to the damaging acid treatment. Platinum nanoparticles with similar particle size distribution have been deposited on the surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The interaction between...... platinum nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid is studied and its electrochemical stability investigated. This study reveals the existence of a platinum-support interaction and leads to three main conclusions. First, the addition of 1-pyrenecarboxylic...... acid is improving the dispersion of platinum nanoparticles, leading to an improved electrochemical activity towards oxygen reduction reaction. Second, the investigations regarding the electrochemical stability showed that the platinum-support interaction plays an important role in improving the long...

  1. Thermogravimetric studies of vapour-aerosol interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshaw, J.; Newland, M.S.; Wood, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis has been used to study the interaction of iodine vapour with cadmium, silver and manganese monoxide substrates. These studies have demonstrated the importance of time-dependence data on reaction rates. Iodine did not react with manganese monoxide (as expected from thermodynamic considerations); however, extensive reaction did occur with silver and cadmium. Two rate limiting mechanisms were observed: mass transfer of iodine molecules from the gas phase (leading to linear reaction rates) and parabolic kinetics (ie inversely proportional to the extent of reaction) when the rate was limited by a diffusion process through the reaction product. (author)

  2. A fluvoxamine-caffeine interaction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, U; Loft, S; Poulsen, H E

    1996-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine is a very potent inhibitor of the liver enzyme CYP1A2, which is the major P450 catalysing the biotransformation of caffeine. Thus, a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken with the purpose of documenting a drug-drug interaction between fluvoxam......The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine is a very potent inhibitor of the liver enzyme CYP1A2, which is the major P450 catalysing the biotransformation of caffeine. Thus, a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken with the purpose of documenting a drug-drug interaction between...... fluvoxamine and caffeine. The study was carried out as a randomized, in vivo, cross-over study including eight healthy volunteers. In Period A of the study, each subject took 200 mg caffeine orally, and in Period B, the subjects took fluvoxamine 50 mg per day for 4 days and 100 mg per day for 8 days. On day 8...... in Period B, the subjects again ingested 200 mg caffeine. After caffeine intake, blood and urine were sampled at regular intervals. Caffeine and its three primary demethylated metabolites, paraxanthine, theobromine and theophylline in plasma and the same four compounds plus 11 more metabolites in urine were...

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Structures and Interactions of Vancomycin Antibiotics with Cell Wall Analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhibo; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Laskin, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Surface-induced dissociation (SID) of the singly protonated complex of vancomycin antibiotic with cell wall peptide analogue (N α , N # var e psilon#-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala) was studied using a 6 T Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially configured for SID experiments. The binding energy between the vancomycin and the peptide was obtained from the RRKM modeling of the time- and energy resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) of the precursor ion and its fragments. Electronic structure calculations of the geometries, proton affinities and binding energies were performed for several model systems including vancomycin (V), vancomycin aglycon (VA), N α , N # var e psilon#-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, and non-covalent complexes of VA with N-acetyl-D-Ala-D-Ala and N α , N # var e psilon#-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. Comparison between the experimental and computational results suggests that the most probable structure of the complex observed in our experiments corresponds to the neutral peptide bound to the vancomycin protonated at the secondary amino group of the N-methyl-leucine residue. The experimental binding energy of 30.9 ± 1.8 kcal/mol is in good agreement with the binding energy of 29.3 ± 2.5 kcal/mol calculated for the model system representing the preferred structure of the complex

  4. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong interaction of antikaons (K− with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states - the prototype system being K−pp. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DAΦNE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound K−p atom leading to a hadronic shift ϵ1s and a hadronic broadening Γ1s of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths have been calculated constrained by the SIDDHARTA data on kaonic hydrogen. For the extraction of the isospin-dependent scattering lengths a measurement of the hadronic shift and width of kaonic deuterium is necessary. Therefore, new X-ray studies with the focus on kaonic deuterium are in preparation (SIDDHARTA2. Many improvements in the experimental setup will allow to measure kaonic deuterium which is challenging due to the anticipated low X-ray yield. Especially important are the data on the X-ray yields of kaonic deuterium extracted from a exploratory experiment within SIDDHARTA.

  5. Diffraction studies of ion--water interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narten, A.H.; Triolo, R.

    1978-01-01

    Ionic solutions were among the first liquids to which x-ray diffraction was applied, and a large number of studies have been reported over the years. However, the interpretation of a single diffraction pattern is always difficult, often ambiguous, and never unique. This ambiguity of interpretation is greatly reduced if a solution is studied with several types of radiation (x-ray, neutron, electron), and a few such studies have been reported. The only currently feasible way of uniquely determining the correlations between water molecules and monatomic ions in solution is to vary the scattering factor of the ion; a simple difference measurement then yields the ion-water correlations. This has been done using the isotopic substitution method in neutron diffraction. It can also be done using synchrotron x-radiation and anomalous dispersion techniques. Diffraction studies of ion-water interactions have yielded detailed and unambiguous information for only a few concentrated solutions. 5 figures

  6. Spacelab data analysis and interactive control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, T. D.; Drake, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The study consisted of two main tasks, a series of interviews of Spacelab users and a survey of data processing and display equipment. Findings from the user interviews on questions of interactive control, downlink data formats, and Spacelab computer software development are presented. Equipment for quick look processing and display of scientific data in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) was surveyed. Results of this survey effort are discussed in detail, along with recommendations for NASA development of several specific display systems which meet common requirements of many Spacelab experiments.

  7. Study of electron-positron interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-09-15

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

  8. Study of electron-positron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-01-01

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model

  9. Interactions: A Study of Office Reference Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Lederer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The purpose of this study was to analyze the data from a referencestatistics-gathering mechanism at Colorado State University (CSU Libraries. It aimedprimarily to better understand patron behaviours, particularly in an academic librarywith no reference desk.Methods – The researchers examined data from 2007 to 2010 of College LiaisonLibrarians’ consultations with patrons. Data were analyzed by various criteria,including patron type, contact method, and time spent with the patron. Theinformation was examined in the aggregate, meaning all librarians combined, andthen specifically from the Liberal Arts and Business subject areas.Results – The researchers found that the number of librarian reference consultationsis substantial. Referrals to librarians from CSU’s Morgan Library’s one public servicedesk have declined over time. The researchers also found that graduate students arethe primary patrons and email is the preferred contact method overall.Conclusion – The researchers found that interactions with patrons in librarians’ offices – either in person or virtually – remain substantial even without a traditional reference desk. The data suggest that librarians’ efforts at marketing themselves to departments, colleges, and patrons have been successful. This study will be of value to reference, subject specialist, and public service librarians, and library administrators as they consider ways to quantify their work, not only for administrative purposes, but in order to follow trends and provide services and staffing accordingly.

  10. Study of electron and neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers-in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  11. Studies of host graft interactions in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljekvist-Larsson, Ingela; Johansson, Kjell

    2007-09-01

    Progenitor and stem cell transplantation represent therapeutic strategies for retinal disorders that are accompanied by photoreceptor degeneration. The transplanted cells may either replace degenerating photoreceptors or secrete beneficial factors that halt the processes of photoreceptor degeneration. The present study analyzes whether rat retinal progenitor cells differentiated into photoreceptor phenotypic cells in neurospheres have a potential to interact with rat retinal explants. Immunocytochemistry for rhodopsin and synaptophysin indicated photoreceptor cell-like differentiation in neurospheres that were stimulated by basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor. Differentiation into neural phenotypes including photoreceptor cells was effectively blocked by an addition of leukemia inhibitory factor. Grafting of neurospheres onto retinal explants demonstrated a consistent penetration of glial cell processes into the explanted tissue. On the other hand, the incorporation of donor cells into explants was very low. A general finding was that neurospheres grafting was associated with local decrease in Müller cell activation in the explants. Further characterization of these effect(s) could provide further insight into progenitor cell-based therapies of retinal degenerative disorders.

  12. Runaway-electron-materials interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Miyahara, A.

    1990-03-01

    During the operation of magnetic fusion devices it has been frequently observed that runaway electrons can cause severe damage to plasma facing components. The energy of the runaway electrons could possibly reach several 100 MeV in a next generation device with an energy content in the plasma in the order of 100 MJ. In this study effects of high energy electron - materials interaction were determined by laboratory experiments using particle beam facilities, i.e. the Electron Linear Accelerator of the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research of Osaka University and the 10 MW Neutral Beam Injection Test Stand of the National Institute for Fusion Science. The experiments and further analyses lead to a first assessment of the damage thresholds of plasma facing materials and components under runaway electron impact. It was found that metals (stainless steel, molybdenum, tungsten) showed grain growth, crack formation and/or melting already below the threshold for crack initiation on graphite (14-33 MJ/m 2 ). Strong erosion of carbon materials would occur above 100 MJ/m 2 . Damage to metal coolant channels can occur already below an energy deposition of 100 MJ/m 2 . The energy deposited in the metal coolant channels depends on the thickness of the plasma facing carbon material D, with the shielding efficiency S of carbon approximately as S∼D 1.15 . (author) 304 refs. 12 tabs. 59 figs

  13. Contribution of phenylalanine side chain intercalation to the TATA-box binding protein-DNA interaction: molecular dynamics and dispersion-corrected density functional theory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Manas; Mukherjee, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-11-01

    Deformation of DNA takes place quite often due to binding of small molecules or proteins with DNA. Such deformation is significant due to minor groove binding and, besides electrostatic interactions, other non-covalent interactions may also play an important role in generating such deformation. TATA-box binding protein (TBP) binds to the minor groove of DNA at the TATA box sequence, producing a large-scale deformation in DNA and initiating transcription. In order to observe the interactions of protein residues with DNA in the minor groove that produce the deformation in the DNA structure, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the TBP-DNA system. The results reveal consistent partial intercalation of two Phe residues, distorting stacking interactions at two dinucleotide step sites. We carried out calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory to understand the source of such stabilization. We observed favorable interaction energies between the Phe residues and the base pairs with which they interact. We suggest that salt-bridge interactions between the phosphate groups and Lys or Arg residues, along with the intercalation of Phe residues between two base pair stacks, stabilize the kinked and opened-up DNA conformation.

  14. H-Bonding Cooperativity Effects in Amyloids: Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanics Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přenosil, Ondřej; Pitoňák, Michal; Sedlák, Robert; Kabeláč, Martin; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 225, č. 5 (2011), s. 553-574 ISSN 0942-9352 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non-covalent interaction * hydrogen bond * amyloids * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2011

  15. Structural Analysis of ‘key’ Interactions in Functional RNA Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of the thesis is to carry out structural bioinformatics study along with usage of advanced quantum chemical methods to look at the structural stability and energetics of RNA building blocks. The main focus of the work described here lies on understanding the reasons behind the intrinsic stability of key interactions in nucleic acids. Crystal structures of RNA molecules exhibit fascinating variety of non-covalent interactions, which play an important role in maintaining the three dimensional structures. An accurate atomic level description of these interactions in the structural building blocks of RNA is a key to understand the structure-function relationship in these molecules. An effort has been made to link the conclusions drawn from quantum chemical computations on RNA base pairs in wide biochemical context of their occurrence in RNA structures. The initial attention was on the impact of natural and non-natural modifications of the nucleic acid bases on the structure and stability of base pairs that they are involved in. In the remaining sections we cover other molecular interactions shaping nucleic acids, as the interaction between ribose and the bases, and the fluoride sensing riboswitch system in order to investigate structure and dynamics of nucleic acids at the atomic level and to gain insight into the physical chemistry behind.

  16. Advances in soil-structure interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maheshwari, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    It is utmost important that lifeline infrastructures (such as bridges, hospitals, power plants, dams etc.) are safe and functional during earthquakes as damage or collapse of these structures may have far reaching implications. A lifeline's failure may hamper relief and rescue operations required just after an earthquake and secondly its indirect economical losses may be very severe. Therefore, safety of these structures during earthquakes is vital. Further, damage to nuclear facilities during earthquake may lead to disaster. These structures should be designed adequately taking into account all the important issues. Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) is one of the design issues, which is often overlooked and even in some cases ignored. The effects of dynamic SSI are well understood and practiced in the nuclear power industry (for large foundations of the nuclear containment structures) since sixties. However, in last decade, there are many advances in techniques of SSI and those need to be incorporated in practice. Failures of many structures occurred during the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge, California earthquakes and the 1995 Kobe, Japan earthquake due to SSI or a related issue. Many jetties had failed in Andaman and Nicobar islands due to Sumatra earthquake and ensuing tsunamis. It is because of this recent experience that the importance of SSI on dynamic response of structures during earthquakes has been fully realized. General belief that the SSI effects are always beneficial for the structure is not correct. Some cases have been presented where it is shown that SSI effects are detrimental for the stability of the structure. This paper addresses the effects of dynamic SSI on the response of the structures and explains its importance. Further advances in SSI studies have been discussed

  17. In Vitro Interactions between 17β-Estradiol and DNA Result in Formation of the Hormone-DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the role of 17β-estradiol (E2 in reproduction and during the menstrual cycle, it has been shown to modulate numerous physiological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and ion transport in many tissues. The pathways in which estrogens affect an organism have been partially described, although many questions still exist regarding estrogens’ interaction with biomacromolecules. Hence, the present study showed the interaction of four oligonucleotides (17, 20, 24 and/or 38-mer with E2. The strength of these interactions was evaluated using optical methods, showing that the interaction is influenced by three major factors, namely: oligonucleotide length, E2 concentration and interaction time. In addition, the denaturation phenomenon of DNA revealed that the binding of E2 leads to destabilization of hydrogen bonds between the nitrogenous bases of DNA strands resulting in a decrease of their melting temperatures (Tm. To obtain a more detailed insight into these interactions, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was employed. This study revealed that E2 with DNA forms non-covalent physical complexes, observed as the mass shifts for app. 270 Da (Mr of E2 to higher molecular masses. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 can affect biomacromolecules, as circulating oligonucleotides, which can trigger mutations, leading to various unwanted effects.

  18. Chemical Force Microscopy of Chemical and Biological Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noy, A

    2006-01-02

    Interactions between chemical functionalities define outcomes of the vast majority of important events in chemistry, biology and materials science. Chemical Force Microscopy (CFM)--a technique that uses direct chemical functionalization of AFM probes with specific functionalities--allows researchers to investigate these important interactions directly. We review the basic principles of CFM, some examples of its application, and theoretical models that provide the basis for understanding the experimental results. We also emphasize application of modern kinetic theory of non-covalent interactions strength to the analysis of CFM data.

  19. Molecular interactions between (--epigallocatechin gallate analogs and pancreatic lipase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihui Wang

    Full Text Available The molecular interactions between pancreatic lipase (PL and four tea polyphenols (EGCG analogs, like (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, (--gallocatechin gallate (GCG, (--epicatechin gallate (ECG, and (--epigallocatechin (EC, were studied from PL activity, conformation, kinetics and thermodynamics. It was observed that EGCG analogs inhibited PL activity, and their inhibitory rates decreased by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. PL activity at first decreased rapidly and then slowly with the increase of EGCG analogs concentrations. α-Helix content of PL secondary structure decreased dependent on EGCG analogs concentration by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. EGCG, ECG, and EC could quench PL fluorescence both dynamically and statically, while GCG only quenched statically. EGCG analogs would induce PL self-assembly into complexes and the hydrodynamic radii of the complexes possessed a close relationship with the inhibitory rates. Kinetics analysis showed that EGCG analogs non-competitively inhibited PL activity and did not bind to PL catalytic site. DSC measurement revealed that EGCG analogs decreased the transition midpoint temperature of PL enzyme, suggesting that these compounds reduced PL enzyme thermostability. In vitro renaturation through urea solution indicated that interactions between PL and EGCG analogs were weak and non-covalent.

  20. Virus-membrane interactions : spectroscopic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datema, K.P.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis some new aspects of the infection process of nonenveloped viruses are reported. The interaction of a rod-shaped (TMV) and three spherical (CCMV, BMV, SBMV) plant viruses, of the filamentous bacteriophage M13, and of their coat proteins with membranes have been investigated. A

  1. Interactive social neuroscience to study autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, Max J; Naples, Adam J; McPartland, James C

    2015-03-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate difficulty with social interactions and relationships, but the neural mechanisms underlying these difficulties remain largely unknown. While social difficulties in ASD are most apparent in the context of interactions with other people, most neuroscience research investigating ASD have provided limited insight into the complex dynamics of these interactions. The development of novel, innovative "interactive social neuroscience" methods to study the brain in contexts with two interacting humans is a necessary advance for ASD research. Studies applying an interactive neuroscience approach to study two brains engaging with one another have revealed significant differences in neural processes during interaction compared to observation in brain regions that are implicated in the neuropathology of ASD. Interactive social neuroscience methods are crucial in clarifying the mechanisms underlying the social and communication deficits that characterize ASD.

  2. QCM-D study of nanoparticle interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Shengming; Liu, Qingxia; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-07-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) has been proven to be a powerful research tool to investigate in situ interactions between nanoparticles and different functionalized surfaces in liquids. QCM-D can also be used to quantitatively determine adsorption kinetics of polymers, DNA and proteins from solutions on various substrate surfaces while providing insights into conformations of adsorbed molecules. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview on various important applications of QCM-D, focusing on deposition of nanoparticles and attachment-detachment of nanoparticles on model membranes in complex fluid systems. We will first describe the working principle of QCM-D and DLVO theory pertinent to understanding nanoparticle deposition phenomena. The interactions between different nanoparticles and functionalized surfaces for different application areas are then critically reviewed. Finally, the potential applications of QCM-D in other important fields are proposed and knowledge gaps are identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of KN interaction in zero isospin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, R.M.

    1977-04-01

    The low-energy parameters for kaon-nucleon interaction in the isospin T = 0 state are computed. The differential cross section for K + - deuteron scattering with charge exchange is calculated using the multiple scattering expansion. The various kinematical and dynamical possibilities are discussed. Wave parameters for s, p1/2 and p3/2 are determined by fitting the obtained cross section with the experimental data at low and intermediate energies. (Author) [pt

  4. The S-layer Associated Serine Protease Homolog PrtX Impacts Cell Surface-Mediated Microbe-Host Interactions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brant R. Johnson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Health-promoting aspects attributed to probiotic microorganisms, including adhesion to intestinal epithelia and modulation of the host mucosal immune system, are mediated by proteins found on the bacterial cell surface. Notably, certain probiotic and commensal bacteria contain a surface (S- layer as the outermost stratum of the cell wall. S-layers are non-covalently bound semi-porous, crystalline arrays of self-assembling, proteinaceous subunits called S-layer proteins (SLPs. Recent evidence has shown that multiple proteins are non-covalently co-localized within the S-layer, designated S-layer associated proteins (SLAPs. In Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, SLP and SLAPs have been implicated in both mucosal immunomodulation and adhesion to the host intestinal epithelium. In this study, a S-layer associated serine protease homolog, PrtX (prtX, lba1578, was deleted from the chromosome of L. acidophilus NCFM. Compared to the parent strain, the PrtX-deficient strain (ΔprtX demonstrated increased autoaggregation, an altered cellular morphology, and pleiotropic increases in adhesion to mucin and fibronectin, in vitro. Furthermore, ΔprtX demonstrated increased in vitro immune stimulation of IL-6, IL-12, and IL-10 compared to wild-type, when exposed to mouse dendritic cells. Finally, in vivo colonization of germ-free mice with ΔprtX led to an increase in epithelial barrier integrity. The absence of PrtX within the exoproteome of a ΔprtX strain caused morphological changes, resulting in a pleiotropic increase of the organisms’ immunomodulatory properties and interactions with some intestinal epithelial cell components.

  5. Flicker Interaction Studies and Flickermeter Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Rong

    2009-06-04

    types are made in the PQ lab of TUE since the human eye is sensitive to the light color. The measurement results are analyzed by FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) and the wavelength contributions to flicker of different lamp types are presented in this thesis. It provides important information on the light color variation of different lamp types under flicker conditions. Weighting factors of various lamp types are obtained by the corresponding wavelength contribution to the flicker weighted with the CIE photopic luminosity curve. These weighting factors indicate the human eye flicker response from the human eye spectrum sensitivity point of view. Then it is possible to develop a simplified flicker measurement method for different lamp types by adding an eye-brain flicker response model. A discussion about the simplified flicker measurement method and the eye-brain model is given in this thesis. Finally, the interaction between flicker and dimmers (the phase controlled dimmer and reverse phase controlled dimmer) is studied based on experimental work. The measurement results show that the phase controlled dimmer will increase the flicker problem. Solutions to avoid the flicker influence of dimmers are discussed in this thesis.

  6. A new hemidirected lead(II) complex extended in holodirected one-dimensional polymer by secondary Pb-O interactions: A precursor for preparation of PbO nanoparticles, and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi Tyula, Yunes; Zabardasti, Abedien; Goudarziafshar, Hamid; Mirtamizdoust, Babak

    2017-12-01

    A new 1D extended lead (II) coordination polymer [Pb(2-apinh) (NO3)2]n (1), (2-apinh = 2-acetylpyridine isonicotinoylhydrazone) has been synthesized by a thermal gradient method in a branched tube and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The single-crystal X-ray data show that the coordination number of Pb(II) in [Pb(2-apinh)(NO3)2] moieties is five (PbN2O3) with a stereo-chemically active lone pair on lead(II), and thus its coordination sphere is hemidirected. Moreover, each [Pb(2-apinh) (NO3)2] unit is linked by the secondary Pb⋯O7i interactions to form 1D extended coordination polymer, which approximately completes the Pb(II) coordination sphere with a Pb⋯O5 interaction (PbN2O5) in a holodirected geometry. In the solid state, the 1D chains are connected through non-covalent interactions, such as π⋯π stacking, C-H⋯π and C-H⋯O interactions to form 3D supramolecular network. Moreover, compound 1 exhibits 1D left-handed helical infinite chains along the c axis by non-covalent interactions. The structure of 1 has been optimized by density functional theory. The calculated structural parameters and IR spectra for the complex are in accordance with its crystal structure. PbO nanoparticles were obtained by thermolysis of 1 at 180 °C with oleic acid as a surfactant and characterized via FT-IR, XRD, and SEM.

  7. In silico study of interaction between rice proteins enhanced disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EDS1 interacts with its positive co-regulator phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4), resulting in mobilization of the salicylic acid defence pathway. Limited information regarding this interaction in rice is available. To study this interaction, a model of EDS1 and PAD4 proteins from rice was generated and validated with Accelrys DS ...

  8. Microfluidic Devices for Studying Biomolecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Wilbur W.; Garcia, Carlos d.; Henry, Charles S.

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for monitoring biomolecular interactions have been invented. These devices are basically highly miniaturized liquid-chromatography columns. They are intended to be prototypes of miniature analytical devices of the laboratory on a chip type that could be fabricated rapidly and inexpensively and that, because of their small sizes, would yield analytical results from very small amounts of expensive analytes (typically, proteins). Other advantages to be gained by this scaling down of liquid-chromatography columns may include increases in resolution and speed, decreases in the consumption of reagents, and the possibility of performing multiple simultaneous and highly integrated analyses by use of multiple devices of this type, each possibly containing multiple parallel analytical microchannels. The principle of operation is the same as that of a macroscopic liquid-chromatography column: The column is a channel packed with particles, upon which are immobilized molecules of the protein of interest (or one of the proteins of interest if there are more than one). Starting at a known time, a solution or suspension containing molecules of the protein or other substance of interest is pumped into the channel at its inlet. The liquid emerging from the outlet of the channel is monitored to detect the molecules of the dissolved or suspended substance(s). The time that it takes these molecules to flow from the inlet to the outlet is a measure of the degree of interaction between the immobilized and the dissolved or suspended molecules. Depending on the precise natures of the molecules, this measure can be used for diverse purposes: examples include screening for solution conditions that favor crystallization of proteins, screening for interactions between drugs and proteins, and determining the functions of biomolecules.

  9. Strong Interaction Studies with PANDA at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schönning, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, provides unique possibilities for a new generation of nuclear-, hadron- and atomic physics experiments. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR will offer a broad physics programme with emphasis on different aspects of hadron physics. Understanding the strong interaction in the perturbative regime remains one of the greatest challenges in contemporary physics and hadrons provide several important keys. In these proceedings, PANDA will be presented along with some high-lights of the planned physics programme

  10. LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SCHEME STUDIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; PTITSIN, V.; WEI, J.

    1999-01-01

    In a companion paper the authors showed that the performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In this situation, the dynamic aperture can be increased through local multipole correctors. Since the betatron phase advance is well defined for magnets that are located in regions of large beta functions, local corrections can be very effective and robust. They compare possible compensation schemes and propose a corrector layout to meet the required dynamic aperture performance

  11. LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SCHEME STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER,W.; PTITSIN,V.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    In a companion paper the authors showed that the performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In this situation, the dynamic aperture can be increased through local multipole correctors. Since the betatron phase advance is well defined for magnets that are located in regions of large beta functions, local corrections can be very effective and robust. They compare possible compensation schemes and propose a corrector layout to meet the required dynamic aperture performance.

  12. Strong Interaction Studies with PANDA at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönning, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, provides unique possibilities for a new generation of nuclear-, hadron- and atomic physics experiments. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR will offer a broad physics programme with emphasis on different aspects of hadron physics. Understanding the strong interaction in the perturbative regime remains one of the greatest challenges in contemporary physics and hadrons provide several important keys. In these proceedings, PANDA will be presented along with some high-lights of the planned physics programme.

  13. A simple model for studying interacting networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Jolad, Shivakumar; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, R. K. P.

    2011-03-01

    Many specific physical networks (e.g., internet, power grid, interstates), have been characterized in considerable detail, but in isolation from each other. Yet, each of these networks supports the functions of the others, and so far, little is known about how their interactions affect their structure and functionality. To address this issue, we consider two coupled model networks. Each network is relatively simple, with a fixed set of nodes, but dynamically generated set of links which has a preferred degree, κ . In the stationary state, the degree distribution has exponential tails (far from κ), an attribute which we can explain. Next, we consider two such networks with different κ 's, reminiscent of two social groups, e.g., extroverts and introverts. Finally, we let these networks interact by establishing a controllable fraction of cross links. The resulting distribution of links, both within and across the two model networks, is investigated and discussed, along with some potential consequences for real networks. Supported in part by NSF-DMR-0705152 and 1005417.

  14. Intermolecular interaction studies of glyphosate with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manon, Priti; Juglan, K. C.; Kaur, Kirandeep; Sethi, Nidhi; Kaur, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U) of glyphosate with water have been measured on different ultrasonic frequency ranges from 1MHz, 2MHz, 3MHz & 5MHz by varying concentrations (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, & 0.40%) at 30°C. The specific gravity bottle, Ostwald's viscometer and quartz crystal interferometer were used to determine density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U). These three factors contribute in evaluating the other parameters as acoustic impedance (Z), adiabatic compressibility (β), relaxation time (τ), intermolecular free length (Lf), free volume (Vf), ultrasonic attenuation (α/f2), Rao's constant (R), Wada's constant (W) and relative strength (R). Solute-solvent interaction is confirmed by ultrasonic velocity and viscosity values, which increases with increase in concentration indicates stronger association between solute and solvent molecules. With rise in ultrasonic frequency the interaction between the solute and solvent particles decreases. The linear variations in Rao's constant and Wada's constant suggest the absence of complex formation.

  15. Experimental and density functional theory studies on benzalkonium ibuprofenate, a double active pharmaceutical ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safna Hussan, K P; Thayyil, M Shahin; Rajan, Vijisha K; Muraleedharan, K

    2018-02-01

    Molecular aspects of a double active pharmaceutical ingredient in ionic liquid form, benzalkonium ibuprofenate (BaIb), were studied using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G (d, p)). A detailed discussion on optimized geometry, energy, heat and the enthalpy of BaIb was carried out. The computed vibrational results agree well with the experimental results. The stability and biological activity were compared to the parent drugs on the basis of global descriptive parameters. The electrophilic and nucleophilic sites were pointed out in the MESP structures well evidently. NBO analysis was also done to predict the relative aromaticity, delocalization effects and the contribution towards stabilization energy of the title compound. The information about non-covalent, non-ionic weak interaction between the cation and anion was obtained from the list of Mulliken charges and NBO analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Studying Wind Energy/Bird Interactions: A Guidance Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R. [California Energy Commission (US); Morrison, M. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (US); Sinclair, K. [Dept. of Energy/National Renewable Energy Lab. (US); Strickland, D. [WEST, Inc. (US)

    1999-12-01

    This guidance document is a product of the Avian Subcommittee of the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC). The NWCC was formed to better understand and promote responsible, credible, and comparable avian/wind energy interaction studies. Bird mortality is a concern and wind power is a potential clean and green source of electricity, making study of wind energy/bird interactions essential. This document provides an overview for regulators and stakeholders concerned with wind energy/bird interactions, as well as a more technical discussion of the basic concepts and tools for studying such interactions.

  17. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments; Interacao de nanotubos de carbono com segmentos de DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-07-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA{sub 20}, poly dT{sub 20}, poly dC{sub 20} and the duplex poly dA{sub 20}:dT{sub 20}. Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  19. Study of interaction of ceruloplasmin with serprocidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, A V; Ageeva, K V; Kostevich, V A; Berlov, M N; Runova, O L; Zakharova, E T; Vasilyev, V B

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes formation of complexes of ceruloplasmin (CP) with such proteins of the serprocidin family as azurocidin (CAP37), neutrophilic elastase (NE), cathepsin G (CG), and proteinase 3 (PR3). We present evidence that serprocidins form complexes with CP at a molar ratio 1 : 1. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, did not prevent the interaction of serprocidins with CP in the course of SDS-free disc electrophoresis. CP affected the activities of NE, CG, and PR3 as a competitive inhibitor with K(i) ~ 1 μM. Inhibitory effect of CP depended on ionic strength of the solution and was negligible at NaCl concentrations above 300 mM. In the mode of competitive inhibitors serprocidins suppressed oxidase activity of CP towards p-phenylenediamine. CAP37 displayed the strongest inhibitory effect (K(i) ~ 20 nM). Upon adding various serprocidins to human, rat, rabbit, dolphin, dog, horse, and mouse plasma only CAP37 would form a complex with CP. Synthetic peptide RKARPRQFPRRR (5-13, 61-63 CAP37) displaced CAP37 from its complex with CP. Adding CAP37 to the triple complex formed by CP, lactoferrin, and myeloperoxidase resulted in displacement of the latter from the complex. The dissociation constant of CAP37 with immobilized CP was 13 nM. Therefore, among serprocidins CAP37 can be regarded as the specific partner of CP.

  20. Determinants of Internet Use for Interactive Learning: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, Jonatan; Duart, Josep M.; Sancho-Vinuesa, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The use of the Internet in higher education teaching can facilitate the interactive learning process and thus improve educational outcomes. The aim of the study presented here is to explore which variables are linked to higher intensity of Internet-based interactive educational practices. The study is based on data obtained from an online survey…

  1. Use of high-temperature, high-torque rheometry to study the viscoelastic properties of coal during carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.C.; Duffy, J.J.; Snape, C.E.; Steel, K.M. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    When coal is heated in the absence of oxygen it softens at approximately 400 degrees C, becomes viscoelastic, and volatiles are driven off. With further heating, the viscous mass reaches a minimum viscosity in the range of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} Pa s and then begins to resolidify. A high-torque, high-temperature, controlled-strain rheometer with parallel plates has been used to study the theology during this process. Under shear, the viscosity of the softening mass decreases with increasing shear rate. During resolidification, the viscosity increases as C-C bond formation and physical interactions gives rise to an aromatic network, but, under shear, the network breaks apart and flows. This is viewed as a yielding of the structure. The higher the shear rate, the earlier the yielding occurs, such that if the shear rate is low enough, the structure is able to build. Also, further into resolidification lower shear rates are able to break the structure. It is proposed that resolidification occurs through the formation of aromatic clusters that grow and become crosslinked by non-covalent interactions. As the clusters grow, the amount of liquid surrounding them decreases and it is thought that the non-covalent interactions between clusters and liquid could decrease and the ability of growing clusters to move past each other increases, which would explain the weakening of the structure under shear. This work is part of a program of work aimed at attaining a greater understanding of microstructural changes taking place during carbonization for different coals, in order to understand the mechanisms that give rise to good quality cokes and coke oven problems such as excessive wall pressure.

  2. Weak interaction studies from nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, M.

    1981-01-01

    The studies performed at the theoretical nuclear physics division of the Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, are reported. Electron spin density and internal conversion process, nuclear excitation by electron transition, beta decay, weak charged current, and beta-ray angular distributions in oriented nuclei have been studied. The relative intensity of internal conversion electrons for the case in which the radial wave functions of orbital electrons are different for electron spin up and down was calculated. The calculated value was in good agreement with the experimental one. The nuclear excitation following the transition of orbital electrons was studied. The calculated probability of the nuclear excitation of Os 189 was 1.4 x 10 - 7 in conformity with the experimental value 1.7 x 10 - 7 . The second class current and other problems on beta-decay have been extensively studied, and described elsewhere. Concerning weak charged current, the effects of all induced terms, the time component of main axial vector, all partial waves of leptons, Coulomb correction for the electrons in finite size nuclei, and radiative correction were studied. The beta-ray angular distribution for the 1 + -- 0 + transition in oriented B 12 and N 12 was investigated. In this connection, investigation on the weak magnetism to include all higher order corrections for the evaluation of the spectral shape factors was performed. Other works carried out by the author and his collaborators are also explained. (Kato, T.)

  3. How the biotin–streptavidin interaction was made even stronger: investigation via crystallography and a chimaeric tetramer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Claire E.; Koner, Apurba L.; Lowe, Edward D.; Howarth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between SA (streptavidin) and biotin is one of the strongest non-covalent interactions in Nature. SA is a widely used tool and a paradigm for protein–ligand interactions. We previously developed a SA mutant, termed Tr (traptavidin), possessing a 10-fold lower off-rate for biotin, with increased mechanical and thermal stability. In the present study, we determined the crystal structures of apo-Tr and biotin–Tr at 1.5 Å resolution. In apo-SA the loop (L3/4), near biotin's valeryl tail, is typically disordered and open, but closes upon biotin binding. In contrast, L3/4 was shut in both apo-Tr and biotin–Tr. The reduced flexibility of L3/4 and decreased conformational change on biotin binding provide an explanation for Tr's reduced biotin off- and on-rates. L3/4 includes Ser45, which forms a hydrogen bond to biotin consistently in Tr, but erratically in SA. Reduced breakage of the biotin–Ser45 hydrogen bond in Tr is likely to inhibit the initiating event in biotin's dissociation pathway. We generated a Tr with a single biotin-binding site rather than four, which showed a simi-larly low off-rate, demonstrating that Tr's low off-rate was governed by intrasubunit effects. Understanding the structural features of this tenacious interaction may assist the design of even stronger affinity tags and inhibitors. PMID:21241253

  4. Studying Complex Interactions in Real Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The study of human behavior must take into account the social context, and real-time, networked experiments with multiple participants is one increasingly popular way to achieve this. In this paper a framework based on Python and XMPP is presented that aims to make it easy to develop such behavio......The study of human behavior must take into account the social context, and real-time, networked experiments with multiple participants is one increasingly popular way to achieve this. In this paper a framework based on Python and XMPP is presented that aims to make it easy to develop...... such behavioral experiments. An illustrative example of how the framework can be used is also presented. This example is a real experiment, which is currently gathering data in the lab....

  5. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  6. From Child-Robot Interaction to Child-Robot-Therapist Interaction: A Case Study in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Giannopulu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Troubles in social communication as well as deficits in the cognitive treatment of emotions are supposed to be a fundamental part of autism. We present a case study based on multimodal interaction between a mobile robot and a child with autism in spontaneous, free game play. This case study tells us that the robot mediates the interaction between the autistic child and therapist once the robot-child interaction has been established. In addition, the child uses the robot as a mediator to express positive emotion playing with the therapist. It is thought that the three-pronged interaction i.e., child-robot-therapist could better facilitate the transfer of social and emotional abilities to real life settings. Robot therapy has a high potential to improve the condition of brain activity in autistic children.

  7. Viscometric and thermodynamic studies of interactions in ternary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Viscometric and thermodynamic studies of interactions in ternary solutions containing sucrose and aqueous alkali metal halides at 293.15, 303.15 and 313.15 K. Reena Gupta Mukhtar Singh ... Keywords. Ternary solutions; interactions of ionic and nonionic solutes; partial molar volumes; sucrosealkali metal halide solutions.

  8. A Usability Study of Interactive Web-Based Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Tulay; Pinar, Musa

    2011-01-01

    This research advances the understanding of the usability of marketing case study modules in the area of interactive web-based technologies through the assignment of seven interactive case modules in a Principles of Marketing course. The case modules were provided for marketing students by the publisher, McGraw Hill Irwin, of the…

  9. Using Facebook Data to Analyze Learner Interaction during Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Although study abroad is viewed as an ideal environment for interaction in the target language, research in this area has relied mostly upon self-reported data, which pose challenges regarding recall bias and participant commitment. This article shows how Facebook data can be used to analyze naturally occurring learner interactions during study…

  10. Strong interactions studies with medium energy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, K.K.

    1993-10-01

    This progress report refers to the period August 1992 to August 1993, which includes the first year of the three-year period December 1, 1992--November 30, 1995 of the existing research contract. As anticipated in the 1992--1995 proposal the major preoccupation during 1992--1993 was with Fermilab experiment E760. This experiment, whose primary objective is to make very high-resolution study of Charmonium Spectroscopy via proton-antiproton annihilations, has turned out to be a veritable gold-mine of exciting hadronic physics in other areas as well. These include the proton from factor in the time-life region, proton-antiproton forward scattering, QCD scaling laws, and light quark spectroscopy. A large fraction of the data from E760 have been analyzed during this year, and several papers have been published. In addition to the E760 experiment at Fermilab continued progress was made earlier nuclear physics-related experiments at LAMPF, MIT, and NIKHEF, and their results for publication. Topics include high- resolution electron scattering, quasi-free electron scattering and low-energy pion double charge exchange

  11. Design and synthesis of collagen mimetic peptide derivatives for studying triple helix assembly and collagen mimetic peptide-collagen binding interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiao

    2008-10-01

    Collagen is the principal tensile clement of the extra-cellular matrix in mammals and is the basic scaffold for cells and tissues. Collagen molecules are comprised of homo-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type II and type III), ABB type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type I, type IV, and type V), or ABC type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. type V). Mimicry of collagen structures can help elucidate collagen triple helical conformation and provide insights into making novel collagen-like biomaterials. Our group previously reported a new physical collagen modification method, which was based on non-covalent interaction between collagen mimetic peptide (CMP: -(Pro-Hyp-Gly) x-) and natural collagen. We hypothesized that CMP binds to collagen through a process involving both strand invasion and triple helix assembly. The aim of this dissertation is to study structural formation and stability of collagen triple helix, and to investigate CMP-collagen binding interactions using two types of CMP derivatives: covalently templated CMP trimer and CMP-nanoparticle conjugates. We demonstrated that covalently templated ABB type CMP hetero-trimers could be prepared by a versatile synthetic strategy involving both solid phase and solution peptide coupling. Our thermal melting studies showed that the templated CMP hetero-trimers formed collagen-like triple helices and their folding kinetics correlated with the amino acid compositions of the individual CMP strands. We also studied the thermal melting behavior and folding kinetics of a templated hetero-trimer complex comprised of CMP and a peptide derived from collagen. This synthetic strategy can be readily extended to synthesize other ABB type hetero-trimers to investigate their local melting behavior and biological activity. We also prepared colloidally stable CMP functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-CMPs) as a TEM marker for investigating the CMP-collagen interaction. Au-CMP showed preferential binding to collagen fiber's gap

  12. Water-clay interactions. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaucher, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Clay minerals contribute to the chemical composition of soil and sediment groundwaters via surface and dissolution/precipitation reactions. The understanding of those processes is still today fragmentary. In this context, our experimental purpose is to identify the contribution of each reaction in the chemical composition of water in a water/clay System. Kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite are the reference clays. After a fine mineralogical study, the exchange equilibria between K + and H + are characterised. Different exchange sites are identified and the exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients are quantified. Then, mixtures of the three clays are equilibrated with acidic and basic (I≤10 -2 M) solutions at 25 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C, during 320 days. The System evolution is observed by chemical analysis of the solutions and mineralogical analysis by TEM. We show that montmorillonite is unstable compared to the kaolinite/amorphous silica assemblage for solutions of pH<7. Aqueous silica is probably controlled by the kinetics of dissolution of the montmorillonite in moderate pH media. In more acidic solutions, amorphous silica precipitates. Al is under control of 'kaolinite' neo-formations. The use of the selectivity coefficients in a numerical simulation shows that K + concentration depends on exchange reactions. The pH has a more complicated evolution, which is not completely understood. This evolution depends on both exchange equilibria and organic acid occurrence. In this type of experiments, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium equations between smectite and kaolinite are inexact. The problem of the thermodynamic nature of clays remains and is not resolved by these solubility experiments. (author) [fr

  13. Observational study of drug-drug interactions in oncological inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sacramento Díaz-Carrasco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of potential clinically relevant drug- drug interactions in adult oncological inpatients, as well as to describe the most frequent interactions. A standard database was used. Method: An observational, transversal, and descriptive study including patients admitted to the Oncology Service of a reference hospital. All prescriptions were collected twice a week during a month. They were analysed using Lexicomp® database, recording all interactions classified with a level of risk: C, D or X. Results: A total of 1 850 drug-drug interactions were detected in 218 treatments. The prevalence of treatments with at least one clinically relevant interaction was 95%, being 94.5% for those at level C and 26.1% for levels D and X. The drugs most commonly involved in the interactions detected were opioid analgesics, antipsychotics (butyrophenones, benzodiazepines, pyrazolones, glucocorticoids and heparins, whereas interactions with antineoplastics were minimal, highlighting those related to paclitaxel and between metamizole and various antineoplastics. Conclusions: The prevalence of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions rate was very high, highlighting the high risk percentage of them related to level of risk X. Due to the frequency of onset and potential severity, highlighted the concomitant use of central nervous system depressants drugs with risk of respiratory depression, the risk of onset of anticholinergic symptoms when combining morphine or haloperidol with butylscopolamine, ipratropium bromide or dexchlorpheniramine and the multiple interactions involving metamizole.

  14. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Perspective on Reagent Diversity and Non-covalent Binding of Reactive Carbonyl Species (RCS and Effector Reagents in Non-enzymatic Glycation (NEG: Mechanistic Considerations and Implications for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Rodnick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This perspective focuses on illustrating the underappreciated connections between reactive carbonyl species (RCS, initial binding in the nonenzymatic glycation (NEG process, and nonenzymatic covalent protein modification (here termed NECPM. While glucose is the central species involved in NEG, recent studies indicate that the initially-bound glucose species in the NEG of human hemoglobin (HbA and human serum albumin (HSA are non-RCS ring-closed isomers. The ring-opened glucose, an RCS structure that reacts in the NEG process, is most likely generated from previously-bound ring-closed isomers undergoing concerted acid/base reactions while bound to protein. The generation of the glucose RCS can involve concomitantly-bound physiological species (e.g., inorganic phosphate, water, etc.; here termed effector reagents. Extant NEG schemes do not account for these recent findings. In addition, effector reagent reactions with glucose in the serum and erythrocyte cytosol can generate RCS (e.g., glyoxal, glyceraldehyde, etc.. Recent research has shown that these RCS covalently modify proteins in vivo via NECPM mechanisms. A general scheme that reflects both the reagent and mechanistic diversity that can lead to NEG and NECPM is presented here. A perspective that accounts for the relationships between RCS, NEG, and NECPM can facilitate the understanding of site selectivity, may help explain overall glycation rates, and may have implications for the clinical assessment/control of diabetes mellitus. In view of this perspective, concentrations of ribose, fructose, Pi, bicarbonate, counter ions, and the resulting RCS generated within intracellular and extracellular compartments may be of importance and of clinical relevance. Future research is also proposed.

  16. A perspective on reagent diversity and non-covalent binding of reactive carbonyl species (RCS) and effector reagents in nonenzymatic glycation (NEG): Mechanistic considerations and implications for future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Holman, R. W.; Ropski, Pamela S.; Huang, Mingdong; Swislocki, Arthur L. M.

    2017-06-01

    This perspective focuses on illustrating the underappreciated connections between reactive carbonyl species (RCS), initial binding in the nonenzymatic glycation (NEG) process, and nonenzymatic covalent protein modification (here termed NECPM). While glucose is the central species involved in NEG, recent studies indicate that the initially-bound glucose species in the NEG of human hemoglobin (HbA) and human serum albumin (HSA) are non-RCS ring-closed isomers. The ring-opened glucose, an RCS structure that reacts in the NEG process, is most likely generated from previously-bound ring-closed isomers undergoing concerted acid/base reactions while bound to protein. The generation of the glucose RCS can involve concomitantly-bound physiological species (e.g., inorganic phosphate, water, etc.); here termed effector reagents. Extant NEG schemes do not account for these recent findings. In addition, effector reagent reactions with glucose in the serum and erythrocyte cytosol can generate RCS (e.g., glyoxal, glyceraldehyde, etc.). Recent research has shown that these RCS covalently modify proteins in vivo via NECPM mechanisms. A general scheme that reflects both the reagent and mechanistic diversity that can lead to NEG and NECPM is presented here. A perspective that accounts for the relationships between RCS, NEG, and NECPM can facilitate the understanding of site selectivity, may help explain overall glycation rates, and may have implications for the clinical assessment/control of diabetes mellitus. In view of this perspective, concentrations of ribose, fructose, Pi, bicarbonate, counter ions, and the resulting RCS generated within intracellular and extracellular compartments may be of importance and of clinical relevance. Future research is also proposed.

  17. Fragment molecular orbital method for studying lanthanide interactions with proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsushima, Satoru [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Komeiji, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Mochizuki, Y. [Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    The binding affinity of the calcium-binding protein calmodulin towards Eu{sup 3+} was studied as a model for lanthanide protein interactions in the large family of ''EF-hand'' calcium-binding proteins.

  18. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Atmosphere Water Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2011-07-04

    Understanding and quantifying the interaction of the atmosphere with underlying water surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of scientific fields such as water resources management, climate studies of ocean-atmosphere exchange, and regional weat

  19. Flow cytometry approach for studying the interaction between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flow cytometry approach for studying the interaction between Bacillus mojavensis and Alternaria alternata. Asma Milet, Noreddine Kacem Chaouche, Laid Dehimat, Asma Ait Kaki, Mounira Kara Ali, Philippe Thonart ...

  20. Studies on the interaction between triptolide and Bovine Serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on the interaction between triptolide and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. Haidong Wang, Hailang Shi, Jie Pang, Xingfa Song, Caiyun Xu, Zengxian Sun ...

  1. Game theory and experimental games the study of strategic interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Colman, Andrew M

    1982-01-01

    Game Theory and Experimental Games: The Study of Strategic Interaction is a critical survey of the essential ideas of game theory and the findings of empirical research on strategic interaction. Some experiments using lifelike simulations of familiar kinds of strategic interactions are presented, and applications of game theory to the study of voting, the theory of evolution, and moral philosophy are discussed.Comprised of 13 chapters, this volume begins with an informal definition of game theory and an outline of the types of social situations to which it applies. Games of skill, games of cha

  2. In vitro study of interaction between quinine and Garcinia kola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the interaction between quinine and Garcinia kola using an in vitro adsorption study. Methods: In vitro interaction between quinine and G. kola was conducted at 37 ± 0.1 °C. Adsorption of quinine (2.5 - 40 μg/ml) to 2.5 % w/v G. kola suspension was studied. Thereafter, quinine desorption process ...

  3. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Further, the Teflon autoclave containing sample was heated at 100°C for 12 h. The product was washed with distilled water and centrifuged repeatedly to remove traces of acid. This yielded DWNTs that was functionalized with. –OH and –COOH groups. The acid treated DWNTs were refluxed with excess SOCl2 for 12 h and ...

  4. Dispersions of non-covalently functionalized graphene with minimal stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviz, Dorsa; Das, Sriya; Irin, Fahmida; Green, Micah

    2013-03-01

    Pyrene derivatives are promising substitutes of surfactants and polymers for stabilization of graphene in aqueous dispersions. We demonstrate that pyrene derivatives stabilize single- to few-layer graphene sheets, yielding exceptionally higher graphene/stabilizer ratio in comparison with conventional stabilizers. Parameters such as stabilizer concentration, initial graphite concentration, type and number of functional groups, counterions, the pH and the polarity of dispersion media were shown to affect the adsorption process and final graphene concentration. The effectiveness of pyrene derivatives is determined by the type, number and electronegativity of functional groups and counterion. It also depends on the distance between functional group and pyrene basal plan, the pH of the dispersion (as shown by zeta potential measurements) and the relative polarity between stabilizer and solvent. Stability of the dispersions against centrifugation, pH and temperature changes and lyophilization was investigated. These dispersions also show promise for applications to polymer nanocomposites, organic solar cells, conductive films, and inkjet-printed electronic devices.

  5. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis of non-covalent complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mum (Vmin) in the free and complexed states of the donor and acceptor molecules as well as in terms of MESP at the donor and acceptor atoms (Vn) of the free monomers and complexes. The change in Vmin or Vn on the donor molecule ( Vmin(D) or Vn(D)) during complex formation is proportional to its electron donating ...

  6. Investigation on interaction between Ligupurpuroside A and pepsin by spectroscopic and docking methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liangliang; Xu, Hong; Huang, Fengwen; Li, Yi; Xiao, Huafeng; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Zhangli; He, Zhendan; Zeng, Zheling; Li, Yinong

    2015-01-01

    Ligupurpuroside A is one of the major glycoside in Ku-Din-Cha, a type of Chinese functional tea. In order to better understand its digestion and metabolism in humans, the interaction between Ligupurpuroside A and pepsin has been investigated by fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and synchronous fluorescence spectra along with molecular docking method. The fluorescence experiments indicate that Ligupurpuroside A can effectively quench the intrinsic fluorescence of pepsin through a combined quenching way at the low concentration of Ligupurpuroside A, and a static quenching procedure at the high concentration. The binding constant, binding sites of Ligupurpuroside A with pepsin have been calculated. The thermodynamic analysis suggests that non-covalent reactions, including electrostatic force, hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main forces stabilizing the complex. According to the Förster's non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between pepsin and Ligupurpuroside A was calculated to be 3.15 nm, which implies that energy transfer occurs between pepsin and Ligupurpuroside A. Conformation change of pepsin was observed from UV-vis absorption spectra and synchronous fluorescence spectra under experimental conditions. In addition, all these experimental results have been validated by the protein-ligand docking studies which show that Ligupurpuroside A is located in the cleft between the domains of pepsin.

  7. Environmental confounding in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-07-01

    We show that, in the presence of uncontrolled environmental confounding, joint tests for the presence of a main genetic effect and gene-environment interaction will be biased if the genetic and environmental factors are correlated, even if there is no effect of either the genetic factor or the environmental factor on the disease. When environmental confounding is ignored, such tests will in fact reject the joint null of no genetic effect with a probability that tends to 1 as the sample size increases. This problem with the joint test vanishes under gene-environment independence, but it still persists if estimating the gene-environment interaction parameter itself is of interest. Uncontrolled environmental confounding will bias estimates of gene-environment interaction parameters even under gene-environment independence, but it will not do so if the unmeasured confounding variable itself does not interact with the genetic factor. Under gene-environment independence, if the interaction parameter without controlling for the environmental confounder is nonzero, then there is gene-environment interaction either between the genetic factor and the environmental factor of interest or between the genetic factor and the unmeasured environmental confounder. We evaluate several recently proposed joint tests in a simulation study and discuss the implications of these results for the conduct of gene-environment interaction studies.

  8. A comparative study of polymer-dye interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini R.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between an anionic dye Methyl Orange and two poly cations namely, Poly (N-vinyl-4-methylpyridiniumiodide, (PC1 & Poly (vinylbenzyltriphenylphosphoniumchloride, (PC2 has been investigated by spectrophotometric method. The polymers are observed to induce metachromasy in the dye as evidenced from the considerable blue shift in the absorption maximum of the dye. The interaction constant and thermodynamic parameters of interaction have been determined by absorbance measurements at the metachromatic band. The effect of additives such as ionic salts, alcohols, urea and polyelectrolytes on the reversal of metachromasy has been studied and used to determine the stability of the metachromatic complex and to understand the nature of binding.

  9. Interweaving interactions in virtual worlds: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantamesse, Matteo; Galimberti, Carlo; Giacoma, Gianandrea

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of playing the online game World of Warcraft (WoW), both on adolescent's (effective) social interaction and on the competence they developed on it. Social interactions within the game environment have been investigated by integrating qualitative and quantitative methods: conversation analysis and social network analysis (SNA). From a psychosocial point of view, the in-game interactions, and in particular conversational exchanges, turn out to be a collaborative path of the joint definition of identities and social ties, with reflection on in-game processes and out-game relationship.

  10. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991 under a great from the US Department of Energy. Most of these studies have involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions. The work has been carried out both with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and with the cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland. Part of the experimental work involves measurements of new data on double-charge-exchange scattering, using facilities at LAMPF which we helped modify, and on pion absorption, using a new detector system at PSI that covers nearly the full solid-angle region which we helped construct. Other work involved preparation for future experiments using polarized nuclear targets and a new high-resolution spectrometer system for detecting π 0 mesons. We also presented several proposals for works to be done in future years, involving studies related to pi-mesonic atoms, fundamental pion-nucleon interactions, studies of the difference between charged and neutral pion interactions with the nucleon, studies of the isospin structure of pion-nucleus interactions, and pion scattering from polarized 3 He targets. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the pion-nucleon interaction, of the pion-nucleus interaction mechanism, and of nuclear structure

  11. Study on competitive interaction models in Cayley tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, J.G.M.A.

    1987-12-01

    We propose two kinds of models in the Cayley tree to simulate Ising models with axial anisotropy in the cubic lattice. The interaction in the direction of the anisotropy is simulated by the interaction along the branches of the tree. The interaction in the planes perpendicular to the anisotropy direction, in the first model, is simulated by interactions between spins in neighbour branches of the same generation arising from same site of the previous generation. In the second model, the simulation of the interaction in the planes are produced by mean field interactions among all spins in sites of the same generation arising from the same site of the previous generations. We study these models in the limit of infinite coordination number. First, we analyse a situation with antiferromagnetic interactions along the branches between first neighbours only, and we find the analogous of a metamagnetic Ising model. In the following, we introduce competitive interactions between first and second neighbours along the branches, to simulate the ANNNI model. We obtain one equation of differences which relates the magnetization of one generation with the magnetization of the two previous generations, to permit a detailed study of the modulated phase region. We note that the wave number of the modulation, for one fixed temperature, changes with the competition parameter to form a devil's staircase with a fractal dimension which increases with the temperature. We discuss the existence of strange atractors, related to a possible caothic phase. Finally, we show the obtained results when we consider interactions along the branches with three neighbours. (author)

  12. A theoretical study on interaction of proline with gold cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Interaction of proline with gold cluster was studied using density functional theory (DFT). Two types of mixed basis sets UB3LYP/6-311++G ∪ LANL2MB and UB3LYP/6-311++G ∪ LANL2DZ were used for optimization of complex structures. Proline interacts with gold cluster either through one anchor bond, N–Au ...

  13. The pragmatics of therapeutic interaction: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Georgia

    2009-10-01

    The research reported in this article aims to demonstrate a method for the systematic study of the therapist/patient interaction in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, drawing upon the tradition and methods of 'pragmatics'--the study of language in interaction. A brief introduction to the discipline of pragmatics demonstrates its relevance to the contemporary focus of clinical theory on the here-and-now dynamics of the relationship between analyst and patient. This is followed by a detailed study of five segments from the transcript of a therapeutic dialogue, drawn from a brief psychoanalytic psychotherapy, in which therapist and patient negotiate the meaning of the patient's symptom: Is it psychosomatic? The research seeks to show how the therapeutic process can be observed and studied as an interactional achievement, grounded in general and well-studied procedures through which meaning is intersubjectively developed and shared. Implications of the analysis for clinical theory and practice, and further research, are discussed.

  14. A study of photon interaction parameters in lung tissue substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Manjunatha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of photon interaction with different composite materials has become a topic of prime importance for radiation physicists. Some parameters of dosimetric interest are the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density; these help in the basic understanding of photon interactions with composite materials. The photon interaction parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ, effective atomic number (Z eff , and effective electron density (N el must be identical for the phantom material and their tissue. In the present study, we have evaluated the photon interaction parameters such as (μ/ρ, Z eff and N el of 13 lung tissue substitutes. The variations of these parameters of lung tissue substitutes with photon energy are graphically represented. The photon interaction parameters of lung tissue substitutes are compared with that of lung tissue. The variation of photon interaction parameters of the studied lung tissue substitutes is similar that of the lung. Logically, it can be shown that Alderson lung is good substitute for lung than the other substitutes.

  15. A study of photon interaction parameters in lung tissue substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H C

    2014-04-01

    The study of photon interaction with different composite materials has become a topic of prime importance for radiation physicists. Some parameters of dosimetric interest are the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density; these help in the basic understanding of photon interactions with composite materials. The photon interaction parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff), and effective electron density (N el) must be identical for the phantom material and their tissue. In the present study, we have evaluated the photon interaction parameters such as (μ/ρ), Z eff and N el of 13 lung tissue substitutes. The variations of these parameters of lung tissue substitutes with photon energy are graphically represented. The photon interaction parameters of lung tissue substitutes are compared with that of lung tissue. The variation of photon interaction parameters of the studied lung tissue substitutes is similar that of the lung. Logically, it can be shown that Alderson lung is good substitute for lung than the other substitutes.

  16. Study on synthesis, kit formulation and chemical kinetics of dissociation of 99mTc labeled PnAO biotin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshan, A.; Jafri, S.R.A.; Maecke, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A bifunctional ligand of PnAO-biotin has recently been synthesized, with a better percentage yield of 63% in the presence of newly developed coupling agent 0-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexaflorophos phate (HATU). Then lyophilized kit with 150μg of PnAObiotin has been developed and labeled with high specific activity of technetium-99m (2500-3000MBq) to get maximum radiochemical purity of 99mTc-PnAO-biotin complex i.e. > 97%. The association of avidin and streptavidin is among the strongest known non-covalent protein ligand interaction Ka 1015 M-1 and 1013 M-1 respectively. We measured the dissociation rate constant of PnAO-biotin from avidin and streptavidin challenged with excess of cold biotin. For the separation of bound and free-labeled biotin we employed ultrafilteration technique. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the non-covalent binding between 99mTc-PnAO-biotin with avidin and 99mTc-PnAO-biotin with streptavidin is more than 99%. Both biotin-binding proteins exhibited a faster initial phase and the rate of dissociation of 99mTc-PnAO-biotin with avidin is found to be 8.2x10-8 at 250C and 2.6x10-7 at 370C while the rate of dissociation 99mTc-PnAO-biotin from streptavidin is found to be 6x10-7 at 250C and 1.06x10-6 at 370C. The in-vitro study of the kinetics of dissociation exhibits the strong interaction of 99mTc-PnAO-biotin complex with both proteins, which suggests that this bifunctional PnAO-biotin ligand can be used for tumor localization with monoclonal antibodies to achieve high tumor to non-tumor ratio. (author)

  17. First Principles Study of Interactions between Dopant Atoms in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aqtash, Nabil; Vasiliev, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We study the interactions between the boron (B) and nitrogen (N) dopant atoms in graphene. Our calculations are carried out using density functional theory combined with the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation functional. The total energies, equilibrium geometries, electronic charge distributions, and densities of states of doped graphene sheets are examined in cases of B-B, N-N, and B-N co-doped graphene. The interaction energy between the two dopant atoms is found to be inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance. We find the B-B and N-N interactions to be repulsive and the B-N interaction to be attractive. The changes in the density of states observed in B- and N-doped graphene are explained in terms of electronic charge transfer. Supported by DOE DE-FG36-08GO88008.

  18. PEER-FEEDBACK AND ONLINE INTERACTION: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Isabel Espitia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of information and communication technologies (ICTs in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom has led to different practices and types of interaction. Online interaction allows teachers and students to use the target language beyond the classroom and provides students with more time to be exposed to and use the language. This case study aimed at understanding how a group of twelve students at Universidad de la Sabana, who participated in online forums as part of the requirements of a blended EFL course, interacted online to provide peer-feedback on written compositions. It also analyzed how online interaction was undertaken when using online forums. Findings suggest that participants raised awareness about the relevance of editing to avoid possible language problems by reviewing their peers' products and that the implementation of online peer feedback as an assessment strategy reveals students' beliefs towards language assessment.

  19. A spectroscopic study of interaction of cationic dyes with heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nandini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of two cationic dyes namely, acridine orange and pinacyanol chloride with an anionic polyelectrolyte, heparin, has been investigated by spectrophotometric method.The polymer induced metachromasy in the dyes resulting in the shift of the absorption maxima of the dyes towards shorter wavelengths. The stability of the complexes formed between acridine orange and heparin was found to be lesser than that formed between pinacyanol chloride and heparin. This fact was further confirmed by reversal studies using alcohols, urea and surfactants. The interaction of acridine orange with heparin has also been investigated fluorimetrically.The interaction parameters revealed that binding between acridine orange and heparin arises due to electrostatic interaction while that between pinacyanol chloride and heparin is found to involve both electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. The effect of the structure of the dye in inducing metachromasy has also been discussed.

  20. Social signal processing for studying parent-infant interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eAvril

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying early interactions is a core issue of infant development and psychopathology. Automatic social signal processing theoretically offers the possibility to extract and analyse communication by taking an integrative perspective, considering the multimodal nature and dynamics of behaviours (including synchrony. This paper proposes an explorative method to acquire and extract relevant social signals from a naturalistic early parent-infant interaction. An experimental setup is proposed based on both clinical and technical requirements. We extracted various cues from body postures and speech productions of partners using the IMI2S (Interaction, Multimodal Integration, and Social Signal Framework. Preliminary clinical and computational results are reported for two dyads (one pathological in a situation of severe emotional neglect and one normal control as an illustration of our cross-disciplinary protocol. The results from both clinical and computational analyses highlight similar differences: the pathological dyad shows dyssynchronic interaction led by the infant whereas the control dyad shows synchronic interaction and a smooth interactive dialog. The results suggest that the current method might be promising for future studies.

  1. Spectrophotometric studies on the interaction between (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kalyan Sundar; Sahoo, Bijaya Ketan; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2008-02-01

    Various reported antibacterial activities of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea prompted us to study its binding with lysozyme. This has been investigated by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and protein-ligand docking. The binding parameters were determined using a modified Stern-Volmer equation. The thermodynamic parameters are indicative of an initial hydrophobic association. The complex is, however, held together predominantly by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. CD studies do not indicate any significant changes in the secondary structure of lysozyme. Docking studies revealed that specific interactions are observed with residues Trp 62 and Trp 63.

  2. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nucl. Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au).

  3. Organoid culture systems to study host-pathogen interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, Devanjali; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in host-microbe interaction studies in organoid cultures have shown great promise and have laid the foundation for much more refined future studies using these systems. Modeling of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in cerebral organoids have helped us understand its association with

  4. Physics Performance Report for PANDA : Strong Interaction Studies with Antiprotons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Heng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Liu, H.; Shen, X.; Wang, O.; Xu, H.; Becker, J.; Feldbauer, F.; Heinsius, F. -H.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Wiedner, U.; Zhong, J.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Pantea, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; De Napoli, M.; Giacoppo, F.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Sfienti, C.; Bialkowski, E.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Kistryn, M.; Kliczewski, S.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Pysz, K.; Schaefer, W.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A.; Czy. zycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Hawryluk, M.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Wojnar, L.; Gil, D.; Hawranek, P.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, St.; Korcyl, K.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Wronska, A.; Al-Turany, M.; Augustin, I.; Deppe, H.; Flemming, H.; Gerl, J.; Goetzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Luehning, J.; Maas, F.; Mishra, D.; Orth, H.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Brinkmann, K. -T.; Freiesleben, H.; Jaekel, R.; Kliemt, R.; Wuerschig, T.; Zaunick, H. -G.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Feshchenko, A. A.; Galoyan, A. S.; Grigoryan, S.; Karmokov, A.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Kudaev, V. Ch.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Yu. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mustafaev, G. A.; Olshevski, A.; . Pasyuk, M. A.; Perevalova, E. A.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T. A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V. K.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Salmin, R. A.; Samartsev, A. G.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, A.; Shabratova, G. S.; Skachkova, A. N.; Skachkov, N. B.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M. K.; Teshev, R. Sh.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Uzhinsky, V. V.; Vodopianov, A. S.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Foehl, K.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Woods, P.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Teufel, A.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K.; Tann, B.; Tomaradze, A.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cecchi, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Negrini, M.; Savri`e, M.; Stancari, G.; Dulach, B.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Pace, E.; Bersani, A.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Brodski, I.; Doering, W.; Drexler, P.; Dueren, M.; Gagyi-Palffy, Z.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kotulla, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, S.; Liu, M.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Salz, C.; Schneider, J.; Schoenmeier, P.; Schubert, R.; Spataro, S.; Stenzel, H.; Strackbein, C.; Thiel, M.; Thoering, U.; Yang, S.; Clarkson, T.; Cowie, E.; Downie, E.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Ireland, D.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Lehmann, I.; Livingston, K.; Lumsden, S.; MacGregor, D.; McKinnon, B.; Murray, M.; Protopopescu, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Yang, G.; Babai, M.; Biegun, A. K.; Bubak, A.; Guliyev, E.; Suyam Jothi, Vanniarajan; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Smit, H.; van der Weele, J. C.; Garcia, F.; Riska, D. -O.; Buescher, M.; Dosdall, R.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Grunwald, D.; Jha, V.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Maier, R.; Mertens, M.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Randriamalala, T.; Ritman, J.; Roeder, M.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wuestner, P.; Kisiel, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Fissum, S.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Lundin, M.; Schroeder, B.; Achenbach, P.; Mora Espi, M. C.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez, S.; Sanchez-Lorente, A.; Dormenev, V. I.; Fedorov, A. A.; Korzhik, M. V.; Missevitch, O. V.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Semenov, A.; Hoeppner, C.; Ketzer, B.; Konorov, I.; Mann, A.; Neubert, S.; Paul, S.; Weitzel, Q.; Khoukaz, A.; Rausmann, T.; Taeschner, A.; Wessels, J.; Varma, R.; Baldin, E.; Kotov, K.; Peleganchuk, S.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Boucher, J.; Hennino, T.; Kunne, R.; Ong, S.; Pouthas, J.; Ramstein, B.; Rosier, P.; Sudol, M.; Van de Wiele, J.; Zerguerras, T.; Dmowski, K.; Korzeniewski, R.; Przemyslaw, D.; Slowinski, B.; Boca, G.; Braghieri, A.; Costanza, S.; Fontana, A.; Genova, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Belikov, N. I.; Davidenko, A. M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Goncharenko, Y. M.; Grishin, V. N.; Kachanov, V. A.; Konstantinov, D. A.; Kormilitsin, V. A.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Matulenko, Y. A.; Melnik, Y. M.; Meschanin, A. P.; Minaev, N. G.; Mochalov, V. V.; Morozov, D. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Ryazantsev, A. V.; Semenov, P. A.; Soloviev, L. F.; Uzunian, A. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Yakutin, A. E.; Baeck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Bargholtz, C.; Geren, L.; Tegner, P. E.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Itzotov, A.; Kisselev, A.; Kravchenko, P.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Naryshkin, Y.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Zhadanov, A.; Fava, L.; Panzieri, D.; Alberto, D.; Amoroso, A.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bufalino, S.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Ferrero, L.; Grasso, A.; Greco, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Maggiora, M.; Marcello, S.; Serbanut, G.; Sosio, S.; Bertini, R.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Feliciello, A.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Mazza, G.; Rivetti, A.; Szymanska, K.; Tosello, F.; Wheadon, R.; Morra, O.; Agnello, M.; Iazzi, F.; Szymanska, K.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Clement, H.; Ekstroem, C.; Calen, H.; Grape, S.; Hoeistad, B.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Thome, E.; Zlomanczuk, J.; Diaz, J.; Ortiz, A.; Borsuk, S.; Chlopik, A.; Guzik, Z.; Kopec, J.; Kozlowski, T.; Melnychuk, D.; Plominski, M.; Szewinski, J.; Traczyk, K.; Zwieglinski, B.; Buehler, P.; Gruber, A.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Lutz, M. F. M.; Pire, B.; Scholten, O.; Timmermans, R.

    To study fundamental questions of hadron and nuclear physics in interactions of antiprotons with nucleons and nuclei, the universal PANDA detector will be built. Gluonic excitations, the physics of strange and charm quarks and nucleon structure studies will be performed with unprecedented accuracy

  5. Teaching Social Interaction Skills in Social Studies Classroom and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is a survey which was carried out with 110 sandwich students of university of Nigeria Nsukka. The focus was to ascertain the relevance of social studies programme of Nigerian universities in inculcating social interaction skills for maintaining peace and managing conflicts in the family. Four research questions ...

  6. Volumetric and Viscometric Studies of Molecular Interactions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    In previous work we have presented a systematic study of the thermodynamic, acoustic and transport properties of binary mixtures of amides with alcohols.1–6 The objective underlying such studies is to improve our understanding of molecular interactions for characterizing the physico-chemical behaviour of mixtures at the ...

  7. Technique of studying the interaction of charges of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yefremov, E.I.; Kravtsov, V.S.; Myachina, N.I.; Rodak, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    A technique is presented for studying the interaction of explosive charges which includes recording of the velocity of detonation of the studied charges, measurement of mechanical stresses developing in this case in the medium and determination of granulometric composition of the model with simultaneous and diverse initiation.

  8. Study on the Interaction between Two Hydrokinetic Savonius Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash Golecha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Savonius turbine is simple in design and easy to fabricate at a lower cost. The drag is the basic driving force for Savonius turbine. Savonius turbines are mainly used for the small-scale electricity generation in remote areas. In real life, multiple Savonius turbines are to be arranged to form a farm to scale up the electricity generation. So, it is important to study the interaction among them to avoid the power loss due to negative interaction between turbines. The purpose of this investigation is to examine closely the effect of interaction between two Savonius turbines arranged in line. Experimental investigations are carried out to study the mutual interaction between turbines with water as the working medium at a Reynolds number of 1.2×105 based on the diameter of the turbine. Influence of separation gap between the two Savonius turbines is studied by varying the separation gap ratio (/ from 3 to 8. As the separation gap ratio increases from 3 to 8, becomes lesser the mutual interaction between the turbines. Results conclude that two turbines placed at a separation gap ratio of 8 performed independently without affecting the performance of each other.

  9. The feedback in the studies of interpersonal interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Amyaga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the problem of interpreting and studying the feedback in interpersonal interaction as a result of some reflective position. A scientist interested in the feedback has to study the reflective positions as well and to consider their ‘second order’, i. e. to identify the object of his research as a certain number of direct and reverse processes together with their possible subjective representation. Considering the interaction of the sociologist with his customer, this means the necessity to correctly understand and reflect the goals, interests and negotiating tools of the other party that determine the success of negotiations.

  10. Parsing of the free energy of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Khomytova, Nina M. [Department of Physics, Sevastopol National Technical University, Sevastopol 99053, Crimea (Ukraine); Hernandez Santiago, Adrian A.; Tavera, Anna-Maria Cervantes; Alvarado, Julieta Salas [Faculty of Chemical Sciences, Autonomous University of Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Evstigneev, Maxim P., E-mail: max_evstigneev@mail.ru [Department of Physics, Sevastopol National Technical University, Sevastopol 99053, Crimea (Ukraine)

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > A protocol for decomposition of the free energy of aromatic stacking is developed. > The factors stabilizing/destabilizing stacking of aromatic molecules are defined. > Hydrophobic contribution is found to be dominant. - Abstract: We report an analysis of the energetics of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions for 39 non-covalent reactions of self- and hetero-association of 12 aromatic molecules with different structures and charge states. A protocol for computation of the contributions to the total energy from various energetic terms has been developed and the results are consistent with experiment in 92% of all the systems studied. It is found that the contributions from hydrogen bonds and entropic factors are always unfavorable, whereas contributions from van-der-Waals, electrostatic and/or hydrophobic effects may lead to stabilizing or destabilizing factors depending on the system studied. The analysis carried out in this work provides an answer to the questions 'What forces stabilize/destabilize the stacking of aromatic molecules in aqueous-salt solution and what are their relative importance?'

  11. Parsing of the free energy of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Khomytova, Nina M.; Hernandez Santiago, Adrian A.; Tavera, Anna-Maria Cervantes; Alvarado, Julieta Salas; Evstigneev, Maxim P.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → A protocol for decomposition of the free energy of aromatic stacking is developed. → The factors stabilizing/destabilizing stacking of aromatic molecules are defined. → Hydrophobic contribution is found to be dominant. - Abstract: We report an analysis of the energetics of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions for 39 non-covalent reactions of self- and hetero-association of 12 aromatic molecules with different structures and charge states. A protocol for computation of the contributions to the total energy from various energetic terms has been developed and the results are consistent with experiment in 92% of all the systems studied. It is found that the contributions from hydrogen bonds and entropic factors are always unfavorable, whereas contributions from van-der-Waals, electrostatic and/or hydrophobic effects may lead to stabilizing or destabilizing factors depending on the system studied. The analysis carried out in this work provides an answer to the questions 'What forces stabilize/destabilize the stacking of aromatic molecules in aqueous-salt solution and what are their relative importance?'

  12. Transformation of leguminous plants to study symbiotic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iantcheva, Anelia; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Ratet, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Legume plants are important in agriculture because they represent an important source of protein for human and animal consumption. This high protein content results from their capacity to use atmospheric nitrogen for their nutrition as a consequence of their symbiotic interaction with rhizobia. Understanding this interaction at the molecular level is a prerequisite for its better use in agriculture and for the long term objective of its transfer to other crops. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a tool of choice for studying this interaction and for unraveling the function of the different genes discovered through classical genetic approaches. However, legume plants are often recalcitrant to regeneration and transformation. This paper describes the technology developments (regeneration, transformation, insertion mutagenesis) related to Agrobacterium transformations that were established in the legume plants, as well as different examples of the technology developments or gene discoveries resulting from these studies.

  13. FTIR Drug-Polymer Interactions Studies of Perindopril Erbumine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modni, A.; Ahmad, S.; Din, I.; Hussain, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to prepare different combinations of Perindopril Erbumine with different polymers like Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose, Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K15M, Xanthan gum and Ethyl cellulose, thereby to determine any possible interactions between Perindopril erbumine and polymers. The analytical technique Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to take spectra of individual drug, polymers and combination of drug with polymers. The results were analyzed to find out any interactions of Perindopril erbumine and polymers. From this study it was concluded that there were no any significant changes in characteristic peaks of drug after combinations with polymers which indicated no interaction between Perindopril erbumine and polymers. (author)

  14. Four faces of the interaction between ions and aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Dóra; Rovó, Petra; Jákli, Imre; Császár, Attila G; Perczel, András

    2017-07-15

    Non-covalent interactions between ions and aromatic rings play an important role in the stabilization of macromolecular complexes; of particular interest are peptides and proteins containing aromatic side chains (Phe, Trp, and Tyr) interacting with negatively (Asp and Glu) and positively (Arg and Lys) charged amino acid residues. The structures of the ion-aromatic-ring complexes are the result of an interaction between the large quadrupole moment of the ring and the charge of the ion. Four attractive interaction types are proposed to be distinguished based on the position of the ion with respect to the plane of the ring: perpendicular cation-π (CP ⊥ ), co-planar cation-π (CP ∥ ), perpendicular anion-π (AP ⊥ ), and co-planar anion-π (AP ∥ ). To understand more than the basic features of these four interaction types, a systematic, high-level quantum chemical study is performed, using the X -  + C 6 H 6 , M +  + C 6 H 6 , X -  + C 6 F 6 , and M +  + C 6 F 6 model systems with X -  = H - , F - , Cl - , HCOO - , CH 3 COO - and M +  = H + , Li + , Na + , NH4+, CH 3 NH3+, whereby C 6 H 6 and C 6 F 6 represent an electron-rich and an electron-deficient π system, respectively. Benchmark-quality interaction energies with small uncertainties, obtained via the so-called focal-point analysis (FPA) technique, are reported for the four interaction types. The computations reveal that the interactions lead to significant stabilization, and that the interaction energy order, given in kcal mol -1 in parentheses, is CP ⊥ (23-37) > AP ⊥ (14-21) > CP ∥ (9-22) > AP ∥ (6-16). A natural bond orbital analysis performed leads to a deeper qualitative understanding of the four interaction types. To facilitate the future quantum chemical characterization of ion-aromatic-ring interactions in large biomolecules, the performance of three density functional theory methods, B3LYP, BHandHLYP, and M06-2X, is tested against the FPA benchmarks

  15. Conglutinin binds the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp 160 and inhibits its interaction with cell membrane CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Sørensen, A M; Svehag, S E

    1991-01-01

    The highly glycosylated envelope glycoprotein (gp 160) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the CD4 molecule present on the membrane of CD4+ cells and is involved in the pathobiology of HIV infection. Lectins bind glycoproteins through non-covalent interactions with specific hexose...... of the binding of rgp160 to the CD4 receptor on CEM 13 cells, as demonstrated by FACS analyses. These results indicate that conglutinin may inhibit the infection with HIV-1 through its interaction with the viral envelope glycoprotein....

  16. Gene-lifestyle interaction and type 2 diabetes: the EPIC interact case-cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Langenberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D has progressed rapidly, but the interactions between common genetic variants and lifestyle risk factors have not been systematically investigated in studies with adequate statistical power. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the combined effects of genetic and lifestyle factors on risk of T2D in order to inform strategies for prevention.The InterAct study includes 12,403 incident T2D cases and a representative sub-cohort of 16,154 individuals from a cohort of 340,234 European participants with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up. We studied the combined effects of an additive genetic T2D risk score and modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors using Prentice-weighted Cox regression and random effects meta-analysis methods. The effect of the genetic score was significantly greater in younger individuals (p for interaction  = 1.20×10-4. Relative genetic risk (per standard deviation [4.4 risk alleles] was also larger in participants who were leaner, both in terms of body mass index (p for interaction  = 1.50×10-3 and waist circumference (p for interaction  = 7.49×10-9. Examination of absolute risks by strata showed the importance of obesity for T2D risk. The 10-y cumulative incidence of T2D rose from 0.25% to 0.89% across extreme quartiles of the genetic score in normal weight individuals, compared to 4.22% to 7.99% in obese individuals. We detected no significant interactions between the genetic score and sex, diabetes family history, physical activity, or dietary habits assessed by a Mediterranean diet score.The relative effect of a T2D genetic risk score is greater in younger and leaner participants. However, this sub-group is at low absolute risk and would not be a logical target for preventive interventions. The high absolute risk associated with obesity at any level of genetic risk highlights the importance of universal rather than targeted approaches to lifestyle

  17. Analysis of binding interaction between the natural apocarotenoid bixin and human serum albumin by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsila, Ferenc; Molnár, Péter; Deli, József

    2005-06-01

    Bixin is an important, pharmacologically active dietary cis-carotenoid, but its interaction with potential macromolecular targets is completely unexplored. This work was aimed to study the binding of bixin to human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in blood plasma. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in combination with UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching techniques were applied. Appearance of induced CD bands in the UV- and VIS-absorption spectral regions indicated the formation of non-covalent carotenoid-albumin complexes. Shape and spectral position of the extrinsic Cotton effects suggested the binding of a single bixin molecule to HSA in chiral conformation. Scatchard and non-linear regression analyses of CD titration data resulted in similar values for the association constant (Ka = 6.6 and 4.6x10(5) M(-1), resp.) and for the number of binding sites (n = 1). The binding interaction was independently confirmed by fluorescence-quenching experiment from which the binding parameters were also calculated. CD Displacement measurements performed with marker ligands established that the main drug binding sites of HSA are not involved in binding of bixin. Palmitic acid decreased the amplitude of the induced CD bands suggesting a common albumin binding site for bixin and long-chain fatty acids. The above data indicate that HSA plays a significant role in the plasma transportation of bixin and related dietary carboxylic acid carotenoids.

  18. Photon interaction studies using 241Am γ-rays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and wood samples, samples like sand, sugar etc., which contain particles of varying sizes as well as pellets and aqueous ... in natural wood, dry wood and dry leaves using 241Am γ-rays. They found that the ... Gamma ray interaction studies at energies near the photoelectric absorption edges have been of interest to ...

  19. In silico study of interaction between rice proteins enhanced disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... A direct interaction of EDS1 with PAD4 is necessary for basal resistance and is related to the transcrip- ... that amplifies resistance locally and systemically (Feys et al. 2001; Volt et al. 2009). Proteomic studies in ..... Technology, New Delhi, for providing financial support under the DST-Women Scientist DST ...

  20. In silico study of interaction between rice proteins enhanced disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... a dimeric protein complex, which, similar to that in Arabidopsis, is perhaps also important for triggering the salicylic acid signalling pathway in plants. [Singh I and Shah K 2012 In silico study of interaction between rice proteins enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and phytoalexin deficient 4, the regulators of ...

  1. Interactive Multimedia: An Alternative Context for Studying Works of Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Nancy F.

    1998-01-01

    Compares the effectiveness of two types of instructional aids, interactive multimedia and slide studies, for art-history students. Reveals that multimedia users searched more extensively for information, demonstrated more understandings and misunderstandings, and experienced carryover effects between experiments. Indicates that interactive…

  2. Studies on pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of vinpocetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Vinpocetine, a semi-synthetic derivative of vincamine, is a popular dietary supplement used for the treatment of several central nervous system related disorders. Despite its wide use, no pharmacokinetic drug interaction studies are reported in literature. Due to increasing use of dietar...

  3. Spectroscopic Studies of the Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The electron donor-acceptor interaction between drugs which act as electron donors and some electron-deficient compounds (π acceptors) has severally been utilized as an analytical tool for the quantitation and qualitative assessment of such drugs. The objective of this study, therefore, was to develop an assay ...

  4. Ultrasonic study of molecular interaction in binary liquid mixtures at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 695–701. Ultrasonic study of molecular interaction in binary liquid mixtures at 30 о. C. A ALI and A K NAIN. Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia ... The variation of these parameters with composition of the mixture helps ... AR grade, 99.5 and 99.0%, respectively) were purified by standard procedure [11]. The.

  5. NMR studies concerning base-base interactions in oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogen, Y.T. van den.

    1988-01-01

    Two main subjects are treated in the present thesis. The firsst part principally deals with the base-base interactions in single-stranded oligoribonucleotides. The second part presents NMR and model-building studies of DNA and RNA duplexes containing an unpaired base. (author). 242 refs.; 26 figs.; 24 tabs

  6. Spectral Study of the Interaction of Myoglobin with Tannin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, K. R.; Sargsyan, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    The interaction of myoglobin with tannin (tannic acid) at 298.15 and 303.15 K was studied by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in the UV region. The physicochemical and thermodynamic binding parameters (the fluorescence quenching mechanism, the bonding constant, the number of binding sites, the type of interaction) and parameters of the formed complex were determined. It was found that binding of myoglobin with tannic acid does not lead to significant changes in the electronic state of the heme ring of myoglobin.

  7. CUSTOMER INTERACTION ON DIGITAL ECONOMY: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Tavares da Silva Cozer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available On a digital economy context, customer interaction is fundamental to any company to provide competitive advantage. This research intends to give concrete answers for the sea of information complexity which is the Internet. The main case is to build a model of digital customer interaction. Customization extends beyond targeted media to include the design and delivery of the product itself. Venkatraman (1998 defines dynamic customization based on three principles: modularity, intelligence and organization. The research is based on Interaction Model and its variables are: Products, Modularity, Artificial Intelligence, Market driven organization, and virtual communities. Two organizations were studied, one with physical product and another with virtual product, and the results were shown from a qualitative research.

  8. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR KINETIC STUDIES OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS: A REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  9. Analytical techniques for the study of polyphenol-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poklar Ulrih, Nataša

    2017-07-03

    This mini review focuses on advances in biophysical techniques to study polyphenol interactions with proteins. Polyphenols have many beneficial pharmacological properties, as a result of which they have been the subject of intensive studies. The most conventional techniques described here can be divided into three groups: (i) methods used for screening (in-situ methods); (ii) methods used to gain insight into the mechanisms of polyphenol-protein interactions; and (iii) methods used to study protein aggregation and precipitation. All of these methods used to study polyphenol-protein interactions are based on modifications to the physicochemical properties of the polyphenols or proteins after binding/complex formation in solution. To date, numerous review articles have been published in the field of polyphenols. This review will give a brief insight in computational methods and biosensors and cell-based methods, spectroscopic methods including fluorescence emission, UV-vis adsorption, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and light scattering techniques including small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering, and calorimetric techniques (isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry), microscopy, the techniques which have been successfully used for polyphenol-protein interactions. At the end the new methods based on single molecule detection with high potential to study polyphenol-protein interactions will be presented. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique will be discussed as well as the thermodynamic, kinetic or structural parameters, which can be obtained. The other relevant biophysical experimental techniques that have proven to be valuable, such electrochemical methods, hydrodynamic techniques and chromatographic techniques will not be described here.

  10. A flexible Bayesian model for studying gene-environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important follow-up step after genetic markers are found to be associated with a disease outcome is a more detailed analysis investigating how the implicated gene or chromosomal region and an established environment risk factor interact to influence the disease risk. The standard approach to this study of gene-environment interaction considers one genetic marker at a time and therefore could misrepresent and underestimate the genetic contribution to the joint effect when one or more functional loci, some of which might not be genotyped, exist in the region and interact with the environment risk factor in a complex way. We develop a more global approach based on a Bayesian model that uses a latent genetic profile variable to capture all of the genetic variation in the entire targeted region and allows the environment effect to vary across different genetic profile categories. We also propose a resampling-based test derived from the developed Bayesian model for the detection of gene-environment interaction. Using data collected in the Environment and Genetics in Lung Cancer Etiology (EAGLE study, we apply the Bayesian model to evaluate the joint effect of smoking intensity and genetic variants in the 15q25.1 region, which contains a cluster of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes and has been shown to be associated with both lung cancer and smoking behavior. We find evidence for gene-environment interaction (P-value = 0.016, with the smoking effect appearing to be stronger in subjects with a genetic profile associated with a higher lung cancer risk; the conventional test of gene-environment interaction based on the single-marker approach is far from significant.

  11. A comparitive study of polyelectrolyte-dye interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandini, R.; Vishalakshi, B.

    2009-12-01

    The interaction of Azure B with sodium alginate and heparin in aqueous solution has been studied by spectrophotometric method. Absorbance of Azure B at 645 nm decreases and a new band appeared at 545 nm and at 556 nm respectively which indicated that a new metachromatic complex formed. A linear decrease in absorbance is noted. It was found that sodium alginate is more effective than heparin in decreasing the absorbance of Azure B at 645 nm. The stoichiometry of sodium alginate or heparin with Azure B was determined by spectrophotometry. The results suggested that the interaction between Azure B with sodium alginate or heparin was a result of electrostatic forces and the difference between heparin and sodium alginate were attributed to the different negative charge number on repetitive disaccharides unit. Studies on the effect of alcohol or urea indicated that sodium alginate and heparin interacted with the aggregates of Azure B. Thermodynamic parameters of interaction has been evaluated to determine the stability of the metachromatic complex. The effect of surfactants on reversal of metachromasy has also been studied.

  12. A comparative study of polyelectrolyte-dye interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandini, R; Vishalakshi, B

    2009-12-01

    The interaction of Azure B with sodium alginate and heparin in aqueous solution has been studied by spectrophotometric method. Absorbance of Azure B at 645 nm decreases and a new band appeared at 545 nm and at 556 nm respectively which indicated that a new metachromatic complex formed. A linear decrease in absorbance is noted. It was found that sodium alginate is more effective than heparin in decreasing the absorbance of Azure B at 645 nm. The stoichiometry of sodium alginate or heparin with Azure B was determined by spectrophotometry. The results suggested that the interaction between Azure B with sodium alginate or heparin was a result of electrostatic forces and the difference between heparin and sodium alginate were attributed to the different negative charge number on repetitive disaccharides unit. Studies on the effect of alcohol or urea indicated that sodium alginate and heparin interacted with the aggregates of Azure B. Thermodynamic parameters of interaction has been evaluated to determine the stability of the metachromatic complex. The effect of surfactants on reversal of metachromasy has also been studied.

  13. Fundamental Study on Laser Interaction with Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to significantly advance the fundamental understanding of laser interaction with metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) and to overcome the fundamental limits of current laser processing techniques by tuning heat transfer and fluid flow using nanoparticles.Ultrasonic assisted electrocodeposition was used to prepare MMNCs samples (e.g., Ni/Al2O3) for laser melting experiments. Microstructural study showed that uniform distribution and dispersion of nanoparticles wer...

  14. Domain-specific interactions between MLN8237 and human serum albumin estimated by STD and WaterLOGSY NMR, ITC, spectroscopic, and docking techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongqin; Liu, Jiuyang; Huang, Yanmei; Gao, Rui; Tang, Bin; Li, Shanshan; He, Jiawei; Li, Hui

    2017-03-01

    Alisertib (MLN8237) is an orally administered inhibitor of Aurora A kinase. This small-molecule inhibitor is under clinical or pre-clinical phase for the treatment of advanced malignancies. The present study provides a detailed characterization of the interaction of MLN8237 with a drug transport protein called human serum albumin (HSA). STD and WaterLOGSY nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-binding studies were conducted first to confirm the binding of MLN8237 to HSA. In the ligand orientation assay, the binding sites of MLN8237 were validated through two site-specific spy molecules (warfarin sodium and ibuprofen, which are two known site-selective probes) by using STD and WaterLOGSY NMR competition techniques. These competition experiments demonstrate that both spy molecules do not compete with MLN8237 for the specific binding site. The AutoDock-based blind docking study recognizes the hydrophobic subdomain IB of the protein as the probable binding site for MLN8237. Thermodynamic investigations by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) reveal that the non-covalent interaction between MLN8237 and HSA (binding constant was approximately 105 M-1) is driven mainly by favorable entropy and unfavorable enthalpy. In addition, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that MLN8237 may induce conformational changes in HSA.

  15. [Study on the interaction of doxycycline with human serum albumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao-Ying; Chen, Lin; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the interaction of doxycycline (DC) with human serum albumin (HSA) by the inner filter effects, displacement experiments and molecular docking methods, based on classic multi-spectroscopy. With fluorescence quenching method at 298 and 310 K, the binding constants Ka, were determined to be 2. 73 X 10(5) and 0. 74X 10(5) L mol-1, respectively, and there was one binding site between DC and HSA, indicating that the binding of DC to HSA was strong, and the quenching mechanism was a static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy change, AH and enthropy change, delta S) were calculated to be -83. 55 kJ mol-1 and -176. 31 J mol-1 K-1 via the Vant' Hoff equation, which indicated that the interaction of DC with HSA was driven mainly by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Based on the Föster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the specific binding distance between Trp-214 (acceptor) and DC (donor) was 4. 98 nm, which was similar to the result confirmed by molecular docking. Through displacement experiments, sub-domain IIA of HSA was assigned to possess the high-affinity binding site of DC. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated that the binding of DC to HSA induced the conformation change of HSA and increased the disclosure of some part of hydrophobic regions that had been buried before. The results of FTIR spectroscopy showed that DC bound to HSA led to the slight unfolding of the polypeptide chain of HSA. Furthermore, the binding details between DC and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking methods, which revealed that DC was bound at sub-domain IIA through multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic effect, polar forces and pi-pi interactions. The experimental results provide theoretical basis and reliable data for the study of the interaction between small drug molecule and human serum albumin

  16. Studies of interaction between two alkaloids and double helix DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yantao; Peng, Tingting; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Dayu; Cui, Yuncheng

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the study on the interaction of two alkaloids (matrine and evodiamine) and hs-DNA by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), DNA melting and viscosity experiments. The spectroscopic studies suggested that two alkaloids can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation also indicated that two alkaloids can intercalate to DNA. The binding constants (K A ) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined. At the same time, some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the alkaloids to DNA were obtained. Competitive binding studies revealed that alkaloids had an effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA. In addition, it was also proved that the fluorescence quenching was influenced by ionic strength. - Highlights: • Interaction between two alkaloids and DNA is studied by spectral methods. • The binding constant and the binding sites between two alkaloids and DNA are obtained. • There are a classical intercalative mode between alkaloids and DNA. • The binding of matrine with DNA is weaker than that of evodiamine. • It is important for us to understand the alkaloids–DNA interactions at a molecular level

  17. Interaction Studies between Newly Synthesized Photosensitive Polymer and Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Tae Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this information age, different kinds of photosensitive materials have been used in the manufacture of information storage devices. But these photosensitive materials have the bane of low diffraction efficiency. In order to solve this problem, we have synthesized a novel photosensitive polymer from epoxy-based azopolymers (with three types of azochromophores. Furthermore, we have studied the interaction between this newly synthesized azopolymer and ionic liquids (ILs. For this purpose, we have used the ammonium and imidazolium families of ILs, such as diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP, tributylammonium methyl sulfate (TBMS, triethylammonium 4-aminotoluene-3-sulfonic acid (TASA, and 1-methylimidazolium chloride ([Mim]Cl. To investigate the molecular interaction between azopolymer and ILs, we have used the following spectroscopic methods of analysis: UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and confocal Raman spectroscopy. In this study, we have developed new photosensitive materials by combining polymer with ILs.

  18. A Numerical Study on Hydrodynamic Interactions between Dynamic Positioning Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Doo Hwa; Lee, Sang Wook [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we conducted computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the unsteady hydrodynamic interaction of multiple thrusters by solving Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A commercial CFD software, STAR-CCM+ was used for all simulations by employing a ducted thruster model with combination of a propeller and No. 19a duct. A sliding mesh technique was used to treat dynamic motion of propeller rotation and non-conformal hexahedral grid system was considered. Four different combinations in tilting and azimuth angles of the thrusters were considered to investigate the effects on the propulsion performance. We could find that thruster-hull and thruster-thruster interactions has significant effect on propulsion performance and further study will be required for the optimal configurations with the best tilting and relative azimuth angle between thrusters.

  19. SANS studies of interacting hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, S.; Nossal, R.

    1988-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate interaction forces between hemoglobin (Hb) molecules contained within human red cells. The scattering separately attributable to cell membranes and intracellular Hb was identified. A series of D/sub 2/O-H/sub 2/O contrast variation measurements were made in order to establish conditions for which scattering from the cell membrane is minimized (approximately 15% D/sub 2/O). Measurements then were performed to examine changes in intermolecular Hb interactions occurring when the cells are contracted or swollen by varying the ionic strength of the suspension buffer. The scattering cross-sections were fitted to structure factors computed by a mean spherical approximation, and molecular parameters thereby extracted. Oxygenation studies on normal cells were performed, and results contrasted with those of similar studies of erythrocytes obtained from sickle cell disease patients.

  20. Content-Related Interactions in Self-initiated Study Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Karen; Talanquer, Vicente

    2012-09-01

    The central goal of the present exploratory study was to investigate the nature of the content-related interactions in study groups independently organized by college organic chemistry students. We were particularly interested in the identification of the different factors that affected the emergence of opportunities for students to co-construct understanding and engage in higher levels of cognitive processing. Our results are based on the analysis of in situ observations of 34 self-initiated study sessions involving over a 100 students in three academic semesters. The investigation revealed three major types of social regulation processes, teaching, tutoring, and co-construction in the observed study sessions. However, the extent to which students engaged in each of them varied widely from one session to another. This variability was mostly determined by the specific composition of the study groups and the nature of the study tasks in which they were engaged. Decisions about how to organize the study session, the relative content knowledge and conceptual understanding expressed by the participants, as well as the cognitive level of the problems that guided group work had a strong impact on the nature of student interactions. Nevertheless, group talk in the observed study groups was mostly focused on low-level cognitive processes. The results of our work provide insights on how to better support students' productive engagement in study groups.

  1. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  2. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as ......The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...... also key figures in the philosophical discussions of nature and science - from philosophical tendencies like logical empiricism via critical rationalism to various neo-Kantian trends....

  3. WIYN Open Cluster Study: Tidal Interactions in Solar type Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Meibom, S.; Mathieu, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    We present an ongoing study on tidal interactions in late-type close binary stars. New results on tidal circularization are combined with existing data to test and constrain theoretical predictions of tidal circularization in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase and throughout the main-sequence phase of stellar evolution. Current data suggest that tidal circularization during the PMS phase sets the tidal cutoff period for binary populations younger than ~1 Gyr. Binary populations older than ~1 G...

  4. Studying Interactions by Molecular Dynamics Simulations at High Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Fogolari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study molecular encounters and recognition. In recent works, simulations using high concentration of interacting molecules have been performed. In this paper, we consider the practical problems for setting up the simulation and to analyse the results of the simulation. The simulation of beta 2-microglobulin association and the simulation of the binding of hydrogen peroxide by glutathione peroxidase are provided as examples.

  5. Interaction between hydroxyethyl starch and propofol: computational and laboratorial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Aura; Sousa, Emília; Palmeira, Andreia; Amorim, Pedro; Guedes de Pinho, Paula; Ferreira, David A

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is one of the most used colloids for intravascular volume replacement during anesthesia. To investigate the existence of a chemical interaction between HES and the anesthetic propofol by in vitro propofol dosing, computational docking, and examination of a complex between propofol and HES by infrared (IR), ultraviolet (UV), and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Ten samples with human plasma mixed with HES or lactated Ringers (n = 5 for each fluid) were prepared, and the propofol free fraction was quantified until 50 min, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The docking study was performed between HES and propofol and compared with controls. The binding affinities between HES and the small molecules were evaluated by binding free energy approximation (ΔGb, kJ mol(-1)). The IR, UV, and NMR spectra were measured for propofol, HES, and a mixture of both obtained by the kneading method. Propofol concentrations were significantly lower in the HES samples than in the LR samples (p = .021). The spectroscopic characterization of propofol combined with HES revealed differences in spectra and docking studies reinforced a potential interaction between propofol and HES. Propofol and HES form a complex with different physical-bio-chemical behavior than the single drugs, which may be an important drug interaction. Further studies should evaluate its clinical effects.

  6. Theoretical Mechanism Studies on the Enantioselectivity of aza-MBH-type Reaction of Nitroalkene to N-tosylimine Catalyzed by Thiourea-tertiary Amine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nan; Wang, Huatian; Wang, Yangping [Shandong Agricultural Univ., Taian (China)

    2013-12-15

    The enantioselective aza-Morita Baylis Hillman reaction of nitroalkene and N-tosylimine catalyzed by thiourea-tertiary amine has been investigated using density functional theory. Enantioselectivity is dominated by the cooperative effect of non-covalent and weak covalent interactions imposed by different units of catalyst. As Lewis base, the tertiary amine unit activates nitroalkene via weak covalent bond. The weak covalent interaction orients the reaction in a major path with smaller variations of this bond. The aromatic ring unit activates N-tosylimine via π-π stacking. The non-covalent interaction selects the major path with smaller changes of the efficient packing areas. Thiourea unit donates more compact H-bonded network for species of the major path. The calculated ee value in xylene solution phase (97.6%) is much higher than that in N,N-Dimethylformamide (27.2%). Our conclusion is also supported by NBO analysis.

  7. A numerical parametric study on hydrofoil interaction in tandem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Kemal Kinaci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of the parameters affecting the interaction of tandem hydrofoil system is a crucial subject in order to fully comprehend the aero/hydrodynamics of any vehicle moving inside a fluid. This study covers a parametric study on tandem hydrofoil interaction in both potential and viscous fluids using iterative Boundary Element Method (BEM and RANSE. BEM allows a quick estimation of the flow around bodies and may be used for practical purposes to assess the interaction inside the fluid. The produced results are verified by conformal mapping and Finite Volume Method (FVM. RANSE is used for viscous flow conditions to assess the effects of viscosity compared to the inviscid solutions proposed by BEM. Six different parameters are investigated and they are the effects of distance, thickness, angle of attack, chord length, aspect ratio and tapered wings. A generalized 2-D code is developed implementing the iterative procedure and is adapted to generate results. Effects of free surface and cavitation are ignored. It is believed that the present work will provide insight into the parametric interference between hydrofoils inside the fluid.

  8. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide−noble-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, L. F., E-mail: lz@fis.unb.br; Leal, L. A.; Silva, G. M. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Pirani, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 Salvador (Brazil); Gargano, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound complexes of chiral molecules. In this paper we study the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}−Ng (Ng=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) systems providing the radial and the angular dependence of the potential energy surface on the relative position of the Ng atom. We accomplish this by introducing an analytical representation which is able to fit the ab initio energies of these complexes in a wide range of geometries. Our analysis sheds light on the role that the enantiomeric forms and the symmetry of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule play on the resulting barriers and equilibrium geometries. The proposed theoretical framework is useful to study the dynamics of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule, or other systems involving O–O and S–S bonds, interacting by non-covalent forces with atoms or molecules and to understand how the relative orientation of the O–H bonds changes along collisional events that may lead to a hydrogen bond formation or even to selectivity in chemical reactions.

  9. Perturbative study of interacting photons in open lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Andy C. Y.; Petruccione, Francesco; Koch, Jens

    2015-03-01

    Quantum simulation realized in the circuit QED architecture is an emerging direction to study many-body physics in open lattice systems. Among several models of interacting photons, the driven-dissipative Jaynes-Cummings (JC) lattice is commonly employed to investigate the steady-state and dynamical behavior. While there is a wealth of analytical and numerical tools applicable to closed lattice systems in thermal equilibrium, the number of methods to treat open lattice systems is rather limited. Hence, many properties of open lattices remain an open question. Here, we formulate a general perturbation theory and an infinite-order resummation scheme applicable to open lattices. We then apply this theory to the driven-dissipative JC lattices to predict steady-state expectation values. This allows us to explore the rich features due to photon-qubit interaction and compare results obtained for finite chains and infinite lattices.

  10. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  11. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... including puppetry and dance. However, the aesthetics of these traditions vary across cultures and carry different associative and interpretive meanings. Puppetry offers a useful frame for understanding the relationship between abstract and imitative gestures and behavior, and instantiates the complex...

  12. Theoretical study of adsorption of nitrogen-containing environmental contaminants on kaolinite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrea Michalkova; Burns, Elizabeth A; Hill, Frances C

    2014-08-01

    The adsorption of nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs) including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), and 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) on kaolinite surfaces was investigated. The M06-2X and M06-2X-D3 density functionals were applied with the cluster approximation. Several different positions of NCCs relative to the adsorption sites of kaolinite were examined, including NCCs in perpendicular and parallel orientation toward both surface models of kaolinite. The binding between the target molecules and kaolinite surfaces was analyzed and bond energies were calculated applying the atoms in molecules (AIM) method. All NCCs were found to prefer a parallel orientation toward both kaolinite surfaces, and were bound more strongly to the octahedral than to the tetrahedral site. TNT exhibited the strongest interaction with the octahedral surface and DNAN with the tetrahedral surface of kaolinite. Hydrogen bonding was shown to be the dominant non-covalent interaction for NCCs interacting with the octahedral surface of kaolinite with a small stabilizing effect of dispersion interactions. In the case of adsorption on the tetrahedral surface, kaolonite-NCC binding was shown to be governed by the balance between hydrogen bonds and dispersion forces. The presence of water as a solvent leads to a significant decrease in the adsorption strength for all studied NCCs interacting with both kaolinite surfaces.

  13. Study of the Deformation/Interaction Model: How Interactions Increase the Reaction Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Liang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions (including weak interactions between dienophiles and dienes play an important role in the Diels-Alder reaction. To elucidate the influence of these interactions on the reactivity, a popular DFT functional and a variational DFT functional corrected with dispersion terms are used to investigate different substituent groups incorporated on the dienophiles and dienes. The bond order is used to track the trajectory of the cycloaddition reaction. The deformation/interaction model is used to obtain the interaction energy from the reactant complex to the inflection point until reaching the saddle point. The interaction energy initially increases with a decrease in the interatomic distance, reaching a maximum value, but then decreases when the dienophiles and dienes come closer. Reduced density gradient and chemical energy component analysis are used to analyse the interaction. Traditional transition state theory and variational transition state theory are used to obtain the reaction rates. The influence of tunneling on the reaction rate is also discussed.

  14. Interactive computer program for optimal designs of longitudinal cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekle, Fetene B; Tan, Frans E S; Berger, Martijn P F

    2009-05-01

    Many large scale longitudinal cohort studies have been carried out or are ongoing in different fields of science. Such studies need a careful planning to obtain the desired quality of results with the available resources. In the past, a number of researches have been performed on optimal designs for longitudinal studies. However, there was no computer program yet available to help researchers to plan their longitudinal cohort design in an optimal way. A new interactive computer program for the optimization of designs of longitudinal cohort studies is therefore presented. The computer program helps users to identify the optimal cohort design with an optimal number of repeated measurements per subject and an optimal allocations of time points within a given study period. Further, users can compute the loss in relative efficiencies of any other alternative design compared to the optimal one. The computer program is described and illustrated using a practical example.

  15. Monte Carlo studies on photon interactions in radiobiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2018-01-01

    X-ray and γ-ray photons have been widely used for studying radiobiological effects of ionizing radiations. Photons are indirectly ionizing radiations so they need to set in motion electrons (which are a directly ionizing radiation) to perform the ionizations. When the photon dose decreases to below a certain limit, the number of electrons set in motion will become so small that not all cells in an "exposed" cell population can get at least one electron hit. When some cells in a cell population are not hit by a directly ionizing radiation (in other words not irradiated), there will be rescue effect between the irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells, and the resultant radiobiological effect observed for the "exposed" cell population will be different. In the present paper, the mechanisms underlying photon interactions in radiobiological experiments were studied using our developed NRUphoton computer code, which was benchmarked against the MCNP5 code by comparing the photon dose delivered to the cell layer underneath the water medium. The following conclusions were reached: (1) The interaction fractions decreased in the following order: 16O > 12C > 14N > 1H. Bulges in the interaction fractions (versus water medium thickness) were observed, which reflected changes in the energies of the propagating photons due to traversals of different amount of water medium as well as changes in the energy-dependent photon interaction cross-sections. (2) Photoelectric interaction and incoherent scattering dominated for lower-energy (10 keV) and high-energy (100 keV and 1 MeV) incident photons. (3) The fractions of electron ejection from different nuclei were mainly governed by the photoelectric effect cross-sections, and the fractions from the 1s subshell were the largest. (4) The penetration fractions in general decreased with increasing medium thickness, and increased with increasing incident photon energy, the latter being explained by the corresponding reduction in

  16. An experimental study on soil-structure interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mita, Akira; Kumagai, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    The soil-structure interaction effects play an important role in the earthquake response of large scale structures such as nuclear power plants. Recent decades, many experimental and analytical studies have been conducted. Even though sophisticated analytical tools are ready to use, complicated soil-structure interaction problems such as those with a complex geometry can not be solved yet. For such problems a laboratory experiment is a powerful alternative. In the laboratory experiment, a device to absorb the reflected waves is always necessary to be attached on the boundaries of the soil model to simulate the semi-infiniteness of the actual ground. But unfortunately absorbing devices currently available are far from satisfactory. In this paper, a new experimental method is employed for soil-structure interaction problems to simulate the semi-infiniteness of the actual ground. The present method utilizes the characteristics of transient response to an impulse load so that no special treatment on the boundaries of the soil model is required. This technique is applicable to a linear elastic system whose impulse response decreases to a small enough value before observing the reflected waves. (author)

  17. Interactive Tutoring in Blended Studies: Hindrances and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Ismail Ilyas (Al-Titinchy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper distinguishes between traditional teaching known as lecturing (the teacher centered approach; and tutoring (the contemporary technology-oriented interactive teaching/learning approach. It is based on the implementation of tutoring strategies of ‘blended studies’  at the Arab Open University. It investigates the application of modern interactive teaching/learning strategies, specifying some hindering factors in the AOU-Jordan Branch context. The factors include four variables: tutors, students, course material and assessment. The paper is based on qualitative research in terms of a real teaching/leaning context, using both observation and conversation with learners, besides the use of some quantitative data retrieved from a questionnaire in which learners’ views are sought regarding a number of relevant matters. A number of suggested solutions related to each of the hindering factors are presented, which if applied, may secure shifting the balance of the teaching/learning process to a more interactive technology-based tutoring level, which in turn will enhance learners’ opportunities for the attainment of better academic standards, and secure a higher degree of achievement of the shared educational goals of learners and the educational institution they study in.

  18. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  19. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Sarita, E-mail: saritaiitr2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Rani, Pooja [D.A.V. College, Sec-10, Chandigarh-160010 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO{sub 2} (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO{sub 2} has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=−21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  20. Investigation of sodium - carbon dioxide interactions with calorimetric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Latge, C.; Gicquel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle could be a promising option to enhance the competitiveness of future Sodium fast reactors but it is highly necessary to get thermodynamic and kinetics information on potential sodium-CO 2 chemical reactions and their consequences. We have studied the interaction between Na and CO 2 via calorimetric methods. These methods are able to point out exothermic/endothermic phenomena and to measure heat of chemical reactions. The main feature of the Na/CO 2 interaction seems to be its sharp dependence on temperature. At low temperature, below 500 C degrees, CO 2 and sodium react and exhibit an induction time which decreases when temperature increases. Above 500 C degrees, we observe a global phenomenon with a fast and instantaneous chemical reaction which may be understood as an auto-combustion of CO 2 in sodium. We clearly demonstrated that Na/CO 2 interaction does not proceed as an auto-catalytic process and is more satisfactorily explained by the occurring of an auto-combustion phenomenon

  1. Acquiring Interactional Competence in a Study Abroad Context: Japanese Language Learners' Use of the Interactional Particle "ne"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the development of interactional competence (Hall, 1993, 1995) by English-speaking learners of Japanese as a foreign language (JFL) in a study abroad setting, as indexed by their use of the interactionally significant particle "ne." The analysis is based on a comparison of (a) 6 sets of conversations between JFL learners and…

  2. Studies on the interaction of lidocaine with plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adotey, J.

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to quantitate lidocaine's interaction with alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), human serum albumin (HSA), and AAG in the presence of HSA, and to determine the extent of displacement of lidocaine from its binding site(s) by selected cardiovascular drugs (dipyridamole, disopyramide and quinidine). Since the limited experimental work reported in this area has involved the use of a single lidocaine concentration, this study involved the evaluation of a range of lidocaine concentrations. Lidocaine interaction with plasma proteins (AAG and HSA) was studied at 37/sup 0/C using an isothermal equilibrium dialysis system and /sup 14/C-lidocaine HCl. A dialysis membrane (M.W. cutoff 12,000 to 14,000) separated the two chambers of each dialysis cell. The extent of /sup 14/C-lidocaine dialysis was studied with respect to both drug and protein concentrations. Aliquots of each chamber of each of the cells were subjected to liquid scintillation counting (LSC) analyses for /sup 14/C-lidocaine. The ratio of bound to free (R/F) lidocaine was evaluated as a function of AAG concentration from the LSC data. Scatchard and/or Rosenthal analyses were employed to evaluate n and k values where appropriate. Linear and multiple linear regression analyses of the data were appropriately performed.

  3. Studies on the interaction of lidocaine with plasma proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adotey, J.

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to quantitate lidocaine's interaction with alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), human serum albumin (HSA), and AAG in the presence of HSA, and to determine the extent of displacement of lidocaine from its binding site(s) by selected cardiovascular drugs (dipyridamole, disopyramide and quinidine). Since the limited experimental work reported in this area has involved the use of a single lidocaine concentration, this study involved the evaluation of a range of lidocaine concentrations. Lidocaine interaction with plasma proteins (AAG and HSA) was studied at 37 0 C using an isothermal equilibrium dialysis system and 14 C-lidocaine HCl. A dialysis membrane (M.W. cutoff 12,000 to 14,000) separated the two chambers of each dialysis cell. The extent of 14 C-lidocaine dialysis was studied with respect to both drug and protein concentrations. Aliquots of each chamber of each of the cells were subjected to liquid scintillation counting (LSC) analyses for 14 C-lidocaine. The ratio of bound to free (R/F) lidocaine was evaluated as a function of AAG concentration from the LSC data. Scatchard and/or Rosenthal analyses were employed to evaluate n and k values where appropriate. Linear and multiple linear regression analyses of the data were appropriately performed

  4. A validation study of a stochastic model of human interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchfield, Mitchel Talmadge

    The purpose of this dissertation is to validate a stochastic model of human interactions which is part of a developmentalism paradigm. Incorporating elements of ancient and contemporary philosophy and science, developmentalism defines human development as a progression of increasing competence and utilizes compatible theories of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, educational psychology, social psychology, curriculum development, neurology, psychophysics, and physics. To validate a stochastic model of human interactions, the study addressed four research questions: (a) Does attitude vary over time? (b) What are the distributional assumptions underlying attitudes? (c) Does the stochastic model, {-}N{intlimitssbsp{-infty}{infty}}varphi(chi,tau)\\ Psi(tau)dtau, have utility for the study of attitudinal distributions and dynamics? (d) Are the Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein theories applicable to human groups? Approximately 25,000 attitude observations were made using the Semantic Differential Scale. Positions of individuals varied over time and the logistic model predicted observed distributions with correlations between 0.98 and 1.0, with estimated standard errors significantly less than the magnitudes of the parameters. The results bring into question the applicability of Fisherian research designs (Fisher, 1922, 1928, 1938) for behavioral research based on the apparent failure of two fundamental assumptions-the noninteractive nature of the objects being studied and normal distribution of attributes. The findings indicate that individual belief structures are representable in terms of a psychological space which has the same or similar properties as physical space. The psychological space not only has dimension, but individuals interact by force equations similar to those described in theoretical physics models. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to estimate Fermi-Dirac parameters from the data. The model explained a high degree

  5. Interaction of diazepam with surfactants. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorometric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Guardia, M.; Rodilla, F.

    1986-03-01

    The interaction of diazepam with non-ionic, anionic and cationic surfactants has been studied spectrophotometrically and fluorometrically. It has been verified that the absorption spectrum of diazepam is not modified in micellar medium. However, a dramatic five-fold increase in fluorescence sensitivity is observed in the presence of sodium lauryl sulphate (SDS). The experimental conditions, temperature, pH and surfactant concentration have been optimized to improve the fluorometric determination of diazepam and a detection limit of 0,04 ppmhas been obtained.

  6. Interaction of erythrocytes and hexavalent uranium compounds -an autoanalytical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, W.I.; Shying, M.E.

    1980-05-01

    An automated analytical system was devised to measure the kinetics of hemolysis by uranyl compounds. Accurate plots of percentage hemolysis v. time were obtained; these, together with the corresponding differential curves, show that hemolysis of plasma-free erythrocytes is a two-stage process. The first stage of hemolysis is particularly affected by pH and anion content of uranyl solutions, and also by incubation of cell suspensions at 37 deg. before mixing with lysing solution. Complementary studies involving Coulter counting and microscopic observation established the general pattern of hemolysis and showed that cell agglutination is a prominent feature of the interaction of cells with uranyl solutions

  7. Study of the interactions between organic matter and transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.; Billon, A.; Theyssier, M.; Dellis, T.

    1991-01-01

    The study of the occurrence of humic substances present in natural waters and their physico-chemical properties, in particular their complexing behaviour, constitutes the main objectives of this research programme. In the first part, the report presents the description of the selected aquifer (representative of a granitic geological formation: Fanay-Augeres), the method for the collection and concentration of the humic substances (a sorption technique) and their characterization by different physico-chemical techniques (elementary and mineral composition, spectroscopic properties, size, proton capacity, datation). The results show that Fanay-Augeres humic substances (considered as site-specific humic substances) represent 41% of the total organic carbon (TOC) present in the aquifer (2ppm) and have properties similar to other aquatic humic substances. The second part describes the study of the interactions occurring between these humic substances and trivalent cations (Eu and Am). Two different analytical methods have been developed to perform these investigations: spectrophotometry and size-exclusion chromatography. Interaction constants and complexing capacities have been determined and compared with literature data. Fanay-Augeres humic substances present complexing for trivalent actinides which agrees with published data. Further developments needed in complexation studies are described. 10 figs.; 15 tabs.; 39 refs

  8. User Interaction Modeling and Profile Extraction in Interactive Systems: A Groupware Application Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîrnăucă, Cristina; Duque, Rafael; Montaña, José L

    2017-07-20

    A relevant goal in human-computer interaction is to produce applications that are easy to use and well-adjusted to their users' needs. To address this problem it is important to know how users interact with the system. This work constitutes a methodological contribution capable of identifying the context of use in which users perform interactions with a groupware application (synchronous or asynchronous) and provides, using machine learning techniques, generative models of how users behave. Additionally, these models are transformed into a text that describes in natural language the main characteristics of the interaction of the users with the system.

  9. Theoretical study for the interlamellar aminoalcohol functionalization of kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Xin-Juan; Li, Huiquan; Liu, Qinfu; Cheng, Hongfei; He, Peng; Li, Shaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The results indicated that aminoalcohols exist with a mixing of intercalation and grafting. • Aminoalcohols can form strong hydrogen bonds with Al octahedral sheet. • The interaction between aminoalcohols and Si tetrahedral sheet are mainly attributed by vdW force. • Aminoalcohols grafting or intercalating on kaolinite have strong reactivity as electron donors. - Abstract: Fundamental problems related to aminoalcohols intercalating on kaolinite were investigated by using density functional theory method. This study examines the adsorption modes of diethanolamine and triethanolamine on kaolinite, the role of hydrogen bonds and van der Waals (vdW) forces between aminoalcohols and interlayer of kaolinite, and the change of molecular orbital occupancies of functionalized kaolinite. Results show that functionalized kaolinite is physically intercalated and covalently grafted by aminoalcohols. Non-covalent interaction analysis provides a visualized description that intercalated aminoalcohols form strong hydrogen bonds with Al octahedral sheet, and the interaction between aminoalcohols and Si tetrahedral sheet is mainly attributed to weak vdW force. The analysis of molecular orbital occupancies for kaolinite complex showed that the functionalized kaolinite has strong chemical reactivity as electron donors on the sites of grafted or intercalated aminoalcohols for further chemical reaction with other materials

  10. Theoretical study for the interlamellar aminoalcohol functionalization of kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Xin-Juan [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Huiquan, E-mail: hqli@home.ipe.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Qinfu; Cheng, Hongfei [School of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); He, Peng; Li, Shaopeng [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The results indicated that aminoalcohols exist with a mixing of intercalation and grafting. • Aminoalcohols can form strong hydrogen bonds with Al octahedral sheet. • The interaction between aminoalcohols and Si tetrahedral sheet are mainly attributed by vdW force. • Aminoalcohols grafting or intercalating on kaolinite have strong reactivity as electron donors. - Abstract: Fundamental problems related to aminoalcohols intercalating on kaolinite were investigated by using density functional theory method. This study examines the adsorption modes of diethanolamine and triethanolamine on kaolinite, the role of hydrogen bonds and van der Waals (vdW) forces between aminoalcohols and interlayer of kaolinite, and the change of molecular orbital occupancies of functionalized kaolinite. Results show that functionalized kaolinite is physically intercalated and covalently grafted by aminoalcohols. Non-covalent interaction analysis provides a visualized description that intercalated aminoalcohols form strong hydrogen bonds with Al octahedral sheet, and the interaction between aminoalcohols and Si tetrahedral sheet is mainly attributed to weak vdW force. The analysis of molecular orbital occupancies for kaolinite complex showed that the functionalized kaolinite has strong chemical reactivity as electron donors on the sites of grafted or intercalated aminoalcohols for further chemical reaction with other materials.

  11. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  12. Study of the interactions between riboflavin and protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongwei; Zhang Zhaoxia; Zhu Hongping; Ge Min; Miao Jinling; Wang Wenfeng; Yao Side

    2006-01-01

    Riboflavin (VB 2 ), a vitamin that is a natural constituent of living organisms, plays an important role in the process of metabolism and it is essential for normal cellular functions and growth. As an endogenous photosensitizer, riboflavin induces photooxidation damages to cells of skin and eye, causing inflammation, accelerated aging and mutation. The photodynamic actions of riboflavin on DNA have been studied extensively, however, its photodynamic actions on protein and enzyme are less studied due to the complex types and structures of proteins, and less attentions have been paid to photosensitive protein damages than DNA. In our lab, the interactions between riboflavin and serum albumin and lysozyme have been carried out by using transient absorption spectrometry, emission spectrometer analysis and electrophoresis techniques. It was found that stable state products and transient process of photosensitive damage to proteins were closely relative to concentration of riboflavin, time of irradiation and the atmosphere of the solutions. The results indicates that proteins can be photosensitive damaged by riboflavin irradiated by UV lights. Riboflavin can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of protein. Both dynamic and static quenching are simultaneous involved. The binding constants, the kinetics and spectroscopic properties of riboflavin interaction with albumin and lysozyme have also been investigated. Mechanisms of the photosensitive damages to proteins were discussed. The experiments also indicated that antioxidants such as melatonin and chlorogenic acid can reduce the damage of lysozyme effectively. (authors)

  13. Study of the interaction of kaempferol with bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jianniao; Liu, Jiaqin; Tian, Xuan; Hu, Zhide; Chen, Xingguo

    2004-03-01

    The binding of kaempferol with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated at three temperatures, 296, 310 and 318 K, by the fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) at pH 7.40. The CD and FT-IR studies indicate that kaempferol binds strongly to BSA. The association constant K was determined by Stern-Volmer equation based on the quenching of the fluorescence BSA in the presence of kaempferol. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to the dependence of enthalpy change on the temperature as follows: Δ H0 and Δ S0 possess small negative (-1.694 kJ/mol) and positive values (88.814 J/mol K), respectively. According to the displacement experimental and the thermodynamic results, it is considered that kaempferol binding site II (subdomain III) mainly by hydrophobic interaction. The results studied by FT-IR and CD experiments indicate that the secondary structures of the protein have been changed by the interaction of kaempferol with BSA. The distance between the tryptophan residues in BSA and kaempferol bound to site II was estimated to be 2.78 nm using Foster's equation on the basis of fluorescence energy transfer.

  14. Study of oral clefts: Indication of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, S.J.; Beaty, T.H.; Panny, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In this study of infants with isolated birth defects, 69 cleft palate-only (CPO) cases, 114 cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P), and 284 controls with non-cleft birth defects (all born in Maryland during 1984-1992) were examined to test for associations among genetic markers and different oral clefts. Modest associations were found between transforming growth factor {alpha} (TGF{alpha}) marker and CPO, as well as that between D17S579 (Mfd188) and CL/P in this study. The association between TGF{alpha} marker and CPO reflects a statistical interaction between mother`s smoking and child`s TGF{alpha} genotype. A significantly higher risk of CPO was found among those reporting maternal smoking during pregnancy and carrying less common TGF{alpha} TaqI allele (odds ratio=7.02 with 95% confidence interval 1.8-27.6). This gene-environment interaction was also found among those who reported no family history of any type of birth defect (odds ratio=5.60 with 95% confidence interval 1.4-22.9). Similar associations were seen for CL/P, but these were not statistically significant.

  15. Thermally decarboxylated sodium bicarbonate: Interactions with water vapour, calorimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Volkova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC was used to study interactions between water vapour and the surface of thermally converted sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3. The decarboxylation degree of the samples was varied from 3% to 35% and the humidity range was 54–100%. The obtained enthalpy values were all exothermic and showed a positive linear correlation with decarboxylation degrees for each humidity studied. The critical humidity, 75% (RHo, was determined as the inflection point on a plot of the mean−ΔHkJ/mole Na2CO3 against RH. Humidities above the critical humidity lead to complete surface dissolution. The water uptake (m was determined after each calorimetric experiment, complementing the enthalpy data. A mechanism of water vapour interaction with decarboxylated samples, including the formation of trona and Wegscheider’s salt on the bicarbonate surface is proposed for humidities below RHo. Keywords: Isothermal titration calorimetry, Sodium bicarbonate, Sodium carbonate, Trona salt, Wegscheider’s salt, Enthalpy, Relative humidity, Pyrolytic decarboxylation

  16. Intergenerational interaction in health promotion: a qualitative study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Elza Maria

    2003-08-01

    In 1994 a pilot intergenerational project was started in the city of Taguatinga, Brazil, to promote the well-being of both elderly and adolescent populations using reminiscence processes as a means of interaction. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the project from the participants' viewpoint and to improve the contribution of those age groups in building up social capital. From November 1999 to April 2000 a qualitative study using focus groups technique was conducted. Using a discussion guide, 9 groups of students, ranging in age from 13 to 19 years old, and 3 groups of elderly aged 60 years and over were interviewed to collect data regarding their interaction before and after an intergenerational program. The main findings suggested a change in attitude of young people toward old age and elderly people. Participating elderly people reported improvement in their health status. For both age groups the findings suggested a better understanding between generations. It seems that reminiscence intergenerational activity contributes to building up mutual trust and reciprocity. These results seem to indicate this is an alternative for investing in social capital and improving participants' well-being. However, further work is needed to support these findings.

  17. Intergenerational interaction in health promotion: a qualitative study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Elza Maria de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In 1994 a pilot intergenerational project was started in the city of Taguatinga, Brazil, to promote the well-being of both elderly and adolescent populations using reminiscence processes as a means of interaction. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the project from the participants' viewpoint and to improve the contribution of those age groups in building up social capital. METHODS: From November 1999 to April 2000 a qualitative study using focus groups technique was conducted. Using a discussion guide, 9 groups of students, ranging in age from 13 to 19 years old, and 3 groups of elderly aged 60 years and over were interviewed to collect data regarding their interaction before and after an intergenerational program. RESULTS: The main findings suggested a change in attitude of young people toward old age and elderly people. Participating elderly people reported improvement in their health status. For both age groups the findings suggested a better understanding between generations. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that reminiscence intergenerational activity contributes to building up mutual trust and reciprocity. These results seem to indicate this is an alternative for investing in social capital and improving participants' well-being. However, further work is needed to support these findings.

  18. Intergenerational interaction in health promotion: a qualitative study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Maria de Souza

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In 1994 a pilot intergenerational project was started in the city of Taguatinga, Brazil, to promote the well-being of both elderly and adolescent populations using reminiscence processes as a means of interaction. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the project from the participants' viewpoint and to improve the contribution of those age groups in building up social capital. METHODS: From November 1999 to April 2000 a qualitative study using focus groups technique was conducted. Using a discussion guide, 9 groups of students, ranging in age from 13 to 19 years old, and 3 groups of elderly aged 60 years and over were interviewed to collect data regarding their interaction before and after an intergenerational program. RESULTS: The main findings suggested a change in attitude of young people toward old age and elderly people. Participating elderly people reported improvement in their health status. For both age groups the findings suggested a better understanding between generations. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that reminiscence intergenerational activity contributes to building up mutual trust and reciprocity. These results seem to indicate this is an alternative for investing in social capital and improving participants' well-being. However, further work is needed to support these findings.

  19. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  20. Study of $\\pi^{-}p$ interactions with neutral final states

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a study of the production of neutral particles or states decaying into photons in the reaction $\\pi^{-} + p \\rightarrow M^{0} + n$ at SPS energies. \\\\ \\\\ Special attention is paid to the measurement of the production of heavy particles with hidden quantum numbers and of possible new heavy spinless states decaying into two photons. \\\\ \\\\ The large four-momentum transfer behaviour of binary processes involving known neutral mesons and the production of new meson resonances with high mass and spin will also be studied. Complex multiparticle final states will be analysed as a by-product.\\\\ \\\\ The central unit of the experimental set-up is a 4000 cell Cerenkov hodoscope spectrometer (GAMS) which allows the measurement of the momentum vector of each $\\gamma$ in a multigamma event. \\\\ \\\\ The longitudinal position of the interaction point in the liquid hydrogen target is measured by the Cerenkov light intensity. \\\\ \\\\ A guard system, made of scintillation counters and lead-glass Cerenkov counters, ...

  1. Experimental framework to study tip vortex interactions in multirotor wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rongnan; Araya, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    We present an experimental study to compare the dynamic characteristics of tip vortices shed from a propeller in a crossflow to similar characteristics of an isolated vortex column generated in a closed system. Our aim is to evaluate the feasibility of using this simple isolated system to study the more complicated three-dimensional vortex interactions inherent to multirotor wakes, where the local unsteadiness generated by one rotor can strongly impact the performance of nearby rotors. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field of the propeller wake flow in a wind tunnel and the vortex column in a water tank. Specific attention is placed on analyzing the observed vortex core precession in the isolated system and comparing this to characteristic tip-vortex wandering phenomenon.

  2. UO2/magnetite concrete interaction and penetration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    The concrete structure represents a line of defense in safety assessment of containment integrity and possible minimization of radiological releases following a reactor accident. The penetration study of hot UO 2 particles into limestone concrete and basalt concrete highlighted some major differences between the two concretes. These included penetration rate, melting and dissolution phenomena, released gases, pressurization of the UO 2 chamber, and characteristics of post-test concrete. The present study focuses on the phenomena associated with core debris interaction with and penetration into magnetite type concrete. The real material experiment was carried out with UO 2 particles and magnetite concrete in a test apparatus similar to the one utilized in the UO 2 /limestone experiment

  3. Experimental and analytical studies of sodium interactions with various concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo-Anttila, A.; Smaardyk, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanistic models of sodium/concrete interactions are described. The SCAM model of interactions with basaltic concrete is being verified by experiments. Modelling of sodium interactions with limestone concrete is still at a preliminary stage but shows promise of being able to predict quantitatively the experimental data. Comparisons with experimental data are presented

  4. Phase equilibria and molecular interaction studies on (naphthols + vanillin) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Preeti; Agrawal, Tanvi; Das, Shiva Saran; Singh, Nakshatra Bahadur

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phase equilibria of (naphthol + vanillin) systems have been studied for the first time. ► Eutectic type phase diagrams are obtained. ► Eutectic mixtures show nonideal behaviour. ► There is a weak molecular interaction between the components in the eutectic mixtures. ► α-Naphthol–vanillin eutectic is more stable as compared to β-naphthol–vanillin. - Abstract: Phase equilibria between (α-naphthol + vanillin) and (β-naphthol + vanillin) systems have been studied by thaw-melt method and the results show the formation of simple eutectic mixtures. Crystallization velocities of components and eutectic mixtures were determined at different stages under cooling. With the help of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), the enthalpy of fusion of components and eutectic mixtures was determined and from the values excess thermodynamic functions viz., excess Gibbs free energy (G E ), excess entropy (S E ), excess enthalpy (H E ) of hypo-, hyper- and eutectic mixtures were calculated. Flexural strength measurements were made in order to understand the non-ideal nature of eutectics. FT-IR spectral studies indicate the formation of hydrogen bond in the eutectic mixture. Anisotropic and isotropic microstructural studies of components, hypo-, hyper- and eutectic mixtures were made. Jackson’s roughness parameter was calculated and found to be greater than 2 suggesting the faceted morphology with irregular structures. The overall results have shown that there is a weak molecular interaction between the components in the eutectic mixtures and the (α-naphthol + vanillin) eutectic is more stable as compared to the (β-naphthol + vanillin) eutectic system.

  5. Drug-polymer interaction studies of cytarabine loaded chitosan nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madni, A.; Kashif, P.M.; Nazir, I.; Rehman, M.

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of possible incompatibilities between drug and excipients is an important parameter of preformulation stage during the pharmaceutical product development of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). The potential physical and chemical interaction among the components of a delivery system can affect the chemical nature, bioavailability, stability, and subsequently therapeutic efficacy of drugs. In this study, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was employed to investigate the possible intermolecular interaction of Cytarabine with deacetylated chitosan and tripolyphosphate in the resulting physical blends and crosslinked nanoparticulate system. Two different strategies, physical blending and ionotropic gelation, were adopted to prepare binary or tertiary mixtures and nanoparticulate formulation, respectively. The IR spectra of CB showed characteristic peaks at 3438.27 cm-1 (primary amine), 3264.74 cm-1 (hydroxyl group) and 1654.98 cm-1 (C=O stretch in cyclic ring); CS at 3361.47 cm-1 (N-H stretching), 1646.18 cm-1 (C=O of Amide I), 1582.36 cm-1 (C=O of Amide II), and sTPP at 1135.77 cm-1 (P=O). CS-sTPP chemical interaction was confirmed from the shift in the absorption band of carbonyl groups (amide I, II) to 1634.66 cm-1 and 1541.17 cm-1 in blank chitosan nanoparticles, and 1636.87 cm-1, 1543.33 cm-1 in CSNP1 (2:6:1), and at 1646.15 cm-1 and 1557.04 cm-1 in CSNP2 (1:3:1). The characteristic peaks of CB were also present in chitosan formulation with a slight shift in the amino group at 3429.43 cm-1 and 3423.21 cm-1, in the hydroxyl group at 3274.54 cm-1 and 3270.73 cm-1, CSNP1 and CSNP2, respectively. The findings counseled no significant interaction in IR absorption pattern of cytarabine functional groups after encapsulation in CS-sTPP complex, which projected the potential of chitosan nanoparticulate system to entrap cytarabine. (author)

  6. Studies of mechanochemical interactions in the tribological behavior of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1990-01-01

    Mechanochemical interaction studies can contribute to the understanding of wear and friction of materials. Specific examples of experimental results relative to the subject are discussed. There are two parts: one describes the synergistic effect of corrosion and wear of iron sliding on sapphire in sulfuric acid, and the other describes the effect of surface films on the wear and friction of plasma-deposited diamondlike carbon (amorphous hydrogenated carbon) films in sliding contact with silicon nitride. The concentration of acid (pH) is an important factor in controlling the iron loss caused by wear-corrosion processes in sulfuric acid. The mechanical action can cause chemical reactions to proceed much faster than they would otherwise. The diamondlike carbon (DLC) films are shown to behave tribologically much like bulk diamond. In a dry nitrogen environment, a mechanochemical reaction produces a substance which greatly decreases the coefficient of friction. In a moist air environment, mechanochemical interactions drastically reduce the wear life of DLC films and water vapor greatly increases friction.

  7. Environmental Pricing: Studies in Policy Choices and Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Environmental taxes can be efficient tools for successful environmental policy. Their use, however, has been limited in many countries. This thoughtful book explores the scope of environmental pricing and examines a variety of national experiences in environmental policy integration, to identify...... the most effective use of taxation and policy for environmental sustainability. Environmental taxes are seldom implemented in isolation and are applied in combination with other regulatory instruments. At issue is the critical lack of knowledge on how different policy instruments and taxes interact...... areas of current practice that must be addressed. Empirical studies of policy strategies are discussed to illustrate the extent to which current climate change policy is integrated against the proposed successful policy combinations that are presented in this insightful book. Environmental pricing...

  8. Numerical Study of Shock-Cylinder Banks Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.P.; Anderson, M.H.; Oakley, J.G.; Bonazza, R.

    2003-01-01

    A numerical parametric study of shock-cylinder banks interactions is presented using a high resolution Euler solver. Staggered cylinder banks of five rows are chosen with the purpose of modeling IFE reactor cooling tube banks. The effect of the aspect ratio of the intercylinder pitch to the distance between successive cylinder rows on the vertical pressure forces acting on the cylinders with different geometries is investigated. Preliminary results show that the largest vertical force develops on the cylinders of the second or third row. This peak pressure force increases with decreasing values of the aspect ratio. It is shown that an increasing second force peak also appears on the successive rows, starting with the second one, with decreasing aspect ratio. It is also observed that the force on the last-row cylinders basically decreases to the level of that on the first row. The results are useful for the optimal design of the cooling tubes system of IFE reactors

  9. Interactive home telehealth and burns: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Sean; Gomez, Jason; Meller, Benjamin; Schneider, Jeffery C; Cheney, Meredith; Nejad, Shamim; Schulz, John; Goverman, Jeremy

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to review our experience incorporating Interactive Home Telehealth (IHT) visits into follow-up burn care. A retrospective review of all burn patients participating in IHT encounters over the course of 15 months was performed. Connections were established through secure video conferencing and call-routing software. Patients connected with a personal computer or tablet and providers connected with a desktop computer with a high-definition web camera. In some cases, high-definition digital images were emailed to the provider prior to the virtual consultation. For each patient, the following was collected: (1) patient and injury demographics (diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management), (2) total number of encounters, (3) service for each encounter (burn, psychiatry, and rehabilitation), (4) length of visit, including travel distance and time saved and, (5) complications, including re-admissions and connectivity issues. 52 virtual encounters were performed with 31 patients during the first year of the pilot project from March 2015 to June 2016. Mean age of the participant was 44 years (range 18-83 years). Mean total burn surface area of the participant was 12% (range 1-80%). Average roundtrip travel distance saved was 188 miles (range 4-822 miles). Average round trip travel time saved was 201min (range 20-564min). There were no unplanned re-admissions and no complications. Five connectivity issues were reported, none of which prevented completion of the visit. Interactive Home Telehealth is a safe and feasible modality for delivering follow-up care to burn patients. Burn care providers benefit from the potential to improve outpatient clinic utilization. Patients benefit from improved access to multiple members of their specialized burn care team, as well as cost-reductions for patient travel expenses. Future studies are needed to ensure patient and provider satisfaction and to further validate the significance, cost-effectiveness and

  10. In vitro drug interaction of levocetirizine and diclofenac: Theoretical and spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Dena, Ahmed S.; Abdel Gaber, Sara A.

    2017-06-01

    Levocetirizine dihydrochloride is known to interact with some anti-inflammatory drugs. We report here a comprehensive integrated theoretical and experimental study for the in vitro drug interaction between levocetirizine dihydrochloride (LEV) and diclofenac sodium (DIC). The interaction of the two drugs was confirmed by the molecular ion peak obtained from the mass spectrum of the product. Moreover, FTIR and 1HNMR spectra of the individual drugs and their interaction product were inspected to allocate the possible sites of interaction. In addition, quantum mechanical DFT calculations were performed to search for the interaction sites and to verify the types of interactions deduced from the spectroscopic studies such as charge-transfer and non-bonding π-π interactions. It was found that the studied drugs interact with each other in aqueous solution via four types of interactions, namely, ion-pair formation, three weak hydrogen bonds, non-bonding π-π interactions and charge-transfer from DIC to LEV.

  11. Prediction of Carbohydrate Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces with 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Keng-Chang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Peng, Hung-Pin; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chen, Jun-Bo; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Non-covalent protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate molecular targeting in many biological processes. Prediction of non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces not only provides insights into the functions of the query proteins; information on key carbohydrate-binding residues could suggest site-directed mutagenesis experiments, design therapeutics targeting carbohydrate-binding proteins, and provide guidance in engineering protein-carbohydrate interactions. In this work, we show that non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces can be predicted with relatively high accuracy when the query protein structures are known. The prediction capabilities were based on a novel encoding scheme of the three-dimensional probability density maps describing the distributions of 36 non-covalent interacting atom types around protein surfaces. One machine learning model was trained for each of the 30 protein atom types. The machine learning algorithms predicted tentative carbohydrate binding sites on query proteins by recognizing the characteristic interacting atom distribution patterns specific for carbohydrate binding sites from known protein structures. The prediction results for all protein atom types were integrated into surface patches as tentative carbohydrate binding sites based on normalized prediction confidence level. The prediction capabilities of the predictors were benchmarked by a 10-fold cross validation on 497 non-redundant proteins with known carbohydrate binding sites. The predictors were further tested on an independent test set with 108 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) for the independent test was 0.45, with prediction precision and sensitivity (or recall) of 0.45 and 0.49 respectively. In addition, 111 unbound carbohydrate-binding protein structures for which the structures were determined in the absence of the carbohydrate ligands were predicted with the trained predictors. The overall

  12. Cross-Racial Interactions during College: A Longitudinal Study of Four Forms of Interracial Interactions among Elite White College Students

    OpenAIRE

    William Carson Byrd

    2014-01-01

    College and universities present distinct opportunities to interact across racial and ethnic lines that may influence people’s prejudice toward different groups. This study examines the influence of four forms of cross-race interaction on traditional and modern forms of racial prejudice among white college students at 28 of the most selective colleges and universities in the US. This study finds that, although white students’ level of racial prejudice declines over four years, interracial con...

  13. Consumer demand with social interactions: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Soetevent, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    How do social interactions affect consumer demand? In this paper, I investigate the effects that different social structures have on social welfare and on the budget shares of various categories of goods. A society is modeled in which households' demand for goods is described by a Linear Expenditure System with Social Interactions (LES-SI). In the context of the LES-SI, I find that social interactions can lead to a considerable reallocation of resources over goods. The differences in effect a...

  14. Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2013-07-30

    This is the final report of a program of research on "Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies'' of the High Energy Physics (HEP) group of The Rockefeller University. The research was carried out using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Three faculty members, two research associates, and two postdoctoral associates participated in this project. At CDF, we studied proton-antiproton collisions at an energy of 1.96 TeV. We focused on diffractive interactions, in which the colliding antiproton loses a small fraction of its momentum, typically less than 1%, while the proton is excited into a high mass state retaining its quantum numbers. The study of such collisions provides insight into the nature of the diffractive exchange, conventionally referred to as Pomeron exchange. In studies of W and Z production, we found results that point to a QCD-based interpretation of the diffractive exchange, as predicted in a data-driven phenomenology developed within the Rockefeller HEP group. At CMS, we worked on diffraction, supersymmetry (SUSY), dark matter, large extra dimensions, and statistical applications to data analysis projects. In diffraction, we extended our CDF studies to higher energies working on two fronts: measurement of the single/double diffraction and of the rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV, and development of a simulation of diffractive processes along the lines of our successful model used at CDF. Working with the PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo simulation authors, we implemented our model as a PYTHIA8-MBR option in PYTHIA8 and used it in our data analysis. Preliminary results indicate good agreement. We searched for SUSY by measuring parameters in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and found results which, combined with other experimental constraints and theoretical considerations, indicate

  15. Identifying critical unrecognized sugar-protein interactions in GH10 xylanases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus using STD NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, Yael S; Lisitsin, Elina; Carmiel, Oshrat; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval; Schmidt, Asher

    2013-09-01

    (1)H solution NMR spectroscopy is used synergistically with 3D crystallographic structures to map experimentally significant hydrophobic interactions upon substrate binding in solution under thermodynamic equilibrium. Using saturation transfer difference spectroscopy (STD NMR), a comparison is made between wild-type xylanase XT6 and its acid/base catalytic mutant E159Q--a non-active, single-heteroatom alteration that has been previously utilized to measure binding thermodynamics across a series of xylooligosaccharide-xylanase complexes [Zolotnitsky et al. (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101, 11275-11280). In this study, performing STD NMR of one substrate screens binding interactions to two proteins, avoiding many disadvantages inherent to the technique and clearly revealing subtle changes in binding induced upon mutation of the catalytic Glu. To visualize and compare the binding epitopes of xylobiose-xylanase complexes, a 'SASSY' plot (saturation difference transfer spectroscopy) is used. Two extraordinarily strong, but previously unrecognized, non-covalent interactions with H2-5 of xylobiose were observed in the wild-type enzyme but not in the E159Q mutant. Based on the crystal structure, these interactions were assigned to tryptophan residues at the -1 subsite. The mutant selectively binds only the β-xylobiose anomer. The (1)H solution NMR spectrum of a xylotriose-E159Q complex displays non-uniform broadening of the NMR signals. Differential broadening provides a unique subsite assignment tool based on structural knowledge of face-to-face stacking with a conserved tyrosine residue at the +1 subsite. The results obtained herein by substrate-observed NMR spectroscopy are discussed further in terms of methodological contributions and mechanistic understanding of substrate-binding adjustments upon a charge change in the E159Q construct. © 2013 FEBS.

  16. Contribution to the study of the alpha-alpha interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darriulat, Pierre

    1965-01-01

    The new variable energy cyclotron at Berkeley that can accelerate an alpha beam up to an energy of 130 MeV and the mass production of lithium diffused junctions have enabled us to perform 2 series of measurement, in the first one we use alpha beams with an energy ranging between 50 and 120 MeV to study alpha-alpha forces in the second one we use the flexibility of the variable energy cyclotron the resonances around 40 MeV, region that can not yet be reached by tandem accelerators. This work is divided into 6 chapters. The first chapter is dedicated to the formalism of partial wave analysis and the theory of the compound nucleus. In the second chapter the author presents the 88 cyclotron at Berkeley and the diffusion chamber, the alpha detectors are lithium diffused junctions made of silicon. The third chapter deals with the experimental methods used and the issue of the reduction of the volume of data. In the fourth chapter the results obtained in the upper part of the energy range are described in terms of complex shifts that allow the description of the α-α interaction at high energy. The very low impact parameter has enabled us to find 2 new components (l=6 and l=8) of the rotational spectrum and to define a more accurate phenomenological potential. The fifth chapter is dedicated to the narrow resonances we have found between 12 and 27 MeV. We present in the last chapter a calculation of the binding energy of C 12 in which we have considered the 12 C nucleus as formed by 3 alpha particles interacting with each other through the phenomenological potential defined above

  17. Analytical study on model tests of soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odajima, M.; Suzuki, S.; Akino, K.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are stiff, heavy and partly-embedded, the behavior of those structures during an earthquake depends on the vibrational characteristics of not only the structure but also the soil. Accordingly, seismic response analyses considering the effects of soil-structure interaction (SSI) are extremely important for seismic design of NPP structures. Many studies have been conducted on analytical techniques concerning SSI and various analytical models and approaches have been proposed. Based on the studies, SSI analytical codes (computer programs) for NPP structures have been improved at JINS (Japan Institute of Nuclear Safety), one of the departments of NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center) in Japan. These codes are soil-spring lumped-mass code (SANLUM), finite element code (SANSSI), thin layered element code (SANSOL). In proceeding with the improvement of the analytical codes, in-situ large-scale forced vibration SSI tests were performed using models simulating light water reactor buildings, and simulation analyses were performed to verify the codes. This paper presents an analytical study to demonstrate the usefulness of the codes

  18. Flavonoid-surfactant interactions: A detailed physicochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Onkar; Kaur, Rajwinder; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the interactions between flavonoids and surfactants with attention of finding the probable location of flavonoids in micellar media that can be used for controlling their antioxidant behavior. In present study, the micellar and interfacial behavior of twin tailed anionic surfactants viz. sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (NaDEHP) in the presence of two flavonoids, namely quercetin (QUE) and kaempferol (KFL) have been studied by surface tension measurements. UV-visible, fluorescence and differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) measurements have been employed to predict the probable location of flavonoids (QUE/KFL) within surfactant (AOT/NaDEHP) aggregates. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements further confirmed the solubilization of QUE/KFL in AOT/NaDEHP aggregates deduced from increased hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) of aggregates in the presence of flavonoids. Both radical scavenging activity (RSA) and degradation rate constant (k) of flavonoids are found to be higher in NaDEHP micelles as compared to AOT micelles.

  19. A study of the neutrino-gravitation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, I.D.

    1976-01-01

    A study of the neutrino-gravitation interaction is made in the framework of Einstein-Dirac coupled equations. Two classes of solutions are obtained, corresponding to two specific physical situations. One cosmological model with expansion is obtained, having neutrinos as the only curvature source; their properties and the parameters which can to characterize the solution as a cosmological model are studied. The second class of solutions corresponds to a naive complete model of a spherically symmetric star emitting neutrinos: the inner region is suposed to be built up of a spherically symmetric distribution of a perfect fluid, bounded in space and which emitts neutrinos; the star matter is considered transparent for neutrinos; the outer region contains only neutrinos and gravitational field. The problem of neutrino compatibility with spherically symmetric gravitational fields is examined. The local conservation laws and the function conditions of the inner and outer solutions in the fluid surface are studied and permit to characterize two kinds of solutions. In one case, the solution describes the neutrino emission phase, with consequent configuration contraction, immediately before the fluid to be completely contained in the interior of the schwarzchild radius, when the neutrino emission and the star contraction stop. The other possibility can correspond to a quasi-stationary configuration, with neutrino emission, where the relativistic equation of radiative equilibrium permits to define the equivalent of 'Radiation pressure' for neutrinos, which acts in the same sense of the gravitational pressure. (L.C.) [pt

  20. Introducing Platform Interactions Model for Studying Multi-Sided Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staykova, Kalina; Damsgaard, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Multi-Sided Platforms (MSPs) function as socio-technical entities that facilitate direct interactions between various affiliated to them constituencies through developing and managing IT architecture. In this paper, we aim to explain the nature of the platform interactions as key characteristic o...

  1. Preferences in Interactive Systems: Technical Challenges and Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Peintner, Bart; Viappiani, Paolo; Yorke-Smith, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Interactive artificial intelligence systems employ preferences in both their reasoning and their interaction with the user. This survey considers preference handling in applications such as recommender systems, personal assistant agents, and personalized user interfaces. We survey the major questions and approaches, present illustrative examples, and give an outlook on potential benefits and challenges.

  2. Interactive television revisited: a case study in home economics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interactive video conferencing, either via satellite, telephone lines or computer ... (Berlo, 1960:131). Video conferencing or another form of bidirectional communication would be suitable to reach this level of interactivity (Borsook & Higgenbotham -Wheat, 1991). .... lecture 'dead' compared to traditional classroom instruction" ...

  3. A STUDY ON THE WHEELSET/SLAB TRACK VERTICAL INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian MAZILU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the interaction between a moving wheelset and a slab track due to the short-pitch corrugated rail. The wheelset is modeled using a free-free Timoshenko beam with attached rigid bodies as the axle boxes, wheels and brake discs. The slab track model consists of elastically supported double Euler-Bernoulli beams. In fact, both wheelset and slab track are symmetric structures and the issue of the wheelset/slab track interaction is reduced to the wheel/rail interaction. The nonlinear equations of motion describing the wheelset/slab track interaction due to the short-pitch corrugated rail are solved using the time-domain Green’s functions method and the convolution theorem. The wheelset/slab track interaction due to the short-pitch corrugated rail exhibits a critical velocity when the vibration reaches the maximum level

  4. Towards future interactive intelligent systems for animals : Study and recognition of embodied interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pons, Patricia; Jaen, Javier; Catala, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    User-centered design applied to non-human animals is showing to be a promising research line known as Animal Computer Interaction (ACI), aimed at improving animals' wellbeing using technology. Within this research line, intelligent systems for animal entertainment could have remarkable benefits for

  5. Transient interactions studied by NMR : iron sulfur proteins and their interaction partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xingfu

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between proteins are of central importance for virtually every process in a living cell. It has long been a mystery how two proteins associate to form a complex in a complicated cellular context. Recently, it was found that an intermediate state called encounter state, of a protein

  6. Study of the interactions between naphthoquinone and protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhaoxia; Zhao Hongwei; Zhu Hongping; Ge Min; Hao Shumei; Wang Wenfeng; Li Wenxin

    2006-01-01

    Quinones are found in probably all respiring animal and plant cells. They are widely used as anticancer, antibacterial or antimalarial drugs and as fungicides. Over the last several decades, much attention has been paid to quinone compounds since they play important roles as electron and hydrogen atom acceptors in both chemistry and biochemistry. It has been known that the reactive states for the photoreduction of quinones are triplets. As for the photochemistry of simple quinones, such as benzoquinones (BQ), anthraquinones (AQ) and naphthoquinone (NQ), a large number of studies on their photochemical properties and elementary photoreactions. However little research on the protein electron transfer of triplet naphthoquinones ( 3 NQ * ) in organic solvents has been reported using laser flash photolysis. We have studied interactions between 3 NQ * and lysozyme in a mixture solution of acetonitrile and H 2 O (3:1, v/v) using 355 nm laser flash photolysis technique combined with the sample being irradiated in steady-state. Electron transfer reaction between 3 NQ * and lysozyme was found, and the rate constant was determined. On the other hand, the results of electrophoresis suggested that protein can be damaged induced by NQ irradiated with UVA light. It was indicated that the mechanisms and products of oxidative damage were relative to the concentration of riboflavin, the time of irradiation and the ambience. Mechanisms of photosensitive damage of protein were proposed. (authors)

  7. Study of ethanol-lysozyme interactions using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.S.; Mason, S.A.; McIntyre, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction has been used to observe the interactions between deuterated ethanol (CD3CD2OH) and lysozyme in triclinic crystals of hen egg white lysozyme soaked in 25% (v/v) ethanol solutions. A total of 6047 observed reflections to a resolution of 2 A were used, and 13 possible ethanol sites were identified. The three highest occupied sites are close to locations for bromoethanol found in an earlier study by Yonath et al. [Yonath, A., Podjarny, A., Honig, B., Traub, W., Sielecki, A., Herzberg, O., and Moult, J. (1978) Biophys. Struct. Mech. 4, 27-36]. Structure refinements including a model for the flat solvent lead to a final crystallographic agreement factor of 0.097. Comparison with earlier neutron studies on triclinic lysozyme showed that neither the molecular structure nor the thermal motions were affected significantly by the ethanol. A detailed analysis of the ethanol-lysozyme contacts showed 61% of these to be with hydrophobic sites, in agreement with the dominant hydrophobic nature of ethanol. This, together with the fact that the molecular structure of lysozyme is not perturbed, suggests a model for denaturation of lysozyme by alcohol, which proceeds via a dehydration of the protein at high alcohol concentration

  8. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  9. Spin interactions in Graphene-Single Molecule Magnets Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Aña; Luis, Fernando; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Dressel, Martin; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is a potential component of novel spintronics devices owing to its long spin diffusion length. Besides its use as spin-transport channel, graphene can be employed for the detection and manipulation of molecular spins. This requires an appropriate coupling between the sheets and the single molecular magnets (SMM). Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of graphene-Fe4 SMM hybrids. The Fe4 clusters are anchored non-covalently to the graphene following a diffusion-limited assembly and can reorganize into random networks when subjected to slightly elevated temperature. Molecules anchored on graphene sheets show unaltered static magnetic properties, whilst the quantum dynamics is profoundly modulated. Interaction with Dirac fermions becomes the dominant spin-relaxation channel, with observable effects produced by graphene phonons and reduced dipolar interactions. Coupling to graphene drives the spins over Villain's threshold, allowing the first observation of strongly-perturbative tunneling processes. Preliminary spin-transport experiments at low-temperature are further presented.

  10. A Design Study of Direct-Touch Interaction for Exploratory 3D Scientific Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Tijmen; Gueniat, Florimond; Pastur, Luc; Vernier, Frederic; Isenberg, Tobias

    We present an interaction design study of several non-overlapping direct-touch interaction widgets, postures, and bi-manual techniques to support the needs of scientists who are exploring a dataset. The final interaction design supports navigation/zoom, cutting plane interaction, a drilling

  11. Presence in Video-Mediated Interactions: Case Studies at CSIRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alem, Leila

    Although telepresence and a sense of connectedness with others are frequently mentioned in media space studies, as far as we know, none of these studies report attempts at assessing this critical aspect of user experience. While some attempts have been made to measure presence in virtual reality or augmented reality, (a comprehensive review of existing measures is available in Baren and Ijsselsteijn [2004]), very little work has been reported in measuring presence in video-mediated collaboration systems. Traditional studies of video-mediated collaboration have mostly focused their evaluation on measures of task performance and user satisfaction. Videoconferencing systems can be seen as a type of media space; they rely on technologies of audio, video, and computing put together to create an environment extending the embodied mind. This chapter reports on a set of video-mediated collaboration studies conducted at CSIRO in which different aspects of presence are being investigated. The first study reports the sense of physical presence a specialist doctor experiences when engaged in a remote consultation of a patient using the virtual critical care unit (Alem et al., 2006). The Viccu system is an “always-on” system connecting two hospitals (Li et al., 2006). The presence measure focuses on the extent to which users of videoconferencing systems feel physically present in the remote location. The second study reports the sense of social presence users experience when playing a game of charades with remote partners using a video conference link (Kougianous et al., 2006). In this study the presence measure focuses on the extent to which users feel connected with their remote partners. The third study reports the sense of copresence users experience when building collaboratively a piece of Lego toy (Melo and Alem, 2007). The sense of copresence is the extent to which users feel present with their remote partner. In this final study the sense of copresence is

  12. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  13. A STUDY ON THE WHEELSET/SLAB TRACK VERTICAL INTERACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Traian MAZILU

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the interaction between a moving wheelset and a slab track due to the short-pitch corrugated rail. The wheelset is modeled using a free-free Timoshenko beam with attached rigid bodies as the axle boxes, wheels and brake discs. The slab track model consists of elastically supported double Euler-Bernoulli beams. In fact, both wheelset and slab track are symmetric structures and the issue of the wheelset/slab track interaction is reduced to the wheel/rail interaction. The n...

  14. 77 FR 9946 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Drug Interaction Studies-Study Design, Data Analysis, Implications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ...] (Formerly Docket No. 2006D-0344) Draft Guidance for Industry on Drug Interaction Studies--Study Design, Data... availability of a revised draft guidance for industry entitled ``Drug Interaction Studies--Study Design, Data... transport, and drug-drug, or drug-therapeutic protein interactions. DATES: Although you can comment on any...

  15. Busbar studies for the LHC interaction region quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, P; Fehér, S; Kerby, J S; Lamm, M J; Orris, D; Sylvester, C D; Tompkins, J C; Zlobin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Fermilab (FNAL) and the Japanese high energy physics lab (KEK) are developing the superconducting quadrupole magnets for the interaction regions (IR) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These magnets have a nominal field gradient of 215 T/m in a 70 mm bore and operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The IR magnets are electrically interconnected with superconducting busbars, which need to be protected in the event of a quench. Experiments to determine the most suitable busbar design for the LHC IR magnets and the analysis of the data are presented. The main purpose of the study was to find a design that allows the inclusion of the superconducting busbars in the magnet quench protection scheme, thus avoiding additional quench protection circuitry. A proposed busbar design that was tested in these experiments consists of a superconducting cable, which is normally used for the inner layer of the Fermilab IR quadrupoles, soldered to similar Rutherford type cables as a stabilizer. A series of prototypes with varyin...

  16. Study of electron and neutrino interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  17. Thermodynamic Study of Molecular Interactions in Eutectic Mixtures Containing Camphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuniewski, Marcin; Paduszyński, Kamil; Domańska, Urszula

    2016-12-22

    Terpenes are an abundant and diverse class of chemicals having numerous applications in different areas of chemistry. Therefore, a detailed knowledge of physical and thermodynamic properties of terpenes and their mixtures with other compounds is highly desired. This paper reports both a thermodynamic study on solid-liquid equilibrium (SLE) phase diagrams in binary systems formed by (±)-camphene (a representative terpene) and one of the following solvents: n-decane, n-dodecane, 1-decanol, 1-dodecanol, phenylmethanol, 2-phenylethanol, 2-cyclohexylethanol. The observed trends in the measured SLE data are discussed in terms of structure (alkyl chain length, aromacity) of the solvent and molecular interactions. Modeling of the considered SLE phase diagrams with three well-established thermodynamic models, namely, modified UNIFAC (Dortmund), perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) and conductor-like screening model for real solvents (COSMO-RS), is presented. A comparative analysis of their performance is given in terms of average absolute deviations between predicted and experimental SLE temperature.

  18. Monte Carlo studies of high-transverse-energy hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    A four-jet Monte Carlo calculation has been used to simulate hadron-hadron interactions which deposit high transverse energy into a large-solid-angle calorimeter and limited solid-angle regions of the calorimeter. The calculation uses first-order QCD cross sections to generate two scattered jets and also produces beam and target jets. Field-Feynman fragmentation has been used in the hadronization. The sensitivity of the results to a few features of the Monte Carlo program has been studied. The results are found to be very sensitive to the method used to ensure overall energy conservation after the fragmentation of the four jets is complete. Results are also sensitive to the minimum momentum transfer in the QCD subprocesses and to the distribution of p/sub T/ to the jet axis and the multiplicities in the fragmentation. With reasonable choices of these features of the Monte Carlo program, good agreement with data at Fermilab/CERN SPS energies is obtained, comparable to the agreement achieved with more sophisticated parton-shower models. With other choices, however, the calculation gives qualitatively different results which are in strong disagreement with the data. These results have important implications for extracting physics conclusions from Monte Carlo calculations. It is not possible to test the validity of a particular model or distinguish between different models unless the Monte Carlo results are unambiguous and different models exhibit clearly different behavior

  19. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E.; Geltenbort, P.; Gridnev, K. A.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Martemyanov, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4′ channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4′ channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  20. Interaction study of collagen and sericin in blending solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Yuan, Jingjie; Yang, Xiao; Cheng, Xinjian; Li, Jiao

    2016-12-01

    The interactions of collagen and sericin were studied by fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, FTIR spectra and dynamic light scattering. The fluorescence quenching in emission spectra and red-shift (283-330nm) in synchronous fluorescence spectra suggested the Tyr of collagen and sericin overlapped with a distance of 3Å, generating excimer. The overlapped Tyr of collagen and sericin decreased the hydrophobicity of collagen, which resulted in the red-shifts (233-240nm) in ultraviolet spectra. Moreover, the red-shifts of amide bands of collagen in FTIR spectra indicated the hydrogen bonds of collagen were weaken and it could also be explained by the overlapped Tyr. The results of 2D-FTIR spectra demonstrated the backbone of collagen molecule was varied and the most susceptible structure of collagen was the triple helix with the presence of sericin. Based on dynamic light scattering, we conjectured large pure collagen aggregates were replaced by hybrid aggregates of collagen and sericin particles after the addition of sericin. With ascending sericin ratio, the diameters of the hybrid aggregates increased and attained maximum with 60% ratio of sericin, which were on account of the increasing excimer number. The results of DSC demonstrated the presence of sericin enhanced the thermal stability of collagen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of direct photons produced in hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karyotakis, Y.

    1985-05-01

    This thesis studies direct photons produced by π + , π - and proton beams of 200 GeV/c, momentum interacting with a carbon target. QCD predicts that direct photons are produced either by the quark-antiquark annihilation qantiq → gγ, or by gluon scattering gq → qγ. The experiment was performed at CERN and used the NA3 spectrometer. Photons are converted within 10% conversion length, and resulting e + e - are detected by the trigger system which requires a minimum transverse momentum of 2.5 GeV/c. Electrons tracks are detected by the spectrometer, while energy and position of photons are measured by an electromagnetic calorimeter and a shower chamber. Direct photon's signal is obtained only statistically, after correcting the ''single photons'' candidats for the π 0 and eta 0 contribution. This correction is obtained only from a sophisticated Monte Carlo, in which electromagnetic shower simulation is difficult. We have observed a significant direct photon signal and we measured the cross section. The γ/π 0 ratio at psub(t) = 4.5 GeV/c is about 10% and seems to grow as a function of transverse momentum. Systematic errors, which are important, limit the precision on the gluon's structure function measurement [fr

  2. Interactive flutter analysis and parametric study for conceptual wing design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1995-01-01

    An interactive computer program was developed for wing flutter analysis in the conceptual design stage. The objective was to estimate the flutter instability boundary of a flexible cantilever wing, when well defined structural and aerodynamic data are not available, and then study the effect of change in Mach number, dynamic pressure, torsional frequency, sweep, mass ratio, aspect ratio, taper ratio, center of gravity, and pitch inertia, to guide the development of the concept. The software was developed on MathCad (trademark) platform for Macintosh, with integrated documentation, graphics, database and symbolic mathematics. The analysis method was based on nondimensional parametric plots of two primary flutter parameters, namely Regier number and Flutter number, with normalization factors based on torsional stiffness, sweep, mass ratio, aspect ratio, center of gravity location and pitch inertia radius of gyration. The plots were compiled in a Vaught Corporation report from a vast database of past experiments and wind tunnel tests. The computer program was utilized for flutter analysis of the outer wing of a Blended Wing Body concept, proposed by McDonnell Douglas Corporation. Using a set of assumed data, preliminary flutter boundary and flutter dynamic pressure variation with altitude, Mach number and torsional stiffness were determined.

  3. Studies of neutron emission from relativistic nuclear interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, S L; Wang, Y L; Guo, H Y; Sá Ben-Hao; Zheng, Y M; Brandt, R; Vater, P; Wan, J S; Ochs, M; Kulakov, B A; Sosnin, A N; Krivopustov, M I; Butsev, V S; Bradnova, V

    1999-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the yields and spatial distributions of secondary neutrons produced in the relativistic nuclear interactions of 1.5 GeV to 14.4 GeV projectiles p, d and alpha-particles with targets Pb and U/Pb. CR-39 track detectors were used to measure the neutrons. It shows that: (1) Secondary neutrons are produced in the whole length of Pb or U targets having a thickness of 20 cm. The neutron intensities produced by proton bombardments are reduced along the proton beam direction in the targets. The higher the energy of protons, the lower the reduction rate of the neutrons. The reduction rate of neutrons in U target is higher than in Pb target for the same energy of protons. (2) The radial intensities of neutrons decrease as the distance increases from the target central line. (3) The neutron yield in U target by proton bombardments is approx 55% higher than in Pb target. (4) The ratio of neutron yield by 14.4 GeV alpha to 7.3 GeV d bombardment in Pb target is 1.74+-0.20.

  4. SELMA: a mission to study lunar environment and surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, Stas; Futaana, Yoshifumi

    2017-04-01

    SELMA (Surface, Environment, and Lunar Magnetic Anomalies) proposed for the ESA M5 mission opportunity is a mission to study how the Moon environment and surface interact. SELMA addresses four overarching science questions: (1) What is the origin of water on the Moon? (2) How do the "volatile cycles" on the Moon work? (3) How do the lunar mini-magnetospheres work? (4) What is the influence of dust on the lunar environment and surface? SELMA uses a unique combination of remote sensing via UV, IR, and energetic neutral atoms and local measurements of plasma, fields, waves, exospheric gasses, and dust. It will also conduct an impact experiment to investigate volatile content in the soil of the permanently shadowed area of the Shakleton crater. SELMA carries an impact probe to sound the Reiner-Gamma mini-magnetosphere and its interaction with the lunar regolith from the SELMA orbit down to the surface. The SELMA science objectives include: - Establish the role of the solar wind and exosphere in the formation of the water bearing materials; - Determine the water content in the regolith of the permanently shadowed region and its isotope composition; - Establish variability, sources and sinks of the lunar exosphere and its relations to impact events; - Investigate a mini-magnetosphere interaction with the solar wind; - Investigate the long-term effects of mini-magnetospheres on the local surface; - Investigate how the impact events affect the lunar dust environments; - Investigate how the plasma effects result in lofting the lunar dust; SELMA is a flexible and short (15 months) mission including the following elements SELMA orbiter, SELMA Impact Probe for Magnetic Anomalies (SIP-MA), passive Impactor, and Relaying CubeSat (RCS). SELMA is placed on quasi-frozen polar orbit 30 km x 200 km with the pericenter over the South Pole. Approximately 9 months after the launch SELMA releases SIP-MA to sound the Reiner-Gamma magnetic anomaly with very high time resolution 10 sec

  5. The Electron-Phonon Interaction as Studied by Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    With recent advances in energy and angle resolution, the effects of electron-phonon interactions are manifest in many valence-band photoelectron spectra (PES) for states near the Fermi level in metals

  6. A Case Study of the Online Interactions among ESL Students to Complete Their Narrative Writing Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nagaletchimee

    2018-01-01

    The study is a qualitative case study that investigated the patterns of interactions among ESL students during their online interactions to complete their narrative essays. The study found that students were engaged in interactions related to language related assistance, using partner as a resource and providing encouragement as suggested by…

  7. A theoretical study on interaction of proline with gold cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    energies of the geometries are shown in table S8. The structure of Pro-Au3 (a) has a monodentate interaction through Au1–N1 with gold cluster. As expected, the Au1–N1 bond length (2·20–2·21Å) does not change much as the basis set is varied, but the interaction energy changes from −36·45 to −28·80 kcal/mol when the ...

  8. Yakima River species interactions studies annual report, 2000; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearsons, Todd N.

    2001-01-01

    Species interactions research and monitoring was initiated in 1989 to investigate ecological interactions among fish in response to proposed supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This is the ninth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the ecology and demographics of non-target taxa (NTT) and target taxon, and develop methods to monitor interactions and supplementation success. Major topics of this report are associated with the chronology of ecological interactions that occur throughout a supplementation program, implementing NTT monitoring prescriptions for detecting potential impacts of hatchery supplementation, hatchery fish interactions, and monitoring fish predation indices. This report is organized into four chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter. This annual report summarizes data collected primarily by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 in the Yakima basin, however these data were compared to data from previous years to identify preliminary trends and patterns. Summaries of each of the chapters included in this report are described

  9. Studying the Interaction of the Epistemology in e-Government, Organization Studies and Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneklis, Vassilis; Douligeris, Christos

    Although there are significant differences between Organization Studies, Information Systems and e-Government, certain boundaries between them have started to dissolve in the light of recent developments. Even though influences can be traced among all three concerning research results, epistemological interaction could produce interesting outcomes. In this paper we propose such an interaction in epistemology, and particularly in methods following the interpretive tradition, which has been notably underused. We present a brief review of literature in e-Government and after sketching its route, we propose ways to integrate in it perceptions and methods from Organization Studies and Information Systems.

  10. Study of the interaction of atoms with strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M.

    1984-01-01

    Three aspects of the interactions of atoms with high intensity laser fields were treated. All three were motivated by experiment. The first investigation was prompted by a recent experiment (Kruit et al. 1983) involving multiphoton ionization of Xe. In this experiment it was found that the photoelectron energy spectrum contained peaks that corresponded to the absorption of more than the minimum number of photons required to ionize the atom. A model approximation here showed good qualitative agreement with experiment. An experiment (Grove et al. 1977) designed to test a theoretical calculation of the dynamical Stark effect stimulated the second part of this thesis, namely: a study of how an adiabatically and near-adiabatically changing field intensity affects the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a two-level atom. It was found that there is an asymmetry in the spectrum for off-resonance excitation produced because the field turn-on repopulates the dressed state that is depopulated by spontaneous emission. The third part of this thesis was based on an experiment (Granneman and Van der Wiel 1976) that attempted to verify a perturbation calculation of the two-photon ionization cross section of Cs. A discrepancy of four orders of magnitude near a minimum in the cross section was found between theory and experiment. To explain this discrepancy it was suggested (Armstrong and Beers 1977) that the effective order of nonlinearity (k) for this process varied significantly around the minimum. This study involves a perturbation calculation of k. It was found that k varies rapidly around the minimum, and that this variation should be experimentally observable for laser intensities of the order of tens of GW cm -2

  11. Calorimetric techniques applied to the thermodynamic study of interactions between proteins and polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Barreto Santos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The interactions between biological macromolecules have been important for biotechnology, but further understanding is needed to maximize the utility of these interactions. Calorimetric techniques provide information regarding these interactions through the thermal energy that is produced or consumed during interactions. Notable techniques include differential scanning calorimetry, which generates a thermodynamic profile from temperature scanning, and isothermal titration calorimetry that provide the thermodynamic parameters directly related to the interaction. This review described how calorimetric techniques can be used to study interactions between proteins and polysaccharides, and provided valuable insight into the thermodynamics of their interaction.

  12. A preliminary study on titanium-clay interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Grolimund, D.; Kumpulainen, S.; Brendle, J.; Snellman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Posiva and SKB are developing a horizontal disposal design alternative, termed KBS-3H. In this design alternative, modules of a Cu-waste canister surrounded by bentonite blocks is placed in a perforated steel cylinder, a so-called supercontainer (SC), before emplacement in the deposition drifts. The current design for the SC is based on carbon steel. But because corrosion will lead to high hydrogen levels and iron-clay interactions, alternative materials are also being considered. A promising alternative are Ti alloys which display high strength and are known to behave as chemically inert materials under variety of conditions. Also for the Ti alloys, both the corrosion rate and interaction behaviour with other components in the drift needs to be known. In particular, it needs to be demonstrated that corrosion-derived Ti has no significant detrimental effects on the bentonite buffer which is one main barrier within the KBS-3H concept. Unfortunately, the benign inert behaviour of Ti makes it difficult to perform meaningful experiments. Hence, it is not surprising that so far, very little research work on this topic has been carried out and experience is very limited. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been launched to shed more light on Ti-clay interaction processes and on the Ti species resulting from these interactions. A series of experiments including purified MX-80 bentonite or synthetic 'Ti-free' montmorillonite were mixed with metallic Ti nano-powder or foil in 0.1 M NaCl solutions at different pH and temperature conditions. After several months, solid and solute samples from the first set of tests were analyzed by wet chemistry and spectroscopic methods. Ti speciation was analyzed with XAS combined with XRF as elemental mapping tool. A further series of tests will be analyzed in the near future. In addition to reacted samples, a number of reference and starting materials (e.g. MX-80, Rokle

  13. Preliminary experimental study of liquid lithium water interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, X.M.; Tong, L.L.; Cao, X.W., E-mail: caoxuewu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Explosive reaction occurs when lithium temperature is over 300 °C. • The violence of liquid lithium water interaction increases with the initial temperature of liquid lithium. • The interaction is suppressed when the initial water temperature is above 70 °C. • Steam explosion is not ignorable in the risk assessment of liquid lithium water interaction. • Explosion strength of liquid lithium water interaction is evaluated by explosive yield. - Abstract: Liquid lithium is the best candidate for a material with low Z and low activation, and is one of the important choices for plasma facing materials in magnetic fusion devices. However, liquid lithium reacts violently with water under the conditions of loss of coolant accidents. The release of large heats and hydrogen could result in the dramatic increase of temperature and pressure. The lithium–water explosion has large effect on the safety of fusion devices, which is an important content for the safety assessment of fusion devices. As a preliminary investigation of liquid lithium water interaction, the test facility has been built and experiments have been conducted under different conditions. The initial temperature of lithium droplet ranged from 200 °C to 600 °C and water temperature was varied between 20 °C and 90 °C. Lithium droplets were released into the test section with excess water. The shape of lithium droplet and steam generated around the lithium were observed by the high speed camera. At the same time, the pressure and temperature in the test section were recorded during the violent interactions. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the initial temperature of lithium and water has an effect on the violence of liquid lithium water interaction.

  14. Molecular interactions and thermal transport in ionic liquids with carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, João M P; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A; Pádua, Agílio A H

    2017-07-05

    We used molecular dynamics simulation to study the effect of suspended carbon nanomaterials, nanotubes and graphene sheets, on the thermal conductivity of ionic liquids, an issue related to understanding the properties of nanofluids. One important aspect that we developed is an atomistic model of the interactions between the organic ions and carbon nanomaterials, so we did not rely on existing force fields for small organic molecules or assume simple combining rules to describe the interactions at the liquid/material interface. Instead, we used quantum calculations with a density functional suitable for non-covalent interactions to parameterize an interaction model, including van der Waals terms and also atomic partial charges on the materials. We fitted a n-m interaction potential function with n values of 9 or 10 and m values between 5 and 8, so a 12-6 Lennard-Jones function would not fit the quantum calculations. For the atoms of ionic liquids and carbon nanomaterials interacting among themselves, we adopted existing models from the literature. We studied the imidazolium ionic liquids [C 4 C 1 im][SCN], [C 4 C 1 im][N(CN) 2 ], [C 4 C 1 im][C(CN) 3 ] and [C 4 C 1 im][(CF 3 SO 2 ) 2 N]. Attraction is stronger for cations (than for anions) above and below the π-system of the nanomaterials, whereas anions show stronger attraction for the hydrogenated edges. The ordering of ions around and inside (7,7) and (10,10) single-walled nanotubes, and near a stack of graphene sheets, was analysed in terms of density distribution functions. We verified that anions are found, as well as cations, in the first interfacial layer interacting with the materials, which is surprising given the interaction potential surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the ionic liquids and of composite systems containing one nanotube or one graphene stack in suspension was calculated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. Thermal conductivity was calculated along the axis of the nanotube and

  15. Water interactions with hydrophobic groups: Assessment and recalibration of semiempirical molecular orbital methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Antoine; Monard, Gérald; Ruiz-López, Manuel F., E-mail: Manuel.Ruiz@univ-lorraine.fr; Ingrosso, Francesca, E-mail: Francesca.Ingrosso@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, SRSMC UMR 7565, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy F-54506 (France); CNRS, SRSMC UMR 7565, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy F-54506 (France)

    2014-07-21

    In this work, we present a study of the ability of different semiempirical methods to describe intermolecular interactions in water solution. In particular, we focus on methods based on the Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap approximation. Significant improvements of these methods have been reported in the literature in the past years regarding the description of non-covalent interactions. In particular, a broad range of methodologies has been developed to deal with the properties of hydrogen-bonded systems, with varying degrees of success. In contrast, the interactions between water and a molecule containing hydrophobic groups have been little analyzed. Indeed, by considering the potential energy surfaces obtained using different semiempirical Hamiltonians for the intermolecular interactions of model systems, we found that none of the available methods provides an entirely satisfactory description of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions in water. In addition, a vibrational analysis carried out in a model system for these interactions, a methane clathrate cluster, showed that some recent methods cannot be used to carry out studies of vibrational properties. Following a procedure established in our group [M. I. Bernal-Uruchurtu, M. T. C. Martins-Costa, C. Millot, and M. F. Ruiz-López, J. Comput. Chem. 21, 572 (2000); W. Harb, M. I. Bernal-Uruchurtu, and M. F. Ruiz-López, Theor. Chem. Acc. 112, 204 (2004)], we developed new parameters for the core-core interaction terms based on fitting potential energy curves obtained at the MP2 level for our model system. We investigated the transferability of the new parameters to describe a system, having both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, interacting with water. We found that only by introducing two different sets of parameters for hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydrogen atom types we are able to match the features of the ab initio calculated properties. Once this assumption is made, a good agreement with the

  16. Synthesis of 1D-glyconanomaterials by a hybrid noncovalent-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes: a study of their selective interactions with lectins and with live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernía Leal, M; Assali, M; Cid, J J; Valdivia, V; Franco, J M; Fernández, I; Pozo, D; Khiar, N

    2015-12-07

    To take full advantage of the remarkable applications of carbon nanotubes in different fields, there is a need to develop effective methods to improve their water dispersion and biocompatibility while maintaining their physical properties. In this sense, current approaches suffer from serious drawbacks such as loss of electronic structure together with low surface coverage in the case of covalent functionalizations, or instability of the dynamic hybrids obtained by non-covalent functionalizations. In the present work, we examined the molecular basis of an original strategy that combines the advantages of both functionalizations without their main drawbacks. The hierarchical self-assembly of diacetylenic-based neoglycolipids into highly organized and compacted rings around the nanotubes, followed by photopolymerization leads to the formation of nanotubes covered with glyconanorings with a shish kebab-type topology exposing the carbohydrate ligands to the water phase in a multivalent fashion. The glyconanotubes obtained are fully functional, and able to establish specific interactions with their cognate receptors. In fact, by taking advantage of this selective binding, an easy method to sense lectins as a working model of toxin detection was developed based on a simple analysis of TEM images. Remarkably, different experimental settings to assess cell membrane integrity, cell growth kinetics and cell cycle demonstrated the cellular biocompatibility of the sugar-coated carbon nanotubes compared to pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  17. Computational Study of Flow Interactions in Coaxial Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Lee, Henry C.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    account for multiple real-world constraints up front in design nor possible to know what performance is possible with a given design. Since unmanned vehicles are sized and optimized for the particular mission, a modern low-fidelity conceptual design and sizing tool that has been used for the design of large helicopters can be used for design of small coaxial rotorcraft. However, unlike most helicopters with single main rotor, the interactions between the upper and lower rotors emerge as an important factor to consider in design because an increase in performance of a multi-rotor system is not proportional to the number of rotors. Interference losses and differences in thrusts between the upper and lower rotors were investigated by theoretical methods as well as a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In this work, hybrid turbulence models are used to investigate the physics of interactions between coaxial rotors and a fuselage that are not well understood. Present study covers not only small-scale drones but also large-scale coaxial rotors for heavy-lifting missions. Considering the recently proposed FAA drone rules that require the flight only in visual line-of-sight, a large multirotor might be used as an airborne carrier for launch and recovery of unmanned aircraft systems with a human operator onboard. For applications to civil operations, their aerodynamic performance and noise levels need to be assessed. Noise is one of the largest limiting factors to rotorcraft operations in urban area. Since the high-frequency noise of multi-rotors may increase the annoyance, noise may turn out to be a key issue that must be addressed for market acceptability. One of the objectives of the present work is to study the effects of inter-rotor spacing and collectives on the performance, efficiency, and acoustics of coaxial rotor systems.

  18. A numerical study of two interacting coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Schmidt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction in the solar wind between two coronal mass ejections (CMEs is investigated using numerical simulations. We show that the nature of the interaction depends on whether the CME magnetic structures interact, but in all cases the result is an equilisation of the speed of the two CMEs. In the absence of magnetic interaction, the forward shock of the faster trailing CME interacts with the slow leading CME, and accelerates it. When the two CMEs have magnetic fields with the same sense of rotation, magnetic reconnection occurs between the two CMEs, leading to the formation of a single magnetic structure: in the most extreme cases, one CME "eats" the other. When the senses of rotation are opposite, reconnection does not occur, but the CMEs collide in a highly non-elastic manner, again forming a single structure. The possibility of enhanced particle acceleration in such processes is assessed. The presence of strong magnetic reconnection provides excellent opportunities for the acceleration of thermal particles, which then form a seed population for further acceleration at the CME shocks. The presence of a large population of seed particles will thus lead to an overall increase in energetic particle fluxes, as suggested by some observations.

  19. Studies on electrospun nylon-6/chitosan complex nanofiber interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haitao; Li Shubai; Branford White, Christopher J.; Ning Xin; Nie Huali; Zhu Limin

    2009-01-01

    Composite membranes of nylon-6/chitosan nanofibers with different weight ratio of nylon-6 to chitosan were fabricated successfully using electrospinning. Morphologies of the nanofibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the intermolecular interactions of the nylon-6/chitosan complex were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as well as mechanical testing. We found that morphology and diameter of the nanofibers were influenced by the concentration of the solution and weight ratio of the blending component materials. Furthermore FT-IR analyses on interactions between components demonstrated an IR band frequency shift that appeared to be dependent on the amount of chitosan in the complex. Observations from XRD and DSC suggested that a new fraction of γ phase crystals appeared and increased with the increasing content of chitosan in blends, this indicated that intermolecular interactions occurred between nylon-6 and chitosan. Results from performance data in mechanical showed that intermolecular interactions varied with varying chitosan content in the fibers. It was concluded that a new composite product was created and the stability of this system was attributed to strong new interactions such as hydrogen bond formation between the nylon-6 polymers and chitosan structures.

  20. Experimental study of cadmium interaction with periphytic biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, O.S., E-mail: oleg@lmtg.obs-mip.fr [Geochimie et Biogeochimie Experimentale, UMR 5563, CNRS-OMP-Universite Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Feurtet-Mazel, A. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Martinez, R.E. [Center for Applied Geosciences, Universitat Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Morin, S. [Unite de Recherche Reseaux, Epuration et Qualite des Eaux REQE, Cemagref, 50 Avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Baudrimont, M. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Duong, T. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)] [Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Coste, M. [Unite de Recherche Reseaux, Epuration et Qualite des Eaux REQE, Cemagref, 50 Avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    This study addresses the interaction of Cd with natural biofilms of periphytic diatoms grown during different seasons in metal-contaminated and metal-non-contaminated streams, along a tributary of the Lot River, France. Specifically, it aims to test whether the biofilms from contaminated sites have developed a protective mechanism due to high Cd exposure. Towards this goal, reversible adsorption experiments on untreated biofilms were performed in 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} with a pH ranging from 2 to 8, Cd concentration from 0.5 to 10,000 {mu}g/L and exposure time from 1 to 24 h. Two types of experiments, pH-dependent adsorption edge and constant-pH 'Langmuirian'-type isotherms were conducted. Results were adequately modeled using a Linear Programming Model. It was found that the adsorption capacities of natural biofilm consortia with respect to Cd do not depend on season and are not directly linked to the growth environment. The biofilms grown in non-contaminated (4.6 ppb Cd in solid) and contaminated (570 ppb Cd in solid) settings exhibit similar adsorption capacities in the Cd concentration range in solution of 100-10,000 {mu}g/L but quite different capacities at low Cd concentration (0.5-100 {mu}g/L); unexpectedly, the non-contaminated biofilm adsorbs approximately 10 times more Cd than the contaminated one. It is therefore possible that the strong low-abundant ligands (for example, phosphoryl or sulfhydryls) are already metal-saturated on surfaces of biofilm grown in the contaminated site whereas these sites are still available for metal adsorption in samples grown in non-contaminated sites.

  1. [Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of nicotine and BSA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Kong, Xiang-rong; Shen, Xinag-can; Liang, Hong

    2005-10-01

    The interaction of nicotine and bovine serum albumin(BSA) was investigated by fluorescence spectra and UV-vis spectra. The fluorescence spectrum showed that BSA fluorescence quench regularly with the addition of nicotine.The fluorescence quenching mechanisms were also studied in pH 5.0, pH 7.4 and pH 11.0 by Stern-Volmer equation, indicating dynamic quenching(pH 5.0) and static quenching(pH 7.4 and pH 11.0) respectively. Association constants (k) of nicotine and BSA at pH 7.4 and pH 11.0 at the temperatures of 20 and 37 degrees C were given by the Lineweaver-Buck equation, which are: k(20 degrees C) = 140.15 L x mol(-1) and k(37 degrees C) = 131.83 mol x L(-1) (pH 7.4), and k(20 degrees C) = 141.76 mol x L(-1), k(37 degrees C) = 27.79 mol x L(-1) (pH 11.0), suggesting that the association constant is effected by the temperature much more remarkably at pH 7.4 than that at pH 11.0 because of the different states of nicotine at different pHs. The UV-Vis spectra exhibit that the absorbance of BSA(210 nm) shifts to red and decreases gradually with the addition of nicotine, reflecting the transition of secondary structure of BSA, namely, the helix of BSA becomes looser. The UV-Vis second derivative spectra and synchronous spectra (delta wavelength = wavelength(em) - wavelength(ex) = 15 nm and delta wavelength = wavelength(em) - wavelength(ex) = 60 nm) imply the change of the microcircumstance of aromatic amino residues of BSA(Trp, Tyr and Phe) from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity at high concentration of nicotine.

  2. Interactions between imazethapyr and bovine serum albumin: Spectrofluorimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, Maria E. [Division Quimica Analitica, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bruzzone, Liliana, E-mail: bruzzone@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Division Quimica Analitica, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-10-15

    The interaction between imazethapyr (IMA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K{sub SV}) at three temperatures was evaluated in order to determine the quenching mechanism. The dependence of fluorescence quenching on viscosity was also evaluated for this purpose. The results showed that IMA quenches the fluorescence intensity of BSA through a static quenching process. The values of the binding constant for the formed BSA-IMA complex and the number of binding sites were found to be 1.51 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} and 0.77, respectively, at room temperature. Based on the calculated thermodynamic parameters, the forces that dominate the binding process are hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces, and the binding process is spontaneous and exothermic. The quenching of protein fluorescence by iodide ion was used to probe the accessibility of tryptophan residues in BSA and the change in accessibility induced by the presence of IMA. According to the obtained results, the BSA-IMA complex is formed in the site where the Trp-134 is located, causing it to become less exposed to the solvent. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence spectroscopy helps to understand protein binding mechanisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quenching measurements reveal the nature of the binding process involved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iodine ion can be used to study the change in accessibility of tryptophan residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic parameters for the binding reaction confirm binding modes.

  3. Interactions of acidic solutions with sediments: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Serne, R.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Krupka, K.M.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology is presented for investigating the chemical interactions of acidic solutions with sediments. The MINTEQ geochemical computer code was used to predict solid-phase reactions that might occur when acidic solutions contact neutral sediments which, in turn, may control the concentrations of certain dissolved components. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis of laboratory samples of sediments that have been contacted with acidic uranium mill tailings solutions suggest gypsum and jarosite precipitated. These same mineralogical changes were identified in sediment samples collected from a drained uranium mill evaporation pond (Lucky Mc mine in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. Geochemical modeling predicted that these same phases and several amorphous solids not identifiable by X-ray diffraction should have precipitated in the contacted sediments. An equilibrium conceptual model consisting of an assemblage of minerals and amorphous solid phases was then developed to represent a sediment column through which uranium mill tailings solutions were percolated. The MINTEQ code was used to predict effluent solution concentrations resulting from the reactions of the tailings solution with the assemblage of solid phases in the conceptual model. The conceptual model successfully predicted the concentrations of several of the macro-constituents (e.g., Ca, SO 4 , Al, Fe, and Mn), but was not successful in modeling the concentrations of trace elements. The lack of success in predicting the observed trace metal concentrations suggests that other mechanisms, such as adsorption, must be included in future models. The geochemical modeling methodology coupled with the laboratory and field studies should be applicable to a variety of waste disposal problems

  4. Microfluidic Experiments Studying Pore Scale Interactions of Microbes and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how physical phenomena, chemical reactions, and microbial behavior interact at the pore-scale is crucial to understanding larger scale trends in groundwater chemistry. Recent studies illustrate the utility of microfluidic devices for illuminating pore-scale physical-biogeochemical processes and their control(s) on the cycling of iron, uranium, and other important elements 1-3. These experimental systems are ideal for examining geochemical reactions mediated by microbes, which include processes governed by complex biological phenomenon (e.g. biofilm formation, etc.)4. We present results of microfluidic experiments using a model metal reducing bacteria and varying pore geometries, exploring the limitations of the microorganisms' ability to access tight pore spaces, and examining coupled biogeochemical-physical controls on the cycling of redox sensitive metals. Experimental results will provide an enhanced understanding of coupled physical-biogeochemical processes transpiring at the pore-scale, and will constrain and compliment continuum models used to predict and describe the subsurface cycling of redox-sensitive elements5. 1. Vrionis, H. A. et al. Microbiological and geochemical heterogeneity in an in situ uranium bioremediation field site. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71, 6308-6318 (2005). 2. Pearce, C. I. et al. Pore-scale characterization of biogeochemical controls on iron and uranium speciation under flow conditions. Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 7992-8000 (2012). 3. Zhang, C., Liu, C. & Shi, Z. Micromodel investigation of transport effect on the kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite. Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 4131-4139 (2013). 4. Ginn, T. R. et al. Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface. Adv. Water Resour. 25, 1017-1042 (2002). 5. Scheibe, T. D. et al. Coupling a genome-scale metabolic model with a reactive transport model to describe in situ uranium bioremediation. Microb. Biotechnol. 2, 274-286 (2009).

  5. Using Neutrons to Study Fluid-Rock Interactions in Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStefano, V. H.; McFarlane, J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Gordon, A.; Hale, R. E.; Hunt, R. D.; Lewis, S. A., Sr.; Littrell, K. C.; Stack, A. G.; Chipera, S.; Perfect, E.; Bilheux, H.; Kolbus, L. M.; Bingham, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of hydrocarbons by hydraulic fracturing depends on complex fluid-rock interactions that we are beginning to understand using neutron imaging and scattering techniques. Organic matter is often thought to comprise the majority of porosity in a shale. In this study, correlations between the type of organic matter embedded in a shale and porosity were investigated experimentally. Selected shale cores from the Eagle Ford and Marcellus formations were subjected to pyrolysis-gas chromatography, Differential Thermal Analysis/Thermogravimetric analysis, and organic solvent extraction with the resulting affluent analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The pore size distribution of the microporosity (~1 nm to 2 µm) in the Eagle Ford shales was measured before and after solvent extraction using small angle neutron scattering. Organics representing mass fractions of between 0.1 to 1 wt.% were removed from the shales and porosity generally increased across the examined microporosity range, particularly at larger pore sizes, approximately 50 nm to 2 μm. This range reflects extraction of accessible organic material, including remaining gas molecules, bitumen, and kerogen derivatives, indicating where the larger amount of organic matter in shale is stored. An increase in porosity at smaller pore sizes, ~1-3 nm, was also present and could be indicative of extraction of organic material stored in the inter-particle spaces of clays. Additionally, a decrease in porosity after extraction for a sample was attributed to swelling of pores with solvent uptake. This occurred in a shale with high clay content and low thermal maturity. The extracted hydrocarbons were primarily paraffinic, although some breakdown of larger aromatic compounds was observed in toluene extractions. The amount of hydrocarbon extracted and an overall increase in porosity appeared to be primarily correlated with the clay percentage in the shale. This study complements fluid transport neutron

  6. Studies of final state interactions via femtoscopy in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Graczykowski, Łukasz Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Femtoscopy is a technique enabling measurements of the space-time characteristics of particle-emitting sources. However, the femtoscopic analysis is also sensitive to the interaction cross-section. In this paper we show the first preliminary measurements of $\\rm K^0_SK^{\\pm}$ correlation functions in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV. These correlations originate from the final-state interactions which proceed through the $a_0(980)$ resonance only and can be employed to constrain its parameters. A similar approach can be applied to baryon pairs to extract the unknown interaction cross-sections for some (anti-)baryon-(anti-)baryon pairs. We show baryon--baryon and baryon--anti-baryon correlation functions of protons and lambdas, as well as discuss shortly the fitting method.

  7. Study of the interaction of cysteamine and cystamine with the dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berleur, F.; Roman, V.; Jaskierowicz, D.; Audet, M.; Fatome, M.

    1984-10-01

    The thermodynamic study of the liposome-radioprotector system brings information on this interaction. The interaction is essentially electrostatic between the phosphate sites and the radioprotector cationic groups and this study could bring further information about the interaction between cysteamine and polyelectrolytic structures, DNA for example, and about the radioprotective properties of this drug [fr

  8. Cross-Racial Interactions during College: A Longitudinal Study of Four Forms of Interracial Interactions among Elite White College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Carson Byrd

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available College and universities present distinct opportunities to interact across racial and ethnic lines that may influence people’s prejudice toward different groups. This study examines the influence of four forms of cross-race interaction on traditional and modern forms of racial prejudice among white college students at 28 of the most selective colleges and universities in the US. This study finds that, although white students’ level of racial prejudice declines over four years, interracial contact during college does not significantly influence their level of prejudice. Moreover, a race-related form of social identity is the most consistent influence on students’ racial prejudice.

  9. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2011-01-01

    The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases an...... and have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells....

  10. Studies of Positron Generation from Ultraintense Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gerald Jackson

    Laser-produced pair jets possess unique characteristics that offer great potential for their use in laboratory-astrophysics experiments to study energetic phenomenon such as relativistic shock accelerations. High-flux, high-energy positron sources may also be used to study relativistic pair plasmas and useful as novel diagnostic tools for high energy density conditions. Copious amounts of positrons are produced with MeV energies from directly irradiating targets with ultraintense lasers where relativistic electrons, accelerated by the laser field, drive positron-electron pair production. Alternatively, laser wakefield accelerated electrons can produce pairs by the same mechanisms inside a secondary converter target. This dissertation describes a series of novel experiments that investigate the characteristics and scaling of pair production from ultraintense lasers, which are designed to establish a robust platform for laboratory-based relativistic pair plasmas. Results include a simple power-law scaling to estimate the effective positron yield for elemental targets for any Maxwellian electron source, typical of direct laser-target interactions. To facilitate these measurements, a solenoid electromagnetic coil was constructed to focus emitted particles, increasing the effective collection angle of the detector and enabling the investigation of pair production from thin targets and low-Z materials. Laser wakefield electron sources were also explored as a compact, high repetition rate platform for the production of high energy pairs with potential applications to the creation of charge-neutral relativistic pair plasmas. Plasma accelerators can produce low-divergence electron beams with energies approaching a GeV at Hz frequencies. It was found that, even for high-energy positrons, energy loss and scattering mechanisms in the target create a fundamental limit to the divergence and energy spectrum of the emitted positrons. The potential future application of laser

  11. High pressure calorimetric studies of gas-polymer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tapan

    Gas sorption in polymeric materials is marked by mass uptake, volume dilation and enthalpy release. The enthalpy of sorption is a measure of polymer-penetrant interactions that complements mass uptake and volume dilation. We have developed a novel technique for direct measurement of enthalpy release, diffusion coefficient of gases and glass transition temperature of polymers in the presence of gas by high pressure microcalorimeter. Polymers used in this study are: bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC), tetramethyl polycarbonate, tetrachloro polycarbonate, tetrabromo polycarbonate, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly-dimethyl siloxane (PDMS). Gas used in the study is COsb2. Sorption is an exothermic phenomena. The heat of sorption in PDMS is constant at -1.5 kcal/mole, up to 300 psig and does not change upon depressurization. In PC, the heat of sorption changes from -3.4 kcal/mole during pressurization to -7.2 kcal/mole during depressurization due to presence of excess free volume regions in the glassy polycarbonate. The magnitude of enthalpy of sorption increases with conditioning pressure. Enthalpy of carbon dioxide sorption in polycarbonate substitutes are measured All samples were preconditioned with COsb2 at 300 psig and 35sp°C for 24 hours. The magnitude of the heat of sorption does not correlate well with polymer free volume, gas solubility or gas partial molar volume. The results suggest that free volume regions are not uniformly accessible. The transient signal from enthalpy of sorption experiment is used to extract diffusion coefficient. The diffusivities appear to be independent of sorbed gas concentration due to thermal inertia of the instrument although a increasing trend is expected. Glass transition temperature of polymers in the presence of high pressure COsb2 is measured. Tsbg measurements of the COsb2 - Poly(methyl methacrylate) system as a function g of gas phase pressure were made. Foaming appears to interfere with Tsbg measurement at the highest gas

  12. Ultrasonic study of molecular interaction in binary liquid mixtures at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The variation of these parameters with composition of the mixture helps us in understanding the nature and extent of interaction between unlike molecules in the mixtures. Further, theoretical values of ultrasonic speed were evaluated using theories and empirical relations. The relative merits of these theories and relations ...

  13. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Ham, Kenneth D.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Species interactions research and monitoring was initiated in 1989 to investigate ecological interactions among fish in response to proposed supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This is the seventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and pre-supplementation monitoring of fishes in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the ecology and demographics of non-target taxa (NTT) and target taxon, and develop methods to monitor interactions and supplementation success. Major topics of this report are associated with monitoring potential impacts to support adaptive management of NTT and baseline monitoring of fish predation indices on spring chinook salmon smolts. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter. This annual report summarizes data collected primarily by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 1998 in the Yakima basin, however these data were compared to data from previous years to identify preliminary trends and patterns

  14. Interacting Winds in Eclipsing Symbiotic Systems – The Case Study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The most adopted physical modeling for many symbiotic stars is that of interacting binaries: a cool giant, a hot .... envelopes the area behind the hot component; and if mw > 1, the hot wind predom- inates the cool wind. ...... Tomov, N., Tomova, M. 2001, Astrophysics and Space Science, 278, 311. Torbett, M. V., Campbell, B.

  15. Viscometric and thermodynamic studies of interactions in ternary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    making and structure-breaking capacities of alkali metal halides in pure aqueous solutions and in the pre- sence of sucrose have been ascertained from temperature dependence of φv. 0. Keywords. Ternary solutions; interactions of ionic and nonionic solutes; partial molar volumes; sucrose- alkali metal halide solutions. 1.

  16. Consumer demand with social interactions: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetevent, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    How do social interactions affect consumer demand? In this paper, I investigate the effects that different social structures have on social welfare and on the budget shares of various categories of goods. A society is modeled in which households' demand for goods is described by a Linear Expenditure

  17. Using Threshold Autoregressive Models to Study Dyadic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaker, Ellen L.; Zhang, Zhiyong; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2009-01-01

    Considering a dyad as a dynamic system whose current state depends on its past state has allowed researchers to investigate whether and how partners influence each other. Some researchers have also focused on how differences between dyads in their interaction patterns are related to other differences between them. A promising approach in this area…

  18. Studies on Molecular Interaction in Ternary Liquid Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Uvarani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity for the ternary liquid mixtures of cyclohexanone with 1-propanol and 1-butanol in carbon tetrachloride were measured at 303 K. The acoustical parameters and their excess values were calculated. The trends in the variation of these excess parameters were used to discuss the nature and strength of the interactions present between the component molecules.

  19. Design And Implementation Of An Interactive Website; A Case Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An interactive website has been designed for the Department of Physics, University of Uyo, using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) involving structuring, coding, and testing. This will enable the Department to gather, process, store and disseminate an up- to- date information to the whole world on the academic ...

  20. Invitro Studies on the Mechanism of Cellular Interactions of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The displaced 65Zn appeared to bind mainly to cellular components of molecular weight 60,000 – 10,000 Daltons. The mechanism of interactions between zinc and other trace elements such as copper and iron is partly due to their binding to common intracellular proteins within the cytoplasm of the mucosa cells of the ...

  1. Collagen–curcumin interaction – A physico-chemical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Curcumin is a widely used therapeutic agent with a wide spectrum of biological and physio- logical applications like wound healing and interacts with the skin protein, collagen. This work reports the effect of curcumin on various physico-chemical properties of collagen. The results suggest that signi- ficant changes ...

  2. Interaction between Protein, Phytate, and Microbial Phytase. In Vitro Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kies, A.K.; Jonge, de L.H.; Kemme, P.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between protein and phytate was investigated in vitro using proteins extracted from five common feedstuffs and from casein. The appearance of naturally present soluble protein-phytate complexes in the feedstuffs, the formation of complexes at different pHs, and the degradation of

  3. In vitro study of the interaction between some fluoroquinolones and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cup diffusion method (CD) was used to evaluate the in vitro interaction of some fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, pefloxacin and levofloxacin) with extracts of Kola nitida seed (KNS) against a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drugs was determined separately and in ...

  4. Drug interaction studies of Ximenia americana and Pavetta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The therapeutic efficacy of single or multicomponent herbs is thought to reside in synergistic interactions between the bioactive constituents. The methanol extracts of X. americana and P. crassipes were initially screened against Gram positive and negative organisms as well as against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ...

  5. Study of interaction between antiobesity and hypolipidemic drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PURPOSE: To explore the interaction between antiobesity drug, topiramate, and hypolipidemic drug, atorvastatin, in rats. METHODS: Obesity was induced in Wistar albino rats by administering cafeteria diet (CD) for 40 days and divided into 5 groups. While one group served as control, each other group received either ...

  6. Studies of thermally assisted interactions of polysulphide polymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-04-06

    Apr 6, 2018 ... The weight loss found between temperatures 313 and 493 K, 7.893%, may be due to the loss of water molecule associated with ILs. [Bmim][Br]. The structural interactions between [Bmim][Br] and polysulphide polymer provide extra stability to the poly- sulphide polymer as seen in the thermogram (figure 4b).

  7. Overview of OWI waste/rock interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenks, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of office of waste isolation (OWI) programs which fall within the waste/rock categories. Discussions are included on salt repository design, thermal powers and radiation intensities, maximum temperatures and gamma doses, salt temperatures around high level waste cannisters, projects concerned with radiation and thermal effects, projects concerned with long term interactions, and waste isolation safety assessment tasks

  8. A systematic study of the strong interaction with PANDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messchendorp, J. G.; Hosaka, A; Khemchandani, K; Nagahiro, H; Nawa, K

    2011-01-01

    The theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) reproduces the strong interaction at distances much shorter than the size of the nucleon. At larger distance scales, the generation of hadron masses and confinement cannot yet be derived from first principles on basis of QCD. The PANDA experiment at FAIR

  9. Studying protein-protein interactions using peptide arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katz, C.; Levy-Beladev, L.; Rotem-Bamberger, S.; Rito, T.; Rudiger, S.G.D.; Friedler, A.

    2010-01-01

    Screening of arrays and libraries of compounds is well-established as a high-throughput method for detecting and analyzing interactions in both biological and chemical systems. Arrays and libraries can be composed from various types of molecules, ranging from small organic compounds to DNA, proteins

  10. Synthesis and structure of 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil and its Ni(II) complex: Topological insights and investigation for noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Diptanu; Roy, Subhadip; Purkayastha, Atanu; Bauzá, Antonio; Choudhury, Rupasree; Ganguly, Rakesh; Frontera, Antonio; Misra, Tarun Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The azo-derivative, 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil (HL) containing 6-aminouracil (a biomolecule) and sulfonamide functionality (commonly found in sulfa-drugs), and its Ni(II) complex, NiIIL2 were synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the ligand (HL) consists of an E conformation about the azo-linkage with a nearly planar geometry and the complex possesses distorted square planar geometry. The H-bonded underlying networks of HL and NiIIL2 were topologically classified revealing distinct topological types, namely tts and hxl, respectively. Moreover, topology of molecular packings in HL and NiIIL2 has also been discussed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, at the M06-2X/def2TZVP level of theory, are employed to characterize a great variety of non-covalent interactions that explicitly show the importance of antiparallel stacking interactions established by π--π+ interactions and H-bonds in the self-assembled dimmers in HL and lp-π/C-H⋯π interactions in NiIIL2. The results of NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies evidence that the ligand exists in hydrazone-imine-keto (B) tautomeric form in solution. The ligand absorption bands consist of the overlapping bands of π→π* and n→π* transitions. The complex experiences electronic transitions that consist of basically ILCT in character with some sort of participation of the atomic d-orbitals of the nickel. The pKa value of the ligand is found to be 4.09.

  11. Heat-induced whey protein gels: protein-protein interactions and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havea, Palatasa; Watkinson, Philip; Kuhn-Sherlock, Barbara

    2009-02-25

    Heat-induced gelation (80 degrees C for 30 min or 85 degrees C for 60 min) of whey protein concentrate (WPC) solutions was studied using small deformation dynamic rheology, small and large deformation compression, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The WPC solutions (15% w/w, pH 6.9) were prepared by dispersing WPC powder in water (control), 1% (w/w) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) solution at a protein/NEM molar ratio of 1:1 or in 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) solution. PAGE analyses showed that the heat treatment of control solutions contained both disulfide and non-covalent linkages between denatured protein molecules. Only disulfide linkages were formed in heated SDS-WPC solutions, whereas only non-covalent linkages were formed in DTT-WPC and NEM-WPC solutions during heating. In heated NEM-WPC solutions, the pre-existing disulfide linkages remained unaltered. Small deformation rheology measurements showed that the storage modulus (G') values, compared with those of the control WPC gels (approximately 14000 Pa), were 3 times less for the SDS-WPC gels (approximately 4000 Pa), double for the NEM-WPC gels (approximately 24000 Pa), and even higher for the DTT-WPC gels (approximately 30000 Pa). Compression tests suggested that the rubberiness (fracture strain) of the WPC gels increased as the degree of disulfide linkages within the gels increased, whereas the stiffness (modulus) of the gels increased as the degree of non-covalent associations among the denatured protein molecules increased.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic, computational (DFT/B3LYP), AChE inhibition and antioxidant studies of imidazole derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faheem; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Alam, Mahboob; Azaz, Shaista; Parveen, Mehtab; Park, Soonheum; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2018-01-01

    The present study reports the synthesis and evaluation of biological properties of 3a,8a-dihydroxy-8-oxo-1,3,3a,8a-tetrahydroindeno[1,2-d]imidazol-2(1H)-iminium chloride (3). The structure was confirmed by the FTIR, NMR, MS, CHN microanalysis and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed at B3LYP-D3/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory to study the molecular geometry, IR, (1H and 13C) NMR, UV/Vis spectra and other molecular parameters of the asymmetric unit of crystal of imidazole compound (3). An empirical dispersion correction to hybrid functional (B3LYP-D3) has been incorporated in the present calculations due to presence of non-covalent interaction, Cl⋯H-O, in the present compound. The remarkable agreement has been observed between theoretical data and those measured experimentally. Moreover, the Hirshfeld analysis was carried out to ascertain the secondary interactions and associated 2D fingerprint plots. The synthesized imidazole derivative showed promising antioxidant property and inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Molecular docking was also performed in order to explain in silico antioxidant studies and to ascertain the probable binding mode of compound with the amino acid residues of protein.

  13. Study of the Λ(1116 interaction in cold nuclear matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Oliver

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of Λ hyperons with baryonic nuclear matter at saturation density is expected to be attractive. The interaction strength was extracted from hypernuclei data. A different approach to obtain the potential depth of the Λ mean-field potential is to compare experimental data with transport simulations. We analyze experimental data of Λ hyperons measured with the HADES detector in p+93Nb reactions with a kinetic beam energy of 3.5 GeV carried by the proton. The high statistic of measured Λ hyperons allows us to perform a double differential analysis in Lorentz-invariant observables of transverse momentum and rapidity. We present the analysis method and a comparison with simulations.

  14. A Meta-study of musicians' non-verbal interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    Music can be seen as a social skilled practice, since the creation of good music is the result of a group effort. According to current literature, communication through non-verbal cues is an important factor in securing a good performance, since it allows musicians to correct each other without...... the music should be played and the intention to communicate through non-verbal interaction, which allows them to achieve their desire and improve the performance on-the-fly. The BDI model has proven useful in synthesising information and it is believed that this scientific-rational model will bring benefits...... interruptions. Hence, despite the fact that the skill to engage in a non-verbal interaction is described as tacit knowledge, it is fundamental for both musicians and teachers (Davidson and Good 2002). Typical observed non-verbal cues are for example: physical gestures, modulations of sound, steady eye contact...

  15. 4-dimensional studies of fluid-rock interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Macente, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Successful management of hydrocarbon reservoirs, geothermal energy extraction sites, radioactive waste and CO2 storage sites depends on a detailed knowledge of fluid transport properties, porosity and permeability. Amongst deformation processes, fluid-rock interaction plays an important role in controlling the petrophysical properties of a rock. The presence of fluids in the rocks induce chemical and physical changes in compositions and texture, affecting porosity and permeabil...

  16. Spectrophotometric and Voltammetric Studies on the Interaction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Crystal violet which is a cationic dye (molecular structure shown in Fig. 1) has been used for the detection of metal ions. Zhang et al. have applied crystal violet for the detection of nucleic acids by reso- nance light-scattering technique based on its interaction with. DNA.16 In pH 3.0 Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffer solutions, the.

  17. Theoretical studies in weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions. Attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, S.

    1999-01-01

    The project covered a wide area of current research in theoretical high-energy physics. This included Standard Model (SM) as well as physics beyond the Standard Model. Specific topics included supersymmetry (SUSY), perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD), a new weak interaction for the third family (called topflavor), neutrino masses and mixings, topcolor model, Pade approximation, and its application to perturbative QCD and other physical processes

  18. Computational Study of Colloidal Droplet Interactions with Three Dimensional Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-18

    create a novel multiphysics model that enables the prediction of colloidal droplet interactions with complex porous structures; (b) advance the...diameter and penetration depth. (2) A model for the transport and deposition of nanoparticles in the porous matrix during droplet sorption was...process. The main research goals of this proposal are to (a) create a novel multiphysics model that enables the prediction of colloidal droplet

  19. An Experimental Study of Embodied Interaction and Human Perception of Social Presence for Interactive Robots in Public Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herath, Damith; Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Vlachos, Evgenios

    2018-01-01

    in a museum context. Using an Experience Design framework, we tested the robot in three different conditions to better understand which factors contribute to the perception of robots as social. The experiment also outlines best practices for conducting human-robot interaction research in museum exhibitions......The human perception of cognitive robots as social depends on many factors, including those that do not necessarily pertain to a robot’s cognitive functioning. Experience Design offers a useful framework for evaluating when participants interact with robots as products or tools and when they regard...... them as social actors. This study describes a between-participants experiment conducted at a science museum, where visitors were invited to play a game of noughts and crosses with a Baxter robot. The goal is to foster meaningful interactions that promote engagement between the human and robot...

  20. A Systematic Study of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Prajal; Costa, Luís.; Rybski, Diego; Lucht, Wolfgang; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2017-11-01

    Sustainable development goals (SDGs) have set the 2030 agenda to transform our world by tackling multiple challenges humankind is facing to ensure well-being, economic prosperity, and environmental protection. In contrast to conventional development agendas focusing on a restricted set of dimensions, the SDGs provide a holistic and multidimensional view on development. Hence, interactions among the SDGs may cause diverging results. To analyze the SDG interactions we systematize the identification of synergies and trade-offs using official SDG indicator data for 227 countries. A significant positive correlation between a pair of SDG indicators is classified as a synergy while a significant negative correlation is classified as a trade-off. We rank synergies and trade-offs between SDGs pairs on global and country scales in order to identify the most frequent SDG interactions. For a given SDG, positive correlations between indicator pairs were found to outweigh the negative ones in most countries. Among SDGs the positive and negative correlations between indicator pairs allowed for the identification of particular global patterns. SDG 1 (No poverty) has synergetic relationship with most of the other goals, whereas SDG 12 (Responsible consumption and production) is the goal most commonly associated with trade-offs. The attainment of the SDG agenda will greatly depend on whether the identified synergies among the goals can be leveraged. In addition, the highlighted trade-offs, which constitute obstacles in achieving the SDGs, need to be negotiated and made structurally nonobstructive by deeper changes in the current strategies.

  1. Utility of Interactional Strategies in the Study of Formal Operations Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    This paper argues in favor of using interactional strategies in the study of formal operations reasoning. Interactional designs allow a convergent approach to specifying processes underlying the interaction of variables. In contrast, current methodologies contain two inherent disadvantages: they have limited utility in specifying the processes…

  2. Theoretical study on molecular packing and electronic structure of bi-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    The molecular aggregation structure of 5,5′-bis(naphthalen-2-yl)-2,2′-bi(1,3,4-oxadiazole) (BOXD-NP) was studied by computing the intermolecular interaction potential energy surface (PES) at density functional theory level based on a dimer model. All B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and M062x functionals can yield a reliable isolated molecular geometry. The conformation of BOXD-NP obtained with all methods is perfectly planar, indicating good conjugation ability between oxadiazole and naphthalene rings. The vibrational frequencies of BOXD-NP were also calculated using the B3LYP/6-311+G∗∗ method, which showed great consistency with the experimental observations and makes the assignments of the IR spectra more solid. It was revealed that the lowest excited state of BOXD-NP should be assigned as a highly allowed π-π∗ state by TD-DFT calculation. Considering the non-covalent interactions in molecular aggregates, the M062x functional was applied in the construction of the PES. Besides the packing structure found in the crystals, PES also predicted several stable structures, indicating that PES has great ability in guiding molecular self-assembly. Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) analysis on these energy-minimum molecular stacking structures revealed that London dispersion forces are the strongest attractive component in the binding. This journal is

  3. Nurse Interaction With Clients In Communication Therapeutic Study Analysis Of Symbolic Interactionism Hospital South Sulawesi

    OpenAIRE

    Hj.Indirawaty; Syamsuddin AB

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to describe briefly on the application of social interaction which made nurses to clients while performing therapeutic communication at the Hospital of South Sulawesi with frame symbolic interactionism. Result achieved against the system carried nurse interaction with clients who patterned on therapeutic communication. At the stage of pre-interaction system is applied such as before the nurse interacts with the client well in advance to prepare the way of dressing re...

  4. Island morphology : morphology's interactions in the study of stem patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Camilleri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the notion of morphological complexity, with a focus on stem patterns. Stem patterns, creating stem-based inflectional classes, are morphological constructs which come about as a result of observing the patterns rendered by the stem-form alternations (or stem splits (Baerman/Corbett forthcoming, which one extracts after the formation of word-forms within paradigms. Stem-based inflectional class formation constitutes one aspect in the analysis of non-canonical paradigms, which also include affix-based inflectional classes, syncretism, defectiveness, and overabundance Corbett 2005, 2007, 2009; Baerman, Brown and Corbett 2005; Thornton 2010. While these non-canonical instances are in themselves interesting to observe, it is even more intriguing to be able to see what interactions can arise, which at times do not seem to be the result of something exterior to morphology proper. Through data taken from Maltese verbal paradigms the phenomenon of stem-based inflectional classes will be explored, which will exhibit how internal to the paradigm there exists a complex system in itself, which is based on the distinct organisation of different conflated morphosyntactic features which come about via syncretism. These patterns should illustrate a paradigm-internal morphological phenomenon that is irrelevant to the syntax, where while morphology borders with it, there need not be any interaction at this interface. At the same time, it will also be shown how at times, the border with phonology is blurred, where while the phonology may often try to build bridges that interface with the morphological island, the island's internal forces that drive its autonomy may deem to be more superior than the phonology's strive to impose its interacting requirements, which render some interesting morphophonological mismatches as a result.

  5. Photovoltaic concentrator pointing dynamics and plasma interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, T. G.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this experiment are to use the Space Technology Experiments Platform (STEP) system to demonstrate the viability of concentrator photovoltaic arrays by: (1) configuring a deployable mast on the STEP pallet with concentrator mass models and some active photovoltaic modules; (2) measuring the array pointing dynamics under normal rotation as well as disturbance conditions; (3) performing an array plasma interaction experiment to determine the steady-state plasma losses under various voltage conditions; and (4) providing active distributed control of the support truss to determine the improvement in dynamic response. Experiment approach and test control and instrumentation are described.

  6. Influence of polyphenol-plasma protein interaction on the antioxidant properties of polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dengfeng; Xie, Aize

    2013-05-01

    Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants. Polyphenols are known to non-covalent interact with plasma proteins in blood through hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. It was found that the effect of polyphenol-plasma protein interaction (PpPI) on the bioavailability of polyphenols is not equivocal. Because the conclusion of individual reports are contradictory to each other; therefore, it is very difficult to give a univocal comment on the influence of PpPI on antioxidant property of polyphenols. The influence of PpPI on the antioxidant activity of polyphenols is decided by the antioxidant assay, the structure characteristics of polyphenols, as well as the proteins. This mini review mainly focused on the influence of PpPI on the antioxidant properties of polyphenols.

  7. Progress at the WITCH experiment towards weak interaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Tandecki, Michaël

    A measurement of the $\\beta$–ν angular correlation in nuclear $\\beta$- decay is a good probe to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, independent of assumptions like parity, charge and time reversal violation. The WITCH (Weak Interaction Trap for Charged Particles) experiment will measure this correlation with the aim of further constraining the possible existence of scalar currents in the weak interaction or find a positive indication. The setup is located at ISOLDE/CERN and consists of a double Penning trap system combined with a retardation spectrometer to probe the energy of the recoil ions from the $\\beta$- decay. The shape of the recoil ion energy spectrum allows to determine the $\\beta$–ν angular correlation coefficient, $a$. Past experiments have allowed to measure this parameter with a precision of 0.5–1 %. The aim of the WITCH experiment is to measure $a$ with a precision of about 0.5 %.\\\\ A first step towards this goal has already been taken in 2006 with the measurement of a recoil ...

  8. Spectral studies of Lanthanide interactions with membrane surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karukstis, K.K.; Kao, M.Y.; Savin, D.A.; Bittker, R.A.; Kaphengst, K.J.; Emetarom, C.M.; Naito, N.R.; Takamoto, D.Y. [Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, CA (United States)

    1995-03-23

    We have monitored the interactions of the series of trivalent lanthanide cations with the thylakoid membrane surface of spinach chloroplasts using two complementary spectral techniques. Measurements of the fluorescence emission of the extrinsic probe 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) and the absorbance of the intrinsic chromophore chlorophyll provide two sensitive means of characterizing the dependence of the cation-membrane interaction on the nature of the cation. In these systems, added lanthanide cations adsorb onto the membrane surface to neutralize exposed segments of membrane-embedded protein complexes. The lanthanide-induced charge neutralization increases the proximity of added TNS anion to the membrane surface as evidenced by variations in the TNS fluorescence level and wavelength of maximum emission. Our results reveal a strong dependence of TNS fluorescence parameters on both lanthanide size and total orbital angular momentum L value. Lanthanides with greater charge density (small size and/or low L value) enhance the TNS fluorescence level to a greater extent. A possible origin for the lanthanide-dependent TNS fluorescence levels is suggested in terms of a heterogeneity in the number and type of TNS binding sites. The data are consistent with the proposal that larger lanthanides with smaller enthalpies of hydration induce more significant membrane appression. 59 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Seismic soil structure interaction: analysis and centrifuge model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, W.D.L.; Ledbetter, R.H.; Beratan, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    A method for non-linear dynamic effective stress analysis is introduced which is applicable to soil-structure interaction problems. Full interaction including slip between structure and foundation is taken into account and the major factors are included which must be considered when computing dynamic soil response. An experimental investigation was conducted using simulated earthquake tests on centrifuged geotechnical models in order to obtain prototype response data of foundation soils carrying both surface and embedded structures and to validate the dynamic effective stress analysis. Horizontal and vertical accelerations were measured at various points on structures and in the sand foundation. Seismically-induced pore water pressure changes were also measured at various locations in the foundation. Computer plots of the data were obtained while the centrifuge was in flight and representative samples are presented. The results show clearly the pronounced effect that increasing pore water pressures have on dynamic response. It is demonstrated that a coherent picture of dynamic response of soil-structure systems is provided by dynamic effective stress non-linear analysis. Based on preliminary results, it appears that the pore water pressure effects can be predicted

  10. Automated interactive video playback for studies of animal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkowski, Trisha; Yan, Wei; Gray, Aaron M; Cui, Rongfeng; Verzijden, Machteld N; Rosenthal, Gil G

    2011-02-09

    Video playback is a widely-used technique for the controlled manipulation and presentation of visual signals in animal communication. In particular, parameter-based computer animation offers the opportunity to independently manipulate any number of behavioral, morphological, or spectral characteristics in the context of realistic, moving images of animals on screen. A major limitation of conventional playback, however, is that the visual stimulus lacks the ability to interact with the live animal. Borrowing from video-game technology, we have created an automated, interactive system for video playback that controls animations in response to real-time signals from a video tracking system. We demonstrated this method by conducting mate-choice trials on female swordtail fish, Xiphophorus birchmanni. Females were given a simultaneous choice between a courting male conspecific and a courting male heterospecific (X. malinche) on opposite sides of an aquarium. The virtual male stimulus was programmed to track the horizontal position of the female, as courting males do in the wild. Mate-choice trials on wild-caught X. birchmanni females were used to validate the prototype's ability to effectively generate a realistic visual stimulus.

  11. Seismic soil-structure interaction: Analysis and centrifuge model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, W.D.L.; Ledbetter, R.H.; Beratan, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for nonlinear dynamic effective stress analysis applicable to soil-structure interaction problems is introduced. Full interaction including slip between structure and foundation is taken into account and the major factors that must be considered when computing dynamic soil response are included. An experimental investigation using simulated earthquake tests on centrifuged geotechnical models was conducted to obtain prototype response data of foundation soils carrying both surface and embedded structures and to validate the dynamic effective stress analysis. The centrifuge tests were conducted in the Geotechnical Centrifuge at Cambridge University, England. Horizontal and vertical accelerations were measured at various points on structures and in the sand foundation. Seismically induced pore water pressure changes were also measured at various locations in the foundation. Computer plots of the data were obtained while the centrifuge was in flight and representative samples are presented. The results clearly show the pronounced effect of increasing pore water pressures on dynamic response. It is demonstrated that a coherent picture of dynamic response of soil-structure systems is provided by dynamic effective stress nonlinear analysis. On the basis of preliminary results, it appears that the effects of pore water pressure can be predicted. (orig.)

  12. A study on the application of voice interaction in automotive human machine interface experience design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Xiemin

    2018-04-01

    This paper, firstly, introduces the application trend of the integration of multi-channel interactions in automotive HMI ((Human Machine Interface) from complex information models faced by existing automotive HMI and describes various interaction modes. By comparing voice interaction and touch screen, gestures and other interaction modes, the potential and feasibility of voice interaction in automotive HMI experience design are concluded. Then, the related theories of voice interaction, identification technologies, human beings' cognitive models of voices and voice design methods are further explored. And the research priority of this paper is proposed, i.e. how to design voice interaction to create more humane task-oriented dialogue scenarios to enhance interactive experiences of automotive HMI. The specific scenarios in driving behaviors suitable for the use of voice interaction are studied and classified, and the usability principles and key elements for automotive HMI voice design are proposed according to the scenario features. Then, through the user participatory usability testing experiment, the dialogue processes of voice interaction in automotive HMI are defined. The logics and grammars in voice interaction are classified according to the experimental results, and the mental models in the interaction processes are analyzed. At last, the voice interaction design method to create the humane task-oriented dialogue scenarios in the driving environment is proposed.

  13. Treatment of system dependencies and human interactions in PRA studies: a review and sensitivity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, D.D.; Joksimovich, V.; Worledge, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute sponsored the review and comparison of five PRA studies: Arkansas Nuclear One - Unit 1, Big Rock Point, Grand Gulf, Limerick, and Zion - Unit 1. The review has been conducted in two phases. The Phase I review may be characterized as a qualitative look into many aspects of a PRA study. The Phase II review was performed to quantify the extent that differences in analytical techniques or key assumptions in these areas affect the differences in study results. In each of the PRA studies reviewed, the general descriptions of analytical approaches and descriptions of the analyses of event tree, fault tree and human interaction analyses that affected the dominant core damage sequences were reviewed. When these descriptions aroused interest because of seeming inconsistencies within the study or with other studies, they were pursued in some depth. The approaches or assumptions were contrasted to similar elements from other studies, and sensitivity analyses were performed in many cases to test the significance of results to the analytical models or assumptions. Inferences were drawn from the results regarding significance of the item to plant-specific results and, where possible, were generalized to other PRAs. This paper describes the results of the review of system dependencies and human interactions

  14. Gene-based testing of interactions in association studies of quantitative traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    Full Text Available Various methods have been developed for identifying gene-gene interactions in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, most methods focus on individual markers as the testing unit, and the large number of such tests drastically erodes statistical power. In this study, we propose novel interaction tests of quantitative traits that are gene-based and that confer advantage in both statistical power and biological interpretation. The framework of gene-based gene-gene interaction (GGG tests combine marker-based interaction tests between all pairs of markers in two genes to produce a gene-level test for interaction between the two. The tests are based on an analytical formula we derive for the correlation between marker-based interaction tests due to linkage disequilibrium. We propose four GGG tests that extend the following P value combining methods: minimum P value, extended Simes procedure, truncated tail strength, and truncated P value product. Extensive simulations point to correct type I error rates of all tests and show that the two truncated tests are more powerful than the other tests in cases of markers involved in the underlying interaction not being directly genotyped and in cases of multiple underlying interactions. We applied our tests to pairs of genes that exhibit a protein-protein interaction to test for gene-level interactions underlying lipid levels using genotype data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. We identified five novel interactions that are not evident from marker-based interaction testing and successfully replicated one of these interactions, between SMAD3 and NEDD9, in an independent sample from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. We conclude that our GGG tests show improved power to identify gene-level interactions in existing, as well as emerging, association studies.

  15. Theorizing Language and Discourse for the Interactional Study of Identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobov, Neill

    2017-03-01

    The following commentary critically reflects on the pragmatic and semiotic approach to language and identity articulated by Tapia, Rojas, and Picado (Culture & Psychology, Tapia et al. 2017). The following questions are central: 1) What theoretical position is (tacitly) being articulated regarding the nature of language and discourse? Although the authors admit that an explicit theorization of language and discourse is not their focus, the absence of a clear theoretical position is conspicuously problematic. And 2) is there an unintended cognitivism present in the way the authors formulate the relationship between language/discourse and identity? After discussing these questions, select parts of a radical interactional approach, grounded in discursive positioning, will be presented as an amendment to the present work, insofar as it attempts to both articulate a progressive theorization of language and discourse and avoid an unintended slide into cognitivism.

  16. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Han Jae; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1999-01-01

    The doppler-free saturation spectroscopy of Na atoms has been performed and the proper conditions for the frequency stabilization of narrow band cw dye lasers, which was used as laser sources for the laser cooling and trapping, have been obtained as follows : a) optimum pressure of a Na vapor cell: 10 mTorr b) intensity of a pump laser : a few {mu}W c) intensity of a probe laser : 1/10 of that of a pump laser. EIT (Electromagnetically Induced Transparency) generated by coherent laser-atom interactions was investigated experimentally and analyzed theoretically. The absorption of a probe laser could be remarkably reduced more than 90 % due to EIT effect. The EIT spectrum as narrow as 6 MHz which is even narrower than the natural linewidth of an excited state could be obtained under proper conditions.

  17. Ultrasonic Studies of Molecular Interactions in Organic Binary Liquid Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thirumaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity have been measured for the mixtures of 1-alkanols such as 1-propanol and 1-butanol with N-N dimethylformamide (DMF at 303 K. The experimental data have been used to calculate the acoustical parameters namely adiabatic compressibility (β, free length (Lf, free volume (Vf and internal pressure (πi. The excess values of the above parameters are also evaluated and discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the mixtures. It is obvious that there is a formation of hydrogen bonding between DMF and 1-alkanols. Further, the addition of DMF causes dissociation of hydrogen bonded structure of 1-alkanols. The evaluated excess values confirm that the molecular association is more pronounced in system-II comparing to the system-I.

  18. Light and neutron scattering study of strongly interacting ionic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiorgio, V.; Corti, M.; Piazza, R.

    1989-01-01

    Dilute solutions of ionic micelles formed by biological glycolipids (gangliosides) have been investigated at various ionic strengths by static and dynamic light scaterring and by small-angle neutron scattering. The size and shape of the micelle is not appreciably affected by the added salt concentration in the range 0-100 mM NaCL. From the measured intensity of scattered light we derive the electric charge Z of the micelle by fitting the data to a theoretical calculation which uses a screened Coulomb potential for the intermicellar interaction, and the hypernetted chain approximation for the calculation of the radial distribution function. The correlation function derived from dynamic light scattering shows the long time contribution typical of concentrated polydisperse systems (author). 15 refs.; 6 figs

  19. Contribution to the study of alpha-alpha interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darriulai, P.

    1965-03-01

    Two sets of measurements of the α-α elastic scattering differential cross section are presented. The first set - angular distributions from 50 up to 120 MeV - shows two new resonances, 6 + and 8 + , at 25 and 57 MeV. Complex phase shifts are extracted from the data and a phenomenological potential is given. A description of the 3 α-particle 0 + states in C 12 is made with this interaction potential. The second set - excitation curves between 20 and 50 MeV - allows investigation of the Be 8 level structure within this energy range - It identifies the 16.6 and 16.9 MeV states as 2 + , but the rise of inelastic processes at higher energies makes further identification of spins and parities more and more difficult. (author) [fr

  20. Magnetic properties in kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, 63, 46000 Safi (Morocco); Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Jabar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic properties of the kagomé lattice have been studied with Ruderman–Kittel–Kasuya–Yosida (RKKY) exchange interactions in a spin-7/2 Ising model using Monte Carlo simulations. The RKKY interaction between the two magnetic layers is considered for different distances. The magnetizations and magnetic susceptibilities of this lattice are given for different triquadratic interactions around each triangular face. The critical temperature is obtained for a fixed size. The magnetic hysteresis cycle of kagomé lattice with RKKY interactions is obtained for different temperatures and for different crystal field with a fixed size of nonmagnetic layer. - Highlights: • We study the RKKY interaction in kagomé lattice using the Monte Carlo simulations. • The transition temperature is obtained for kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction. • The coercive field is obtained for kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction.

  1. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  2. Prognostic significance of delayed intraventricular haemorrhage in the INTERACT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moullaali, Tom J; Sato, Shoichiro; Wang, Xia; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Arima, Hisatomi; Carcel, Cheryl; Chen, Guofang; Robinson, Thompson; Heeley, Emma; Chan, Edward; Delcourt, Candice; Stapf, Christian; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Lindley, Richard I; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S

    2017-01-01

    Intraventricular extension of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) predicts poor outcome, but the significance of delayed intraventricular haemorrhage (dIVH) is less well defined. We determined the prognostic significance of dIVH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trials (INTERACT 1 and 2). Pooled analyses of the INTERACT CT substudies-international, multicentre, prospective, open, blinded end point, randomised controlled trials of patients with acute spontaneous ICH and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP)-randomly assigned to intensive (<140 mm Hg) or guideline-based (<180 mm Hg) SBP management. Participants had blinded central analyses of baseline and 24 h CTs, with dIVH defined as new intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) on the latter scan. Outcomes of death and major disability were defined by modified Rankin Scale scores at 90 days. There were 349 (27%) of 1310 patients with baseline IVH, and 107 (11%) of 961 initially IVH-free patients who developed dIVH. Significant associations of dIVH were prior warfarin anticoagulation, high (≥15) baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, larger (≥15 mL) ICH volume, greater ICH growth and higher achieved SBP over 24 h. Compared with those who were IVH-free, dIVH had greater odds of 90-day death or major disability versus initial IVH (adjusted ORs 2.84 (95% CI 1.52 to 5.28) and 1.87 (1.36 to 2.56), respectively (p trend <0.0001)). Although linked to factors determining greater ICH growth including poor SBP control, dIVH is independently associated with poor outcome in acute small to moderate-size ICH. NCT00226096 and NCT00716079. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danni Zheng

    Full Text Available Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2 participants on an hourly timescale.INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150-220 mmHg assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs and 95% CI.Low ambient temperature (≤10°C was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99-1.91 for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31-2.81 for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89-5.19 for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30-14.42 for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses.Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079.

  4. In vitro drug interaction of levocetirizine and diclofenac: Theoretical and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Dena, Ahmed S; Abdel Gaber, Sara A

    2017-06-15

    Levocetirizine dihydrochloride is known to interact with some anti-inflammatory drugs. We report here a comprehensive integrated theoretical and experimental study for the in vitro drug interaction between levocetirizine dihydrochloride (LEV) and diclofenac sodium (DIC). The interaction of the two drugs was confirmed by the molecular ion peak obtained from the mass spectrum of the product. Moreover, FTIR and 1 HNMR spectra of the individual drugs and their interaction product were inspected to allocate the possible sites of interaction. In addition, quantum mechanical DFT calculations were performed to search for the interaction sites and to verify the types of interactions deduced from the spectroscopic studies such as charge-transfer and non-bonding π-π interactions. It was found that the studied drugs interact with each other in aqueous solution via four types of interactions, namely, ion-pair formation, three weak hydrogen bonds, non-bonding π-π interactions and charge-transfer from DIC to LEV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Photon interaction studies using 241Am γ-rays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rays from a 241Am source. These include attenuation studies as well as photoelectric absorption studies in various samples. The attenuation studies have been made using leaf and wood samples, samples like sand, sugar etc., which ...

  6. Hydrodynamic interaction between two vesicles in a linear shear flow: asymptotic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, P Y; Danker, G; Misbah, C

    2012-07-01

    Interactions between two vesicles in an imposed linear shear flow are studied theoretically, in the limit of almost spherical vesicles, with a large intervesicle distance, in a strong flow, with a large inner to outer viscosity ratio. This allows to derive a system of ordinary equations describing the dynamics of the two vesicles. We provide an analytic expression for the interaction law. We find that when the vesicles are in the same shear plane, the hydrodynamic interaction leads to a repulsion. When they are not, the interaction may turn into attraction instead. The interaction law is discussed and analyzed as a function of relevant parameters.

  7. Calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbanov, A.R.; Sharipov, D.Sh.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid. The calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid was carried out in order to determine the thermal effects of reactions. The results of interaction of Ba(OH) 4 ·8H 2 O with 5, 10, and 20% solution of hydrofluoric acid were considered.

  8. Supramolecular salts of 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine and acids through classical H-Bonds and other intermolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lingfeng; Jin, Shouwen; Jin, Shide; Gao, Xingjun; Xie, Xinxin; Lin, Zhihao; Wang, Yining; Xu, Weiqiang; Wang, Daqi

    2018-02-01

    This article demonstrates 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine based organic salts formation of crystalline solids 1-9, in which the acidic units have been integrated via a variety of non-covalent bonds. Addition of equivalents of the acidic units to the solution of 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine generates the single protonated species which direct the anions. The nine compounds crystallize as their salts with the acidic H transferred to the aromatic N of the 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine. In 2, 3, 4, and 7 the methyl substituted N-rings were protonated, while others were protonated at the NH2 substituted N-ring. All salts have been characterized via IR, mp, EA and XRD technique. The major driving force for the salt formation is attributed to the classical H-bonds from 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine and the acids. Other extensive intermolecular interactions also play great functions in space association of the molecular assemblies in the relevant crystals. The common R22(8) graph set has been observed in all salts due to the H-bonds and other intermolecular interactions, except 2, 4, and 6. For the synergistic interactions of the various non-covalent bonds, all salts displayed 3D structures.

  9. Micromechanical study of protein-DNA interactions and chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    I will discuss micromechanics experiments that our group has used to analyze protein-DNA interactions and chromosome organization. In single-DNA experiments we have found that a feature of protein-DNA complexes is that their dissociation rates can depend strikingly on bulk solution concentrations of other proteins and DNA segments; I will describe experiments which demonstrate this effect, which can involve tens-fold changes in off-rates with submicromolar changes in solution concentrations. Second, I will discuss experiments aimed at analyzing large-scale human chromosome structure; we isolate metaphase chromosomes, which in their native form behave as remarkably elastic networks of chromatin. Exposure to DNA-cutting restriction enzymes completely eliminates this elasticity, indicating that there is not a mechanically contiguous protein ''scaffold'' from which the chromosome gains its stability. I will show results of siRNA experiments indicating that depletion of condensin proteins leads to destabilization of chromosome mechanics, indicating condensin's role as the major chromatin ''cross-linker'' in metaphase chromosomes. Finally I will discuss similar experiments on human G1 nuclei, where we use genetic and chemical modifications to separate the contributions of the nuclear lamina and chromatin to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus as a whole. Supported by the NSF (DMR-1206868, MCB-1022117) and the NIH (GM105847, CA193419).

  10. In vivo study of drug interaction with brain benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, O.; Shinotoh, H.; Ito, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Yamasaki, T.

    1985-05-01

    The possibility of direct estimation of in vivo Bz receptor occupancy in brain was evaluated using C-11, or H-3-flumazepil (Ro15-1788). In animal experiments, 1 ..mu..Ci of H-3-Ro15-1788 was injected at 0.5 or 20 hr after i.v. injection of various dosage of clonazepam. Then radioactivity in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and blood at 5 min. after injection of the tracer was compared. Competitive inhibition of in vivo binding was clearly observed when clonazepam was pretreated at 0.5 hr before injection of the tracer. On the other hand, brain radioactivity was increased when clonazepam was administered at 20 hr before injection of the tracer. This increase in binding of H-3-Ro15-1788 might be caused by rebound of Bz receptor function by treatment with Bz agonist, and this rebound may have an important role in physiological function. Clinical investigation concerning drug interaction with brain Bz receptor was performed in normal volunteer and patients with neurological disorders. The distribution of C-11-Ro15-1788 in the brain of patients chronically treated with clonazepam were significantly heterogeneous. However, cerebral blood flow estimated with N-13 NH3 of these patients were normal.

  11. Team interactions in specialized palliative care teams: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarare, Anna; Hagelin, Carina Lundh; Fürst, Carl Johan; Fossum, Bjöörn

    2013-09-01

    Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned. The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in specialized palliative care teams. Semistructured interviews were conducted with health professionals working in specialized palliative home care teams. The interviews were analyzed by content analysis. Participants were recruited from specialized palliative care units in Sweden. The 15 interviewees included 4 men and 11 women. Physcians, nurses, paramedical staff, and social workers were included. Organizational issues like resources and leadership have a great impact on delivery of care. Competence was mirrored in education, collaboration, approach, and support within the team; while communication was described as key to being a team, resolving conflict, and executing palliative care. Communication and communication patterns within the team create the feeling of being a team. Team climate and team performance are significantly impacted by knowledge and trust of competence in colleagues, with other professions, and by the available leadership. Proportions of different health professionals in the team have an impact on the focus and delivery of care. Interprofessional education giving clarity on one's own professional role and knowledge of other professions would most likely benefit patients and family caregivers.

  12. An autosampling differential scanning calorimeter instrument for studying molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Valerian; Rochalski, Andrew; Brandts, Michael; Brandts, John F; Williston, Samuel; Frasca, Verna; Lin, Lung-Nan

    2002-11-01

    A new ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) instrument is described, which utilizes autosampling for continuous operation. High scanning rates to 250 deg/h with rapid cooling and equilibration between scans facilitates higher sample throughput up to 50 samples during each 24 h of unattended operation. The instrument is suited for those pharmaceutical applications where higher throughput is important, such as screening drug candidates for binding constant or screening solution conditions for stability of liquid protein formulations. Results are presented on the binding of five different anionic inhibitors to ribonuclease A, which included cytidine 2'-monophosphate (2'CMP), 3'CMP, uridine 3'-monophosphate, pyrophosphate, and phosphate. Binding constants K(B) (or dissociation constants K(d)) are obtained from the shift in the transition temperature T(M) for ribonuclease thermal unfolding in the presence of ligand relative to the transition temperature in the absence of ligand. Measured binding constants ranged from 155 M(-1) (K(d) = 6.45 mM) for the weak-binding phosphate anion to 13100 M(-1) (K(d) = 76.3 microM) for the strongest binding ligand, 2'CMP. The DSC method for measuring binding constants can also be extended to ultratight interactions involving either ligand-protein or protein-protein binding.

  13. SHARP - a framework for incorporating human interactions into PRA studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannaman, G.W.; Joksimovich, V.; Spurgin, A.J.; Worledge, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, increased attention has been given to understanding the role of humans in the safe operation of nuclear power plants. By virtue of the ability to combine equipment reliability with human reliability probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology was deemed capable of providing significant insights about the contributions of human interations in accident scenarios. EPRI recognized the need to strengthen the methodology for incorporating human interactions into PRAs as one element of their broad research program to improve the credibility of PRAs. This research project lead to the development and detailed description of SHARP (Systematic Human Application Reliability Procedure) in EPRI NP-3583. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the SHARP framework. This should help PRA analysts state more clearly their assumptions and approach no matter which human reliability assessment technique is used. SHARP includes a structure of seven analysis steps which can be formally or informally performed during PRAs. The seven steps are termed definition, screening, breakdown, representation, impact assessment, quantification, and documentation

  14. Comprehensive study of tartrazine/cationic surfactant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahir, Afshin Asadzadeh; Javadian, Soheila; Razavizadeh, Bi Bi Marzieh; Gharibi, Hussein

    2011-12-15

    Interaction of a food dye, tartrazine, with some cationic conventional and gemini surfactants, tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB), N,N'-ditetradecyl-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-butanediyl-diammonium dibromide (14,4,14), and N,N'-didodecyl-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-butanediyl-diammonium dibromide (12,4,12), were first investigated comprehensively employing conductometry, tensiometry, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Tartrazine was found to behave in the same manner as aromatic counterions. The formation of ion pairs reflected as a considerable increase of the surfactant efficiency in tensiometry plots and their stoichiometry were determined by Job's method of continuous variations. For the tartrazine/TTAB system, nonionic DS(3), ionic DS(2-), and/or DS(2)(-) ion pairs, their small premicelles, and tartrazine-rich micelles were constituted as well as dye-containing TTAB-rich micelles. Insoluble J-aggregates of DS(-) ion pairs and cylindrical surfactant-rich micelles were also formed in tartrazine/gemini surfactant systems and recognized by transmission electron microscopy. The zeta potential and the size of the aggregates were determined using dynamic light scattering and confirmed the suggested models for the processes happening in each system. Cyclic voltammetry was applied successfully to track all of these species using tartrazine's own reduction peak current for the first time.

  15. Age differences in adults' daily social interactions: An ecological momentary assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaoyang, Ruixue; Sliwinski, Martin J; Martire, Lynn M; Smyth, Joshua M

    2018-04-30

    Prevailing research has suggested that social relationships get better with age, but this evidence has been largely based on studies with lengthy reporting intervals. Using an ecological momentary assessment approach, the present study examined age differences in several characteristics of social interactions as reported in near-real time: the frequency, quality, and partner type. Participants (N = 173) ages 20-79 years reported their social interactions at 5 random times throughout the day for 1 week. Results revealed that age was associated with higher frequency of interacting with family and lower frequency of interacting with peripheral partners. These age effects, however, became nonsignificant after accounting for contextual factors such as race, gender, education, employment status, family structure, and living arrangement. In contrast, a curvilinear relationship best characterized age differences in both positive and negative ratings of daily social interaction quality, with middle-aged adults reporting the lowest positive ratings and older adults reporting the lowest negative ratings among all ages. Contextual factors did not account for these patterns of age differences in interaction quality. Furthermore, the intraindividual variability of interaction frequency with peripheral partners, partner diversity, and interaction quality (positivity and negativity) was lower among older adults than among younger adults. Findings from the present study portray a nuanced picture of social interactions in daily life and advance the understanding of social interactions across the life span. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. A conceptual framework for studying the strength of plant-animal mutualistic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Diego P; Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo; Urbani, Pasquinell; Valdovinos, Fernanda S

    2015-04-01

    The strength of species interactions influences strongly the structure and dynamics of ecological systems. Thus, quantifying such strength is crucial to understand how species interactions shape communities and ecosystems. Although the concepts and measurement of interaction strength in food webs have received much attention, there has been comparatively little progress in the context of mutualism. We propose a conceptual scheme for studying the strength of plant-animal mutualistic interactions. We first review the interaction strength concepts developed for food webs, and explore how these concepts have been applied to mutualistic interactions. We then outline and explain a conceptual framework for defining ecological effects in plant-animal mutualisms. We give recommendations for measuring interaction strength from data collected in field studies based on a proposed approach for the assessment of interaction strength in plant-animal mutualisms. This approach is conceptually integrative and methodologically feasible, as it focuses on two key variables usually measured in field studies: the frequency of interactions and the fitness components influenced by the interactions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Mathematics for physicists and engineers fundamentals and interactive study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Weltner, Klaus; Weber, Wolfgang J; Schuster, Peter; Grosjean, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This textbook offers an accessible and highly approved approach which is characterized by the combination of the textbook with a detailed study guide available online at our repository extras.springer.com. This study guide divides the whole learning task into small units which the student is very likely to master successfully. Thus he or she is asked to read and study a limited section of the textbook and to return to the study guide afterwards. Working with the study guide his or her learning results are controlled, monitored and deepened by graded questions, exercises, repetitions and finally by problems and applications of the content studied. Since the degree of difficulties is slowly rising the students gain confidence and experience their own progress in mathematical competence thus fostering motivation. Furthermore in case of learning difficulties he or she is given supplementary explanations and in case of individual needs supplementary exercises and applications. So the sequence of the studies is ind...

  18. Synthesis, structure, computational and in-silico anticancer studies of N,N-diethyl-N‧-palmitoylthiourea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asegbeloyin, Jonnie Niyi; Oyeka, Ebube Evaristus; Okpareke, Obinna; Ibezim, Akachukwu

    2018-02-01

    A new potential ONS donor ligand N,N-diethyl-N‧-palmitoylthiourea (PACDEA) with the molecular formular C21H42N2OS has been synthesized and characterized by ESI-MS, UV, FTIR 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and single X-ray crystallography. The asymmetric molecules crystallized in the centrosymmetric structure of monoclinic crystal system with space group P21/c. In the crystal structure of the compound, molecules are linked in a continuous chain by intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonds, which stabilized the crystal structure. The palmitoyl moiety and N (2)-ethyl group lie on a plane, while the thiocarbonyl moiety is twisted and lying othorgonal to the plane. Non-covalent interaction (NCI) analysis on the hydrogen bonded solid state structure of the molecule revealed the presence of a significant number of non-covalent interactions including intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions, Csbnd Hsbnd -lone pair interactions, weak Van der Waals interactions, and steric/ring closure interactions. The NCI analysis also showed the presence of intramolecular stabilizing Csbnd H⋯Odbnd C and Csbnd H⋯Sdbnd C interactions. Docking simulation revealed that the compound interacted favourably with ten selected validated anticancer drug targets, which is an indication that the compound could possess some anticancer properties.

  19. Fundamental studies of hydrogen interaction with supported meta and bimetallic catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Sandeep [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-12-07

    The thesis is divided into 3 parts: interaction of H with silica supported Ru catalysts (high pressure in situ NMR), in situ NMR study of H interaction with supported Ru-group IB bimetallic catalysts, and in-situ NMR study of H effects on silica-supported Pt, Rh and Ru catalysts.

  20. Model plants for studying the interaction between Methylobacterium mesophilicum and Xylella fastidiosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, FD; Lacava, PT; Gai, CS; Araujo, WL; Maccheroni, W; van Overbeek, LS; van Elsas, JD; Azevedo, JL

    Over the last few years, endophytic bacterial communities associated with citrus have been studied as key components interacting with Xylella fastidiosa. In this study, we investigated the possible interaction between the citrus endophyte Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6 and X. fastidiosa in

  1. Model Plants for Studying the Interaction between Methylobacterium mesophilicum and Xylella fastidiosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, F.D.; Lacava, P.T.; Araújo, W.L.; Maccheroni Jr., W.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Elsas, van J.D.; Azevedo, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few years, endophytic bacterial communities associated with citrus have been studied as key components interacting with Xylella fastidiosa. In this study, we investigated the possible interaction between the citrus endophyte Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6 and X. fastidiosa in

  2. Studying protein-protein interactions via blot overlay/far western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Blot overlay is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. This technique involves fractionating proteins on SDS-PAGE, blotting to nitrocellulose or PVDF membrane, and then incubating with a probe of interest. The probe is typically a protein that is radiolabeled, biotinylated, or simply visualized with a specific antibody. When the probe is visualized via antibody detection, this technique is often referred to as "Far Western blot." Many different kinds of protein-protein interactions can be studied via blot overlay, and the method is applicable to screens for unknown protein-protein interactions as well as to the detailed characterization of known interactions.

  3. The Role of Interactive Whiteboard on Motivating Learners in Mathematics Classes: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mtchedlishvili

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The enhancement of motivation and enthusiasm by the use of interactive whiteboard has improved self- esteem, encouragement and success of many learners who have found mathematics difficult. This study aims to investigate whether the use of interactive whiteboard in mathematics classes promotes motivation of learners which facilitates learning process. 40 lecturers and 40 students were surveyed in the study and the results have been compared and it has been found that interactive whiteboard enhances interactivity, motivates learners and facilitates learning in mathematics classes.

  4. Studying protein-protein interactions via blot overlay or Far Western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Randy A

    2004-01-01

    Blot overlay is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. This technique involves fractionating proteins on SDS-PAGE, blotting to nitrocellulose or PVDF membrane, and then incubating with a probe of interest. The probe is typically a protein that is radiolabeled, biotinylated, or simply visualized with a specific antibody. When the probe is visualized via antibody detection, this technique is often referred to as "Far Western blot." Many different kinds of protein-protein interactions can be studied via blot overlay, and the method is applicable to screens for unknown protein-protein interactions as well as to the detailed characterization of known interactions.

  5. A critical examination of indices of dynamic interaction for wildlife telemetry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jed A; Nelson, Trisalyn A; Webb, Stephen L; Gee, Kenneth L

    2014-09-01

    Wildlife scientists continue to be interested in studying ways to quantify how the movements of animals are interdependent - dynamic interaction. While a number of applied studies of dynamic interaction exist, little is known about the comparative effectiveness and applicability of available methods used for quantifying interactions between animals. We highlight the formulation, implementation and interpretation of a suite of eight currently available indices of dynamic interaction. Point- and path-based approaches are contrasted to demonstrate differences between methods and underlying assumptions on telemetry data. Correlated and biased correlated random walks were simulated at a range of sampling resolutions to generate scenarios with dynamic interaction present and absent. We evaluate the effectiveness of each index at identifying different types of interactive behaviour at each sampling resolution. Each index is then applied to an empirical telemetry data set of three white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) dyads. Results from the simulated data show that three indices of dynamic interaction reliant on statistical testing procedures are susceptible to Type I error, which increases at fine sampling resolutions. In the white-tailed deer examples, a recently developed index for quantifying local-level cohesive movement behaviour (the di index) provides revealing information on the presence of infrequent and varying interactions in space and time. Point-based approaches implemented with finely sampled telemetry data overestimate the presence of interactions (Type I errors). Indices producing only a single global statistic (7 of the 8 indices) are unable to quantify infrequent and varying interactions through time. The quantification of infrequent and variable interactive behaviour has important implications for the spread of disease and the prevalence of social behaviour in wildlife. Guidelines are presented to inform researchers wishing to study dynamic

  6. Communicative Case Studies for EFL--Lessons for Interactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne E.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses use of case studies and role play throughout the curriculum at the Ecole de Hautes Etudes Commerciales du Nord, a French graduate school associated with the Catholic University of Lille. Provides a case study that was developed to reconcile conflicting needs in the business English classroom at the graduate level. Students require…

  7. Photon interaction studies using 241Am γ-rays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The attenuation studies as well as the photoelectric studies in the case of rare earth elements have been carried out on samples containing such elements whose K-absorption edge energies lie below and close to the -energy used. Suitable compounds of the rare earth elements have been chosen as mixture absorbers in ...

  8. NMR studies on inter- and intramolecular interactions in polymer melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehr, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    relaxometry was applied to deuterated bulk polyethyleneoxide and polybutadiene melts with molecular weights above the critical value. Spin-lattice relaxation data due to intrasegment (quadrupolar) interactions was probed. Diverse dynamic limits were identified both with the proton and deuteron frequency dispersion data. The comparison between the intrachain, intrasegment and the interchain contributions led to the conclusion that only model theories based on largely isotropic chain dynamics can account for the experimental findings. The extremely anisotropic character of the well-known tube/reptation model and the extremely isotropic character of the Renormalized Rouse model are not compatible with the experimental data. (orig.)

  9. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing

    Surface modification plays a pivotal role in bioengineering. Polymer coatings can provide biocompatibility and biofunctionalities to biomaterials through surface modification. In this dissertation, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was utilized to coat two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) substrates with differently charged polyelectrolytes in order to generate antimicrobial and osteocompatible biomaterials. ICVD is a modified CVD technique that enables surface modification in an all-dry condition without substrate damage and solvent contamination. The free-radical polymerization allows the vinyl polymers to conformally coat on various micro- and nano-structured substrates and maintains the delicate structure of the functional groups. The vapor deposition of polycations provided antimicrobial activity to planar and porous substrates through destroying the negatively charged bacterial membrane and brought about high contact-killing efficiency (99.99%) against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the polyampholytes synthesized by iCVD exhibited excellent antifouling performance against the adhesion of Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Gram-negative E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Their antifouling activities were attributed to the electrostatic interaction and hydration layers that served as physical and energetic barriers to prevent bacterial adhesion. The contact-killing and antifouling polymers synthesized by iCVD can be applied to surface modification of food processing equipment and medical devices with the aim of reducing foodborne diseases and medical infections. Moreover, the charged polyelectrolyte modified 2D polystyrene surfaces displayed good osteocompatibility and enhanced osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells than the un-modified polystyrene surface. In order to promote osteoinduction of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, bioinspired polymer-controlled mineralization was conducted

  10. Final Report - Few-Body Studies Using Electromagnetic Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2018-01-31

    The work discussed here is an extension of work previously funded by U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-97ER41025. Measurements of charged pion photoproduction from deuterium using the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory previously made by us, as members of the LEGS Collaboration, resulted in the most interesting result of two decades of work. By measuring the production of a charged pion (p + ) in coincidence with an emitted photon we observed structures in the residual two-nucleon system. These indicated the existence of rare, long-lived states not explicable by standard nuclear theory; they suggested a set of configurations not explicable in terms of a nucleon-nucleon pair. The existence of such “exotic” structures has formed the foundation for most of the work that has ensued. Several measurements at various laboratories have supported, but not proved, the existence of these exotic states. The rarity of these states made their existence undetectable in most previous measurements. Only by observing characteristic signatures of such states (i.e., decay photons), by using very specific kinematics which isolate certain reaction products, or by measuring polarization-dependent observables. During the period of this grant we pursued and made progress on the development of experiments to be performed at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIGS) of the Tri Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). Our understanding of photon- and electron-induced nuclear reactions depends on understanding of the basic electron and photon interaction. Recently, the issue of two-photon contributions has arisen in the context of deeply inelastic electron scattering. One way to address this is to measure asymmetries in the Bethe-Heitler ee process. We also made progress in developing the detectors required to measure these asymmetries at HIGS. During the last several years the apparent discrepancy between the size of the proton as measured using

  11. Mathematics for physicists and engineers fundamentals and interactive study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Weltner, Klaus; Grosjean, Jean; Schuster, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Mathematics is the basic language in physics and engineering. It is an essential tool which first and second year students have to master as soon as possible. A lack of competence in mathematics is the main reason for failure and drop out in the beginning periods of study. This textbook offers an accessible and highly approved approach which is characterized by the combination of the textbook with a detailed study guide available online at extras.springer.com. This study guide divides the whole learning task into small units which the student is very likely to master successfully. Thus he or she is asked to read and study a limited section of the textbook and to return to the study guide afterwards. Working with the study guide his or her learning results are controlled, monitored and deepened by graded questions, exercises, repetitions and finally by problems and applications of the content studied. Since the degree of difficulties is slowly rising the students gain confidence and experience their own progre...

  12. Discourse and Interaction Studies in the ‘New North’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    understandings of itself as a community of peaceful, caring societies built on consensus social democracy challenged by neoliberalism, globalisation and immigration? How can discourse studies study these developments in a positive yet critical fashion, with tools crafted with our concerns (not Anglo American...... societies) in the foreground? There is also the theme of the 'New North'. How is the Northern Rim being reconfigured as a result of climate change, (un)sustainable travel, resource exploitation, geopolitics, and cultural nationalism? How can discourse studies help us understand, advise and intervene...

  13. Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership: Interactive Case Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Case studies illustrate the kinds of decisions and dilemmas managers face every day, and as such provide an effective learning tool for project management. Due to...

  14. Characterization of Intermolecular Interactions at Play in the 2,2,2-TRIFLUOROETHANOL Trimers Using Cavity and Chirped-Pulse Microwave Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Thomas, Javix; Jäger, Wolfgang; Xu, Yunjie

    2017-06-01

    2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) is a common aqueous co-solvent in biological chemistry which may induce or destabilize secondary structures of proteins and polypeptides, thanks to its diverse intermolecular linkages originating from the hydrogen bonding potential of both the hydroxyl and perfluoro groups. Theoretically, the TFE monomer is predicted to have two stable gauche (gauche^{+}/gauche^{-}) conformations whereas the trans form is unstable or is supported only by a very shallow potential. Only the gauche conformers have been identified in the gas phase, whereas liquid phase studies suggest a trans:gauche ratio of 2:3. The question at which sample (cluster) size the trans form of TFE would appear was one major motivation for our study. Here, we report the detection of three trimers of TFE using Balle-Flygare cavity and chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW) techniques. The most stable observed trimer features one trans- and two gauche-TFE subunits. The other two trimers, observed using a newly constructed 2-6 GHz CP-FTMW spectrometer, consist of only the two gauche conformers of TFE. Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and non-covalent interactions (NCI) analyses give detailed insights into which intermolecular interactions are at play to stabilize the trans form of TFE in the most stable trimer. M. Buck, Q. Rev. Biophys. 1998, 31, 297-335. I. Bakó, T. Radnai, M. Claire, B. Funel, J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 12472-12480. R. F. W. Bader, Chem. Rev. 1991, 91, 893-928. E. R. Johnson, S. Keinan, P. Mori-Sánchez, J. Contreras-Garcia, A. J. Cohen, W. Yang, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2010, 132, 6498-6506.

  15. MFM study of magnetic interaction between recording and soft magnetic layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yukio; Tanahashi, Kiwamu; Hirayama, Yoshiyuki; Kikukawa, Atsushi; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to study the magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers in double-layer perpendicular media by observing the magnetization structure from the soft magnetic layer side. There was a strong magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers. Introducing a thin nonmagnetic intermediate layer between the two layers greatly reduced the magnetic interaction and drastically reduced the medium noise

  16. Lack of replication of interactions between polymorphisms in rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility: case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Aida Ferreiro-Iglesias; Calaza, Manuel; Perez-Pampin, Eva; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Marenco-de la Fuente, José Luís; Blanco, Francisco J.; Narváez García, Francisco Javier; Navarro-Sarabia, Federico; Cañete Crespillo, Juan D.; Rodríguez de la Serna, Arturo; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Pablos, Jose L.; Balsa, Alejandro; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately 100 loci have been definitively associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility. However, they explain only a fraction of RA heritability. Interactions between polymorphisms could explain part of the remaining heritability. Multiple interactions have been reported, but only the shared epitope (SE) × protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) interaction has been replicated convincingly. Two recent studies deserve attention because of their q...

  17. Lack of replication of interactions between polymorphisms in rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility: case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreiro-Iglesias, Aida; Calaza, Manuel; Perez-Pampin, Eva; Lopez Longo, Francisco J; Marenco, Jose L; Blanco, Francisco J; Narvaez, Javier; Navarro, Federico; Cañete, Juan D; de la Serna, Arturo R; Gonzalez-Alvaro, Isidoro; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Pablos, Jose L; Balsa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 100 loci have been definitively associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility. However, they explain only a fraction of RA heritability. Interactions between polymorphisms could explain part of the remaining heritability. Multiple interactions have been reported, but only the shared epitope (SE) × protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) interaction has been replicated convincingly. Two recent studies deserve attention because of their qu...

  18. The study of interaction of dentures and oral microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryzhova I.P.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the adhesion of oral microflora and the degree of penetration into the structure of the basis of structural polymers in a comparative perspective. Material and methods. The object of the study is based on samples representative of the modern basis of polymers subjected to contamination by microorganisms in the experiment. Assessment of the quality of the resulting surface samples of basic dental polymer after polishing using a scanning ion microscope. The study of adhesion of microorganisms on the surface of the samples was performed in the experiment in vitro by the method of V. N. Zarev, 2006. Fluorescence imaging was held to study microbial penetration into the interior of polymers of microorganisms using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Results of the study revealed a degree of adhesion and penetration of microorganisms to the surface and the structure of the base polymer. Conclusion. The findings suggest the importance of final basic polymers. Thermoplastic polymers are characterized by complex processing, concerning promote greater adhesion and infiltration of microorganisms into the interior of the construction in comparison with the acrylic polymers.

  19. Radioisotope studies of some effects and interactions of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The coordinated programme of ''isotopic tracer-aided studies of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture'', initiated in 1973, had involved the participation of 12 scientists from 10 countries. Pesticide residues, toxic metals, atmospheric sulphur dioxide were studied, and the use of radiotracer techniques as monitoring tools for existing contaminant levels or for their biological effects. The programme had been successful in the development and application of selected labelled substrate techniques. Specific aspects studied were the effects of environmental contaminants at the molecular level of the cell nucleus, the development and significance of radioimmunoassay procedure for trace contaminants, action and joint action of toxic elements, and the radiometric analysis of cholinesterase as an index of exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Ten papers were presented and 12 coordinated investigations discussed. A number of recommendations were made

  20. Plant--Pollinator Interactions: A Rich Area for Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    Outlines an adaptive framework for the study of plants and their pollinators in which both partners in the ecological relationship are seen as maximizing fitness through efficient use of the other as a resource. Suggests experimental projects to examine the validity of these assumptions giving an evolutionary emphasis. (Author/CW)

  1. A comparative study of Interactions between chronic Alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The effects of drinking 10% alcohol solution for 12 weeks on daily body weight, and drinking and feeding behaviour were studied in Sprague – Dawley rats of both sexes. Daily measurement of body weight, fluid intake and food consumption were recorded and compared. Multiple linear regression analysis was ...

  2. Genetic interaction and mapping studies on the leaflet development ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Pisum sativum, the completely penetrant leaflet development (lld) mutation is known to sporadically abort pinnae suborgans in the unipinnate compound leaf. Here, the frequency and morphology of abortion was studied in each of the leaf suborgans in 36 genotypes and in presence of auxin and gibberellin, and their ...

  3. A Plurisemiotic Study of Multimodal Interactive Teaching through Videoconferencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Tatiana; Celik, Christelle Combe

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to describe and analyze webcam pedagogical communication between a French Foreign Language tutor and two students during seven online classes. It tries to answer the following question: how does the tutor in a multimodal learning environment change her semio-discursive behavior from the first to the last session? We analyze…

  4. Small angle neutron scattering studies on the interaction of cationic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a wide variety of industrial, biological, pharmaceutical and cosmetic systems. The mechanism of unfolding of proteins on addition of the surfactant has been studied by several techniques such as circular dichroism (CD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), microcalorimetry, light scattering and small angle scattering.

  5. Comparative and Interactive Studies of Aqueous Leaf Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the comparative effects of aqueous leaf extract of Ocimum gratissimum Linn. (Lamiaceae), vitamin C and vitamin E on the basal serum phosphatases- alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total acid phosphatase (ACPT) and prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) of the male guinea-pig.

  6. Studies of interactive plasma processes in the polar cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The final report for NAGW-1657 (SwRI Project 15-2783) is presented. Several distinctly different areas of research are discussed: (1) studies of the thermal structure of polar outflows; (2) Prognoz-8 data analysis; and (3) the Ulysses Jupiter encounter.

  7. Density functional studies of endosulphan and its interaction with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    action between endosulphan and amino acids employ- ing density functional methods. Two conformers of both α- and β-endosulphan were considered in the present study. Two amino acids, glycine and GABA were chosen, as they are known to be chief neurotrans- mitters in the central nervous system. It has been shown.

  8. Small angle neutron scattering studies on the interaction of cationic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structure of the protein–surfactant complex of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cationic surfactants has been studied by small angle neutron scattering. At low concentrations, the CTAB monomers are observed to bind to the protein leading to an increase in its size. On the other hand at high concentrations, surfactant ...

  9. Connecting theoretical and empirical studies of trait-mediated interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolker, B.; Holyoak, M.; Křivan, Vlastimil; Rowe, L.; Schmitz, O.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 5 (2003), s. 1101-1114 ISSN 0012-9658 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : community models * competition * empirical study Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.701, year: 2003

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of the Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The objective of this study, therefore, was to develop an assay procedure for dosage forms of chloroquine phosphate based on its reaction with chloranilic acid which resulted in the formation of a charge-transfer complex. Methods: The complex formation between chloroquine phosphate and chloranilc acid as evidenced by.

  11. Comparison of weighting approaches for genetic risk scores in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüls, Anke; Krämer, Ursula; Carlsten, Christopher; Schikowski, Tamara; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger

    2017-12-16

    Weighted genetic risk scores (GRS), defined as weighted sums of risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are statistically powerful for detection gene-environment (GxE) interactions. To assign weights, the gold standard is to use external weights from an independent study. However, appropriate external weights are not always available. In such situations and in the presence of predominant marginal genetic effects, we have shown in a previous study that GRS with internal weights from marginal genetic effects ("GRS-marginal-internal") are a powerful and reliable alternative to single SNP approaches or the use of unweighted GRS. However, this approach might not be appropriate for detecting predominant interactions, i.e. interactions showing an effect stronger than the marginal genetic effect. In this paper, we present a weighting approach for such predominant interactions ("GRS-interaction-training") in which parts of the data are used to estimate the weights from the interaction terms and the remaining data are used to determine the GRS. We conducted a simulation study for the detection of GxE interactions in which we evaluated power, type I error and sign-misspecification. We compared this new weighting approach to the GRS-marginal-internal approach and to GRS with external weights. Our simulation study showed that in the absence of external weights and with predominant interaction effects, the highest power was reached with the GRS-interaction-training approach. If marginal genetic effects were predominant, the GRS-marginal-internal approach was more appropriate. Furthermore, the power to detect interactions reached by the GRS-interaction-training approach was only slightly lower than the power achieved by GRS with external weights. The power of the GRS-interaction-training approach was confirmed in a real data application to the Traffic, Asthma and Genetics (TAG) Study (N = 4465 observations). When appropriate external weights are unavailable, we

  12. A linguistic study of patient-centered interviewing: emergent interactional effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Ashley M; Sarinopoulos, Issidoros; Frankel, Richard M; Smith, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate interactional effects of patient-centered interviewing (PCI) compared to isolated clinician-centered interviewing (CCI). We conducted a pilot study comparing PCI (N=4) to CCI (N=4) for simulated new-patient visits. We rated interviews independently and measured patient satisfaction with the interaction via a validated questionnaire. We conducted interactional sociolinguistic analysis on the interviews and compared across three levels of analysis: turn, topic, and interaction. We found significant differences between PCI and CCI in physician responses to patients' psychosocial cues and concerns. The number and type of physician questions also differed significantly across PCI and CCI sets. Qualitatively, we noted several indicators of physician-patient attunement in the PCI interviews that were not present in the CCI interviews. They spanned diverse aspects of physician and patient speech, suggesting interactional accommodation on the part of both participants. This small pilot study highlights a variety of interactional variables that may underlie the effects associated with patient-centered interviewing (e.g., positive relationships, health outcomes). Question form, phonological accommodation processes, and use of stylistic markers are relatively unexplored in controlled studies of physician-patient interaction. This study characterizes several interactional variables for larger scale studies and contributes to models of patient-centeredness in practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Studying inner ear protein–protein interactions using FRET and FLIM

    OpenAIRE

    Hallworth, Richard; Currall, Benjamin; Nichols, Michael G.; Wu, Xudong; Zuo, Jian

    2006-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies of the inner ear have recently revealed a large number of previously undescribed proteins, but their functions remain unclear. Optical methods such as FRET and FLIM are just beginning to be applied to the study of functional interactions between novel inner ear proteins. This review discusses the various methods for employing FRET and FLIM in protein–protein interaction studies, their advantages and pitfalls, with examples drawn from inner ear studies.

  14. A combination test for detection of gene-environment interaction in cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Brandon; Basu, Saonli; McGue, Matt

    2017-07-01

    Identifying gene-environment (G-E) interactions can contribute to a better understanding of disease etiology, which may help researchers develop disease prevention strategies and interventions. One big criticism of studying G-E interaction is the lack of power due to sample size. Studies often restrict the interaction search to the top few hundred hits from a genome-wide association study or focus on potential candidate genes. In this paper, we test interactions between a candidate gene and an environmental factor to improve power by analyzing multiple variants within a gene. We extend recently developed score statistic based genetic association testing approaches to the G-E interaction testing problem. We also propose tests for interaction using gene-based summary measures that pool variants together. Although it has recently been shown that these summary measures can be biased and may lead to inflated type I error, we show that under several realistic scenarios, we can still provide valid tests of interaction. These tests use significantly less degrees of freedom and thus can have much higher power to detect interaction. Additionally, we demonstrate that the iSeq-aSum-min test, which combines a gene-based summary measure test, iSeq-aSum-G, and an interaction-based summary measure test, iSeq-aSum-I, provides a powerful alternative to test G-E interaction. We demonstrate the performance of these approaches using simulation studies and illustrate their performance to study interaction between the SNPs in several candidate genes and family climate environment on alcohol consumption using the Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research dataset. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. A Good Statistics Study of Antiproton Interactions with Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment extends the study of inclusive pion production and the correlation between pions which result from hadron-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies to the antiproton-nucleus system. It is part of a long term systematic search for exotic nuclear phenomena. The correlation data will be used to extract, via pion interferometry, the size and coherence of the annihilation source in nuclei. In addition, the reaction @* + A @A p + A* will be studied to look for structure in the proton spectra which antiproton-nucleus bound states.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental system is based on a flexible, broad range, large acceptance (1~steradian) spectrometer which consists of an 80~cm diameter dipole magnet surrounded with detector arrays. These detectors provide momentum, energy loss, Cerenkov and time of flight information for up to ten ejectiles per event. Momentum resolution varies from 1\\% to 3\\%, depending on energy.

  16. Effect and interaction study of acetamiprid photodegradation using experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassalit, Djilali; Chekir, Nadia; Benhabiles, Ouassila; Mouzaoui, Oussama; Mahidine, Sarah; Merzouk, Nachida Kasbadji; Bentahar, Fatiha; Khalil, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    The methodology of experimental research was carried out using the MODDE 6.0 software to study the acetamiprid photodegradation depending on the operating parameters, such as the initial concentration of acetamiprid, concentration and type of the used catalyst and the initial pH of the medium. The results showed the importance of the pollutant concentration effect on the acetamiprid degradation rate. On the other hand, the amount and type of the used catalyst have a considerable influence on the elimination kinetics of this pollutant. The degradation of acetamiprid as an environmental pesticide pollutant via UV irradiation in the presence of titanium dioxide was assessed and optimized using response surface methodology with a D-optimal design. The acetamiprid degradation ratio was found to be sensitive to the different studied factors. The maximum value of discoloration under the optimum operating conditions was determined to be 99% after 300 min of UV irradiation.

  17. Neutron diffraction studies of chemical structure and interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of chemical structure, using neutron crystallography, is reviewed. First the various aspects of neutron diffraction are discussed and special advantages are outlined. Then various themes within the study of three-dimensional crystalline material are treated. The most traditional of these, the location of light atoms in structures, is shown to remain important, and likewise high-precision work still gives much new information. Within the last decade powder analysis has become a tool in chemical analysis. This is partly due to developments in monochromator technology, computer applications and large area detectors. For very similar reasons studies of materials in real time and under extreme conditions are becoming frequent. We therefore observe both a continuing use of traditional neutron crystallographic techniques, and a growth of new methods and areas which depend on instrumental developments. With the advent of new sources and larger detector systems, further advances can thus be expected in the application of neutrons in structural chemistry. (author)

  18. A study of everyday repair: informing interaction design

    OpenAIRE

    Maestri, Leah Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Repair is typically seen in design as the restoration of broken objects to their original state. Repair by non-experts, or everyday repair, can often lead to novel forms of repair resulting in the creative repurposing of objects that are often unforeseen by designers. Using a grounded theory approach, this study describes key aspects of repair including: the techniques non-experts employ for repairing their objects; the motivations that prompt acts of repair; and the outcomes that result fr...

  19. Study of interaction of GNR with glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Arti; Cardoso-Avila, P. E.; Sridharan, Sangita; Sahu, Aditi; Nair, Jyothi; Dongre, Harsh; Goda, Jayant S.; Sawant, Sharada; Dutt, Shilpee; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Murali Krishna, C.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation resistance is one of the major causes of recurrence and failure of radiotherapy. Different methods have been used to increase the efficacy of radiation therapy and at the same time restrict the radiation resistivity. From last few years nanoparticles have played a key role in the enhancement of radiosensitization. The densely packed nanoparticles can selectively scatter or absorb the high radiations, which allow better targeting of cellular components within the tumor hence resulting in increased radiation damage to the cancer cells. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the highly radioresistant brain cancer. Current treatment methods are surgical resection followed by concurrent chemo and radiation therapy. In this study we have used in-house engineered gold nano rodes (GNR) and analyzed their effect on U-87MG cell lines. MTT assay was employed to determine the cytotoxic concentration of the nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the effect of gold nanoparticles on glioma cells, which was followed by transmission electron microscopic examinations to visualize their cellular penetration. Our data shows that GNR were able to penetrate the cells and induce cytotoxicity at the concentration of 198 μM as determined by MTT assay at 24 post GNP treatment. Additionally, we show that Raman spectroscopy, could classify spectra between untreated and cells treated with nanoparticles. Taken together, this study shows GNR penetration and cytotoxicity in glioma cells thereby providing a rationale to use them in cancer therapeutics. Future studies will be carried out to study the biological activity of the formulation as a radiosensitizer in GBM.

  20. Lateral interactions in the photoreceptor membrane: a NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollevanger, L.C.P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The photoreceptor membrane has an exceptionally high content of polyunsaturated fatty acyl chains combined with a high amount of phosphatidyl ethanolamine. It is situated in a cell organelle, the rod outer segment, with a high biological activity in which controlable trans-membrane currents of different ions play an important role. These characteristics make it a very interesting biological membrane to search for the existence of non-bilayer structures. Therefore in this thesis a detailed study of the polymorphic phase behaviour of the rod outer segment photoreceptor lipids was undertaken, concerning modulation of the polymorphic phase behaviour of photoreceptor membrane lipids by divalent cations and temperature, polymorphism of the individual phospholipid classes phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine and effects of cholesterol, bilayer stabilization by (rhod)opsin. Morphologically intact rod outer segment possesses a large magnetic anisotropy. This property is used to obtain 31 P-NMR of oriented photoreceptor membranes which allows spectral analysis and identification of individual phospholipid classes, and allows to study lateral lipid diffusion in intact disk membranes. The power of high resolution solid state 13 C-NMR to study the conformation of the chromophore in rhodopsin is demonstrated. (Auth.)

  1. Study of interaction of the bacterium cupriavidus metallidurans with strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussiga, Rim

    2010-01-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans strain Ch 34 (previously known as Ralstonia metallidurans, Ralstonia eutropha, and Alcaligenes eutrophus) is an ideal subject to study heavy metal disturbance of cellular processes. Moreover, the capacity of C. metallidurans Ch 34 for in situ bioremediation was assessed and proved to be feasible on pilot scale. In this work, the molecular and physiological response to strontium cations (Sr 2+ ) by C.metallidurans Ch 34 was studied. Results showed that C. metallidurans Ch 34 resisted to high concentrations of Sr (120 m M) and that this resistance is not linked to the presence of its 2 large plasmid pMOL30 or pMOL28. During this study, a tctCBA-dependent tripartite tricarboxylate transport (TTT) system in strain Ch 34 was discovered. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observation of C.metallidurans challenged with strontium confirms the precipitation of Sr 2+ ) directly onto the surface of cells, inside and in the microenvironment around the cells. These results highlight the potential of C. metalliduras Ch 34 to endure environmental extremes and suggest that in situ bioremediation of Sr-containing waste with Ch 34 might be feasible.

  2. The role of nonlinear coupling in Human-Horse Interaction: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanata, Antonio; Guidi, Andrea; Valenza, Gaetano; Baragli, Paolo; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2017-07-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of human-horse dynamic interaction using cardiovascular information exclusively. Specifically, the Information Theoretic Learning (ITL) approach has been applied to a Human-Horse Interaction paradigm, therefore accounting for the nonlinear information of the heart-heart interplay between humans and horses. Heartbeat dynamics was gathered from humans and horses during three experimental conditions: absence of interaction, visual-olfactory interaction, and brooming. Cross Information Potential, Cross Correntropy, and Correntropy Coefficient were computed to quantitatively estimate nonlinear coupling in a group of eleven subjects and one horse. Results showed a statistical significant difference on all of the three interaction phases. Furthermore, a Support Vector Machine classifier recognized the three conditions with an accuracy of 90:9%. These preliminary and encouraging results suggest that ITL analysis provides viable metrics for the quantitative evaluation of human-horse interaction.

  3. Effect of hairpin loop structure on reactivity, sequence preference and adduct orientation of a DNA-interactive pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) antitumour agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, David E; Vassoler, Higia; Jackson, Paul J M; James, Colin H; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2015-04-07

    The pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) are a family of covalent-binding DNA-interactive minor-groove binding agents with a thermodynamic preference for binding to 5'-Pu-G-Pu-3' sequences (Pu = Purine) but a kinetic preference for 5'-Py-G-Py-3' (Py = Pyrimidine). Using HPLC/MS methodology and a range of designed hairpin-forming oligonucleotides, the kinetics of reaction of a C8-bis-pyrrole pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) conjugate (GWL-78, 2) with sixteen isomeric oligonucleotides has been evaluated, each containing a single PBD binding site in one of two locations. The PBD-binding base-pair triplets were designed to include every possible combination of A and T bases adjacent to the covalently-reacting guanine, with the set of hairpins consisting of isomeric pairs containing the same sequence in the hairpin stem but with either hexaethylene glycol (HEG) or TTT loops. The PBD 2 reacted most rapidly with TGT and TGA sequences, with the possibility that adducts might form in both the 3'- and 5'-directions with some sequences according to modelling studies. A faster reaction rate was observed for all hairpins containing the HEG loop except one (Seq 10) when the PBD binding triplets were located either near the loop or adjacent to the 5'-end. Modelling studies have suggested that this difference in reactivity could be due to the structural flexibility of the HEG loop allowing both A-ring-3' and A-ring-5' adducts to form, while a TTT loop should favour only A-ring-5' adducts due to steric considerations. These findings contrast with the results reported by Nguyen and Wilson for the interaction of non-covalent DNA-binding molecules with DNA hairpins, where the loop structure was found to have little effect on interaction in the main stem of the hairpin.

  4. Computational studies on the interactions of nanomaterials with proteins and their impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, De-Yi; Su, Ji-Guo; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The intensive concern over the biosafety of nanomaterials demands the systematic study of the mechanisms underlying their biological effects. Many of the effects of nanomaterials can be attributed to their interactions with proteins and their impacts on protein function. On the other hand, nanomaterials show potential for a variety of biomedical applications, many of which also involve direct interactions with proteins. In this paper, we review some recent computational studies on this subject, especially those investigating the interactions of carbon and gold nanomaterials. Beside hydrophobic and π-stacking interactions, the mode of interaction of carbon nanomaterials can also be regulated by their functional groups. The coatings of gold nanomaterials similarly adjust their mode of interaction, in addition to coordination interactions with the sulfur groups of cysteine residues and the imidazole groups of histidine residues. Nanomaterials can interact with multiple proteins and their impacts on protein activity are attributed to a wide spectrum of mechanisms. These findings on the mechanisms of nanomaterial-protein interactions can further guide the design and development of nanomaterials to realize their application in disease diagnosis and treatment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21273240, 11204267, and 11474013).

  5. New Mexico Center for Particle Physics: Studies of fundamental interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The New Mexico Center/UNM group research program includes the CDF experiment at Fermilab and the SDC experiment at the SSC. In both experiments the UNM group research focuses on silicon strip tracking systems. The present research goals are to develop and utilize precision silicon tracking to increase significantly the physics reach of the Tevatron, and to make possible the study of high-P t physics at the SSC. The search for the t-quark in CDF is the primary goal of the upcoming Tevatron runs. This Progress Report summarizes our research accomplishments from the last year

  6. Studies of double parton interactions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00227648; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of double and multiple parton scattering are sizable in many physics processes at the LHC, especially in the region of low particle transverse momenta. Studies of double-parton scattering using various final states, i.e. W+dijet, W+J/Psi, Z+J/Psi, double-J/psi and four-jet events, are presented along with measurements of the effective cross section, exploiting the different kinematic configurations of events with the double parton and single parton scattering.

  7. Parametric study for characterization of beam-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, A.; Charissoux, C.; Calvet, J.N.; Contre, M.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements of the use of surface thermal treatment by laser (quenching for example) and the operation control involve a perfect knowledge of the specific action of each parameter. The characteristics and the thickness of the transformed metal are indeed, very directly related to the material and beam characteristics. A parametric study was made in this way on two alloys: zircaloy and TA6V. It has led to the setting up of an empiric formulation relating closely quenching penetration and test conditions. The application of this approach for the continuous surface treatment was examined through the analysis of the problems connected to the pass overlapping and the associated thermal cycles [fr

  8. Nursing Interactions With Intensive Care Unit Patients Affected by Sleep Deprivation: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Gian Domenico; Tuteri, Debora; Giontella, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) often experience sleep deprivation due to different factors. Its consequences are damaging both physiologically and psychologically. This study focuses particularly on nursing interactions as the main factor involved in sleep deprivation issues. The aims of this study were to examine the frequency, pattern, and types of nocturnal care interactions with patients in the respiratory and cardiology ICUs; analyze the relationship between these interactions and patients' variables (age, sex, recovery diagnosis, and acuity of care); and analyze the differences in patterns of nocturnal care interactions among the units. This is an observational retrospective study that analyzes the frequency, pattern, and types of nocturnal care interactions with patients between 7 PM and 6 AM recording data in the activity data sheets. Data consisted of 93 data assessment sheets. The mean number of care interactions per night was 18.65 (SD, 3.71). In both ICUs, interactions were most frequent at 7 PM, 10 PM, and 6 AM. Only 8 uninterrupted sleep periods occurred. Frequency of interactions correlated significantly with patients' acuity scores and the number of nurse interventions in both ICUs. Patients in ICUs have fragmented sleep patterns. This study underlines the need to develop new management approaches to promote and maintain sleep.

  9. Interactions among Future Study Abroad Students: Exploring Potential Intercultural Learning Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, C.; Beaven, A.; Pugliese, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study presented in this article aims to explore if and how intercultural learning may take place in students' class interaction. It is grounded in the assumption that interculturality is not a clear-cut feature inherent to interactions occurring when individuals with presumed different linguistic and cultural/national backgrounds talk to each…

  10. Increasing International and Domestic Student Interaction through Group Work: A Case Study from the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Ken; Chen, Honglin; Warren, Stan

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the use of group work strategies to increase student interaction and learning. Despite the growing linguistic and cultural diversity in tertiary institutions, there is strong evidence of minimal interaction between "domestic" and "international" students in classrooms and in wider university contexts. This study investigates…

  11. Studies on interfacial interactions of TiO2 nanoparticles with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Studies on interfacial interactions of TiO2 nanoparticles with bacterial cells under light and dark conditions by Swayamprava Dalai et al (pp 371–381). Graphical abstract. Sequence of events occurring in course of cell-NP interaction: Surface adsorption, internalization and bioaccumulation of NPs which leads to stress upon ...

  12. Interaction between adrenaline and dibenzo-18-crown-6: Electrochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance, and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between adrenaline (Ad) and dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) was studied by cyclic voltammetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the theoretical calculations, respectively. The results show that DB18C6 will affect the electron transfer properties of Ad. DB18C6 can form stable supramolecular complexes with Ad through ion-dipole and hydrogen bond interactions.

  13. Parental Interaction Patterns in Children with Adhd and Controls; a Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Afkhami -Aghda

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Communicational patterns of the parents can either positively or negatively influence children's personality. Parenting manner has long-term effects on behavior, function, expectations and eventually people's future personality. This study investigates parental interaction patterns in children with attention deficit- hyperactive disorder. Methods :In this study, 50 male children aged 7-12 years were selected in two groups including 1 25 students with ADHD referring to psychiatry clinics in Isfahan according to the diagnostic scale of DSM- IV and 2 25 healthy boys selected by random cluster multistage sampling from primary schools in five districts of Isfahan from Septamber 2005 until March 2005. Schaffer and Edgerton parental interaction questionnaire was filled for them. Results: In "Communication" interaction pattern, the mean score of healthy children was 15.08, while the mean score of ADHD children was 13.42. In "admission" interactional pattern; the mean of the first group was 14.76, while the second group was 11.76. In "control" interactional pattern, mean of group one was 13.28 and the second group was 11.76. In "aggression control" interactional pattern, the mean of group one was 13 and the second group was 14.68. In "lack of aggressive attachment" interactional pattern, mean of the first group was 13.36 and the second group was 16.67. The mean scores of parental interactional pattern in healthy children were all higher than ADHD children except for "aggression control" and "lack of aggressive attachment" interactional patterns. Conclusion: The more the parental "admission" interactional pattern score, the lower the signs of ADHD in children. The signs of severity are lower in cases with more positive parental "control" interactional patterns. If the scores of "lack of aggressive/ attachment" and "aggressive/ control" interactional patterns are higher, ADHD signs are more severe.

  14. Shock-tube study of fusion plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.; Tien, J.K.; Jensen, B.; Panayotou, N.F.; Feinberg, B.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have been made of phenomena which occur when a hot (T 1 approximately equal to 6 x 10 6 0 K), dense (n approximately equal to 10 16 cm -3 ), deuterium plasma containing a transverse magnetic field is brought into sudden contact with a cold metal wall. These studies are motivated by the need to understand plasma and metallurgical conditions at the first-wall of a fusion reactor. Experiments were carried out in the Columbia high energy electromagnetic shock tube. Computational simulation was used to investigate the detailed physics of the fusion plasma boundary layer which develops at the wall. The rate of energy transfer from the plasma to the wall was calculated and conditions under which surface melting occurs are estimated. Experimental measurements of plasma-wall heat transfer rates up to 3 x 10 5 watts/cm 2 were obtained and agreement with computed values are good. Fusion reactor first-wall materials have been exposed to 6.0 x 10 21 eV cm -2 (1,000 shots) of deuterium plasma bombardment. Scanning electron micrograph photographs show preferential erosion at grain boundaries, formation of deuterium surface blisters, and evidence of local surface melting. Some cracking is observed along grain boundaries, and a decrease in tensile ductiity is measured

  15. Engaging the Terminal: Promoting Halogen Bonding Interactions with Uranyl Oxo Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Korey P; Kalaj, Mark; Surbella, Robert G; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Cahill, Christopher L

    2017-11-02

    Engaging the nominally terminal oxo atoms of the linear uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) cation in non-covalent interactions represents both a significant challenge and opportunity within the field of actinide hybrid materials. An approach has been developed for promoting oxo atom participation in a range of non-covalent interactions, through judicious choice of electron donating equatorial ligands and appropriately polarizable halogen-donor atoms. As such, a family of uranyl hybrid materials was generated based on a combination of 2,5-dihalobenzoic acid and aromatic, chelating N-donor ligands. Delineation of criteria for oxo participation in halogen bonding interactions has been achieved by preparing materials containing 2,5-dichloro- (25diClBA) and 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid (25diBrBA) coupled with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) (1 and 2), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3-5), 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (terpy) (6-8), or 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (Cl-terpy) (9-10), which have been characterized through single crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman, Infrared (IR), and luminescence spectroscopy, as well as through density functional calculations of electrostatic potentials. Looking comprehensively, these results are compared with recently published analogues featuring 2,5-diiodobenzoic acid which indicate that although inclusion of a capping ligand in the uranyl first coordination sphere is important, it is the polarizability of the selected halogen atom that ultimately drives halogen bonding interactions with the uranyl oxo atoms. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Cold K-Ca+ interaction studies in an ion-atom hybrid trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraladevi, Jyothi; Egodapitiya, Kisra; Shu, Gang; Zhang, Bichen; Condoluci, John; Chiappina, Piero; Lao, Di; Jia, Zhubing; Clark, Rob; Brown, Ken

    2017-04-01

    Mixtures of cooled and trapped ions and atoms enable study of cold collisions including elastic collisions, charge exchange interactions and molecular ion formation. To facilitate these studies, we have developed an apparatus comprising a spatially overlapped ion trap (linear Paul trap) and an atom trap (magneto optical trap). The apparatus is integrated with a high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for identifying the reaction products. Initial studies on interactions between cold Calcium (Ca+) ions and Potassium (K) atoms will be presented. The prospects for rotational cooling of molecular ions by interaction with ultracold Potassium atoms will be discussed. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative of ARO.

  17. Reverse protein arrays applied to host-pathogen interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Víctor J; Kauffmann, Ekkehard; Molina, María

    2011-01-01

    Infection of cells and tissues by pathogenic microorganisms often involves severe reprogramming of host cell signaling. Typically, invasive microorganisms manipulate host cellular pathways seeking advantage for replication and survival within the host, or to evade the immune response. Understanding such subversion of the host cell by intracellular pathogens at a molecular level is the key to possible preventive and therapeutic interventions on infectious diseases. Reverse Protein Arrays (RPAs) have been exploited in other fields, especially in molecular oncology. However, this technology has not been applied yet to the study of infectious diseases. Coupling classic in vitro infection techniques used by cellular microbiologists to proteomic approaches such as RPA analysis should provide a wealth of information about how host cell pathways are manipulated by pathogens. The increasing availability of antibodies specific for phosphorylated epitopes in signaling proteins allows monitoring global changes in phosphorylation through the infection process by utilizing RPA analyses. In our lab, we have shown the potential of RPA technology in this field by devising a microarray consisting of lysates from cell cultures infected by Salmonella typhimurium. The protocols used are described here.

  18. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  19. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY FOCUSED ON MOVEMENTS AND INTERACTIONS IN THE WORK ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyeon Bae

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how the interior layout of the workspace can affect employees’ number of steps and face-to-face interactions. Eighteen participants were recruited for the study and the data was collected over ten business days. The participants completed self-report forms to report the number of steps and interactions they had daily. A positive relationship was found between distance and the number of steps and interactions. A negative correlation was found between depth, a construct of the space syntax theory, and the number of steps and interactions. The findings further examined whether the results support a social ecological model with the relationships between distance, depth, the number of steps and interaction, and moderate variables (personal, environmental, and organizational factors. Findings indicated that the number of steps, as a function of human behavior, was affected by distance and depth (as environmental factors, age and years of working (as personal factors, and work hours (as an organizational factor.

  20. STATISTICAL INTERACTIONS AND BAYES ESTIMATION OF LOG ODDS IN CASE-CONTROL STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satagopan, Jaya M.; Olson, Sara H.; Elston, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the estimation of the logarithm of disease odds (log odds) when evaluating two risk factors, whether or not interactions are present. Statisticians define interaction as a departure from an additive model on a certain scale of measurement of the outcome. Certain interactions, known as removable interactions, may be eliminated by fitting an additive model under an invertible transformation of the outcome. This can potentially provide more precise estimates of log odds than fitting a model with interaction terms. In practice, we may also encounter non-removable interactions. The model must then include interaction terms, regardless of the choice of the scale of the outcome. However, in practical settings, we do not know at the outset whether an interaction exists, and if so whether it is removable or non-removable. Rather than trying to decide on significance levels to test for the existence of removable and non-removable interactions, we develop a Bayes estimator based on a squared error loss function. We demonstrate the favorable bias-variance trade-offs of our approach using simulations, and provide empirical illustrations using data from three published endometrial cancer case-control studies. The methods are implemented in an R program, available freely at http://www.mskcc.org/biostatistics/~satagopj. PMID:25586327