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Sample records for non-covalent interactions studied

  1. Conformers and non-covalent interactions studied by laser spectroscopies and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Susanne

    2001-07-01

    The model peptides, formanilide and acetanilide, and their weakly bound complexes were studied in the gas-phase using resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) and zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. Both, cis- and trans-isomers of formanilide, were observed under molecular beam conditions. Trans-formanilide displayed predominantly in-plane vibrational excitation indicative of a planar geometry with modest geometry changes upon excitation and ionisation. In cis-formanilide the side-chain is twisted compared to the phenyl plane in the S{sub 0} state, but planar in the S{sub 1} and D{sub 0} states, revealed in characteristic side-chain torsional and out-of-plane bending excitations. Additionally, the ZEKE spectra provide evidence that excess cationic charge is delocalised from the aromatic ring to the side chain. The work on trans-formanilide was extended to its van der Waals complex with Argon with the purpose of investigating the torsional potential of the side-chain and probing charge delocalisation. Complexation of amides with water is of considerable interest since water is not only present as a bulk solvent surrounding a peptide but also attached to specific binding sites in its interior. Evidence was found for the existence of a NH- and CO-bound isomer of trans-formanilide in the neutral, S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}, states, with the ZEKE spectrum of the cationic 'CO-bound' complex indicating a strong preference for the NH binding site. (author)

  2. Recognition of anions using urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes: A density functional theory study of non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, Mohd; Lone, Mohsin Y.; Jha, Prakash C.

    2018-02-01

    Designing of new calixarene receptors for the selective binding of anions is an age-old concept; even though expected outcomes from this field are at premature stage. Herein, we have performed quantum chemical calculations to provide structural basis of anion binding with urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes (1, 2, and 3). In particular, spherical halides (F-, Cl-, Br-) and linear anions (CN-, N3-, SCN-) were modelled for calculating binding energies with receptor 1, 2 and 3 followed by their marked IR vibrations; taking the available experimental information into account. We found that the thiourea substitutions have better capability to stabilize the anions. Results have suggested that the structural behaviour of macrocyclic motifs were responsible for displaying the anion binding potentials. Moreover, second order "charge transfer" interactions of n-σ∗NH and n-σ∗OH type along the H-bond axis played critical role in developing hydrogen bonds. The present work also examines the role of non-covalent interactions (NCI) and their effects on thermodynamic and chemical-reactivity descriptors.

  3. Characterising non-covalent interactions with the Cambridge Structural Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommerse, J P; Taylor, R

    1997-02-01

    This review describes how the CSD can be used to study non-covalent interactions. Several different types of information may be obtained. First, the relative frequencies of various interactions can be studied; for example, we have shown that the terminal oxygen atoms of phosphate groups accept hydrogen bonds far more often than the linkage oxygens. Secondly, information can be obtained about the geometries of nonbonded contacts; for example, hydrogen bonds to P-O groups rarely form along the extension of the P-O bond, whereas short contacts between oxygen and carbon-bound iodine show a strong preference for linear C-I ... O angles. Thirdly, the CSD can be searched for novel interactions which may be exploited in inhibitor design; for example, the I ... O contacts just mentioned, and N-H ... pi hydrogen bonds. Finally, the CSD can suggest synthetic targets for medicinal chemistry; for example, molecules containing delocalised electron deficient groups such as trimethylammonium, pyridinium, thaizolium and dinitrophenyl have a good chance of binding to an active-site tryptophan. Although the CSD contains small-molecule crystal structures, not protein-ligand complexes, there is considerable evidence that the contacts seen in the two types of structures are similar. We have illustrated this a number of times in the present review and additional evidence has been given previously by Klebe. The major advantages of the CSD are its size, diversity and experimental accuracy. For these reasons, it is a useful tool for modellers engaged in rational inhibitor design.

  4. Nature and consequences of non-covalent interactions between flavonoids and macronutrients in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordenave, Nicolas; Hamaker, Bruce R; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2014-01-01

    Many of the potential health benefits of flavonoids have been associated with their specific chemical and biological properties including their ability to interact and bind non-covalently to macronutrients in foods. While flavonoid-protein interactions and binding have been the subject of intensive study, significantly less is understood about non-covalent interactions with carbohydrates and lipids. These interactions with macronutrients are likely to impact both the flavonoid properties in foods, such as their radical scavenging activity, and the food or beverage matrix itself, including their taste, texture and other sensorial properties. Overall, non-covalent binding of flavonoids with macronutrients is primarily driven by van der Waals interactions. From the flavonoid perspective, these interactions are modulated by characteristics such as degree of polymerization, molecular flexibility, number of external hydroxyl groups, or number of terminal galloyl groups. From the macronutrient standpoint, electrostatic and ionic interactions are generally predominant with carbohydrates, while hydrophobic interactions are generally predominant with lipids and mainly limited to interactions with flavonols. All of these interactions are involved in flavonoid-protein interactions. While primarily associated with undesirable characteristics in foods and beverages, such as astringency, negative impact on macronutrient digestibility and hazing, more recent efforts have attempted to leverage these interactions to develop controlled delivery systems or strategies to enhance flavonoids bioavailability. This paper aims at reviewing the fundamental bases for non-covalent interactions, their occurrence in food and beverage systems and their impact on the physico-chemical, organoleptic and some nutritional properties of food.

  5. Alignment of non-covalent interactions at protein-protein interfaces.

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    Hongbo Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study and comparison of protein-protein interfaces is essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between proteins. While there are many methods for comparing protein structures and protein binding sites, so far no methods have been reported for comparing the geometry of non-covalent interactions occurring at protein-protein interfaces. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a method for aligning non-covalent interactions between different protein-protein interfaces. The method aligns the vector representations of van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds based on their geometry. The method has been applied to a dataset which comprises a variety of protein-protein interfaces. The alignments are consistent to a large extent with the results obtained using two other complementary approaches. In addition, we apply the method to three examples of protein mimicry. The method successfully aligns respective interfaces and allows for recognizing conserved interface regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Galinter method has been validated in the comparison of interfaces in which homologous subunits are involved, including cases of mimicry. The method is also applicable to comparing interfaces involving non-peptidic compounds. Galinter assists users in identifying local interface regions with similar patterns of non-covalent interactions. This is particularly relevant to the investigation of the molecular basis of interaction mimicry.

  6. Stereodynamic tetrahydrobiisoindole “NU-BIPHEP(O”s: functionalization, rotational barriers and non-covalent interactions

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    Golo Storch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stereodynamic ligands offer intriguing possibilities in enantioselective catalysis. “NU-BIPHEPs” are a class of stereodynamic diphosphine ligands which are easily accessible via rhodium-catalyzed double [2 + 2 + 2] cycloadditions. This study explores the preparation of differently functionalized “NU-BIPHEP(O” compounds, the characterization of non-covalent adduct formation and the quantification of enantiomerization barriers. In order to explore the possibilities of functionalization, we studied modifications of the ligand backbone, e.g., with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride. Diastereomeric adducts with Okamoto-type cellulose derivatives and on-column deracemization were realized on the basis of non-covalent interactions. Enantioselective dynamic HPLC (DHPLC allowed for the determination of rotational barriers of ΔG‡298K = 92.2 ± 0.3 kJ mol−1 and 99.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol−1 underlining the stereodynamic properties of “NU-BIPHEPs” and “NU-BIPHEP(Os”, respectively. These results make the preparation of tailor-made functionalized stereodynamic ligands possible and give an outline for possible applications in enantioselective catalysis.

  7. Non-covalent Interactions of Graphene with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zygouri, Panagiota; Potsi, Georgia; Mouzourakis, Eleftherios; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In this mini review we discuss the interactions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with graphene and the experimental approaches developed so far to create novel graphene/PAH hybrids and composite systems. The utilization of these systems in electrical, biomedical and polymer-reinforcement

  8. Description of Non-Covalent Interactions in SCC-DFTB Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miriyala, Vijay Madhav; Řezáč, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2017), s. 688-697 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-11321Y Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional tight binding * DFTB3 * non- covalent interactions * dispersion correction * hydrogen bonding correction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.229, year: 2016

  9. Non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 dictates its degradation.

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    Yu Zhao

    Full Text Available GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4. GTPCH1 protein degradation has been reported in animal models of several diseases, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GTPCH1 is degraded remain uncharacterized. Here we report a novel non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTPCH1 in vitro and in vivo. The non-covalent binding of GTPCH1 to polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD results in ubiquitination and degradation. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin in cultured cells accelerated GTPCH1 degradation. In cultured cells and in vitro assays, Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains, but not Lys63-linked chains, interacted with GTPCH1 and targeted it for degradation. Consistently, proteasome inhibition attenuated GTPCH1 degradation. Finally, direct mutagenesis of an isoleucine (Ile131 in the hydrophobic patch of the GTPCH1 UBD affected its ubiquitin binding and the enzyme stability. Taken together, we conclude that GTPCH1 non-covalently interacts with polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain. The polyubiquitin binding directs GTPCH1 ubiquitination and proteasome degradation.

  10. Molecular insight on the non-covalent interactions between carbapenems and uc(l,d)-transpeptidase 2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ONIOM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntombela, Thandokuhle; Fakhar, Zeynab; Ibeji, Collins U.; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E. M.; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2018-05-01

    Tuberculosis remains a dreadful disease that has claimed many human lives worldwide and elimination of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis also remains elusive. Multidrug-resistant TB is rapidly increasing worldwide; therefore, there is an urgent need for improving the current antibiotics and novel drug targets to successfully curb the TB burden. uc(l,d)-Transpeptidase 2 is an essential protein in Mtb that is responsible for virulence and growth during the chronic stage of the disease. Both uc(d,d)- and uc(l,d)-transpeptidases are inhibited concurrently to eradicate the bacterium. It was recently discovered that classic penicillins only inhibit uc(d,d)-transpeptidases, while uc(l,d)-transpeptidases are blocked by carbapenems. This has contributed to drug resistance and persistence of tuberculosis. Herein, a hybrid two-layered ONIOM (B3LYP/6-31G+(d): AMBER) model was used to extensively investigate the binding interactions of LdtMt2 complexed with four carbapenems (biapenem, imipenem, meropenem, and tebipenem) to ascertain molecular insight of the drug-enzyme complexation event. In the studied complexes, the carbapenems together with catalytic triad active site residues of LdtMt2 (His187, Ser188 and Cys205) were treated at with QM [B3LYP/6-31+G(d)], while the remaining part of the complexes were treated at MM level (AMBER force field). The resulting Gibbs free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) for all complexes showed that the carbapenems exhibit reasonable binding interactions towards LdtMt2. Increasing the number of amino acid residues that form hydrogen bond interactions in the QM layer showed significant impact in binding interaction energy differences and the stabilities of the carbapenems inside the active pocket of LdtMt2. The theoretical binding free energies obtained in this study reflect the same trend of the experimental observations. The electrostatic, hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions between the carbapenems and Ldt

  11. Atomic Ensemble Effects and Non-Covalent Interactions at the Electrode–Electrolyte Interface

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    Angel Cuesta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-modified Pt(111 electrodes have been recently employed to study atomic ensemble effects in electrocatalysis. This work, which will be briefly reviewed, reveals that the smallest site required for methanol dehydrogenation and formic acid dehydration is composed of three contiguous Pt atoms. By blocking these trigonal sites, the specific adsorption of anions, such as sulfate and phosphate, can be inhibited, thus increasing the rate of oxygen reduction reaction by one order of magnitude or more. Moreover, alkali metal cations affect hydrogen adsorption on cyanide-modified Pt(111. This effect is attributed to the non-covalent interactions at the electrical double layer between specifically adsorbed anions or dipoles and the alkali metal cations. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effect of the concentration of alkali metal cations. Accordingly, a simple model that reproduces the experimental observations accurately and enables the understanding of the trends in the strength of the interaction between M+ and CNad when moving from Li+ to Cs+, as well as the deviations from the expected trends, is developed. This simple model can also explain the occurrence of super-Nernstian shifts of the equilibrium potential of interfacial proton-coupled electron transfers. Therefore, the model can be generally applied to explain quantitatively the effect of cations on the properties of the electrical double layer. The recently reported effects of alkali metal cations on several electrocatalytic reactions must be mediated by the interaction between these cations and chemisorbed species. As these interactions seem to be adequately and quantitatively described by our model, we expect the model to also be useful to describe, explain, and potentially exploit these effects.

  12. Preparation and characterization of malonic acid cross-linked chitosan and collagen 3D scaffolds: an approach on non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Tapas; Sailakshmi, G; Gnanamani, A; Mandal, A B

    2012-05-01

    The present study emphasizes the influence of non-covalent interactions on the mechanical and thermal properties of the scaffolds of chitosan/collagen origin. Malonic acid (MA), a bifuncitonal diacid was chosen to offer non-covalent cross-linking. Three dimensional scaffolds was prepared using chitosan at 1.0% (w/v) and MA at 0.2% (w/v), similarly collagen 0.5% (w/v) and MA 0.2% (w/v) and characterized. Results on FT-IR, TGA, DSC, SEM and mechanical properties (tensile strength, stiffness, Young's modulus, etc.) assessment demonstrated the existence of non-covalent interaction between MA and chitosan/collagen, which offered flexibility and high strength to the scaffolds suitable for tissue engineering research. Studies using NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells suggested biocompatibility nature of the scaffolds. Docking simulation study further supports the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions between MA and chitosan/collagen.

  13. Network Formation via Anion Coordination: Crystal Structures Based on the Interplay of Non-Covalent Interactions

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    Matteo Savastano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis and the structural characterization of new H2L(CF3CO22 (1 and H2L(Ph2PO42 (2 compounds containing the diprotonated form (H2L2+ of the tetrazine-based molecule 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of single crystals of these compounds showed that H2L2+ displays similar binding properties toward both anions when salt bridge interactions are taken into account. Nevertheless, the different shapes, sizes and functionalities of trifluoroacetate and diphenyl phosphate anions define quite different organization patterns leading to the peculiar crystal lattices of 1 and 2. These three-dimensional (3D architectures are self-assembled by a variety of non-covalent forces, among which prominent roles are played by fluorine–π (in 1 and anion–π (in 2 interactions.

  14. Core/Shell Conjugated Polymer/Quantum Dot Composite Nanofibers through Orthogonal Non-Covalent Interactions

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    Brad W. Watson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructuring organic polymers and organic/inorganic hybrid materials and controlling blend morphologies at the molecular level are the prerequisites for modern electronic devices including biological sensors, light emitting diodes, memory devices and solar cells. To achieve all-around high performance, multiple organic and inorganic entities, each designed for specific functions, are commonly incorporated into a single device. Accurate arrangement of these components is a crucial goal in order to achieve the overall synergistic effects. We describe here a facile methodology of nanostructuring conjugated polymers and inorganic quantum dots into well-ordered core/shell composite nanofibers through cooperation of several orthogonal non-covalent interactions including conjugated polymer crystallization, block copolymer self-assembly and coordination interactions. Our methods provide precise control on the spatial arrangements among the various building blocks that are otherwise incompatible with one another, and should find applications in modern organic electronic devices such as solar cells.

  15. Non-covalent interactions between thio-caffeine derivatives and water-soluble porphyrin in ethanol-water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipke, Agnieszka; Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena; Sierakowska, Arleta; Jasiewicz, Beata

    2018-03-01

    To determine the binding interactions and ability to form the non-covalent systems, the association process between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP) and a series of five structurally diverse thio-caffeine analogues has been studied in ethanol and ethanol-water solutions, analyzing its absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra. The porphyrin fluorescence lifetimes in the systems studied were established as well. During the titration with thio-caffeine compounds the slight bathochromic effect and considerable hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret band maximum can be noted. The fluorescence quenching effect observed for interactions in H2TTMePP - thio-caffeine derivative systems, as well as the order of binding and fluorescence quenching constants (of 105-103 mol- 1) suggest the existence of the mechanism of static quenching due to the formation of non-covalent and non-fluorescent stacking complexes. In all the systems studied the phenomenon of the fractional accessibility of the fluorophore for the quencher was observed as well. Additionally, the specific binding interactions, due to the changes in reaction environment polarity, can be observed. It was found that thio-caffeine compounds can quench the porphyrin fluorescence according to the structure of thio-substituent in caffeine molecule. The obtained results can be potentially useful from scientific, therapeutic or environmental points of view.

  16. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Z.; Biver, T.; Corti, A.; Eltugral, N.; Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A.; Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M.

    2010-08-01

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdSnp) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Aunp) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Aunp are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdSnp do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO3. As regards the CdSnp/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdSnp external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 ± 0.5) × 105 M-1. On the contrary, concerning Aunp, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdSnp or Aunp. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdSnp to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration ( p resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Aunp neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdSnp can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Aunp.

  17. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Z. [Bogazici University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Biver, T., E-mail: tarita@dcci.unipi.i [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Corti, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Eltugral, N. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdS{sub np}) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Au{sub np}) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Au{sub np} are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdS{sub np} do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}. As regards the CdS{sub np}/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdS{sub np} external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}. On the contrary, concerning Au{sub np}, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdS{sub np} or Au{sub np}. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdS{sub np} to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration (p < 0.005), while longer-time exposure resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Au{sub np} neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdS{sub np} can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Au{sub np}.

  18. Non-Covalent Interactions and Impact of Charge Penetration Effects in Linear Oligoacene Dimers and Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-18

    Non-covalent interactions determine in large part the thermodynamic aspects of molecular packing in organic crystals. Using a combination of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) and classical multipole electrostatics, we describe the interaction potential energy surfaces for dimers of the oligoacene family, from benzene to hexacene. An analysis of these surfaces and a thorough assessment of dimers extracted from the reported crystal structures underline that high-order interactions (i.e., three-body non-additive interactions) must be considered in order to rationalize the details of the crystal structures. A comparison of the SAPT electrostatic energy with the multipole interaction energy demonstrates the importance of the contribution of charge penetration, which is shown to account for up to 50% of the total interaction energy in dimers extracted from the experimental single crystals; in the case of the most stable co-facial model dimers, this contribution is even larger than the total interaction energy. Our results highlight the importance of taking account of charge penetration in studies of the larger oligoacenes.

  19. Non-covalent interactions of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras proto-oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jorge H.; Deligkaris, Christos

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the complementary, but different, effects of physical (non-covalent) and chemical (covalent) mutagen-DNA and carcinogen-DNA interactions is important for understanding possible mechanisms of development and prevention of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. A highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ α]pyrene, namely (+)-anti-BPDE, is known to undergo both physical and chemical complexation with DNA. The major covalent adduct, a promutagenic, is known to be an external (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N2-dGuanosine configuration whose origins are not fully understood. Thus, it is desirable to study the mechanisms of external non-covalent BPDE-DNA binding and their possible relationships to external covalent trans adduct formation. We present a detailed codon-by-codon computational study of the non-covalent interactions of (+)-anti-BPDE with DNA which explains and correctly predicts preferential (+)-anti-BPDE binding at minor groove guanosines. Due to its relevance to carcinogenesis, the interaction of (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras gene has been studied in detail. Present address: Department of Physics, Drury University

  20. Inter- and intramolecular non-covalent interactions in 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde complexes of copper, silver, and gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Laura; Jääskeläinen, Sirpa; Hirva, Pipsa; Haukka, Matti

    2014-09-01

    Three new imidazole compounds, [CuBr2(mimc)2] (1), [Ag(mimc)2][CF3SO3] (2), and [AuCl3(mimc)] (3) (mimc = 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde), have been synthesized, structurally characterized, and further analyzed using the QTAIM analysis. The compounds exhibit self-assembled 3D networks arising from intermolecular non-covalent interactions such as metallophilic interactions, metal-π contacts, halogens-halogen interactions, and hydrogen bonds. These weak interactions have a strong impact on the coordination sphere of the metal atoms and on the packing of compounds 1, 2, and 3.

  1. ESI-MS study on non-covalent bond complex of rhFKBP12 and new neurogrowth promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hongxia; (王红霞); ZHANG; Xuemin; (张学敏); YANG; Songcheng; (杨松成); XIAO; Junhai; (肖军海); NIE; Aihua; (聂爱华); ZHAO; Liqin; (赵丽琴); LI; Song; (李松)

    2003-01-01

    An ESI-MS method for studying the non-covalent bond complex of rhFKBP12 with its nonimmunosuppressive ligands was developed. The method was used to screen out three compounds capable of binding to rhFKBP12 non-covalently from 52 compounds. By competing binding experiment, the binding site and the relative binding strength of these three compounds 000107, 000308 and A2B12 with rhFKBP12 were measured. All of them have the same binding site as FK506 does. X-ray crystalline diffraction experiment of non-covalent bond complex of 000107, 000308 with rhFKBP12 by Tsinghua University showed the same results. Among them 000308 has good effect on stimulating neurite to grow in chicken sensory neuronal cultures.

  2. Scaled MP3 non-covalent interaction energies agree closely with accurate CCSD(T) benchmark data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitonák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Cerný, Jirí; Grimme, Stefan; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-12

    Scaled MP3 interaction energies calculated as a sum of MP2/CBS (complete basis set limit) interaction energies and scaled third-order energy contributions obtained in small or medium size basis sets agree very closely with the estimated CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energies for the 22 H-bonded, dispersion-controlled and mixed non-covalent complexes from the S22 data set. Performance of this so-called MP2.5 (third-order scaling factor of 0.5) method has also been tested for 33 nucleic acid base pairs and two stacked conformers of porphine dimer. In all the test cases, performance of the MP2.5 method was shown to be superior to the scaled spin-component MP2 based methods, e.g. SCS-MP2, SCSN-MP2 and SCS(MI)-MP2. In particular, a very balanced treatment of hydrogen-bonded compared to stacked complexes is achieved with MP2.5. The main advantage of the approach is that it employs only a single empirical parameter and is thus biased by two rigorously defined, asymptotically correct ab-initio methods, MP2 and MP3. The method is proposed as an accurate but computationally feasible alternative to CCSD(T) for the computation of the properties of various kinds of non-covalently bound systems.

  3. Two supramolecular complexes based on polyoxometalates and Co-EDTA units via covalent connection or non-covalent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Chunlin; Xiao, Hanxi [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Cai, Qing [Chemistry Department, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tang, Jianting; Cai, Tiejun [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Deng, Qian, E-mail: dengqian10502@163.com [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Two new 3D network organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes ([Na{sub 6}(CoEDTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 13}]·(H{sub 2}SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40})·xH{sub 2}O)n (1) and [CoH{sub 4}EDTA(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}(SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40})·15H{sub 2}O (2) (H{sub 4}EDTA=Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) have been successfully synthesized by solution method, and characterized by infrared spectrum (IR), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and single{sup −}crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both of the complexes are the supramolecules, but with different liking mode, they are two representative models of supramolecule. complex (1) is a 3D infinite network supramolecular coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through coordinate-covalent bonds. While complex (2) is normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions, such as H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. Both of complex (1) and (2) exhibit good catalytic activities for catalytic oxidation of methanol, when the initial concentration of methanol is 3.0 g m{sup −3}, flow rate is 10 mL min{sup −1}, and the quality of catalyst is 0.2 g, for complex (1) and complex (2) the maximum elimination rates of methanol are 85% (150 °C) and 92% (120 °C), respectively. - Graphical abstract: Two new organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes based on Co-EDTA, and Keggin polyanions have been successfully synthesized with different pH value by solution method. They are attributed to two representative models of supramolecule. Complex(1) is an infinite coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through covalent bonds. Complex (2) is a normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions of H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. - Highlights: • Two supramolecules

  4. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  5. Thermal solid-state Z/E isomerization of 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines: effects of non-covalent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKO DŽAMBASKI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Configurational isomerization of stereo-defined 5-substituted and unsubstituted 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines (1 in the solid state, giving the Z/E mixtures in various ratios, was investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, X-ray powder crystallography and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The Z/E composition can be rationalized in terms of non-covalent interactions, involving intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and directional non-bonded 1,5-type S×××O interactions. X-Ray powder crystallography, using selected crystalline (Z-4-oxothiazolidine substrates, revealed transformation to the amorphous state during the irreversible Z®E process. A correlation between previous results on the Z/E isomerization in solution and now in the solid state was established.

  6. Effects of non-covalent interactions with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid) on the heat denaturation and solubility of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Jong, G.A.H. de; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The non-covalent interactions between the monomeric phenolic compound chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin were characterized, and their effect on protein properties was examined. 5-CQA had a low affinity for all three proteins, and these interactions

  7. Quantum chemical investigation of attractive non-covalent interactions between halomethanes and rare gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Linda J; Bruce, Duncan W; Karadakov, Peter B

    2012-11-01

    The interaction between rare gas atoms and trifluoromethylhalides and iodomethane is investigated using ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods: MP2, CCSD, B3LYP, M06, M06-L, M06-2X, M06-HF, X3LYP, PBE, B97-D, B3LYP-D3, and M06-L-D3, in combination with the aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVTZ-PP basis sets. A weakly attractive interaction is observed for all complexes, whose strength increases as the rare gas and halogen bond donor become more polarizable, and as the group bound to the halogen bond donor becomes more electron-withdrawing. The separation between iodine and krypton in the complex CF(3)I···Kr, calculated at the MP2 and B3LYP-D3 levels of theory, agrees very well with recent experimental results (Stephens, S. L.; Walker, N. R.; Legon, A. C. J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 135, 224309). Analysis of the ability of theoretical methods to account for the dispersion interaction present in these complexes leads to the conclusion that MP2 and B3LYP-D3, which produce very similar results, are the better performing methods, followed by B97-D and the M06 suite of functionals; the popular B3LYP as well as X3LYP perform poorly and significantly underestimate the interaction strength. The orbitals responsible for the interaction are identified through Edmiston-Ruedenberg localization; it is shown that, by combining the key orbitals, it is possible to observe a molecular orbital picture of a σ-hole interaction.

  8. Non-Covalent Interactions: Complexes of Guanidinium with DNA and RNA Nucleobases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blanco, F.; Kelly, B.; Sanchez-Sanz, Goar; Trujillo, Cristina; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.; Rozas, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 39 (2013), s. 11608-11616 ISSN 1520-6106 Grant - others:Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union(XE) FP7-274988 People Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular -orbital methods * cation-pi interactions * minor-groove binders Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  9. Synthetic, XRD, non-covalent interactions and solvent dependent nonlinear optical studies of Sulfadiazine-Ortho-Vanillin Schiff base: (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxy- benzylidene) amino)-N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Salim, Muhammad; Khalid, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Khan, Muhammad Usman; Braga, Ataualpa Albert Carmo

    2018-06-01

    In this study, Sulfadiazine-Ortho-Vanillin Schiff base namely (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)amino)sbnd N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide (BS) was synthesized. Chemical characterization and computational studies using different techniques like XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis, NBO, FMO, and MEP have been employed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory to obtain optimized geometry and vibrational wave numbers for (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)amino)sbnd N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide (BS). The DFT optimized geometry supports the experimental XRD parameters. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energies and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces have been executed at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory. NBO analysis has been carried out at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level which not only discovered the hyper conjugative interactions and stability in title molecule but also reconfirmed the existence of Nsbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds between the dimer. The findings of small EHOMO-ELUMO gap shows less hardness and larger softness values which suggested the bioactiveness of the title molecule. Finally, the effect of solvent on nonlinear optical (NLO) properties has been executed using M06-2X level of theory and 6-311 + G (d,p) basis set. The solvent polarity enhanced the NLO response from 3.62 × 10-30 esu to 4.66 × 10-30 esu indicating the considerable NLO character hence in general may have potential applications in the development of non-linear optical materials.

  10. Non-Covalent Interactions in the Crystal Structure of Methyl 4-Hydroxy-3-Nitrobenzoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Simpson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Methyl 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzoate, (I, C8H7NO5, crystallizes with two unique molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit of the triclinic unit cell. The space group was assigned as P-1, with lattice parameters a = 0.72831(15, b = 1.0522(2, c = 1.1410(2 nm, α = 83.38(3, β = 80.83(3, γ = 82.02(3°, Z = 4, V = 0.8510(3 nm3, Mr = 197.15, Dc = 1.539 g/m3, µ= 0.131 mm−1, F(000 = 408, R = 0.1002 and wR = 0.2519. In the crystal structure, 12 hydrogen bonding and two p-stacking interactions link the molecules into infinite stacked sheets parallel to (101.

  11. A role for non-covalent SUMO interaction motifs in Pc2/CBX4 E3 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C Merrill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of proteins by the small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO is an essential process in mammalian cells. SUMO is covalently attached to lysines in target proteins via an enzymatic cascade which consists of E1 and E2, SUMO activating and conjugating enzymes. There is also a variable requirement for non-enzymatic E3 adapter like proteins, which can increase the efficiency and specificity of the sumoylation process. In addition to covalent attachment of SUMO to target proteins, specific non-covalent SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs that are generally short hydrophobic peptide motifs have been identified.Intriguingly, consensus SIMs are present in most SUMO E3s, including the polycomb protein, Pc2/Cbx4. However, a role for SIMs in SUMO E3 activity remains to be shown. We show that Pc2 contains two functional SIMs, both of which contribute to full E3 activity in mammalian cells, and are also required for sumoylation of Pc2 itself. Pc2 forms distinct sub-nuclear foci, termed polycomb bodies, and can recruit partner proteins, such as the corepressor CtBP. We demonstrate that mutation of the SIMs in Pc2 prevents Pc2-dependent CtBP sumoylation, and decreases enrichment of SUMO1 and SUMO2 at polycomb foci. Furthermore, mutational analysis of both SUMO1 and SUMO2 reveals that the SIM-interacting residues of both SUMO isoforms are required for Pc2-mediated sumoylation and localization to polycomb foci.This work provides the first clear evidence for a role for SIMs in SUMO E3 activity.

  12. Non-covalent conjugation of cutinase from Fusarium sp. ICT SAC1 with pectin for enhanced stability: Process minutiae, kinetics, thermodynamics and structural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, Abhijeet B; Chaudhari, Sandeep A; Singhal, Rekha S

    2017-09-01

    Cutinase, a member of α/β-fold hydrolase family possess potentially diverse applications in several industrial processes and products. The present work aims towards thermo-stabilization of cutinase from novel source Fusarium sp. ICT SAC1 via non-covalent interaction with polysaccharides. Although all six polysaccharides chosen for study enhanced the thermal stability, pectin was found to be most promising. The interaction protocol for cutinase with pectin was optimized sequentially with respect to the ratio of enzyme to pectin, solution pH, and buffer strength. Cutinase-pectin conjugate under optimized conditions (1:12, pH-6.5, 50mM) showed enhanced thermal stability as evident from lower inactivation rate constant, higher half-life and D-value within the 40-55°C. A slender rise in K m and V max values and enhanced thermodynamic parameters of cutinase-pectin conjugate were observed after non-covalent interaction. Entropy values were 1.5-fold higher for cutinase-pectin conjugate at each temperature suggesting an upsurge in number of protein molecules in a transition activated state. Positive values of entropy for both forms of cutinase suggested a rise in disordered conformation. Noticeable conformational changes in cutinase after conjugation with pectin were confirmed by FTIR as well as fluorescence emission spectra. An increment in helix to turn conversion was observed in complexed cutinase vis-à-vis free cutinase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-covalent interactions across organic and biological subsets of chemical space: Physics-based potentials parametrized from machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; DiStasio, Robert A.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2018-06-01

    Classical intermolecular potentials typically require an extensive parametrization procedure for any new compound considered. To do away with prior parametrization, we propose a combination of physics-based potentials with machine learning (ML), coined IPML, which is transferable across small neutral organic and biologically relevant molecules. ML models provide on-the-fly predictions for environment-dependent local atomic properties: electrostatic multipole coefficients (significant error reduction compared to previously reported), the population and decay rate of valence atomic densities, and polarizabilities across conformations and chemical compositions of H, C, N, and O atoms. These parameters enable accurate calculations of intermolecular contributions—electrostatics, charge penetration, repulsion, induction/polarization, and many-body dispersion. Unlike other potentials, this model is transferable in its ability to handle new molecules and conformations without explicit prior parametrization: All local atomic properties are predicted from ML, leaving only eight global parameters—optimized once and for all across compounds. We validate IPML on various gas-phase dimers at and away from equilibrium separation, where we obtain mean absolute errors between 0.4 and 0.7 kcal/mol for several chemically and conformationally diverse datasets representative of non-covalent interactions in biologically relevant molecules. We further focus on hydrogen-bonded complexes—essential but challenging due to their directional nature—where datasets of DNA base pairs and amino acids yield an extremely encouraging 1.4 kcal/mol error. Finally, and as a first look, we consider IPML for denser systems: water clusters, supramolecular host-guest complexes, and the benzene crystal.

  14. Investigation of Non-Covalent Interactions of Aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, G2, and M1 with Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Poór

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are widely spread mycotoxins produced mainly by Aspergillus species. Consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated foods and drinks causes serious health risks for people worldwide. It is well-known that the reactive epoxide metabolite of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 forms covalent adducts with serum albumin. However, non-covalent interactions of aflatoxins with human serum albumin (HSA are poorly characterized. Thus, in this study the complex formation of aflatoxins was examined with HSA applying spectroscopic and molecular modelling studies. Our results demonstrate that aflatoxins form stable complexes with HSA as reflected by binding constants between 2.1 × 104 and 4.5 × 104 dm3/mol. A binding free energy value of −26.90 kJ mol−1 suggests a spontaneous binding process between AFB1 and HSA at room-temperature, while the positive entropy change of 55.1 JK−1 mol−1 indicates a partial decomposition of the solvation shells of the interacting molecules. Modeling studies and investigations with site markers suggest that Sudlow’s Site I of subdomain IIA is the high affinity binding site of aflatoxins on HSA. Interaction of AFB1 with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumins was also investigated. Similar stabilities of the examined AFB1-albumin complexes were observed suggesting the low species differences of the albumin-binding of aflatoxins.

  15. Hirshfeld surface analyses and crystal structures of supramolecular self-assembly thiourea derivatives directed by non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Ilkay; Solmaz, Ummuhan; Binzet, Gun; Keskin, Ebru; Arslan, Birdal; Arslan, Hakan

    2018-04-01

    The novel N-(bis(3,5-dimethoxybenzyl)carbamothioyl)-4-R-benzamide (R: H, Cl, CH3 and OCH3) compounds have been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Their crystal structures were also determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Hirshfeld surfaces analysis and their associated two dimensional fingerprint plots of compounds were used as theoretical approach to assess driving force for crystal structure formation via the intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattices of synthesized compounds. The study of X-ray single crystal diffraction and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of the prepared compounds shows that hydrogen bonding and other weaker interactions such as Nsbnd H⋯S, weak Csbnd H⋯S, Csbnd H⋯O, Csbnd H⋯N and Csbnd H···π intermolecular interactions and π-π stacking, among molecules of synthesized compounds participate in a cooperative way to stabilize the supramolecular structures.

  16. Crystal structure of a human single domain antibody dimer formed through V(H-V(H non-covalent interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toya Nath Baral

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs derived from human V(H are considered to be less soluble and prone to aggregate which makes it difficult to determine the crystal structures. In this study, we isolated and characterized two anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2 sdAbs, Gr3 and Gr6, from a synthetic human V(H phage display library. Size exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analyses demonstrated that Gr3 is a monomer, but that Gr6 is a strict dimer. To understand this different molecular behavior, we solved the crystal structure of Gr6 to 1.6 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the homodimer assembly of Gr6 closely mimics the V(H-V(L heterodimer of immunoglobulin variable domains and the dimerization interface is dominated by hydrophobic interactions.

  17. Non-Covalent Interactions and Impact of Charge Penetration Effects in Linear Oligoacene Dimers and Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    of charge penetration, which is shown to account for up to 50% of the total interaction energy in dimers extracted from the experimental single crystals; in the case of the most stable co-facial model dimers, this contribution is even larger than the total

  18. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.

    2013-01-01

    We here present amethod to form a noncovalent conjugate of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid aimed to interact with cells over-expressing folate receptors. The bonding was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple, rapid “one pot” synthesis method. The zeta...... a low toxicity of the conjugates in the THP-1 cells. The low toxicity and the cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotube–folic acid by cancer cells suggest their potential use in carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems and in the diagnosis of cancer or tropical diseases such as leishmaniasis....

  19. Non-Covalent Interactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Sagan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an in-depth, qualitative and quantitative description of non-covalent interactions in the hydrogen storage materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3 was performed by means of the charge and energy decomposition method (ETS-NOCV as well as the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA approach. It was determined that both crystals are stabilized by electrostatically dominated intra- and intermolecular M∙∙∙H–B interactions (M = Li, K. For LiN(CH32BH3 the intramolecular charge transfer appeared (B–H→Li to be more pronounced compared with the corresponding intermolecular contribution. We clarified for the first time, based on the ETS-NOCV and IQA methods, that homopolar BH∙∙∙HB interactions in LiN(CH32BH3 can be considered as destabilizing (due to the dominance of repulsion caused by negatively charged borane units, despite the fact that some charge delocalization within BH∙∙∙HB contacts is enforced (which explains H∙∙∙H bond critical points found from the QTAIM method. Interestingly, quite similar (to BH∙∙∙HB intermolecular homopolar dihydrogen bonds CH∙∙∙HC appared to significantly stabilize both crystals—the ETS-NOCV scheme allowed us to conclude that CH∙∙∙HC interactions are dispersion dominated, however, the electrostatic and σ/σ*(C–H charge transfer contributions are also important. These interactions appeared to be more pronounced in KN(CH32BH3 compared with LiN(CH32BH3.

  20. Predominantly ligand guided non-covalently linked assemblies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JUBARAJ B BARUAH

    2018-05-12

    May 12, 2018 ... Abstract. Various non-covalently linked inorganic self-assemblies formed by the supramolecular interacting .... metal-organic frameworks.59 Inorganic chemists rou- ...... two-dimensional organic–inorganic layered perovskite.

  1. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between cell penetrating peptides and plasmid DNA are important for stable non-covalent complexation and intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Archana; Sangave, Preeti C

    2016-10-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful tools for intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. Delivery of plasmid DNA, a large nucleic acid, poses a challenge for peptide mediated transport. The paper investigates and compares efficacy of five novel peptide designs for complexation of plasmid DNA and subsequent delivery into cells. The peptides were designed to contain reported DNA condensing agents and basic cell penetrating sequences, octa-arginine (R 8 ) and CHK 6 HC coupled to cell penetration accelerating peptides such as Bax inhibitory mutant peptide (KLPVM) and a peptide derived from the Kaposi fibroblast growth factor (kFGF) membrane translocating sequence. A tryptophan rich peptide, an analogue of Pep-3, flanked with CH 3 on either ends was also a part of the study. The peptides were analysed for plasmid DNA complexation, protection of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes against DNase I, serum components and competitive ligands by simple agarose gel electrophoresis techniques. Hemolysis of rat red blood corpuscles (RBCs) in the presence of the peptides was used as a measure of peptide cytotoxicity. Plasmid DNA delivery through the designed peptides was evaluated in two cell lines, human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and (NIH/3 T3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts via expression of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. The importance of hydrophobic sequences in addition to cationic sequences in peptides for non-covalent plasmid DNA complexation and delivery has been illustrated. An alternative to the employment of fatty acid moieties for enhanced gene transfer has been proposed. Comparison of peptides for plasmid DNA complexation and delivery of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes to cells estimated by expression of a reporter gene, SEAP. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Non-Covalent Functionalisation of C30 Fullerene by Pyrrole-n-Carboxylic Acid (n=2, 3): Density Functional Theory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harismah, Kun; Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Ghasemi, Nahid; Nejati, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    For functionalisation of a representative C30 fullerene nanostructure by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (PnCA; n=2, 3) their stabilities and properties were investigated based on density functional theory calculations. Parallel calculations were also done for C60 fullerene as evidence for comparing the results. Non-covalent interactions are considered to make the functionalised structures. In contrast with the spherical shape of C60, the shape of C30 fullerene is elliptical; therefore, the functionalisation processes were done for both axial and equatorial elliptical positions (AC30 and EC30). The results indicated that both the positions of C30 have almost equivalent chances to be functionalised by PnCA; but functionalisation by P2CA is slightly more favourable than P3CA, either for C60. The illustrated molecular orbitals' distributions indicated that the direction of charge transfer could be considered from PnCA counterparts to fullerene counterparts. The molecular properties indicated more reactivity for C30 than for C60 fullerene. Finally, the atomic scale quadrupole coupling constants indicated different roles for N and O atoms of PnCA in the functionalised models.

  3. Non-covalent functionalisation of C{sub 30} fullerene by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (n=2, 3). Density functional theory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harismah, Kun [Univ. Muhammadiyah Surakarta (Indonesia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Mirzaei, Mahmoud [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Bioinformatics Research Center; Ghasemi, Nahid [Islamic Azad Univ., Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Nejati, Mohammad [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2018-04-01

    For functionalisation of a representative C{sub 30} fullerene nanostructure by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (PnCA; n=2, 3) their stabilities and properties were investigated based on density functional theory calculations. Parallel calculations were also done for C{sub 60} fullerene as evidence for comparing the results. Non-covalent interactions are considered to make the functionalised structures. In contrast with the spherical shape of C{sub 60}, the shape of C{sub 30} fullerene is elliptical; therefore, the functionalisation processes were done for both axial and equatorial elliptical positions (AC{sub 30} and EC{sub 30}). The results indicated that both the positions of C{sub 30} have almost equivalent chances to be functionalised by PnCA; but functionalisation by P2CA is slightly more favourable than P3CA, either for C{sub 60}. The illustrated molecular orbitals' distributions indicated that the direction of charge transfer could be considered from PnCA counterparts to fullerene counterparts. The molecular properties indicated more reactivity for C{sub 30} than for C{sub 60} fullerene. Finally, the atomic scale quadrupole coupling constants indicated different roles for N and O atoms of PnCA in the functionalised models.

  4. Non-covalent associative structure of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, H. [Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2004-06-01

    The recent progress of non-covalent associative structure of coal and the mechanisms of the carbon disulphide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (CS{sub 2}/NMP) are mixed solvent and the additive addition enhancing the extraction yield of coals are reviewed, and the aggregation behaviour of coal in solid and solution states are presented, and the aggregation behavior of coal in solid and solution states are introduced in this paper. Coal extraction and swelling in organic solvents at room temperature were the most useful methods to understand the associative structure of coal. CS{sub 2}/NMP is a unique solvent to give high extraction yields for some bituminous coals. Some additives such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) can dissociate the stronger interactions among coal molecules and enhance the extraction yields of coal in the mixed solvent. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Non-covalent interactions between {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) with pyridoxine hydrochloride in methanol at T = (298.15, 308.15 and 318.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahman, Dhiraj; Sinha, Biswajit

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Methanolic solution of pyridoxine hydrochloride used as solvent. • {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) used as solute. • Partial molar volumes and viscosity B-coefficients of the solute were determined. • Weak 1:1 association between the complex and pyridoxine hydrochloride found. • Non-covalent interactions and Cu(II) complex acts as a net structure maker in the ternary solutions. - Abstract: Non-covalent interactions between of {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) with pyridoxine hydrochloride in methanol were investigated by a combination of physico-chemical and spectrophotometric methods at T = (298.15, 308.15 and 318.15) K under ambient pressure. From measured density and viscosity data the apparent molar volume (ϕ V ), the slope (S V ∗ ), standard partial molar volume (ϕ V 0 ), standard transfer volume (Δ t ϕ V 0 ), isobaric apparent molar expansibility (ϕ E ), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕ E 0 ), the viscosity B-coefficient, its temperature derivative (∂B/∂T), solvation number (S n ) were calculated and discussed on the basis of specific or non-specific (solute + cosolute) and (solute + solvent) interactions. Thermodynamics of viscous flow were discussed on the basis of the transition state theory. Spectrophotometric results indicated 1:1 (solute + cosolute) interaction between the complex and pyridoxine hydrochloride

  6. Multi-step non-covalent pathways to supramolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous organization of building blocks into ordered structures governed by non-covalent interactions, or self-assembly, is a commonly encountered pathway in nature to obtain functional materials. These materials often consist of many different components ordered into intricate structures.

  7. Synergistic effect of non-covalent interaction in colloidal nematic liquid crystal doped with magnetic functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalir, Nima; Javadian, Soheila

    2018-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), CNT@Fe3O4, and Fe3O4 nanocomposites were doped to eutectic uniaxial nematic liquid crystal (NLC's) (E5CN7) to improve physiochemical properties such as phase transition temperature, activation energy (Ea), dielectric anisotropy, and electro-optical properties. The thermal study of nematic phase shows a decrease in the nematic to isotropic phase transition temperature as CNT is doped. However, higher doping concentration of CNTs leads to the further increase in transition temperature. The anchoring effect or π-π interaction plays a key role in N-I phase transition. The functionalization of SWCNTs with Fe3O4 diminishes the CNT aggregation while the magnetic susceptibility is increased. The functionalized CNT doping to NLC's decrease significantly the phase transition temperature compared to doping of non-functionalized CNTs. Attractive interaction between guest and host molecules by magnetic and geometry effect increased the enthalpy and entropy of phase transition in the SWCNT@Fe3O4 sample compared to non-functionalized CNT doped system. Also, the Ea values are decreased as SWCNT@Fe3O4 is doped to pure E5CN7. The difference of N-I phase transition temperature was observed in Fe3O4 and CNT@Fe3O4 compared to SWCNT doped systems. Finally, dielectric anisotropy was increased in the doped system compared to pure NLC.

  8. On the nature of non-covalent interactions in isomers of 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone dimers - ground- and excited-state properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pandiyan, B. V.; Deepa, Palanisamy; Kolandaivel, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 37 (2014), s. 19928-19940 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogen bonding interactions * density functional theory * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.493, year: 2014

  9. Enzymatic Activity Enhancement of Non-Covalent Modified Superoxide Dismutase and Molecular Docking Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Jun Song

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase was improved in the pyrogallol autoxidation system by about 27%, after interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclo- dextrin and superoxide dismutase. Fluorescence spectrometry was used to study the interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and superoxide dismutase at different temperatures. By doing this, it can be found that these interactions increase fluorescence sensitivity. In the meantime, the synchronous fluorescence intensity revealed the interaction sites to be close to the tryptophan (Trp and tyrosine (Tyr residues of superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to explore the binding mode between the ligands and the receptor. This suggested that HP-β-CD interacted with the B ring, G ring and the O ring and revealed that the lysine (Lys residues enter the nanocavity. It was concluded that the HP-β-CD caused specific conformational changes in SOD by non-covalent modification.

  10. Relationships between Cargo, Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cell Type for Uptake of Non-Covalent Complexes into Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea-Anneliese Keller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Modulating signaling pathways for research and therapy requires either suppression or expression of selected genes or internalization of proteins such as enzymes, antibodies, nucleotide binding proteins or substrates including nucleoside phosphates and enzyme inhibitors. Peptides, proteins and nucleotides are transported by fusing or conjugating them to cell penetrating peptides or by formation of non-covalent complexes. The latter is often preferred because of easy handling, uptake efficiency and auto-release of cargo into the live cell. In our studies complexes are formed with labeled or readily detectable cargoes for qualitative and quantitative estimation of their internalization. Properties and behavior of adhesion and suspension vertebrate cells as well as the protozoa Leishmania tarentolae are investigated with respect to proteolytic activity, uptake efficiency, intracellular localization and cytotoxicity. Our results show that peptide stability to membrane-bound, secreted or intracellular proteases varies between different CPPs and that the suitability of individual CPPs for a particular cargo in complex formation by non-covalent interactions requires detailed studies. Cells vary in their sensitivity to increasing concentrations of CPPs. Thus, most cells can be efficiently transduced with peptides, proteins and nucleotides with intracellular concentrations in the low micromole range. For each cargo, cell type and CPP the optimal conditions must be determined separately.

  11. Stable non-covalent labeling of layered silicate nanoparticles for biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Gysell M; Jack, Kevin S; Musumeci, Anthony W; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2016-04-01

    Layered silicate nanoparticles (LSN) are widely used in industrial applications and consumer products. They also have potential benefits in biomedical applications such as implantable devices and for drug delivery. To study how nanomaterials interact with cells and tissues, techniques to track and quantify their movement through different biological compartments are essential. While radiolabels can be very sensitive, particularly for in vivo studies, fluorescent labeling has been preferred in recent years because of the array of methods available to image and quantify fluorescent nanoparticles. However, labeling can be problematic, especially if it alters the physical properties of the nanomaterial. Herein is described a novel non-covalent labeling technique for LSN using readily available fluorescent dimeric cyanine dyes without the need to use excess amounts of dye to achieve labeling, or the need for removal of unbound dye. The approach utilizes the cationic binding properties of layered silicate clays and the multiple quaternary nitrogens associated with the dyes. Preparation of YOYO-1 labeled LSN with optimal dispersion in aqueous media is presented. The utilization of the labeled particles is then demonstrated in cell binding and uptake studies using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The labeled LSN are highly fluorescent, stable and exhibit identical physical properties with respect to the unlabeled nanoparticles. The general approach described here is applicable to other cyanine dyes and may be utilized more widely for labeling nanoparticles that comprise a crystalline plate structure with a high binding capacity. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol from contaminated water using non-covalent imprinted microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Li Xin; Li Yuqi; Qi Jingyao; Bian Jiang; Yuan Yixing

    2009-01-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for selective removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in water was prepared as microspheres by the reverse microemulsion polymerization method based on the non-covalent interactions between 2,4-DCP, oleic acid, and divinylbenzene in acetonitrile. Microspheres have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) studies with evidence of 2,4-DCP linkage in polymer particles and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study their morphological properties. The proper adsorption and selective recognition ability of the MIP were studied by an equilibrium-adsorption method. The MIP showed outstanding affinity towards 2,4-DCP in aqueous solution and the optimum pH value for binding has been found around the neutral range. The molecular recognition of 2,4-DCP was analyzed in detail by using molecular modeling software. In addition, by investigating the variation in the adsorption ability of the MIP, it clearly showed excellent reproducibility. - Molecular imprinting has potential as a remediation technology in water treatment.

  13. Non-covalent interactions in 2-methylimidazolium copper(II) complex (MeImH)2[Cu(pfbz)4]: Synthesis, characterization, single crystal X-ray structure and packing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Pal; Saini, Anju; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Jitendra; Sathishkumar, Ranganathan; Venugopalan, Paloth

    2017-01-01

    A new anionic copper(II) complex, (MeImH)2 [Cu(pfbz)4] (1) where, MeImH = 2-methylimidazolium and pfbz = pentafluorobenzoate has been isolated by reacting copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate, pentafluorobenzoic acid and 2-methylimidazole in ethanol: water mixture in 1:2:2 molar ratio. This complex 1 has been characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, FT-IR) and conductance measurements. The complex salt crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with space group C2/c. Single crystal X-ray structure determination revealed the presence of discrete ions: [Cu(pfbz)4]2- anion and two 2-methylimidazolium cation (C4H7N2)+. The crystal lattice is stabilized by strong hydrogen bonding and F⋯F interactions between cationic-anionic and the anionic-anionic moieties respectively, besides π-π interactions.

  14. Synthesis and non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes rings: new nanomaterials with lectin affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Leal, Manuel Pernía; Khiar, Noureddine; Fernández, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    We present a mild and practical carbon nanotubes rings (CNRs) synthesis from non-covalent functionalized and water-soluble linear single-wall carbon nanotubes. The hemi-micellar–supramolecular self-organization of lactose-based glycolipid 1 on the ring surface, followed by photo-polymerization of the diacetylenic function triggered by UV light afforded the first water-soluble and biocompatible CNRs. The obtained donut-like nanoconstructs expose a high density of lactose moieties on their surface, and are able to engage specific interactions with Arachis hypogea lectin similar to glycoconjugates on the cell membrane. (paper)

  15. Non-covalent interaction between dietary stilbenoids and human serum albumin: Structure-affinity relationship, and its influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Jia, Xueping; Shi, Jian; Xiao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are associated with many benefits for human health, which depend on their bioavailability and bioaccessibility. The stilbenoid-human serum albumin (HSA) interactions are investigated to explore the structure-affinity relationship and influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids. The structure-affinity relationship of the stilbenoids-HSA interaction was found as: (1) the methoxylation enhanced the affinity, (2) an additional hydroxyl group increases the affinity and (3) the glycosylation significantly weakened the affinity. HSA obviously masked the free radical scavenging potential of stilbenoids. The stabilities of stilbenoids in different medium were determined as: HSA solution>human plasma>Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. It appears that the milk enhanced the cell uptake of stilbenoids with multi-hydroxyl groups and weakened the cell uptake of stilbenoids with methoxyl group on EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. The stilbenoids are hardly absorbed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preventing disulfide bond formation weakens non-covalent forces among lysozyme aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ravi

    Full Text Available Nonnative disulfide bonds have been observed among protein aggregates in several diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cataract and so on. The molecular mechanism by which formation of such bonds promotes protein aggregation is poorly understood. Here in this work we employ previously well characterized aggregation of hen eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL at alkaline pH to dissect the molecular role of nonnative disulfide bonds on growth of HEWL aggregates. We employed time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the size, morphology and non-covalent interaction forces among the aggregates, respectively. These measurements were performed under conditions when disulfide bond formation was allowed (control and alternatively when it was prevented by alkylation of free thiols using iodoacetamide. Blocking disulfide bond formation affected growth but not growth kinetics of aggregates which were ∼50% reduced in volume, flatter in vertical dimension and non-fibrillar in comparison to control. Interestingly, single-molecule force spectroscopy data revealed that preventing disulfide bond formation weakened the non-covalent interaction forces among monomers in the aggregate by at least ten fold, thereby stalling their growth and yielding smaller aggregates in comparison to control. We conclude that while constrained protein chain dynamics in correctly disulfide bonded amyloidogenic proteins may protect them from venturing into partial folded conformations that can trigger entry into aggregation pathways, aberrant disulfide bonds in non-amyloidogenic proteins (like HEWL on the other hand, may strengthen non-covalent intermolecular forces among monomers and promote their aggregation.

  17. Non-covalent and reversible functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Di Crescenzo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been proposed and actively explored as multipurpose innovative nanoscaffolds for applications in fields such as material science, drug delivery and diagnostic applications. Their versatile physicochemical features are nonetheless limited by their scarce solubilization in both aqueous and organic solvents. In order to overcome this drawback CNTs can be easily non-covalently functionalized with different dispersants. In the present review we focus on the peculiar hydrophobic character of pristine CNTs that prevent them to easily disperse in organic solvents. We report some interesting examples of CNTs dispersants with the aim to highlight the essential features a molecule should possess in order to act as a good carbon nanotube dispersant both in water and in organic solvents. The review pinpoints also a few examples of dispersant design. The last section is devoted to the exploitation of the major quality of non-covalent functionalization that is its reversibility and the possibility to obtain stimuli-responsive precipitation or dispersion of CNTs.

  18. Crystal structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GlgE and complexes with non-covalent inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberger, Jared J.; Veleti, Sri Kumar; Wilson, Brittney N.; Sucheck, Steven J.; Ronning, Donald R. (Toledo)

    2015-08-06

    GlgE is a bacterial maltosyltransferase that catalyzes the elongation of a cytosolic, branched α-glucan. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), inactivation of GlgE (Mtb GlgE) results in the rapid death of the organism due to a toxic accumulation of the maltosyl donor, maltose-1-phosphate (M1P), suggesting that GlgE is an intriguing target for inhibitor design. In this study, the crystal structures of the Mtb GlgE in a binary complex with maltose and a ternary complex with maltose and a maltosyl-acceptor molecule, maltohexaose, were solved to 3.3 Å and 4.0 Å, respectively. The maltohexaose structure reveals a dominant site for α-glucan binding. To obtain more detailed interactions between first generation, non-covalent inhibitors and GlgE, a variant Streptomyces coelicolor GlgEI (Sco GlgEI-V279S) was made to better emulate the Mtb GlgE M1P binding site. The structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S complexed with α-maltose-C-phosphonate (MCP), a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, was solved to 1.9 Å resolution, and the structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S complexed with 2,5-dideoxy-3-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-2,5-imino-D-mannitol (DDGIM), an oxocarbenium mimic, was solved to 2.5 Å resolution. These structures detail important interactions that contribute to the inhibitory activity of these compounds, and provide information on future designs that may be exploited to improve upon these first generation GlgE inhibitors.

  19. Non-Covalent Organocatalyzed Domino Reactions Involving Oxindoles: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tecla Gasperi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of spirooxindole architectures with several functionalities and stereogenic centers in bioactive molecules has been appealing for the development of novel methodologies seeking their preparation in high yields and selectivities. Expansion and refinement in the field of asymmetric organocatalysis have made possible the development of straightforward strategies that address these two requisites. In this review, we illustrate the current state-of-the-art in the field of spirooxindole synthesis through the use of non-covalent organocatalysis. We aim to provide a concise overview of very recent methods that allow to the isolation of unique, densely and diversified spirocyclic oxindole derivatives with high structural diversity via the use of cascade, tandem and domino processes.

  20. The effect of non-covalent functionalization on the thermal conductance of graphene/organic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shangchao; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic interfacial thermal resistance at graphene/organic interfaces, as a result of mismatches in the phonon vibrational spectra of the two materials, diminishes the overall heat transfer performance of graphene/organic nanocomposites. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to design alkyl-pyrene molecules that can non-covalently functionalize graphene surfaces in contact with a model organic phase composed of octane. The alkyl-pyrene molecules possess phonon-spectra features of both graphene and octane and, therefore, can serve as phonon-spectra linkers to bridge the vibrational mismatch at the graphene/octane interface. In support of this hypothesis, we find that the best linker candidate can enhance the out-of-plane graphene/organic interfacial thermal conductance by ∼22%, attributed to its capability to compensate the low-frequency phonon mode of graphene. We also find that the length of the alkyl chain indirectly affects the interfacial thermal conductance through different orientations of these chains because they dictate the contribution of the out-of-plane high-frequency carbon–hydrogen bond vibrations to the overall phonon transport. This study advances our understanding of the less destructive non-covalent functionalization method and design principles of suitable linker molecules to enhance the thermal performance of graphene/organic nanocomposites while retaining the intrinsic chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties of pristine graphene. (paper)

  1. Combination of computational methods, adsorption isotherms and selectivity tests for the conception of a mixed non-covalent-semi-covalent molecularly imprinted polymer of vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzio, Kinga; Delépée, Raphaël; Vidal, Richard; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2013-08-06

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for vanillin was prepared by photo initiated polymerization in dichloromethane using a mixed semi-covalent and non-covalent imprinting strategy. Taking polymerisable syringaldehyde as "dummy" template, acrylamide was chosen as functional monomer on B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional theory computational method basis with counterpoise. The binding parameters for the recognition of vanillin on imprinted polymers were studied with three different isotherm models (Langmuir, bi-Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich) and compared. The results indicate an heterogeneity of binding sites. It was found and proved by DFT calculations that the specific binding of vanillin in the cavities is due to non-covalent interactions of the template with the hydroxyphenyl- and the amide-moieties. The binding geometry of vanillin in the MIP cavity was also modelled. The obtained MIP is highly specific for vanillin (with an imprinting factor of 7.4) and was successfully applied to the extraction of vanillin from vanilla pods, red wine spike with vanillin, natural and artificial vanilla sugar with a recovery of 80%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  3. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili; Abdurahman, Ayjamal; Gü lseren, Oğuz; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  4. Photodissociative Cross-Linking of Non-covalent Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Tureček, František

    2018-05-01

    We report a gas-phase UV photodissociation study investigating non-covalent interactions between neutral hydrophobic pentapeptides and peptide ions incorporating a diazirine-tagged photoleucine residue. Phenylalanine (Phe) and proline (Pro) were chosen as the conformation-affecting residues that were incorporated into a small library of neutral pentapeptides. Gas-phase ion-molecule complexes of these peptides with photo-labeled pentapeptides were subjected to photodissociation. Selective photocleavage of the diazirine ring at 355 nm formed short-lived carbene intermediates that underwent cross-linking by insertion into H-X bonds of the target peptide. The cross-link positions were established from collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectra (CID-MS3) providing sequence information on the covalent adducts. Effects of the amino acid residue (Pro or Phe) and its position in the target peptide sequence were evaluated. For proline-containing peptides, interactions resulting in covalent cross-links in these complexes became more prominent as proline was moved towards the C-terminus of the target peptide sequence. The photocross-linking yields of phenylalanine-containing peptides depended on the position of both phenylalanine and photoleucine. Density functional theory calculations were used to assign structures of low-energy conformers of the (GLPMG + GLL*LK + H)+ complex. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectory calculations were used to capture the thermal motion in the complexes within 100 ps and determine close contacts between the incipient carbene and the H-X bonds in the target peptide. This provided atomic-level resolution of potential cross-links that aided spectra interpretation and was in agreement with experimental data. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Covalent and non-covalent chemical engineering of actin for biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saroj; Mansson, Alf

    2017-11-15

    The cytoskeletal filaments are self-assembled protein polymers with 8-25nm diameters and up to several tens of micrometres length. They have a range of pivotal roles in eukaryotic cells, including transportation of intracellular cargoes (primarily microtubules with dynein and kinesin motors) and cell motility (primarily actin and myosin) where muscle contraction is one example. For two decades, the cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor systems have been explored for nanotechnological applications including miniaturized sensor systems and lab-on-a-chip devices. Several developments have also revolved around possible exploitation of the filaments alone without their motor partners. Efforts to use the cytoskeletal filaments for applications often require chemical or genetic engineering of the filaments such as specific conjugation with fluorophores, antibodies, oligonucleotides or various macromolecular complexes e.g. nanoparticles. Similar conjugation methods are also instrumental for a range of fundamental biophysical studies. Here we review methods for non-covalent and covalent chemical modifications of actin filaments with focus on critical advantages and challenges of different methods as well as critical steps in the conjugation procedures. We also review potential uses of the engineered actin filaments in nanotechnological applications and in some key fundamental studies of actin and myosin function. Finally, we consider possible future lines of investigation that may be addressed by applying chemical conjugation of actin in new ways. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aryloxyalkanoic Acids as Non-Covalent Modifiers of the Allosteric Properties of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsattar M. Omar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb modifiers that stereospecifically inhibit sickle hemoglobin polymer formation and/or allosterically increase Hb affinity for oxygen have been shown to prevent the primary pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD, specifically, Hb polymerization and red blood cell sickling. Several such compounds are currently being clinically studied for the treatment of SCD. Based on the previously reported non-covalent Hb binding characteristics of substituted aryloxyalkanoic acids that exhibited antisickling properties, we designed, synthesized and evaluated 18 new compounds (KAUS II series for enhanced antisickling activities. Surprisingly, select test compounds showed no antisickling effects or promoted erythrocyte sickling. Additionally, the compounds showed no significant effect on Hb oxygen affinity (or in some cases, even decreased the affinity for oxygen. The X-ray structure of deoxygenated Hb in complex with a prototype compound, KAUS-23, revealed that the effector bound in the central water cavity of the protein, providing atomic level explanations for the observed functional and biological activities. Although the structural modification did not lead to the anticipated biological effects, the findings provide important direction for designing candidate antisickling agents, as well as a framework for novel Hb allosteric effectors that conversely, decrease the protein affinity for oxygen for potential therapeutic use for hypoxic- and/or ischemic-related diseases.

  7. Nano-mechanics of Tunable Adhesion using Non Covalent Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Liechti

    2012-09-08

    The objective of this program was to examine, via experiment and atomistic and continuum analysis, coordinated noncovalent bonding over a range of length scales with a view to obtaining modulated, patterned and reversible bonding at the molecular level. The first step in this project was to develop processes for depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing carboxylic acid and amine moieties on Si (111) surfaces and probe tips of an interfacial force microscope (IFM). This allowed the adhesive portion of the interactions between functionalized surfaces to be fully captured in the force-displacement response (force profiles) that are measured by the IFM. The interactionswere extracted in the form of traction-separation laws using combined molecular and continuum stress analyses. In this approach, the results of molecular dynamics analyses of SAMs subjected to simple stress states are used to inform continuum models of their stress-strain behavior. Continuum analyses of the IFM experiment were then conducted, which incorporate the stress-strain behavior of the SAMs and traction-separation relations that represent the interactions between the tip and functionalized Si surface. Agreement between predicted and measured force profiles was taken to imply that the traction-separation relations have been properly extracted. Scale up to larger contact areas was considered by forming Si/SAM/Si sandwiches and then separating them via fracture experiments. The mode 1 traction-separation relations have been extracted using fracture mechanics concepts under mode 1 and mixed-mode conditions. Interesting differences were noted between the three sets of traction-separation relations.

  8. Catalyst recycling via specific non-covalent adsorption on modified silicas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluwer, A.M.; Simons, C.; Knijnenburg, Q.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new strategy for the recycling of a homogeneous hydroformylation catalyst, by selective adsorption of the catalyst to tailor-made supports after a batchwise reaction. The separation of the catalyst from the product mixture is based on selective non-covalent supramolecular

  9. Non-covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures for synthesizing carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Song, Sing I; Song, Ga Young; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanodiamonds provide an important type of substrate for constructing a variety of hybrid nanomaterials. However, their intrinsic chemistry-inert surfaces make it indispensable to pre-functionalize them prior to immobilizing additional components onto their surfaces. Currently developed strategies for functionalizing CNSs include covalent and non-covalent approaches. Conventional covalent treatments often damage the structure integrity of carbon surfaces and adversely affect their physical properties. In contrast, the non-covalent approach offers a non-destructive way to modify CNSs with desired functional surfaces, while reserving their intrinsic properties. Thus far, a number of surface modifiers including aromatic compounds, small-molecular surfactants, amphiphilic polymers, and biomacromolecules have been developed to non-covalently functionalize CNS surfaces. Mediated by these surface modifiers, various functional components such as organic species and inorganic nanoparticles were further decorated onto their surfaces, resulting in versatile carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials with broad applications in chemical engineering and biomedical areas. In this review, the recent advances in the generation of such hybrid nanostructures based on non-covalently functionalized CNSs will be reviewed.

  10. Electromagnetic interference shielding and thermal properties of non-covalently functionalized reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Chhetri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO was non-covalently functionalized using sulfanilic acid azocromotrop (SAC followed by hydrazine reduction to achieve SAC functionalized reduced GO (SAC-rGO. Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis and electrical conductivity measurements confirmed the successful functionlization and reduction of GO. The electrical conductivity of ~515 S•m−1 for SAC-rGO was recorded. The non-covalently functionalized reduced GO was subsequently dispersed in epoxy matrix at the loading level of 0.3 to 0.5 wt% to investigate its electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding properties. The morphological and structural characterization of the SAC-rGO/epoxy composites was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy analysis, which revealed the good dispersion of SAC-rGO in the epoxy. The SAC-rGO/epoxy composites showed the EMI shielding of −22.6 dB at the loading of 0.5 wt% SAC-rGO. Dynamical mechanical properties of the composites were studied to establish the reinforcing competency of the SAC-rGO. The storage modulus of the composites was found to increase within the studied temperature. Thermal stability of pure epoxy and its composites were compared by selecting the temperatures at 10 and 50% weight loss, respectively.

  11. Strategies to balance covalent and non-covalent biomolecule attachment within collagen-GAG biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Jacquelyn C; Gonnerman, Emily A; Bailey, Ryan C; Harley, Brendan A C

    2014-09-01

    Strategies to integrate instructive biomolecular signals into a biomaterial are becoming increasingly complex and bioinspired. While a large majority of reports still use repeated treatments with soluble factors, this approach can be prohibitively costly and difficult to translate in vivo for applications where spatial control over signal presentation is necessary. Recent efforts have explored the use of covalent immobilization of biomolecules to the biomaterial, via both bulk (ubiquitous) as well as spatially-selective light-based crosslinking, as a means to both enhance stability and bioactivity. However, little is known about how processing conditions during immobilization impact the degree of unintended non-covalent interactions, or fouling, that takes place between the biomaterial and the biomolecule of interest. Here we demonstrate the impact of processing conditions for bulk carbodiimide (EDC) and photolithography-based benzophenone (BP) crosslinking on specific attachment vs. fouling of a model protein (Concanavalin A, ConA) within collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds. Collagen source significantly impacts the selectivity of biomolecule immobilization. EDC crosslinking intensity and ligand concentration significantly impacted selective immobilization. For benzophenone photoimmobilization we observed that increased UV exposure time leads to increased ConA immobilization. Immobilization efficiency for both EDC and BP strategies was maximal at physiological pH. Increasing ligand concentration during immobilization process led to enhanced immobilization for EDC chemistry, no impact on BP immobilization, but significant increases in non-specific fouling. Given recent efforts to covalently immobilize biomolecules to a biomaterial surface to enhance bioactivity, improved understanding of the impact of crosslinking conditions on selective attachment versus non-specific fouling will inform the design of instructive biomaterials for applications across tissue

  12. Second-Generation Non-Covalent NAAA Inhibitors are Protective in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Marco; Pontis, Silvia; Fuentes de Arriba, Angel Luis; Realini, Natalia; Torrente, Esther; Armirotti, Andrea; Romeo, Elisa; Di Martino, Simona; Russo, Debora; Pizzirani, Daniela; Summa, Maria; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Ottonello, Giuliana; Busquet, Perrine; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Garcia-Guzman, Miguel; Heim, Roger; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-09-05

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) are endogenous lipid mediators that suppress inflammation. Their actions are terminated by the intracellular cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA). Even though NAAA may offer a new target for anti-inflammatory therapy, the lipid-like structures and reactive warheads of current NAAA inhibitors limit the use of these agents as oral drugs. A series of novel benzothiazole-piperazine derivatives that inhibit NAAA in a potent and selective manner by a non-covalent mechanism are described. A prototype member of this class (8) displays high oral bioavailability, access to the central nervous system (CNS), and strong activity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). This compound exemplifies a second generation of non-covalent NAAA inhibitors that may be useful in the treatment of MS and other chronic CNS disorders. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Non-covalently anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes with hexa-decafluorinated zinc phthalocyanine as ppb level chemiresistive chlorine sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.; Kumar, Subodh; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.

    2018-01-01

    A cost effective solution assembly method has been explored for preparing zinc(II)1,2,3,4,8,9,10,11,15,16,17,18,22,23,24,25-hexa-decafluoro-29H,31H-phthalocyanine/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH) hybrid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) investigations confirm the non-covalent anchoring of F16ZnPc onto MWCNTs-COOH through п-п stacking interactions. Further, a highly sensitive and selective chemiresistive Cl2 sensor has been fabricated using F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH hybrid. The response of sensor is found to be 21.28% for 2 ppm of Cl2 with a response time of 14 s and theoretical detection limit of the sensor is found down to 0.06 ppb. The improved Cl2 sensing characteristics of hybrid are found to be originated from the synergetic interaction between F16ZnPc and MWCNTs-COOH. The underlying mechanism for improved gas sensing performance of F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH sensor towards Cl2 has been explained using Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies.

  14. Effect of density variation and non-covalent functionalization on the compressive behavior of carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, A [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Raney, J R; Craig, A E; Daraio, C, E-mail: daraio@caltech.edu [Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-10-21

    Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been proposed for different applications, including electrochemical energy storage and shock-absorbing materials. Understanding their mechanical response, in relation to their structural characteristics, is important for tailoring the synthesis method to the different operational conditions of the material. In this paper, we grow vertically aligned CNT arrays using a thermal chemical vapor deposition system, and we study the effects of precursor flow on the structural and mechanical properties of the CNT arrays. We show that the CNT growth process is inhomogeneous along the direction of the precursor flow, resulting in varying bulk density at different points on the growth substrate. We also study the effects of non-covalent functionalization of the CNTs after growth, using surfactant and nanoparticles, to vary the effective bulk density and structural arrangement of the arrays. We find that the stiffness and peak stress of the materials increase approximately linearly with increasing bulk density.

  15. Temperature Scanning Stress Relaxation of an Autonomous Self-Healing Elastomer Containing Non-Covalent Reversible Network Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report about the mechanical relaxation characteristics of an intrinsically self-healable imidazole modified commercial rubber. This kind of self-healing rubber was prepared by melt mixing of 1-butyl imidazole with bromo-butyl rubber (bromine modified isoprene-isobutylene copolymer, BIIR. By this melt mixing process, the reactive allylic bromine of bromo-butyl rubber was converted into imidazole bromide salt. The resulting development of an ionic character to the polymer backbone leads to an ionic association of the groups which ultimately results to the formation of a network structure of the rubber chains. The modified BIIR thus behaves like a robust crosslinked rubber and shows unusual self-healing properties. The non-covalent reversible network has been studied in detail with respect to stress relaxation experiments, scanning electron microscopic and X-ray scattering.

  16. Host-Guest Complexes of Cyclodextrins and Nanodiamonds as a Strong Non-Covalent Binding Motif for Self-Assembled Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibilla, Frauke; Voskuhl, Jens; Fokina, Natalie A; Dahl, Jeremy E P; Schreiner, Peter R; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2017-11-13

    We report the inclusion of carboxy- and amine-substituted molecular nanodiamonds (NDs) adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane by β-cyclodextrin and γ-cyclodextrin (β-CD and γ-CD), which have particularly well-suited hydrophobicity and symmetry for an optimal fit of the host and guest molecules. We studied the host-guest interactions in detail and generally observed 1:1 association of the NDs with the larger γ-CD cavity, but observed 1:2 association for the largest ND in the series (triamantane) with β-CD. We found higher binding affinities for carboxy-substituted NDs than for amine-substituted NDs. Additionally, cyclodextrin vesicles (CDVs) were decorated with d-mannose by using adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane as non-covalent anchors, and the resulting vesicles were compared with the lectin concanavalin A in agglutination experiments. Agglutination was directly correlated to the host-guest association: adamantane showed lower agglutination than di- or triamantane with β-CDV and almost no agglutination with γ-CDV, whereas high agglutination was observed for di- and triamantane with γ-CDV. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes: Controlling Chirality Selectivity via Alkyl Groups of Conjugated Co-Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight, Braden; Gifford, Brendan; Kilina, Svetlana

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) play an important role in nanotechnology, including electronics, chemical sensors, and solar cells. Their electronic and optical properties depend on the size and geometry (chirality) of the nanotube. However, one main concern regarding nanotube application in optoelectronic devices is the difficulty of separating them based upon chirality after synthesis, as all known synthesis methods produce more than one chirality simultaneously. To get around this, one method is the functionalization of the CNTs via non-covalent bonding of co-polymers by wrapping them around the tube. We use force field simulations to explore the effects of various structural manipulations to the co-polymer 9,9-dialkylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl bipyridine (PFO-BPY) to find the preferential mechanisms of selective interactions between the PFO-BPY and CNTs of various chiralities. In particular, we focus on the effect of the branching in alkyl side-groups of PFO-BPY on their binding to the CNT surface. We have observed correlations between the side-group structures and their wrapping morphology on the CNT-Polymer interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that the branching in the position closest to the conjugated backboned results in the strongest interaction with all CNT. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (CHE 1413614) and the Center for Computationally-Assisted Science and Technology at NDSU.

  18. Preparation of non-aggregated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) by non-covalent coating with a block copolymer and proteins for enhancement of intracellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Woo; Lee, Seonju; Jang, Sangmok; Han, Kyu Young; Kim, Younggyu; Hyun, Jaekyung; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are very promising fluorophores for use in biosystems due to their high biocompatibility and photostability. To overcome their tendency to aggregate in physiological solutions, which severely limits the biological applications of FNDs, we developed a new non-covalent coating method using a block copolymer, PEG-b-P(DMAEMA-co-BMA), or proteins such as BSA and HSA. By simple mixing of the block copolymer with FNDs, the cationic DMAEMA and hydrophobic BMA moieties can strongly interact with the anionic and hydrophobic moieties on the FND surface, while the PEG block can form a shell to prevent the direct contact between FNDs. The polymer-coated FNDs, along with BSA- and HSA-coated FNDs, showed non-aggregation characteristics and maintained their size at the physiological salt concentration. The well-dispersed, polymer- or protein-coated FNDs in physiological solutions showed enhanced intracellular uptake, which was confirmed by CLSM. In addition, the biocompatibility of the coated FNDs was expressly supported by a cytotoxicity assay. Our simple non-covalent coating with the block copolymer, which can be easily modified by various chemical methods, projects a very promising outlook for future biomedical applications, especially in comparison with covalent coating or protein-based coating.

  19. Non-covalent interactions in anisole-(CO2)(n) (n=1, 2) complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Becucci, M.; Mazzoni, F.; Pietraperzia, G.; Řezáč, Jan; Nachtigallová, Dana; Hobza, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 34 (2017), s. 22749-22758 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * anisole-water complex * equation of state Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  20. Non-covalent O⋅⋅⋅O interactions among isopolyanions using a cis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    2008-05-09

    May 9, 2008 ... T Arumuganathan et al. 298 ... Sodium molybdate dihydrate (1 g, 4⋅13 mmol) was dissolved in 20 mL of ..... Int. Ed. Engl. 32 610; Kroenke Jr J W, John P F and. Anthony M M .... D, Machado A S, Tempete C and Robert-Gero M.

  1. Isoelectric focusing of small non-covalent metal species from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Jessica; Hayen, Heiko; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Weber, Günther

    2011-03-01

    IEF is known as a powerful electrophoretic separation technique for amphoteric molecules, in particular for proteins. The objective of the present work is to prove the suitability of IEF also for the separation of small, non-covalent metal species. Investigations are performed with copper-glutathione complexes, with the synthetic ligand ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid (EDDHA) and respective metal complexes (Fe, Ga, Al, Ni, Zn), and with the phytosiderophore 2'-deoxymugineic acid (DMA) and its ferric complex. It is shown that ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid and DMA species are stable during preparative scale IEF, whereas copper-glutathione dissociates considerably. It is also shown that preparative scale IEF can be applied successfully to isolate ferric DMA from real plant samples, and that multidimensional separations are possible by combining preparative scale IEF with subsequent HPLC-MS analysis. Focusing of free ligands and respective metal complexes with di- and trivalent metals results in different pIs, but CIEF is usually needed for a reliable estimation of pI values. Limitations of the proposed methods (preparative IEF and CIEF) and consequences of the results with respect to metal speciation in plants are discussed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The non-covalent decoration of self-assembling protein fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Zahra N; Grundy, Daniel J; Channon, Kevin J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2010-10-01

    The design of self-assembling fibers presents challenges in basic science, and has potential for developing materials for applications in areas such as tissue engineering. A contemporary issue in the field is the construction of multi-component, functionalized systems. Previously, we have developed peptide-based fibers, the SAF system, that comprises two complementary peptides, which affords considerable control over assembly and morphology. Here we present a straightforward route to functionalizing the SAFs with small molecules and, subsequently, other moieties. This is achieved via non-covalent recruitment of charged peptide tags, which offers advantages such as further control, reversibility, and future prospects for developing recombinant tags. We demonstrate the concept by appending fluorescent labels and biotin (and thence gold nanoparticles) to the peptides, and visualising the resulting decorated SAFs by light and electron microscopy. The peptide tags bind in the nm-mum range, and show specificity compared with control peptides, and for the SAFs over similar alpha-helix-based peptide fibers. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioelectrochemistry of non-covalent immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase on oxidized diamond nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Eduardo; Méndez, Jessica; Fonseca, José J; Griebenow, Kai; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2012-06-01

    Diamond nanoparticles are considered a biocompatible material mainly due to their non-cytotoxicity and remarkable cellular uptake. Model proteins such as cytochrome c and lysozyme have been physically adsorbed onto diamond nanoparticles, proving it to be a suitable surface for high protein loading. Herein, we explore the non-covalent immobilization of the redox enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (E.C.1.1.1.1) onto oxidized diamond nanoparticles for bioelectrochemical applications. Diamond nanoparticles were first oxidized and physically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR and TEM. Langmuir isotherms were constructed to investigate the ADH adsorption onto the diamond nanoparticles as a function of pH. It was found that a higher packing density is achieved at the isoelectric point of the enzyme. Moreover, the relative activity of the immobilized enzyme on diamond nanoparticles was addressed under optimum pH conditions able to retain up to 70% of its initial activity. Thereafter, an ethanol bioelectrochemical cell was constructed by employing the immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase onto diamond nanoparticles, this being able to provide a current increment of 72% when compared to the blank solution. The results of this investigation suggest that this technology may be useful for the construction of alcohol biosensors or biofuel cells in the near future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A non-covalent peptide-based strategy for ex vivo and in vivo oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombez, Laurence; Morris, May C; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The dramatic acceleration in identification of new nucleic acid-based therapeutic molecules such as short interfering RNA (siRNA) and peptide-nucleic acid (PNA) analogues has provided new perspectives for therapeutic targeting of specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. However, the poor cellular uptake of nucleic acids together with the low permeability of the cell membrane to negatively charged molecules remain major obstacles to their clinical development. Several non-viral strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of synthetic short oligonucleotides both in cultured cells and in vivo. Cell-penetrating peptides constitute very promising tools for non-invasive cellular import of oligonucleotides and analogs. We recently described a non-covalent strategy based on short amphiphatic peptides (MPG8/PEP3) that have been successfully applied ex vivo and in vivo for the delivery of therapeutic siRNA and PNA molecules. PEP3 and MPG8 form stable nanoparticles with PNA analogues and siRNA, respectively, and promote their efficient cellular uptake, independently of the endosomal pathway, into a wide variety of cell lines, including primary and suspension lines, without any associated cytotoxicity. This chapter describes easy-to-handle protocols for the use of MPG-8 or PEP-3-nanoparticle technologies for PNA and siRNA delivery into adherent and suspension cell lines as well as in vivo into cancer mouse models.

  5. Identification of an estrogen receptor α non covalent ubiquitin-binding surface: role in 17β-estradiol-induced transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesiri, Valeria; La Rosa, Piergiorgio; Stano, Pasquale; Acconcia, Filippo

    2013-06-15

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-binding domains (UBDs) located in Ub receptors decode the ubiquitination signal by non-covalently engaging the Ub modification on their binding partners and transduce the Ub signalling through Ub-based molecular interactions. In this way, inducible protein ubiquitination regulates diverse biological processes. The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the pleiotropic effects of the sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2). Fine regulation of E2 pleiotropic actions depends on E2-dependent ERα association with a plethora of binding partners and/or on the E2 modulation of receptor ubiquitination. Indeed, E2-induced ERα polyubiquitination triggers receptor degradation and transcriptional activity, and E2-dependent reduction in ERα monoubiquitination is crucial for E2 signalling. Monoubiquitinated proteins often contain UBDs, but whether non-covalent Ub-ERα binding could occur and play a role in E2-ERα signalling is unknown. Here, we report an Ub-binding surface within the ERα ligand binding domain that directs in vitro the receptor interaction with both ubiquitinated proteins and recombinant Ub chains. Mutational analysis reveals that ERα residues leucine 429 and alanine 430 are involved in Ub binding. Moreover, impairment of ERα association to ubiquitinated species strongly affects E2-induced ERα transcriptional activity. Considering the importance of UBDs in the Ub-based signalling network and the central role of different ERα binding partners in the modulation of E2-dependent effects, our discoveries provide novel insights into ERα activity that could also be relevant for ERα-dependent diseases.

  6. Crystal Structure of the Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Enzyme from Proteus Mirabilis Bound Non-covalently to an Active Site Peptide Ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  7. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun

    2015-07-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC50 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL-1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL-1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer-drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders.

  8. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC_5_0 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL"−"1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL"−"1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer–drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders. (paper)

  9. Fabrication and non-covalent modification of highly oriented thin films of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication of the first thin film of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology (rho-ZMOF-1, ([In48(HImDC)96]48-)n) in a highly oriented fashion on a gold-functionalized substrate. The oriented rho-ZMOF-1 film was functionalized by non-covalent modification via post-synthetic exchange of different probe molecules, such as acridine yellow, methylene blue, and Nile red. In addition, encapsulation of a porphyrin moiety was achieved via in situ synthesis and construction of the rho-ZMOF. Adsorption kinetics of volatile organic compounds on rho-ZMOF-1 thin films was also investigated. This study suggests that rho-ZMOF-1 thin films can be regarded as a promising platform for various applications such as sensing and catalysis. This journal is

  10. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  11. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2015-08-27

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  12. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Non-covalent attachment of silver nanoclusters onto single-walled carbon nanotubes with human serum albumin as linking molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Galván, Andrés, E-mail: andres.rodriguez@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Física, Dpto. Física Experimental, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer INCan-UNAM, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México, DF 14080 (Mexico); Heredia, Alejandro [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Amelines-Sarria, Oscar; Rivera, Margarita [Instituto de Física, Dpto. Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    The attachment of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the formation of integrated fluorescence sites has attracted much attention due their potential applications as biological probes and nanovectors in theragnosis. Here, we report the preparation through assembly of fluorescent quasi 1-D nanomaterial based on SWNTs and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) non-covalently attached to human serum albumin as biological linker. The fluorescent SWNT–AgNCs–HSA conjugates were characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), fluorescent and UV–vis spectroscopy. The above techniques confirmed that AgNCs were non-covalently attached onto the external surface of SWNTs. In addition, it was observed that the modification did not affect the optical properties of the synthesized AgNCs since the absorption spectra and fluorescence under UV irradiation (λ = 365 nm) remain the same. The effect of the functionalized systems was tested on mammal red blood cells (RBCs) and it was found that their structural integrity was compromised by the conjugates, limiting their biological and medical applications.

  14. Non-covalent attachment of silver nanoclusters onto single-walled carbon nanotubes with human serum albumin as linking molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Galván, Andrés; Heredia, Alejandro; Amelines-Sarria, Oscar; Rivera, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The attachment of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the formation of integrated fluorescence sites has attracted much attention due their potential applications as biological probes and nanovectors in theragnosis. Here, we report the preparation through assembly of fluorescent quasi 1-D nanomaterial based on SWNTs and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) non-covalently attached to human serum albumin as biological linker. The fluorescent SWNT–AgNCs–HSA conjugates were characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), fluorescent and UV–vis spectroscopy. The above techniques confirmed that AgNCs were non-covalently attached onto the external surface of SWNTs. In addition, it was observed that the modification did not affect the optical properties of the synthesized AgNCs since the absorption spectra and fluorescence under UV irradiation (λ = 365 nm) remain the same. The effect of the functionalized systems was tested on mammal red blood cells (RBCs) and it was found that their structural integrity was compromised by the conjugates, limiting their biological and medical applications

  15. Leaf phenolics and seaweed tannins : analysis, enzymatic oxidation and non-covalent protein binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, Anne M.

    2017-01-01

    Upon extraction of proteins from sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) and oarweed (Laminaria digitata) for animal food and feed purposes, endogenous phenolics and proteins can interact with each other, which might affect the protein’s applicability. Sugar beet leaf proteins

  16. Hydrogels Based on Dynamic Covalent and Non Covalent Bonds: A Chemistry Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Picchioni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels based on reversible covalent bonds represent an attractive topic for research at both academic and industrial level. While the concept of reversible covalent bonds dates back a few decades, novel developments continue to appear in the general research area of gels and especially hydrogels. The reversible character of the bonds, when translated at the general level of the polymeric network, allows reversible interaction with substrates as well as responsiveness to variety of external stimuli (e.g., self-healing. These represent crucial characteristics in applications such as drug delivery and, more generally, in the biomedical world. Furthermore, the several possible choices that can be made in terms of reversible interactions generate an almost endless number of possibilities in terms of final product structure and properties. In the present work, we aim at reviewing the latest developments in this field (i.e., the last five years by focusing on the chemistry of the systems at hand. As such, this should allow molecular designers to develop a toolbox for the synthesis of new systems with tailored properties for a given application.

  17. Sacrificial spacer and non-covalent routes toward the molecular imprinting of 'poorly-functionalized' N-heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, N.; Alexander, C.; Davies, S.; Whitcombe, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    A comparison of three different methods for the imprinting of small aromatic heterocycles containing only a single nitrogen atom, for the preparation of specific analytical phases, was carried out. A conventional non-covalent approach to the imprinting of pyridine using methacrylic acid as the functional monomer was compared with two sacrificial spacer methods, in which heterocycles were imprinted as covalent template analogues. The results of binding experiments showed that discrimination based on ligand size was possible when polymers were prepared using a silyl ester-based template. The most selective polymer was able to bind pyridine in preference to quinoline or acridine which is opposite to the trend predicted by the pK HB values for the three ligands. Curve fitting of the isotherm for pyridine binding to this polymer to the Langmuir model gave an approximate K d of 1.1±0.1 mM and a binding site concentration of 57±2 mmol g -1 . Acridine binding did not show saturation behaviour and was non-specific and cooperative in nature

  18. Sacrificial spacer and non-covalent routes toward the molecular imprinting of 'poorly-functionalized' N-heterocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, N.; Alexander, C.; Davies, S.; Whitcombe, M.J

    2004-02-16

    A comparison of three different methods for the imprinting of small aromatic heterocycles containing only a single nitrogen atom, for the preparation of specific analytical phases, was carried out. A conventional non-covalent approach to the imprinting of pyridine using methacrylic acid as the functional monomer was compared with two sacrificial spacer methods, in which heterocycles were imprinted as covalent template analogues. The results of binding experiments showed that discrimination based on ligand size was possible when polymers were prepared using a silyl ester-based template. The most selective polymer was able to bind pyridine in preference to quinoline or acridine which is opposite to the trend predicted by the pK{sub HB} values for the three ligands. Curve fitting of the isotherm for pyridine binding to this polymer to the Langmuir model gave an approximate K{sub d} of 1.1{+-}0.1 mM and a binding site concentration of 57{+-}2 mmol g{sup -1}. Acridine binding did not show saturation behaviour and was non-specific and cooperative in nature.

  19. Investigating the Non-Covalent Functionalization and Chemical Transformation of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Chun-Hong

    Trend in device miniatures demands capabilities to produce rationally designed patterns in ever-shrinking length scale. The research community has examined various techniques to push the current lithography resolution to sub-10nm scale. One of the ideas is to utilize the natural nanoscale patterns of molecular assemblies. In this thesis, the self-assembling phenomenon of a photoactive molecule on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown on SiC was discussed. This molecular assembly enables manipulation of chemical contrast in nanoscale through UV exposure or atomic layer deposition. Future development of nanoelectronics industry will be fueled by innovations in electronics materials, which could be discovered through covalent modification of graphene. In a study reported in this thesis, silicon is deposited onto EG. After annealing, a new surface reconstruction, identified to be (3x3)-SiC, was formed. Raman spectroscopy finds no signature of graphene after annealing, indicating a complete chemical transformation of graphene. DFT calculations reveal a possible conversion mechanism. Overall, these studies provide insights for future device miniaturization; contribute to the search of novel materials and help bridging the gap between graphene and current silicon-based industrial infrastructures.

  20. Systematic validation and atomic force microscopy of non-covalent short oligonucleotide barcode microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular barcode arrays provide a powerful means to analyze cellular phenotypes in parallel through detection of short (20-60 base unique sequence tags, or "barcodes", associated with each strain or clone in a collection. However, costs of current methods for microarray construction, whether by in situ oligonucleotide synthesis or ex situ coupling of modified oligonucleotides to the slide surface are often prohibitive to large-scale analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that unmodified 20mer oligonucleotide probes printed on conventional surfaces show comparable hybridization signals to covalently linked 5'-amino-modified probes. As a test case, we undertook systematic cell size analysis of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome-wide deletion collection by size separation of the deletion pool followed by determination of strain abundance in size fractions by barcode arrays. We demonstrate that the properties of a 13K unique feature spotted 20 mer oligonucleotide barcode microarray compare favorably with an analogous covalently-linked oligonucleotide array. Further, cell size profiles obtained with the size selection/barcode array approach recapitulate previous cell size measurements of individual deletion strains. Finally, through atomic force microscopy (AFM, we characterize the mechanism of hybridization to unmodified barcode probes on the slide surface. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies push the lower limit of probe size in genome-scale unmodified oligonucleotide microarray construction and demonstrate a versatile, cost-effective and reliable method for molecular barcode analysis.

  1. Do we see what we should see? Describing non-covalent interactions in protein structures including precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Gurusaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of X-ray crystal structure analysis as a technique is to `see where the atoms are'. The results are extensively used by a wide variety of research communities. However, this `seeing where the atoms are' can give a false sense of security unless the precision of the placement of the atoms has been taken into account. Indeed, the presentation of bond distances and angles to a false precision (i.e. to too many decimal places is commonplace. This article has three themes. Firstly, a basis for a proper representation of protein crystal structure results is detailed and demonstrated with respect to analyses of Protein Data Bank entries. The basis for establishing the precision of placement of each atom in a protein crystal structure is non-trivial. Secondly, a knowledge base harnessing such a descriptor of precision is presented. It is applied here to the case of salt bridges, i.e. ion pairs, in protein structures; this is the most fundamental place to start with such structure-precision representations since salt bridges are one of the tenets of protein structure stability. Ion pairs also play a central role in protein oligomerization, molecular recognition of ligands and substrates, allosteric regulation, domain motion and α-helix capping. A new knowledge base, SBPS (Salt Bridges in Protein Structures, takes these structural precisions into account and is the first of its kind. The third theme of the article is to indicate natural extensions of the need for such a description of precision, such as those involving metalloproteins and the determination of the protonation states of ionizable amino acids. Overall, it is also noted that this work and these examples are also relevant to protein three-dimensional structure molecular graphics software.

  2. Scaled MP3 Non-Covalent Interaction Energies Agree Closely with Accurate CCSD(T) Benchmark Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pitoňák, Michal; Neogrady, P.; Černý, Jiří; Grimme, S.; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2009), s. 282-289 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Scaled MP3 * CCSD(T) Benchmark Data * Extended Data Set Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.453, year: 2009

  3. Influence of non-covalent modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the crystallization behaviour of binary blends of polypropylene and polyamide 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Nabaneeta; Panwar, Ajay S; Kumar, Gulshan; Samajdar, I; Bhattacharyya, Arup R

    2015-02-14

    Blends of polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared using different processing strategies in a twin-screw micro-compounder. The effect of MWNTs on the crystallization behaviour of the PP phase and the PA6 phase of the blend has been investigated through non-isothermal crystallization studies by differential scanning calorimetric analysis. Furthermore, the effect of the addition of the compatibilizer (PP-g-MA) and the modification of MWNTs (m-MWNTs) with a non-covalent organic modifier (Li-salt of 6 amino hexanoic acid, Li-AHA) has also been studied in context to the crystallization behaviour of the PP and PA6 phase in the blend. The crystallization studies have indicated a significant increase in bulk crystallization temperature of the PP phase in the blend in the presence of MWNTs. Moreover, the formation of 'trans-lamellar crystalline' structure consisting of PA6 'trans-crystalline lamellae' on MWNTs surface was facilitated in the case of blends prepared via 'protocol 2' as compared to the corresponding blends prepared via 'protocol 1'. Wide angle X-ray diffraction analysis has showed the existence of a β-polymorph of the PP phase due to incorporation of the PA6 phase in the blend. Addition of MWNTs in the blends has facilitated further β-crystalline structure formation of the PP phase. In the presence of m-MWNTs, a higher β-fraction was observed in the PP phase as compared to the blend with pristine MWNTs. Addition of PP-g-MA has suppressed the β-phase formation in the PP phase in the blend. X-ray bulk texture analysis revealed that incorporation of PA6 as well as pristine/modified MWNTs has influenced the extent of orientation of the PP chains towards specific crystalline planes in various blend compositions of PP and PA6.

  4. Ultrasensitive Nanoimmunosensor by coupling non-covalent functionalized graphene oxide platform and numerous ferritin labels on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Rashida; Jeong, Bongjin; Choi, Jong-Soon; Rahman, Md Aminur

    2016-06-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical nanostructured immunosensor for a breast cancer biomarker carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) was fabricated using non-covalent functionalized graphene oxides (GO/Py-COOH) as sensor probe and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs)-supported numerous ferritin as labels. The immunosensor was constructed by immobilizing a monoclonal anti-CA 15-3 antibody on the GO modified cysteamine (Cys) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on an Au electrode (Au/Cys) through the amide bond formation between the carboxylic acid groups of GO/Py-COOH and amine groups of anti-CA 15-3. Secondary antibody conjugated MWCNT-supported ferritin labels (Ab2-MWCNT-Ferritin) were prepared through the amide bond formation between amine groups of Ab2 and ferritin and carboxylic acid groups of MWCNTs. The detection of CA 15-3 was based on the enhanced bioelectrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide mediated by hydroquinone (HQ) at the GO/Py-COOH-based sensor probe. The GO/Py-COOH-based sensor probe and Ab2-MWCNT-Ferritin labels were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique, CA 15-3 can be selectively detected as low as 0.01 ± 0.07 U/mL in human serum samples. Additionally, the proposed CA 15-3 immunosensor showed excellent selectivity and better stability in human serum samples, which demonstrated that the proposed immunosensor has potentials in proteomic researches and diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Noncovalent cation-π interactions--their role in nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Krzysztof; Boratyński, Janusz

    2014-11-07

    Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions--cation-π interactions--is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation-aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  6. Weak interactions and cooperativity effects on disiloxane: a look at the building block of silicones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Carlos; Montero-Campillo, M. Merced; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2018-06-01

    The behaviour of disiloxane 1 towards a set of Lewis acids (LA) and Lewis bases (LB) forming complexes through its oxygen and silicon atoms, respectively, was studied at the MP2/aug‧-cc-pVTZ level of theory, exploring a wide variety of non-covalent interactions. Disiloxane is a moderate electron acceptor and a good electron donor, exhibiting in the latter case binding energies up to almost -100 kJ/mol with BeCl2. Cooperativity effects were also analysed by looking at ternary 1:LA:LB complexes. Shorter intermolecular distances than in the corresponding binary complexes and a negative contribution of the three-body term to the binding energy indicate that the non-covalent interactions allowed by disiloxane through its acid and basic centres cooperate between them to reinforce both donor-acceptor pairs. These effects are particularly strong in complexes involving beryllium and triel bonds, but are also relevant for complexes containing hydrogen bonds.

  7. Surface functionalization of PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional spacer for active targeting in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamake, S. I.; Raut, S. L.; Ranjan, A. P.; Gryczynski, Z.; Vishwanatha, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the surface functionalization of polymeric PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional chemical crosslinker, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) for targeted cancer therapy. We dissolved BS3 in aqueous solution of PVA during formulation of nanoparticles by a modified solid/oil/water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The non-covalent insertion of BS3 was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curcumin and annexin A2 were used as a model drug and a cell specific target, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized for particle size, zeta potential and surface morphology. The qualitative assessment of antibody attachment was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as confocal microscopy. The optimized formulation showed antibody attachment of 86%. However, antibody attachment was abolished upon blocking the functional groups of BS3. The availability of functional antibodies was evaluated by the presence of a light chain fraction after gel electrophoresis. We further evaluated the in vitro release kinetics of curcumin from antibody coated and uncoated nanoparticles. The release of curcumin is enhanced upon antibody attachment and followed an anomalous release pattern. We also observed that the cellular uptake of nanoparticles was significantly higher in annexin A2 positive cells than in negative cells. Therefore, these results demonstrate the potential use of this method for functionalization as well as to deliver chemotherapeutic agents for treating cancer.

  8. Surface functionalization of PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional spacer for active targeting in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamake, S I; Raut, S L [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Ranjan, A P; Vishwanatha, J K [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Gryczynski, Z, E-mail: jamboor.vishwanatha@unthsc.edu [Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-01-21

    This work reports the surface functionalization of polymeric PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional chemical crosslinker, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) for targeted cancer therapy. We dissolved BS3 in aqueous solution of PVA during formulation of nanoparticles by a modified solid/oil/water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The non-covalent insertion of BS3 was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curcumin and annexin A2 were used as a model drug and a cell specific target, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized for particle size, zeta potential and surface morphology. The qualitative assessment of antibody attachment was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as confocal microscopy. The optimized formulation showed antibody attachment of 86%. However, antibody attachment was abolished upon blocking the functional groups of BS3. The availability of functional antibodies was evaluated by the presence of a light chain fraction after gel electrophoresis. We further evaluated the in vitro release kinetics of curcumin from antibody coated and uncoated nanoparticles. The release of curcumin is enhanced upon antibody attachment and followed an anomalous release pattern. We also observed that the cellular uptake of nanoparticles was significantly higher in annexin A2 positive cells than in negative cells. Therefore, these results demonstrate the potential use of this method for functionalization as well as to deliver chemotherapeutic agents for treating cancer.

  9. Novel non-covalent sulfonated multiwalled carbon nanotube from p-toluenesulfonic acid/glucose doped polypyrrole for electrochemical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Q.B.; Gao, B.; Hao, L.; Lu, X.J.; Yang, S.D.; Zhang, X.G. [Nanjing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is considered as one of the most promising electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors due to its environmental stability and fast doping and dedoping capacity. Carbon nanotube (CNT) and PPy hybrids can work synergistically to achieve the advantages of an electric double layer capacitor and faradaic pseudocapacitor. Sulfonation can be used to increase the dispersion of CNTs. In this study, multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) were modified with a high -SOH{sub 3}H loading carbonaceous material. Pyrolle monomers were absorbed on the surface of the MWCNT-SO{sub 3}H composite through strong electron and hydrogen bonding interactions between the -SO{sub 3}H group and the amino group of pyrrole. The pyrrole was then in-situ polymerized on the surface of the MWCNTs with the addition of an initiator. The study showed that the specific capacitance loss of the MWCNTs-SO{sub 3}H/PPy was only 3 per cent after 1000 cycles. Results of the study suggested that the composite is a promising electrode material for electrochemical capacitors. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  10. A versatile strategy towards non-covalent functionalization of graphene by surface-confined supramolecular self-assembly of Janus tectons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Du

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D, supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces is now well-mastered with several existing examples. However, one remaining challenge to enable future applications in nanoscience is to provide potential functionalities to the physisorbed adlayer. This work reviews a recently developed strategy that addresses this key issue by taking advantage of a new concept, Janus tecton materials. This is a versatile, molecular platform based on the design of three-dimensional (3D building blocks consisting of two faces linked by a cyclophane-type pillar. One face is designed to steer 2D self-assembly onto C(sp2-carbon-based flat surfaces, the other allowing for the desired functionality above the substrate with a well-controlled lateral order. In this way, it is possible to simultaneously obtain a regular, non-covalent paving as well as supramolecular functionalization of graphene, thus opening interesting perspectives for nanoscience applications.

  11. Alecto 2 - interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, J.P.; Clouet d'Orval, Ch.; Mougniot, J.C.; Penet, F.

    1965-01-01

    Weak interactions were experimentally studies with the tank of the critical assembly Alecto II and one, two or three bottles containing solutions of various concentrations. In particular, was studied the validity of certain classical assumptions, shielding effects, screening and semi-reflexion effects, importance of thermal coupling. The method of the 'k eff , solid angle' is shown to apply to such a system. The determination by divergence and pulsed neutron technique of the reactivity related to a millimeter of solution level affords the obtention of critical heights in terms of reactivity. (authors) [fr

  12. Interactions of hemin with bovine serum albumin and human hemoglobin: A fluorescence quenching study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2018-03-01

    The binding interactions between hemin (Hmi) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) or human hemoglobin (HHb), respectively, have been examined in aqueous solution at pH = 7.4, applying UV-vis absorption, as well as steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques. Representative results received for both BSA and HHb intrinsic fluorescence proceeding from the interactions with hemin suggest the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes in both the Hmi-BSA and Hmi-HHb systems, with highly possible concurrent formation of a coordinate bond between a group on the protein surface and the metal in Hmi molecule. All the values of calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants point to the involvement of static quenching in both the systems studied. The blue shift in the synchronous fluorescence spectra imply the participation of both tryptophan and tyrosine residues in quenching of BSA and HHb intrinsic fluorescence. Depicted outcomes suggest that hemin is supposedly able to influence the physiological functions of BSA and HHb, the most important blood proteins, particularly in case of its overuse.

  13. Peptide carrier-mediated non-covalent delivery of unmodified cisplatin, methotrexate and other agents via intravenous route to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid pre-clinical evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against brain cancers and other neurological disorders remains largely unattained due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which limits transport of most therapeutic compounds to the brain. A synthetic peptide carrier, K16ApoE, was previously developed that enabled transport of target proteins to the brain by mimicking a ligand-receptor system. The peptide carrier was found to generate transient BBB permeability, which was utilized for non-covalent delivery of cisplatin, methotrexate and other compounds to the brain. APPROACH: Brain delivery of the chemotherapeutics and other agents was achieved either by injecting the carrier peptide and the drugs separately or as a mixture, to the femoral vein. A modification of the method comprised injection of K16ApoE pre-mixed with cetuximab, followed by injection of a 'small-molecule' drug. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven-of-seven different small molecules were successfully delivered to the brain via K16ApoE. Depending on the method, brain uptake with K16ApoE was 0.72-1.1% for cisplatin and 0.58-0.92% for methotrexate (34-50-fold and 54-92 fold greater for cisplatin and methotrexate, respectively, with K16ApoE than without. Visually intense brain-uptake of Evans Blue, Light Green SF and Crocein scarlet was also achieved. Direct intracranial injection of EB show locally restricted distribution of the dye in the brain, whereas K16ApoE-mediated intravenous injection of EB resulted in the distribution of the dye throughout the brain. Experiments with insulin suggest that ligand-receptor signaling intrinsic to the BBB provides a natural means for passive transport of some molecules across the BBB. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the carrier peptide can non-covalently transport various chemotherapeutic agents to the brain. Thus, the method offers an avenue for pre-clinical evaluation of various small and large therapeutic molecules

  14. Non-covalent doping of graphitic carbon nitride with ultrathin graphene oxide and molybdenum disulfide nanosheets: an effective binary heterojunction photocatalyst under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S W; Yang, L W; Tian, Y; Wei, X L; Ding, J W; Zhong, J X; Chu, Paul K

    2014-10-01

    A proof of concept integrating binary p-n heterojunctions into a semiconductor hybrid photocatalyst is demonstrated by non-covalent doping of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with ultrathin GO and MoS2 nanosheets using a facile sonochemical method. In this unique ternary hybrid, the layered MoS2 and GO nanosheets with a large surface area enhance light absorption to generate more photoelectrons. On account of the coupling between MoS2 and GO with g-C3N4, the ternary hybrid possesses binary p-n heterojunctions at the g-C3N4/MoS2 and g-C3N4/GO interfaces. The space charge layers created by the p-n heterojunctions not only enhance photogeneration, but also promote charge separation and transfer of electron-hole pairs. In addition, the ultrathin MoS2 and GO with high mobility act as electron mediators to facilitate separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs at each p-n heterojunction. As a result, the ternary hybrid photocatalyst exhibits improved photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation compared to other reference materials. The results provide new insights into the large-scale production of semiconductor photocatalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A FRET-based probe for epidermal growth factor receptor bound non-covalently to a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Reina E.; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Fujioka, Aki; Sharma, Alok; Mayer, Bruce J.; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2005-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor plays a pivotal role in a variety of cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. To monitor the EGF receptor (EGFR) activity in living cells, we developed a probe for EGFR activity based on the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Previously, we developed a probe designated as Picchu (Phosphorylation indicator of the CrkII chimeric unit), which detects the tyrosine phosphorylation of the CrkII adaptor protein. We used a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes, WinZipA2 and WinZipB1, to bind Picchu non-covalently to the carboxyl-terminus of the EGFR. Using this modified probe named Picchu-Z, the activity of EGFR was followed in EGF-stimulated Cos7 cells. We found that a high level of tyrosine phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe remained after endocytosis until the point when the EGFR was translocated to the perinuclear region. These findings are in agreement with the previously reported 'signaling endosome' model. Furthermore, by pulse stimulation with EGF and by acute ablation of EGFR activity with AG1478, it was suggested that the phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe, and probably the phosphorylation of EGFR also, underwent a rapid equilibrium (τ 1/2 < 2 min) between the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states in the presence of EGF

  16. The use of radiolabelled milk proteins to study thermally-induced interactions in milk systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat induced complexes between milk proteins are of considerable importance in determining the heat stability and rennin clottability of milk products. Thiol-disulfide interchange reactions have been suggested as the principal reaction mechanism for complex formation. Studies to data have not adequately established the mechanism and stoichiometry of complex formation in situ in total milk system. Tracer amounts of 14 C-β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin were heated under various conditions. After clotting with rennet, radioactivity retained in the curd was counted to estimate extent of interaction of β-lactoglobulin with casein. 14 C- and 3 H-Methyl labelled proteins were used for the preparation of radiolabelled artificial casein micelles. These micelles with radiolabelled whey proteins were heated and heat-induced complexes were separated on Sephacryl S-300 eluting with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride to break all non-covalent bonds. Further separation of the protein complexes was obtained using CPG-10 or Sephacryl S-1000. The ratios of 3 H to 14 C labelled proteins in the protein complexes suggested that the stoichiometries of k-, α s2 -casein, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin in the heat-induced complexes varied as a function of the heat treatment

  17. DFT study of the interaction between DOTA chelator and competitive alkali metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, E; Skelton, A A; Honarparvar, B

    2017-09-01

    1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetracetic acid (DOTA) is an important chelator for radiolabeling of pharmaceuticals. The ability of alkali metals found in the body to complex with DOTA and compete with radio metal ions can alter the radiolabeling process. Non-covalent interactions between DOTA complexed with alkali metals Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + , are investigated with density functional theory using B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals. Conformational possibilities of DOTA were explored with a varying number of carboxylic pendant arms of DOTA in close proximity to the ions. It is found that the case in which four arms of DOTA are interacting with ions is more stable than other conformations. The objective of this study is to explore the electronic structure properties upon complexation of alkali metals Li + Na + , K + and Rb + with a DOTA chelator. Interaction energies, relaxation energies, entropies, Gibbs free energies and enthalpies show that the stability of DOTA, complexed with alkali metals decreases down the group of the periodic table. Implicit water solvation affects the complexation of DOTA-ions leading to decreases in the stability of the complexes. NBO analysis through the natural population charges and the second order perturbation theory, revealed a charge transfer between DOTA and alkali metals. Conceptual DFT-based properties such as HOMO/LUMO energies, ΔE HOMO-LUMO and chemical hardness and softness indicated a decrease in the chemical stability of DOTA-alkali metal complexes down the alkali metal series. This study serves as a guide to researchers in the field of organometallic chelators, particularly, radiopharmaceuticals in finding the efficient optimal match between chelators and various metal ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature.

  19. Non-Covalent Supported of l-Proline on Graphene Oxide/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: A Novel, Highly Efficient and Superparamagnetically Separable Catalyst for the Synthesis of Bis-Pyrazole Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosadegh Keshavarz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A superparamagnetic graphene oxide/Fe3O4/l-proline nano hybrid that was obtained from the non-covalent immobilization of l-proline on graphene oxide/Fe3O4 nanocomposite was used as a new magnetically separable catalyst for the efficient synthesis of 4,4′-(arylmethylenebis(1H-pyrazol-5-ol derivatives. The prepared heterogeneous catalyst was characterized using FTIR, TGA, DTG, XRD, TEM, SEM, and elemental analysis techniques. Short reaction times (5–15 min, excellent yields (87–98%, and simple experimental procedure with an easy work-up are some of the advantages of the introduced catalyst.

  20. Water-soluble light-emitting nanoparticles prepared by non-covalent bond self-assembly of a hydroxyl group functionalized oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) with different water-soluble polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Water-soluble light-emitting nanoparticles were prepared from hydroxyl group functionalized oligos(p-phenyleneethynylene) (OHOPEL) and water-soluble polymers(PEG,PAA,and PG) by non-covalent bond self-assembly.Their structure and optoelectronic properties were investigated through dynamic light scattering(DLS) ,UV and PL spectroscopy.The optical properties of OHOPEL-based water-soluble nanoparticles exhibited the same properties as that found in OHOPEL films,indicating the existence of interchain-aggregation of OHOPELs in the nanoparticles.OHOPEL-based nanoparticles prepared from conjugated oligomers show smaller size and lower dispersity than nanoparticles from conjugated polymers,which means that the structures of water-soluble nanoparticles are linked to the conjugated length.Furthermore,the OHOPEL/PG and OHOPEL/PAA systems produced smaller particles and lower polydispersity than the OHOPEL/PEG system,indicating that there may exist influence of the strength of non-covalent bonds on the size and degree of dispersity of the nanoparticles.

  1. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  2. Synthesis, characterization, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxicity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes derived from dipyridyl triazole ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Di; Wei, Yi; Tang, Jie; Bian, He-Dong; Huang, Fu-Ping; Liang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Four different transition metal complexes containing dipyridyl triazole ligands, namely [Cu(abpt)2Cl2]·2H2O (1), [Cu(abpt)2(ClO4)2] (2), [Co2(abpt)2(H2O)2Cl2]·Cl2·4H2O (3) and [Co2(Hbpt)2(CH3OH)2(NO3)2] (4) have been designed, synthesized and further structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, ESI-MS, elemental analysis, IR and Raman spectroscopy. In these complexes, the both ligands act as bidentate ligands with N, N donors. DNA binding interactions with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) of the ligand and its complexes 1 ~ 4 were investigated via electronic absorption, fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and viscosity measurements as well as confocal Laser Raman spectroscopy. The results show these complexes are able to bind to DNA via the non-covalent mode i.e. intercalation and groove binding or electrostatic interactions. The interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also studied using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods which indicated that fluorescence quenching of BSA by these compounds was the presence of both static and dynamic quenching. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxic effects of the complexes against four cell lines SK-OV-3, HL-7702, BEL7404 and NCI-H460 showed the necessity of the coordination action on the biological properties on the respective complex and that all four complexes exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity.

  3. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashynska, Vlada, E-mail: vlada@vl.kharkov.ua [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Stepanian, Stepan [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly [Institute of Organic Chemistry of Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudosok korutja, 2, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary); Adamowicz, Ludwik [University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms.

  4. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashynska, Vlada; Stepanian, Stepan; Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms

  5. Calculations on Noncovalent Interactions and Databases of Benchmark Interaction Energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2012), s. 663-672 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non-covalent interactions * covalent interactions * quantum chemical approach Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 20.833, year: 2012

  6. The hydroxyl functionality and a rigid proximal N are required for forming a novel non-covalent quinine-heme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alumasa, John N; Gorka, Alexander P; Casabianca, Leah B; Comstock, Erica; de Dios, Angel C; Roepe, Paul D

    2011-03-01

    Quinoline antimalarial drugs bind both monomeric and dimeric forms of free heme, with distinct preferences depending on the chemical environment. Under biological conditions, chloroquine (CQ) appears to prefer to bind to μ-oxo dimeric heme, while quinine (QN) preferentially binds monomer. To further explore this important distinction, we study three newly synthesized and several commercially available QN analogues lacking various functional groups. We find that removal of the QN hydroxyl lowers heme affinity, hemozoin (Hz) inhibition efficiency, and antiplasmodial activity. Elimination of the rigid quinuclidyl ring has similar effects, but elimination of either the vinyl or methoxy group does not. Replacing the quinuclidyl N with a less rigid tertiary aliphatic N only partially restores activity. To further study these trends, we probe drug-heme interactions via NMR studies with both Fe and Zn protoporphyrin IX (FPIX, ZnPIX) for QN, dehydroxyQN (DHQN), dequinuclidylQN (DQQN), and deamino-dequinuclidylQN (DADQQN). Magnetic susceptibility measurements in the presence of FPIX demonstrate that these compounds differentially perturb FPIX monomer-dimer equilibrium. We also isolate the QN-FPIX complex formed under mild aqueous conditions and analyze it by mass spectrometry, as well as fluorescence, vibrational, and solid-state NMR spectroscopies. The data elucidate key features of QN pharmacology and allow us to propose a refined model for the preferred binding of QN to monomeric FPIX under biologically relevant conditions. With this model in hand, we also propose how QN, CQ, and amodiaquine (AQ) differ in their ability to inhibit Hz formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-covalent association of protein and capsular polysaccharide on bacteria-sized latex beads as a model for polysaccharide-specific humoral immunity to intact Gram-positive extracellular bacteria1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colino, Jesus; Duke, Leah; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2013-01-01

    Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressing type 14 capsular polysaccharide (PPS14) and type III Streptococcus agalactiae containing a PPS14 core capsule identical to PPS14, exhibit non-covalent associations of PPS14 and bacterial protein, in contrast to soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. Both bacteria and conjugates induce murine PPS14-specific IgG responses dependent on CD4+ T cells. Further, secondary immunization with conjugate and S. agalactiae, although not S. pneumoniae, results in a boosted response. However, in contrast to conjugate, PPS14-specific IgG responses to bacteria lack affinity maturation, utilize the 44.1-idiotype and are dependent on marginal zone B cells. To better understand the mechanism underlying this dichotomy we developed a minimal model of intact bacteria in which PPS14 and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) were stably attached to 1 μm (bacteria-sized) latex beads, but not directly linked to each other, in contrast to PPS14-PspA conjugate. PPS14+[PspA] beads, similar to conjugate, induced in mice boosted PPS14-specific IgG secondary responses, dependent on T cells and ICOS-dependent costimulation, and in which priming could be achieved with PspA alone. In contrast to conjugate, but similar to intact bacteria, the primary PPS14-specific IgG response to PPS14+[PspA] beads peaked rapidly, with the secondary response highly enriched for the 44.1-idiotype and lacking affinity maturation. These results demonstrate that non-covalent association in a particle, of polysaccharide and protein, recapitulates essential immunologic characteristics of intact bacteria that are distinct from soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. PMID:23926322

  8. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, W.A. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  9. The Role of Wheat and Egg Constituents in the Formation of a Covalent and Non-covalent Protein Network in Fresh and Cooked Egg Noodles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Marlies A; Rombouts, Ine; Nivelle, Mieke A; Delcour, Jan A

    2017-01-01

    Noodles of constant protein content and flour-to-egg protein ratio were made with whole egg, egg white, or egg yolk. The optimal cooking time, water absorption, and cooking loss of salted whole egg noodles was respectively lower and higher than of egg white and egg yolk noodles. However, cooked whole egg noodles showed the best Kieffer-rig extensibility. Differences in noodle properties were linked to protein network formation. Disulfide bonds in whole egg noodles developed faster and to a larger extent during cooking than in egg yolk noodles but slower and to a lower extent than in egg white noodles. The balance between the rate of protein cross-linking and starch swelling determines cooked noodle properties. Ionic and hydrophobic protein interactions increase the optimum cooking time and total work in Kieffer-rig extensibility testing of fresh noodles. Hydrogen bonds and covalent cross-links are probably the main determinants of the extensibility of cooked noodles. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. Introduction to a Protein Interaction System Used for Quantitative Evaluation of Biomolecular Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Yamniuk, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    A central goal of molecular biology is the determination of biomolecular function. This comes largely from a knowledge of the non-covalent interactions that biological small and macro-molecules experience. The fundamental mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the ABRF is to show how solution biophysical tools are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core t...

  11. A time-resolved study on the photodynamic primary process of ADE. Pt.2: Photochemistry in biomolecular complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jingxi; Lin Weizhen; Han Zhenhui; Miao Jinling; Wang Wenfeng; Yao Side; Lin Nianyun; Zhu Dayuan

    2003-01-01

    By use of laser flash photolysis and steady state absorption techniques, a systematic study was carried out on the interaction of ADE, which is a kind of model compound of actinomycin D, with DNA and BSA. Non-covalent binding was found between ADE and ssDNA, dsDNA and BSA, and photoinduced electron transfer reaction was observed. These results indicate that actinomycins might be used as type I photodrugs in the future and will be helpful for structure modification of this kind of compound

  12. CRITIC2: A program for real-space analysis of quantum chemical interactions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Johnson, Erin R.; Luaña, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    We present CRITIC2, a program for the analysis of quantum-mechanical atomic and molecular interactions in periodic solids. This code, a greatly improved version of the previous CRITIC program (Otero-de-la Roza et al., 2009), can: (i) find critical points of the electron density and related scalar fields such as the electron localization function (ELF), Laplacian, … (ii) integrate atomic properties in the framework of Bader’s Atoms-in-Molecules theory (QTAIM), (iii) visualize non-covalent interactions in crystals using the non-covalent interactions (NCI) index, (iv) generate relevant graphical representations including lines, planes, gradient paths, contour plots, atomic basins, … and (v) perform transformations between file formats describing scalar fields and crystal structures. CRITIC2 can interface with the output produced by a variety of electronic structure programs including WIEN2k, elk, PI, abinit, Quantum ESPRESSO, VASP, Gaussian, and, in general, any other code capable of writing the scalar field under study to a three-dimensional grid. CRITIC2 is parallelized, completely documented (including illustrative test cases) and publicly available under the GNU General Public License. Catalogue identifier: AECB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECB_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11686949 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 337020731 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 and 90. Computer: Workstations. Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Shared-memory parallelization can be used for most tasks. Classification: 7.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECB_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 157 Nature of problem: Analysis of quantum

  13. Non-covalent synthesis of organic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the synthesis, characterization and functionalization of hydrogen bonded, box-like assemblies. These assemblies are formed upon mixing bismelamine calix[4]arenes with a complementary barbiturate in apolar solvents. Various techniques for the characterization have been used,

  14. To bend or not to bend – are heteroatom interactions within conjugated molecules effective in dictating conformation and planarity?

    KAUST Repository

    Conboy, Gary; Spencer, Howard J.; Angioni, Enrico; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L.; Findlay, Neil J.; Coles, Simon J.; Wilson, Claire; Pitak, Mateusz B.; Risko, Chad; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Skabara, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the roles of heteroatoms (mainly nitrogen, the halogens and the chalcogens) in dictating the conformation of linear conjugated molecules and polymers through non-covalent intramolecular interactions. Whilst hydrogen bonding is a competitive and sometimes more influential interaction, we provide unambiguous evidence that heteroatoms are able to determine the conformation of such materials with reasonable predictability.

  15. Antioxidative activity and emulsifying properties of cuttlefish skin gelatin–tannic acid complex as influenced by types of interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aewsiri, T.; Benjakul, S.; Visessanguan, W.; Wierenga, P.A.; Gruppen, H.

    2010-01-01

    The non-covalent interaction between cuttlefish skin gelatin and tannic acid was observed in gelatin modified with unoxidized tannic acid at pH 7, whereas covalent interaction was found in gelatin modified with oxidized tannic acid at pH 9. Degree of tannic acid incorporation into gelatin via

  16. To bend or not to bend – are heteroatom interactions within conjugated molecules effective in dictating conformation and planarity?

    KAUST Repository

    Conboy, Gary

    2016-04-26

    We consider the roles of heteroatoms (mainly nitrogen, the halogens and the chalcogens) in dictating the conformation of linear conjugated molecules and polymers through non-covalent intramolecular interactions. Whilst hydrogen bonding is a competitive and sometimes more influential interaction, we provide unambiguous evidence that heteroatoms are able to determine the conformation of such materials with reasonable predictability.

  17. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  18. Intermolecular interactions of decamethoxinum and acetylsalicylic acid in systems of various complexity levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Vashchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions between decamethoxinum (DEC and acetylsalicylic acid (ASА have been studied in the phospholipid-containing systems of escalating complexity levels. The host media for these substances were solvents, L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC membranes, and samples of human erythrocytes. Peculiar effects caused by DEC-ASА interaction have been observed in each system using appropriate techniques: (a DEC-ASА non-covalent complexes formation in DPPC-containing systems were revealed by mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization; (b joint DEC-ASА action on DPPC model membranes led to increasing of membrane melting temperature Tm, whereas individual drugs caused pronounced Tm decreasing, which was demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry; (c deceleration of DEC-induced haemolysis of erythrocytes under joint DEC-ASА application was observed by optical microscopy.

  19. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesha R. Hathwar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ...Cπ interactions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. The quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.

  20. Influence of Secondary Interactions on the Structure, Sublimation Thermodynamics, and Solubility of Salicylate:4-Hydroxybenzamide Cocrystals. Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manin, Alex N; Voronin, Alexander P; Shishkina, Anastasia V; Vener, Mikhail V; Churakov, Andrei V; Perlovich, German L

    2015-08-20

    Cocrystal screening of 4-hydroxybenzamide with a number of salicylates (salicylic acid, SA; 4-aminosalicylic acid, PASA; acetylsalicylic acid, ASA; and salicylsalicylic acid, SSA) was conducted to confirm the formation of two cocrystals, [SA+4-OHBZA] (1:1) and [PASA+4-OHBZA] (1:1). Their structures were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and the hydrogen-bond network topology was studied. Thermodynamic characteristics of salicylic acid cocrystal sublimation were obtained experimentally. It was proved that PASA cocrystallization with 4-OHBZA makes the drug more stable and prevents the irreversible process of decarboxylation of PASA resulting in formation of toxic 3-aminophenol. The pattern of non-covalent interactions in the cocrystals is described quantitatively using solid-state density functional theory followed by Bader analysis of the periodic electron density. It has been found that the total energy of secondary interactions between synthon atoms and the side hydroxyl group of the acid molecule in [SA+4-OHBZA] (1:1) and [PASA+4-OHBZA] (1:1) cocrystals is comparable to the energy of the primary acid-amide heterosynthon. The theoretical value of the sublimation enthalpy of [SA+4-OHBZA], 231 kJ/mol, agrees fairly well with the experimental one, 272 kJ/mol. The dissolution experiments with [SA+4-OHBZA] have proved that the relatively large cocrystal stability in relation to the stability of its components has a negative effect on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility. The [PASA+4-OHBZA] (1:1) cocrystal showed an enhancement of apparent solubility compared to that of the corresponding pure active pharmaceutical ingredient, while their intrinsic dissolution rates are comparable.

  1. The specific cleavage of lactone linkage to open-loop in cyclic lipopeptide during negative ESI tandem mass spectrometry: the hydrogen bond interaction effect of 4-ethyl guaiacol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengzhe Guo

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a valuable tool for the analysis and identification of chemical compounds, particularly proteins and peptides. Lichenysins G, the major cyclic lipopeptide of lichenysin, and the non-covalent complex of lichenysins G and 4-ethylguaiacol were investigated with negative ion ESI tandem mass spectrometry. The different fragmentation mechanisms for these compounds were investigated. Our study shows the 4-ethylguaiacol hydrogen bond with the carbonyl oxygen of the ester group in the loop of lichenysins G. With the help of this hydrogen bond interaction, the ring structure preferentially opens in lactone linkage rather than O-C bond of the ester-group to produce alcohol and ketene. Isothermal titration 1H-NMR analysis verified the hydrogen bond and determined the proportion of subject and ligand in the non-covalent complex to be 1∶1. Theoretical calculations also suggest that the addition of the ligand can affect the energy of the transition structures (TS during loop opening.

  2. Reciprocal carbonyl-carbonyl interactions in small molecules and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Abdur; Saha, Pinaki; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Sukumar, Nagamani; Sarma, Bani Kanta

    2017-07-19

    Carbonyl-carbonyl n→π* interactions where a lone pair (n) of the oxygen atom of a carbonyl group is delocalized over the π* orbital of a nearby carbonyl group have attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to their ability to affect the 3D structure of small molecules, polyesters, peptides, and proteins. In this paper, we report the discovery of a "reciprocal" carbonyl-carbonyl interaction with substantial back and forth n→π* and π→π* electron delocalization between neighboring carbonyl groups. We have carried out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to show the presence of this interaction in both small molecules and proteins. In proteins, these interactions are primarily found in polyproline II (PPII) helices. As PPII are the most abundant secondary structures in unfolded proteins, we propose that these local interactions may have implications in protein folding.Carbonyl-carbonyl π* non covalent interactions affect the structure and stability of small molecules and proteins. Here, the authors carry out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to describe an additional type of carbonyl-carbonyl interaction.

  3. Alecto 2 - interaction studies; Alecto 2 - etudes d'interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet, J P; Clouet d' Orval, Ch; Mougniot, J C; Penet, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Weak interactions were experimentally studies with the tank of the critical assembly Alecto II and one, two or three bottles containing solutions of various concentrations. In particular, was studied the validity of certain classical assumptions, shielding effects, screening and semi-reflexion effects, importance of thermal coupling. The method of the 'k{sub eff}, solid angle' is shown to apply to such a system. The determination by divergence and pulsed neutron technique of the reactivity related to a millimeter of solution level affords the obtention of critical heights in terms of reactivity. (authors) [French] Une etude experimentale d'interactions faibles a ete faite entre la cuve de l'experience critique ALECTO II et une, deux ou trois bouteilles contenant des concentrations variees. On etudie, en particulier, la validite de certaines hypotheses classiques, effets d'ombre, d'ecrans, de semi-reflexion, importance du couplage thermique. On montre d'autre part que la methode du 'K{sub eff}, angle solide' peut s'appliquer a un tel systeme. La determination par divergence et neutrons pulses de la reactivite liee au millimetre de solution permet de traduire les hauteurs critiques obtenues, en terme de reactivite. (auteurs)

  4. Stabilization and Structure Calculations for Noncovalent Interactions in Extended Molecular Systems Based on Wave Function and Density Functional Theories

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, K. E.; Pitoňák, Michal; Jurečka, P.; Hobza, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 9 (2010), s. 5023-5063 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non covalent interactions * wave function theories * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 33.033, year: 2010

  5. Study of 12C interactions at HISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.

    1982-12-01

    Single-particle inclusive measurements in high-energy nuclear physics have provided the foundation for a number of models of interacting nuclear fluids. Such measurements yield information on the endpoints of the evolution of highly excited nuclear systems. However, they suffer from the fact that observed particles can be formed in a large number of very different evolutionary paths. To learn more about how interactions proceed we have performed a series of experiments in which all fast nuclear fragments are analyzed for each individual interaction. These experiments were performed at the LBL Bevalac HISS (Heavy Ion Spectrometer System) facility where we studied the interaction of 1 GeV/nuc 12C nuclei with targets of C, CH 2 , Cu, and U. In this paper we describe HISS and present some preliminary results of the experiment

  6. 新型非共价相互作用——σ-hole作用的研究进展%Research Progress on the New Tept of Non-covale σ-hole Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李巍; 曾艳丽; 孟令鹏

    2015-01-01

    第Ⅳ~Ⅶ主族元素的原子的σ-hole与亲核物质之间的作用,已经成为目前研究弱相互作用的热点问题.该类作用一般表示为RnX…B(n=1,2,3,4),其中X为第Ⅳ~Ⅶ主族元素的原子,B为亲核物质.RX分子σ-hole处静电势最大值(VS,max)与2个因素有关:1)X原子外VS,max值随X原子的电负性增大而减小;2)X原子外Vs,max值随RnX(n=1,2,3,4)分子中X原子sp杂化中p轨道的贡献的增大而增大.

  7. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  8. A Study of Multiplicities in Hadronic Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Tristan, Nora Patricia; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2006-02-01

    Using data from the SELEX (Fermilab E781) experiment obtained with a minimum-bias trigger, we study multiplicity and angular distributions of secondary particles produced in interactions in the experimental targets. We observe interactions of {Sigma}{sup -}, proton, {pi}{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +}, at beam momenta between 250 GeV/c and 650 GeV/c, in copper, polyethylene, graphite, and beryllium targets. We show that the multiplicity and angular distributions for meson and baryon beams at the same momentum are identical. We also show that the mean multiplicity increases with beam momentum, and presents only small variations with the target material.

  9. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA 20 , poly dT 20 , poly dC 20 and the duplex poly dA 20 :dT 20 . Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their purification using strong

  10. Context and Crossmodal Interactions: An ERP Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz R Sarmiento

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In a previous behavioural study, we reported that a particular context of stimulus congruency influenced audiovisual interactions. In particular, audiovisual interaction, measured in terms of congruency effect, was reduced when a high proportion of incongruent trials was presented. We argued that this modulation was due to changes in participants' control set as a function of the context of congruency, with greater control applied when most of the trials were incongruent. Since behavioural data do not allow to specify the level at which control was affecting audiovisual interaction, we conducted an event-related potentials (ERPs study to further investigate each context of audiovisual congruency. Participants performed an audiovisual congruency task, where the stimulus onset could be present on two different contexts mixed at random: a high proportion congruent context and a low proportion congruent context. The context manipulation was found to modulate brain ERPs related to perceptual and response selection processes, ie, the N2 and P3 components. The N2 amplitude was larger for the less common trials on both high and low congruent proportion contexts, while the P3 amplitude and latency were differentially modulated by incongruent trials on the two contexts.

  11. A fluvoxamine-caffeine interaction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, U; Loft, S; Poulsen, H E

    1996-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine is a very potent inhibitor of the liver enzyme CYP1A2, which is the major P450 catalysing the biotransformation of caffeine. Thus, a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken with the purpose of documenting a drug-drug interaction between fluvoxam......The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine is a very potent inhibitor of the liver enzyme CYP1A2, which is the major P450 catalysing the biotransformation of caffeine. Thus, a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken with the purpose of documenting a drug-drug interaction between...... fluvoxamine and caffeine. The study was carried out as a randomized, in vivo, cross-over study including eight healthy volunteers. In Period A of the study, each subject took 200 mg caffeine orally, and in Period B, the subjects took fluvoxamine 50 mg per day for 4 days and 100 mg per day for 8 days. On day 8...... fluvoxamine treatment may lead to caffeine intoxication. Finally, our study provides additional evidence that fluvoxamine can be used to probe CYP1A2 in drug metabolism....

  12. Thermogravimetric studies of vapour-aerosol interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshaw, J.; Newland, M.S.; Wood, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis has been used to study the interaction of iodine vapour with cadmium, silver and manganese monoxide substrates. These studies have demonstrated the importance of time-dependence data on reaction rates. Iodine did not react with manganese monoxide (as expected from thermodynamic considerations); however, extensive reaction did occur with silver and cadmium. Two rate limiting mechanisms were observed: mass transfer of iodine molecules from the gas phase (leading to linear reaction rates) and parabolic kinetics (ie inversely proportional to the extent of reaction) when the rate was limited by a diffusion process through the reaction product. (author)

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Structures and Interactions of Vancomycin Antibiotics with Cell Wall Analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhibo; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Laskin, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Surface-induced dissociation (SID) of the singly protonated complex of vancomycin antibiotic with cell wall peptide analogue (N α , N # var e psilon#-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala) was studied using a 6 T Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially configured for SID experiments. The binding energy between the vancomycin and the peptide was obtained from the RRKM modeling of the time- and energy resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) of the precursor ion and its fragments. Electronic structure calculations of the geometries, proton affinities and binding energies were performed for several model systems including vancomycin (V), vancomycin aglycon (VA), N α , N # var e psilon#-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, and non-covalent complexes of VA with N-acetyl-D-Ala-D-Ala and N α , N # var e psilon#-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. Comparison between the experimental and computational results suggests that the most probable structure of the complex observed in our experiments corresponds to the neutral peptide bound to the vancomycin protonated at the secondary amino group of the N-methyl-leucine residue. The experimental binding energy of 30.9 ± 1.8 kcal/mol is in good agreement with the binding energy of 29.3 ± 2.5 kcal/mol calculated for the model system representing the preferred structure of the complex

  14. Self-Healing Supramolecular Hydrogels Based on Reversible Physical Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Strandman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic and reversible polymer networks capable of self-healing, i.e., restoring their mechanical properties after deformation and failure, are gaining increasing research interest, as there is a continuous need towards extending the lifetime and improving the safety and performance of materials particularly in biomedical applications. Hydrogels are versatile materials that may allow self-healing through a variety of covalent and non-covalent bonding strategies. The structural recovery of physical gels has long been a topic of interest in soft materials physics and various supramolecular interactions can induce this kind of recovery. This review highlights the non-covalent strategies of building self-repairing hydrogels and the characterization of their mechanical properties. Potential applications and future prospects of these materials are also discussed.

  15. Quadrupole interaction studies of Hg in Sb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, J.C.; Krien, K.; Herzog, P.; Folle, H.R.; Freitag, K.; Reuschenbach, F.; Reuschenbach, M.; Trzcinski, R.

    1978-01-01

    Time differential perturbed angular correlation and nuclear orientation studies of the electric quadrupole interaction for Hg in Sb have been performed. The effective field gradients at room temperature and below 0.05K have been derived. These two values are no indication for an anomalous temperature dependence of the effective field gradient for Hg in Sb. The value of the electric field gradient fits well into the systematics for Hg in other hosts. It is shown that the electronic enhancements of the field gradients are correlated to the valence of the impurities and are rather insensitive to the host properties. (orig./HPOE) [de

  16. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Studies of molybdenite interaction with nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potashnikov, Yu.M.; Lutsik, V.I.; Chursanov, Yu.V.

    1984-01-01

    Product composition and their effect on the reaction rate of molybdenite with nitric acid are specified. It is shown that alongside with NO NO 2 is included in the composition of the products of MoS 2 and HNO 3 interaction and it produces catalytic effect on the process considered. Under the conditions studied MoS 2 dissolution proceeds in the mixed regime, conditioned by similar values of molybdenite oxidation rate and reaction product diffusion into solution volume (Esub(act.=28.9 kJ/mol, K 298 =6.3x10 -7 , cmxs -1 ), at that due to catalytic effect of NO 2 the dependence V approximately αsup(-g.37) is observed

  18. Study of electron-positron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-01-01

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model

  19. Beam-Beam Interaction Studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, Michaela; Alemany Fernandez, R

    2011-01-01

    The beam-beam force is one of the most important limiting factors in the performance of a collider, mainly in the delivered luminosity. Therefore, it is essential to measure the effects in LHC. Moreover, adequate understanding of LHC beam-beam interaction is of crucial importance in the design phases of the LHC luminosity upgrade. Due to the complexity of this topic the work presented in this thesis concentrates on the beam-beam tune shift and orbit effects. The study of the Linear Coherent Beam-Beam Parameter at the LHC has been determined with head-on collisions with small number of bunches at injection energy (450 GeV). For high bunch intensities the beam-beam force is strong enough to expect orbit effects if the two beams do not collide head-on but with a crossing angle or with a given offset. As a consequence the closed orbit changes. The closed orbit of an unperturbed machine with respect to a machine where the beam-beam force becomes more and more important has been studied and the results are as well ...

  20. Interactions: A Study of Office Reference Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Lederer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The purpose of this study was to analyze the data from a referencestatistics-gathering mechanism at Colorado State University (CSU Libraries. It aimedprimarily to better understand patron behaviours, particularly in an academic librarywith no reference desk.Methods – The researchers examined data from 2007 to 2010 of College LiaisonLibrarians’ consultations with patrons. Data were analyzed by various criteria,including patron type, contact method, and time spent with the patron. Theinformation was examined in the aggregate, meaning all librarians combined, andthen specifically from the Liberal Arts and Business subject areas.Results – The researchers found that the number of librarian reference consultationsis substantial. Referrals to librarians from CSU’s Morgan Library’s one public servicedesk have declined over time. The researchers also found that graduate students arethe primary patrons and email is the preferred contact method overall.Conclusion – The researchers found that interactions with patrons in librarians’ offices – either in person or virtually – remain substantial even without a traditional reference desk. The data suggest that librarians’ efforts at marketing themselves to departments, colleges, and patrons have been successful. This study will be of value to reference, subject specialist, and public service librarians, and library administrators as they consider ways to quantify their work, not only for administrative purposes, but in order to follow trends and provide services and staffing accordingly.

  1. Activity and stability studies of platinized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as fuel cell electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Borghei, Maryam; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2015-01-01

    A non-covalent functionalization for multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been used as an alternative to the damaging acid treatment. Platinum nanoparticles with similar particle size distribution have been deposited on the surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The interaction between...

  2. H-Bonding Cooperativity Effects in Amyloids: Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanics Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přenosil, Ondřej; Pitoňák, Michal; Sedlák, Robert; Kabeláč, Martin; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 225, č. 5 (2011), s. 553-574 ISSN 0942-9352 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non- covalent interaction * hydrogen bond * amyloids * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2011

  3. Study of electron and neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers-in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  4. Runaway-electron-materials interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Miyahara, A.

    1990-03-01

    During the operation of magnetic fusion devices it has been frequently observed that runaway electrons can cause severe damage to plasma facing components. The energy of the runaway electrons could possibly reach several 100 MeV in a next generation device with an energy content in the plasma in the order of 100 MJ. In this study effects of high energy electron - materials interaction were determined by laboratory experiments using particle beam facilities, i.e. the Electron Linear Accelerator of the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research of Osaka University and the 10 MW Neutral Beam Injection Test Stand of the National Institute for Fusion Science. The experiments and further analyses lead to a first assessment of the damage thresholds of plasma facing materials and components under runaway electron impact. It was found that metals (stainless steel, molybdenum, tungsten) showed grain growth, crack formation and/or melting already below the threshold for crack initiation on graphite (14-33 MJ/m 2 ). Strong erosion of carbon materials would occur above 100 MJ/m 2 . Damage to metal coolant channels can occur already below an energy deposition of 100 MJ/m 2 . The energy deposited in the metal coolant channels depends on the thickness of the plasma facing carbon material D, with the shielding efficiency S of carbon approximately as S∼D 1.15 . (author) 304 refs. 12 tabs. 59 figs

  5. Structural Analysis of ‘key’ Interactions in Functional RNA Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of the thesis is to carry out structural bioinformatics study along with usage of advanced quantum chemical methods to look at the structural stability and energetics of RNA building blocks. The main focus of the work described here lies on understanding the reasons behind the intrinsic stability of key interactions in nucleic acids. Crystal structures of RNA molecules exhibit fascinating variety of non-covalent interactions, which play an important role in maintaining the three dimensional structures. An accurate atomic level description of these interactions in the structural building blocks of RNA is a key to understand the structure-function relationship in these molecules. An effort has been made to link the conclusions drawn from quantum chemical computations on RNA base pairs in wide biochemical context of their occurrence in RNA structures. The initial attention was on the impact of natural and non-natural modifications of the nucleic acid bases on the structure and stability of base pairs that they are involved in. In the remaining sections we cover other molecular interactions shaping nucleic acids, as the interaction between ribose and the bases, and the fluoride sensing riboswitch system in order to investigate structure and dynamics of nucleic acids at the atomic level and to gain insight into the physical chemistry behind.

  6. Structural Analysis of ‘key’ Interactions in Functional RNA Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of the thesis is to carry out structural bioinformatics study along with usage of advanced quantum chemical methods to look at the structural stability and energetics of RNA building blocks. The main focus of the work described here lies on understanding the reasons behind the intrinsic stability of key interactions in nucleic acids. Crystal structures of RNA molecules exhibit fascinating variety of non-covalent interactions, which play an important role in maintaining the three dimensional structures. An accurate atomic level description of these interactions in the structural building blocks of RNA is a key to understand the structure-function relationship in these molecules. An effort has been made to link the conclusions drawn from quantum chemical computations on RNA base pairs in wide biochemical context of their occurrence in RNA structures. The initial attention was on the impact of natural and non-natural modifications of the nucleic acid bases on the structure and stability of base pairs that they are involved in. In the remaining sections we cover other molecular interactions shaping nucleic acids, as the interaction between ribose and the bases, and the fluoride sensing riboswitch system in order to investigate structure and dynamics of nucleic acids at the atomic level and to gain insight into the physical chemistry behind.

  7. The Janus Kinase (JAK) FERM and SH2 Domains: Bringing Specificity to JAK-Receptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrao, Ryan; Lupardus, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases essential for signaling in response to cytokines and interferons and thereby control many essential functions in growth, development, and immune regulation. JAKs are unique among tyrosine kinases for their constitutive yet non-covalent association with class I and II cytokine receptors, which upon cytokine binding bring together two JAKs to create an active signaling complex. JAK association with cytokine receptors is facilitated by N-terminal FERM and SH2 domains, both of which are classical mediators of peptide interactions. Together, the JAK FERM and SH2 domains mediate a bipartite interaction with two distinct receptor peptide motifs, the proline-rich "Box1" and hydrophobic "Box2," which are present in the intracellular domain of cytokine receptors. While the general sidechain chemistry of Box1 and Box2 peptides is conserved between receptors, they share very weak primary sequence homology, making it impossible to posit why certain JAKs preferentially interact with and signal through specific subsets of cytokine receptors. Here, we review the structure and function of the JAK FERM and SH2 domains in light of several recent studies that reveal their atomic structure and elucidate interaction mechanisms with both the Box1 and Box2 receptor motifs. These crystal structures demonstrate how evolution has repurposed the JAK FERM and SH2 domains into a receptor-binding module that facilitates interactions with multiple receptors possessing diverse primary sequences.

  8. Experimental studies on beam-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiwamoto, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Beam-handling technology has reached now at such a level as to enable highly controlled experiments of beam-plasma interaction. Varieties of hypotheses and suppositions about the beam propagation and interaction in space plasma can be proved and often be corrected by examining the specific processes in laboratory plasma. The experiments performed in this way by the author are briefed: ion beam instability in unmagnetized plasma; ion beam instability perpendicular to magnetic field; and electron beam instability. (Mori, K.)

  9. In Vitro Interactions between 17β-Estradiol and DNA Result in Formation of the Hormone-DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the role of 17β-estradiol (E2 in reproduction and during the menstrual cycle, it has been shown to modulate numerous physiological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and ion transport in many tissues. The pathways in which estrogens affect an organism have been partially described, although many questions still exist regarding estrogens’ interaction with biomacromolecules. Hence, the present study showed the interaction of four oligonucleotides (17, 20, 24 and/or 38-mer with E2. The strength of these interactions was evaluated using optical methods, showing that the interaction is influenced by three major factors, namely: oligonucleotide length, E2 concentration and interaction time. In addition, the denaturation phenomenon of DNA revealed that the binding of E2 leads to destabilization of hydrogen bonds between the nitrogenous bases of DNA strands resulting in a decrease of their melting temperatures (Tm. To obtain a more detailed insight into these interactions, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was employed. This study revealed that E2 with DNA forms non-covalent physical complexes, observed as the mass shifts for app. 270 Da (Mr of E2 to higher molecular masses. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 can affect biomacromolecules, as circulating oligonucleotides, which can trigger mutations, leading to various unwanted effects.

  10. Advances in soil-structure interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maheshwari, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    It is utmost important that lifeline infrastructures (such as bridges, hospitals, power plants, dams etc.) are safe and functional during earthquakes as damage or collapse of these structures may have far reaching implications. A lifeline's failure may hamper relief and rescue operations required just after an earthquake and secondly its indirect economical losses may be very severe. Therefore, safety of these structures during earthquakes is vital. Further, damage to nuclear facilities during earthquake may lead to disaster. These structures should be designed adequately taking into account all the important issues. Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) is one of the design issues, which is often overlooked and even in some cases ignored. The effects of dynamic SSI are well understood and practiced in the nuclear power industry (for large foundations of the nuclear containment structures) since sixties. However, in last decade, there are many advances in techniques of SSI and those need to be incorporated in practice. Failures of many structures occurred during the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge, California earthquakes and the 1995 Kobe, Japan earthquake due to SSI or a related issue. Many jetties had failed in Andaman and Nicobar islands due to Sumatra earthquake and ensuing tsunamis. It is because of this recent experience that the importance of SSI on dynamic response of structures during earthquakes has been fully realized. General belief that the SSI effects are always beneficial for the structure is not correct. Some cases have been presented where it is shown that SSI effects are detrimental for the stability of the structure. This paper addresses the effects of dynamic SSI on the response of the structures and explains its importance. Further advances in SSI studies have been discussed

  11. Molecular interactions between (--epigallocatechin gallate analogs and pancreatic lipase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihui Wang

    Full Text Available The molecular interactions between pancreatic lipase (PL and four tea polyphenols (EGCG analogs, like (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, (--gallocatechin gallate (GCG, (--epicatechin gallate (ECG, and (--epigallocatechin (EC, were studied from PL activity, conformation, kinetics and thermodynamics. It was observed that EGCG analogs inhibited PL activity, and their inhibitory rates decreased by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. PL activity at first decreased rapidly and then slowly with the increase of EGCG analogs concentrations. α-Helix content of PL secondary structure decreased dependent on EGCG analogs concentration by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. EGCG, ECG, and EC could quench PL fluorescence both dynamically and statically, while GCG only quenched statically. EGCG analogs would induce PL self-assembly into complexes and the hydrodynamic radii of the complexes possessed a close relationship with the inhibitory rates. Kinetics analysis showed that EGCG analogs non-competitively inhibited PL activity and did not bind to PL catalytic site. DSC measurement revealed that EGCG analogs decreased the transition midpoint temperature of PL enzyme, suggesting that these compounds reduced PL enzyme thermostability. In vitro renaturation through urea solution indicated that interactions between PL and EGCG analogs were weak and non-covalent.

  12. The S-layer Associated Serine Protease Homolog PrtX Impacts Cell Surface-Mediated Microbe-Host Interactions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brant R. Johnson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Health-promoting aspects attributed to probiotic microorganisms, including adhesion to intestinal epithelia and modulation of the host mucosal immune system, are mediated by proteins found on the bacterial cell surface. Notably, certain probiotic and commensal bacteria contain a surface (S- layer as the outermost stratum of the cell wall. S-layers are non-covalently bound semi-porous, crystalline arrays of self-assembling, proteinaceous subunits called S-layer proteins (SLPs. Recent evidence has shown that multiple proteins are non-covalently co-localized within the S-layer, designated S-layer associated proteins (SLAPs. In Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, SLP and SLAPs have been implicated in both mucosal immunomodulation and adhesion to the host intestinal epithelium. In this study, a S-layer associated serine protease homolog, PrtX (prtX, lba1578, was deleted from the chromosome of L. acidophilus NCFM. Compared to the parent strain, the PrtX-deficient strain (ΔprtX demonstrated increased autoaggregation, an altered cellular morphology, and pleiotropic increases in adhesion to mucin and fibronectin, in vitro. Furthermore, ΔprtX demonstrated increased in vitro immune stimulation of IL-6, IL-12, and IL-10 compared to wild-type, when exposed to mouse dendritic cells. Finally, in vivo colonization of germ-free mice with ΔprtX led to an increase in epithelial barrier integrity. The absence of PrtX within the exoproteome of a ΔprtX strain caused morphological changes, resulting in a pleiotropic increase of the organisms’ immunomodulatory properties and interactions with some intestinal epithelial cell components.

  13. Virus-membrane interactions : spectroscopic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datema, K.P.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis some new aspects of the infection process of nonenveloped viruses are reported. The interaction of a rod-shaped (TMV) and three spherical (CCMV, BMV, SBMV) plant viruses, of the filamentous bacteriophage M13, and of their coat proteins with membranes have been investigated. A

  14. Interactive social neuroscience to study autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, Max J; Naples, Adam J; McPartland, James C

    2015-03-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate difficulty with social interactions and relationships, but the neural mechanisms underlying these difficulties remain largely unknown. While social difficulties in ASD are most apparent in the context of interactions with other people, most neuroscience research investigating ASD have provided limited insight into the complex dynamics of these interactions. The development of novel, innovative "interactive social neuroscience" methods to study the brain in contexts with two interacting humans is a necessary advance for ASD research. Studies applying an interactive neuroscience approach to study two brains engaging with one another have revealed significant differences in neural processes during interaction compared to observation in brain regions that are implicated in the neuropathology of ASD. Interactive social neuroscience methods are crucial in clarifying the mechanisms underlying the social and communication deficits that characterize ASD.

  15. Plasma surface interaction studies in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.; Yamashina, T.

    1994-01-01

    In order to achieve a long burning time period in a fusion reactor, the interactions between the plasma facing materials and the fusion plasma have to be well controlled. Namely, the radiation loss due to impurities and deterioration of the energy confinement time due to fuel particle recyclings have to be suppressed, in addition to the requirement of heat removal based on a high heat flux component. Recently, in Japan, the plasma facing material/component has been very actively developed for ITER and Large Helical Device (LHD). In this review paper, we briefly introduce the following issues, (1) progress of plasma surface interactions in tokamaks and helical devices, (2) development of plasma facing materials, (3) divertor development, (4) boronization, (5) selective pumping of helium ash, (6) tritium retention, and (7) neutron damage of graphite plasma facing material. (author)

  16. Study of KN interaction in zero isospin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, R.M.

    1977-04-01

    The low-energy parameters for kaon-nucleon interaction in the isospin T = 0 state are computed. The differential cross section for K + - deuteron scattering with charge exchange is calculated using the multiple scattering expansion. The various kinematical and dynamical possibilities are discussed. Wave parameters for s, p1/2 and p3/2 are determined by fitting the obtained cross section with the experimental data at low and intermediate energies. (Author) [pt

  17. Flicker Interaction Studies and Flickermeter Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Rong

    2009-06-04

    types are made in the PQ lab of TUE since the human eye is sensitive to the light color. The measurement results are analyzed by FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) and the wavelength contributions to flicker of different lamp types are presented in this thesis. It provides important information on the light color variation of different lamp types under flicker conditions. Weighting factors of various lamp types are obtained by the corresponding wavelength contribution to the flicker weighted with the CIE photopic luminosity curve. These weighting factors indicate the human eye flicker response from the human eye spectrum sensitivity point of view. Then it is possible to develop a simplified flicker measurement method for different lamp types by adding an eye-brain flicker response model. A discussion about the simplified flicker measurement method and the eye-brain model is given in this thesis. Finally, the interaction between flicker and dimmers (the phase controlled dimmer and reverse phase controlled dimmer) is studied based on experimental work. The measurement results show that the phase controlled dimmer will increase the flicker problem. Solutions to avoid the flicker influence of dimmers are discussed in this thesis.

  18. Culture matters : a study on presence in an interactive movie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, J.; Bartneck, C.

    2008-01-01

    A cross cultural study was conducted to test the influences of different cultural backgrounds on the user's presence experience in interacting with a distributed interactive movie. The effects of embodied interaction on presence were also investigated because embodiment is often used to enrich the

  19. Influence of hydration on ion-biomolecule interactions: M(+)(indole)(H2O)(n) (M = Na, K; n = 3-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Haochen; Lisy, James M

    2015-10-14

    The indole functional group can be found in many biologically relevant molecules, such as neurotransmitters, pineal hormones and medicines. Indole has been used as a tractable model to study the hydration structures of biomolecules as well as the interplay of non-covalent interactions within ion-biomolecule-water complexes, which largely determine their structure and dynamics. With three potential binding sites: above the six- or five-member ring, and the N-H group, the competition between π and hydrogen bond interactions involves multiple locations. Electrostatic interactions from monovalent cations are in direct competition with hydrogen bonding interactions, as structural configurations involving both direct cation-indole interactions and cation-water-indole bridging interactions were observed. The different charge densities of Na(+) and K(+) give rise to different structural conformers at the same level of hydration. Infrared spectra with parallel hybrid functional-based calculations and Gibbs free energy calculations revealed rich structural insights into the Na(+)/K(+)(indole)(H2O)3-6 cluster ion complexes. Isotopic (H/D) analyses were applied to decouple the spectral features originating from the OH and NH stretches. Results showed no evidence of direct interaction between water and the NH group of indole (via a σ-hydrogen bond) at current levels of hydration with the incorporation of cations. Hydrogen bonding to a π-system, however, was ubiquitous at hydration levels between two and five.

  20. Microfluidic Devices for Studying Biomolecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Wilbur W.; Garcia, Carlos d.; Henry, Charles S.

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for monitoring biomolecular interactions have been invented. These devices are basically highly miniaturized liquid-chromatography columns. They are intended to be prototypes of miniature analytical devices of the laboratory on a chip type that could be fabricated rapidly and inexpensively and that, because of their small sizes, would yield analytical results from very small amounts of expensive analytes (typically, proteins). Other advantages to be gained by this scaling down of liquid-chromatography columns may include increases in resolution and speed, decreases in the consumption of reagents, and the possibility of performing multiple simultaneous and highly integrated analyses by use of multiple devices of this type, each possibly containing multiple parallel analytical microchannels. The principle of operation is the same as that of a macroscopic liquid-chromatography column: The column is a channel packed with particles, upon which are immobilized molecules of the protein of interest (or one of the proteins of interest if there are more than one). Starting at a known time, a solution or suspension containing molecules of the protein or other substance of interest is pumped into the channel at its inlet. The liquid emerging from the outlet of the channel is monitored to detect the molecules of the dissolved or suspended substance(s). The time that it takes these molecules to flow from the inlet to the outlet is a measure of the degree of interaction between the immobilized and the dissolved or suspended molecules. Depending on the precise natures of the molecules, this measure can be used for diverse purposes: examples include screening for solution conditions that favor crystallization of proteins, screening for interactions between drugs and proteins, and determining the functions of biomolecules.

  1. Strong Interaction Studies with PANDA at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönning, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, provides unique possibilities for a new generation of nuclear-, hadron- and atomic physics experiments. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR will offer a broad physics programme with emphasis on different aspects of hadron physics. Understanding the strong interaction in the perturbative regime remains one of the greatest challenges in contemporary physics and hadrons provide several important keys. In these proceedings, PANDA will be presented along with some high-lights of the planned physics programme.

  2. Strong Interaction Studies with PANDA at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schönning, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, provides unique possibilities for a new generation of nuclear-, hadron- and atomic physics experiments. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR will offer a broad physics programme with emphasis on different aspects of hadron physics. Understanding the strong interaction in the perturbative regime remains one of the greatest challenges in contemporary physics and hadrons provide several important keys. In these proceedings, PANDA will be presented along with some high-lights of the planned physics programme

  3. Bundle duct interaction studies for fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, H.T.S.; Kaplan, S.

    1981-06-01

    It is known that the wire-wrapped rods and duct in an LMFBR are undergoing a gradual structural distortion from the initially uniform geometry under the combined effects of thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling and creep. These deformations have a significant effect on flow characteristics, thus causing changes in thermal behavior such as cladding temperature and temperature distribution within a bundle. The temperature distribution may further enhance or retard irradiation induced deformation of the bundle. This report summarizes the results of the continuing effort in investigating the bundle-duct interaction, focusing on the need for the large development plant

  4. Interaction Studies of Dilute Aqueous Oxalic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Kandpal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular conductance λm, relative viscosity and density of oxalicacid at different concentration in dilute aqueous solution were measured at 293 K.The conductance data were used to calculate the value association constant.Viscosity and density data were used to calculate the A and B coefficient ofJone-Dole equation and apparent molar volume respectively. The viscosityresults were utilized for the applicability of Modified Jone-Dole equation andStaurdinger equations. Mono oxalate anion acts, as structure maker and thesolute-solvent interaction were present in the dilute aqueous oxalic acid.

  5. Intermolecular interaction studies of glyphosate with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manon, Priti; Juglan, K. C.; Kaur, Kirandeep; Sethi, Nidhi; Kaur, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U) of glyphosate with water have been measured on different ultrasonic frequency ranges from 1MHz, 2MHz, 3MHz & 5MHz by varying concentrations (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, & 0.40%) at 30°C. The specific gravity bottle, Ostwald's viscometer and quartz crystal interferometer were used to determine density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U). These three factors contribute in evaluating the other parameters as acoustic impedance (Z), adiabatic compressibility (β), relaxation time (τ), intermolecular free length (Lf), free volume (Vf), ultrasonic attenuation (α/f2), Rao's constant (R), Wada's constant (W) and relative strength (R). Solute-solvent interaction is confirmed by ultrasonic velocity and viscosity values, which increases with increase in concentration indicates stronger association between solute and solvent molecules. With rise in ultrasonic frequency the interaction between the solute and solvent particles decreases. The linear variations in Rao's constant and Wada's constant suggest the absence of complex formation.

  6. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments; Interacao de nanotubos de carbono com segmentos de DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-07-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA{sub 20}, poly dT{sub 20}, poly dC{sub 20} and the duplex poly dA{sub 20}:dT{sub 20}. Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their

  7. Studying Wind Energy/Bird Interactions: A Guidance Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R. [California Energy Commission (US); Morrison, M. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (US); Sinclair, K. [Dept. of Energy/National Renewable Energy Lab. (US); Strickland, D. [WEST, Inc. (US)

    1999-12-01

    This guidance document is a product of the Avian Subcommittee of the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC). The NWCC was formed to better understand and promote responsible, credible, and comparable avian/wind energy interaction studies. Bird mortality is a concern and wind power is a potential clean and green source of electricity, making study of wind energy/bird interactions essential. This document provides an overview for regulators and stakeholders concerned with wind energy/bird interactions, as well as a more technical discussion of the basic concepts and tools for studying such interactions.

  8. Design, synthesis and DNA interactions of a chimera between a platinum complex and an IHF mimicking peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harita; Damian, Mariana S; Alshiekh, Alak; Elmroth, Sofi K C; Diederichsen, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    Conjugation of metal complexes with peptide scaffolds possessing high DNA binding affinity has shown to modulate their biological activities and to enhance their interaction with DNA. In this work, a platinum complex/peptide chimera was synthesized based on a model of the Integration Host Factor (IHF), an architectural protein possessing sequence specific DNA binding and bending abilities through its interaction with a minor groove. The model peptide consists of a cyclic unit resembling the minor grove binding subdomain of IHF, a positively charged lysine dendrimer for electrostatic interactions with the DNA phosphate backbone and a flexible glycine linker tethering the two units. A norvaline derived artificial amino acid was designed to contain a dimethylethylenediamine as a bidentate platinum chelating unit, and introduced into the IHF mimicking peptides. The interaction of the chimeric peptides with various DNA sequences was studied by utilizing the following experiments: thermal melting studies, agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA unwinding experiments, and native and denaturing gel electrophoresis to visualize non-covalent and covalent peptide-DNA adducts, respectively. By incorporation of the platinum metal center within the model peptide mimicking IHF we have attempted to improve its specificity and DNA targeting ability, particularly towards those sequences containing adjacent guanine residues.

  9. Use of high-temperature, high-torque rheometry to study the viscoelastic properties of coal during carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, M.C.; Duffy, J.J.; Snape, C.E.; Steel, K.M. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    When coal is heated in the absence of oxygen it softens at approximately 400 degrees C, becomes viscoelastic, and volatiles are driven off. With further heating, the viscous mass reaches a minimum viscosity in the range of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} Pa s and then begins to resolidify. A high-torque, high-temperature, controlled-strain rheometer with parallel plates has been used to study the theology during this process. Under shear, the viscosity of the softening mass decreases with increasing shear rate. During resolidification, the viscosity increases as C-C bond formation and physical interactions gives rise to an aromatic network, but, under shear, the network breaks apart and flows. This is viewed as a yielding of the structure. The higher the shear rate, the earlier the yielding occurs, such that if the shear rate is low enough, the structure is able to build. Also, further into resolidification lower shear rates are able to break the structure. It is proposed that resolidification occurs through the formation of aromatic clusters that grow and become crosslinked by non-covalent interactions. As the clusters grow, the amount of liquid surrounding them decreases and it is thought that the non-covalent interactions between clusters and liquid could decrease and the ability of growing clusters to move past each other increases, which would explain the weakening of the structure under shear. This work is part of a program of work aimed at attaining a greater understanding of microstructural changes taking place during carbonization for different coals, in order to understand the mechanisms that give rise to good quality cokes and coke oven problems such as excessive wall pressure.

  10. Determinants of Internet Use for Interactive Learning: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, Jonatan; Duart, Josep M.; Sancho-Vinuesa, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The use of the Internet in higher education teaching can facilitate the interactive learning process and thus improve educational outcomes. The aim of the study presented here is to explore which variables are linked to higher intensity of Internet-based interactive educational practices. The study is based on data obtained from an online survey…

  11. An Activity Theoretical Approach to Social Interaction during Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Rachel L.

    2016-01-01

    This case study examines how one study abroad student oriented to social interaction during a semester in Spain. Using an activity theoretical approach, the findings indicate that the student not only viewed social interaction with his Spanish host family and an expert-Spanish-speaking age peer as an opportunity for second language (L2) learning,…

  12. Insights into the fold organization of TIM barrel from interaction energy based structure networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayabaskar, M S; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2012-01-01

    There are many well-known examples of proteins with low sequence similarity, adopting the same structural fold. This aspect of sequence-structure relationship has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically, however with limited success. Most of the studies consider remote homology or "sequence conservation" as the basis for their understanding. Recently "interaction energy" based network formalism (Protein Energy Networks (PENs)) was developed to understand the determinants of protein structures. In this paper we have used these PENs to investigate the common non-covalent interactions and their collective features which stabilize the TIM barrel fold. We have also developed a method of aligning PENs in order to understand the spatial conservation of interactions in the fold. We have identified key common interactions responsible for the conservation of the TIM fold, despite high sequence dissimilarity. For instance, the central beta barrel of the TIM fold is stabilized by long-range high energy electrostatic interactions and low-energy contiguous vdW interactions in certain families. The other interfaces like the helix-sheet or the helix-helix seem to be devoid of any high energy conserved interactions. Conserved interactions in the loop regions around the catalytic site of the TIM fold have also been identified, pointing out their significance in both structural and functional evolution. Based on these investigations, we have developed a novel network based phylogenetic analysis for remote homologues, which can perform better than sequence based phylogeny. Such an analysis is more meaningful from both structural and functional evolutionary perspective. We believe that the information obtained through the "interaction conservation" viewpoint and the subsequently developed method of structure network alignment, can shed new light in the fields of fold organization and de novo computational protein design.

  13. How the biotin–streptavidin interaction was made even stronger: investigation via crystallography and a chimaeric tetramer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Claire E.; Koner, Apurba L.; Lowe, Edward D.; Howarth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between SA (streptavidin) and biotin is one of the strongest non-covalent interactions in Nature. SA is a widely used tool and a paradigm for protein–ligand interactions. We previously developed a SA mutant, termed Tr (traptavidin), possessing a 10-fold lower off-rate for biotin, with increased mechanical and thermal stability. In the present study, we determined the crystal structures of apo-Tr and biotin–Tr at 1.5 Å resolution. In apo-SA the loop (L3/4), near biotin's valeryl tail, is typically disordered and open, but closes upon biotin binding. In contrast, L3/4 was shut in both apo-Tr and biotin–Tr. The reduced flexibility of L3/4 and decreased conformational change on biotin binding provide an explanation for Tr's reduced biotin off- and on-rates. L3/4 includes Ser45, which forms a hydrogen bond to biotin consistently in Tr, but erratically in SA. Reduced breakage of the biotin–Ser45 hydrogen bond in Tr is likely to inhibit the initiating event in biotin's dissociation pathway. We generated a Tr with a single biotin-binding site rather than four, which showed a simi-larly low off-rate, demonstrating that Tr's low off-rate was governed by intrasubunit effects. Understanding the structural features of this tenacious interaction may assist the design of even stronger affinity tags and inhibitors. PMID:21241253

  14. Weak interaction studies from nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, M.

    1981-01-01

    The studies performed at the theoretical nuclear physics division of the Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, are reported. Electron spin density and internal conversion process, nuclear excitation by electron transition, beta decay, weak charged current, and beta-ray angular distributions in oriented nuclei have been studied. The relative intensity of internal conversion electrons for the case in which the radial wave functions of orbital electrons are different for electron spin up and down was calculated. The calculated value was in good agreement with the experimental one. The nuclear excitation following the transition of orbital electrons was studied. The calculated probability of the nuclear excitation of Os 189 was 1.4 x 10 - 7 in conformity with the experimental value 1.7 x 10 - 7 . The second class current and other problems on beta-decay have been extensively studied, and described elsewhere. Concerning weak charged current, the effects of all induced terms, the time component of main axial vector, all partial waves of leptons, Coulomb correction for the electrons in finite size nuclei, and radiative correction were studied. The beta-ray angular distribution for the 1 + -- 0 + transition in oriented B 12 and N 12 was investigated. In this connection, investigation on the weak magnetism to include all higher order corrections for the evaluation of the spectral shape factors was performed. Other works carried out by the author and his collaborators are also explained. (Kato, T.)

  15. Studying Complex Interactions in Real Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The study of human behavior must take into account the social context, and real-time, networked experiments with multiple participants is one increasingly popular way to achieve this. In this paper a framework based on Python and XMPP is presented that aims to make it easy to develop...

  16. Communication: The Study of Human Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, C. David

    Designed to provide a comprehensive and broadly based introduction to the study of human communication, this book presents the concept of communication as interrelated constituent processes that operate at varying levels of complexity and acquire significance only in the context of larger intrapersonal, interpersonal, or socio-cultural systems of…

  17. Studies on phytoplankton-bacterial interactions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.

    community was most diverse during the pre- monsoon period. Heterotrophic dinoflagellates were abundant in the water column as well as sediment. A seasonal cycling between vegetative and resting cysts of autotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates... governed by the environmental characteristics of the study area was observed. Temperature, salinity and Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) were the main factors affecting dinoflagellate community structure in both the water column and sediment...

  18. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  19. A study of the flow field surrounding interacting line fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevor Maynard; Marko Princevac; David R. Weise

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of converging fires often leads to significant changes in fire behavior, including increased flame length, angle, and intensity. In this paper, the fluid mechanics of two adjacent line fires are studied both theoretically and experimentally. A simple potential flow model is used to explain the tilting of interacting flames towards each other, which...

  20. A theoretical study on interaction of proline with gold cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with Au3 (Pakiari and Jamshidi 2007) and interaction of. ∗. Author for correspondence (harjinder.singh@iiit.ac.in) small gold clusters with xDNA base pairs (Sharma et al. 2009) have motivated us to carry out a theoretical study on interaction of proline with gold nanoparticles. Proline is unique among the natural amino acids ...

  1. A Usability Study of Interactive Web-Based Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Tulay; Pinar, Musa

    2011-01-01

    This research advances the understanding of the usability of marketing case study modules in the area of interactive web-based technologies through the assignment of seven interactive case modules in a Principles of Marketing course. The case modules were provided for marketing students by the publisher, McGraw Hill Irwin, of the…

  2. From Child-Robot Interaction to Child-Robot-Therapist Interaction: A Case Study in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Giannopulu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Troubles in social communication as well as deficits in the cognitive treatment of emotions are supposed to be a fundamental part of autism. We present a case study based on multimodal interaction between a mobile robot and a child with autism in spontaneous, free game play. This case study tells us that the robot mediates the interaction between the autistic child and therapist once the robot-child interaction has been established. In addition, the child uses the robot as a mediator to express positive emotion playing with the therapist. It is thought that the three-pronged interaction i.e., child-robot-therapist could better facilitate the transfer of social and emotional abilities to real life settings. Robot therapy has a high potential to improve the condition of brain activity in autistic children.

  3. A Perspective on Reagent Diversity and Non-covalent Binding of Reactive Carbonyl Species (RCS and Effector Reagents in Non-enzymatic Glycation (NEG: Mechanistic Considerations and Implications for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Rodnick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This perspective focuses on illustrating the underappreciated connections between reactive carbonyl species (RCS, initial binding in the nonenzymatic glycation (NEG process, and nonenzymatic covalent protein modification (here termed NECPM. While glucose is the central species involved in NEG, recent studies indicate that the initially-bound glucose species in the NEG of human hemoglobin (HbA and human serum albumin (HSA are non-RCS ring-closed isomers. The ring-opened glucose, an RCS structure that reacts in the NEG process, is most likely generated from previously-bound ring-closed isomers undergoing concerted acid/base reactions while bound to protein. The generation of the glucose RCS can involve concomitantly-bound physiological species (e.g., inorganic phosphate, water, etc.; here termed effector reagents. Extant NEG schemes do not account for these recent findings. In addition, effector reagent reactions with glucose in the serum and erythrocyte cytosol can generate RCS (e.g., glyoxal, glyceraldehyde, etc.. Recent research has shown that these RCS covalently modify proteins in vivo via NECPM mechanisms. A general scheme that reflects both the reagent and mechanistic diversity that can lead to NEG and NECPM is presented here. A perspective that accounts for the relationships between RCS, NEG, and NECPM can facilitate the understanding of site selectivity, may help explain overall glycation rates, and may have implications for the clinical assessment/control of diabetes mellitus. In view of this perspective, concentrations of ribose, fructose, Pi, bicarbonate, counter ions, and the resulting RCS generated within intracellular and extracellular compartments may be of importance and of clinical relevance. Future research is also proposed.

  4. Strong interactions studies with medium energy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, K.K.

    1993-10-01

    This progress report refers to the period August 1992 to August 1993, which includes the first year of the three-year period December 1, 1992--November 30, 1995 of the existing research contract. As anticipated in the 1992--1995 proposal the major preoccupation during 1992--1993 was with Fermilab experiment E760. This experiment, whose primary objective is to make very high-resolution study of Charmonium Spectroscopy via proton-antiproton annihilations, has turned out to be a veritable gold-mine of exciting hadronic physics in other areas as well. These include the proton from factor in the time-life region, proton-antiproton forward scattering, QCD scaling laws, and light quark spectroscopy. A large fraction of the data from E760 have been analyzed during this year, and several papers have been published. In addition to the E760 experiment at Fermilab continued progress was made earlier nuclear physics-related experiments at LAMPF, MIT, and NIKHEF, and their results for publication. Topics include high- resolution electron scattering, quasi-free electron scattering and low-energy pion double charge exchange

  5. Water-clay interactions. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaucher, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Clay minerals contribute to the chemical composition of soil and sediment groundwaters via surface and dissolution/precipitation reactions. The understanding of those processes is still today fragmentary. In this context, our experimental purpose is to identify the contribution of each reaction in the chemical composition of water in a water/clay System. Kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite are the reference clays. After a fine mineralogical study, the exchange equilibria between K + and H + are characterised. Different exchange sites are identified and the exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients are quantified. Then, mixtures of the three clays are equilibrated with acidic and basic (I≤10 -2 M) solutions at 25 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C, during 320 days. The System evolution is observed by chemical analysis of the solutions and mineralogical analysis by TEM. We show that montmorillonite is unstable compared to the kaolinite/amorphous silica assemblage for solutions of pH<7. Aqueous silica is probably controlled by the kinetics of dissolution of the montmorillonite in moderate pH media. In more acidic solutions, amorphous silica precipitates. Al is under control of 'kaolinite' neo-formations. The use of the selectivity coefficients in a numerical simulation shows that K + concentration depends on exchange reactions. The pH has a more complicated evolution, which is not completely understood. This evolution depends on both exchange equilibria and organic acid occurrence. In this type of experiments, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium equations between smectite and kaolinite are inexact. The problem of the thermodynamic nature of clays remains and is not resolved by these solubility experiments. (author) [fr

  6. Experimental studies of oxidic molten corium-vessel steel interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petrov, Yu.B.; Petchenkov, A.Yu.; Kulagin, I.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V.; Martinov, V.V.; Gusarov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The experimental results of molten corium-steel specimen interaction with molten corium on the 'Rasplav-2' test facility are presented. In the experiments, cooled vessel steel specimens positioned on the molten pool bottom and uncooled ones lowered into the molten pool were tested. Interaction processes were studied for different corium compositions, melt superheating and in alternative (inert and air) overlying atmosphere. Hypotheses were put forward explaining the observed phenomena and interaction mechanisms. The studies presented in the paper were aimed at the detection of different corium-steel interaction mechanisms. Therefore certain identified phenomena are more typical of the ex-vessel localization conditions than of the in-vessel corium retention. Primarily, this can be referred to the phenomena of low-temperature molten corium-vessel steel interaction in oxidizing atmosphere

  7. Experimental studies of oxidic molten corium-vessel steel interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. E-mail: niti-npc@sbor.net; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petrov, Yu.B.; Petchenkov, A.Yu.; Kulagin, I.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V.; Martinov, V.V.; Gusarov, V.V

    2001-12-01

    The experimental results of molten corium-steel specimen interaction with molten corium on the 'Rasplav-2' test facility are presented. In the experiments, cooled vessel steel specimens positioned on the molten pool bottom and uncooled ones lowered into the molten pool were tested. Interaction processes were studied for different corium compositions, melt superheating and in alternative (inert and air) overlying atmosphere. Hypotheses were put forward explaining the observed phenomena and interaction mechanisms. The studies presented in the paper were aimed at the detection of different corium-steel interaction mechanisms. Therefore certain identified phenomena are more typical of the ex-vessel localization conditions than of the in-vessel corium retention. Primarily, this can be referred to the phenomena of low-temperature molten corium-vessel steel interaction in oxidizing atmosphere.

  8. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Observational study of drug-drug interactions in oncological inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sacramento Díaz-Carrasco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of potential clinically relevant drug- drug interactions in adult oncological inpatients, as well as to describe the most frequent interactions. A standard database was used. Method: An observational, transversal, and descriptive study including patients admitted to the Oncology Service of a reference hospital. All prescriptions were collected twice a week during a month. They were analysed using Lexicomp® database, recording all interactions classified with a level of risk: C, D or X. Results: A total of 1 850 drug-drug interactions were detected in 218 treatments. The prevalence of treatments with at least one clinically relevant interaction was 95%, being 94.5% for those at level C and 26.1% for levels D and X. The drugs most commonly involved in the interactions detected were opioid analgesics, antipsychotics (butyrophenones, benzodiazepines, pyrazolones, glucocorticoids and heparins, whereas interactions with antineoplastics were minimal, highlighting those related to paclitaxel and between metamizole and various antineoplastics. Conclusions: The prevalence of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions rate was very high, highlighting the high risk percentage of them related to level of risk X. Due to the frequency of onset and potential severity, highlighted the concomitant use of central nervous system depressants drugs with risk of respiratory depression, the risk of onset of anticholinergic symptoms when combining morphine or haloperidol with butylscopolamine, ipratropium bromide or dexchlorpheniramine and the multiple interactions involving metamizole.

  10. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    photographs of the dispersions of amide-functio- nalized DWNTs in dichloromethane and tetrahydro- furan. In figure 3b, we show a TEM image of DWNTs after covalent functionalization. The images are not as sharp after functionalization as in the case of pris- tine nanotubes (figure 3a), and the bundles seem to be intact.

  11. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis of non-covalent complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical Sciences and Technology Division and Academy of Scientific & Innovative Research (AcSIR), ... workers proposed the electrostatic-covalent model of hydrogen bonding. ..... tain degree of electron donation and acceptance occurs.

  12. Fragment molecular orbital method for studying lanthanide interactions with proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsushima, Satoru [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Komeiji, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Mochizuki, Y. [Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    The binding affinity of the calcium-binding protein calmodulin towards Eu{sup 3+} was studied as a model for lanthanide protein interactions in the large family of ''EF-hand'' calcium-binding proteins.

  13. Simulation study of the beam-beam interaction at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, J.

    1980-01-01

    A two dimensional simulation study of the beam-beam interaction at SPEAR indicates that quantum fluctuations affecting the horizontal betatron oscillation play a critical role in the vertical beam blowup

  14. Quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper

    antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes. Motivated by that fact, the scope of this thesis is to study these antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions. In particular, we attempt to study these interactions with a quantitative approach. For that purpose, we consider the three...... a significant problem for quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions; namely that antimicrobial peptides adsorb to surfaces of glass and plastic. Specifically, we demonstrate that under standard experimental conditions, this effect is significant for mastoparan X, melittin...... lead to inaccurate conclusions, or even completely wrong conclusions, when interpreting the FCS data. We show that, if all of the pitfalls are avoided, then FCS is a technique with a large potential for quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-induced leakage of fluorescent markers from large...

  15. Flow cytometry approach for studying the interaction between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flow cytometry approach for studying the interaction between Bacillus mojavensis and Alternaria alternata. Asma Milet, Noreddine Kacem Chaouche, Laid Dehimat, Asma Ait Kaki, Mounira Kara Ali, Philippe Thonart ...

  16. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Atmosphere Water Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2011-07-04

    Understanding and quantifying the interaction of the atmosphere with underlying water surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of scientific fields such as water resources management, climate studies of ocean-atmosphere exchange, and regional weat

  17. Game theory and experimental games the study of strategic interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Colman, Andrew M

    1982-01-01

    Game Theory and Experimental Games: The Study of Strategic Interaction is a critical survey of the essential ideas of game theory and the findings of empirical research on strategic interaction. Some experiments using lifelike simulations of familiar kinds of strategic interactions are presented, and applications of game theory to the study of voting, the theory of evolution, and moral philosophy are discussed.Comprised of 13 chapters, this volume begins with an informal definition of game theory and an outline of the types of social situations to which it applies. Games of skill, games of cha

  18. In vitro study of interaction between quinine and Garcinia kola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the interaction between quinine and Garcinia kola using an in vitro adsorption study. Methods: In vitro interaction between quinine and G. kola was conducted at 37 ± 0.1 °C. Adsorption of quinine (2.5 - 40 μg/ml) to 2.5 % w/v G. kola suspension was studied. Thereafter, quinine desorption process ...

  19. Using interactive video technology in nursing education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, Daria M; Pulcher, Karen L

    2008-02-01

    A pilot study was conducted to analyze the benefits of using interactive technology with external assessors and graduating senior nursing students during Senior Nurse Leadership Assessment Day at the University of Central Missouri. The primary aim was to determine whether videoconferencing technology would promote recruitment and retention of professional nurse external assessors without compromising student learning. Among the issues discussed are the advantages and disadvantages of using interactive videoconferencing technology in education and the influence of external assessors in nursing education. The study results indicate that interactive videoconferencing is an effective, accepted format for educational opportunities such as Senior Nurse Leadership Assessment Day, based on the lived experiences of the study participants. In addition, the results demonstrate that interactive videoconferencing does not compromise student learning or assessment by external assessors.

  20. Environmental confounding in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-07-01

    We show that, in the presence of uncontrolled environmental confounding, joint tests for the presence of a main genetic effect and gene-environment interaction will be biased if the genetic and environmental factors are correlated, even if there is no effect of either the genetic factor or the environmental factor on the disease. When environmental confounding is ignored, such tests will in fact reject the joint null of no genetic effect with a probability that tends to 1 as the sample size increases. This problem with the joint test vanishes under gene-environment independence, but it still persists if estimating the gene-environment interaction parameter itself is of interest. Uncontrolled environmental confounding will bias estimates of gene-environment interaction parameters even under gene-environment independence, but it will not do so if the unmeasured confounding variable itself does not interact with the genetic factor. Under gene-environment independence, if the interaction parameter without controlling for the environmental confounder is nonzero, then there is gene-environment interaction either between the genetic factor and the environmental factor of interest or between the genetic factor and the unmeasured environmental confounder. We evaluate several recently proposed joint tests in a simulation study and discuss the implications of these results for the conduct of gene-environment interaction studies.

  1. Study on synthesis, kit formulation and chemical kinetics of dissociation of 99mTc labeled PnAO biotin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshan, A.; Jafri, S.R.A.; Maecke, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A bifunctional ligand of PnAO-biotin has recently been synthesized, with a better percentage yield of 63% in the presence of newly developed coupling agent 0-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexaflorophos phate (HATU). Then lyophilized kit with 150μg of PnAObiotin has been developed and labeled with high specific activity of technetium-99m (2500-3000MBq) to get maximum radiochemical purity of 99mTc-PnAO-biotin complex i.e. > 97%. The association of avidin and streptavidin is among the strongest known non-covalent protein ligand interaction Ka 1015 M-1 and 1013 M-1 respectively. We measured the dissociation rate constant of PnAO-biotin from avidin and streptavidin challenged with excess of cold biotin. For the separation of bound and free-labeled biotin we employed ultrafilteration technique. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the non-covalent binding between 99mTc-PnAO-biotin with avidin and 99mTc-PnAO-biotin with streptavidin is more than 99%. Both biotin-binding proteins exhibited a faster initial phase and the rate of dissociation of 99mTc-PnAO-biotin with avidin is found to be 8.2x10-8 at 250C and 2.6x10-7 at 370C while the rate of dissociation 99mTc-PnAO-biotin from streptavidin is found to be 6x10-7 at 250C and 1.06x10-6 at 370C. The in-vitro study of the kinetics of dissociation exhibits the strong interaction of 99mTc-PnAO-biotin complex with both proteins, which suggests that this bifunctional PnAO-biotin ligand can be used for tumor localization with monoclonal antibodies to achieve high tumor to non-tumor ratio. (author)

  2. Interweaving interactions in virtual worlds: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantamesse, Matteo; Galimberti, Carlo; Giacoma, Gianandrea

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of playing the online game World of Warcraft (WoW), both on adolescent's (effective) social interaction and on the competence they developed on it. Social interactions within the game environment have been investigated by integrating qualitative and quantitative methods: conversation analysis and social network analysis (SNA). From a psychosocial point of view, the in-game interactions, and in particular conversational exchanges, turn out to be a collaborative path of the joint definition of identities and social ties, with reflection on in-game processes and out-game relationship.

  3. A comparative study of polymer-dye interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini R.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between an anionic dye Methyl Orange and two poly cations namely, Poly (N-vinyl-4-methylpyridiniumiodide, (PC1 & Poly (vinylbenzyltriphenylphosphoniumchloride, (PC2 has been investigated by spectrophotometric method. The polymers are observed to induce metachromasy in the dye as evidenced from the considerable blue shift in the absorption maximum of the dye. The interaction constant and thermodynamic parameters of interaction have been determined by absorbance measurements at the metachromatic band. The effect of additives such as ionic salts, alcohols, urea and polyelectrolytes on the reversal of metachromasy has been studied and used to determine the stability of the metachromatic complex and to understand the nature of binding.

  4. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991 under a great from the US Department of Energy. Most of these studies have involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions. The work has been carried out both with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and with the cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland. Part of the experimental work involves measurements of new data on double-charge-exchange scattering, using facilities at LAMPF which we helped modify, and on pion absorption, using a new detector system at PSI that covers nearly the full solid-angle region which we helped construct. Other work involved preparation for future experiments using polarized nuclear targets and a new high-resolution spectrometer system for detecting π 0 mesons. We also presented several proposals for works to be done in future years, involving studies related to pi-mesonic atoms, fundamental pion-nucleon interactions, studies of the difference between charged and neutral pion interactions with the nucleon, studies of the isospin structure of pion-nucleus interactions, and pion scattering from polarized 3 He targets. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the pion-nucleon interaction, of the pion-nucleus interaction mechanism, and of nuclear structure

  5. Study on competitive interaction models in Cayley tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, J.G.M.A.

    1987-12-01

    We propose two kinds of models in the Cayley tree to simulate Ising models with axial anisotropy in the cubic lattice. The interaction in the direction of the anisotropy is simulated by the interaction along the branches of the tree. The interaction in the planes perpendicular to the anisotropy direction, in the first model, is simulated by interactions between spins in neighbour branches of the same generation arising from same site of the previous generation. In the second model, the simulation of the interaction in the planes are produced by mean field interactions among all spins in sites of the same generation arising from the same site of the previous generations. We study these models in the limit of infinite coordination number. First, we analyse a situation with antiferromagnetic interactions along the branches between first neighbours only, and we find the analogous of a metamagnetic Ising model. In the following, we introduce competitive interactions between first and second neighbours along the branches, to simulate the ANNNI model. We obtain one equation of differences which relates the magnetization of one generation with the magnetization of the two previous generations, to permit a detailed study of the modulated phase region. We note that the wave number of the modulation, for one fixed temperature, changes with the competition parameter to form a devil's staircase with a fractal dimension which increases with the temperature. We discuss the existence of strange atractors, related to a possible caothic phase. Finally, we show the obtained results when we consider interactions along the branches with three neighbours. (author)

  6. Study on Human-structure Dynamic Interaction in Civil Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Cao, Li Lin; Li, Xing Hua

    2018-06-01

    The research of human-structure dynamic interaction are reviewed. Firstly, the influence of the crowd load on structural dynamic characteristics is introduced and the advantages and disadvantages of different crowd load models are analyzed. Then, discussing the influence of structural vibration on the human-induced load, especially the influence of different stiffness structures on the crowd load. Finally, questions about human-structure interaction that require further study are presented.

  7. The pragmatics of therapeutic interaction: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Georgia

    2009-10-01

    The research reported in this article aims to demonstrate a method for the systematic study of the therapist/patient interaction in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, drawing upon the tradition and methods of 'pragmatics'--the study of language in interaction. A brief introduction to the discipline of pragmatics demonstrates its relevance to the contemporary focus of clinical theory on the here-and-now dynamics of the relationship between analyst and patient. This is followed by a detailed study of five segments from the transcript of a therapeutic dialogue, drawn from a brief psychoanalytic psychotherapy, in which therapist and patient negotiate the meaning of the patient's symptom: Is it psychosomatic? The research seeks to show how the therapeutic process can be observed and studied as an interactional achievement, grounded in general and well-studied procedures through which meaning is intersubjectively developed and shared. Implications of the analysis for clinical theory and practice, and further research, are discussed.

  8. Gender interaction in coed physical education: a study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Canan

    2009-01-01

    Although there has been a long-standing debate about whether a single-sex or mixed-sex environment is better for students in many Western countries, coeducation is one of the taken-for-granted issues in the modern Turkish education system. This study examined commonly expressed concerns about gender equity in a mixed-sex environment within the context of physical education (PE) in Turkey. The purpose of the study was to examine teacher-student interaction in the coed PE classroom, focusing on gender-stereotyped beliefs. Participants consisted of two PE teachers and 37 eighth-grade students from a private school situated in suburban Ankara Turkey. The modified observational instrument with the combination of Teacher-Student Interaction (TSI) and Interactions for Sex Equity in Classroom Teaching Observation System (INTERSECT) was used to assess teacher-student interaction in the classroom. In order to understand students' and teachers' gender-stereotyped beliefs, individual interviews were also conducted. The findings of this study indicated that both male and female PE teachers interact more frequently with boys, and this interaction was influenced by gender-stereotyped beliefs of both teachers and students. In sum, similar to many other western countries, the movement toward coeducation in Turkey has not automatically brought equal opportunities for girls or boys in PE.

  9. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J.

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au)

  10. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nucl. Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au).

  11. A spectroscopic study of interaction of cationic dyes with heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nandini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of two cationic dyes namely, acridine orange and pinacyanol chloride with an anionic polyelectrolyte, heparin, has been investigated by spectrophotometric method.The polymer induced metachromasy in the dyes resulting in the shift of the absorption maxima of the dyes towards shorter wavelengths. The stability of the complexes formed between acridine orange and heparin was found to be lesser than that formed between pinacyanol chloride and heparin. This fact was further confirmed by reversal studies using alcohols, urea and surfactants. The interaction of acridine orange with heparin has also been investigated fluorimetrically.The interaction parameters revealed that binding between acridine orange and heparin arises due to electrostatic interaction while that between pinacyanol chloride and heparin is found to involve both electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. The effect of the structure of the dye in inducing metachromasy has also been discussed.

  12. PEER-FEEDBACK AND ONLINE INTERACTION: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Isabel Espitia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of information and communication technologies (ICTs in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom has led to different practices and types of interaction. Online interaction allows teachers and students to use the target language beyond the classroom and provides students with more time to be exposed to and use the language. This case study aimed at understanding how a group of twelve students at Universidad de la Sabana, who participated in online forums as part of the requirements of a blended EFL course, interacted online to provide peer-feedback on written compositions. It also analyzed how online interaction was undertaken when using online forums. Findings suggest that participants raised awareness about the relevance of editing to avoid possible language problems by reviewing their peers' products and that the implementation of online peer feedback as an assessment strategy reveals students' beliefs towards language assessment.

  13. Social signal processing for studying parent-infant interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eAvril

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying early interactions is a core issue of infant development and psychopathology. Automatic social signal processing theoretically offers the possibility to extract and analyse communication by taking an integrative perspective, considering the multimodal nature and dynamics of behaviours (including synchrony. This paper proposes an explorative method to acquire and extract relevant social signals from a naturalistic early parent-infant interaction. An experimental setup is proposed based on both clinical and technical requirements. We extracted various cues from body postures and speech productions of partners using the IMI2S (Interaction, Multimodal Integration, and Social Signal Framework. Preliminary clinical and computational results are reported for two dyads (one pathological in a situation of severe emotional neglect and one normal control as an illustration of our cross-disciplinary protocol. The results from both clinical and computational analyses highlight similar differences: the pathological dyad shows dyssynchronic interaction led by the infant whereas the control dyad shows synchronic interaction and a smooth interactive dialog. The results suggest that the current method might be promising for future studies.

  14. Organoid culture systems to study host-pathogen interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, Devanjali; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in host-microbe interaction studies in organoid cultures have shown great promise and have laid the foundation for much more refined future studies using these systems. Modeling of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in cerebral organoids have helped us understand its association with

  15. Quadrupole interactions of Au in Be and lattice location studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perscheid, B.; Gayer, H.W.; Krien, K.; Freitag, K.

    1978-01-01

    The Moessbauer nucleus 197 Au is used as probe for quadrupole interaction (QI) studies in Be metal. The 77 keV Moessbauer level is populated by the β - decay of 197 Pt and the EC decay of 197 Hg. This fact enabled samples prepared in different ways to be studied. (Auth.)

  16. The Philosophy of Local Studies in the Interactive Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Peter H.; Macafee, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    The authors examine strategic priorities for local studies libraries in the context of the interactive Web. They examine the implications for access, investigations and the needs of different users. The philosophy that has previously guided local studies is articulated as a number of maxims, taking into account also social inclusion and lifelong…

  17. Teaching Social Interaction Skills in Social Studies Classroom and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is a survey which was carried out with 110 sandwich students of university of Nigeria Nsukka. The focus was to ascertain the relevance of social studies programme of Nigerian universities in inculcating social interaction skills for maintaining peace and managing conflicts in the family. Four research questions ...

  18. Technique of studying the interaction of charges of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yefremov, E.I.; Kravtsov, V.S.; Myachina, N.I.; Rodak, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    A technique is presented for studying the interaction of explosive charges which includes recording of the velocity of detonation of the studied charges, measurement of mechanical stresses developing in this case in the medium and determination of granulometric composition of the model with simultaneous and diverse initiation.

  19. Parsing of the free energy of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Khomytova, Nina M. [Department of Physics, Sevastopol National Technical University, Sevastopol 99053, Crimea (Ukraine); Hernandez Santiago, Adrian A.; Tavera, Anna-Maria Cervantes; Alvarado, Julieta Salas [Faculty of Chemical Sciences, Autonomous University of Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Evstigneev, Maxim P., E-mail: max_evstigneev@mail.ru [Department of Physics, Sevastopol National Technical University, Sevastopol 99053, Crimea (Ukraine)

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > A protocol for decomposition of the free energy of aromatic stacking is developed. > The factors stabilizing/destabilizing stacking of aromatic molecules are defined. > Hydrophobic contribution is found to be dominant. - Abstract: We report an analysis of the energetics of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions for 39 non-covalent reactions of self- and hetero-association of 12 aromatic molecules with different structures and charge states. A protocol for computation of the contributions to the total energy from various energetic terms has been developed and the results are consistent with experiment in 92% of all the systems studied. It is found that the contributions from hydrogen bonds and entropic factors are always unfavorable, whereas contributions from van-der-Waals, electrostatic and/or hydrophobic effects may lead to stabilizing or destabilizing factors depending on the system studied. The analysis carried out in this work provides an answer to the questions 'What forces stabilize/destabilize the stacking of aromatic molecules in aqueous-salt solution and what are their relative importance?'

  20. Parsing of the free energy of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Khomytova, Nina M.; Hernandez Santiago, Adrian A.; Tavera, Anna-Maria Cervantes; Alvarado, Julieta Salas; Evstigneev, Maxim P.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → A protocol for decomposition of the free energy of aromatic stacking is developed. → The factors stabilizing/destabilizing stacking of aromatic molecules are defined. → Hydrophobic contribution is found to be dominant. - Abstract: We report an analysis of the energetics of aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions for 39 non-covalent reactions of self- and hetero-association of 12 aromatic molecules with different structures and charge states. A protocol for computation of the contributions to the total energy from various energetic terms has been developed and the results are consistent with experiment in 92% of all the systems studied. It is found that the contributions from hydrogen bonds and entropic factors are always unfavorable, whereas contributions from van-der-Waals, electrostatic and/or hydrophobic effects may lead to stabilizing or destabilizing factors depending on the system studied. The analysis carried out in this work provides an answer to the questions 'What forces stabilize/destabilize the stacking of aromatic molecules in aqueous-salt solution and what are their relative importance?'

  1. Study on the Interaction between Two Hydrokinetic Savonius Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash Golecha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Savonius turbine is simple in design and easy to fabricate at a lower cost. The drag is the basic driving force for Savonius turbine. Savonius turbines are mainly used for the small-scale electricity generation in remote areas. In real life, multiple Savonius turbines are to be arranged to form a farm to scale up the electricity generation. So, it is important to study the interaction among them to avoid the power loss due to negative interaction between turbines. The purpose of this investigation is to examine closely the effect of interaction between two Savonius turbines arranged in line. Experimental investigations are carried out to study the mutual interaction between turbines with water as the working medium at a Reynolds number of 1.2×105 based on the diameter of the turbine. Influence of separation gap between the two Savonius turbines is studied by varying the separation gap ratio (/ from 3 to 8. As the separation gap ratio increases from 3 to 8, becomes lesser the mutual interaction between the turbines. Results conclude that two turbines placed at a separation gap ratio of 8 performed independently without affecting the performance of each other.

  2. Four faces of the interaction between ions and aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Dóra; Rovó, Petra; Jákli, Imre; Császár, Attila G; Perczel, András

    2017-07-15

    Non-covalent interactions between ions and aromatic rings play an important role in the stabilization of macromolecular complexes; of particular interest are peptides and proteins containing aromatic side chains (Phe, Trp, and Tyr) interacting with negatively (Asp and Glu) and positively (Arg and Lys) charged amino acid residues. The structures of the ion-aromatic-ring complexes are the result of an interaction between the large quadrupole moment of the ring and the charge of the ion. Four attractive interaction types are proposed to be distinguished based on the position of the ion with respect to the plane of the ring: perpendicular cation-π (CP ⊥ ), co-planar cation-π (CP ∥ ), perpendicular anion-π (AP ⊥ ), and co-planar anion-π (AP ∥ ). To understand more than the basic features of these four interaction types, a systematic, high-level quantum chemical study is performed, using the X -  + C 6 H 6 , M +  + C 6 H 6 , X -  + C 6 F 6 , and M +  + C 6 F 6 model systems with X -  = H - , F - , Cl - , HCOO - , CH 3 COO - and M +  = H + , Li + , Na + , NH4+, CH 3 NH3+, whereby C 6 H 6 and C 6 F 6 represent an electron-rich and an electron-deficient π system, respectively. Benchmark-quality interaction energies with small uncertainties, obtained via the so-called focal-point analysis (FPA) technique, are reported for the four interaction types. The computations reveal that the interactions lead to significant stabilization, and that the interaction energy order, given in kcal mol -1 in parentheses, is CP ⊥ (23-37) > AP ⊥ (14-21) > CP ∥ (9-22) > AP ∥ (6-16). A natural bond orbital analysis performed leads to a deeper qualitative understanding of the four interaction types. To facilitate the future quantum chemical characterization of ion-aromatic-ring interactions in large biomolecules, the performance of three density functional theory methods, B3LYP, BHandHLYP, and M06-2X, is tested against the FPA benchmarks

  3. The feedback in the studies of interpersonal interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Amyaga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the problem of interpreting and studying the feedback in interpersonal interaction as a result of some reflective position. A scientist interested in the feedback has to study the reflective positions as well and to consider their ‘second order’, i. e. to identify the object of his research as a certain number of direct and reverse processes together with their possible subjective representation. Considering the interaction of the sociologist with his customer, this means the necessity to correctly understand and reflect the goals, interests and negotiating tools of the other party that determine the success of negotiations.

  4. Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives on Designing Video Studies of Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena Rostvall

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors discuss the theoretical basis for the methodological decisions made during the course of a Swedish research project on interaction and learning. The purpose is to discuss how different theories are applied at separate levels of the study. The study is structured on three levels, with separate sets of research questions and theoretical concepts. The levels reflect a close-up description, a systematic analysis, and an interpretation of how teachers and students act and interact. The data consist of 12 hours of video-recorded and transcribed music lessons from high school and college. Through a multidisciplinary theoretical framework, the general understanding of teaching and learning in terms of interaction can be widened. The authors also present a software tool developed to facilitate the processes of transcription and analysis of the video data.

  5. FTIR Drug-Polymer Interactions Studies of Perindopril Erbumine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modni, A.; Ahmad, S.; Din, I.; Hussain, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to prepare different combinations of Perindopril Erbumine with different polymers like Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose, Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K15M, Xanthan gum and Ethyl cellulose, thereby to determine any possible interactions between Perindopril erbumine and polymers. The analytical technique Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to take spectra of individual drug, polymers and combination of drug with polymers. The results were analyzed to find out any interactions of Perindopril erbumine and polymers. From this study it was concluded that there were no any significant changes in characteristic peaks of drug after combinations with polymers which indicated no interaction between Perindopril erbumine and polymers. (author)

  6. Controlled interaction: strategies for using virtual reality to study perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgin, Frank H; Li, Zhi

    2010-05-01

    Immersive virtual reality systems employing head-mounted displays offer great promise for the investigation of perception and action, but there are well-documented limitations to most virtual reality systems. In the present article, we suggest strategies for studying perception/action interactions that try to depend on both scale-invariant metrics (such as power function exponents) and careful consideration of the requirements of the interactions under investigation. New data concerning the effect of pincushion distortion on the perception of surface orientation are presented, as well as data documenting the perception of dynamic distortions associated with head movements with uncorrected optics. A review of several successful uses of virtual reality to study the interaction of perception and action emphasizes scale-free analysis strategies that can achieve theoretical goals while minimizing assumptions about the accuracy of virtual simulations.

  7. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  8. Context Matters: Increasing Understanding with Interactive Clicker Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.; Kang, Hosun; Wolter, Bjorn; delMas, Robert; Armstrong, Norris; Borsari, Bruno; Boury, Nancy; Brickman, Peggy; Hannam, Kristi; Heinz, Cheryl; Horvath, Thomas; Knabb, Maureen; Platt, Terry; Rice, Nancy; Rogers, Bill; Sharp, Joan; Ribbens, Eric; Maier, Kimberly S.; Deschryver, Mike; Hagley, Rodney; Goulet, Tamar; Herreid, Clyde F.

    2011-01-01

    Although interactive technology is presumed to increase student understanding in large classes, no previous research studies have empirically explored the effects of Clicker Cases on students' performance. A Clicker Case is a story (e.g., a problem someone is facing) that uses clickers (student response systems) to engage students in understanding…

  9. NMR studies concerning base-base interactions in oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogen, Y.T. van den.

    1988-01-01

    Two main subjects are treated in the present thesis. The firsst part principally deals with the base-base interactions in single-stranded oligoribonucleotides. The second part presents NMR and model-building studies of DNA and RNA duplexes containing an unpaired base. (author). 242 refs.; 26 figs.; 24 tabs

  10. Base flow and exhaust plume interaction. Part 1 : Experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoones, M.M.J.; Bannink, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study of the flow field along an axi-symmetric body with a single operating exhaust nozzle has been performed in the scope of an investigation on base flow-jet plume interactions. The structure of under-expanded jets in a co-flowing supersonic free stream was described using

  11. Electroreflectance and the problem of studying plasma-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preppernau, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    A long standing problem in low-temperature plasma discharge physics is to understand in detail the mutual interaction of real exposed surfaces (electrodes) with the reactive plasma environment. In particular, one wishes to discern the influence of these surfaces on the plasma parameters given their contributions from secondary electrons and ions. This paper briefly reviews the known surface interaction processes as well as currently available diagnostics to study the interface between plasmas and surfaces. Next comes a discussion describing the application of plasma-modulated electroreflectance to this research and some potential experimental techniques

  12. SPS ionosphere/microwave beam interactions: Arecibo experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, L.M.

    1980-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to determine the environmental impacts associated with the operation of the proposed SPS microwave power transmission system. It is expected that thermal effects will provide the dominant force driving the nonlinear ionosphere/microwave beam interactions. Collisional damping of radio waves, producing ohmic heating of the ionospheric plasma, depends inversely on the square of the radio wave frequency. Therefore, equivalent heating and equivalent thermal forces can be generated at lower radiated power densities by using lower radio wave frequencies. This principle is fundamental to a large part of the experimental program. An understanding of the physics of the specific interactions excited by the SPS microwave beam is also an important part of the assessment program. This program is designed to determine instability thresholds, the growth rates and spatial extent of the resultant ionospheric disturbances, and the frequency and power dependences of the interactions. How these interactions are affected by variations in the natural ionospheric conditions, how different instabilities occurring simultaneously may affect each other, and how distinct microwave beams might mutually interact are studied. Status of the program is described

  13. Study of weak interaction with p-p colliding beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafune, Jiro; Sugawara, Hirotaka

    1975-01-01

    Weak interaction in the energy range of TRISTAN project is discussed. The cross-section of production of weak boson in p-p reaction was calculated with the parton model. The observation of weak boson may be possible. The production rate of neutral weak boson was also estimated on the basis of the Weinberg model, and was almost same as that of weak boson. The method of observation of weak boson is suggested. The direct method is the observation of lepton pair due to the decay of neutral weak boson. It is expected that the spectrum of decay products (+ -) in the decay of weak boson shows a characteristic feature, and it shows the existence of weak boson. Weak interaction makes larger contribution in case of large momentum transfer than electromagnetic interaction. When the momentum transfer is larger than 60 GeV/c, the contribution of weak interaction is dominant over the others. Therefore, the experiments at high energy will give informations concerning the relations among the interactions of elementary particles. Possibility of study on the Higgs scalar meson is also discussed. (Kato, T.)

  14. CUSTOMER INTERACTION ON DIGITAL ECONOMY: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Tavares da Silva Cozer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available On a digital economy context, customer interaction is fundamental to any company to provide competitive advantage. This research intends to give concrete answers for the sea of information complexity which is the Internet. The main case is to build a model of digital customer interaction. Customization extends beyond targeted media to include the design and delivery of the product itself. Venkatraman (1998 defines dynamic customization based on three principles: modularity, intelligence and organization. The research is based on Interaction Model and its variables are: Products, Modularity, Artificial Intelligence, Market driven organization, and virtual communities. Two organizations were studied, one with physical product and another with virtual product, and the results were shown from a qualitative research.

  15. Analytical techniques for the study of polyphenol-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poklar Ulrih, Nataša

    2017-07-03

    This mini review focuses on advances in biophysical techniques to study polyphenol interactions with proteins. Polyphenols have many beneficial pharmacological properties, as a result of which they have been the subject of intensive studies. The most conventional techniques described here can be divided into three groups: (i) methods used for screening (in-situ methods); (ii) methods used to gain insight into the mechanisms of polyphenol-protein interactions; and (iii) methods used to study protein aggregation and precipitation. All of these methods used to study polyphenol-protein interactions are based on modifications to the physicochemical properties of the polyphenols or proteins after binding/complex formation in solution. To date, numerous review articles have been published in the field of polyphenols. This review will give a brief insight in computational methods and biosensors and cell-based methods, spectroscopic methods including fluorescence emission, UV-vis adsorption, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and light scattering techniques including small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering, and calorimetric techniques (isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry), microscopy, the techniques which have been successfully used for polyphenol-protein interactions. At the end the new methods based on single molecule detection with high potential to study polyphenol-protein interactions will be presented. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique will be discussed as well as the thermodynamic, kinetic or structural parameters, which can be obtained. The other relevant biophysical experimental techniques that have proven to be valuable, such electrochemical methods, hydrodynamic techniques and chromatographic techniques will not be described here.

  16. A study of compound particles in pion-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Tufail

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the phenomenon of multiparticle production has been studied using the nuclear emulsion technique. Nuclear emulsion is a material which memorises the tracks of charged particles. When an incident particle interacts with the nuclei of the emulsion, secondary particles are produced. These secondary particles are classified into three categories viz., shower (Ns), grey (Ng) and black (Nb) particles. The investigation of particle-nucleus collisions is fundamental for understanding the nature of the interaction process. In such studies most of the attention was paid to the relativistic charged particles that is showers (1-3). From the survey of literature it is found that slow particles (grey and black) are less studied in comparison to charged shower particles. Grey particles may provide some valuable information and it may be taken as good measure of number of collisions made by the incident particle

  17. Cellular studies and interaction mechanisms of extremely low frequency fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the biological effects of ELF (extremely low frequency, level is to identify cellular responses to ELF fields, to develop a dose threshold for such interactions, and with such information to formulate and test appropriate interaction mechanisms. This review is selective and will discuss the most recent cellular studies directed at these goals which relate to power line, sinusoidal ELF fields. In these studies an interaction site at the cell membrane is by consensus a likely candidate, since changes in ion transport, ligand-receptor events such as antibody binding, and G protein activation have been reported. These changes strongly indicate that signal transduction (ST) can be influenced. Also, ELF fields are reported to influence enzyme activation, gene expression, protein synthesis, and cell proliferation, which are triggered by earlier ST events at the cell membrane. The concept of ELF fields altering early cell membrane events and thereby influencing intracellular cell function via the ST cascade is perhaps the most plausible biological framework currently being investigated for understanding ELF effects on cells. For example, the consequence of an increase due to ELF fields in mitogenesis, the final endpoint of the ST cascade, is an overall increase in the probability of mutagenesis and consequently cancer, according to the Ames epigenetic model of carcinogenesis. Consistent with this epigenetic mechanism and the ST pathway to carcinogenesis is recent evidence that ELF fields can alter breast cancer cell proliferation and can act as a copromoter in vitro. The most important dosimetric question being addressed currently is whether the electric (E) or the magnetic (B) field, or if combinations of static B and time-varying B fields represent an exposure metric for the cell. This question relates directly to understanding fundamental interaction mechanisms and to the development of a rationale for ELF dose threshold guidelines. The weight of

  18. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  19. [Study on the interaction of doxycycline with human serum albumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao-Ying; Chen, Lin; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the interaction of doxycycline (DC) with human serum albumin (HSA) by the inner filter effects, displacement experiments and molecular docking methods, based on classic multi-spectroscopy. With fluorescence quenching method at 298 and 310 K, the binding constants Ka, were determined to be 2. 73 X 10(5) and 0. 74X 10(5) L mol-1, respectively, and there was one binding site between DC and HSA, indicating that the binding of DC to HSA was strong, and the quenching mechanism was a static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy change, AH and enthropy change, delta S) were calculated to be -83. 55 kJ mol-1 and -176. 31 J mol-1 K-1 via the Vant' Hoff equation, which indicated that the interaction of DC with HSA was driven mainly by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Based on the Föster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the specific binding distance between Trp-214 (acceptor) and DC (donor) was 4. 98 nm, which was similar to the result confirmed by molecular docking. Through displacement experiments, sub-domain IIA of HSA was assigned to possess the high-affinity binding site of DC. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated that the binding of DC to HSA induced the conformation change of HSA and increased the disclosure of some part of hydrophobic regions that had been buried before. The results of FTIR spectroscopy showed that DC bound to HSA led to the slight unfolding of the polypeptide chain of HSA. Furthermore, the binding details between DC and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking methods, which revealed that DC was bound at sub-domain IIA through multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic effect, polar forces and pi-pi interactions. The experimental results provide theoretical basis and reliable data for the study of the interaction between small drug molecule and human serum albumin

  20. [Role of food interaction pharmacokinetic studies in drug development. Food interaction studies of theophylline and nifedipine retard and buspirone tablets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabant, S; Klebovich, I; Gachályi, B; Renczes, G; Farsang, C

    1998-09-01

    Due to several mechanism, meals may modify the pharmacokinetics of drug products, thereby eliciting to clinically significant food interaction. Food interactions with the drug substance and with the drug formulation should be distinguished. Food interaction of different drug products containing the same active ingredient can be various depending on the pharmaceutical formulation technology. Particularly, in the case of modified release products, the food/formulation interaction can play an important role in the development of food interaction. Well known example, that bioavailability of theophylline can be influenced in different way (either increased, decreased or unchanged) by concomitant intake of food in the case of different sustained release products. The role and methods of food interaction studies in the different kinds of drug development (new chemical entity, modified release products, generics) are reviewed. Prediction of food effect response on the basis of the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drug molecule or formulations is discussed. The results of three food interaction studies carried out the products of EGIS Pharmaceuticals Ltd. are also reviewed. The pharmacokinetic parameters of theophyllin 400 mg retard tablet were practically the same in both fasting condition and administration after consumption of a high fat containing standard breakfast. The ingestion of a high fat containing breakfast, increased the AUC of nifedipine from 259.0 +/- 101.2 ng h/ml to 326.7 +/- 122.5 ng h/ml and Cmax from 34.5 +/- 15.9 ng/ml to 74.3 +/- 23.9 ng/ml in case of nifedipine 20 mg retard tablet, in agreement with the data of literature. The statistical evaluation indicated significant differences between the pharmacokinetic parameters in the case of two administrations (before and after meal). The effect of a high fat containing breakfast for a generic version of buspiron 10 mg tablet and the bioequivalence after food consumption were

  1. Naphtha interaction with bitumen and clays : a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afara, M.; Munoz, V.; Mikula, R. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Western Research Centre

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described a preliminary study conducted to characterize naphtha interactions with bitumen and clays. Coarse tailings, fluid-fine tailings, and froth treatment tailings are produced as a result of surface mine oil sands operations. Solvents are used to produce the bitumens, but the actual fraction of the solvent that evaporates and contributes to VOCs from tailing ponds is poorly understood. This study examined the interactions between the solvent, bitumen and mineral components in froth treatment tails. The study was conducted with aim of quantifying the VOC or solvent escaping from the froth treatment tailings. Samples containing bitumen, clay, a bitumen-clay mixture, or MFT were spiked with 3000 ppm of solvent. The amount of naphtha released was monitored by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and flame ionization detection of the evolved gases. The results were expressed as a percentage of the total hydrocarbon peak area of the sample versus a control. Results of the study showed that the naphtha interacted more strongly with the bitumen than with kaolinite and the clay minerals from the oil sands. Although initial solvent evaporation was reduced in the presence of bitumens and clays, long-term solvent releases will need to be quantified. tabs., figs.

  2. Studies of interaction between two alkaloids and double helix DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yantao; Peng, Tingting; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Dayu; Cui, Yuncheng

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the study on the interaction of two alkaloids (matrine and evodiamine) and hs-DNA by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), DNA melting and viscosity experiments. The spectroscopic studies suggested that two alkaloids can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation also indicated that two alkaloids can intercalate to DNA. The binding constants (K A ) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined. At the same time, some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the alkaloids to DNA were obtained. Competitive binding studies revealed that alkaloids had an effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA. In addition, it was also proved that the fluorescence quenching was influenced by ionic strength. - Highlights: • Interaction between two alkaloids and DNA is studied by spectral methods. • The binding constant and the binding sites between two alkaloids and DNA are obtained. • There are a classical intercalative mode between alkaloids and DNA. • The binding of matrine with DNA is weaker than that of evodiamine. • It is important for us to understand the alkaloids–DNA interactions at a molecular level

  3. A study of inclusive charged current neutrino interactions in deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis the results of an analysis of inclusive neutrino and antineutrino interaction on deuterium nuclei are presented. The use of deuterium as a target provides a mean to study proton and neutron scattering separately. The presently accepted theory of electro-weak interactions is reviewed. Applications of the quark-parton model in the context of deep-inelastic neutrino interactions on nucleons are summarized. The concept of scaling and its consequences are treated, together with some sources of violation of scaling. The properties of the CERN wide-band neutrino beam and an overview of the elements of this beam are given. The method to determine the energy distribution and the composition of the neutrino and antineutrino beam is described. The technique employed to separate neutrino interactions on protons and neutrons is discussed. Results of the measurement of the total nucleon charged-current cross-sections and differential cross-sections are presented. The relative contributions of quarks and antiquarks to the neutrino cross-sections are deduced from y-distributions and compared to those obtained from the total cross-section measurements. Finally, the analysis of the structure functions is given. (Auth.)

  4. Theoretical Studies of Strongly Interacting Fine Particle Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Michael

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A theoretical analysis of the time dependent behaviour of a system of fine magnetic particles as a function of applied field and temperature was carried out. The model used was based on a theory assuming Neel relaxation with a distribution of particle sizes. This theory predicted a linear variation of S_{max} with temperature and a finite intercept, which is not reflected by experimental observations. The remanence curves of strongly interacting fine-particle systems were also investigated theoretically. It was shown that the Henkel plot of the dc demagnetisation remanence vs the isothermal remanence is a useful representation of interactions. The form of the plot was found to be a reflection of the magnetic and physical microstructure of the material, which is consistent with experimental data. The relationship between the Henkel plot and the noise of a particulate recording medium, another property dependent on the microstructure, is also considered. The Interaction Field Factor (IFF), a single parameter characterising the non-linearity of the Henkel plot, is investigated. These results are consistent with a previous experimental study. Finally the results of the noise power spectral density for erased and saturated recording media are presented, so that characterisation of interparticle interactions may be carried out with greater accuracy.

  5. Experimental Studies of Thermal Interactions at AEE Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    Assessment of the consequences of very severe reactor accidents in which fuel is melted involves evaluation of the nature of any thermal interaction between molten fuel or cladding and the reactor coolant. Work on these problems has been pursued in many countries, both experimentally and theoretically, but although much progress has been made there is as yet no well established theoretical description of large scale efficient thermal interactions. The need for further experimental data in this area was one of the main reasons for establishing a new range of experimental facilities at Winfrith which provide the ability to carry out experiments involving explosions under safe conditions. Experiments are set up inside a strong test cell situated in the centre of a 200 m exclusion area. Instrumentation is provided for transient measurements of pressure and strain, and for high speed cine photography. The first part of this programme started early in 1975, and is concerned with the propagation of thermal interaction through a metal/water system. This programme is not yet complete but some results of interest have been obtained. The first part of this paper will describe these experiments and discuss the significance of the results currently available. Such studies of large scale metal/water interactions should help to provide an improved understanding of the way in which propagation might occur in the reactor case, but must be complemented by experiments using reactor materials. The second stage of the Winfrith programme will study the UO 2 /Na system directly. Facilities for the production of pure uranium burning thermite charges will be commissioned early in 1976. This chemical technique for producing molten UO 2 will be used in two main types of experiment. Firstly the interaction of a two phase bubble of UO 2 with a surrounding pool of Na will be studied, extending the investigations of this kind started at AWRE Foulness. Secondly, the heat transfer rate from UO 2

  6. Intersegmental interactions in supercoiled DNA: atomic force microscope study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Miloseska, Lela; Potaman, Vladimir N.; Sinden, Richard R.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2003-10-15

    Intersegmental interactions in DNA facilitated by the neutralization of electrostatic repulsion was studied as a function of salt concentration and DNA supercoiling. DNA samples with defined superhelical densities were deposited onto aminopropyl mica at different ionic conditions and imaged in air after drying of the samples. Similar to hydrodynamic data, we did not observe a collapse of supercoiled DNA, as proposed earlier by cryo-EM studies. Instead, the formation of the contacts between DNA helices within supercoiled loops with no visible space between the duplexes was observed. The length of such close contacts increased upon increasing NaCl concentration. DNA supercoiling was a critical factor for the stabilization of intersegmental contacts. Implications of the observed effect for understanding DNA compaction in the cell and for regulation DNA transactions via interaction of distantly separated DNA regions are discussed.

  7. ISOLTRAP Mass Measurements for Weak-Interaction Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerbauer, A.; Delahaye, P.; Herlert, A.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Mukherjee, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Weber, C.; Yazidjian, C.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Schwarz, S.; George, S.; Schweikhard, L.

    2006-01-01

    The conserved-vector-current (CVC) hypothesis of the weak interaction and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are two fundamental postulates of the Standard Model. While existing data on CVC supports vector current conservation, the unitarity test of the CKM matrix currently fails by more than two standard deviations. High-precision mass measurements performed with the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE/CERN provide crucial input for these fundamental studies by greatly improving our knowledge of the decay energy of super-allowed β decays. Recent results of mass measurements on the β emitters 18Ne, 22Mg, 34Ar, and 74Rb as pertaining to weak-interaction studies are presented

  8. Interaction Studies between Newly Synthesized Photosensitive Polymer and Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Tae Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this information age, different kinds of photosensitive materials have been used in the manufacture of information storage devices. But these photosensitive materials have the bane of low diffraction efficiency. In order to solve this problem, we have synthesized a novel photosensitive polymer from epoxy-based azopolymers (with three types of azochromophores. Furthermore, we have studied the interaction between this newly synthesized azopolymer and ionic liquids (ILs. For this purpose, we have used the ammonium and imidazolium families of ILs, such as diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP, tributylammonium methyl sulfate (TBMS, triethylammonium 4-aminotoluene-3-sulfonic acid (TASA, and 1-methylimidazolium chloride ([Mim]Cl. To investigate the molecular interaction between azopolymer and ILs, we have used the following spectroscopic methods of analysis: UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and confocal Raman spectroscopy. In this study, we have developed new photosensitive materials by combining polymer with ILs.

  9. A Numerical Study on Hydrodynamic Interactions between Dynamic Positioning Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Doo Hwa; Lee, Sang Wook [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we conducted computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the unsteady hydrodynamic interaction of multiple thrusters by solving Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A commercial CFD software, STAR-CCM+ was used for all simulations by employing a ducted thruster model with combination of a propeller and No. 19a duct. A sliding mesh technique was used to treat dynamic motion of propeller rotation and non-conformal hexahedral grid system was considered. Four different combinations in tilting and azimuth angles of the thrusters were considered to investigate the effects on the propulsion performance. We could find that thruster-hull and thruster-thruster interactions has significant effect on propulsion performance and further study will be required for the optimal configurations with the best tilting and relative azimuth angle between thrusters.

  10. Content-Related Interactions in Self-initiated Study Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Karen; Talanquer, Vicente

    2012-09-01

    The central goal of the present exploratory study was to investigate the nature of the content-related interactions in study groups independently organized by college organic chemistry students. We were particularly interested in the identification of the different factors that affected the emergence of opportunities for students to co-construct understanding and engage in higher levels of cognitive processing. Our results are based on the analysis of in situ observations of 34 self-initiated study sessions involving over a 100 students in three academic semesters. The investigation revealed three major types of social regulation processes, teaching, tutoring, and co-construction in the observed study sessions. However, the extent to which students engaged in each of them varied widely from one session to another. This variability was mostly determined by the specific composition of the study groups and the nature of the study tasks in which they were engaged. Decisions about how to organize the study session, the relative content knowledge and conceptual understanding expressed by the participants, as well as the cognitive level of the problems that guided group work had a strong impact on the nature of student interactions. Nevertheless, group talk in the observed study groups was mostly focused on low-level cognitive processes. The results of our work provide insights on how to better support students' productive engagement in study groups.

  11. Studies on Se-Cr interactions in mungbean using radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanker, Karuna; Mishra, Seema; Srivastava, Shalini; Srivastava, Rohit; Dass, Sahab; Prakash, Satya; Srivastava, M M [Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Agra (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-09-01

    The paper describes a preliminary report of hydroponic experiment on the effect of selenium (selenite and selenate) treatments on the absorption of trivalent and hexavalent chromium by mung bean (Phaseolus mungo) plant. The studies are mainly confined to animal system and little attention has been paid on Se-metal interactions, particularly with those of different oxidation states of selenium and chromium in plant system. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab.

  12. WIYN Open Cluster Study: Tidal Interactions in Solar type Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Meibom, S.; Mathieu, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    We present an ongoing study on tidal interactions in late-type close binary stars. New results on tidal circularization are combined with existing data to test and constrain theoretical predictions of tidal circularization in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase and throughout the main-sequence phase of stellar evolution. Current data suggest that tidal circularization during the PMS phase sets the tidal cutoff period for binary populations younger than ~1 Gyr. Binary populations older than ~1 G...

  13. Studies on Se-Cr interactions in mungbean using radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanker, Karuna; Mishra, Seema; Srivastava, Shalini; Srivastava, Rohit; Dass, Sahab; Prakash, Satya; Srivastava, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes a preliminary report of hydroponic experiment on the effect of selenium (selenite and selenate) treatments on the absorption of trivalent and hexavalent chromium by mung bean (Phaseolus mungo) plant. The studies are mainly confined to animal system and little attention has been paid on Se-metal interactions, particularly with those of different oxidation states of selenium and chromium in plant system. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab

  14. Interactive verification of Markov chains: Two distributed protocol case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Hölzl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic model checkers like PRISM only check probabilistic systems of a fixed size. To guarantee the desired properties for an arbitrary size, mathematical analysis is necessary. We show for two case studies how this can be done in the interactive proof assistant Isabelle/HOL. The first case study is a detailed description of how we verified properties of the ZeroConf protocol, a decentral address allocation protocol. The second case study shows the more involved verification of anonymity properties of the Crowds protocol, an anonymizing protocol.

  15. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide−noble-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, L. F., E-mail: lz@fis.unb.br; Leal, L. A.; Silva, G. M. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Pirani, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 Salvador (Brazil); Gargano, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound complexes of chiral molecules. In this paper we study the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}−Ng (Ng=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) systems providing the radial and the angular dependence of the potential energy surface on the relative position of the Ng atom. We accomplish this by introducing an analytical representation which is able to fit the ab initio energies of these complexes in a wide range of geometries. Our analysis sheds light on the role that the enantiomeric forms and the symmetry of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule play on the resulting barriers and equilibrium geometries. The proposed theoretical framework is useful to study the dynamics of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule, or other systems involving O–O and S–S bonds, interacting by non-covalent forces with atoms or molecules and to understand how the relative orientation of the O–H bonds changes along collisional events that may lead to a hydrogen bond formation or even to selectivity in chemical reactions.

  16. Morphology studies on gas hydrates interacting with silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, J.; Servio, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates or gas hydrates are non-stoichiometric, crystalline compounds that form when small molecules come in contact with water at certain temperatures and pressures. Natural gas hydrates are found in the ocean bottom and in permafrost regions. It is thought that the amount of energy stored in natural hydrates is at least twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. In addition, trapping carbon dioxide as a hydrate in the bottom of the ocean has been suggested as an alternative means of reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Naturally occurring clathrates are found in close interaction with fine grained particles of very small mean pore diameters. Even though an increasing amount of hydrate equilibrium data for small diameter porous media has become available, the morphological behavior of hydrates subject to such conditions is yet to be explored. This paper presented a study that visually examined hydrate formation and decomposition of gas hydrates while interacting with fine grains of silica gel. The study showed still frames from high-resolution video recordings for hydrate formation and decomposition. The paper discussed the experiment including the apparatus as well as the results of hydrate formation and hydrate dissociation. This study enabled for the first time to observe clathrate morphology while hydrates interacted closely with fine grain particles with small mean pore diameters. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  17. New insights into the mechanism of interaction between CO2 and polymers from thermodynamic parameters obtained by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrienko, Anton A; Ewing, Andrew V; Chibiryaev, Andrey M; Agafontsev, Alexander M; Dubkov, Konstantin A; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-03-07

    This work reports new physical insights of the thermodynamic parameters and mechanisms of possible interactions occurring in polymers subjected to high-pressure CO2. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy has been used in situ to determine the thermodynamic parameters of the intermolecular interactions between CO2 and different functional groups of the polymers capable of specific interactions with sorbed CO2 molecules. Based on the measured ATR-FTIR spectra of the polymer samples subjected to high-pressure CO2 (30 bar) at different temperatures (300-340 K), it was possible to characterize polymer-polymer and CO2-polymer interactions. Particularly, the enthalpy and entropy of the formation of the specific non-covalent complexes between CO2 and the hydroxy (-OH), carbonyl (C[double bond, length as m-dash]O) and hydroxyimino ([double bond, length as m-dash]N-OH) functional groups of the polymer samples have been measured. Furthermore, the obtained spectroscopic results have provided an opportunity for the structure of these complexes to be proposed. An interesting phenomenon regarding the behavior of CO2/polymer systems has also been observed. It has been found that only for the polyketone, the value of enthalpy was negative indicating an exothermic process during the formation of the CO2-polymer non-covalent complexes. Conversely, for the polyoxime and polyalcohol samples there is a positive enthalpy determined. This is a result of the initial polymer-polymer interactions requiring more energy to break than is released during the formation of the CO2-polymer complex. The effect of increasing temperature to facilitate the breaking of the polymer-polymer interactions has also been observed. Hence, a mechanism for the formation of CO2-polymer complexes was suggested based on these results, which occurs via a two-step process: (1) the breaking of the existing polymer-polymer interactions followed by (2) the formation of new CO2-polymer non-covalent interactions.

  18. Interactive television revisited: a case study in home economics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    telephone lines or computer networks. The South African ... communication would be suitable to reach this level of interactivity ... specified, and the interaction has to be mediated through ... synchronous interaction is face-to-face contact. Live.

  19. The anomalous halogen bonding interactions between chlorine and bromine with water in clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dureckova, Hana; Woo, Tom K; Udachin, Konstantin A; Ripmeester, John A; Alavi, Saman

    2017-10-13

    Clathrate hydrate phases of Cl 2 and Br 2 guest molecules have been known for about 200 years. The crystal structure of these phases was recently re-determined with high accuracy by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In these structures, the water oxygen-halogen atom distances are determined to be shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii, which indicates the action of some type of non-covalent interaction between the dihalogens and water molecules. Given that in the hydrate phases both lone pairs of each water oxygen atom are engaged in hydrogen bonding with other water molecules of the lattice, the nature of the oxygen-halogen interactions may not be the standard halogen bonds characterized recently in the solid state materials and enzyme-substrate compounds. The nature of the halogen-water interactions for the Cl 2 and Br 2 molecules in two isolated clathrate hydrate cages has recently been studied with ab initio calculations and Natural Bond Order analysis (Ochoa-Resendiz et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 145, 161104). Here we present the results of ab initio calculations and natural localized molecular orbital analysis for Cl 2 and Br 2 guests in all cage types observed in the cubic structure I and tetragonal structure I clathrate hydrates to characterize the orbital interactions between the dihalogen guests and water. Calculations with isolated cages and cages with one shell of coordinating molecules are considered. The computational analysis is used to understand the nature of the halogen bonding in these materials and to interpret the guest positions in the hydrate cages obtained from the X-ray crystal structures.

  20. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  1. A Study of the Flow Field Surrounding Interacting Line Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Maynard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of converging fires often leads to significant changes in fire behavior, including increased flame length, angle, and intensity. In this paper, the fluid mechanics of two adjacent line fires are studied both theoretically and experimentally. A simple potential flow model is used to explain the tilting of interacting flames towards each other, which results from a momentum imbalance triggered by fire geometry. The model was validated by measuring the velocity field surrounding stationary alcohol pool fires. The flow field was seeded with high-contrast colored smoke, and the motion of smoke structures was analyzed using a cross-correlation optical flow technique. The measured velocities and flame angles are found to compare reasonably with the predicted values, and an analogy between merging fires and wind-blown flames is proposed.

  2. Monte Carlo study of double exchange interaction in manganese oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naa, Christian Fredy, E-mail: chris@cphys.fi.itb.ac.id [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Unité de Dynamique et Structure des Matérioux Moléculaires, Université Littoral Côte d’Opale, Maison de la Reserche Blaise Pascal 50, rue Ferdinand Buisson, Calais, France email (France); Suprijadi,, E-mail: supri@fi.itb.ac.id; Viridi, Sparisoma, E-mail: dudung@fi.itb.ac.id; Djamal, Mitra, E-mail: mitra@fi.itb.ac.id [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Fasquelle, Didier, E-mail: didier.fasquelle@univ-littoral.fr [Unité de Dynamique et Structure des Matérioux Moléculaires, Université Littoral Côte d’Opale, Maison de la Reserche Blaise Pascal 50, rue Ferdinand Buisson, Calais, France email (France)

    2015-09-30

    In this paper we study the magnetoresistance properties attributed by double exchange (DE) interaction in manganese oxide by Monte Carlo simulation. We construct a model based on mixed-valence Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} on the general system of Re{sub 2/3}Ae{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} in two dimensional system. The conduction mechanism is based on probability of e{sub g} electrons hopping from Mn{sup 3+} to Mn{sup 4+}. The resistivity dependence on temperature and the external magnetic field are presented and the validity with related experimental results are discussed. We use the resistivity power law to fit our data on metallic region and basic activated behavior on insulator region. On metallic region, we found our result agree well with the quantum theory of DE interaction. From general arguments, we found our simulation agree qualitatively with experimental results.

  3. Sum frequency generation for studying plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roke, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Interaction of a plasma with a surface results in chemical and physical restructuring of the surface as well as the plasma in the vicinity of the surface. Studying such a reorganization of the atoms and molecules in the surface layer requires optical tools that can penetrate the plasma environment. At the same time, surface specificity is required. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is an optical method that fulfills these requirements. SFG has been developed into a surface specific probe during the eighties and nineties. Nowadays SFG is routinely applied in the research of complex interfaces. In such experiments, liquid/gas, solid/gas, solid/liquid, or liquid/liquid interfaces are probed, and the chemical surface composition, orientational distribution, order and chirality can be retrieved. An application to investigate plasma-wall interactions is feasible too.

  4. Discourse and Interaction Studies in the ‘New North’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    The plenary roundtable draws together key scholars from the Nordic countries and scholars living in the Nordic region to discuss the future of discourse and interaction studies in the Nordic region. It will address what sorts of approaches in discourse studies do we need for studying and shaping...... 'the Nordic' in the twenty first century, and what theoretical concepts and methodological principles should we abide by or develop. For example, the roundtable could discuss the theme of challenges to 'the Nordic model'. How are the North's so-called social welfare and healthcare model and its...... understandings of itself as a community of peaceful, caring societies built on consensus social democracy challenged by neoliberalism, globalisation and immigration? How can discourse studies study these developments in a positive yet critical fashion, with tools crafted with our concerns (not Anglo American...

  5. Study of the Deformation/Interaction Model: How Interactions Increase the Reaction Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Liang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions (including weak interactions between dienophiles and dienes play an important role in the Diels-Alder reaction. To elucidate the influence of these interactions on the reactivity, a popular DFT functional and a variational DFT functional corrected with dispersion terms are used to investigate different substituent groups incorporated on the dienophiles and dienes. The bond order is used to track the trajectory of the cycloaddition reaction. The deformation/interaction model is used to obtain the interaction energy from the reactant complex to the inflection point until reaching the saddle point. The interaction energy initially increases with a decrease in the interatomic distance, reaching a maximum value, but then decreases when the dienophiles and dienes come closer. Reduced density gradient and chemical energy component analysis are used to analyse the interaction. Traditional transition state theory and variational transition state theory are used to obtain the reaction rates. The influence of tunneling on the reaction rate is also discussed.

  6. Monte Carlo studies on photon interactions in radiobiological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2018-01-01

    X-ray and γ-ray photons have been widely used for studying radiobiological effects of ionizing radiations. Photons are indirectly ionizing radiations so they need to set in motion electrons (which are a directly ionizing radiation) to perform the ionizations. When the photon dose decreases to below a certain limit, the number of electrons set in motion will become so small that not all cells in an “exposed” cell population can get at least one electron hit. When some cells in a cell population are not hit by a directly ionizing radiation (in other words not irradiated), there will be rescue effect between the irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells, and the resultant radiobiological effect observed for the “exposed” cell population will be different. In the present paper, the mechanisms underlying photon interactions in radiobiological experiments were studied using our developed NRUphoton computer code, which was benchmarked against the MCNP5 code by comparing the photon dose delivered to the cell layer underneath the water medium. The following conclusions were reached: (1) The interaction fractions decreased in the following order: 16O > 12C > 14N > 1H. Bulges in the interaction fractions (versus water medium thickness) were observed, which reflected changes in the energies of the propagating photons due to traversals of different amount of water medium as well as changes in the energy-dependent photon interaction cross-sections. (2) Photoelectric interaction and incoherent scattering dominated for lower-energy (10 keV) and high-energy (100 keV and 1 MeV) incident photons. (3) The fractions of electron ejection from different nuclei were mainly governed by the photoelectric effect cross-sections, and the fractions from the 1s subshell were the largest. (4) The penetration fractions in general decreased with increasing medium thickness, and increased with increasing incident photon energy, the latter being explained by the corresponding reduction in

  7. Monte Carlo studies on photon interactions in radiobiological experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Shahmohammadi Beni

    Full Text Available X-ray and γ-ray photons have been widely used for studying radiobiological effects of ionizing radiations. Photons are indirectly ionizing radiations so they need to set in motion electrons (which are a directly ionizing radiation to perform the ionizations. When the photon dose decreases to below a certain limit, the number of electrons set in motion will become so small that not all cells in an "exposed" cell population can get at least one electron hit. When some cells in a cell population are not hit by a directly ionizing radiation (in other words not irradiated, there will be rescue effect between the irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells, and the resultant radiobiological effect observed for the "exposed" cell population will be different. In the present paper, the mechanisms underlying photon interactions in radiobiological experiments were studied using our developed NRUphoton computer code, which was benchmarked against the MCNP5 code by comparing the photon dose delivered to the cell layer underneath the water medium. The following conclusions were reached: (1 The interaction fractions decreased in the following order: 16O > 12C > 14N > 1H. Bulges in the interaction fractions (versus water medium thickness were observed, which reflected changes in the energies of the propagating photons due to traversals of different amount of water medium as well as changes in the energy-dependent photon interaction cross-sections. (2 Photoelectric interaction and incoherent scattering dominated for lower-energy (10 keV and high-energy (100 keV and 1 MeV incident photons. (3 The fractions of electron ejection from different nuclei were mainly governed by the photoelectric effect cross-sections, and the fractions from the 1s subshell were the largest. (4 The penetration fractions in general decreased with increasing medium thickness, and increased with increasing incident photon energy, the latter being explained by the corresponding reduction in

  8. An experimental study on soil-structure interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mita, Akira; Kumagai, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    The soil-structure interaction effects play an important role in the earthquake response of large scale structures such as nuclear power plants. Recent decades, many experimental and analytical studies have been conducted. Even though sophisticated analytical tools are ready to use, complicated soil-structure interaction problems such as those with a complex geometry can not be solved yet. For such problems a laboratory experiment is a powerful alternative. In the laboratory experiment, a device to absorb the reflected waves is always necessary to be attached on the boundaries of the soil model to simulate the semi-infiniteness of the actual ground. But unfortunately absorbing devices currently available are far from satisfactory. In this paper, a new experimental method is employed for soil-structure interaction problems to simulate the semi-infiniteness of the actual ground. The present method utilizes the characteristics of transient response to an impulse load so that no special treatment on the boundaries of the soil model is required. This technique is applicable to a linear elastic system whose impulse response decreases to a small enough value before observing the reflected waves. (author)

  9. Interactive Tutoring in Blended Studies: Hindrances and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Ismail Ilyas (Al-Titinchy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper distinguishes between traditional teaching known as lecturing (the teacher centered approach; and tutoring (the contemporary technology-oriented interactive teaching/learning approach. It is based on the implementation of tutoring strategies of ‘blended studies’  at the Arab Open University. It investigates the application of modern interactive teaching/learning strategies, specifying some hindering factors in the AOU-Jordan Branch context. The factors include four variables: tutors, students, course material and assessment. The paper is based on qualitative research in terms of a real teaching/leaning context, using both observation and conversation with learners, besides the use of some quantitative data retrieved from a questionnaire in which learners’ views are sought regarding a number of relevant matters. A number of suggested solutions related to each of the hindering factors are presented, which if applied, may secure shifting the balance of the teaching/learning process to a more interactive technology-based tutoring level, which in turn will enhance learners’ opportunities for the attainment of better academic standards, and secure a higher degree of achievement of the shared educational goals of learners and the educational institution they study in.

  10. DFT Studies on Interaction between Lanthanum and Hydroxyamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Anindita; Kundu, T. K.; Pal, Snehanshu

    2018-03-01

    Extraction and separation of individual rare earth elements has been a challenge as they are chemically very similar. Solvent extraction is the most suitable way for extraction of rare earth elements. Acidic, basic, neutral, chelating are the major classes of extractants for solvent extraction of rare earth elements. The coordination complex of chelating extractants is very selective with positively charged metal ion. Hence they are widely used. Hydroxyamide is capable of forming chelates with metal cations. In this present study interactions of hydroxyamide ligand with lanthanum have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). Two different functional such as raB97XD and B3LYP are applied along with 6-31+G(d,p) basis set for carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and SDD basis set for lanthanum. Stability of formed complexes has been evaluated based on calculated interaction energies and solvation energies. Frontier orbital (highest occupied molecular orbital or HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital or LUMO) energies of the molecule have also been calculated. Electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical softness and chemical potential are also determined for these complexes to get an idea about the reactivity. From the partial charge distribution it is seen that oxygen atoms in hydroxyamide have higher negative charge. The double bonded oxygen atom present in the hydroxyamide structure has higher electron density and so it forms bond with lanthanum but the singly bonded oxygen atom in the hydroxyamide structure is weaker donor atom and so it is less available for interaction with lanthanum.

  11. Low-energy antikaon nucleon and nucleus interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Johann; Leannis Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The antikaon (K-) interaction on nucleons and nuclei at low energy is neither simple nor well understood. Kaonic hydrogen is a very interesting case where the strong interaction of K- with the proton leads to an energy shift and a broadening of the 1s ground state. These two observables can be precisely studied with x-ray spectroscopy. The behavior at threshold is influenced strongly by the elusive Lambda(1405) resonance. In Europe the DAFNE electron-positron collider at Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) provides an unique source of monoenergetic kaons emitted in the Phi meson decay. Recently the experiment SIDDHARTA on kaonic hydrogen and helium isotopes was successfully performed at LNF. A European network LEANNIS with an outreach to J-PARC in Japan was set up which is promoting the research on the antikaon interactions with nucleons and nuclei. This talk will give an overview of LEANNIS research tasks, the present status and an outlook to future perspectives. Financial support by the EU project HadronPhysics2 is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Investigation of sodium - carbon dioxide interactions with calorimetric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Latge, C.; Gicquel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle could be a promising option to enhance the competitiveness of future Sodium fast reactors but it is highly necessary to get thermodynamic and kinetics information on potential sodium-CO 2 chemical reactions and their consequences. We have studied the interaction between Na and CO 2 via calorimetric methods. These methods are able to point out exothermic/endothermic phenomena and to measure heat of chemical reactions. The main feature of the Na/CO 2 interaction seems to be its sharp dependence on temperature. At low temperature, below 500 C degrees, CO 2 and sodium react and exhibit an induction time which decreases when temperature increases. Above 500 C degrees, we observe a global phenomenon with a fast and instantaneous chemical reaction which may be understood as an auto-combustion of CO 2 in sodium. We clearly demonstrated that Na/CO 2 interaction does not proceed as an auto-catalytic process and is more satisfactorily explained by the occurring of an auto-combustion phenomenon

  13. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  14. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Sarita, E-mail: saritaiitr2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Rani, Pooja [D.A.V. College, Sec-10, Chandigarh-160010 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO{sub 2} (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO{sub 2} has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=−21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  15. Use of interactive lecture demonstrations: A ten year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula D. Sharma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The widely held constructivist view of learning advocates student engagement via interactivity. Within the physics education research community, several specific interactive strategies have been developed to enhance conceptual understanding. One such strategy, the Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD is designed for large lecture classes and, if measured using specific conceptual surveys, is purported to provide learning gains of up to 80%. This paper reports on learning gains for two different Projects over ten years. In Project 1, the ILDs were implemented from 1999 to 2001 with students who had successfully completed senior high school physics. The learning gains for students not exposed to the ILDs were in the range 13% to 16% while those for students exposed to the ILDs was 31% to 50%. In Project 2, the ILDs were implemented from 2007 to 2009 with students who had not studied senior high school physics. Since the use of ILDs in Project 1 had produced positive results, ethical considerations dictated that all students be exposed to ILDs. The learning gains were from 28% to 42%. On the one hand it is pleasing to note that there is an increase in learning gains, yet on the other, we note that the gains are nowhere near the claimed 80%. This paper also reports on teacher experiences of using the ILDs, in Project 2.

  16. Tools to study pathogen-host interactions in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arinjay; Misra, Vikram; Schountz, Tony; Baker, Michelle L

    2018-03-15

    Bats are natural reservoirs for a variety of emerging viruses that cause significant disease in humans and domestic animals yet rarely cause clinical disease in bats. The co-evolutionary history of bats with viruses has been hypothesized to have shaped the bat-virus relationship, allowing both to exist in equilibrium. Progress in understanding bat-virus interactions and the isolation of bat-borne viruses has been accelerated in recent years by the development of susceptible bat cell lines. Viral sequences similar to severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus (SARS-CoV) have been detected in bats, and filoviruses such as Marburg virus have been isolated from bats, providing definitive evidence for the role of bats as the natural host reservoir. Although viruses can be readily detected in bats using molecular approaches, virus isolation is far more challenging. One of the limitations in using traditional culture systems from non-reservoir species is that cell types and culture conditions may not be compatible for isolation of bat-borne viruses. There is, therefore, a need to develop additional bat cell lines that correspond to different cell types, including less represented cell types such as immune cells, and culture them under more physiologically relevant conditions to study virus host interactions and for virus isolation. In this review, we highlight the current progress in understanding bat-virus interactions in bat cell line systems and some of the challenges and limitations associated with cell lines. Future directions to address some of these challenges to better understand host-pathogen interactions in these intriguing mammals are also discussed, not only in relation to viruses but also other pathogens carried by bats including bacteria and fungi. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Studies on the interaction of lidocaine with plasma proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adotey, J.

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to quantitate lidocaine's interaction with alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), human serum albumin (HSA), and AAG in the presence of HSA, and to determine the extent of displacement of lidocaine from its binding site(s) by selected cardiovascular drugs (dipyridamole, disopyramide and quinidine). Since the limited experimental work reported in this area has involved the use of a single lidocaine concentration, this study involved the evaluation of a range of lidocaine concentrations. Lidocaine interaction with plasma proteins (AAG and HSA) was studied at 37 0 C using an isothermal equilibrium dialysis system and 14 C-lidocaine HCl. A dialysis membrane (M.W. cutoff 12,000 to 14,000) separated the two chambers of each dialysis cell. The extent of 14 C-lidocaine dialysis was studied with respect to both drug and protein concentrations. Aliquots of each chamber of each of the cells were subjected to liquid scintillation counting (LSC) analyses for 14 C-lidocaine. The ratio of bound to free (R/F) lidocaine was evaluated as a function of AAG concentration from the LSC data. Scatchard and/or Rosenthal analyses were employed to evaluate n and k values where appropriate. Linear and multiple linear regression analyses of the data were appropriately performed

  18. Binaural interaction in the auditory brainstem response: a normative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Yper, Lindsey N; Vermeire, Katrien; De Vel, Eddy F J; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Dhooge, Ingeborg J M

    2015-04-01

    Binaural interaction can be investigated using auditory evoked potentials. A binaural interaction component can be derived from the auditory brainstem response (ABR-BIC) and is considered evidence for binaural interaction at the level of the brainstem. Although click ABR-BIC has been investigated thoroughly, data on 500 Hz tone-burst (TB) ABR-BICs are scarce. In this study, characteristics of click and 500 Hz TB ABR-BICs are described. Furthermore, reliability of both click and 500 Hz TB ABR-BIC are investigated. Eighteen normal hearing young adults (eight women, ten men) were included. ABRs were recorded in response to clicks and 500 Hz TBs. ABR-BICs were derived by subtracting the binaural response from the sum of the monaural responses measured in opposite ears. Good inter-rater reliability is obtained for both click and 500 Hz TB ABR-BICs. The most reliable peak in click ABR-BIC occurs at a mean latency of 6.06 ms (SD 0.354 ms). Reliable 500 Hz TB ABR-BIC are obtained with a mean latency of 9.47 ms (SD 0.678 ms). Amplitudes are larger for 500 Hz TB ABR-BIC than for clicks. The most reliable peak in click ABR-BIC occurs at the downslope of wave V. Five hundred Hertz TB ABR-BIC is characterized by a broad positivity occurring at the level of wave V. The ABR-BIC is a useful technique to investigate binaural interaction in certain populations. Examples are bilateral hearing aid users, bilateral cochlear implant users and bimodal listeners. The latter refers to the combination of unilateral cochlear implantation and contralateral residual hearing. The majority of these patients have residual hearing in the low frequencies. The current study suggests that 500 Hz TB ABR-BIC may be a suitable technique to assess binaural interaction in this specific population of cochlear implant users. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Theoretical study for the interlamellar aminoalcohol functionalization of kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Xin-Juan; Li, Huiquan; Liu, Qinfu; Cheng, Hongfei; He, Peng; Li, Shaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The results indicated that aminoalcohols exist with a mixing of intercalation and grafting. • Aminoalcohols can form strong hydrogen bonds with Al octahedral sheet. • The interaction between aminoalcohols and Si tetrahedral sheet are mainly attributed by vdW force. • Aminoalcohols grafting or intercalating on kaolinite have strong reactivity as electron donors. - Abstract: Fundamental problems related to aminoalcohols intercalating on kaolinite were investigated by using density functional theory method. This study examines the adsorption modes of diethanolamine and triethanolamine on kaolinite, the role of hydrogen bonds and van der Waals (vdW) forces between aminoalcohols and interlayer of kaolinite, and the change of molecular orbital occupancies of functionalized kaolinite. Results show that functionalized kaolinite is physically intercalated and covalently grafted by aminoalcohols. Non-covalent interaction analysis provides a visualized description that intercalated aminoalcohols form strong hydrogen bonds with Al octahedral sheet, and the interaction between aminoalcohols and Si tetrahedral sheet is mainly attributed to weak vdW force. The analysis of molecular orbital occupancies for kaolinite complex showed that the functionalized kaolinite has strong chemical reactivity as electron donors on the sites of grafted or intercalated aminoalcohols for further chemical reaction with other materials

  20. Unraveling origins of the heterogeneous curvature dependence of polypeptide interactions with carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Asis K; Tiwari, Mrityunjay K; Vanka, Kumar; Sengupta, Neelanjana

    2016-02-17

    Emerging nanotechnology has rapidly broadened interfacial prospects of biological molecules with carbon nanomaterials (CNs). A prerequisite for effectively harnessing such hybrid materials is a multi-faceted understanding of their complex interfacial interactions as functions of the physico-chemical characteristics and the surface topography of the individual components. In this article, we address the origins of the curvature dependence of polypeptide adsorption on CN surfaces (CNSs), a phenomenon bearing an acute influence upon the behavior and activity of CN-protein conjugates. Our benchmark molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the amphiphilic full-length amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide demonstrate that protein adsorption is strongest on the concave (inner) CN surface, weakest on the convex (outer) surface, and intermediary on the planar surface, in agreement with recent experimental reports. The curvature effects, however, are found to manifest non-uniformly between the amino acid subtypes. To understand the underlying interplay of the chemical nature of the amino acids and surface topography of the CNs, we performed high-level quantum chemical (QM) calculations with amino acid analogs (AAA) representing their five prominent classes, and convex, concave and planar CN fragments. Molecular electrostatic potential maps reveal pronounced curvature dependence in the mixing of electron densities, and a resulting variance in the stabilization of the non-covalently bound molecular complexes. Interestingly, our study revealed that the interaction trends of the high-level QM calculations were captured well by the empirical force field. The findings in this study have important bearing upon the design of carbon based bio-nanomaterials, and additionally, provide valuable insights into the accuracy of various computational techniques for probing non-bonded interfacial interactions.

  1. A sensitivity study for soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunar, R.R.; White, D.C.; Ashdown, M.J.; Waker, C.H.; Daintith, D.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study in which the sensitivity of a containment building typical of one type of construction used in the nuclear reprocessing industry is examined for variations in soil data and seismic input. A number of dynamic soil-structure interaction analyses are performed on the structure and its foundations using parametric variations of the depth of soil layer, soil material properties, bedrock flexibility, seismic input location and time and phase characteristics of the earthquake excitation. Previous experience is combined with the results obtained to gneralise conclusions regarding the conditions under which each of the uncertainties will be significant enough to merit proper statistical treatment. (orig.)

  2. Study of Interaction of Reinforcement with Concrete by Numerical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, V. M.; Samoshkin, A. S.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the study of deformation of reinforced concrete. A mathematical model for the interaction of reinforcement with concrete, based on the introduction of a contact layer, whose mechanical characteristics are determined from the experimental data, is developed. The limiting state of concrete is described using the Drucker-Prager theory and the fracture criterion with respect to maximum plastic deformations. A series of problems of the theory of reinforced concrete are solved: stretching of concrete from a central-reinforced prism and pre-stressing of concrete. It is shown that the results of the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Thermal-hydraulic studies on molten core-concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report discusses studies carried out in connection with light water power reactor accidents. Recent assessments have indicated that the consequences of molten-core concrete interactions dominate the considerations of severe accidents. The two areas of interest that have been investigated are interlayer heat and mass transfer and liquid-liquid boiling. Interlayer heat and mass transfer refers to processes that occur within a core melt between the stratified, immiscible phases of core oxides and metals. Liquid-liquid boiling refers to processes that occur at the melt-concrete on melt-coolant interface

  4. Interaction of erythrocytes and hexavalent uranium compounds -an autoanalytical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, W.I.; Shying, M.E.

    1980-05-01

    An automated analytical system was devised to measure the kinetics of hemolysis by uranyl compounds. Accurate plots of percentage hemolysis v. time were obtained; these, together with the corresponding differential curves, show that hemolysis of plasma-free erythrocytes is a two-stage process. The first stage of hemolysis is particularly affected by pH and anion content of uranyl solutions, and also by incubation of cell suspensions at 37 deg. before mixing with lysing solution. Complementary studies involving Coulter counting and microscopic observation established the general pattern of hemolysis and showed that cell agglutination is a prominent feature of the interaction of cells with uranyl solutions

  5. Studies of the beam-beam interaction for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnagopal, S.; Furman, M.A.; Turner, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have used the beam-beam simulation code CBI to study the beam-beam interaction for the LHC. We find that for nominal LHC parameters, and assuming only one bunch per beam, there are no collective (coherent) beam-beam instabilities. We have investigated the effect of sweeping one of the beams around the other (a procedure that could be used as a diagnostic for head-on beam-beam collisions). We find that this does not cause any problems at the nominal current, though at higher currents there can be beam blow-up and collective beam motion. consequence of quadrupole collective effects

  6. Study of Adhesion Interaction Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grybos, J.; Pyka-Fosciak, G.; Lebed, K.; Lekka, M.; Stachura, Z.; Styczeñ, J.

    2003-05-01

    An atomic force microscope is a useful tool to study the interaction forces at molecular level. In particular the atomic force microscope can measure an unbinding force needed to separate the two single molecule complexes. Recent studies have shown that such unbinding force depends linearly on the logarithm of the applied loading rate, defined as a product of scanning velocity and the spring constant characterizing the investigated system (cantilever vs. surface). This dependence can be used to study the energy landscape shape of a molecular complex by the estimation of energy barrier locations and the related dissociation rates. In the present work the complex consisting of ethylene(di)aminetetraacetic acid and the bovine serum albumin was measured. The dependence between the unbinding force and the logarithm of the loading rate was linear. Using the Bell model describing the dissociation of the above molecules caused by the action of the external bond breaking force, two parameters were estimated: the dissociation rate and the position of the energy barrier needed to overcome during a transition from a bound to unbound state. The obtained results are similar to those obtained for a typical ligand--receptor interaction.

  7. Study of the interactions between organic matter and transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.; Billon, A.; Theyssier, M.; Dellis, T.

    1991-01-01

    The study of the occurrence of humic substances present in natural waters and their physico-chemical properties, in particular their complexing behaviour, constitutes the main objectives of this research programme. In the first part, the report presents the description of the selected aquifer (representative of a granitic geological formation: Fanay-Augeres), the method for the collection and concentration of the humic substances (a sorption technique) and their characterization by different physico-chemical techniques (elementary and mineral composition, spectroscopic properties, size, proton capacity, datation). The results show that Fanay-Augeres humic substances (considered as site-specific humic substances) represent 41% of the total organic carbon (TOC) present in the aquifer (2ppm) and have properties similar to other aquatic humic substances. The second part describes the study of the interactions occurring between these humic substances and trivalent cations (Eu and Am). Two different analytical methods have been developed to perform these investigations: spectrophotometry and size-exclusion chromatography. Interaction constants and complexing capacities have been determined and compared with literature data. Fanay-Augeres humic substances present complexing for trivalent actinides which agrees with published data. Further developments needed in complexation studies are described. 10 figs.; 15 tabs.; 39 refs

  8. User Interaction Modeling and Profile Extraction in Interactive Systems: A Groupware Application Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîrnăucă, Cristina; Duque, Rafael; Montaña, José L.

    2017-01-01

    A relevant goal in human–computer interaction is to produce applications that are easy to use and well-adjusted to their users’ needs. To address this problem it is important to know how users interact with the system. This work constitutes a methodological contribution capable of identifying the context of use in which users perform interactions with a groupware application (synchronous or asynchronous) and provides, using machine learning techniques, generative models of how users behave. Additionally, these models are transformed into a text that describes in natural language the main characteristics of the interaction of the users with the system. PMID:28726762

  9. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  10. Protein-protein interaction site predictions with three-dimensional probability distributions of interacting atoms on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Tai Chen

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted

  11. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  12. Crystallization of copper(II) sulfate based minerals and MOF from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    critical nucleus in terms of aggregation of tectons through non-covalent interactions provides chemical insights .... minerals and materials crystallized from the system ... occurs (refer figure 7). obtained from various crystallization studies. Use of.

  13. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Cu(II) complexes and the effect of non-covalent interactions on their supramolecular framework .... Is dynamic heterogeneity of water in presence of a protein denaturing agent different from that in ... A molecular dynamics simulation study.

  14. Study of oral clefts: Indication of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, S.J.; Beaty, T.H.; Panny, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In this study of infants with isolated birth defects, 69 cleft palate-only (CPO) cases, 114 cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P), and 284 controls with non-cleft birth defects (all born in Maryland during 1984-1992) were examined to test for associations among genetic markers and different oral clefts. Modest associations were found between transforming growth factor {alpha} (TGF{alpha}) marker and CPO, as well as that between D17S579 (Mfd188) and CL/P in this study. The association between TGF{alpha} marker and CPO reflects a statistical interaction between mother`s smoking and child`s TGF{alpha} genotype. A significantly higher risk of CPO was found among those reporting maternal smoking during pregnancy and carrying less common TGF{alpha} TaqI allele (odds ratio=7.02 with 95% confidence interval 1.8-27.6). This gene-environment interaction was also found among those who reported no family history of any type of birth defect (odds ratio=5.60 with 95% confidence interval 1.4-22.9). Similar associations were seen for CL/P, but these were not statistically significant.

  15. Study of the interactions between riboflavin and protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongwei; Zhang Zhaoxia; Zhu Hongping; Ge Min; Miao Jinling; Wang Wenfeng; Yao Side

    2006-01-01

    Riboflavin (VB 2 ), a vitamin that is a natural constituent of living organisms, plays an important role in the process of metabolism and it is essential for normal cellular functions and growth. As an endogenous photosensitizer, riboflavin induces photooxidation damages to cells of skin and eye, causing inflammation, accelerated aging and mutation. The photodynamic actions of riboflavin on DNA have been studied extensively, however, its photodynamic actions on protein and enzyme are less studied due to the complex types and structures of proteins, and less attentions have been paid to photosensitive protein damages than DNA. In our lab, the interactions between riboflavin and serum albumin and lysozyme have been carried out by using transient absorption spectrometry, emission spectrometer analysis and electrophoresis techniques. It was found that stable state products and transient process of photosensitive damage to proteins were closely relative to concentration of riboflavin, time of irradiation and the atmosphere of the solutions. The results indicates that proteins can be photosensitive damaged by riboflavin irradiated by UV lights. Riboflavin can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of protein. Both dynamic and static quenching are simultaneous involved. The binding constants, the kinetics and spectroscopic properties of riboflavin interaction with albumin and lysozyme have also been investigated. Mechanisms of the photosensitive damages to proteins were discussed. The experiments also indicated that antioxidants such as melatonin and chlorogenic acid can reduce the damage of lysozyme effectively. (authors)

  16. Study of the interaction of kaempferol with bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jianniao; Liu, Jiaqin; Tian, Xuan; Hu, Zhide; Chen, Xingguo

    2004-03-01

    The binding of kaempferol with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated at three temperatures, 296, 310 and 318 K, by the fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) at pH 7.40. The CD and FT-IR studies indicate that kaempferol binds strongly to BSA. The association constant K was determined by Stern-Volmer equation based on the quenching of the fluorescence BSA in the presence of kaempferol. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to the dependence of enthalpy change on the temperature as follows: Δ H0 and Δ S0 possess small negative (-1.694 kJ/mol) and positive values (88.814 J/mol K), respectively. According to the displacement experimental and the thermodynamic results, it is considered that kaempferol binding site II (subdomain III) mainly by hydrophobic interaction. The results studied by FT-IR and CD experiments indicate that the secondary structures of the protein have been changed by the interaction of kaempferol with BSA. The distance between the tryptophan residues in BSA and kaempferol bound to site II was estimated to be 2.78 nm using Foster's equation on the basis of fluorescence energy transfer.

  17. Thermally decarboxylated sodium bicarbonate: Interactions with water vapour, calorimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Volkova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC was used to study interactions between water vapour and the surface of thermally converted sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3. The decarboxylation degree of the samples was varied from 3% to 35% and the humidity range was 54–100%. The obtained enthalpy values were all exothermic and showed a positive linear correlation with decarboxylation degrees for each humidity studied. The critical humidity, 75% (RHo, was determined as the inflection point on a plot of the mean−ΔHkJ/mole Na2CO3 against RH. Humidities above the critical humidity lead to complete surface dissolution. The water uptake (m was determined after each calorimetric experiment, complementing the enthalpy data. A mechanism of water vapour interaction with decarboxylated samples, including the formation of trona and Wegscheider’s salt on the bicarbonate surface is proposed for humidities below RHo. Keywords: Isothermal titration calorimetry, Sodium bicarbonate, Sodium carbonate, Trona salt, Wegscheider’s salt, Enthalpy, Relative humidity, Pyrolytic decarboxylation

  18. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Ko, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 10 8 . The atoms of several tens of μK degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  19. Benzene: a case study in parent chemical and metabolite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medinsky, M A; Kenyon, E M; Schlosser, P M

    1995-12-28

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia and pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol for example) is apparently necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Since benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus, the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. However, zonal localization of Phase I and Phase II enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus regulates this competition. Biologically-based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans.

  20. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform 13 C, 15 N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific 13 C and 15 N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions

  1. Hyperfine interaction studies with pulsed heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, P.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy-ion reactions using pulsed beams have had a strong impact on the study of hyperfine interactions. Unique advantages offered by this technique have considerably extended the scope, detail and systematic range of its applications beyond that possible with radioactivity or light-ion reaction. This survey will cover a brief description of the methodological aspects of the field and recent applications to selected problems in nuclear and solid state physiscs illustrating its role. These include measurements of nuclear magnetic and electric quadrupole moments of high spin isomers, measurements of hyperfine magnetic fields at impurities in 3d and rare-earths ferromagnetic hosts, studies of paramagnetic systems, especially those exhibiting valence instabilities, and investigations of electric field gradients of impurities in noncubic metals. Future prospects of this technique will be briefly assessed. (orig.)

  2. Study of $\\pi^{-}p$ interactions with neutral final states

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a study of the production of neutral particles or states decaying into photons in the reaction $\\pi^{-} + p \\rightarrow M^{0} + n$ at SPS energies. \\\\ \\\\ Special attention is paid to the measurement of the production of heavy particles with hidden quantum numbers and of possible new heavy spinless states decaying into two photons. \\\\ \\\\ The large four-momentum transfer behaviour of binary processes involving known neutral mesons and the production of new meson resonances with high mass and spin will also be studied. Complex multiparticle final states will be analysed as a by-product.\\\\ \\\\ The central unit of the experimental set-up is a 4000 cell Cerenkov hodoscope spectrometer (GAMS) which allows the measurement of the momentum vector of each $\\gamma$ in a multigamma event. \\\\ \\\\ The longitudinal position of the interaction point in the liquid hydrogen target is measured by the Cerenkov light intensity. \\\\ \\\\ A guard system, made of scintillation counters and lead-glass Cerenkov counters, ...

  3. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  4. UO2/magnetite concrete interaction and penetration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    The concrete structure represents a line of defense in safety assessment of containment integrity and possible minimization of radiological releases following a reactor accident. The penetration study of hot UO 2 particles into limestone concrete and basalt concrete highlighted some major differences between the two concretes. These included penetration rate, melting and dissolution phenomena, released gases, pressurization of the UO 2 chamber, and characteristics of post-test concrete. The present study focuses on the phenomena associated with core debris interaction with and penetration into magnetite type concrete. The real material experiment was carried out with UO 2 particles and magnetite concrete in a test apparatus similar to the one utilized in the UO 2 /limestone experiment

  5. Experimental and analytical studies of sodium interactions with various concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo-Anttila, A.; Smaardyk, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanistic models of sodium/concrete interactions are described. The SCAM model of interactions with basaltic concrete is being verified by experiments. Modelling of sodium interactions with limestone concrete is still at a preliminary stage but shows promise of being able to predict quantitatively the experimental data. Comparisons with experimental data are presented

  6. Phase equilibria and molecular interaction studies on (naphthols + vanillin) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Preeti; Agrawal, Tanvi; Das, Shiva Saran; Singh, Nakshatra Bahadur

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phase equilibria of (naphthol + vanillin) systems have been studied for the first time. ► Eutectic type phase diagrams are obtained. ► Eutectic mixtures show nonideal behaviour. ► There is a weak molecular interaction between the components in the eutectic mixtures. ► α-Naphthol–vanillin eutectic is more stable as compared to β-naphthol–vanillin. - Abstract: Phase equilibria between (α-naphthol + vanillin) and (β-naphthol + vanillin) systems have been studied by thaw-melt method and the results show the formation of simple eutectic mixtures. Crystallization velocities of components and eutectic mixtures were determined at different stages under cooling. With the help of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), the enthalpy of fusion of components and eutectic mixtures was determined and from the values excess thermodynamic functions viz., excess Gibbs free energy (G E ), excess entropy (S E ), excess enthalpy (H E ) of hypo-, hyper- and eutectic mixtures were calculated. Flexural strength measurements were made in order to understand the non-ideal nature of eutectics. FT-IR spectral studies indicate the formation of hydrogen bond in the eutectic mixture. Anisotropic and isotropic microstructural studies of components, hypo-, hyper- and eutectic mixtures were made. Jackson’s roughness parameter was calculated and found to be greater than 2 suggesting the faceted morphology with irregular structures. The overall results have shown that there is a weak molecular interaction between the components in the eutectic mixtures and the (α-naphthol + vanillin) eutectic is more stable as compared to the (β-naphthol + vanillin) eutectic system.

  7. Drug-polymer interaction studies of cytarabine loaded chitosan nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madni, A.; Kashif, P.M.; Nazir, I.; Rehman, M.

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of possible incompatibilities between drug and excipients is an important parameter of preformulation stage during the pharmaceutical product development of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). The potential physical and chemical interaction among the components of a delivery system can affect the chemical nature, bioavailability, stability, and subsequently therapeutic efficacy of drugs. In this study, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was employed to investigate the possible intermolecular interaction of Cytarabine with deacetylated chitosan and tripolyphosphate in the resulting physical blends and crosslinked nanoparticulate system. Two different strategies, physical blending and ionotropic gelation, were adopted to prepare binary or tertiary mixtures and nanoparticulate formulation, respectively. The IR spectra of CB showed characteristic peaks at 3438.27 cm-1 (primary amine), 3264.74 cm-1 (hydroxyl group) and 1654.98 cm-1 (C=O stretch in cyclic ring); CS at 3361.47 cm-1 (N-H stretching), 1646.18 cm-1 (C=O of Amide I), 1582.36 cm-1 (C=O of Amide II), and sTPP at 1135.77 cm-1 (P=O). CS-sTPP chemical interaction was confirmed from the shift in the absorption band of carbonyl groups (amide I, II) to 1634.66 cm-1 and 1541.17 cm-1 in blank chitosan nanoparticles, and 1636.87 cm-1, 1543.33 cm-1 in CSNP1 (2:6:1), and at 1646.15 cm-1 and 1557.04 cm-1 in CSNP2 (1:3:1). The characteristic peaks of CB were also present in chitosan formulation with a slight shift in the amino group at 3429.43 cm-1 and 3423.21 cm-1, in the hydroxyl group at 3274.54 cm-1 and 3270.73 cm-1, CSNP1 and CSNP2, respectively. The findings counseled no significant interaction in IR absorption pattern of cytarabine functional groups after encapsulation in CS-sTPP complex, which projected the potential of chitosan nanoparticulate system to entrap cytarabine. (author)

  8. An electrochemical study of neutral red-DNA interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heli, H.; Bathaie, S.Z.; Mousavi, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical methods were used to investigate the interaction of neutral red (NR) with double-stranded calf thymus DNA, in solution as well as using a DNA-modified glassy carbon (GC-DNA) electrode. The results were compared with those obtained from bare glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The formal potential of NR was more positive when GC-DNA electrode was used although the rate of heterogeneous electron transfer is as high as that of using GC electrode. GC-DNA electrode enables preconcentration of NR for chosen times on the electrode surface, despite the fact that the mass transfer effects in the thin DNA layer adsorbed on the surface was still observed using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of NR, binding site size in base pairs and the ratio of the binding constants for the oxidized and reduced forms of the bound species were obtained. A binding isotherm for NR at GC-DNA electrode was obtained from coulometric titrations and gave an affinity constant equal to 2.76 x 10 4 L mol -1 . From the studies of the interaction in solution, the diffusion coefficient of free and DNA-bound NR, binding constant and binding site size of the DNA-NR complex was also obtained simultaneously by non-linear fitting analysis of voltammetric data

  9. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  10. Gene–obesogenic environment interactions in the UK Biobank study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, Jessica; Wood, Andrew R; Ames, Ryan M; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Beaumont, Robin N; Jones, Samuel E; Tuke, Marcus A; Ruth, Katherine S; Freathy, Rachel M; Davey Smith, George; Joost, Stéphane; Guessous, Idris; Murray, Anna; Strachan, David P; Kutalik, Zoltán; Weedon, Michael N; Frayling, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous studies have suggested that modern obesogenic environments accentuate the genetic risk of obesity. However, these studies have proven controversial as to which, if any, measures of the environment accentuate genetic susceptibility to high body mass index (BMI). Methods: We used up to 120 000 adults from the UK Biobank study to test the hypothesis that high-risk obesogenic environments and behaviours accentuate genetic susceptibility to obesity. We used BMI as the outcome and a 69-variant genetic risk score (GRS) for obesity and 12 measures of the obesogenic environment as exposures. These measures included Townsend deprivation index (TDI) as a measure of socio-economic position, TV watching, a ‘Westernized’ diet and physical activity. We performed several negative control tests, including randomly selecting groups of different average BMIs, using a simulated environment and including sun-protection use as an environment. Results: We found gene–environment interactions with TDI (Pinteraction = 3 × 10–10), self-reported TV watching (Pinteraction = 7 × 10–5) and self-reported physical activity (Pinteraction = 5 × 10–6). Within the group of 50% living in the most relatively deprived situations, carrying 10 additional BMI-raising alleles was associated with approximately 3.8 kg extra weight in someone 1.73 m tall. In contrast, within the group of 50% living in the least deprivation, carrying 10 additional BMI-raising alleles was associated with approximately 2.9 kg extra weight. The interactions were weaker, but present, with the negative controls, including sun-protection use, indicating that residual confounding is likely. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the obesogenic environment accentuates the risk of obesity in genetically susceptible adults. Of the factors we tested, relative social deprivation best captures the aspects of the obesogenic environment responsible. PMID:28073954

  11. Photon interaction studies using 241Am γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Karunakaran Nair, K.; Abdullah, K.K.; Varier, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    We have carried out some photon interaction measurements using 59.54 keV γ-rays from a 241 Am source. These include γ attenuation studies as well as photoelectric absorption studies in various samples. The attenuation studies have been made using leaf and wood samples, samples like sand, sugar etc., which contain particles of varying sizes as well as pellets and aqueous solutions of rare earth compounds. In the case of the leaf and wood samples, we have used the γ-ray attenuation technique for the determination of the water content in fresh and dried samples. The variation of the attenuation coefficient with particle size has been investigated for sand and sugar samples. The attenuation studies as well as the photoelectric studies in the case of rare earth elements have been carried out on samples containing such elements whose K-absorption edge energies lie below and close to the γ-energy used. Suitable compounds of the rare earth elements have been chosen as mixture absorbers in these investigations. A narrow beam good geometry set-up was used for the attenuation measurements. A well-shielded scattering geometry was used for the photoelectric measurements. The mixture rule was invoked to extract the values of the mass attenuation coefficients for the elements from those of the corresponding compounds. The results are consistent with theoretical values derived from the XCOM package. (author)

  12. Self-assembly of Hydrazide-based Heterodimers Driven by Hydrogen Bonding and Donor-Acceptor Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG,Dai-Jun; WANG,Peng; LI,Xiao-Qiang; LI,Zhan-Ting

    2006-01-01

    A new series of hydrogen bonding-driven heterodimers have been self-assembled in chloroform from hydrazide-based monomers. Additional intermolecular donor-acceptor interaction between the electron-rich bis(p-phenylene)-34-crown-10 unit and the electron-deficient naphthalene diimide unit has been utilized to increase the stability of the dimmers, and pronounced cooperativity of the two discrete non-covalent forces to stabilize the dimer has been revealed by the quantitative 1H (2D) NMR and UV-Vis experiments.

  13. Laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the structures and encapsulation motifs of functional molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebata, Takayuki; Kusaka, Ryoji [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Xantheas, Sotiris S. [Chemical and Materials Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, MS K1-83, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Extensive laser spectroscopic and theoretical studies have been recently carried out with the aim to reveal the structure and dynamics of encapsulation complexes in the gas phase. The characteristics of the encapsulation complexes are governed by the fact that (i) most of the host molecules are flexible and (ii) the complexes form high dimensional structures by using weak non-covalent interactions. These characteristics result in the possibility of the coexistence of many conformers in close energetic proximity. The combination of supersonic jet/laser spectroscopy and high level quantum chemical calculations is essential in tackling these challenging problems. In this report we describe our recent studies on the structures and dynamics of the encapsulation complexes formed by calix[4]arene (C4A), dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether (DB18C6), and benzo-18-crown-6-ether (B18C6) 'hosts' interacting with N{sub 2}, acetylene, water, and ammonia 'guest' molecules. The gaseous host-guest complexes are generated under jet-cooled conditions. We apply various laser spectroscopic methods to obtain the conformer- and isomer-specified electronic and IR spectra. The experimental results are complemented with quantum chemical calculations ranging from density functional theory to high level first principles calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. We discuss the possible conformations of the bare host molecules, the structural changes they undergo upon complexation, and the key interactions that are responsible in stabilizing the specific complexes.

  14. Parent-child interactions during traditional and interactive media settings: A pilot randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaug, Silje; Englund, Kjellrun T; Saksvik-Lehouillier, Ingvild; Lydersen, Stian; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2018-04-01

    Parent-child interactions are pivotal for children's socioemotional development, yet might suffer with increased attention to screen media, as research has suggested. In response, we hypothesized that parent-child play on a tablet computer, as representative of interactive media, would generate higher-quality parent-child interactions than toy play or watching TV. We examined the emotional availability of mothers and their 2-year-old child during the previous three contexts using a randomized crossover design (n = 22) in a laboratory room. Among other results, mothers were more sensitive and structuring during joint gaming on a tablet than when engaged in toy play or watching TV. In addition, mothers were more hostile toward their children during play with traditional toys than during joint tablet gaming and television co-viewing. Such findings provide new insights into the impact of new media on parent-child interactions, chiefly by demonstrating that interactive media devices such as tablets can afford growth-enhancing parent-child interactions. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. UV-SPR biosensor for biomolecular interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, F. A.; Fossati, S.; Khan, I.; Gisbert Quilis, N.; Knoll, W.; Dostalek, J.

    2017-05-01

    UV surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for direct in situ detection of protein binding events is reported. A crossed relief aluminum grating was employed for diffraction coupling to surface plasmons as an alternative to more commonly used attenuated total reflection method. Wavelength interrogation of SPR was carried out by using transmission measurements in order to probe odorant-binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). The native oxide layer on the top of an aluminum grating sensor chip allows for covalent coupling of protein molecules by using regular silane-based linkers. The probing of bound OBP14 protein at UV with confined field of surface plasmons holds potential for further studies of interaction with recently developed artificial fluorescent odorants.

  16. Numerical Study of Shock-Cylinder Banks Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.P.; Anderson, M.H.; Oakley, J.G.; Bonazza, R.

    2003-01-01

    A numerical parametric study of shock-cylinder banks interactions is presented using a high resolution Euler solver. Staggered cylinder banks of five rows are chosen with the purpose of modeling IFE reactor cooling tube banks. The effect of the aspect ratio of the intercylinder pitch to the distance between successive cylinder rows on the vertical pressure forces acting on the cylinders with different geometries is investigated. Preliminary results show that the largest vertical force develops on the cylinders of the second or third row. This peak pressure force increases with decreasing values of the aspect ratio. It is shown that an increasing second force peak also appears on the successive rows, starting with the second one, with decreasing aspect ratio. It is also observed that the force on the last-row cylinders basically decreases to the level of that on the first row. The results are useful for the optimal design of the cooling tubes system of IFE reactors

  17. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle

  18. Study of imploding liner-electrode wall interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshev, V K; Zharinov, E I; Mokhov, V N [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Acceleration of solid aluminium liners and their interaction with electrodes is studied experimentally. One of the main goal of the experiments is to find the method of improving the contact between the liner and the electrode during the acceleration process. Two independent liners connected in series in one discharge circuit are used. This arrangement makes it possible to record two different liner positions simultaneously at one discharge current. As an energy source, a helical explosive magnetic generator of the length of 0.7 m and 100 mm in diameter is used. The shape of liners at various stages of acceleration is recorded by using a flash radiographic facility. The measured liner flight velocity and the compression radius are compared with the results of MHD model calculations. (J.U.). 21 figs., 7 refs.

  19. A quantitative study of nanoparticle skin penetration with interactive segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Onseok; Lee, See Hyun; Jeong, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jaeyoung; Ryu, Hwa Jung; Oh, Chilhwan; Son, Sang Wook

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, the application of nanotechnology techniques has expanded within diverse areas such as pharmacology, medicine, and optical science. Despite such wide-ranging possibilities for implementation into practice, the mechanisms behind nanoparticle skin absorption remain unknown. Moreover, the main mode of investigation has been qualitative analysis. Using interactive segmentation, this study suggests a method of objectively and quantitatively analyzing the mechanisms underlying the skin absorption of nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy and applied to the human skin equivalent model. Captured fluorescence images of this model were used to evaluate degrees of skin penetration. These images underwent interactive segmentation and image processing in addition to statistical quantitative analyses of calculated image parameters including the mean, integrated density, skewness, kurtosis, and area fraction. In images from both groups, the distribution area and intensity of fluorescent silica gradually increased in proportion to time. Since statistical significance was achieved after 2 days in the negative charge group and after 4 days in the positive charge group, there is a periodic difference. Furthermore, the quantity of silica per unit area showed a dramatic change after 6 days in the negative charge group. Although this quantitative result is identical to results obtained by qualitative assessment, it is meaningful in that it was proven by statistical analysis with quantitation by using image processing. The present study suggests that the surface charge of SNPs could play an important role in the percutaneous absorption of NPs. These findings can help achieve a better understanding of the percutaneous transport of NPs. In addition, these results provide important guidance for the design of NPs for biomedical applications.

  20. In vitro drug interaction of levocetirizine and diclofenac: Theoretical and spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Dena, Ahmed S.; Abdel Gaber, Sara A.

    2017-06-01

    Levocetirizine dihydrochloride is known to interact with some anti-inflammatory drugs. We report here a comprehensive integrated theoretical and experimental study for the in vitro drug interaction between levocetirizine dihydrochloride (LEV) and diclofenac sodium (DIC). The interaction of the two drugs was confirmed by the molecular ion peak obtained from the mass spectrum of the product. Moreover, FTIR and 1HNMR spectra of the individual drugs and their interaction product were inspected to allocate the possible sites of interaction. In addition, quantum mechanical DFT calculations were performed to search for the interaction sites and to verify the types of interactions deduced from the spectroscopic studies such as charge-transfer and non-bonding π-π interactions. It was found that the studied drugs interact with each other in aqueous solution via four types of interactions, namely, ion-pair formation, three weak hydrogen bonds, non-bonding π-π interactions and charge-transfer from DIC to LEV.

  1. Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2013-07-30

    This is the final report of a program of research on "Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies'' of the High Energy Physics (HEP) group of The Rockefeller University. The research was carried out using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Three faculty members, two research associates, and two postdoctoral associates participated in this project. At CDF, we studied proton-antiproton collisions at an energy of 1.96 TeV. We focused on diffractive interactions, in which the colliding antiproton loses a small fraction of its momentum, typically less than 1%, while the proton is excited into a high mass state retaining its quantum numbers. The study of such collisions provides insight into the nature of the diffractive exchange, conventionally referred to as Pomeron exchange. In studies of W and Z production, we found results that point to a QCD-based interpretation of the diffractive exchange, as predicted in a data-driven phenomenology developed within the Rockefeller HEP group. At CMS, we worked on diffraction, supersymmetry (SUSY), dark matter, large extra dimensions, and statistical applications to data analysis projects. In diffraction, we extended our CDF studies to higher energies working on two fronts: measurement of the single/double diffraction and of the rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV, and development of a simulation of diffractive processes along the lines of our successful model used at CDF. Working with the PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo simulation authors, we implemented our model as a PYTHIA8-MBR option in PYTHIA8 and used it in our data analysis. Preliminary results indicate good agreement. We searched for SUSY by measuring parameters in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and found results which, combined with other experimental constraints and theoretical considerations, indicate

  2. Analytical study on model tests of soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odajima, M.; Suzuki, S.; Akino, K.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are stiff, heavy and partly-embedded, the behavior of those structures during an earthquake depends on the vibrational characteristics of not only the structure but also the soil. Accordingly, seismic response analyses considering the effects of soil-structure interaction (SSI) are extremely important for seismic design of NPP structures. Many studies have been conducted on analytical techniques concerning SSI and various analytical models and approaches have been proposed. Based on the studies, SSI analytical codes (computer programs) for NPP structures have been improved at JINS (Japan Institute of Nuclear Safety), one of the departments of NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center) in Japan. These codes are soil-spring lumped-mass code (SANLUM), finite element code (SANSSI), thin layered element code (SANSOL). In proceeding with the improvement of the analytical codes, in-situ large-scale forced vibration SSI tests were performed using models simulating light water reactor buildings, and simulation analyses were performed to verify the codes. This paper presents an analytical study to demonstrate the usefulness of the codes

  3. A study of the neutrino-gravitation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, I.D.

    1976-01-01

    A study of the neutrino-gravitation interaction is made in the framework of Einstein-Dirac coupled equations. Two classes of solutions are obtained, corresponding to two specific physical situations. One cosmological model with expansion is obtained, having neutrinos as the only curvature source; their properties and the parameters which can to characterize the solution as a cosmological model are studied. The second class of solutions corresponds to a naive complete model of a spherically symmetric star emitting neutrinos: the inner region is suposed to be built up of a spherically symmetric distribution of a perfect fluid, bounded in space and which emitts neutrinos; the star matter is considered transparent for neutrinos; the outer region contains only neutrinos and gravitational field. The problem of neutrino compatibility with spherically symmetric gravitational fields is examined. The local conservation laws and the function conditions of the inner and outer solutions in the fluid surface are studied and permit to characterize two kinds of solutions. In one case, the solution describes the neutrino emission phase, with consequent configuration contraction, immediately before the fluid to be completely contained in the interior of the schwarzchild radius, when the neutrino emission and the star contraction stop. The other possibility can correspond to a quasi-stationary configuration, with neutrino emission, where the relativistic equation of radiative equilibrium permits to define the equivalent of 'Radiation pressure' for neutrinos, which acts in the same sense of the gravitational pressure. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Studying wind power-bird interactions during the next decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, M. [TransAlta Wind, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described TransAlta's ongoing study of wind power and bird interactions, and outlined the company's plans for the future. The deaths of large birds were noticed by the public as well as by the operators of wind farms built in response to the energy crisis of the 1970s. Post-construction casualty monitoring was established in 1994 in order to understand the direct effects of wind power projects on birds as well as to amass data and identify the broader issues affecting bird mortalities. Increased regulatory rigour led to a further clarification of the techniques used to monitor bird deaths. A study of the amassed data demonstrated that birds were not being killed in large numbers, but that common bird species in a given area were the most common casualties observed at wind farms. Particular species were not predisposed to be at risk. Significant declines in bird species have been noted in Canada, and many population declines have occurred in species located in landscapes well-suited for wind farms. The declines have meant that more scrutiny is placed on wind development projects and their potential cumulative effect. The direct effects of wind turbines on birds are not yet well-understood. The requirements for pre- and post-construction data collection must be reviewed and amended. Future studies will consider bird casualties as well as habitat and behavioural changes. tabs., figs.

  5. Flavonoid-surfactant interactions: A detailed physicochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Onkar; Kaur, Rajwinder; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the interactions between flavonoids and surfactants with attention of finding the probable location of flavonoids in micellar media that can be used for controlling their antioxidant behavior. In present study, the micellar and interfacial behavior of twin tailed anionic surfactants viz. sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (NaDEHP) in the presence of two flavonoids, namely quercetin (QUE) and kaempferol (KFL) have been studied by surface tension measurements. UV-visible, fluorescence and differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) measurements have been employed to predict the probable location of flavonoids (QUE/KFL) within surfactant (AOT/NaDEHP) aggregates. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements further confirmed the solubilization of QUE/KFL in AOT/NaDEHP aggregates deduced from increased hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) of aggregates in the presence of flavonoids. Both radical scavenging activity (RSA) and degradation rate constant (k) of flavonoids are found to be higher in NaDEHP micelles as compared to AOT micelles.

  6. Spin interactions in Graphene-Single Molecule Magnets Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Aña; Luis, Fernando; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Dressel, Martin; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is a potential component of novel spintronics devices owing to its long spin diffusion length. Besides its use as spin-transport channel, graphene can be employed for the detection and manipulation of molecular spins. This requires an appropriate coupling between the sheets and the single molecular magnets (SMM). Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of graphene-Fe4 SMM hybrids. The Fe4 clusters are anchored non-covalently to the graphene following a diffusion-limited assembly and can reorganize into random networks when subjected to slightly elevated temperature. Molecules anchored on graphene sheets show unaltered static magnetic properties, whilst the quantum dynamics is profoundly modulated. Interaction with Dirac fermions becomes the dominant spin-relaxation channel, with observable effects produced by graphene phonons and reduced dipolar interactions. Coupling to graphene drives the spins over Villain's threshold, allowing the first observation of strongly-perturbative tunneling processes. Preliminary spin-transport experiments at low-temperature are further presented.

  7. Introducing Platform Interactions Model for Studying Multi-Sided Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staykova, Kalina; Damsgaard, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Multi-Sided Platforms (MSPs) function as socio-technical entities that facilitate direct interactions between various affiliated to them constituencies through developing and managing IT architecture. In this paper, we aim to explain the nature of the platform interactions as key characteristic o...

  8. Ideology and Interaction: Debating Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Ross; Street, Brian V.

    2014-01-01

    In this exchange, Street and Collin debate the merits of the interaction model of literacy that Collin outlined in a recent issue of Reading Research Quarterly. Built as a complement and a counter to Street's ideological model of literacy, Collin's interaction model defines literacies as technologies that coevolve with sociocultural…

  9. Preferences in Interactive Systems: Technical Challenges and Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Peintner, Bart; Viappiani, Paolo; Yorke-Smith, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Interactive artificial intelligence systems employ preferences in both their reasoning and their interaction with the user. This survey considers preference handling in applications such as recommender systems, personal assistant agents, and personalized user interfaces. We survey the major questions and approaches, present illustrative examples, and give an outlook on potential benefits and challenges.

  10. Mother-Father-Infant Interaction: A Naturalistic Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsky, Jay

    1979-01-01

    Investigates infant preferences for interaction with mother v father, similarities and differences in maternal and paternal behavior, and the influence of a second parent's presence on parent-infant interaction. Families with infants 15 months of age were observed in their own homes. (Author/SS)

  11. Study of the interactions between naphthoquinone and protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhaoxia; Zhao Hongwei; Zhu Hongping; Ge Min; Hao Shumei; Wang Wenfeng; Li Wenxin

    2006-01-01

    Quinones are found in probably all respiring animal and plant cells. They are widely used as anticancer, antibacterial or antimalarial drugs and as fungicides. Over the last several decades, much attention has been paid to quinone compounds since they play important roles as electron and hydrogen atom acceptors in both chemistry and biochemistry. It has been known that the reactive states for the photoreduction of quinones are triplets. As for the photochemistry of simple quinones, such as benzoquinones (BQ), anthraquinones (AQ) and naphthoquinone (NQ), a large number of studies on their photochemical properties and elementary photoreactions. However little research on the protein electron transfer of triplet naphthoquinones ( 3 NQ * ) in organic solvents has been reported using laser flash photolysis. We have studied interactions between 3 NQ * and lysozyme in a mixture solution of acetonitrile and H 2 O (3:1, v/v) using 355 nm laser flash photolysis technique combined with the sample being irradiated in steady-state. Electron transfer reaction between 3 NQ * and lysozyme was found, and the rate constant was determined. On the other hand, the results of electrophoresis suggested that protein can be damaged induced by NQ irradiated with UVA light. It was indicated that the mechanisms and products of oxidative damage were relative to the concentration of riboflavin, the time of irradiation and the ambience. Mechanisms of photosensitive damage of protein were proposed. (authors)

  12. Study of ethanol-lysozyme interactions using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.S.; Mason, S.A.; McIntyre, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction has been used to observe the interactions between deuterated ethanol (CD3CD2OH) and lysozyme in triclinic crystals of hen egg white lysozyme soaked in 25% (v/v) ethanol solutions. A total of 6047 observed reflections to a resolution of 2 A were used, and 13 possible ethanol sites were identified. The three highest occupied sites are close to locations for bromoethanol found in an earlier study by Yonath et al. [Yonath, A., Podjarny, A., Honig, B., Traub, W., Sielecki, A., Herzberg, O., and Moult, J. (1978) Biophys. Struct. Mech. 4, 27-36]. Structure refinements including a model for the flat solvent lead to a final crystallographic agreement factor of 0.097. Comparison with earlier neutron studies on triclinic lysozyme showed that neither the molecular structure nor the thermal motions were affected significantly by the ethanol. A detailed analysis of the ethanol-lysozyme contacts showed 61% of these to be with hydrophobic sites, in agreement with the dominant hydrophobic nature of ethanol. This, together with the fact that the molecular structure of lysozyme is not perturbed, suggests a model for denaturation of lysozyme by alcohol, which proceeds via a dehydration of the protein at high alcohol concentration

  13. Microscopic study of the α-16O interaction on the basis of the realistic effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinichiro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the α- 16 O complex potential by the totally microscopic method where we use the many-body theory taking into account the Pauli principle explicitly and the realistic effective interactions. The comparison of the theoretical inter-nucleus potential with the phenomenological 'unique' optical potential is performed. (author)

  14. Towards future interactive intelligent systems for animals : Study and recognition of embodied interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pons, Patricia; Jaen, Javier; Catala, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    User-centered design applied to non-human animals is showing to be a promising research line known as Animal Computer Interaction (ACI), aimed at improving animals' wellbeing using technology. Within this research line, intelligent systems for animal entertainment could have remarkable benefits for

  15. Presence in Video-Mediated Interactions: Case Studies at CSIRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alem, Leila

    Although telepresence and a sense of connectedness with others are frequently mentioned in media space studies, as far as we know, none of these studies report attempts at assessing this critical aspect of user experience. While some attempts have been made to measure presence in virtual reality or augmented reality, (a comprehensive review of existing measures is available in Baren and Ijsselsteijn [2004]), very little work has been reported in measuring presence in video-mediated collaboration systems. Traditional studies of video-mediated collaboration have mostly focused their evaluation on measures of task performance and user satisfaction. Videoconferencing systems can be seen as a type of media space; they rely on technologies of audio, video, and computing put together to create an environment extending the embodied mind. This chapter reports on a set of video-mediated collaboration studies conducted at CSIRO in which different aspects of presence are being investigated. The first study reports the sense of physical presence a specialist doctor experiences when engaged in a remote consultation of a patient using the virtual critical care unit (Alem et al., 2006). The Viccu system is an “always-on” system connecting two hospitals (Li et al., 2006). The presence measure focuses on the extent to which users of videoconferencing systems feel physically present in the remote location. The second study reports the sense of social presence users experience when playing a game of charades with remote partners using a video conference link (Kougianous et al., 2006). In this study the presence measure focuses on the extent to which users feel connected with their remote partners. The third study reports the sense of copresence users experience when building collaboratively a piece of Lego toy (Melo and Alem, 2007). The sense of copresence is the extent to which users feel present with their remote partner. In this final study the sense of copresence is

  16. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  17. Study of electron and neutrino interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  18. Monte Carlo studies of high-transverse-energy hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    A four-jet Monte Carlo calculation has been used to simulate hadron-hadron interactions which deposit high transverse energy into a large-solid-angle calorimeter and limited solid-angle regions of the calorimeter. The calculation uses first-order QCD cross sections to generate two scattered jets and also produces beam and target jets. Field-Feynman fragmentation has been used in the hadronization. The sensitivity of the results to a few features of the Monte Carlo program has been studied. The results are found to be very sensitive to the method used to ensure overall energy conservation after the fragmentation of the four jets is complete. Results are also sensitive to the minimum momentum transfer in the QCD subprocesses and to the distribution of p/sub T/ to the jet axis and the multiplicities in the fragmentation. With reasonable choices of these features of the Monte Carlo program, good agreement with data at Fermilab/CERN SPS energies is obtained, comparable to the agreement achieved with more sophisticated parton-shower models. With other choices, however, the calculation gives qualitatively different results which are in strong disagreement with the data. These results have important implications for extracting physics conclusions from Monte Carlo calculations. It is not possible to test the validity of a particular model or distinguish between different models unless the Monte Carlo results are unambiguous and different models exhibit clearly different behavior

  19. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E.; Geltenbort, P.; Gridnev, K. A.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Martemyanov, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4′ channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4′ channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  20. Studies of neutron emission from relativistic nuclear interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, S L; Wang, Y L; Guo, H Y; Sá Ben-Hao; Zheng, Y M; Brandt, R; Vater, P; Wan, J S; Ochs, M; Kulakov, B A; Sosnin, A N; Krivopustov, M I; Butsev, V S; Bradnova, V

    1999-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the yields and spatial distributions of secondary neutrons produced in the relativistic nuclear interactions of 1.5 GeV to 14.4 GeV projectiles p, d and alpha-particles with targets Pb and U/Pb. CR-39 track detectors were used to measure the neutrons. It shows that: (1) Secondary neutrons are produced in the whole length of Pb or U targets having a thickness of 20 cm. The neutron intensities produced by proton bombardments are reduced along the proton beam direction in the targets. The higher the energy of protons, the lower the reduction rate of the neutrons. The reduction rate of neutrons in U target is higher than in Pb target for the same energy of protons. (2) The radial intensities of neutrons decrease as the distance increases from the target central line. (3) The neutron yield in U target by proton bombardments is approx 55% higher than in Pb target. (4) The ratio of neutron yield by 14.4 GeV alpha to 7.3 GeV d bombardment in Pb target is 1.74+-0.20.

  1. A study of the phi phi system in hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, I.R.M.

    1984-05-01

    The thesis presents a study of the phi phi system in hadronic interactions. Data were collected from the reaction π - Be → phi phiX, at 85 GeV/c, using the CERN OMEGA Spectrometer. The phi phi system was of interest because it has been suggested that the hadronic production of the Jsup(p)=O - hidden charm state etac(2980) may be observed through the decay to two phi mesons, and because it is expected that gluonium states exist in the mass range 2.0 to 2.5 GeV/c 2 , and these should decay to two phi mesons. Experimental details and data analysis of the experiment are given. The phi phi mass resolution was determined from the errors on the track parameters of the particles and from the examination of the observed phi and K 0 signals. The mass resolution was used in an examination of the phi phi mass spectrum for narrow resonances and in the estimation of the upper limits of the cross-section for a narrow resonance. (U.K.)

  2. Studying electron-PAG interactions using electron-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Amrit; Grzeskowiak, Steven; Ostrander, Jonathan; Schad, Jonathon; Rebeyev, Eliran; Neisser, Mark; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Denbeaux, Gregory; Brainard, Robert L.

    2016-03-01

    In extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, 92 eV photons are used to expose photoresists. Typical EUV resists are organic-based and chemically amplified using photoacid generators (PAGs). Upon exposure, PAGs produce acids which catalyze reactions that result in changes in solubility. In EUV lithography, photo- and secondary electrons (energies of 10- 80 eV) play a large role in PAG acid-production. Several mechanisms for electron-PAG interactions (e.g. electron trapping, and hole-initiated chemistry) have been proposed. The aim of this study is to explore another mechanism - internal excitation - in which a bound PAG electron can be excited by receiving energy from another energetic electron, causing a reaction that produces acid. This paper explores the mechanism of internal excitation through the analogous process of electron-induced fluorescence, in which an electron loses energy by transferring that energy to a molecule and that molecule emits a photon rather than decomposing. We will show and quantify electron-induced fluorescence of several fluorophores in polymer films to mimic resist materials, and use this information to refine our proposed mechanism. Relationships between the molecular structure of fluorophores and fluorescent quantum yield may aid in the development of novel PAGs for EUV lithography.

  3. Kaonic atoms – studies of the strong interaction with strangeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong interaction of charged antikaons (K− with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is a fascinating topic. The antikaon plays a peculiar role in hadron physics due to the strong attraction antikaon-nucleon which is a key question for possible kaonic nuclear bound states. A rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions to low-lying states in light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen and deuterium. After the successful completion of precision measurements on kaonic hydrogen and helium isotopes by SIDDHARTA at DAΦNE/LNF, new X-ray studies with the focus on kaonic deuterium are in preparation (SIDDHARTA2. In the future with kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-dependent scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the experimental results of SIDDHARTA and an outlook to future perspectives in the SIDDHARTA2 experiments in this frontier research field will be given.

  4. Immunohistochemical study of epithelial-myofibroblast interaction in Barrett metaplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochicha O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sub-epithelial myofibroblasts are known to influence the biology (proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of overlying epithelia. In the intestine, myofibroblasts have been demonstrated to be essential for epithelial differentiation. It is therefore hypothesized that myofibroblasts may also be involved in intestinal metaplasia that is characteristic of Barrett esophagus. Objective: This study endeavors to immunohistologically evaluate epithelial-myofibroblast interaction in Barrett′s metaplasia. Materials and Methods: Nineteen archival esophageal endoscopic biopsies of Barrett′s metaplasia were immune-phenotyped for the following epithelial and myofibroblast antigens - cytokeratins (CK 8, 13, 18, CDX2 (Caudal type homeobox 2, a-smooth muscle actin (SMA. Results: α-SMA immunostaining revealed close association between myofibroblasts and metaplastic Barrett′s epithelium but not with normal esophageal squamous epithelium. Myofibroblasts were more prominent in dysplastic than in non-dysplastic Barrett metaplasia. CDX2 and CK 8/18, indicators of intestinal differentiation were expressed in Barrett metaplasia but not normal esophageal squamous epithelium, while the reverse was the case for CK 13, which only stained normal esophageal squamous epithelium. Conclusion: Although their precise role is yet to be clearly defined, sub-epithelial myofibroblasts are very likely involved in the pathogenesis of Barrett′s metaplasia.

  5. Study of direct photons produced in hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karyotakis, Y.

    1985-05-01

    This thesis studies direct photons produced by π + , π - and proton beams of 200 GeV/c, momentum interacting with a carbon target. QCD predicts that direct photons are produced either by the quark-antiquark annihilation qantiq → gγ, or by gluon scattering gq → qγ. The experiment was performed at CERN and used the NA3 spectrometer. Photons are converted within 10% conversion length, and resulting e + e - are detected by the trigger system which requires a minimum transverse momentum of 2.5 GeV/c. Electrons tracks are detected by the spectrometer, while energy and position of photons are measured by an electromagnetic calorimeter and a shower chamber. Direct photon's signal is obtained only statistically, after correcting the ''single photons'' candidats for the π 0 and eta 0 contribution. This correction is obtained only from a sophisticated Monte Carlo, in which electromagnetic shower simulation is difficult. We have observed a significant direct photon signal and we measured the cross section. The γ/π 0 ratio at psub(t) = 4.5 GeV/c is about 10% and seems to grow as a function of transverse momentum. Systematic errors, which are important, limit the precision on the gluon's structure function measurement [fr

  6. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A. P., E-mail: serebrov@pnpi.spb.ru; Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Geltenbort, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin (France); Gridnev, K. A. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Martemyanov, V. P. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); and others

    2016-05-15

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4′ channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4′ channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  7. Pellet-plasma interaction studies at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocsis, G.; Belonohy, E.; Gal, K.; Kalvin, S.; Veres, G.; Lang, P.T.

    2005-01-01

    to localize the pellet cloud at a certain time (e. g. at the onset of the triggered ELMs). In order to facilitate scaling studies for the next generation of tokamaks, a database containing the decisive parameters of the pellet-plasma interaction was developed using the experimental results obtained at ASDEX Upgrade. Based upon this database a statistical multiple regression analysis is performed using the forward selection method to determine the penetration depth dependence on the main plasma and pellet parameters. Pellet ablation and cloud distribution is simulated by using 1D-Lagrangian cell code which was extended recently by combining it with the simulation of a neutral gas shielding model. Both a simple analytical approximation and a more elaborated quasi 2D approach were developed and validated with the experimental data. In this conference contribution the recent results of these investigations are presented with particular attention to the ELM triggering by pellets and pellet cloud dynamics and drift. (author)

  8. The Electron-Phonon Interaction as Studied by Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    With recent advances in energy and angle resolution, the effects of electron-phonon interactions are manifest in many valence-band photoelectron spectra (PES) for states near the Fermi level in metals

  9. Studying the Interaction of the Epistemology in e-Government, Organization Studies and Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneklis, Vassilis; Douligeris, Christos

    Although there are significant differences between Organization Studies, Information Systems and e-Government, certain boundaries between them have started to dissolve in the light of recent developments. Even though influences can be traced among all three concerning research results, epistemological interaction could produce interesting outcomes. In this paper we propose such an interaction in epistemology, and particularly in methods following the interpretive tradition, which has been notably underused. We present a brief review of literature in e-Government and after sketching its route, we propose ways to integrate in it perceptions and methods from Organization Studies and Information Systems.

  10. Studies of halo distributions under beam-beam interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.; Irwin, J.; Siemann, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    The halo distribution due to the beam-beam interaction in circular electron-positron colliders is simulated with a program which uses a technique that saves a factor of hundreds to thousands of CPU time. The distribution and the interference between the beam-beam interaction and lattice nonlinearities has been investigated. The effects on the halo distribution due to radiation damping misalignment at the collision point, and chromatic effect are presented

  11. Inhibition of interaction between epigallocatechin-3-gallate and myofibrillar protein by cyclodextrin derivatives improves gel quality under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumeng; Chen, Lin; Lv, Yuanqi; Wang, Shuangxi; Suo, Zhiyao; Cheng, Xingguang; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong; Li, Zhixi; Feng, Xianchao

    2018-06-01

    High levels of polyphenols can interact with myofibrillar proteins (MPs), causing damage to a MP emulsion gel. In this study, β-cyclodextrins were used to reduce covalent and non-covalent interaction between epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and MPs under oxidative stress. The loss of both thiol and free amine groups and the unfolding of MPs caused by EGCG (80 μM/g protein) were significantly prevented by β-cyclodextrins, and the structural stability and solubility were improved. MP emulsion gel treated with EGCG (80 μM/g protein) had the highest cooking loss (68.64%) and gel strength (0.51 N). Addition of β-cyclodextrins significantly reduced cooking loss (26.24-58.20%) and improved gel strength (0.31-0.41 N) of MP emulsion gel jeopardized by EGCG under oxidative stress. Damage to the emulsifying properties of MPs caused by EGCG was significantly prevented by addition of β-cyclodextrins. β-cyclodextrins reduced interaction between EGCG and MPs in the order Methyl-β-cyclodextrin > (2-Hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin > β-cyclodextrin. In absence of EGCG, addition of β-cyclodextrins partly protected MPs from oxidative attack and improved its solubility. It is concluded that β-cyclodextrins does not markedly reduce the antioxidant ability of EGCG according to carbonyl analysis, and can effectively increase EGCG loading to potentially provide more durable antioxidant effect for meat products during processing, transportation and storage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular interactions and thermal transport in ionic liquids with carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, João M P; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A; Pádua, Agílio A H

    2017-07-05

    We used molecular dynamics simulation to study the effect of suspended carbon nanomaterials, nanotubes and graphene sheets, on the thermal conductivity of ionic liquids, an issue related to understanding the properties of nanofluids. One important aspect that we developed is an atomistic model of the interactions between the organic ions and carbon nanomaterials, so we did not rely on existing force fields for small organic molecules or assume simple combining rules to describe the interactions at the liquid/material interface. Instead, we used quantum calculations with a density functional suitable for non-covalent interactions to parameterize an interaction model, including van der Waals terms and also atomic partial charges on the materials. We fitted a n-m interaction potential function with n values of 9 or 10 and m values between 5 and 8, so a 12-6 Lennard-Jones function would not fit the quantum calculations. For the atoms of ionic liquids and carbon nanomaterials interacting among themselves, we adopted existing models from the literature. We studied the imidazolium ionic liquids [C 4 C 1 im][SCN], [C 4 C 1 im][N(CN) 2 ], [C 4 C 1 im][C(CN) 3 ] and [C 4 C 1 im][(CF 3 SO 2 ) 2 N]. Attraction is stronger for cations (than for anions) above and below the π-system of the nanomaterials, whereas anions show stronger attraction for the hydrogenated edges. The ordering of ions around and inside (7,7) and (10,10) single-walled nanotubes, and near a stack of graphene sheets, was analysed in terms of density distribution functions. We verified that anions are found, as well as cations, in the first interfacial layer interacting with the materials, which is surprising given the interaction potential surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the ionic liquids and of composite systems containing one nanotube or one graphene stack in suspension was calculated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. Thermal conductivity was calculated along the axis of the nanotube and

  13. Yakima River species interactions studies annual report, 2000; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearsons, Todd N.

    2001-01-01

    Species interactions research and monitoring was initiated in 1989 to investigate ecological interactions among fish in response to proposed supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This is the ninth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the ecology and demographics of non-target taxa (NTT) and target taxon, and develop methods to monitor interactions and supplementation success. Major topics of this report are associated with the chronology of ecological interactions that occur throughout a supplementation program, implementing NTT monitoring prescriptions for detecting potential impacts of hatchery supplementation, hatchery fish interactions, and monitoring fish predation indices. This report is organized into four chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter. This annual report summarizes data collected primarily by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 in the Yakima basin, however these data were compared to data from previous years to identify preliminary trends and patterns. Summaries of each of the chapters included in this report are described

  14. A preliminary study on titanium-clay interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Grolimund, D.; Kumpulainen, S.; Brendle, J.; Snellman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Posiva and SKB are developing a horizontal disposal design alternative, termed KBS-3H. In this design alternative, modules of a Cu-waste canister surrounded by bentonite blocks is placed in a perforated steel cylinder, a so-called supercontainer (SC), before emplacement in the deposition drifts. The current design for the SC is based on carbon steel. But because corrosion will lead to high hydrogen levels and iron-clay interactions, alternative materials are also being considered. A promising alternative are Ti alloys which display high strength and are known to behave as chemically inert materials under variety of conditions. Also for the Ti alloys, both the corrosion rate and interaction behaviour with other components in the drift needs to be known. In particular, it needs to be demonstrated that corrosion-derived Ti has no significant detrimental effects on the bentonite buffer which is one main barrier within the KBS-3H concept. Unfortunately, the benign inert behaviour of Ti makes it difficult to perform meaningful experiments. Hence, it is not surprising that so far, very little research work on this topic has been carried out and experience is very limited. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been launched to shed more light on Ti-clay interaction processes and on the Ti species resulting from these interactions. A series of experiments including purified MX-80 bentonite or synthetic 'Ti-free' montmorillonite were mixed with metallic Ti nano-powder or foil in 0.1 M NaCl solutions at different pH and temperature conditions. After several months, solid and solute samples from the first set of tests were analyzed by wet chemistry and spectroscopic methods. Ti speciation was analyzed with XAS combined with XRF as elemental mapping tool. A further series of tests will be analyzed in the near future. In addition to reacted samples, a number of reference and starting materials (e.g. MX-80, Rokle

  15. Preliminary experimental study of liquid lithium water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, X.M.; Tong, L.L.; Cao, X.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Explosive reaction occurs when lithium temperature is over 300 °C. • The violence of liquid lithium water interaction increases with the initial temperature of liquid lithium. • The interaction is suppressed when the initial water temperature is above 70 °C. • Steam explosion is not ignorable in the risk assessment of liquid lithium water interaction. • Explosion strength of liquid lithium water interaction is evaluated by explosive yield. - Abstract: Liquid lithium is the best candidate for a material with low Z and low activation, and is one of the important choices for plasma facing materials in magnetic fusion devices. However, liquid lithium reacts violently with water under the conditions of loss of coolant accidents. The release of large heats and hydrogen could result in the dramatic increase of temperature and pressure. The lithium–water explosion has large effect on the safety of fusion devices, which is an important content for the safety assessment of fusion devices. As a preliminary investigation of liquid lithium water interaction, the test facility has been built and experiments have been conducted under different conditions. The initial temperature of lithium droplet ranged from 200 °C to 600 °C and water temperature was varied between 20 °C and 90 °C. Lithium droplets were released into the test section with excess water. The shape of lithium droplet and steam generated around the lithium were observed by the high speed camera. At the same time, the pressure and temperature in the test section were recorded during the violent interactions. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the initial temperature of lithium and water has an effect on the violence of liquid lithium water interaction.

  16. Preliminary experimental study of liquid lithium water interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, X.M.; Tong, L.L.; Cao, X.W., E-mail: caoxuewu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Explosive reaction occurs when lithium temperature is over 300 °C. • The violence of liquid lithium water interaction increases with the initial temperature of liquid lithium. • The interaction is suppressed when the initial water temperature is above 70 °C. • Steam explosion is not ignorable in the risk assessment of liquid lithium water interaction. • Explosion strength of liquid lithium water interaction is evaluated by explosive yield. - Abstract: Liquid lithium is the best candidate for a material with low Z and low activation, and is one of the important choices for plasma facing materials in magnetic fusion devices. However, liquid lithium reacts violently with water under the conditions of loss of coolant accidents. The release of large heats and hydrogen could result in the dramatic increase of temperature and pressure. The lithium–water explosion has large effect on the safety of fusion devices, which is an important content for the safety assessment of fusion devices. As a preliminary investigation of liquid lithium water interaction, the test facility has been built and experiments have been conducted under different conditions. The initial temperature of lithium droplet ranged from 200 °C to 600 °C and water temperature was varied between 20 °C and 90 °C. Lithium droplets were released into the test section with excess water. The shape of lithium droplet and steam generated around the lithium were observed by the high speed camera. At the same time, the pressure and temperature in the test section were recorded during the violent interactions. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the initial temperature of lithium and water has an effect on the violence of liquid lithium water interaction.

  17. Experimental study of cadmium interaction with periphytic biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovsky, O.S.; Feurtet-Mazel, A.; Martinez, R.E.; Morin, S.; Baudrimont, M.; Duong, T.; Coste, M.

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the interaction of Cd with natural biofilms of periphytic diatoms grown during different seasons in metal-contaminated and metal-non-contaminated streams, along a tributary of the Lot River, France. Specifically, it aims to test whether the biofilms from contaminated sites have developed a protective mechanism due to high Cd exposure. Towards this goal, reversible adsorption experiments on untreated biofilms were performed in 0.01 M NaNO 3 with a pH ranging from 2 to 8, Cd concentration from 0.5 to 10,000 μg/L and exposure time from 1 to 24 h. Two types of experiments, pH-dependent adsorption edge and constant-pH 'Langmuirian'-type isotherms were conducted. Results were adequately modeled using a Linear Programming Model. It was found that the adsorption capacities of natural biofilm consortia with respect to Cd do not depend on season and are not directly linked to the growth environment. The biofilms grown in non-contaminated (4.6 ppb Cd in solid) and contaminated (570 ppb Cd in solid) settings exhibit similar adsorption capacities in the Cd concentration range in solution of 100-10,000 μg/L but quite different capacities at low Cd concentration (0.5-100 μg/L); unexpectedly, the non-contaminated biofilm adsorbs approximately 10 times more Cd than the contaminated one. It is therefore possible that the strong low-abundant ligands (for example, phosphoryl or sulfhydryls) are already metal-saturated on surfaces of biofilm grown in the contaminated site whereas these sites are still available for metal adsorption in samples grown in non-contaminated sites.

  18. Experimental study of cadmium interaction with periphytic biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, O.S., E-mail: oleg@lmtg.obs-mip.fr [Geochimie et Biogeochimie Experimentale, UMR 5563, CNRS-OMP-Universite Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Feurtet-Mazel, A. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Martinez, R.E. [Center for Applied Geosciences, Universitat Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Morin, S. [Unite de Recherche Reseaux, Epuration et Qualite des Eaux REQE, Cemagref, 50 Avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Baudrimont, M. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Duong, T. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)] [Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Coste, M. [Unite de Recherche Reseaux, Epuration et Qualite des Eaux REQE, Cemagref, 50 Avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    This study addresses the interaction of Cd with natural biofilms of periphytic diatoms grown during different seasons in metal-contaminated and metal-non-contaminated streams, along a tributary of the Lot River, France. Specifically, it aims to test whether the biofilms from contaminated sites have developed a protective mechanism due to high Cd exposure. Towards this goal, reversible adsorption experiments on untreated biofilms were performed in 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} with a pH ranging from 2 to 8, Cd concentration from 0.5 to 10,000 {mu}g/L and exposure time from 1 to 24 h. Two types of experiments, pH-dependent adsorption edge and constant-pH 'Langmuirian'-type isotherms were conducted. Results were adequately modeled using a Linear Programming Model. It was found that the adsorption capacities of natural biofilm consortia with respect to Cd do not depend on season and are not directly linked to the growth environment. The biofilms grown in non-contaminated (4.6 ppb Cd in solid) and contaminated (570 ppb Cd in solid) settings exhibit similar adsorption capacities in the Cd concentration range in solution of 100-10,000 {mu}g/L but quite different capacities at low Cd concentration (0.5-100 {mu}g/L); unexpectedly, the non-contaminated biofilm adsorbs approximately 10 times more Cd than the contaminated one. It is therefore possible that the strong low-abundant ligands (for example, phosphoryl or sulfhydryls) are already metal-saturated on surfaces of biofilm grown in the contaminated site whereas these sites are still available for metal adsorption in samples grown in non-contaminated sites.

  19. Interactions between imazethapyr and bovine serum albumin: Spectrofluorimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, Maria E. [Division Quimica Analitica, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bruzzone, Liliana, E-mail: bruzzone@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Division Quimica Analitica, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-10-15

    The interaction between imazethapyr (IMA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K{sub SV}) at three temperatures was evaluated in order to determine the quenching mechanism. The dependence of fluorescence quenching on viscosity was also evaluated for this purpose. The results showed that IMA quenches the fluorescence intensity of BSA through a static quenching process. The values of the binding constant for the formed BSA-IMA complex and the number of binding sites were found to be 1.51 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} and 0.77, respectively, at room temperature. Based on the calculated thermodynamic parameters, the forces that dominate the binding process are hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces, and the binding process is spontaneous and exothermic. The quenching of protein fluorescence by iodide ion was used to probe the accessibility of tryptophan residues in BSA and the change in accessibility induced by the presence of IMA. According to the obtained results, the BSA-IMA complex is formed in the site where the Trp-134 is located, causing it to become less exposed to the solvent. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence spectroscopy helps to understand protein binding mechanisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quenching measurements reveal the nature of the binding process involved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iodine ion can be used to study the change in accessibility of tryptophan residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic parameters for the binding reaction confirm binding modes.

  20. [Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of nicotine and BSA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Kong, Xiang-rong; Shen, Xinag-can; Liang, Hong

    2005-10-01

    The interaction of nicotine and bovine serum albumin(BSA) was investigated by fluorescence spectra and UV-vis spectra. The fluorescence spectrum showed that BSA fluorescence quench regularly with the addition of nicotine.The fluorescence quenching mechanisms were also studied in pH 5.0, pH 7.4 and pH 11.0 by Stern-Volmer equation, indicating dynamic quenching(pH 5.0) and static quenching(pH 7.4 and pH 11.0) respectively. Association constants (k) of nicotine and BSA at pH 7.4 and pH 11.0 at the temperatures of 20 and 37 degrees C were given by the Lineweaver-Buck equation, which are: k(20 degrees C) = 140.15 L x mol(-1) and k(37 degrees C) = 131.83 mol x L(-1) (pH 7.4), and k(20 degrees C) = 141.76 mol x L(-1), k(37 degrees C) = 27.79 mol x L(-1) (pH 11.0), suggesting that the association constant is effected by the temperature much more remarkably at pH 7.4 than that at pH 11.0 because of the different states of nicotine at different pHs. The UV-Vis spectra exhibit that the absorbance of BSA(210 nm) shifts to red and decreases gradually with the addition of nicotine, reflecting the transition of secondary structure of BSA, namely, the helix of BSA becomes looser. The UV-Vis second derivative spectra and synchronous spectra (delta wavelength = wavelength(em) - wavelength(ex) = 15 nm and delta wavelength = wavelength(em) - wavelength(ex) = 60 nm) imply the change of the microcircumstance of aromatic amino residues of BSA(Trp, Tyr and Phe) from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity at high concentration of nicotine.

  1. Experimental studies of elementary particle interactions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1992-01-01

    In the past year, our research program encompassed four major areas: the UA-6 experiment at CERN, the CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) experiment at Fermilab, the SDC (Solenoidal Detector Collaboration) experiment of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider), and an R ampersand D project for the development of High Pressure Gas Calorimetry for high luminosity colliders. The UA-6 experiment studies direct-γ and J/ψ production in pp and bar pp interactions at √s = 22.5 GeV. In the CDF experiment we have concentrated in the plug calorimeter upgrade program, which involves replacing the plug and forward calorimetry with a more compact calorimeter based on scintillator tiles being readout with wave-length shifting (WLS) fibers. In the SDC experiment, we have taken primary responsibility for the Preshower/Shower-Maximum detectors. We wrote the original shower-maximum proposal for the SDC and have contributed to detector simulations, scintillator/WLS-fiber light yield measurements, building prototype preshower and shower-maximum detectors and measuring their performance in a test beam, and developing novel photosensitive devices to read out the fibers. The High Pressure Gas Calorimeter project has been very successful. A prototype parallel plate iron based electromagnetic calorimeter was designed, constructed and tested in an electron beam at Fermilab. The results were very encouraging. We are presently working on a new design, which would be more suitable for the construction of economical, large scale calorimeters, such as those needed for the forward region of SDC and FAD

  2. Interactions of acidic solutions with sediments: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Serne, R.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Krupka, K.M.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology is presented for investigating the chemical interactions of acidic solutions with sediments. The MINTEQ geochemical computer code was used to predict solid-phase reactions that might occur when acidic solutions contact neutral sediments which, in turn, may control the concentrations of certain dissolved components. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis of laboratory samples of sediments that have been contacted with acidic uranium mill tailings solutions suggest gypsum and jarosite precipitated. These same mineralogical changes were identified in sediment samples collected from a drained uranium mill evaporation pond (Lucky Mc mine in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. Geochemical modeling predicted that these same phases and several amorphous solids not identifiable by X-ray diffraction should have precipitated in the contacted sediments. An equilibrium conceptual model consisting of an assemblage of minerals and amorphous solid phases was then developed to represent a sediment column through which uranium mill tailings solutions were percolated. The MINTEQ code was used to predict effluent solution concentrations resulting from the reactions of the tailings solution with the assemblage of solid phases in the conceptual model. The conceptual model successfully predicted the concentrations of several of the macro-constituents (e.g., Ca, SO 4 , Al, Fe, and Mn), but was not successful in modeling the concentrations of trace elements. The lack of success in predicting the observed trace metal concentrations suggests that other mechanisms, such as adsorption, must be included in future models. The geochemical modeling methodology coupled with the laboratory and field studies should be applicable to a variety of waste disposal problems

  3. Microfluidic Experiments Studying Pore Scale Interactions of Microbes and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how physical phenomena, chemical reactions, and microbial behavior interact at the pore-scale is crucial to understanding larger scale trends in groundwater chemistry. Recent studies illustrate the utility of microfluidic devices for illuminating pore-scale physical-biogeochemical processes and their control(s) on the cycling of iron, uranium, and other important elements 1-3. These experimental systems are ideal for examining geochemical reactions mediated by microbes, which include processes governed by complex biological phenomenon (e.g. biofilm formation, etc.)4. We present results of microfluidic experiments using a model metal reducing bacteria and varying pore geometries, exploring the limitations of the microorganisms' ability to access tight pore spaces, and examining coupled biogeochemical-physical controls on the cycling of redox sensitive metals. Experimental results will provide an enhanced understanding of coupled physical-biogeochemical processes transpiring at the pore-scale, and will constrain and compliment continuum models used to predict and describe the subsurface cycling of redox-sensitive elements5. 1. Vrionis, H. A. et al. Microbiological and geochemical heterogeneity in an in situ uranium bioremediation field site. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71, 6308-6318 (2005). 2. Pearce, C. I. et al. Pore-scale characterization of biogeochemical controls on iron and uranium speciation under flow conditions. Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 7992-8000 (2012). 3. Zhang, C., Liu, C. & Shi, Z. Micromodel investigation of transport effect on the kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite. Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 4131-4139 (2013). 4. Ginn, T. R. et al. Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface. Adv. Water Resour. 25, 1017-1042 (2002). 5. Scheibe, T. D. et al. Coupling a genome-scale metabolic model with a reactive transport model to describe in situ uranium bioremediation. Microb. Biotechnol. 2, 274-286 (2009).

  4. Studies on electrospun nylon-6/chitosan complex nanofiber interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haitao; Li Shubai; Branford White, Christopher J.; Ning Xin; Nie Huali; Zhu Limin

    2009-01-01

    Composite membranes of nylon-6/chitosan nanofibers with different weight ratio of nylon-6 to chitosan were fabricated successfully using electrospinning. Morphologies of the nanofibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the intermolecular interactions of the nylon-6/chitosan complex were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as well as mechanical testing. We found that morphology and diameter of the nanofibers were influenced by the concentration of the solution and weight ratio of the blending component materials. Furthermore FT-IR analyses on interactions between components demonstrated an IR band frequency shift that appeared to be dependent on the amount of chitosan in the complex. Observations from XRD and DSC suggested that a new fraction of γ phase crystals appeared and increased with the increasing content of chitosan in blends, this indicated that intermolecular interactions occurred between nylon-6 and chitosan. Results from performance data in mechanical showed that intermolecular interactions varied with varying chitosan content in the fibers. It was concluded that a new composite product was created and the stability of this system was attributed to strong new interactions such as hydrogen bond formation between the nylon-6 polymers and chitosan structures.

  5. A numerical study of two interacting coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Schmidt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction in the solar wind between two coronal mass ejections (CMEs is investigated using numerical simulations. We show that the nature of the interaction depends on whether the CME magnetic structures interact, but in all cases the result is an equilisation of the speed of the two CMEs. In the absence of magnetic interaction, the forward shock of the faster trailing CME interacts with the slow leading CME, and accelerates it. When the two CMEs have magnetic fields with the same sense of rotation, magnetic reconnection occurs between the two CMEs, leading to the formation of a single magnetic structure: in the most extreme cases, one CME "eats" the other. When the senses of rotation are opposite, reconnection does not occur, but the CMEs collide in a highly non-elastic manner, again forming a single structure. The possibility of enhanced particle acceleration in such processes is assessed. The presence of strong magnetic reconnection provides excellent opportunities for the acceleration of thermal particles, which then form a seed population for further acceleration at the CME shocks. The presence of a large population of seed particles will thus lead to an overall increase in energetic particle fluxes, as suggested by some observations.

  6. Using Neutrons to Study Fluid-Rock Interactions in Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStefano, V. H.; McFarlane, J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Gordon, A.; Hale, R. E.; Hunt, R. D.; Lewis, S. A., Sr.; Littrell, K. C.; Stack, A. G.; Chipera, S.; Perfect, E.; Bilheux, H.; Kolbus, L. M.; Bingham, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of hydrocarbons by hydraulic fracturing depends on complex fluid-rock interactions that we are beginning to understand using neutron imaging and scattering techniques. Organic matter is often thought to comprise the majority of porosity in a shale. In this study, correlations between the type of organic matter embedded in a shale and porosity were investigated experimentally. Selected shale cores from the Eagle Ford and Marcellus formations were subjected to pyrolysis-gas chromatography, Differential Thermal Analysis/Thermogravimetric analysis, and organic solvent extraction with the resulting affluent analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The pore size distribution of the microporosity (~1 nm to 2 µm) in the Eagle Ford shales was measured before and after solvent extraction using small angle neutron scattering. Organics representing mass fractions of between 0.1 to 1 wt.% were removed from the shales and porosity generally increased across the examined microporosity range, particularly at larger pore sizes, approximately 50 nm to 2 μm. This range reflects extraction of accessible organic material, including remaining gas molecules, bitumen, and kerogen derivatives, indicating where the larger amount of organic matter in shale is stored. An increase in porosity at smaller pore sizes, ~1-3 nm, was also present and could be indicative of extraction of organic material stored in the inter-particle spaces of clays. Additionally, a decrease in porosity after extraction for a sample was attributed to swelling of pores with solvent uptake. This occurred in a shale with high clay content and low thermal maturity. The extracted hydrocarbons were primarily paraffinic, although some breakdown of larger aromatic compounds was observed in toluene extractions. The amount of hydrocarbon extracted and an overall increase in porosity appeared to be primarily correlated with the clay percentage in the shale. This study complements fluid transport neutron

  7. Studies of final state interactions via femtoscopy in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Graczykowski, Łukasz Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Femtoscopy is a technique enabling measurements of the space-time characteristics of particle-emitting sources. However, the femtoscopic analysis is also sensitive to the interaction cross-section. In this paper we show the first preliminary measurements of $\\rm K^0_SK^{\\pm}$ correlation functions in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV. These correlations originate from the final-state interactions which proceed through the $a_0(980)$ resonance only and can be employed to constrain its parameters. A similar approach can be applied to baryon pairs to extract the unknown interaction cross-sections for some (anti-)baryon-(anti-)baryon pairs. We show baryon--baryon and baryon--anti-baryon correlation functions of protons and lambdas, as well as discuss shortly the fitting method.

  8. Study of the interaction of cysteamine and cystamine with the dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berleur, F.; Roman, V.; Jaskierowicz, D.; Audet, M.; Fatome, M.

    1984-10-01

    The thermodynamic study of the liposome-radioprotector system brings information on this interaction. The interaction is essentially electrostatic between the phosphate sites and the radioprotector cationic groups and this study could bring further information about the interaction between cysteamine and polyelectrolytic structures, DNA for example, and about the radioprotective properties of this drug [fr

  9. Cross-Racial Interactions during College: A Longitudinal Study of Four Forms of Interracial Interactions among Elite White College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Carson Byrd

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available College and universities present distinct opportunities to interact across racial and ethnic lines that may influence people’s prejudice toward different groups. This study examines the influence of four forms of cross-race interaction on traditional and modern forms of racial prejudice among white college students at 28 of the most selective colleges and universities in the US. This study finds that, although white students’ level of racial prejudice declines over four years, interracial contact during college does not significantly influence their level of prejudice. Moreover, a race-related form of social identity is the most consistent influence on students’ racial prejudice.

  10. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2011-01-01

    and have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells.......The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases...

  11. Studies of Positron Generation from Ultraintense Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gerald Jackson

    Laser-produced pair jets possess unique characteristics that offer great potential for their use in laboratory-astrophysics experiments to study energetic phenomenon such as relativistic shock accelerations. High-flux, high-energy positron sources may also be used to study relativistic pair plasmas and useful as novel diagnostic tools for high energy density conditions. Copious amounts of positrons are produced with MeV energies from directly irradiating targets with ultraintense lasers where relativistic electrons, accelerated by the laser field, drive positron-electron pair production. Alternatively, laser wakefield accelerated electrons can produce pairs by the same mechanisms inside a secondary converter target. This dissertation describes a series of novel experiments that investigate the characteristics and scaling of pair production from ultraintense lasers, which are designed to establish a robust platform for laboratory-based relativistic pair plasmas. Results include a simple power-law scaling to estimate the effective positron yield for elemental targets for any Maxwellian electron source, typical of direct laser-target interactions. To facilitate these measurements, a solenoid electromagnetic coil was constructed to focus emitted particles, increasing the effective collection angle of the detector and enabling the investigation of pair production from thin targets and low-Z materials. Laser wakefield electron sources were also explored as a compact, high repetition rate platform for the production of high energy pairs with potential applications to the creation of charge-neutral relativistic pair plasmas. Plasma accelerators can produce low-divergence electron beams with energies approaching a GeV at Hz frequencies. It was found that, even for high-energy positrons, energy loss and scattering mechanisms in the target create a fundamental limit to the divergence and energy spectrum of the emitted positrons. The potential future application of laser

  12. Synthesis and structure of 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil and its Ni(II) complex: Topological insights and investigation for noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Diptanu; Roy, Subhadip; Purkayastha, Atanu; Bauzá, Antonio; Choudhury, Rupasree; Ganguly, Rakesh; Frontera, Antonio; Misra, Tarun Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The azo-derivative, 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil (HL) containing 6-aminouracil (a biomolecule) and sulfonamide functionality (commonly found in sulfa-drugs), and its Ni(II) complex, NiIIL2 were synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the ligand (HL) consists of an E conformation about the azo-linkage with a nearly planar geometry and the complex possesses distorted square planar geometry. The H-bonded underlying networks of HL and NiIIL2 were topologically classified revealing distinct topological types, namely tts and hxl, respectively. Moreover, topology of molecular packings in HL and NiIIL2 has also been discussed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, at the M06-2X/def2TZVP level of theory, are employed to characterize a great variety of non-covalent interactions that explicitly show the importance of antiparallel stacking interactions established by π--π+ interactions and H-bonds in the self-assembled dimmers in HL and lp-π/C-H⋯π interactions in NiIIL2. The results of NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies evidence that the ligand exists in hydrazone-imine-keto (B) tautomeric form in solution. The ligand absorption bands consist of the overlapping bands of π→π* and n→π* transitions. The complex experiences electronic transitions that consist of basically ILCT in character with some sort of participation of the atomic d-orbitals of the nickel. The pKa value of the ligand is found to be 4.09.

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic, computational (DFT/B3LYP), AChE inhibition and antioxidant studies of imidazole derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faheem; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Alam, Mahboob; Azaz, Shaista; Parveen, Mehtab; Park, Soonheum; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2018-01-01

    The present study reports the synthesis and evaluation of biological properties of 3a,8a-dihydroxy-8-oxo-1,3,3a,8a-tetrahydroindeno[1,2-d]imidazol-2(1H)-iminium chloride (3). The structure was confirmed by the FTIR, NMR, MS, CHN microanalysis and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed at B3LYP-D3/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory to study the molecular geometry, IR, (1H and 13C) NMR, UV/Vis spectra and other molecular parameters of the asymmetric unit of crystal of imidazole compound (3). An empirical dispersion correction to hybrid functional (B3LYP-D3) has been incorporated in the present calculations due to presence of non-covalent interaction, Cl⋯H-O, in the present compound. The remarkable agreement has been observed between theoretical data and those measured experimentally. Moreover, the Hirshfeld analysis was carried out to ascertain the secondary interactions and associated 2D fingerprint plots. The synthesized imidazole derivative showed promising antioxidant property and inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Molecular docking was also performed in order to explain in silico antioxidant studies and to ascertain the probable binding mode of compound with the amino acid residues of protein.

  14. Overview of OWI waste/rock interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenks, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of office of waste isolation (OWI) programs which fall within the waste/rock categories. Discussions are included on salt repository design, thermal powers and radiation intensities, maximum temperatures and gamma doses, salt temperatures around high level waste cannisters, projects concerned with radiation and thermal effects, projects concerned with long term interactions, and waste isolation safety assessment tasks

  15. Ultrasonic study of molecular interaction in binary liquid mixtures at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The variation of these parameters with composition of the mixture helps us in understanding the nature and extent of interaction between unlike molecules in the mixtures. Further, theoretical values of ultrasonic speed were evaluated using theories and empirical relations. The relative merits of these theories and relations ...

  16. Hyperfine interaction study of F+ center in ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, C.; Galland, D.; Herve, A.

    1975-01-01

    Irradiation of ZnO monocrystals with 3MeV electron creates isolated zinc vacancies and F + centres. Analysis of angular variations of the ESR spectrum enabled the parameters of interaction of the F + centre with a Zn 67 nucleus to be determined [fr

  17. In vitro study of the interaction between some fluoroquinolones and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cup diffusion method (CD) was used to evaluate the in vitro interaction of some fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, pefloxacin and levofloxacin) with extracts of Kola nitida seed (KNS) against a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drugs was determined separately and in ...

  18. Drug interaction studies of Ximenia americana and Pavetta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The therapeutic efficacy of single or multicomponent herbs is thought to reside in synergistic interactions between the bioactive constituents. The methanol extracts of X. americana and P. crassipes were initially screened against Gram positive and negative organisms as well as against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ...

  19. Study of interaction between antiobesity and hypolipidemic drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PURPOSE: To explore the interaction between antiobesity drug, topiramate, and hypolipidemic drug, atorvastatin, in rats. METHODS: Obesity was induced in Wistar albino rats by administering cafeteria diet (CD) for 40 days and divided into 5 groups. While one group served as control, each other group received either ...

  20. Molecular dynamics study of the silica-water-SDA interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szyja, B.M.; Jansen, A.P.J.; Verstraelen, T.; Santen, van R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have applied the molecular dynamics simulations in order to analyse the role of the structure directing tetrapropylammonium ions in the aggregation process that leads to silicalite formation. We address the specific question of how the interactions between silica precursor species

  1. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Ham, Kenneth D.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Species interactions research and monitoring was initiated in 1989 to investigate ecological interactions among fish in response to proposed supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This is the seventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and pre-supplementation monitoring of fishes in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the ecology and demographics of non-target taxa (NTT) and target taxon, and develop methods to monitor interactions and supplementation success. Major topics of this report are associated with monitoring potential impacts to support adaptive management of NTT and baseline monitoring of fish predation indices on spring chinook salmon smolts. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter. This annual report summarizes data collected primarily by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 1998 in the Yakima basin, however these data were compared to data from previous years to identify preliminary trends and patterns

  2. Channeling studies of impurity-defect interactions in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggers, L.W.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis deals with the mechanism of defect production and interaction of introduced defects with impurity atoms in silicon single crystals. Defects are created by irradiation with energetic light particles (.2 - 3 MeV H + or He + ions). Mostly simple defects like vacancies and interstitials are produced during bombardment. (Auth.)

  3. Studies on Molecular Interaction in Ternary Liquid Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Uvarani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity for the ternary liquid mixtures of cyclohexanone with 1-propanol and 1-butanol in carbon tetrachloride were measured at 303 K. The acoustical parameters and their excess values were calculated. The trends in the variation of these excess parameters were used to discuss the nature and strength of the interactions present between the component molecules.

  4. A Meta-study of musicians' non-verbal interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    interruptions. Hence, despite the fact that the skill to engage in a non-verbal interaction is described as tacit knowledge, it is fundamental for both musicians and teachers (Davidson and Good 2002). Typical observed non-verbal cues are for example: physical gestures, modulations of sound, steady eye contact...

  5. Design And Implementation Of An Interactive Website; A Case Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An interactive website has been designed for the Department of Physics, University of Uyo, using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) involving structuring, coding, and testing. This will enable the Department to gather, process, store and disseminate an up- to- date information to the whole world on the academic ...

  6. In vitro study of interaction between quinine and Garcinia kola

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: In vitro interaction between quinine and G. kola was conducted at 37 ± 0.1 °C. Adsorption of ... The amount of quinine adsorbed and desorbed was quantified using HPLC. A ..... first place, G. kola is known to contain flavonoids.

  7. Interactions between $U(1)$ Cosmic Strings: An Analytical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bettencourt, L. M. A.; Rivers, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We derive analytic expressions for the interaction energy between two general $U(1)$ cosmic strings as the function of their relative orientation and the ratio of the coupling constants in the model. The results are relevant to the statistic description of strings away from critical coupling and shed some light on the mechanisms involved in string formation and the evolution of string networks.

  8. Studies of thermally assisted interactions of polysulphide polymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-04-06

    Apr 6, 2018 ... are engaged in the maintenance of protein shape and func- tion, as in keratin. ... a fixed conformation. In the modern world of .... The surface analysis of the .... Furthermore, there is a possibility of an electrostatic interaction ...

  9. Interaction between Protein, Phytate, and Microbial Phytase. In Vitro Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kies, A.K.; Jonge, de L.H.; Kemme, P.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between protein and phytate was investigated in vitro using proteins extracted from five common feedstuffs and from casein. The appearance of naturally present soluble protein-phytate complexes in the feedstuffs, the formation of complexes at different pHs, and the degradation of

  10. A systematic study of the strong interaction with PANDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messchendorp, J. G.; Hosaka, A; Khemchandani, K; Nagahiro, H; Nawa, K

    2011-01-01

    The theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) reproduces the strong interaction at distances much shorter than the size of the nucleon. At larger distance scales, the generation of hadron masses and confinement cannot yet be derived from first principles on basis of QCD. The PANDA experiment at FAIR

  11. A first principles study of the acetylene-water interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeli, Demeter [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrain University of Athens, P.O. Box 64 004, 157 10 Zografou, Athens, (Greece); Mavridis, Aristides [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrain University of Athens, P.O. Box 64 004, 157 10 Zografou, Athens, (Greece); Xantheas, Sotiris S. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 906 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, MS K8-91, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2000-04-08

    We present an extensive study of the stationary points on the acetylene-water (AW) ground-state potential energy surface (PES) aimed in establishing accurate energetics for the two different bonding scenarios that are considered. Those include arrangements in which water acts either as a proton acceptor from one of the acetylene hydrogen atoms or a proton donor to the triple bond. We used a hierarchy of theoretical methods to account for electron correlation [MP2 (second-order Moller-Plesset), MP4 (fourth-order Moller-Plesset), and CCSD(T) (coupled-cluster single double triple)] coupled with a series of increasing size augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=2,3,4). We furthermore examined the effect of corrections due to basis set superposition error (BSSE). We found that those have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the PES of the complex. They are responsible for producing a structure of higher (C{sub 2v}) symmetry for the global minimum. Zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections were found to increase the stability of the C{sub 2v} arrangement. For the global (water acceptor) minimum of C{sub 2v} symmetry our best estimates are {delta}E{sub e}=-2.87 kcal/mol ({delta}E{sub 0}=-2.04 kcal/mol) and a van der Waals distance of R{sub e}=2.190 Aa. The water donor arrangement lies 0.3 kcal/mol (0.5 kcal/mol including ZPE corrections) above the global minimum. The barrier for its isomerization to the global minimum is E{sub e}=0.18 kcal/mol; however, inclusion of BSSE- and ZPE-corrections destabilize the water donor arrangement suggesting that it can readily convert to the global minimum. We therefore conclude that there exists only one minimum on the PES in accordance with previous experimental observations. To this end, vibrational averaging and to a lesser extend proper description of intermolecular interactions (BSSE) were found to have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the ground-state PES of the acetylene

  12. A first principles study of the acetylene-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeli, Demeter; Mavridis, Aristides; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2000-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the stationary points on the acetylene-water (AW) ground-state potential energy surface (PES) aimed in establishing accurate energetics for the two different bonding scenarios that are considered. Those include arrangements in which water acts either as a proton acceptor from one of the acetylene hydrogen atoms or a proton donor to the triple bond. We used a hierarchy of theoretical methods to account for electron correlation [MP2 (second-order Moller-Plesset), MP4 (fourth-order Moller-Plesset), and CCSD(T) (coupled-cluster single double triple)] coupled with a series of increasing size augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=2,3,4). We furthermore examined the effect of corrections due to basis set superposition error (BSSE). We found that those have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the PES of the complex. They are responsible for producing a structure of higher (C 2v ) symmetry for the global minimum. Zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections were found to increase the stability of the C 2v arrangement. For the global (water acceptor) minimum of C 2v symmetry our best estimates are ΔE e =-2.87 kcal/mol (ΔE 0 =-2.04 kcal/mol) and a van der Waals distance of R e =2.190 Aa. The water donor arrangement lies 0.3 kcal/mol (0.5 kcal/mol including ZPE corrections) above the global minimum. The barrier for its isomerization to the global minimum is E e =0.18 kcal/mol; however, inclusion of BSSE- and ZPE-corrections destabilize the water donor arrangement suggesting that it can readily convert to the global minimum. We therefore conclude that there exists only one minimum on the PES in accordance with previous experimental observations. To this end, vibrational averaging and to a lesser extend proper description of intermolecular interactions (BSSE) were found to have a large effect in altering the qualitative features of the ground-state PES of the acetylene-water complex. (c) 2000 American Institute

  13. Theoretical study on molecular packing and electronic structure of bi-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Haitao; Bai, Fuquan; Jia, Xiaoshi; Cao, Di; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Qu, Songnan; Bai, Binglian; Zhang, Hongxing; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    The molecular aggregation structure of 5,5′-bis(naphthalen-2-yl)-2,2′-bi(1,3,4-oxadiazole) (BOXD-NP) was studied by computing the intermolecular interaction potential energy surface (PES) at density functional theory level based on a dimer model. All B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and M062x functionals can yield a reliable isolated molecular geometry. The conformation of BOXD-NP obtained with all methods is perfectly planar, indicating good conjugation ability between oxadiazole and naphthalene rings. The vibrational frequencies of BOXD-NP were also calculated using the B3LYP/6-311+G∗∗ method, which showed great consistency with the experimental observations and makes the assignments of the IR spectra more solid. It was revealed that the lowest excited state of BOXD-NP should be assigned as a highly allowed π-π∗ state by TD-DFT calculation. Considering the non-covalent interactions in molecular aggregates, the M062x functional was applied in the construction of the PES. Besides the packing structure found in the crystals, PES also predicted several stable structures, indicating that PES has great ability in guiding molecular self-assembly. Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) analysis on these energy-minimum molecular stacking structures revealed that London dispersion forces are the strongest attractive component in the binding. This journal is

  14. Study of the Λ(1116 interaction in cold nuclear matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Oliver

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of Λ hyperons with baryonic nuclear matter at saturation density is expected to be attractive. The interaction strength was extracted from hypernuclei data. A different approach to obtain the potential depth of the Λ mean-field potential is to compare experimental data with transport simulations. We analyze experimental data of Λ hyperons measured with the HADES detector in p+93Nb reactions with a kinetic beam energy of 3.5 GeV carried by the proton. The high statistic of measured Λ hyperons allows us to perform a double differential analysis in Lorentz-invariant observables of transverse momentum and rapidity. We present the analysis method and a comparison with simulations.

  15. Study on the interactions PVC/plasticizers by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Maria I.B.; Monteiro, Elisabeth E.C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas; Harris, Robin [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-31

    The nature of the interactions between PVC and plasticizers as di-butyl phthalate and di-2-ethyl-hexyl phthalate can be investigated using proton/carbon-13 NMR techniques. The measurements of T{sub 1} for protons and carbon-13 and T{sub 1} P for protons can provide a good source of information about the complex behaviour for those two systems which were investigated. (author) 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Conglutinin binds the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp 160 and inhibits its interaction with cell membrane CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Sørensen, A M; Svehag, S E

    1991-01-01

    The highly glycosylated envelope glycoprotein (gp 160) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the CD4 molecule present on the membrane of CD4+ cells and is involved in the pathobiology of HIV infection. Lectins bind glycoproteins through non-covalent interactions with specific hexose...... residues. The mammalian C-type lectin bovine conglutinin was examined for its ability to interact with recombinant gp160 (rgp160) produced in vaccinia virus-infected BHK21 cells. Specific binding of conglutinin to rgp160 was demonstrated by ELISA. The interaction of bovine conglutinin with rgp160...... of the binding of rgp160 to the CD4 receptor on CEM 13 cells, as demonstrated by FACS analyses. These results indicate that conglutinin may inhibit the infection with HIV-1 through its interaction with the viral envelope glycoprotein....

  17. A study of inclusive neutrino interactions in a marble target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panman, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the results of an analysis of neutrino and antineutrino interactions on nuclei are presented. The data were taken with the calorimeter of the Amsterdam-CERN-Hamburg-Moscow-Rome (CHARM) collaboration at the narrow-band beam of the CERN SPS. The detector combines a large target mass with a high power of pattern recognition. The presently accepted theory of weak interactions of Glashow, Salam, and Weinberg is introduced. Applications of the quark-parton model in the context of deep-inelastic neutrino interactions on nuclei are summarized. The properties of the narrow-band neutrino beam at CERN, which are relevant for the experiment are given. The neutrino energy spectrum and the flux monitors are described. Measurements of total cross-sections are presented. From the ratios of neutral-current and charged-current cross-sections of neutrinos and antineutrinos the coupling constants of the weak neutral-current are deduced. Some details of the methods used in the analysis of differential distributions are discussed. The differential charged-current cross-sections dsigma/dy and dsigma/dx are measured. Finally, the analysis of the structure functions is presented in terms of x and Q 2 . (Auth.)

  18. A Systematic Study of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Prajal; Costa, Luís.; Rybski, Diego; Lucht, Wolfgang; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2017-11-01

    Sustainable development goals (SDGs) have set the 2030 agenda to transform our world by tackling multiple challenges humankind is facing to ensure well-being, economic prosperity, and environmental protection. In contrast to conventional development agendas focusing on a restricted set of dimensions, the SDGs provide a holistic and multidimensional view on development. Hence, interactions among the SDGs may cause diverging results. To analyze the SDG interactions we systematize the identification of synergies and trade-offs using official SDG indicator data for 227 countries. A significant positive correlation between a pair of SDG indicators is classified as a synergy while a significant negative correlation is classified as a trade-off. We rank synergies and trade-offs between SDGs pairs on global and country scales in order to identify the most frequent SDG interactions. For a given SDG, positive correlations between indicator pairs were found to outweigh the negative ones in most countries. Among SDGs the positive and negative correlations between indicator pairs allowed for the identification of particular global patterns. SDG 1 (No poverty) has synergetic relationship with most of the other goals, whereas SDG 12 (Responsible consumption and production) is the goal most commonly associated with trade-offs. The attainment of the SDG agenda will greatly depend on whether the identified synergies among the goals can be leveraged. In addition, the highlighted trade-offs, which constitute obstacles in achieving the SDGs, need to be negotiated and made structurally nonobstructive by deeper changes in the current strategies.

  19. Attachment, attractiveness, and social interaction: a diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, M C; Reis, H T; Shaver, P R

    1996-10-01

    To what extent are attachment styles manifested in natural social activity? A total of 125 participants categorized as possessing secure, avoidant, or anxious-ambivalent attachment styles kept structured social interaction diaries for 1 week. Several theoretically important findings emerged. First, compared with secure and anxious-ambivalent persons, avoidant persons reported lower levels of intimacy, enjoyment, promotive interaction, and positive emotions, and higher levels of negative emotions, primarily in opposite-sex interactions. Analyses indicated that avoidant persons may structure social activities in ways that minimize closeness. Second, secure people differentiated more clearly than either insecure group between romantic and other opposite-sex partners. Third, the subjective experiences of anxious-ambivalent persons were more variable than those of the other groups. Finally, the authors examined and rejected the possibility that attachment effects might be confounded with physical attractiveness. These findings suggest that feeling and behaviors that arise during spontaneous, everyday social activity may contribute to the maintenance of attachment styles in adulthood.

  20. An Experimental Study of Embodied Interaction and Human Perception of Social Presence for Interactive Robots in Public Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Heath, Damith; Vlachos, Evgenios

    2018-01-01

    The human perception of cognitive robots as social depends on many factors, including those that do not necessarily pertain to a robot’s cognitive functioning. Experience Design offers a useful framework for evaluating when participants interact with robots as products or tools and when they regard...... them as social actors. This study describes a between-participants experiment conducted at a science museum, where visitors were invited to play a game of noughts and crosses with a Baxter robot. The goal is to foster meaningful interactions that promote engagement between the human and robot...... in a museum context. Using an Experience Design framework, we tested the robot in three different conditions to better understand which factors contribute to the perception of robots as social. The experiment also outlines best practices for conducting human-robot interaction research in museum exhibitions...

  1. Utility of Interactional Strategies in the Study of Formal Operations Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    This paper argues in favor of using interactional strategies in the study of formal operations reasoning. Interactional designs allow a convergent approach to specifying processes underlying the interaction of variables. In contrast, current methodologies contain two inherent disadvantages: they have limited utility in specifying the processes…

  2. Nurse Interaction With Clients In Communication Therapeutic Study Analysis Of Symbolic Interactionism Hospital South Sulawesi

    OpenAIRE

    Hj.Indirawaty; Syamsuddin AB

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to describe briefly on the application of social interaction which made nurses to clients while performing therapeutic communication at the Hospital of South Sulawesi with frame symbolic interactionism. Result achieved against the system carried nurse interaction with clients who patterned on therapeutic communication. At the stage of pre-interaction system is applied such as before the nurse interacts with the client well in advance to prepare the way of dressing re...

  3. The WITCH experiment: towards weak interactions studies. Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, V. Yu.; Beck, M.; Coeck, S.; Herbane, M.; Kraev, I. S.; Severijns, N.; Wauters, F.; Delahaye, P.; Herlert, A.; Wenander, F.; Zakoucky, D.

    2006-01-01

    Primary goal of the WITCH experiment is to test the Standard Model for a possible admixture of a scalar or tensor type interaction in β-decay. This information will be inferred from the shape of the recoil energy spectrum. The experimental set-up was completed and is under intensive commissioning at ISOLDE (CERN). It combines a Penning trap to store the ions and a retardation spectrometer to probe the recoil ion energy. A brief overview of the WITCH set-up and the results of commissioning tests performed until now are presented. Finally, perspectives of the physics program are reviewed.

  4. Photon Interaction Studies with Some Glasses and Building Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Harvinder; Singh, Kulwant; Sharma, Gopi; Nathuram, R.; Sahota, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients of some shielding materials, namely, Bakelite, black cement, white cement, plaster of paris, and concrete were determined at 356-, 511-, 662-, 1173-, and 1332-keV energies, and those of glasses containing oxides of B, Cd, Pb, and Bi were determined only at 662 keV using a narrow beam transmission method. These coefficients of glasses were then used to determine their interaction cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities. Good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical values. It has been proven that glasses have a potential application as a transparent radiation shielding

  5. Seismic soil structure interaction: analysis and centrifuge model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, W.D.L.; Ledbetter, R.H.; Beratan, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    A method for non-linear dynamic effective stress analysis is introduced which is applicable to soil-structure interaction problems. Full interaction including slip between structure and foundation is taken into account and the major factors are included which must be considered when computing dynamic soil response. An experimental investigation was conducted using simulated earthquake tests on centrifuged geotechnical models in order to obtain prototype response data of foundation soils carrying both surface and embedded structures and to validate the dynamic effective stress analysis. Horizontal and vertical accelerations were measured at various points on structures and in the sand foundation. Seismically-induced pore water pressure changes were also measured at various locations in the foundation. Computer plots of the data were obtained while the centrifuge was in flight and representative samples are presented. The results show clearly the pronounced effect that increasing pore water pressures have on dynamic response. It is demonstrated that a coherent picture of dynamic response of soil-structure systems is provided by dynamic effective stress non-linear analysis. Based on preliminary results, it appears that the pore water pressure effects can be predicted

  6. Seismic soil-structure interaction: Analysis and centrifuge model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, W.D.L.; Ledbetter, R.H.; Beratan, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for nonlinear dynamic effective stress analysis applicable to soil-structure interaction problems is introduced. Full interaction including slip between structure and foundation is taken into account and the major factors that must be considered when computing dynamic soil response are included. An experimental investigation using simulated earthquake tests on centrifuged geotechnical models was conducted to obtain prototype response data of foundation soils carrying both surface and embedded structures and to validate the dynamic effective stress analysis. The centrifuge tests were conducted in the Geotechnical Centrifuge at Cambridge University, England. Horizontal and vertical accelerations were measured at various points on structures and in the sand foundation. Seismically induced pore water pressure changes were also measured at various locations in the foundation. Computer plots of the data were obtained while the centrifuge was in flight and representative samples are presented. The results clearly show the pronounced effect of increasing pore water pressures on dynamic response. It is demonstrated that a coherent picture of dynamic response of soil-structure systems is provided by dynamic effective stress nonlinear analysis. On the basis of preliminary results, it appears that the effects of pore water pressure can be predicted. (orig.)

  7. Spectral studies of Lanthanide interactions with membrane surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karukstis, K.K.; Kao, M.Y.; Savin, D.A.; Bittker, R.A.; Kaphengst, K.J.; Emetarom, C.M.; Naito, N.R.; Takamoto, D.Y. [Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, CA (United States)

    1995-03-23

    We have monitored the interactions of the series of trivalent lanthanide cations with the thylakoid membrane surface of spinach chloroplasts using two complementary spectral techniques. Measurements of the fluorescence emission of the extrinsic probe 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) and the absorbance of the intrinsic chromophore chlorophyll provide two sensitive means of characterizing the dependence of the cation-membrane interaction on the nature of the cation. In these systems, added lanthanide cations adsorb onto the membrane surface to neutralize exposed segments of membrane-embedded protein complexes. The lanthanide-induced charge neutralization increases the proximity of added TNS anion to the membrane surface as evidenced by variations in the TNS fluorescence level and wavelength of maximum emission. Our results reveal a strong dependence of TNS fluorescence parameters on both lanthanide size and total orbital angular momentum L value. Lanthanides with greater charge density (small size and/or low L value) enhance the TNS fluorescence level to a greater extent. A possible origin for the lanthanide-dependent TNS fluorescence levels is suggested in terms of a heterogeneity in the number and type of TNS binding sites. The data are consistent with the proposal that larger lanthanides with smaller enthalpies of hydration induce more significant membrane appression. 59 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. WITCH, a Penning trap for weak interaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, V Yu

    2005-01-01

    This work is the completion of the installation of the WITCH set-up and the first tests and commissioning of it. The first goal of the WITCH experiment is to improve the present limit on a scalar interaction in nuclear $\\beta$-decay by determining the $\\beta$-neutrino angular correlation parameter $a$ via a precise measurement of the shape of the energy spectrum of the recoil ions. The development of the WITCH set-up and its installation at ISOLDE (CERN) were recently completed. The principle of WITCH is based on a combination of a Penning trap to confine the radioactive ions and a retardation spectrometer to probe the energy of the recoil ions resulting from $\\beta$-decays in the trap. Extensive computer simulations show that for a reasonable measurement time a precision on the $a$-parameter of 0.5% can be achieved. This corresponds to an upper limit for the scalar interaction constant Cs/Cv < 9% at 95% C.L. Designing and constructing a set-up as large and complex as the WITCH set-up takes time, several y...

  9. Progress at the WITCH experiment towards weak interaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Tandecki, Michaël

    A measurement of the $\\beta$–ν angular correlation in nuclear $\\beta$- decay is a good probe to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, independent of assumptions like parity, charge and time reversal violation. The WITCH (Weak Interaction Trap for Charged Particles) experiment will measure this correlation with the aim of further constraining the possible existence of scalar currents in the weak interaction or find a positive indication. The setup is located at ISOLDE/CERN and consists of a double Penning trap system combined with a retardation spectrometer to probe the energy of the recoil ions from the $\\beta$- decay. The shape of the recoil ion energy spectrum allows to determine the $\\beta$–ν angular correlation coefficient, $a$. Past experiments have allowed to measure this parameter with a precision of 0.5–1 %. The aim of the WITCH experiment is to measure $a$ with a precision of about 0.5 %.\\\\ A first step towards this goal has already been taken in 2006 with the measurement of a recoil ...

  10. Automated interactive video playback for studies of animal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkowski, Trisha; Yan, Wei; Gray, Aaron M; Cui, Rongfeng; Verzijden, Machteld N; Rosenthal, Gil G

    2011-02-09

    Video playback is a widely-used technique for the controlled manipulation and presentation of visual signals in animal communication. In particular, parameter-based computer animation offers the opportunity to independently manipulate any number of behavioral, morphological, or spectral characteristics in the context of realistic, moving images of animals on screen. A major limitation of conventional playback, however, is that the visual stimulus lacks the ability to interact with the live animal. Borrowing from video-game technology, we have created an automated, interactive system for video playback that controls animations in response to real-time signals from a video tracking system. We demonstrated this method by conducting mate-choice trials on female swordtail fish, Xiphophorus birchmanni. Females were given a simultaneous choice between a courting male conspecific and a courting male heterospecific (X. malinche) on opposite sides of an aquarium. The virtual male stimulus was programmed to track the horizontal position of the female, as courting males do in the wild. Mate-choice trials on wild-caught X. birchmanni females were used to validate the prototype's ability to effectively generate a realistic visual stimulus.

  11. A study on the application of voice interaction in automotive human machine interface experience design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Xiemin

    2018-04-01

    This paper, firstly, introduces the application trend of the integration of multi-channel interactions in automotive HMI ((Human Machine Interface) from complex information models faced by existing automotive HMI and describes various interaction modes. By comparing voice interaction and touch screen, gestures and other interaction modes, the potential and feasibility of voice interaction in automotive HMI experience design are concluded. Then, the related theories of voice interaction, identification technologies, human beings' cognitive models of voices and voice design methods are further explored. And the research priority of this paper is proposed, i.e. how to design voice interaction to create more humane task-oriented dialogue scenarios to enhance interactive experiences of automotive HMI. The specific scenarios in driving behaviors suitable for the use of voice interaction are studied and classified, and the usability principles and key elements for automotive HMI voice design are proposed according to the scenario features. Then, through the user participatory usability testing experiment, the dialogue processes of voice interaction in automotive HMI are defined. The logics and grammars in voice interaction are classified according to the experimental results, and the mental models in the interaction processes are analyzed. At last, the voice interaction design method to create the humane task-oriented dialogue scenarios in the driving environment is proposed.

  12. Treatment of system dependencies and human interactions in PRA studies: a review and sensitivity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, D.D.; Joksimovich, V.; Worledge, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute sponsored the review and comparison of five PRA studies: Arkansas Nuclear One - Unit 1, Big Rock Point, Grand Gulf, Limerick, and Zion - Unit 1. The review has been conducted in two phases. The Phase I review may be characterized as a qualitative look into many aspects of a PRA study. The Phase II review was performed to quantify the extent that differences in analytical techniques or key assumptions in these areas affect the differences in study results. In each of the PRA studies reviewed, the general descriptions of analytical approaches and descriptions of the analyses of event tree, fault tree and human interaction analyses that affected the dominant core damage sequences were reviewed. When these descriptions aroused interest because of seeming inconsistencies within the study or with other studies, they were pursued in some depth. The approaches or assumptions were contrasted to similar elements from other studies, and sensitivity analyses were performed in many cases to test the significance of results to the analytical models or assumptions. Inferences were drawn from the results regarding significance of the item to plant-specific results and, where possible, were generalized to other PRAs. This paper describes the results of the review of system dependencies and human interactions

  13. 77 FR 9946 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Drug Interaction Studies-Study Design, Data Analysis, Implications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... industry entitled ``Drug Interaction Studies--Study Design, Data Analysis, Implications for Dosing, and... data analysis in the context of identifying potential drug interactions. The guidance also addresses... Studies--Study Design, Data Analysis, and Implications for Dosing and Labeling.'' Comments were received...

  14. Gene-based testing of interactions in association studies of quantitative traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    Full Text Available Various methods have been developed for identifying gene-gene interactions in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, most methods focus on individual markers as the testing unit, and the large number of such tests drastically erodes statistical power. In this study, we propose novel interaction tests of quantitative traits that are gene-based and that confer advantage in both statistical power and biological interpretation. The framework of gene-based gene-gene interaction (GGG tests combine marker-based interaction tests between all pairs of markers in two genes to produce a gene-level test for interaction between the two. The tests are based on an analytical formula we derive for the correlation between marker-based interaction tests due to linkage disequilibrium. We propose four GGG tests that extend the following P value combining methods: minimum P value, extended Simes procedure, truncated tail strength, and truncated P value product. Extensive simulations point to correct type I error rates of all tests and show that the two truncated tests are more powerful than the other tests in cases of markers involved in the underlying interaction not being directly genotyped and in cases of multiple underlying interactions. We applied our tests to pairs of genes that exhibit a protein-protein interaction to test for gene-level interactions underlying lipid levels using genotype data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. We identified five novel interactions that are not evident from marker-based interaction testing and successfully replicated one of these interactions, between SMAD3 and NEDD9, in an independent sample from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. We conclude that our GGG tests show improved power to identify gene-level interactions in existing, as well as emerging, association studies.

  15. Contribution to the study of alpha-alpha interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darriulai, P.

    1965-03-01

    Two sets of measurements of the α-α elastic scattering differential cross section are presented. The first set - angular distributions from 50 up to 120 MeV - shows two new resonances, 6 + and 8 + , at 25 and 57 MeV. Complex phase shifts are extracted from the data and a phenomenological potential is given. A description of the 3 α-particle 0 + states in C 12 is made with this interaction potential. The second set - excitation curves between 20 and 50 MeV - allows investigation of the Be 8 level structure within this energy range - It identifies the 16.6 and 16.9 MeV states as 2 + , but the rise of inelastic processes at higher energies makes further identification of spins and parities more and more difficult. (author) [fr

  16. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Han Jae; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1999-01-01

    The doppler-free saturation spectroscopy of Na atoms has been performed and the proper conditions for the frequency stabilization of narrow band cw dye lasers, which was used as laser sources for the laser cooling and trapping, have been obtained as follows : a) optimum pressure of a Na vapor cell: 10 mTorr b) intensity of a pump laser : a few {mu}W c) intensity of a probe laser : 1/10 of that of a pump laser. EIT (Electromagnetically Induced Transparency) generated by coherent laser-atom interactions was investigated experimentally and analyzed theoretically. The absorption of a probe laser could be remarkably reduced more than 90 % due to EIT effect. The EIT spectrum as narrow as 6 MHz which is even narrower than the natural linewidth of an excited state could be obtained under proper conditions.

  17. Fe dimers: a theoretical study of the hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenzburger, D.J.R.; Saitovitch, E.M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structures of diatomic molecules Fe 2 and FeM, where M = Mn, Co, Ni and Cu, are investigated by molecular orbitals calculations using a discrete variational method and a local approximation for the exchange interaction. The one-electron wave functions obtained are used to calculate electric field gradients, electronic charge and spin densities at the Fe nucleus and spin-dipolar hyperfine fields, which are related to measured hyperfine parameters reported from experiments in solid inert-gas matrices. Molecular orbitals energy schemes and population analysis are presented. These and other aspects of the electronic structure of the FeM molecules are used in a qualitative interpretation of the hyperfine data; in some cases, are given suggestions for the ground-state configuration. (Author) [pt

  18. Fluorescence Spectra Studies on the Interaction between Lanthanides and Calmodulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The conformation of Calmodulin(CaM) induced by lanthanides has been examined using fluorescence methods.With the addition of lanthanide (Ln3+), the intrinsic fluorescence intensity of CaM without calcium ions (Apo-CaM) first increases and then decreases.Ln3+ causes the decrease of intrinsic fluorescence intensity of calcium saturated CaM (Ca2+4-CaM) only at high concentrations.At low concentrations, Ln3+ results not only in the enhancement of fluorescence intensity of Apo-CaM, but also in a blue shift of the maximum emission wavelengh of dansyl labeled calmodulin(Apo-D-CaM).The molecular mechanism of the interaction between Ln3+ and CaM has been discussed in the light of the fluorescence spectra.

  19. Ultrasonic Studies of Molecular Interactions in Organic Binary Liquid Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thirumaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity have been measured for the mixtures of 1-alkanols such as 1-propanol and 1-butanol with N-N dimethylformamide (DMF at 303 K. The experimental data have been used to calculate the acoustical parameters namely adiabatic compressibility (β, free length (Lf, free volume (Vf and internal pressure (πi. The excess values of the above parameters are also evaluated and discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the mixtures. It is obvious that there is a formation of hydrogen bonding between DMF and 1-alkanols. Further, the addition of DMF causes dissociation of hydrogen bonded structure of 1-alkanols. The evaluated excess values confirm that the molecular association is more pronounced in system-II comparing to the system-I.

  20. Light and neutron scattering study of strongly interacting ionic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiorgio, V.; Corti, M.; Piazza, R.

    1989-01-01

    Dilute solutions of ionic micelles formed by biological glycolipids (gangliosides) have been investigated at various ionic strengths by static and dynamic light scaterring and by small-angle neutron scattering. The size and shape of the micelle is not appreciably affected by the added salt concentration in the range 0-100 mM NaCL. From the measured intensity of scattered light we derive the electric charge Z of the micelle by fitting the data to a theoretical calculation which uses a screened Coulomb potential for the intermicellar interaction, and the hypernetted chain approximation for the calculation of the radial distribution function. The correlation function derived from dynamic light scattering shows the long time contribution typical of concentrated polydisperse systems (author). 15 refs.; 6 figs

  1. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Han Jae; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The doppler-free saturation spectroscopy of Na atoms has been performed and the proper conditions for the frequency stabilization of narrow band cw dye lasers, which was used as laser sources for the laser cooling and trapping, have been obtained as follows : a) optimum pressure of a Na vapor cell: 10 mTorr b) intensity of a pump laser : a few μW c) intensity of a probe laser : 1/10 of that of a pump laser. EIT (Electromagnetically Induced Transparency) generated by coherent laser-atom interactions was investigated experimentally and analyzed theoretically. The absorption of a probe laser could be remarkably reduced more than 90 % due to EIT effect. The EIT spectrum as narrow as 6 MHz which is even narrower than the natural linewidth of an excited state could be obtained under proper conditions

  2. Magnetic properties in kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, 63, 46000 Safi (Morocco); Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Jabar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic properties of the kagomé lattice have been studied with Ruderman–Kittel–Kasuya–Yosida (RKKY) exchange interactions in a spin-7/2 Ising model using Monte Carlo simulations. The RKKY interaction between the two magnetic layers is considered for different distances. The magnetizations and magnetic susceptibilities of this lattice are given for different triquadratic interactions around each triangular face. The critical temperature is obtained for a fixed size. The magnetic hysteresis cycle of kagomé lattice with RKKY interactions is obtained for different temperatures and for different crystal field with a fixed size of nonmagnetic layer. - Highlights: • We study the RKKY interaction in kagomé lattice using the Monte Carlo simulations. • The transition temperature is obtained for kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction. • The coercive field is obtained for kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction.

  3. In vitro drug interaction of levocetirizine and diclofenac: Theoretical and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Dena, Ahmed S; Abdel Gaber, Sara A

    2017-06-15

    Levocetirizine dihydrochloride is known to interact with some anti-inflammatory drugs. We report here a comprehensive integrated theoretical and experimental study for the in vitro drug interaction between levocetirizine dihydrochloride (LEV) and diclofenac sodium (DIC). The interaction of the two drugs was confirmed by the molecular ion peak obtained from the mass spectrum of the product. Moreover, FTIR and 1 HNMR spectra of the individual drugs and their interaction product were inspected to allocate the possible sites of interaction. In addition, quantum mechanical DFT calculations were performed to search for the interaction sites and to verify the types of interactions deduced from the spectroscopic studies such as charge-transfer and non-bonding π-π interactions. It was found that the studied drugs interact with each other in aqueous solution via four types of interactions, namely, ion-pair formation, three weak hydrogen bonds, non-bonding π-π interactions and charge-transfer from DIC to LEV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactive scan control for kinematic study in open MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kiyomi; Ito, Taeko; Nagao, Hisako; Takahashi, Tetsuhiko; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Hiai, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    A tool to support the subject is generally used for kinematic joint imaging with an open MRI apparatus because of difficulty setting the image plane correctly. However, use of a support tool requires a complicated procedure to position the subject, and setting the image plane when the joint angle changes is time consuming. Allowing the subject to move freely enables better diagnoses when kinematic joint imaging is performed. We therefore developed an interactive scan control (ISC) to facilitate the easy, quick, and accurate setting of the image plane even when a support tool is not used. We used a 0.4T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system open in the horizontal direction. The ISC determines the image plane interactively on the basis of fluoroscopy images displayed on a user interface. The imaging pulse is a balanced steady-state acquisition with rewound gradient echo (SARGE) sequence with update time less than 2 s. Without using a tool to support the knee, we positioned the knee of a healthy volunteer at 4 different joint angles and set the image plane through the patella and femur at each of the angles. Lumbar imaging is also demonstrated with ISC. Setting the image plane was easy and quick at all knee angles, and images obtained clearly showed the patella and femur. Total imaging time was less than 10 min, a fourth of the time needed when a support tool is used. We also used our ISC in kinematic imaging of the lumbar. The ISC shortens total time for kinematic joint imaging, and because a support tool is not needed, imaging can be done more freely in an open MR imaging apparatus. (author)

  5. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  6. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements in NMR peptide-membrane interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosol, S.

    2011-01-01

    Small membrane-bound proteins or peptides are involved in numerous essential biological processes, like cellular recognition, signaling, channel formation, and cytolysis. The secondary structure, orientation, mode of interaction and dynamics of these peptides can be as varied as their functions. Their localization in the membrane, the immersion depth, and their binding mode are factors critical to the function of these peptides. The atomic 3D solution structure of peptides bound to micelles can be determined by NMR spectroscopy. However, by employing paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) information on the complete topology of peptide bound to a micelle can be obtained. The antimicrobial peptide maximin H6, fst, a bacterial toxin, and the human peptide hormone ghrelin served as membrane-bound model peptides of similar sizes but strongly differing amino acid sequences. Their structures and binding behavior were determined and compared.The measured PREs provided suitable data for determining and distinguishing the different topologies of the investigated peptides bound to micelles. Maximin H6 and fst fold into α-helices upon insertion into a membrane, whereas the unstructured ghrelin is freely mobile in solution and interacts only via a covalently bound octanoyl group with the lipids. Maximin H6 is oriented parallel to the membrane surface, enabling the peptide to aggregate at the membrane water interface. Fst binds in transmembrane orientation with a protruding intrinsically disordered region near the C-terminus. Aside from determining the orientation of the bound peptides from the PREs, the moieties critical for membrane binding could be mapped in ghrelin. If suitable relaxation-edited spectra are acquired, the complete orientation and immersion depth of a peptide bound to a micelle can readily be obtained. (author) [de

  7. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danni Zheng

    Full Text Available Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2 participants on an hourly timescale.INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150-220 mmHg assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs and 95% CI.Low ambient temperature (≤10°C was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99-1.91 for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31-2.81 for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89-5.19 for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30-14.42 for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses.Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079.

  8. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Danni; Arima, Hisatomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Gasparrini, Antonio; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Lo, Serigne; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) participants on an hourly timescale. Methods INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset) and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150–220 mmHg) assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg) or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg) BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI. Results Low ambient temperature (≤10°C) was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99–1.91) for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31–2.81) for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89–5.19) for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30–14.42) for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079 PMID:26859491

  9. Photon interaction studies using 241Am γ-rays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rays from a 241Am source. These include attenuation studies as well as photoelectric absorption studies in various samples. The attenuation studies have been made using leaf and wood samples, samples like sand, sugar etc., which ...

  10. Pilot Study of Person Robot Interaction in a Public Transit Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Mikael; Bak, Thomas; Maler, Ouri

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the effect of a human interactive robot placed in an urban transit space. The underlying hypothesis is that it is possible to create interesting new living spaces and induce value in terms of experiences, information or economics, by putting socially interactive...... showed harder than expected to start interaction with commuters due to their determination and speed towards their goal. Further it was demonstrated that it was possible to track and follow people, who were not beforehand informed about the experiment. The evaluation indicated that the distance...... to initiate interaction was shorter than would be expected for normal human to human interaction....

  11. Calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbanov, A.R.; Sharipov, D.Sh.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid. The calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid was carried out in order to determine the thermal effects of reactions. The results of interaction of Ba(OH) 4 ·8H 2 O with 5, 10, and 20% solution of hydrofluoric acid were considered.

  12. Synthesis, structure, computational and in-silico anticancer studies of N,N-diethyl-N‧-palmitoylthiourea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asegbeloyin, Jonnie Niyi; Oyeka, Ebube Evaristus; Okpareke, Obinna; Ibezim, Akachukwu

    2018-02-01

    A new potential ONS donor ligand N,N-diethyl-N‧-palmitoylthiourea (PACDEA) with the molecular formular C21H42N2OS has been synthesized and characterized by ESI-MS, UV, FTIR 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and single X-ray crystallography. The asymmetric molecules crystallized in the centrosymmetric structure of monoclinic crystal system with space group P21/c. In the crystal structure of the compound, molecules are linked in a continuous chain by intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonds, which stabilized the crystal structure. The palmitoyl moiety and N (2)-ethyl group lie on a plane, while the thiocarbonyl moiety is twisted and lying othorgonal to the plane. Non-covalent interaction (NCI) analysis on the hydrogen bonded solid state structure of the molecule revealed the presence of a significant number of non-covalent interactions including intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions, Csbnd Hsbnd -lone pair interactions, weak Van der Waals interactions, and steric/ring closure interactions. The NCI analysis also showed the presence of intramolecular stabilizing Csbnd H⋯Odbnd C and Csbnd H⋯Sdbnd C interactions. Docking simulation revealed that the compound interacted favourably with ten selected validated anticancer drug targets, which is an indication that the compound could possess some anticancer properties.

  13. Theoretical studies of some nonlinear laser-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.

    1975-01-01

    The nonlinear coupling of intense, monochromatic, electromagnetic radiation with plasma is considered in a number of special cases. The first part of the thesis serves as an introduction to three-wave interactions. A general formulation of the stimulated scattering of transverse waves by longitudinal modes in a warm, unmagnetized, uniform plasma is constructed. A general dispersion relation is derived that describes Raman and Brillouin scattering, modulational instability, and induced Thomson scattering. Raman scattering (the scattering of a photon into another photon and an electron plasma wave) is investigated as a possible plasma heating scheme. Analytic theory complemented by computer simulation is presented describing the nonlinear mode coupling of laser light with small and large amplitude, resonantly excited electron plasma waves. The simulated scattering of a coherent electromagnetic wave by low frequency density perturbations in homogeneous plasma is discussed. A composite picture of the linear dispersion relations for filamentation and Brillouin scattering is constructed. The absolute instability of Brillouin weak and strong coupling by analytic and numerical means is described

  14. An autosampling differential scanning calorimeter instrument for studying molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Valerian; Rochalski, Andrew; Brandts, Michael; Brandts, John F; Williston, Samuel; Frasca, Verna; Lin, Lung-Nan

    2002-11-01

    A new ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) instrument is described, which utilizes autosampling for continuous operation. High scanning rates to 250 deg/h with rapid cooling and equilibration between scans facilitates higher sample throughput up to 50 samples during each 24 h of unattended operation. The instrument is suited for those pharmaceutical applications where higher throughput is important, such as screening drug candidates for binding constant or screening solution conditions for stability of liquid protein formulations. Results are presented on the binding of five different anionic inhibitors to ribonuclease A, which included cytidine 2'-monophosphate (2'CMP), 3'CMP, uridine 3'-monophosphate, pyrophosphate, and phosphate. Binding constants K(B) (or dissociation constants K(d)) are obtained from the shift in the transition temperature T(M) for ribonuclease thermal unfolding in the presence of ligand relative to the transition temperature in the absence of ligand. Measured binding constants ranged from 155 M(-1) (K(d) = 6.45 mM) for the weak-binding phosphate anion to 13100 M(-1) (K(d) = 76.3 microM) for the strongest binding ligand, 2'CMP. The DSC method for measuring binding constants can also be extended to ultratight interactions involving either ligand-protein or protein-protein binding.

  15. Small scale lithium-lead/water-interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranert, O.; Kottowski, H.

    1991-01-01

    One current concept in fusion blanket design is to utilize water as the coolant and liquid lithium-lead as the breeding/neutron multiplier material. Considering the complex design of the blanket module, it is likely that a water leakage into the liquid alloy may occur due to a tube rupture provoking an intolerable pressure increase in the blanket module. The pressure increase is caused by the combined chemical and thermohydraulic reaction of lithium-lead with water. Experiments which simulate such a transient event are necessary to obtain information which is important for the blanket module design. The interaction has been investigated by conducting small-scale experiments at various injection pressures, alloy- and coolant temperatures. Besides using eutectic Li 17 Pb 83 , Li 7 Pb 2 , lithium and lead have been used. Among other results, the experiments indicate increasing chemical reaction with increasing lithium concentration. At the same time, the chemical reaction inhibits violent thermohydaulic reactions due to the attenuating effect of the hydrogen produced. The preliminary epxerimental results from Li 17 Pb 83 and Li 7 Pb 2 reveal that the pressure- and temperature transients caused by the chemical and thermohydraulic reactions lie within technically manageable limits. (orig.)

  16. SHARP - a framework for incorporating human interactions into PRA studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannaman, G.W.; Joksimovich, V.; Spurgin, A.J.; Worledge, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, increased attention has been given to understanding the role of humans in the safe operation of nuclear power plants. By virtue of the ability to combine equipment reliability with human reliability probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology was deemed capable of providing significant insights about the contributions of human interations in accident scenarios. EPRI recognized the need to strengthen the methodology for incorporating human interactions into PRAs as one element of their broad research program to improve the credibility of PRAs. This research project lead to the development and detailed description of SHARP (Systematic Human Application Reliability Procedure) in EPRI NP-3583. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the SHARP framework. This should help PRA analysts state more clearly their assumptions and approach no matter which human reliability assessment technique is used. SHARP includes a structure of seven analysis steps which can be formally or informally performed during PRAs. The seven steps are termed definition, screening, breakdown, representation, impact assessment, quantification, and documentation

  17. In vivo study of drug interaction with brain benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, O.; Shinotoh, H.; Ito, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Yamasaki, T.

    1985-05-01

    The possibility of direct estimation of in vivo Bz receptor occupancy in brain was evaluated using C-11, or H-3-flumazepil (Ro15-1788). In animal experiments, 1 ..mu..Ci of H-3-Ro15-1788 was injected at 0.5 or 20 hr after i.v. injection of various dosage of clonazepam. Then radioactivity in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and blood at 5 min. after injection of the tracer was compared. Competitive inhibition of in vivo binding was clearly observed when clonazepam was pretreated at 0.5 hr before injection of the tracer. On the other hand, brain radioactivity was increased when clonazepam was administered at 20 hr before injection of the tracer. This increase in binding of H-3-Ro15-1788 might be caused by rebound of Bz receptor function by treatment with Bz agonist, and this rebound may have an important role in physiological function. Clinical investigation concerning drug interaction with brain Bz receptor was performed in normal volunteer and patients with neurological disorders. The distribution of C-11-Ro15-1788 in the brain of patients chronically treated with clonazepam were significantly heterogeneous. However, cerebral blood flow estimated with N-13 NH3 of these patients were normal.

  18. Study on mechanical interaction between molten alloy and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Nishi, Yoshihisa; Furuya, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Izumi

    1999-01-01

    Simulant experiments using low melting point molten alloy and water have been conducted to observe both fragmentation behavior of molten jet and boiling phenomena of water, and to measure both particle size and shape of fragmented solidified jet, focusing on post-pin-failure molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCl) which was important to evaluate the sequence of the initiating phase for metallic fueled FBR. In addition, characteristics of coolant boiling phenomena on FCIs have been investigated, focusing on the boiling heat transfer in the direct contact heat transfer mode. As a results, it is concluded that the fragmentation of poured molten alloy jet is affected by a degree of boiling of water and is classified into three modes by thermal conditions of both the instantaneous contact interface temperature of two liquids and subcooling of water. In the case of forced convection boiling in direct contact mode, it is found that the heat transfer performance is enhanced by increase of the heat transfer area, due to oscillation of the surface and fragmentation of molten alloy. As a results of preliminary investigation of FCI behavior for metallic fuel core based on these results, it is expected that the ejected molten fuel is fragmented into almost spherical particles due to the developed boiling of sodium. (author)

  19. Study of high-energy neutrino neutral-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Ballagh, H.C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J.P.; Bingham, H.H.; Brucker, E.B.; Burnstein, R.A.; Campbell, J.R.; Cence, R.J.; Chatterjee, T.K.; Clayton, E.F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; DeProspo, D.; Devanand; De Wolf, E.A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Foeth, H.; Fretter, W.B.; Gupta, V.K.; Hanlon, J.; Harigel, G.; Harris, F.A.; Jabiol, M.A.; Jacques, P.; Jain, V.; Jones, G.T.; Jones, M.D.; Kafka, T.; Kalelkar, M.; Kasper, P.; Kohli, J.M.; Koller, E.L.; Krawiec, R.J.; Lauko, M.; Lys, J.E.; Marage, P.; Milburn, R.H.; Miller, D.B.; Mittra, I.S.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Moreels, J.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Myatt, G.; Nailor, P.; Naon, R.; Napier, A.; Neveu, M.; Passmore, D.; Peters, M.W.; Peterson, V.Z.; Plano, R.; Rao, N.K.; Rubin, H.A.; Sacton, J.; Sambyal, S.S.; Schmitz, N.; Schneps, J.; Singh, J.B.; Smart, W.; Stamer, P.; Varvell, K.E.; Verluyten, L.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wainstein, S.; Willocq, S.; Yost, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    From an exposure of the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber to the Tevatron quadrupole triplet neutrino beam, we have determined the ratio of neutral-current (NC) to charged-current (CC) interactions to be 0.288±0.032 for events with visible hadron momentum above 10 GeV/c. The mean ν(bar ν) event energy is 150 (110) GeV, which is higher than that for any previous beam. This result agrees with those from previous experiments at lower energies. The NC/CC ratio is derived for a combined sample of ν and bar ν events. A value of 0.274±0.038 is obtained for the dominant ν component assuming bar ν NC/CC=0.39±0.08. For events with visible hadron momentum above 25 GeV/c, where the neutral hadron contamination remaining in the NC sample is assumed to be negligible, the combined NC/CC is 0.323±0.025 and the K 0 production rates are 0.375±0.064 per CC and 0.322±0.073 per NC event. The corresponding Λ rates are 0.161±0.030 per CC and 0.113±0.030 per NC event. The K 0 and Λ distributions of the fractional hadron energy variable z in NC events are consistent with those in CC events

  20. Study of high-energy neutrino neutral-current interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P. P.; Badyal, S. K.; Ballagh, H. C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J. P.; Bingham, H. H.; Brucker, E. B.; Burnstein, R. A.; Campbell, J. R.; Cence, R. J.; Chatterjee, T. K.; Clayton, E. F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; Deprospo, D.; Devanand; de Wolf, E. A.; Faulkner, P. J.; Foeth, H.; Fretter, W. B.; Gupta, V. K.; Hanlon, J.; Harigel, G.; Harris, F. A.; Jabiol, M. A.; Jacques, P.; Jain, V.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, M. D.; Kafka, T.; Kalelkar, M.; Kasper, P.; Kohli, J. M.; Koller, E. L.; Krawiec, R. J.; Lauko, M.; Lys, J. E.; Marage, P.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, D. B.; Mittra, I. S.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Moreels, J.; Morrison, D. R.; Myatt, G.; Nailor, P.; Naon, R.; Napier, A.; Neveu, M.; Passmore, D.; Peters, M. W.; Peterson, V. Z.; Plano, R.; Rao, N. K.; Rubin, H. A.; Sacton, J.; Sambyal, S. S.; Schmitz, N.; Schneps, J.; Singh, J. B.; Smart, W.; Stamer, P.; Varvell, K. E.; Verluyten, L.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wainstein, S.; Willocq, S.; Yost, G. P.

    1992-04-01

    From an exposure of the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber to the Tevatron quadrupole triplet neutrino beam, we have determined the ratio of neutral-current (NC) to charged-current (CC) interactions to be 0.288+/-0.032 for events with visible hadron momentum above 10 GeV/c. The mean ν(ν¯) event energy is 150 (110) GeV, which is higher than that for any previous beam. This result agrees with those from previous experiments at lower energies. The NC/CC ratio is derived for a combined sample of ν and ν¯ events. A value of 0.274+/-0.038 is obtained for the dominant ν component assuming ν¯ NC/CC=0.39+/-0.08. For events with visible hadron momentum above 25 GeV/c, where the neutral hadron contamination remaining in the NC sample is assumed to be negligible, the combined NC/CC is 0.323+/-0.025 and the K0 production rates are 0.375+/-0.064 per CC and 0.322+/-0.073 per NC event. The corresponding Λ rates are 0.161+/-0.030 per CC and 0.113+/-0.030 per NC event. The K0 and Λ distributions of the fractional hadron energy variable z in NC events are consistent with those in CC events.

  1. Comprehensive study of tartrazine/cationic surfactant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahir, Afshin Asadzadeh; Javadian, Soheila; Razavizadeh, Bi Bi Marzieh; Gharibi, Hussein

    2011-12-15

    Interaction of a food dye, tartrazine, with some cationic conventional and gemini surfactants, tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB), N,N'-ditetradecyl-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-butanediyl-diammonium dibromide (14,4,14), and N,N'-didodecyl-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-butanediyl-diammonium dibromide (12,4,12), were first investigated comprehensively employing conductometry, tensiometry, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Tartrazine was found to behave in the same manner as aromatic counterions. The formation of ion pairs reflected as a considerable increase of the surfactant efficiency in tensiometry plots and their stoichiometry were determined by Job's method of continuous variations. For the tartrazine/TTAB system, nonionic DS(3), ionic DS(2-), and/or DS(2)(-) ion pairs, their small premicelles, and tartrazine-rich micelles were constituted as well as dye-containing TTAB-rich micelles. Insoluble J-aggregates of DS(-) ion pairs and cylindrical surfactant-rich micelles were also formed in tartrazine/gemini surfactant systems and recognized by transmission electron microscopy. The zeta potential and the size of the aggregates were determined using dynamic light scattering and confirmed the suggested models for the processes happening in each system. Cyclic voltammetry was applied successfully to track all of these species using tartrazine's own reduction peak current for the first time.

  2. Mathematics for physicists and engineers fundamentals and interactive study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Weltner, Klaus; Weber, Wolfgang J; Schuster, Peter; Grosjean, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This textbook offers an accessible and highly approved approach which is characterized by the combination of the textbook with a detailed study guide available online at our repository extras.springer.com. This study guide divides the whole learning task into small units which the student is very likely to master successfully. Thus he or she is asked to read and study a limited section of the textbook and to return to the study guide afterwards. Working with the study guide his or her learning results are controlled, monitored and deepened by graded questions, exercises, repetitions and finally by problems and applications of the content studied. Since the degree of difficulties is slowly rising the students gain confidence and experience their own progress in mathematical competence thus fostering motivation. Furthermore in case of learning difficulties he or she is given supplementary explanations and in case of individual needs supplementary exercises and applications. So the sequence of the studies is ind...

  3. Age differences in adults' daily social interactions: An ecological momentary assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaoyang, Ruixue; Sliwinski, Martin J; Martire, Lynn M; Smyth, Joshua M

    2018-04-30

    Prevailing research has suggested that social relationships get better with age, but this evidence has been largely based on studies with lengthy reporting intervals. Using an ecological momentary assessment approach, the present study examined age differences in several characteristics of social interactions as reported in near-real time: the frequency, quality, and partner type. Participants (N = 173) ages 20-79 years reported their social interactions at 5 random times throughout the day for 1 week. Results revealed that age was associated with higher frequency of interacting with family and lower frequency of interacting with peripheral partners. These age effects, however, became nonsignificant after accounting for contextual factors such as race, gender, education, employment status, family structure, and living arrangement. In contrast, a curvilinear relationship best characterized age differences in both positive and negative ratings of daily social interaction quality, with middle-aged adults reporting the lowest positive ratings and older adults reporting the lowest negative ratings among all ages. Contextual factors did not account for these patterns of age differences in interaction quality. Furthermore, the intraindividual variability of interaction frequency with peripheral partners, partner diversity, and interaction quality (positivity and negativity) was lower among older adults than among younger adults. Findings from the present study portray a nuanced picture of social interactions in daily life and advance the understanding of social interactions across the life span. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. A conceptual framework for studying the strength of plant-animal mutualistic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Diego P; Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo; Urbani, Pasquinell; Valdovinos, Fernanda S

    2015-04-01

    The strength of species interactions influences strongly the structure and dynamics of ecological systems. Thus, quantifying such strength is crucial to understand how species interactions shape communities and ecosystems. Although the concepts and measurement of interaction strength in food webs have received much attention, there has been comparatively little progress in the context of mutualism. We propose a conceptual scheme for studying the strength of plant-animal mutualistic interactions. We first review the interaction strength concepts developed for food webs, and explore how these concepts have been applied to mutualistic interactions. We then outline and explain a conceptual framework for defining ecological effects in plant-animal mutualisms. We give recommendations for measuring interaction strength from data collected in field studies based on a proposed approach for the assessment of interaction strength in plant-animal mutualisms. This approach is conceptually integrative and methodologically feasible, as it focuses on two key variables usually measured in field studies: the frequency of interactions and the fitness components influenced by the interactions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  5. Model Plants for Studying the Interaction between Methylobacterium mesophilicum and Xylella fastidiosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, F.D.; Lacava, P.T.; Araújo, W.L.; Maccheroni Jr., W.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Elsas, van J.D.; Azevedo, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few years, endophytic bacterial communities associated with citrus have been studied as key components interacting with Xylella fastidiosa. In this study, we investigated the possible interaction between the citrus endophyte Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6 and X. fastidiosa in

  6. Model plants for studying the interaction between Methylobacterium mesophilicum and Xylella fastidiosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, FD; Lacava, PT; Gai, CS; Araujo, WL; Maccheroni, W; van Overbeek, LS; van Elsas, JD; Azevedo, JL

    Over the last few years, endophytic bacterial communities associated with citrus have been studied as key components interacting with Xylella fastidiosa. In this study, we investigated the possible interaction between the citrus endophyte Methylobacterium mesophilicum SR1.6/6 and X. fastidiosa in

  7. Teacher-Student Interactions: Four Case Studies of Gender in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathryn; Nicaise, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand gender interactions between teachers and students in high school physical education. Gender interactions were explored in relation to the theory of reflective practice. Interview data were examined as four case studies using individual and cross-case inductive analysis. Two common themes emerged: (a)…

  8. The subtle balance of weak supramolecular interactions: The hierarchy of halogen and hydrogen bonds in haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Raatikainen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts: 4-IPhNH3Cl (1, 4-IPhNH3Br (5, 4-IPhNH3H2PO4 (6, 4-ClPhNH3H2PO4 (8, 3-IPyBnCl (9, 3-IPyHCl (10 and 3-IPyH-5NIPA (3-iodopyridinium 5-nitroisophthalate, 13, where hydrogen or/and halogen bonding represents the most relevant non-covalent interactions, has been prepared and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. This series was further complemented by extracting some relevant crystal structures: 4-BrPhNH3Cl (2, CCDC ref. code TAWRAL, 4-ClPhNH3Cl (3, CURGOL, 4-FPhNH3Cl (4, ANLCLA, 4-BrPhNH3H2PO4, (7, UGISEI, 3-BrPyHCl, (11, CIHBAX and 3-ClPyHCl, (12, VOQMUJ from Cambridge Structural Database for sake of comparison. Based on the X-ray data it was possible to highlight the balance between non-covalent forces acting in these systems, where the relative strength of the halogen bonding C–X···A− (X = I, Br or Cl and the ratio between the halogen and hydrogen bonds [C–X···A− : D–H···A−] varied across the series.

  9. The Role of Interactive Whiteboard on Motivating Learners in Mathematics Classes: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mtchedlishvili

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The enhancement of motivation and enthusiasm by the use of interactive whiteboard has improved self- esteem, encouragement and success of many learners who have found mathematics difficult. This study aims to investigate whether the use of interactive whiteboard in mathematics classes promotes motivation of learners which facilitates learning process. 40 lecturers and 40 students were surveyed in the study and the results have been compared and it has been found that interactive whiteboard enhances interactivity, motivates learners and facilitates learning in mathematics classes.

  10. Communicative Case Studies for EFL--Lessons for Interactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne E.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses use of case studies and role play throughout the curriculum at the Ecole de Hautes Etudes Commerciales du Nord, a French graduate school associated with the Catholic University of Lille. Provides a case study that was developed to reconcile conflicting needs in the business English classroom at the graduate level. Students require…

  11. Some significant but buried studies of embodiment and materiality in social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    When preparing a recent review on rising interest in ‘embodiment’ in EM CA research on social interaction (Nevile 2015) (e.g. gesture, body, mobility; cf. ‘multimodality’), considering over 500 studies, I was delighted to be reminded of, or often ‘discover’, some less-well-known-and-cited studies...... some to highlight from the prominent journal Research on Language and Social Interaction. The paper argues that active recognition of the contribution of the body-in-interaction might be relatively recent, but scholarly awareness of it is not (in EM CA and beyond). My aim is to resurrect some early...... discussion of doing CA and EM as a research community. Goodwin, C. (2000) Action and embodiment within situated human interaction. Journal of Pragmatics, 32, 1489–1522. Nevile, M. (2015) The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction. Research on Language and Social Interaction. 48,2: 121...

  12. Final Report - Few-Body Studies Using Electromagnetic Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norum, Blaine [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2018-01-25

    The work discussed here is an extension of work previously funded by U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-97ER41025. Measurements of charged pion photoproduction from deuterium using the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory previously made by us, as members of the LEGS Collaboration, resulted in the most interesting result of two decades of work. By measuring the production of a charged pion (π+) in coincidence with an emitted photon we observed structures in the residual two-nucleon system. These indicated the existence of rare, long-lived states not explicable by standard nuclear theory; they suggested a set of configurations not explicable in terms of a nucleon-nucleon pair. The existence of such “exotic” structures has formed the foundation for most of the work that has ensued. Several measurements at various laboratories have supported, but not proved, the existence of these exotic states. The rarity of these states made their existence undetectable in most previous measurements. Only by observing characteristic signatures of such states (i.e., decay photons), by using very specific kinematics which isolate certain reaction products, or by measuring polarization-dependent observables. During the period of this grant we pursued and made progress on the development of experiments to be performed at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIGS) of the Tri Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). Our understanding of photon- and electron-induced nuclear reactions depends on understanding of the basic electron and photon interaction. Recently, the issue of two-photon contributions has arisen in the context of deeply inelastic electron scattering. One way to address this is to measure asymmetries in the Bethe-Heitler ee process. We also made progress in developing the detectors required to measure these asymmetries at HIGS. During the last several years the apparent discrepancy between the size of the proton as measured

  13. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing

    Surface modification plays a pivotal role in bioengineering. Polymer coatings can provide biocompatibility and biofunctionalities to biomaterials through surface modification. In this dissertation, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was utilized to coat two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) substrates with differently charged polyelectrolytes in order to generate antimicrobial and osteocompatible biomaterials. ICVD is a modified CVD technique that enables surface modification in an all-dry condition without substrate damage and solvent contamination. The free-radical polymerization allows the vinyl polymers to conformally coat on various micro- and nano-structured substrates and maintains the delicate structure of the functional groups. The vapor deposition of polycations provided antimicrobial activity to planar and porous substrates through destroying the negatively charged bacterial membrane and brought about high contact-killing efficiency (99.99%) against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the polyampholytes synthesized by iCVD exhibited excellent antifouling performance against the adhesion of Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Gram-negative E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Their antifouling activities were attributed to the electrostatic interaction and hydration layers that served as physical and energetic barriers to prevent bacterial adhesion. The contact-killing and antifouling polymers synthesized by iCVD can be applied to surface modification of food processing equipment and medical devices with the aim of reducing foodborne diseases and medical infections. Moreover, the charged polyelectrolyte modified 2D polystyrene surfaces displayed good osteocompatibility and enhanced osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells than the un-modified polystyrene surface. In order to promote osteoinduction of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, bioinspired polymer-controlled mineralization was conducted

  14. Mathematics for physicists and engineers fundamentals and interactive study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Weltner, Klaus; Grosjean, Jean; Schuster, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Mathematics is the basic language in physics and engineering. It is an essential tool which first and second year students have to master as soon as possible. A lack of competence in mathematics is the main reason for failure and drop out in the beginning periods of study. This textbook offers an accessible and highly approved approach which is characterized by the combination of the textbook with a detailed study guide available online at extras.springer.com. This study guide divides the whole learning task into small units which the student is very likely to master successfully. Thus he or she is asked to read and study a limited section of the textbook and to return to the study guide afterwards. Working with the study guide his or her learning results are controlled, monitored and deepened by graded questions, exercises, repetitions and finally by problems and applications of the content studied. Since the degree of difficulties is slowly rising the students gain confidence and experience their own progre...

  15. Bird interactions with wind turbines : a Canadian case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.; Hamilton, B. [TAEM Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    An environmental study has been conducted on a wind farm adjacent to Castle River, in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in Alberta. The objective was to determine the impact of the many wind turbines on birds. The study involved observations of different bird species including raptors, waterfowl and passerines. The observations looked at bird numbers, location relative to turbines, and changes in flight pattern. The study found that raptors flew around or over the turbine blades, while passerines remained below, and waterfowl flew up and over the blades. Very few dead birds were found over the monitoring period, suggesting that wind turbines do not have a major impact on birds. figs.

  16. Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership: Interactive Case Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Case studies illustrate the kinds of decisions and dilemmas managers face every day, and as such provide an effective learning tool for project management. Due to...

  17. The Effects of Interactions between Management Control Systems and Strategy on Firm Performance: An Empirical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Melek Eker; Semih Eker

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in examining the relationships among management control systems, business strategy and firm performance. In this study, the interactions of management control systems and strategy with their impact on firm performance are examined with an empirical analysis, based on the data from 94 manufacturing firms from the top 500 in Turkey in 2014. The results support the postulate that high interaction between interactive control system (ICS) and differ...

  18. MFM study of magnetic interaction between recording and soft magnetic layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yukio; Tanahashi, Kiwamu; Hirayama, Yoshiyuki; Kikukawa, Atsushi; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to study the magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers in double-layer perpendicular media by observing the magnetization structure from the soft magnetic layer side. There was a strong magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers. Introducing a thin nonmagnetic intermediate layer between the two layers greatly reduced the magnetic interaction and drastically reduced the medium noise

  19. Studies on Cross-linking of succinic acid with chitosan/collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study summarizes the cross-linking property of succinic acid with chitosan /collagen. In detail, the chemistry behind the cross-linking and the improvement in mechanical and thermal properties of the cross-linked material were discussed with suitable instruments and bioinformatics tools. The concentration of succinic acid with reference to the chosen polymers was optimized. A 3D scaffold prepared using an optimized concentration of succinic acid (0.2% (w/v with chitosan (1.0% (w/v and similarly with collagen (0.5% (w/v, was subjected to surface morphology, FT-IR analysis, tensile strength assessment, thermal stability and biocompatibility. Results revealed, cross-linking with succinic acid impart appreciable mechanical strength to the scaffold material. In silico analysis suggested the prevalence of non-covalent interactions, which played a crucial role in improving the mechanical and thermal properties of the cross-linked scaffold. The resultant 3D scaffold may find application as wound dressing material, as an implant in clinical applications and as a tissue engineering material.

  20. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-08-07

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of "low-cost" electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT methods

  1. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of “low-cost” electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT

  2. Radioisotope studies of some effects and interactions of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The coordinated programme of ''isotopic tracer-aided studies of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture'', initiated in 1973, had involved the participation of 12 scientists from 10 countries. Pesticide residues, toxic metals, atmospheric sulphur dioxide were studied, and the use of radiotracer techniques as monitoring tools for existing contaminant levels or for their biological effects. The programme had been successful in the development and application of selected labelled substrate techniques. Specific aspects studied were the effects of environmental contaminants at the molecular level of the cell nucleus, the development and significance of radioimmunoassay procedure for trace contaminants, action and joint action of toxic elements, and the radiometric analysis of cholinesterase as an index of exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Ten papers were presented and 12 coordinated investigations discussed. A number of recommendations were made

  3. Coevolution study of mitochondria respiratory chain proteins: toward the understanding of protein--protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Ge, Yan; Wu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jingfa; Yu, Jun

    2011-05-20

    Coevolution can be seen as the interdependency between evolutionary histories. In the context of protein evolution, functional correlation proteins are ever-present coordinated evolutionary characters without disruption of organismal integrity. As to complex system, there are two forms of protein--protein interactions in vivo, which refer to inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction. In this paper, we studied the difference of coevolution characters between inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction using "Mirror tree" method on the respiratory chain (RC) proteins. We divided the correlation coefficients of every pairwise RC proteins into two groups corresponding to the binary protein--protein interaction in intra-complex and the binary protein--protein interaction in inter-complex, respectively. A dramatical discrepancy is detected between the coevolution characters of the two sets of protein interactions (Wilcoxon test, p-value = 4.4 × 10(-6)). Our finding reveals some critical information on coevolutionary study and assists the mechanical investigation of protein--protein interaction. Furthermore, the results also provide some unique clue for supramolecular organization of protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. More detailed binding sites map and genome information of nuclear encoded RC proteins will be extraordinary valuable for the further mitochondria dynamics study. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Modelling the Interaction Levels in HCI Using an Intelligent Hybrid System with Interactive Agents: A Case Study of an Interactive Museum Exhibition Module in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rosales

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Technology has become a necessity in our everyday lives and essential for completing activities we typically take for granted; technologies can assist us by completing set tasks or achieving desired goals with optimal affect and in the most efficient way, thereby improving our interactive experiences. This paper presents research that explores the representation of user interaction levels using an intelligent hybrid system approach with agents. We evaluate interaction levels of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI with the aim of enhancing user experiences. We consider the description of interaction levels using an intelligent hybrid system to provide a decision-making system to an agent that evaluates interaction levels when using interactive modules of a museum exhibition. The agents represent a high-level abstraction of the system, where communication takes place between the user, the exhibition and the environment. In this paper, we provide a means to measure the interaction levels and natural behaviour of users, based on museum user-exhibition interaction. We consider that, by analysing user interaction in a museum, we can help to design better ways to interact with exhibition modules according to the properties and behaviour of the users. An interaction-evaluator agent is proposed to achieve the most suitable representation of the interaction levels with the aim of improving user interactions to offer the most appropriate directions, services, content and information, thereby improving the quality of interaction experienced between the user-agent and exhibition-agent.

  5. Connecting theoretical and empirical studies of trait-mediated interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolker, B.; Holyoak, M.; Křivan, Vlastimil; Rowe, L.; Schmitz, O.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 5 (2003), s. 1101-1114 ISSN 0012-9658 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : community models * competition * empirical study Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.701, year: 2003

  6. A comparative study of Interactions between chronic Alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The effects of drinking 10% alcohol solution for 12 weeks on daily body weight, and drinking and feeding behaviour were studied in Sprague – Dawley rats of both sexes. Daily measurement of body weight, fluid intake and food consumption were recorded and compared. Multiple linear regression analysis was ...

  7. Plant--Pollinator Interactions: A Rich Area for Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    Outlines an adaptive framework for the study of plants and their pollinators in which both partners in the ecological relationship are seen as maximizing fitness through efficient use of the other as a resource. Suggests experimental projects to examine the validity of these assumptions giving an evolutionary emphasis. (Author/CW)

  8. Small angle neutron scattering studies on the interaction of cationic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structure of the protein–surfactant complex of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cationic surfactants has been studied by small angle neutron scattering. At low concentrations, the CTAB monomers are observed to bind to the protein leading to an increase in its size. On the other hand at high concentrations, surfactant ...

  9. Spectroscopic Studies of the Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conformity with Beer\\'s law was evident over the concentration range 0.8 – 8.0 mg/100 ml of chloroquine phosphate; thus making it possible for an accurate quantitative determination of the drug. Conclusion: The studied complexation phenomenon formed a basis for the quantitative determination of both pure samples and ...

  10. Comparison of weighting approaches for genetic risk scores in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüls, Anke; Krämer, Ursula; Carlsten, Christopher; Schikowski, Tamara; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger

    2017-12-16

    Weighted genetic risk scores (GRS), defined as weighted sums of risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are statistically powerful for detection gene-environment (GxE) interactions. To assign weights, the gold standard is to use external weights from an independent study. However, appropriate external weights are not always available. In such situations and in the presence of predominant marginal genetic effects, we have shown in a previous study that GRS with internal weights from marginal genetic effects ("GRS-marginal-internal") are a powerful and reliable alternative to single SNP approaches or the use of unweighted GRS. However, this approach might not be appropriate for detecting predominant interactions, i.e. interactions showing an effect stronger than the marginal genetic effect. In this paper, we present a weighting approach for such predominant interactions ("GRS-interaction-training") in which parts of the data are used to estimate the weights from the interaction terms and the remaining data are used to determine the GRS. We conducted a simulation study for the detection of GxE interactions in which we evaluated power, type I error and sign-misspecification. We compared this new weighting approach to the GRS-marginal-internal approach and to GRS with external weights. Our simulation study showed that in the absence of external weights and with predominant interaction effects, the highest power was reached with the GRS-interaction-training approach. If marginal genetic effects were predominant, the GRS-marginal-internal approach was more appropriate. Furthermore, the power to detect interactions reached by the GRS-interaction-training approach was only slightly lower than the power achieved by GRS with external weights. The power of the GRS-interaction-training approach was confirmed in a real data application to the Traffic, Asthma and Genetics (TAG) Study (N = 4465 observations). When appropriate external weights are unavailable, we

  11. Synergistic interaction between gold nanoparticles and nickel phthalocyanine in layer-by-layer (LbL) films: evidence of constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Wagner S; Crespilho, Frank N; Martins, Marccus V A; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Silva, Welter C

    2009-07-07

    The concept of constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) based on the control of non-covalent interactions in supramolecular structures is promising for having a large impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology if adequate nanoscale manipulation methods are used. In this study, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique may be used to produce electroactive electrodes with ITO coated by tetrasulfonated nickel phthalocyanine (NiTsPc) alternated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) incorporating gold nanoparticles (AuNP), in which synergy has been achieved in the interaction between the nanoparticles and NiTsPc. The catalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in multilayer films was investigated using cyclic voltammetry, where oxidation of H(2)O(2) led to increased currents in the PAH-AuNP/NiTsPc films for the electrochemical processes associated with the phthalocyanine ring and nickel at 0.52 and 0.81 V vs. SCE, respectively, while for PAH/NiTsPc films (without AuNP) only the first redox process was affected. In control experiments we found out that the catalytic activity was not solely due to the presence of AuNP, but rather to the nanoparticles inducing NiTsPc supramolecular structures that favored access to their redox sites, thus yielding strong charge transfer. The combined effects of NiTsPc and AuNP, which could only be observed in nanostructured LbL films, point to another avenue to pursue within the CDC paradigm.

  12. Gene-Lifestyle Interactions in Complex Diseases: Design and Description of the GLACIER and VIKING Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbasic, Azra; Poveda, Alaitz; Chen, Yan; Agren, Asa; Engberg, Elisabeth; Hu, Frank B; Johansson, Ingegerd; Barroso, Ines; Brändström, Anders; Hallmans, Göran; Renström, Frida; Franks, Paul W

    2014-12-01

    Most complex diseases have well-established genetic and non-genetic risk factors. In some instances, these risk factors are likely to interact, whereby their joint effects convey a level of risk that is either significantly more or less than the sum of these risks. Characterizing these gene-environment interactions may help elucidate the biology of complex diseases, as well as to guide strategies for their targeted prevention. In most cases, the detection of gene-environment interactions will require sample sizes in excess of those needed to detect the marginal effects of the genetic and environmental risk factors. Although many consortia have been formed, comprising multiple diverse cohorts to detect gene-environment interactions, few robust examples of such interactions have been discovered. This may be because combining data across studies, usually through meta-analysis of summary data from the contributing cohorts, is often a statistically inefficient approach for the detection of gene-environment interactions. Ideally, single, very large and well-genotyped prospective cohorts, with validated measures of environmental risk factor and disease outcomes should be used to study interactions. The presence of strong founder effects within those cohorts might further strengthen the capacity to detect novel genetic effects and gene-environment interactions. Access to accurate genealogical data would also aid in studying the diploid nature of the human genome, such as genomic imprinting (parent-of-origin effects). Here we describe two studies from northern Sweden (the GLACIER and VIKING studies) that fulfill these characteristics.

  13. A linguistic study of patient-centered interviewing: emergent interactional effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Ashley M; Sarinopoulos, Issidoros; Frankel, Richard M; Smith, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate interactional effects of patient-centered interviewing (PCI) compared to isolated clinician-centered interviewing (CCI). We conducted a pilot study comparing PCI (N=4) to CCI (N=4) for simulated new-patient visits. We rated interviews independently and measured patient satisfaction with the interaction via a validated questionnaire. We conducted interactional sociolinguistic analysis on the interviews and compared across three levels of analysis: turn, topic, and interaction. We found significant differences between PCI and CCI in physician responses to patients' psychosocial cues and concerns. The number and type of physician questions also differed significantly across PCI and CCI sets. Qualitatively, we noted several indicators of physician-patient attunement in the PCI interviews that were not present in the CCI interviews. They spanned diverse aspects of physician and patient speech, suggesting interactional accommodation on the part of both participants. This small pilot study highlights a variety of interactional variables that may underlie the effects associated with patient-centered interviewing (e.g., positive relationships, health outcomes). Question form, phonological accommodation processes, and use of stylistic markers are relatively unexplored in controlled studies of physician-patient interaction. This study characterizes several interactional variables for larger scale studies and contributes to models of patient-centeredness in practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A combination test for detection of gene-environment interaction in cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Brandon; Basu, Saonli; McGue, Matt

    2017-07-01

    Identifying gene-environment (G-E) interactions can contribute to a better understanding of disease etiology, which may help researchers develop disease prevention strategies and interventions. One big criticism of studying G-E interaction is the lack of power due to sample size. Studies often restrict the interaction search to the top few hundred hits from a genome-wide association study or focus on potential candidate genes. In this paper, we test interactions between a candidate gene and an environmental factor to improve power by analyzing multiple variants within a gene. We extend recently developed score statistic based genetic association testing approaches to the G-E interaction testing problem. We also propose tests for interaction using gene-based summary measures that pool variants together. Although it has recently been shown that these summary measures can be biased and may lead to inflated type I error, we show that under several realistic scenarios, we can still provide valid tests of interaction. These tests use significantly less degrees of freedom and thus can have much higher power to detect interaction. Additionally, we demonstrate that the iSeq-aSum-min test, which combines a gene-based summary measure test, iSeq-aSum-G, and an interaction-based summary measure test, iSeq-aSum-I, provides a powerful alternative to test G-E interaction. We demonstrate the performance of these approaches using simulation studies and illustrate their performance to study interaction between the SNPs in several candidate genes and family climate environment on alcohol consumption using the Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research dataset. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Engaging the Terminal: Promoting Halogen Bonding Interactions with Uranyl Oxo Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Korey P; Kalaj, Mark; Surbella, Robert G; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Cahill, Christopher L

    2017-11-02

    Engaging the nominally terminal oxo atoms of the linear uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) cation in non-covalent interactions represents both a significant challenge and opportunity within the field of actinide hybrid materials. An approach has been developed for promoting oxo atom participation in a range of non-covalent interactions, through judicious choice of electron donating equatorial ligands and appropriately polarizable halogen-donor atoms. As such, a family of uranyl hybrid materials was generated based on a combination of 2,5-dihalobenzoic acid and aromatic, chelating N-donor ligands. Delineation of criteria for oxo participation in halogen bonding interactions has been achieved by preparing materials containing 2,5-dichloro- (25diClBA) and 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid (25diBrBA) coupled with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) (1 and 2), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3-5), 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (terpy) (6-8), or 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (Cl-terpy) (9-10), which have been characterized through single crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman, Infrared (IR), and luminescence spectroscopy, as well as through density functional calculations of electrostatic potentials. Looking comprehensively, these results are compared with recently published analogues featuring 2,5-diiodobenzoic acid which indicate that although inclusion of a capping ligand in the uranyl first coordination sphere is important, it is the polarizability of the selected halogen atom that ultimately drives halogen bonding interactions with the uranyl oxo atoms. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. An in situ study of the adsorption behavior of functionalized particles on selfassembled monolayers via different chemical interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, X.Y.; Malaquin, Laurent; Reinhoudt, David; Wolf, Heiko; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2007-01-01

    The formation of particle monolayers by convective assembly was studied in situ with three different kinds of particle-surface interactions: adsorption onto native surfaces, with additional electrostatic interactions, and with supramolecular host-guest interactions. In the first case

  17. [Theory of elementary particles studies in weak interaction and grand unification and studies in accelerator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in high energy physics on the following topics: rare b decays; flavor changing top decays;neutrino physics; standard model; cp violation; heavy ion collisions; electron-positron interactions; electron-hadron interactions; hadron-hadron interactions; deep inelastic scattering; and grand unified models

  18. Toppar: an interactive browser for viewing association study results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Banasik, Karina; Robertson, Neil R; Mott, Richard; McCarthy, Mark I

    2018-06-01

    Data integration and visualization help geneticists make sense of large amounts of data. To help facilitate interpretation of genetic association data we developed Toppar, a customizable visualization tool that stores results from association studies and enables browsing over multiple results, by combining features from existing tools and linking to appropriate external databases. Detailed information on Toppar's features and functionality are on our website http://mccarthy.well.ox.ac.uk/toppar/docs along with instructions on how to download, install and run Toppar. Our online version of Toppar is accessible from the website and can be test-driven using Firefox, Safari or Chrome on sub-sets of publicly available genome-wide association study anthropometric waist and body mass index data (Locke et al., 2015; Shungin et al., 2015) from the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits consortium. totajuliusd@gmail.com.

  19. Study of interaction of GNR with glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Arti; Cardoso-Avila, P. E.; Sridharan, Sangita; Sahu, Aditi; Nair, Jyothi; Dongre, Harsh; Goda, Jayant S.; Sawant, Sharada; Dutt, Shilpee; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Murali Krishna, C.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation resistance is one of the major causes of recurrence and failure of radiotherapy. Different methods have been used to increase the efficacy of radiation therapy and at the same time restrict the radiation resistivity. From last few years nanoparticles have played a key role in the enhancement of radiosensitization. The densely packed nanoparticles can selectively scatter or absorb the high radiations, which allow better targeting of cellular components within the tumor hence resulting in increased radiation damage to the cancer cells. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the highly radioresistant brain cancer. Current treatment methods are surgical resection followed by concurrent chemo and radiation therapy. In this study we have used in-house engineered gold nano rodes (GNR) and analyzed their effect on U-87MG cell lines. MTT assay was employed to determine the cytotoxic concentration of the nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the effect of gold nanoparticles on glioma cells, which was followed by transmission electron microscopic examinations to visualize their cellular penetration. Our data shows that GNR were able to penetrate the cells and induce cytotoxicity at the concentration of 198 μM as determined by MTT assay at 24 post GNP treatment. Additionally, we show that Raman spectroscopy, could classify spectra between untreated and cells treated with nanoparticles. Taken together, this study shows GNR penetration and cytotoxicity in glioma cells thereby providing a rationale to use them in cancer therapeutics. Future studies will be carried out to study the biological activity of the formulation as a radiosensitizer in GBM.

  20. Considerations of stationary-phase interactions in groundwater pollution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.S.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of groundwater pollution are complicated by retention of both pollutant and tracers as static phases associated with the rock matrix. Three types of static phase are considered: (1) immobile pore water, (2) equilibrium adsorbed layers and (3) bulk precipitates, including biological systems. A brief discussion of the systems is given with examples from the work of the Water Research Centre on the problems encountered in quantifying groundwater pollution where static contamination may occur. (author)