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Sample records for non-classical rotational inertia

  1. Non-classical rotational inertia in the supersolid state

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Shun-ichiro

    2004-01-01

    An abrupt drop in the moment of inertia recently found in solid helium 4 is explained in terms of dynamics of zero-point vacancies (ZPV). Mechanical decoupling of ZPV from the motion of the container due to Bose statistics is developed to a macroscopic phenomenon by repulsive interaction. It gives a negative answer to the question whether BEC is a necessary condition for non-classical rotational inertia in a bulk three-dimensional system.

  2. Observation of non-classical rotational inertia in bulk solid 4He

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, Motoshi; Takada, Shunichi; Shibayama, Yoshiyuki; Shirahama, Keiya

    2006-01-01

    In recent torsional oscillator experiments by Kim and Chan (KC), a decrease of rotational inertia has been observed in solid 4He in porous materials and in a bulk annular channel. This observation strongly suggests the existence of "non-classical rotational inertia" (NCRI), i.e. superflow, in solid 4He. In order to study such a possible "supersolid" phase, we perform torsional oscillator experiments for cylindrical solid 4He samples. We have observed decreases of rotational inertia below 200 ...

  3. Non Classical Rotational Inertia Fraction in a One Dimensional Model of Supersolid

    OpenAIRE

    Sepulveda, Néstor; Josserand, Christophe; Rica, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    We study the rotational inertia of a model of supersolid in the frame of the mean field Gross-Pitaevskii theory in one space dimension. We discuss the ground state of the model and the existence of a non classical inertia (NCRI) under rotation that models an annular geometry. An explicit formula for the NCRI is deduced. It depends on the density profil of the ground state, in full agreement with former theories. We compare the NCRI computed through this theory with direct numerical simulation...

  4. Nonclassical rotational inertia for a supersolid under rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Aftalion, Amandine; Blanc, Xavier; Jerrard, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    As proposed by Leggett [4], the supersolidity of a crystal is characterized by the Non Classical Rotational Inertia (NCRI) property. Using a model of quantum crystal introduced by Josserand, Pomeau and Rica [5], we prove that NCRI occurs. This is done by analyzing the ground state of the aforementioned model, which is related to a sphere packing problem, and then deriving a theoretical formula for the inertia momentum. We infer a lower estimate for the NCRI fraction, which is a landmark of su...

  5. Rotational propulsion enabled by inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, François; Pak, On Shun; Zhu, LaiLai; Brandt, Luca; Lauga, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The fluid mechanics of small-scale locomotion has recently attracted considerable attention, due to its importance in cell motility and the design of artificial micro-swimmers for biomedical applications. Most studies on the topic consider the ideal limit of zero Reynolds number. In this paper, we investigate a simple propulsion mechanism --an up-down asymmetric dumbbell rotating about its axis of symmetry-- unable to propel in the absence of inertia in a Newtonian fluid. Inertial forces lead to continuous propulsion for all finite values of the Reynolds number. We study computationally its propulsive characteristics as well as analytically in the small-Reynolds-number limit. We also derive the optimal dumbbell geometry. The direction of propulsion enabled by inertia is opposite to that induced by viscoelasticity.

  6. Rotational inertia and multimodal heaviness perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Matthew; Shockley, Kevin; Riley, Michael A

    2007-10-01

    Perceived heaviness of wielded objects has been shown to be a function of the objects' rotational inertia--the objects' resistance to rotational acceleration. Studies have also demonstrated that if virtual objects rotate faster than the actual wielded object (i.e., a rotational gain is applied to virtual object motion), the wielded object is perceived as systematically lighter. The present research determined whether combining those inertial and visual manipulations would influence heaviness perception in a manner consistent with an inertial model of multimodal heaviness perception. Rotational inertia and optical rotational gain of wielded objects were manipulated to specify inertia multimodally. Both visual and haptic manipulations significantly influenced perceived heaviness. The results suggest that rotational inertia is detected multimodally and that multimodal heaviness perception conforms to an inertial model.

  7. Is the anomalous magnetic moment the consequence of a non-classical transformation for rotating frames?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisin, B V

    2002-01-01

    We consider the anomalous magnetic moment from an 'optical viewpoint' using an analogy between the motion of a particle with a magnetic moment in a magnetic field and the propagation of an optical pulse through an electro-optical crystal in an electric field. We show that an optical experiment similar to electron magnetic resonance is possible in some electro-optical crystals possessing the Faraday effect. This phenomenon is described by an analogue of the Pauli equation extracted from the Maxwell equation in the slowly varied amplitude approximation. In such an experiment the modulation by rotating fields plays a significant role. From the optical viewpoint the modulation assumes introducing the concept of a point rotation frame with the rotation axis at every point originated from the concept of the optical indicatrix (index ellipsoid). We discuss the connection between the non-classical transformation by transition from one such frame to another and an anomalous magnetic moment

  8. Classical rotational inertia of solid 4He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, J G; Wettlaufer, J S

    2005-06-17

    The observation of reduced rotational inertia in a cell containing solid 4He has been interpreted as evidence for superfluidity of the solid. We propose an alternative explanation: slippage of the solid, due to grain boundary premelting between the solid and dense adsorbed layers at the container wall. We calculate the range of film thickness, and determine the viscosity that will account for the missing rotational inertia. Grain boundary premelting also explains inertial anomalies in an earlier study of solid helium in porous glass and indicates that the liquid is partially superfluid.

  9. Nonclassical rotational inertia in helium crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A C; West, J T; Chan, M H W

    2007-09-28

    It has been proposed that the observed nonclassical rotational inertia (NCRI) in solid helium results from the superflow of thin liquid films along interconnected grain boundaries within the sample. We have observed NCRI in large (4)He crystals grown at constant temperature and pressure, demonstrating that the superfluid grain boundary model cannot explain the phenomenon.

  10. Non-classical continuum theory for fluids incorporating internal and Cosserat rotation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, K. S.; Joy, A. D.; Reddy, J. N.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a non-classical continuum theory for fluent continua in which the conservation and balance laws are derived by incorporating both internal rotation rates arising from the velocity gradient tensor and the rotation rates of the Cosserats. Specifically, in this non-classical continuum theory we have (1) the usual velocities (\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{v }}}), (2) the three internal rotation rates ({}_i^t\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{Θ }}}) about the axes of a fixed triad whose axes are parallel to the x-frame arising from the velocity gradient tensor (\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{L }}}) that are completely defined by the antisymmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, and (3) three additional rotation rates ({}_e^t\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{Θ }}}) about the axes of the same triad located at each material point as additional three unknown degrees of freedom, referred to as Cosserat rotation rates. This gives rise to \\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{v }}} and {}_e^t\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{Θ }}} as six degrees of freedom at a material point. The internal rotation rates {}_i^t\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{Θ }}}, often neglected in classical fluid mechanics, exist in all deforming fluent continua as these are due to velocity gradient tensor. When the internal rotation rates {}_i^t\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{Θ }}} are resisted by deforming fluent continua, conjugate moment tensor arises that together with {}_i^t\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{Θ }}} may result in energy storage and/or dissipation, which must be considered in the conservation and balance laws. The Cosserat rotation rations {}_e^t\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{Θ }}} also result in conjugate moment tensor that together with {}_e^t\\bar{ ±b {\\varvec{Θ }}} may also result in energy storage and/or dissipation. The main focus of this paper is a consistent derivation of conservation and balance laws for fluent continua that incorporate the aforementioned physics and associated constitutive theories for thermofluids using the conditions resulting from the entropy

  11. Nonclassical rotational inertia of a supersolid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftalion, Amandine; Blanc, Xavier; Jerrard, Robert L

    2007-09-28

    As proposed by Leggett [Phys. Rev. Lett. 25, 1543 (1970)10.1103/PhysRevLett.25.1543], the supersolidity of a crystal is characterized by the nonclassicalical Rotational Inertia (NCRI) property. Using a model of quantum crystal introduced by Josserand, Pomeau, and Rica [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2426 (1994)10.1103/PhysRevLett.72.2426], we prove that NCRI occurs. This is done by analyzing the ground state of the aforementioned model, which is related to a sphere packing problem, and then deriving a theoretical formula for the moment of inertia. We infer a lower estimate for the NCRI fraction, which is a landmark of supersolidity.

  12. Scaling of rotational inertia of primate mandibles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Callum F; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Platts, Ellen; Walsh, Treva; Heins, Liam; Gerstner, Geoffrey E; Taylor, Andrea B

    2017-05-01

    The relative importance of pendulum mechanics and muscle mechanics in chewing dynamics has implications for understanding the optimality criteria driving the evolution of primate feeding systems. The Spring Model (Ross et al., 2009b), which modeled the primate chewing system as a forced mass-spring system, predicted that chew cycle time would increase faster than was actually observed. We hypothesized that if mandibular momentum plays an important role in chewing dynamics, more accurate estimates of the rotational inertia of the mandible would improve the accuracy with which the Spring Model predicts the scaling of primate chew cycle period. However, if mass-related momentum effects are of negligible importance in the scaling of primate chew cycle period, this hypothesis would be falsified. We also predicted that greater "robusticity" of anthropoid mandibles compared with prosimians would be associated with higher moments of inertia. From computed tomography scans, we estimated the scaling of the moment of inertia (I j ) of the mandibles of thirty-one species of primates, including 22 anthropoid and nine prosimian species, separating I j into the moment about a transverse axis through the center of mass (I xx ) and the moment of the center of mass about plausible axes of rotation. We found that across primates I j increases with positive allometry relative to jaw length, primarily due to positive allometry of jaw mass and I xx , and that anthropoid mandibles have greater rotational inertia compared with prosimian mandibles of similar length. Positive allometry of I j of primate mandibles actually lowers the predictive ability of the Spring Model, suggesting that scaling of primate chew cycle period, and chewing dynamics in general, are more strongly influenced by factors other than scaling of inertial properties of the mandible, such as the dynamic properties of the jaw muscles and neural control. Differences in cycle period scaling between chewing and locomotion

  13. Influence of rotational inertia on turning performance of theropod dinosaurs: clues from humans with increased rotational inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, D R; Walter, R M; Lee, D V

    2001-11-01

    The turning agility of theropod dinosaurs may have been severely limited by the large rotational inertia of their horizontal trunks and tails. Bodies with mass distributed far from the axis of rotation have much greater rotational inertia than bodies with the same mass distributed close to the axis of rotation. In this study, we increased the rotational inertia about the vertical axis of human subjects 9.2-fold, to match our estimate for theropods the size of humans, and measured the ability of the subjects to turn. To determine the effect of the increased rotational inertia on maximum turning capability, five subjects jumped vertically while attempting to rotate as far as possible about their vertical axis. This test resulted in a decrease in the average angle turned to 20 % of the control value. We also tested the ability of nine subjects to run as rapidly as possible through a tight slalom course of six 90 degrees turns. When the subjects ran with the 9.2-fold greater rotational inertia, the average velocity through the course decreased to 77% of the control velocity. When the subjects ran the same course but were constrained as to where they placed their feet, the average velocity through the course decreased to 65 % of the control velocity. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that rotational inertia may have limited the turning performance of theropods. They also indicate that the effect of rotational inertia on turning performance is dependent on the type of turning behavior. Characters such as retroverted pubes, reduced tail length, decreased body size, pneumatic vertebrae and the absence of teeth reduced rotational inertia in derived theropods and probably, therefore, improved their turning agility. To reduce rotational inertia, theropods may have run with an arched back and tail, an S-curved neck and forelimbs held backwards against the body.

  14. Compensations for increased rotational inertia during human cutting turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Mu; Brown, Brian; Jindrich, Devin L

    2014-02-01

    Locomotion in a complex environment is often not steady state, but unsteady locomotion (stability and maneuverability) is not well understood. We investigated the strategies used by humans to perform sidestep cutting turns when running. Previous studies have argued that because humans have small yaw rotational moments of inertia relative to body mass, deceleratory forces in the initial velocity direction that occur during the turning step, or 'braking' forces, could function to prevent body over-rotation during turns. We tested this hypothesis by increasing body rotational inertia and testing whether braking forces during stance decreased. We recorded ground reaction force and body kinematics from seven participants performing 45 deg sidestep cutting turns and straight running at five levels of body rotational inertia, with increases up to fourfold. Contrary to our prediction, braking forces remained consistent at different rotational inertias, facilitated by anticipatory changes to body rotational speed. Increasing inertia revealed that the opposing effects of several turning parameters, including rotation due to symmetrical anterior-posterior forces, result in a system that can compensate for fourfold changes in rotational inertia with less than 50% changes to rotational velocity. These results suggest that in submaximal effort turning, legged systems may be robust to changes in morphological parameters, and that compensations can involve relatively minor adjustments between steps to change initial stance conditions.

  15. Galaxy rotations from quantised inertia and visible matter only

    OpenAIRE

    McCulloch, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown here that a model for inertial mass, called quantised inertia, or MiHsC (Modified inertia by a Hubble-scale Casimir effect) predicts the rotational acceleration of the 153 good quality galaxies in the SPARC dataset (2016 AJ 152 157), with a large range of scales and mass, from just their visible baryonic matter, the speed of light and the co-moving diameter of the observable universe. No dark matter is needed. The performance of quantised inertia is comparable to that of MoND, yet...

  16. Scaling of rotational inertia in murine rodents and two species of lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Rebecca M; Carrier, David R

    2002-07-01

    Because the force required to rotate a body about an axis is directly proportional to its rotational inertia about the axis, it is likely that animals with high rotational inertia would be constrained in their turning abilities. Given that rotational inertia scales with mass(1.67) in geometrically similar animals, whereas the ability to apply torque scales with mass(1.00), larger animals would be expected to have more difficulty turning than smaller animals of similar shape. To determine how rotational inertia scales with body mass, we used the fact that the period of a physical pendulum is proportional to its rotational inertia(0.50), and measured rotational inertia in two groups of vertebrates with greatly different body shapes: murine rodents (Mus domesticus and Rattus norvegicus) and lizards (Iguana iguana and Varanus exanthematicus). Rotational inertia did not deviate significantly from isometric scaling in the murine rodents as a group or in the varanid lizards, scaling with mass(1.63) and mass(1.59), respectively. Although rotational inertia did scale with negative allometry in iguanas and rats alone, with mass(1.56) and mass(1.42), respectively, it still increased much more quickly with increasing mass than the predicted ability to apply torque. This suggests either that these animals are not constrained by rotational inertia because of their relatively small size or that larger rodents and lizards are poorer turners than smaller ones. The murine rodents had a 3.0- to 4.9-fold lower rotational inertia than similarly sized lizards of either species. Given that the basal synapsids had body proportions and limb configurations similar to those of modern lizards, we suggest that the loss of the large muscular tail and elongated body form during the evolution of cynodonts and mammals reduced rotational inertia and probably improved turning ability.

  17. The calculation of the mass moment of inertia of a fluid in a rotating rectangular tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    This analysis calculated the mass moment of inertia of a nonviscous fluid in a slowly rotating rectangular tank. Given the dimensions of the tank in the x, y, and z coordinates, the axis of rotation, the percentage of the tank occupied by the fluid, and angle of rotation, an algorithm was written that could calculate the mass moment of inertia of the fluid. While not included in this paper, the change in the mass moment of inertia of the fluid could then be used to calculate the force exerted by the fluid on the container wall.

  18. Influence of increased rotational inertia on the turning performance of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D V; Walter, R M; Deban, S M; Carrier, D R

    2001-11-01

    The rotational inertia of an animal can be expected to influence directly its ability to execute rapid turning maneuvers. We hypothesized that a ninefold increase in rotational inertia would reduce maximum turning performance to one-ninth of control values. To test this prediction, we increased rotational inertia about the vertical axis of six human subjects and measured their ability to turn during maximum-effort jump turns. We measured the free moment about a vertical (i.e. yaw) axis as the subjects performed maximum-effort jump turns under three conditions: (i) unencumbered, (ii) wearing a backpack with a control weight and (iii) wearing a backpack of the same mass that increased the rotational inertia of the subject to 9.2 times that with the control weight. Rotational inertia measurements allowed us to estimate the angle turned during the take-off period (i.e. from jump initiation until the feet leave the ground) and the angular power and work of the maximum-effort turns. Surprisingly, the angle turned during take-off in the increased inertia trials was 44.7 % of that of the control trials, rather than the 10.9 % (9.2-fold reduction) expected on the basis of the increase in rotational inertia. When the subjects turned with increased rotational inertia, the maximum and mean torques exerted were, on average, 142 % and 190 %, respectively, of the values recorded during the control trials. Maximum torques during increased rotational inertia trials actually approached isometric maxima. In the increased rotational inertia trials, the angular impulse was 252 % of that of the control trials and the take-off period was 130 % of that of the control trials. By exerting larger torques over longer take-off periods, the subjects were able partially to compensate for the excess rotational inertia. In contrast to the observed changes in torque, maximum and mean angular power were highest in the unencumbered trials and lowest in the increased inertia trials. On the basis of a

  19. Spin Alignment and Collective Moment of Inertia of the Basic Rotational Band in the Cranking Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihide, TANAKA; Department of Physics, Osaka City University

    1982-01-01

    By making an attempt to separate the intrinsic particle and collective rotational motions in the cranking model, the spin alignment and the collective moment of inertia characterizing the basic rotational bands are defined, and investigated by using a simple i_ shell model. The result of the calculation indicates that the collective moment of inertia decreases under the presence of the quasiparticles which are responsible for the increase of the spin alignment of the band.

  20. Impact of Low Rotational Inertia on Power System Stability and Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Ulbig, Andreas; Borsche, Theodor S.; Andersson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale deployment of RES has led to significant generation shares of variable RES in power systems worldwide. RES units, notably inverter-connected wind turbines and PV that as such do not provide rotational inertia, are effectively displacing conventional generators and their rotating machinery. The traditional assumption that grid inertia is sufficiently high with only small variations over time is thus not valid for power systems with high RES shares. This has implications for frequen...

  1. Rotational inertia of continents: A proposed link between polar wandering and plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, M.F.

    1972-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed whereby displacement between continents and the earth's pole of rotation (polar wandering) gives rise to latitudinal transport of continental plates (continental drift) because of their relatively greater rotational inertia. When extended to short-term polar wobble, the hypothesis predicts an energy change nearly equivalent to the seismic energy rate.

  2. Extending pairing energy density functional using pairing rotational moments of inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinohara, Nobuo

    2018-02-01

    The pairing energy density functionals (EDFs) that include the spatial derivative and kinetic terms of the pair densities are discussed. The coupling constants of the pairing EDF are adjusted to reproduce the experimental pairing rotational moment of inertia, and the pair-density derivative terms are shown to systematically improve the values of the pairing rotational moments of inertia in Sn and Pb isotopes. It is pointed out that the conventional average pairing gaps overestimate the experimental odd–even mass staggering in the presence of the pair-density derivative terms.

  3. Sensorless interior permanent magnet synchronous motor control with rotational inertia adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Mao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical model is generally required in high dynamic sensorless motor control schemes for zero phase lag estimation of rotor position and speed. However, the rotational inertia uncertainty will cause dynamic estimation errors, eventually resulting in performance deterioration of the sensorless control system. Therefore, this article proposes a high dynamic performance sensorless control strategy with online adjustment of the rotational inertia. Based on a synthetic back electromotive force model, the voltage equation of interior permanent magnet synchronous motor is transformed to that of an equivalent non-salient permanent magnet synchronous motor. Then, an extended nonlinear observer is designed for interior permanent magnet synchronous motor in the stator-fixed coordinate frame, with rotor position, speed and load torque simultaneously estimated. The effect of inaccurate rotational inertia on the estimation of rotor position and speed is investigated, and a novel rotational inertia adjustment approach that employs the gradient descent algorithm is proposed to suppress the dynamic estimation errors. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy is demonstrated by experimental tests.

  4. On the polar moment of inertia of a compressible body. [planetary rotational dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The rotational dynamics of a body are governed by the values of its principle moments of inertia. These quantities are not directly observable, but they are related to the harmonic coefficients of the external gravity field and to the density distribution within the body, both of which can be inferred from appropriate observations. It is shown that, for the particular case of a spherical planet whose density varies as a power of the radial distance, the principal moment of inertia has an elegantly simple form. Application of this simplified case to the Jovian planets suggests that the density profiles outside the central core are approximately linear, with the apparent exception of Neptune.

  5. Thouless-Valatin rotational moment of inertia from linear response theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrík, Kristian; Kortelainen, Markus

    2018-03-01

    Spontaneous breaking of continuous symmetries of a nuclear many-body system results in the appearance of zero-energy restoration modes. These so-called spurious Nambu-Goldstone modes represent a special case of collective motion and are sources of important information about the Thouless-Valatin inertia. The main purpose of this work is to study the Thouless-Valatin rotational moment of inertia as extracted from the Nambu-Goldstone restoration mode that results from the zero-frequency response to the total-angular-momentum operator. We examine the role and effects of the pairing correlations on the rotational characteristics of heavy deformed nuclei in order to extend our understanding of superfluidity in general. We use the finite-amplitude method of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation on top of the Skyrme energy density functional framework with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. We have successfully extended this formalism and established a practical method for extracting the Thouless-Valatin rotational moment of inertia from the strength function calculated in the symmetry-restoration regime. Our results reveal the relation between the pairing correlations and the moment of inertia of axially deformed nuclei of rare-earth and actinide regions of the nuclear chart. We have also demonstrated the feasibility of the method for obtaining the moment of inertia for collective Hamiltonian models. We conclude that from the numerical and theoretical perspective, the finite-amplitude method can be widely used to effectively study rotational properties of deformed nuclei within modern density functional approaches.

  6. Nonsuperfluid origin of the nonclassical rotational inertia in a bulk sample of solid 4He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppy, John D

    2010-06-25

    The torsional oscillator experiments described here examine the effect of disorder on the nonclassical rotational inertia (NCRI) of a solid 4He sample. The NCRI increases with increasing disorder, but the period changes responsible for this increase occur primarily at higher temperatures. Contrary to expectations based on a supersolid scenario, the oscillator period remains relatively unaffected at the lowest temperatures. This result points to a nonsuperfluid origin for the NCRI.

  7. Dynamic behavior of a rotating delaminated composite beam including rotary inertia and shear deformation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan-Ali Jafari-Talookolaei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A finite element (FE model is developed to study the free vibration of a rotating laminated composite beam with a single delamination. The rotary inertia and shear deformation effects, as well as the bending–extension, bending–twist and extension–twist coupling terms are taken into account in the FE model. Comparison between the numerical results of the present model and the results published in the literature verifies the validity of the present model. Furthermore, the effects of various parameters, such as delamination size and location, fiber orientation, hub radius, material anisotropy and rotating speed, on the vibration of the beam are studied in detail. These results provide useful information in the study of the free vibration of rotating delaminated composite beams.

  8. Stability control of grasping objects with different locations of center of mass and rotational inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, Gregory P; Suh, Moon Suk; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe how the digits of the hand adjust to varying location of the center of mass (CoM) above or below the grasp and rotational inertia (RI) of a handheld object. Such manipulations do not immediately affect the equilibrium equations while stability control is affected. Participants were instructed to hold a handle, instrumented with 5 force-torque transducers and a 3-D rotational tilt sensor, while either the location of the CoM or the RI values were adjusted. On the whole, people use 2 mechanisms to adjust to the changed stability requirements; they increase the grip force and redistribute the total moment between the normal and tangential forces offsetting internal torques. The increase in grip force, an internal force, and offsetting internal torques allows for increases in joint and hand rotational apparent stiffness while not creating external forces-torques that would unbalance the equations of equilibrium.

  9. Oscillation frequency dependence of nonclassical rotation inertia of solid 4He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Y; Graves, J C; Kojima, H

    2007-07-06

    The nonclassical rotational inertia fraction of the identical cylindrical solid 4He below 300 mK is studied at 496 and 1173 Hz by a double resonance torsional oscillator. Below 35 mK, the fractions are the same at sufficiently low rim velocities. Above 35 mK, the fraction is greater for the higher than the lower mode. The dissipation peak of the lower mode occurs at a temperature approximately 4 mK lower than that of the higher mode. The drive dependence of the two modes shows that the reduction of the fraction is characterized by critical velocity, not amplitude or acceleration.

  10. Probing the upper limit of nonclassical rotational inertia in solid helium 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittner, Ann Sophie C; Reppy, John D

    2008-10-10

    We study the effect of confinement on solid 4He's nonclassical rotational inertia fraction (NCRIF) in a torsional oscillator by constraining it to narrow annular cells of various widths. The NCRIF exhibits an observed maximum value of 20% for annuli of approximately 100 microm width. Samples constrained to porous media or to larger geometries both have smaller NCRIF, mostly below approximately 1%. In addition, we extend the blocked-annulus experiment of Kim and Chan to solid samples with large supersolid fractions. Blocking the annulus suppresses the nonclassical decoupling from 17.1% to below the limit of our detection of 0.8%. This result demonstrates the nonlocal nature of the supersolid phenomena. At 20 mK, NCRIF depends on velocity history showing a closed hysteresis loop in different thin annular cells.

  11. Tyrannosaurus en pointe: allometry minimized rotational inertia of large carnivorous dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Donald M; Snively, Eric

    2004-02-07

    Theropod dinosaurs attained the largest body sizes among terrestrial predators, and were also unique in being exclusively bipedal. With only two limbs for propulsion and balance, theropods would have been greatly constrained in their locomotor performance at large body size. Using three-dimensional restorations of the axial bodies and limbs of 12 theropod dinosaurs, and determining their rotational inertias (RIs) about a vertical axis, we show that these animals expressed a pattern of phyletic size increase that minimized the increase in RI associated with increases in body size. By contrast, the RI of six quadrupedal, carnivorous archosaurs exhibited changes in body proportions that were closer to those predicted by isometry. Correlations of low RI with high agility in lizards suggest that large theropods, with low relative RI, could engage in activities requiring higher agility than would be possible with isometric scaling.

  12. Felt heaviness is used to perceive the affordance for throwing but rotational inertia does not affect either.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qin; Shockley, Kevin; Riley, Michael A; Tolston, Michael T; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2013-01-01

    Bingham et al. discovered a perceptible affordance property, composed of a relation between object weight and size, used to select optimal objects for long-distance throwing. Subsequent research confirmed this finding, but disconfirmed a hypothesis formulated by Bingham et al. about the information used to perceive the affordance. Following this, Zhu and Bingham investigated the possibility that optimal objects for throwing are selected as having a particular felt heaviness. The results supported this hypothesis. Perceived heaviness exhibits the size-weight illusion: to be perceived as equally heavy, larger objects must weigh more than smaller ones. Amazeen and Turvey showed that heaviness perception is determined by rotational inertia. We investigated whether rotational inertia would determine both perceived heaviness and throw-ability when spherical objects were held in the hand and wielded about the wrist. We found again that a particular judged heaviness corresponded to judged throw-ability. However, rotational inertia was found to have no effect on either judgment, suggesting that rotational inertia does not determine perceived heaviness of spherical objects held in the hand, as it did for the weighted-rod-type objects used by Amazeen and Turvey.

  13. Force Outputs during Squats Performed Using a Rotational Inertia Device under Stable versus Unstable Conditions with Different Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Guerrero, Jairo; Moras, Gerard; Baeza, Jennifer; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the force outputs achieved during a squat exercise using a rotational inertia device in stable versus unstable conditions with different loads and in concentric and eccentric phases. Thirteen male athletes (mean ± SD: age 23.7 ± 3.0 years, height 1.80 ± 0.08 m, body mass 77.4 ± 7.9 kg) were assessed while squatting, performing one set of three repetitions with four different loads under stable and unstable conditions at maximum concentric effort. Overall, there were no significant differences between the stable and unstable conditions at each of the loads for any of the dependent variables. Mean force showed significant differences between some of the loads in stable and unstable conditions (P rotational inertia device allowed the generation of similar force outputs under stable and unstable conditions at each of the four loads. The study also provides empirical evidence of the different force outputs achieved by adjusting load conditions on the rotational inertia device when performing squats, especially in the case of peak force. Concentric force outputs were significantly higher than eccentric outputs, except for peak force under both conditions. These findings support the use of the rotational inertia device to train the squatting exercise under unstable conditions for strength and conditioning trainers. The device could also be included in injury prevention programs for muscle lesions and ankle and knee joint injuries.

  14. Mass distribution and rotational inertia of "microtype" and "freely mobile" middle ear ossicles in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Danielle; Taraskin, Sergei N; Mason, Matthew J

    2011-12-01

    The middle ears of seven species of rodents, including four hamster species, were examined under light microscopy and through micro-CT imaging. Hamsters were found to possess a spectrum of ossicular morphologies ranging from something approaching "freely mobile" (Mesocricetus) to something nearer the "microtype" (Cricetulus), although no hamster has an orbicular apophysis of the malleus. Rats, mice and Calomyscus were found to have typically microtype ossicles. To explore the functional effects of these morphological differences, CT scan data were used to calculate the magnitudes of the moments of inertia and positions of the centres of mass and principal rotational axes for the malleus-incus complexes. Microtype species were found to have much greater ossicular inertias, relative to size, about the "anatomical axis" extending between anterior process of the malleus and short process of the incus; ossicular centres of mass were displaced further from this axis. Calculated inertial values were then put into an existing model of middle ear function (Hemilä et al., 1995), in order to see whether the more accurate data would improve predictions of upper hearing limits. For the rat and mouse they did, but this was not so for the hamster Mesocricetus. This might indicate that the inner rather than the middle ear limits hearing in this species, or might simply reflect other shortcomings of the model. Functional differences appear to exist even among rodent ears of the same general type, but the adaptive significance of these differences remains enigmatic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Falling with Style: Bats Perform Complex Aerial Rotations by Adjusting Wing Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergou, Attila J.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Vejdani, Hamid; Riskin, Daniel K.; Reimnitz, Lauren; Taubin, Gabriel; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable maneuverability of flying animals results from precise movements of their highly specialized wings. Bats have evolved an impressive capacity to control their flight, in large part due to their ability to modulate wing shape, area, and angle of attack through many independently controlled joints. Bat wings, however, also contain many bones and relatively large muscles, and thus the ratio of bats’ wing mass to their body mass is larger than it is for all other extant flyers. Although the inertia in bat wings would typically be associated with decreased aerial maneuverability, we show that bat maneuvers challenge this notion. We use a model-based tracking algorithm to measure the wing and body kinematics of bats performing complex aerial rotations. Using a minimal model of a bat with only six degrees of kinematic freedom, we show that bats can perform body rolls by selectively retracting one wing during the flapping cycle. We also show that this maneuver does not rely on aerodynamic forces, and furthermore that a fruit fly, with nearly massless wings, would not exhibit this effect. Similar results are shown for a pitching maneuver. Finally, we combine high-resolution kinematics of wing and body movements during landing and falling maneuvers with a 52-degree-of-freedom dynamical model of a bat to show that modulation of wing inertia plays the dominant role in reorienting the bat during landing and falling maneuvers, with minimal contribution from aerodynamic forces. Bats can, therefore, use their wings as multifunctional organs, capable of sophisticated aerodynamic and inertial dynamics not previously observed in other flying animals. This may also have implications for the control of aerial robotic vehicles. PMID:26569116

  16. Effect of fluid and particle inertia on the rotation of an oblate spheroidal particle suspended in linear shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, T.; Do-Quang, M.; Aidun, C. K.; Lundell, F.

    2015-05-01

    This work describes the inertial effects on the rotational behavior of an oblate spheroidal particle confined between two parallel opposite moving walls, which generate a linear shear flow. Numerical results are obtained using the lattice Boltzmann method with an external boundary force. The rotation of the particle depends on the particle Reynolds number, Rep=G d2ν-1 (G is the shear rate, d is the particle diameter, ν is the kinematic viscosity), and the Stokes number, St =α Rep (α is the solid-to-fluid density ratio), which are dimensionless quantities connected to fluid and particle inertia, respectively. The results show that two inertial effects give rise to different stable rotational states. For a neutrally buoyant particle (St =Rep ) at low Rep, particle inertia was found to dominate, eventually leading to a rotation about the particle's symmetry axis. The symmetry axis is in this case parallel to the vorticity direction; a rotational state called log-rolling. At high Rep, fluid inertia will dominate and the particle will remain in a steady state, where the particle symmetry axis is perpendicular to the vorticity direction and has a constant angle ϕc to the flow direction. The sequence of transitions between these dynamical states were found to be dependent on density ratio α , particle aspect ratio rp, and domain size. More specifically, the present study reveals that an inclined rolling state (particle rotates around its symmetry axis, which is not aligned in the vorticity direction) appears through a pitchfork bifurcation due to the influence of periodic boundary conditions when simulated in a small domain. Furthermore, it is also found that a tumbling motion, where the particle symmetry axis rotates in the flow-gradient plane, can be a stable motion for particles with high rp and low α .

  17. Effect of fluid and particle inertia on the rotation of an oblate spheroidal particle suspended in linear shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, T; Do-Quang, M; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F

    2015-05-01

    This work describes the inertial effects on the rotational behavior of an oblate spheroidal particle confined between two parallel opposite moving walls, which generate a linear shear flow. Numerical results are obtained using the lattice Boltzmann method with an external boundary force. The rotation of the particle depends on the particle Reynolds number, Re(p)=Gd(2)ν(-1) (G is the shear rate, d is the particle diameter, ν is the kinematic viscosity), and the Stokes number, St=αRe(p) (α is the solid-to-fluid density ratio), which are dimensionless quantities connected to fluid and particle inertia, respectively. The results show that two inertial effects give rise to different stable rotational states. For a neutrally buoyant particle (St=Re(p)) at low Re(p), particle inertia was found to dominate, eventually leading to a rotation about the particle's symmetry axis. The symmetry axis is in this case parallel to the vorticity direction; a rotational state called log-rolling. At high Re(p), fluid inertia will dominate and the particle will remain in a steady state, where the particle symmetry axis is perpendicular to the vorticity direction and has a constant angle ϕ(c) to the flow direction. The sequence of transitions between these dynamical states were found to be dependent on density ratio α, particle aspect ratio r(p), and domain size. More specifically, the present study reveals that an inclined rolling state (particle rotates around its symmetry axis, which is not aligned in the vorticity direction) appears through a pitchfork bifurcation due to the influence of periodic boundary conditions when simulated in a small domain. Furthermore, it is also found that a tumbling motion, where the particle symmetry axis rotates in the flow-gradient plane, can be a stable motion for particles with high r(p) and low α.

  18. A Rotating Speed Controller Design Method for Power Levelling by Means of Inertia Energy in Wind Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zian; Blaabjerg, Frede; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Power fluctuation caused by wind speed variations may be harmful for the stability of the power system as well as the reliability of the wind power converter, since it may induce thermal excursions in the solder joints of the power modules. Using the wind turbine rotor inertia energy for power...... leveling has been studied before, but no quantified analysis or generic design method have been found. In this paper, the transfer functions from the wind speed to electrical power, electromagnetic torque, and rotating speed are built based on which the rotating speed controller is designed...... in the frequency domain for power leveling. Moreover, the impact of other parameters on power leveling, including the time constant of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) and the rotor inertia, are also studied. With the proposed optimal design, the power fluctuations are mitigated as much as possible, while...

  19. Force Outputs during Squats Performed Using a Rotational Inertia Device under Stable versus Unstable Conditions with Different Loads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Vázquez-Guerrero

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to compare the force outputs achieved during a squat exercise using a rotational inertia device in stable versus unstable conditions with different loads and in concentric and eccentric phases. Thirteen male athletes (mean ± SD: age 23.7 ± 3.0 years, height 1.80 ± 0.08 m, body mass 77.4 ± 7.9 kg were assessed while squatting, performing one set of three repetitions with four different loads under stable and unstable conditions at maximum concentric effort. Overall, there were no significant differences between the stable and unstable conditions at each of the loads for any of the dependent variables. Mean force showed significant differences between some of the loads in stable and unstable conditions (P < 0.010 and peak force output differed between all loads for each condition (P < 0.045. Mean force outputs were greater in the concentric than in the eccentric phase under both conditions and with all loads (P < 0.001. There were no significant differences in peak force between concentric and eccentric phases at any load in either stable or unstable conditions. In conclusion, squatting with a rotational inertia device allowed the generation of similar force outputs under stable and unstable conditions at each of the four loads. The study also provides empirical evidence of the different force outputs achieved by adjusting load conditions on the rotational inertia device when performing squats, especially in the case of peak force. Concentric force outputs were significantly higher than eccentric outputs, except for peak force under both conditions. These findings support the use of the rotational inertia device to train the squatting exercise under unstable conditions for strength and conditioning trainers. The device could also be included in injury prevention programs for muscle lesions and ankle and knee joint injuries.

  20. Effect of the boundary conditions and influence of the rotational inertia on the vibrational modes of an elastic ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauvelin, Nicolas; Olson, Wilma K; Tobias, Irwin

    2014-04-01

    We present the small-amplitude vibrations of a circular elastic ring with periodic and clamped boundary conditions. We model the rod as an inextensible, isotropic, naturally straight Kirchhoff elastic rod and obtain the vibrational modes of the ring analytically for periodic boundary conditions and numerically for clamped boundary conditions. Of particular interest are the dependence of the vibrational modes on the torsional stress in the ring and the influence of the rotational inertia of the rod on the mode frequencies and amplitudes. In rescaling the Kirchhoff equations, we introduce a parameter inversely proportional to the aspect ratio of the rod. This parameter makes it possible to capture the influence of the rotational inertia of the rod. We find that the rotational inertia has a minor influence on the vibrational modes with the exception of a specific category of modes corresponding to high-frequency twisting deformations in the ring. Moreover, some of the vibrational modes over or undertwist the elastic rod depending on the imposed torsional stress in the ring.

  1. Observation of classical rotational inertia and nonclassical supersolid signals in solid 4He below 250 mK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittner, Ann Sophie C; Reppy, John D

    2006-10-20

    We have confirmed the existence, as first reported by Kim and Chan, of a supersolid state in solid 4He at temperatures below 250 mK. We have employed a torsional oscillator cell with a square cross section to insure a locking of the solid to the oscillating cell. We find that the nonclassical rotational inertia signal is not a universal property of solid 4He but can be eliminated through an annealing of the solid helium sample. This result has important implications for our understanding of the supersolid state.

  2. Prism adaptation of underhand throwing: rotational inertia and the primary and latent aftereffects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Julia J C; Stephen, Damian G; Carello, Claudia; Turvey, M T

    2009-06-05

    The effect of prism adaptation on movement is typically reduced when movement at test (with prisms removed) is different from movement at training. Previous research [J. Fernández-Ruiz, C. Hall-Haro, R. Díaz, J. Mischner, P. Vergara, J. C. Lopez-Garcia, Learning motor synergies makes use of information on muscular load, Learning & Memory 7 (2000) 193-198] suggests, however, that some adaptation is latent and only revealed through further testing in which the movement at training is fully reinstated. Movement in their training trials was throwing overhand to a vertical target with a mass attached to the arm. The critical test trials involved the same act initially without the attached mass and then with the attached mass. In replication, we studied throwing underhand to a horizontal target with left shifting prisms and a dissociation of the throwing arm's mass and moment of inertia. The two main results were that the observed latent aftereffect (a) depended on the similarity of training and test moments of inertia, and (b) combined with the primary aftereffect to yield a condition-independent sum. Discussion focused on a parallel between prism adaptation and principles governing recall highlighted in investigations of implicit memory: whether given training (study) conditions lead to good or poor persistence of adaptation (memory performance) at test depends on the conditions at test relative to the conditions at training (study).

  3. On steady rotations of a rigid body bearing a single-axis powered gyroscope whose precession axis is parallel to a principal plane of inertia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amel'kin, N. I.

    The set of steady motions of the system named in the title is represented parametrically via the gyro gimbal rotation angle for an arbitrary position of the gimbal axis. We study the set of steady motions for a system in which the gyro gimbal axis is parallel to a principal plane of inertia as well

  4. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilization abilities are also discussed. (author)

  5. Manipulated Changes in Limb Mass and Rotational Inertia in Trotting Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and Their Effect on Limb Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Brandon M; Carrier, David R

    2016-12-01

    While the mass distribution of limbs is known to influence the metabolic energy consumed during locomotion, it remains unknown how the mass distribution of limbs may influence overall limb kinematics and whether the influence of limb mass distribution on limb kinematics differs between fore- and hindlimbs. To examine limb mass distribution's influence upon fore- and hindlimb kinematics, temporal stride parameters and swing phase joint kinematics were recorded from four dogs trotting on a treadmill with 0.5% and 1.0% body mass added to each limb, forelimbs alone, and hindlimbs alone, as well as with no added mass. Under all loading conditions, stride period did not differ between fore- and hindlimbs; however, forelimbs exhibited greater duty factors and stance durations, whereas hindlimbs exhibited greater swing durations, which may be related to the hindlimb's greater mass. Changes in forelimb joint and hip range of motion (RoM), flexion, and extension were subject to a high amount of kinematic plasticity among dogs. In contrast, for the knee and ankle, distally loading all four limbs or hindlimbs alone substantially increased joint RoM and flexion. Increased flexion of the knee and ankle has the potential to reduce the hindlimb's rotational inertia during swing phase. The differing response of fore- and hindlimbs with regard to joint kinematics is likely due to differences in their mass and mass distribution and differences in the physiological traits of fore- and hindlimb protractors and joint flexors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Earthquake Protection of Existing Structures with Limited Seismic Joint: Base Isolation with Supplemental Damping versus Rotational Inertia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario De Domenico

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing civil engineering structures having strategic importance, such as hospitals, fire stations, and power plants, often do not comply with seismic standards in force today, as they were designed and built based on past structural guidelines. On the other hand, due to their special importance, structural integrity of such buildings is of vital importance during and after earthquakes, which puts demands on strategies for their seismic protection. In this regard, seismic base isolation has been widely employed; however, the existing limited seismic joint between adjacent buildings may hamper this application because of the large displacements concentrated at the isolation floor. In this paper, we compare two possible remedies: the former is to provide supplemental damping in conventional base isolation systems and the latter consists in a combination of base isolation with supplemental rotational inertia. For the second strategy, a mechanical device, called inerter, is arranged in series with spring and dashpot elements to form the so-called tuned-mass-damper-inerter (TMDI directly connected to an isolation floor. Several advantages of this second system as compared to the first one are outlined, especially with regard to the limitation of floor accelerations and interstory drifts, which may be an issue for nonstructural elements and equipment, in addition to disturbing occupants. Once the optimal design of the TMDI is established, possible implementation of this system into existing structures is discussed.

  7. Non-classical continuum mechanics a dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Maugin, Gérard A

    2017-01-01

    This dictionary offers clear and reliable explanations of over 100 keywords covering the entire field of non-classical continuum mechanics and generalized mechanics, including the theory of elasticity, heat conduction, thermodynamic and electromagnetic continua, as well as applied mathematics. Every entry includes the historical background and the underlying theory, basic equations and typical applications. The reference list for each entry provides a link to the original articles and the most important in-depth theoretical works. Last but not least, every entry is followed by a cross-reference to other related subject entries in the dictionary.

  8. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko, E-mail: nori@phys-h.keio.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  9. Sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Patricia; Muzet, Alain

    2000-08-01

    Sleep inertia is a transitional state of lowered arousal occurring immediately after awakening from sleep and producing a temporary decrement in subsequent performance. Many factors are involved in the characteristics of sleep inertia. The duration of prior sleep can influence the severity of subsequent sleep inertia. Although most studies have focused on sleep inertia after short naps, its effects can be shown after a normal 8-h sleep period. One of the most critical factors is the sleep stage prior to awakening. Abrupt awakening during a slow wave sleep (SWS) episode produces more sleep inertia than awakening in stage 1 or 2, REM sleep being intermediate. Therefore, prior sleep deprivation usually enhances sleep inertia since it increases SWS. There is no direct evidence that sleep inertia exhibits a circadian rhythm. However, it seems that sleep inertia is more intense when awakening occurs near the trough of the core body temperature as compared to its circadian peak. A more controversial issue concerns the time course of sleep inertia. Depending on the studies, it can last from 1 min to 4 h. However, in the absence of major sleep deprivation, the duration of sleep inertia rarely exceeds 30 min. But all these results should be analysed as a function of type of task and dependent variables. Different cognitive functions are probably not sensitive to the same degree to sleep inertia and special attention should be provided to dependent variables as a result of the cognitive processes under review. Finally, sleep disorders represent risk factors which deserve new insight in treatment strategies to counteract the adverse effects of sleep inertia.

  10. Thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut quartz plates carrying finite-size particles with rotational degree of freedom and rotatory inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunli; Liu, Nan; Yang, Jiashi; Chen, Weiqiu

    2011-03-01

    We study thickness-shear (TSh) vibration of a rotated Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) carrying finitesize circular particles that have a rotational degree of freedom and rotatory inertia. The particles are elastically attached to the QCR and are allowed to roll without sliding on the QCR surface. An analytical solution for particle-induced frequency shifts in the QCR is obtained. Examination of the frequency shifts shows that although they can be used to measure geometric/physical properties of the particles, the frequency shifts can have relatively complicated behaviors that cause deviations from the Sauerbrey equation and other anomalies in mass sensing. A frequency-dependent effective particle mass is introduced to classify and characterize different aspects of the particle-induced frequency shifts.

  11. Toward Higher-Order Mass Detection: Influence of an Adsorbate’s Rotational Inertia and Eccentricity on the Resonant Response of a Bernoulli-Euler Cantilever Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new theoretical model is derived, the results of which permit a detailed examination of how the resonant characteristics of a cantilever are influenced by a particle (adsorbate attached at an arbitrary position along the beam’s length. Unlike most previous work, the particle need not be small in mass or dimension relative to the beam, and the adsorbate’s geometric characteristics are incorporated into the model via its rotational inertia and eccentricity relative to the beam axis. For the special case in which the adsorbate’s (translational mass is indeed small, an analytical solution is obtained for the particle-induced resonant frequency shift of an arbitrary flexural mode, including the effects of rotational inertia and eccentricity. This solution is shown to possess the exact first-order behavior in the normalized particle mass and represents a generalization of analytical solutions derived by others in earlier studies. The results suggest the potential for “higher-order” nanobeam-based mass detection methods by which the multi-mode frequency response reflects not only the adsorbate’s mass but also important geometric data related to its size, shape, or orientation (i.e., the mass distribution, thus resulting in more highly discriminatory techniques for discrete-mass sensing.

  12. Toward Higher-Order Mass Detection: Influence of an Adsorbate’s Rotational Inertia and Eccentricity on the Resonant Response of a Bernoulli-Euler Cantilever Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Stephen M.; Dufour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new theoretical model is derived, the results of which permit a detailed examination of how the resonant characteristics of a cantilever are influenced by a particle (adsorbate) attached at an arbitrary position along the beam’s length. Unlike most previous work, the particle need not be small in mass or dimension relative to the beam, and the adsorbate’s geometric characteristics are incorporated into the model via its rotational inertia and eccentricity relative to the beam axis. For the special case in which the adsorbate’s (translational) mass is indeed small, an analytical solution is obtained for the particle-induced resonant frequency shift of an arbitrary flexural mode, including the effects of rotational inertia and eccentricity. This solution is shown to possess the exact first-order behavior in the normalized particle mass and represents a generalization of analytical solutions derived by others in earlier studies. The results suggest the potential for “higher-order” nanobeam-based mass detection methods by which the multi-mode frequency response reflects not only the adsorbate’s mass but also important geometric data related to its size, shape, or orientation (i.e., the mass distribution), thus resulting in more highly discriminatory techniques for discrete-mass sensing. PMID:26610493

  13. Toward Higher-Order Mass Detection: Influence of an Adsorbate's Rotational Inertia and Eccentricity on the Resonant Response of a Bernoulli-Euler Cantilever Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Stephen M; Dufour, Isabelle

    2015-11-19

    In this paper a new theoretical model is derived, the results of which permit a detailed examination of how the resonant characteristics of a cantilever are influenced by a particle (adsorbate) attached at an arbitrary position along the beam's length. Unlike most previous work, the particle need not be small in mass or dimension relative to the beam, and the adsorbate's geometric characteristics are incorporated into the model via its rotational inertia and eccentricity relative to the beam axis. For the special case in which the adsorbate's (translational) mass is indeed small, an analytical solution is obtained for the particle-induced resonant frequency shift of an arbitrary flexural mode, including the effects of rotational inertia and eccentricity. This solution is shown to possess the exact first-order behavior in the normalized particle mass and represents a generalization of analytical solutions derived by others in earlier studies. The results suggest the potential for "higher-order" nanobeam-based mass detection methods by which the multi-mode frequency response reflects not only the adsorbate's mass but also important geometric data related to its size, shape, or orientation (i.e., the mass distribution), thus resulting in more highly discriminatory techniques for discrete-mass sensing.

  14. Investigation on reactivity of non-classical carbenes with sterically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 4. Investigation on reactivity of non-classical carbenes with sterically hindered Lewis acid, B(C6F5)3 under inert and open conditions. Arunabha Thakur Pavan K Vardhanapu Gonela Vijaykumar Sushil Ranjan Bhatta. Regular Articles Volume 128 Issue 4 ...

  15. Investigation on reactivity of non-classical carbenes with sterically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (OH2). ] (1). As a part of our ongoing research interest in aNHC chemistry,24 the present study reports the reactivity of the strongly acidic, sterically encumbered borane. B(C6F5)3 towards non-classical carbenes as Lewis bases. Herein we report the isolation and characteri- zation of four new boron compounds resulted by ...

  16. Classical Sets and Non-Classical Sets: An Overview -38 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classical Sets and Non-Classical Sets: Sumita Basu is assistant professor of mathematics at Lady Braboume. College, Kolkata. Her research interests include artificial intelligence, automata theory, and mathematical logic. Keywords. Fuzzy sets, crisp sets, rough sets, law of excluded middle,. DeMorgan's laws. An Overview.

  17. Atomism and the Reasoning by a Non-Classical Logic

    OpenAIRE

    Antonino Drago; Romina Oliva

    1999-01-01

    Often, in the original scientific writings, a double negated statement (DNS) is not equivalent to his corresponding positive one; that means the inferring law 'non non A -> A' does not apply. Recent studies recognized in the failure of this logical law the borderline between classical and non-classical logics. Original writings by classical chemists dealing with the problem of atomism are particularly characterized by the occurrences of DNSs. An historical case, Avogadro's contribution to ...

  18. Patrolling Mechanics of Non-Classical Monocytes in Vascular Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscher, Konrad; Marcovecchio, Paola; Hedrick, Catherine C; Ley, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Non-classical monocytes have emerged as the preeminent vascular housekeepers. Continuous intravascular screening is enabled by slow patrolling on the endothelium and allows a rapid response to local perturbations. Intravital imaging has been crucial to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and migratory phenotype of patrolling. In this review, we discuss technical requirements of intravital microscopy such as imaging modalities, labeling strategies, and data analysis. We further focus on patrolling kinetics and adhesion receptors in different organs and vascular beds including arteries during homeostasis and vascular inflammation and define pertinent questions in the field.

  19. Patrolling Mechanics of Non-Classical Monocytes in Vascular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Buscher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-classical monocytes have emerged as the preeminent vascular housekeepers. Continuous intravascular screening is enabled by slow patrolling on the endothelium and allows a rapid response to local perturbations. Intravital imaging has been crucial to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and migratory phenotype of patrolling. In this review, we discuss technical requirements of intravital microscopy such as imaging modalities, labeling strategies, and data analysis. We further focus on patrolling kinetics and adhesion receptors in different organs and vascular beds including arteries during homeostasis and vascular inflammation and define pertinent questions in the field.

  20. The state of Hawking radiation is non-classical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.; Zigdon, Yoav

    2018-01-01

    We show that the state of the Hawking radiation emitted from a large Schwarzschild black hole (BH) deviates significantly from a classical state, in spite of its apparent thermal nature. For this state, the occupation numbers of single modes of massless asymptotic fields, such as photons, gravitons and possibly neutrinos, are small and, as a result, their relative fluctuations are large. The occupation numbers of massive fields are much smaller and suppressed beyond even the expected Boltzmann suppression. It follows that this type of thermal state cannot be viewed as classical or even semiclassical. We substantiate this claim by showing that, in a state with low occupation numbers, physical observables have large quantum fluctuations and, as such, cannot be faithfully described by a mean-field or by a WKB-like semiclassical state. Since the evolution of the BH is unitary, our results imply that the state of the BH interior must also be non-classical when described in terms of the asymptotic fields. We show that such a non-classical interior cannot be described in terms of a semiclassical geometry, even though the average curvature is sub-Planckian.

  1. Statistical methods in quantum optics 2 non-classical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Carmichael, H J

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Methods in Quantum Optics 2 - Non-Classical Fields continues the development of the methods used in quantum optics to treat open quantum systems and their fluctuations. Its early chapters build upon the phase-space methods introduced in the first volume Statistical Methods in Quantum Optics 1 - Matter Equations and Fokker-Planck Equations: the difficulties these methods face in treating non-classical light are exposed, where the regime of large fluctuations – failure of the system size expansion – is shown to be particularly problematic. Cavity QED is adopted as a natural vehicle for extending quantum noise theory into this regime. In response to the issues raised, the theory of quantum trajectories is presented as a universal approach to the treatment of fluctuations in open quantum systems. This book presents its material at a level suitable for beginning researchers or students in an advanced course in quantum optics, or a course in quantum mechanics or statistical physics that deals with o...

  2. Changes in inertia and effect on turning effort across different wheelchair configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Jayme J. Caspall, MS; Erin Seligsohn; Phuc V. Dao, MS; Stephen Sprigle, PhD, PT

    2014-01-01

    When executing turning maneuvers, manual wheelchair users must overcome the rotational inertia of the wheelchair system. Differences in wheelchair rotational inertia can result in increases in torque required to maneuver, resulting in greater propulsion effort and stress on the shoulder joints. The inertias of various configurations of an ultralightweight wheelchair were measured using a rotational inertia-measuring device. Adjustments in axle position, changes in wheel and tire type, and the...

  3. A multiscale transport model for non-classical nanochannel electroosmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Aluru, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    We present a multiscale model describing the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in nanoscale channels involving high surface charge liquid-solid interfaces. The departure of the EOF velocity profiles from classical predictions is explained by the non-classical charge distribution in the confined direction including charge inversion, reduced mobility of interfacial counter-ions, and subsequent enhancement of the local viscosity. The excess component of the local solvent viscosity is modeled by the local application of the Fuoss-Onsager theory and the Hubbard-Onsager electro-hydrodynamic equation based dielectric friction theory. The electroosmotic slip velocity is estimated from the interfacial friction coefficient, which in turn is calculated using a generalized Langevin equation based dynamical framework. The proposed model for local viscosity enhancement and EOF velocity shows good agreement of corresponding physical quantities against relevant molecular dynamics simulation results, including the cases of anomalous transport such as EOF reversal.

  4. Non-Classical Smoothening of Nano-Scale Surface Corrugations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Michael J.; Chason, Eric; Erlebacher, Jonah; Floro, Jerrold A.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    1999-05-20

    We report the first experimental observation of non-classical morphological equilibration of a corrugated crystalline surface. Periodic rippled structures with wavelengths of 290-550 nm were made on Si(OO1) by sputter rippling and then annealed at 650 - 750 °C. In contrast to the classical exponential decay with time, the ripple amplitude, A{lambda}(t), followed an inverse linear decay, A{lambda}(t)= A{lambda}(0)/(1 +k{lambda}t), agreeing with a prediction of Ozdemir and Zangwill. We measure the activation energy for surface relaxation to be 1.6±0.2 eV, consistent with an interpretation that dimers mediate transport.

  5. Non-Classical Smoothening of Nano-Scale Surface Corrugations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Michael J.; Chason, Eric; Erlebacher, Jonah; Floro, Jerrold A.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    1999-01-01

    We report the first experimental observation of non-classical morphological equilibration of a corrugated crystalline surface. Periodic rippled structures with wavelengths of 290-550 nm were made on Si(OO1) by sputter rippling and then annealed at 650 - 750 ampersand deg;C. In contrast to the classical exponential decay with time, the ripple amplitude, A λ (t), followed an inverse linear decay, A λ (t)= A λ (0)/(1 +k λ t), agreeing with a prediction of Ozdemir and Zangwill. We measure the activation energy for surface relaxation to be 1.6 ampersand plusmn;0.2 eV, consistent with an interpretation that dimers mediate transport

  6. Non-classical state engineering for quantum networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, Christina E.

    2014-01-24

    The wide field of quantum information processing and quantum networks has developed very fast in the last two decades. Besides the regime of discrete variables, which was developed first, the regime of continuous variables represents an alternative approach to realize many quantum applications. Non-classical states of light, like squeezed or entangled states, are a fundamental resource for quantum applications like quantum repeaters, quantum memories, quantum key distribution, quantum spectroscopy, and quantum metrology. These states can be generated successfully in the infrared wavelength regime. However, for some tasks other wavelengths, especially in the visible wavelength regime, are desirable. To generate non-classical states of light in this wavelength regime frequency up-conversion can be used, since all quantum properties are maintained in this process. The first part of this thesis deals with the experimental frequency up-conversion of quantum states. Squeezed vacuum states of light at 1550 nm were up-converted to 532 nm and a noise reduction of -1.5 dB at 532 nm was achieved. These states can be used for increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors or spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, one part of an entangled state at 1550 nm was up-converted to 532 nm and, thus, entanglement between these two wavelengths was generated and characterized to -1.4 dB following Duan et al. With such a quantum link it is possible to establish a quantum network, which takes advantage of the low optical loss at 1550 nm for information transmission and of atomic transitions around 532 nm for a quantum memory in a quantum repeater. For quantum networks the distribution of entanglement and especially of a quantum key is essential. In the second part of this thesis the experimental distribution of entanglement by separable states is demonstrated. The underlying protocol requires a special three-mode state, which is separable in two of the three splittings. With

  7. Non-classical state engineering for quantum networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, Christina E.

    2014-01-01

    The wide field of quantum information processing and quantum networks has developed very fast in the last two decades. Besides the regime of discrete variables, which was developed first, the regime of continuous variables represents an alternative approach to realize many quantum applications. Non-classical states of light, like squeezed or entangled states, are a fundamental resource for quantum applications like quantum repeaters, quantum memories, quantum key distribution, quantum spectroscopy, and quantum metrology. These states can be generated successfully in the infrared wavelength regime. However, for some tasks other wavelengths, especially in the visible wavelength regime, are desirable. To generate non-classical states of light in this wavelength regime frequency up-conversion can be used, since all quantum properties are maintained in this process. The first part of this thesis deals with the experimental frequency up-conversion of quantum states. Squeezed vacuum states of light at 1550 nm were up-converted to 532 nm and a noise reduction of -1.5 dB at 532 nm was achieved. These states can be used for increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors or spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, one part of an entangled state at 1550 nm was up-converted to 532 nm and, thus, entanglement between these two wavelengths was generated and characterized to -1.4 dB following Duan et al. With such a quantum link it is possible to establish a quantum network, which takes advantage of the low optical loss at 1550 nm for information transmission and of atomic transitions around 532 nm for a quantum memory in a quantum repeater. For quantum networks the distribution of entanglement and especially of a quantum key is essential. In the second part of this thesis the experimental distribution of entanglement by separable states is demonstrated. The underlying protocol requires a special three-mode state, which is separable in two of the three splittings. With

  8. Rodent Models of Non-classical Progesterone Action Regulating Ovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Mittelman-Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming clear that steroid hormones act not only by binding to nuclear receptors that associate with specific response elements in the nucleus but also by binding to receptors on the cell membrane. In this newly discovered manner, steroid hormones can initiate intracellular signaling cascades which elicit rapid effects such as release of internal calcium stores and activation of kinases. We have learned much about the translocation and signaling of steroid hormone receptors from investigations into estrogen receptor α, which can be trafficked to, and signal from, the cell membrane. It is now clear that progesterone (P4 can also elicit effects that cannot be exclusively explained by transcriptional changes. Similar to E2 and its receptors, P4 can initiate signaling at the cell membrane, both through progesterone receptor and via a host of newly discovered membrane receptors (e.g., membrane progesterone receptors, progesterone receptor membrane components. This review discusses the parallels between neurotransmitter-like E2 action and the more recently investigated non-classical P4 signaling, in the context of reproductive behaviors in the rodent.

  9. A Non-classical Hydrostatic Equation for Unsaturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Bras, R. L.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Sakaki, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The classical hydrostatic equation (CHE) of a liquid fluid in unsaturated porous media is critically re-examined vis-a-vis Newton's first law, the principle of minimum potential energy, and the principle of virtual work. We found that the CHE is inconsistent with these fundamental principles. A non-classical hydrostatic equation (NCHE), derived based on Newton's first law and the principle of minimum potential energy, includes an extra term as a nonlinear function of tension and liquid content. The NCHE makes four quantitative and experimentally verifiable predictions that are inconsistent with the CHE: 1) tension head is a nonlinear function of elevation (nonlinearity); 2) the vertical profile of equilibrium liquid content extends within a finite distance bounded by 'edges' (discontinuity); 3) equilibrium profiles of liquid content and tension head may decrease or increase with elevation (non-monotonicity); and 4) opposite horizontal equilibrium distribution of liquid content to that according to the CHE (lateral reversion). Preliminary laboratory experiments have confirmed nonlinearity and provided suggestive evidence consistent with discontinuity. In addition, an analytical expression of areal liquid content as a function of liquid content in terms of retention curve was obtained for the first time. This study provides an alternative explanation of flow and transport in unsaturated porous media deviating from Darcy's law or Richards' equation, and may be a starting point of formulating revised Darcy's and Richards' equation.

  10. A novel and simple means to estimate asteroid thermal inertia

    OpenAIRE

    Drube, Line; Harris, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Calculating accurate values of thermal inertia for asteroids is a difficult process requiring a shape model, thermal-infrared observations of the object obtained over broad ranges of rotation period and aspect angle, and detailed thermophysical modeling. Consequently, reliable thermal inertia values are currently available for relatively few asteroids. On the basis of simple asteroid thermal modeling we have developed an empirical relationship enabling the thermal inertia of an asteroid to be...

  11. Dynamic Inertia Measurement Method

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Critically important inertia measurements are complex and expensive to obtain due to the extensive fixturing and custom instrumentation of conventional techniques....

  12. Moments of Inertia of Disks and Spheres without Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok-Cheol; Hong, Seok-In

    2013-01-01

    Calculation of moments of inertia is often challenging for introductory-level physics students due to the use of integration, especially in non-Cartesian coordinates. Methods that do not employ calculus have been described for finding the rotational inertia of thin rods and other simple bodies. In this paper we use the parallel axis theorem and…

  13. Spectroscopic studies of OCS-doped 4He clusters with 9-72 helium atoms: observation of broad oscillations in the rotational moment of inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A R W; Xu, Yunjie; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2007-08-09

    High-resolution spectra of HeN-OCS clusters with N up to 39 in the microwave region and up to 72 in the infrared region were observed with apparatus-limited line widths of about 15 kHz and 0.001 cm(-1), respectively. The cold (approximately 0.2 K) clusters were produced in pulsed supersonic jet expansions of very dilute OCS + He mixtures and probed using a microwave Fourier transform spectrometer or a tunable infrared diode laser spectrometer. Consistent analyses of the microwave and infrared data yield band origins for the carbonyl stretching vibration, together with rotational parameters for the ground and excited vibrational states. The rotational constant, B, passes through a minimum at N = 9 and then rises as the He atoms uncouple from the OCS rotational motion as a result of superfluid effects. There are broad unexpected oscillations in B, with maxima at N = 24 and 47 and minima at N = 36 and 62. The change in B upon vibrational excitation, which is negative for the OCS molecule, converges to positive values for N > 15. These results help to bridge the gap between individual molecules and bulk matter with atom-by-atom resolution over a significant range of cluster sizes.

  14. [Diffuse hypertrichosis revealing non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthin, C; Sibilia, P; Martins-Hericher, J; Donzeau, A; Martin, L

    2018-03-07

    Non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NC-CAH) is a recessive autosomal disease caused by a deficiency of adrenal steroidogenesis enzymes. It must be distinguished from classical CAH, either simple virilising or salt-wasting, diagnosed during the neonatal period and responsible for potentially lethal disorders of sexual differentiation. NC-CAH presents a simpler and less specific clinical picture. Herein, we present two cases comprising twin girls consulting for diffuse hypertrichosis. Two 5-year-old twin girls were seen at our consultation for increased pilosity on all four limbs, but with no facial pilosity or synophrys, as well as comedones on the chin. Their height and weight and psychomotor development was normal, with no signs of precocious puberty and no clitoral hypertrophy. Levels of 17OH-P and SDHA were high, while FSH and LH were low and IGF1 and TSH were normal. Analysis of gene CYP21 associated with NC-CAH showed mutations p.V281L and IVS2-13A/C>G. Mutation p.V281L was present in the heterozygous state in the older sister and the father, together with moderate hyperpilosity but without hirsutism or acne. No mutations were found in the mother, indicating either de novo appearance of mutation IVS2-13A/C>G in the twins or germline mosaicism in the mother. We diagnosed NC-CAH as the cause of diffuse hypertrichosis in these twins. This disease is not rare, with a prevalence of 1/1000 to 1500 among peoples of European descent. It is often diagnosed late since routine neonatal screening is not performed. In some cases, NC-CAH remains asymptomatic. The appearance of pubic hair at around 5 to 7 years is the initial reason for consultation, particularly with a dermatologist. Hyperandrogenism varies, involving hirsutism, acne, fertility disorders and premature ageing of bone. Cortisol and aldosterone levels are generally normal. The risk of acute adrenal insufficiency is extremely low. Differential diagnosis concerns ovarian or adrenal tumors and

  15. Mars Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the global thermal inertia of the Martian surface as measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor. The data were acquired during the first 5000 orbits of the MGS mapping mission. The pattern of inertia variations observed by TES agrees well with the thermal inertia maps made by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper experiment, but the TES data shown here are at significantly higher spatial resolution (15 km versus 60 km).The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  16. Nuclear moments of inertia at high spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleplanque, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    The competition between collective motion and alignment at high spin can be evaluated by measuring two complementary dynamic moments of inertia. The first, I band, measured in γ-γ correlation experiments, relates to the collective properties of the nucleus. A new moment of inertia I/sub eff/ is defined here, which contains both collective and alignment effects. Both of these can be measured in continuum γ-ray spectra of rotational nuclei up to high frequencies. The evolution of γ-ray spectra for Er nuclei from mass 160 to 154 shows that shell effects can directly be observed in the spectra of the lighter nuclei

  17. Implementation and validation of synthetic inertia support employing series produced electric vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezkalla, Michel M.N.; Martinenas, Sergejus; Zecchino, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The high integration of renewable energy resources (inverter connected) replacing conventional generation reduces the available rotational inertia in the power system. This introduces the need for faster regulation services including synthetic inertia services. These services could potentially...... be provided by electric vehicles due to their fast response capability. This work evaluates and experimentally shows the capability and limits of EVs in providing synthetic inertia services. Three series produced EVs are used during the experiment. The results show the performance of the EVs in providing...... synthetic inertia. It shows also that, on the contrary of synchronous inertia, synthetic inertia might lead to unstable frequency behavior....

  18. Non-classical structures of organic compounds: unusual stereochemistry and hypercoordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, Vladimir I; Minyaev, Ruslan M; Hoffmann, Roald

    2002-01-01

    Non-classical structures of organic compounds are defined as molecules containing non-tetrahedral tetracoordinate and/or hypercoordinate carbon atoms. The evolution of the views on this subject is considered and the accumulated theoretical and experimental data on the structures and dynamic transformations of non-classical organic compounds are systematised. It is shown that computational analysis using the methods and the software potential of modern quantum chemistry has now acquired high predictive capacity and is the most important source of data on the structures of non-classical compounds. The bibliography includes 227 references.

  19. Changes in inertia and effect on turning effort across different wheelchair configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspall, Jayme J; Seligsohn, Erin; Dao, Phuc V; Sprigle, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    When executing turning maneuvers, manual wheelchair users must overcome the rotational inertia of the wheelchair system. Differences in wheelchair rotational inertia can result in increases in torque required to maneuver, resulting in greater propulsion effort and stress on the shoulder joints. The inertias of various configurations of an ultralightweight wheelchair were measured using a rotational inertia-measuring device. Adjustments in axle position, changes in wheel and tire type, and the addition of several accessories had various effects on rotational inertias. The configuration with the highest rotational inertia (solid tires, mag wheels with rearward axle) exceeded the configuration with the lowest (pneumatic tires, spoke wheels with forward axle) by 28%. The greater inertia requires increased torque to accelerate the wheelchair during turning. At a representative maximum acceleration, the reactive torque spanned the range of 11.7 to 15.0 N-m across the wheelchair configurations. At higher accelerations, these torques exceeded that required to overcome caster scrub during turning. These results indicate that a wheelchair's rotational inertia can significantly influence the torque required during turning and that this influence will affect active users who turn at higher speeds. Categorizing wheelchairs using both mass and rotational inertia would better represent differences in effort during wheelchair maneuvers.

  20. Materials with complex behaviour II properties, non-classical materials and new technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Oechsner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This book reviews developments and trends in advanced materials and their properties; modeling and simulation of non-classical materials and new technologies for joining materials. Offers tools for characterizing and predicting properties and behavior.

  1. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  2. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinan Hu

    Full Text Available Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+ at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability.

  3. Pairing field and moments of inertia of superdeformed nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Yong; Xu Fu Xin

    2002-01-01

    The authors have systematically analysed the dynamic moments of inertia of the experimental superdeformed (SD) bands observed in the A = 190, 150 and 60-80 mass regions as functions of rotational frequency. By combining the different mass regions, the dramatic features of the dynamic moments of inertia were found and explained based on the calculations of the pairing fields of SD nuclei with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator quadrupole pairing Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model

  4. Feature-based prediction of non-classical and leaderless protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Blom, Nikolaj

    2004-01-01

    -containing) secretory proteins where only the mature part of the protein has been annotated or cases where the signal peptide remains uncleaved. By scanning the entire human proteome we identified new proteins potentially undergoing non-classical secretion. Predictions can be made at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/SecretomeP....

  5. [Classical and non-classical taxonomy: where does the boundary pass?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlinov, I Ia

    2006-01-01

    Rise of non-classical science during XX century had certain influence upon development of biological taxonomy. Scientific pluralism (especially normative naturalism of Laudan), contrary to positivist and early post-positivist treatments, made taxonomy acknowledged scientific discipline of its own right. The present state of some schools of taxonomy makes it possible to consider them as a part of non-classical science and constituting the non-classical taxonomy. The latter is characterized by the following most important features. Ontological substantiation of both classificatory approaches and particular classifications is requested which invalidates such formal approaches as nominalistic and phenetic (numerical) schools. This substantiation takes a form of content-wise background preferably causal models which include certain axioms and presumptions about taxonomic diversity being studied, together with its causes, and thus define initial conditions of classificatory procedures. From this viewoint, phylogenetic classificatory approach is the most developed part of non-classical taxonomy. The entire taxonomic diversity is structured into several aspects of different levels of generality, each being outlined by a particular consideration aspect. The latter makes personal knowledge constituting an irremovable part of any scientific statement about taxonomic diversity, thus opposition of "objectively" and "subjectively" elaborated classifications becomes vague. Interrelation of various species concepts corresponding to its different consideration aspects is described by uncertainty relation principle. Classificatory algorithms are to be compatible with the conditions of a background model to ensure particular classifications obtained by their means are interpretable within the same model: this is provided by the correspondence principle. Classification is considered as a taxonomic hypothesis, i.e. a conjectural judgement about structure of particular fragment of

  6. Non-classical Signature of Parametric Fluorescence and its Application in Metrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamar M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a short theoretical background of what the non-classical light means. We applied the criterion for the existence of non-classical effects derived by C.T. Lee on parametric fluorescence. The criterion was originally derived for the study of two light beams with one mode per beam. We checked if the criterion is still working for two multimode beams of parametric down-conversion through numerical simulations. The theoretical results were tested by measurement of photon number statistics of twin beams emitted by nonlinear BBO crystal pumped by intense femtoseconds UV pulse. We used ICCD camera as the detector of photons in both beams. It appears that the criterion can be used for the measurement of the quantum efficiencies of the ICCD cameras.

  7. Löwenheim-Skolem theorems for non-classical first-order algebraizable logics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dellunde, P.; García-Cerdaña, A.; Noguera, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2016), s. 321-345 ISSN 1367-0751 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14654S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Löwenheim-Skolem theorems * first-order predicate logic s * non-classical logic s * algebraizable logic s * model theory Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.575, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/MTR/noguera-0469168.pdf

  8. Phase-space representation of non-classical behaviour of scalar wave-fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canas-Cardona, Gustavo; Castaneda, Roman [Physics School, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Medellin, A.A. 3840 Medellin (Colombia); Vinck-Posada, Herbert, E-mail: gcanas@unal.edu.co [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Bogota, Bogota D.C (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of optical fields by using radiant and virtual point sources for the spatial coherence wavelets in the phase-space representation evidences some effects, conventionally attributed to non-classical correlations of light, although such type of correlations are not explicitly included in the model. Specifically, a light state is produced that has similar morphology to the Wigner Distribution Function of the well-known quantum Schroedinger cat and squeezed states.

  9. Electron microscopy of crystalline solids and non-classical crystal growth

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, Heather Frances

    2013-01-01

    This project concerns the non-classical crystal growth of various porous and non-porous materials. In order to determine their crystal growth mechanism, the reaction was stopped at several different reaction times with the size, morphology, crystal structure and orientation of the particles analysed using scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy as the principal characterisation techniques. Other techniques used include X-ray diffraction, energy disper...

  10. Non-classical austenite-martensite interfaces observed in single crystals of Cu-Al-Ni

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 11 (2009), s. 793-807 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627; GA ČR(CZ) GP202/09/P164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : shape memory alloy s * martensitic microstructure * non-classical interfaces * crossing twins Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.935, year: 2009 http://www.informaworld.com

  11. Spin-Mechanical Inertia in Antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ran; Wu, Xiaochuan; Xiao, Di

    Interplay between spin dynamics and mechanical motions is responsible for numerous striking phenomena, which has shaped a rapidly expanding field known as spin-mechanics. The guiding principle of this field has been the conservation of angular momentum that involves both quantum spins and classical mechanical rotations. However, in an antiferromagnet, the macroscopic magnetization vanishes while the order parameter (Néel order) does not carry an angular momentum. It is therefore not clear whether the order parameter dynamics has any mechanical consequence as its ferromagnetic counterparts. Here we demonstrate that the Néel order dynamics affects the mechanical motion of a rigid body by modifying its inertia tensor in the presence of strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy. This effect depends on temperature when magnon excitations are considered. Such a spin-mechanical inertia can produce measurable consequences at nanometer scales. Our discovery establishes spin-mechanical inertia as an essential ingredient to properly describe spin-mechanical effects in AFs, which supplements the known governing physics from angular momentum conservation. This work was supported by the DOE, Basic Energy Sciences, Grant No. DE-SC0012509. D.X. also acknowledges support from a Research Corporation for Science Advancement Cottrell Scholar Award.

  12. [A non-classical approach to medical practices: Michel Foucault and Actor-Network Theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bińczyk, E

    2001-01-01

    The text presents an analysis of medical practices stemming from two sources: Michel Foucault's conception and the research of Annemarie Mol and John Law, representatives of a trend known as Actor-Network Theory. Both approaches reveal significant theoretical kinship: they can be successfully consigned to the framework of non-classical sociology of science. I initially refer to the cited conceptions as a version of non-classical sociology of medicine. The identity of non-classical sociology of medicine hinges on the fact that it undermines the possibility of objective definitions of disease, health and body. These are rather approached as variable social and historical phenomena, co-constituted by medical practices. To both Foucault and Mol the main object of interest was not medicine as such, but rather the network of medical practices. Mol and Law sketch a new theoretical perspective for the analysis of medical practices. They attempt to go beyond the dichotomous scheme of thinking about the human body as an object of medical research and the subject of private experience. Research on patients suffering blood-sugar deficiency provide the empirical background for the thesis of Actor-Network Theory representatives. Michel Foucault's conceptions are extremely critical of medical practices. The French researcher describes the processes of 'medicalising' Western society as the emergence of a new type of power. He attempts to sensitise the reader to the ethical dimension of the processes of medicalising society.

  13. Cross-sectional observational study of 208 patients with non-classical urea cycle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüegger, Corinne M; Lindner, Martin; Ballhausen, Diana; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Beblo, Skadi; Das, Anibh; Gautschi, Matthias; Glahn, Esther M; Grünert, Sarah C; Hennermann, Julia; Hochuli, Michel; Huemer, Martina; Karall, Daniela; Kölker, Stefan; Lachmann, Robin H; Lotz-Havla, Amelie; Möslinger, Dorothea; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Plecko, Barbara; Rutsch, Frank; Santer, René; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Staufner, Christian; Stricker, Tamar; Wijburg, Frits A; Williams, Monique; Burgard, Peter; Häberle, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are inherited disorders of ammonia detoxification often regarded as mainly of relevance to pediatricians. Based on an increasing number of case studies it has become obvious that a significant number of UCD patients are affected by their disease in a non-classical way: presenting outside the newborn period, following a mild course, presenting with unusual clinical features, or asymptomatic patients with only biochemical signs of a UCD. These patients are surviving into adolescence and adulthood, rendering this group of diseases clinically relevant to adult physicians as well as pediatricians. In preparation for an international workshop we collected data on all patients with non-classical UCDs treated by the participants in 20 European metabolic centres. Information was collected on a cohort of 208 patients 50% of which were ≥ 16 years old. The largest subgroup (121 patients) had X-linked ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) of whom 83 were female and 29% of these were asymptomatic. In index patients, there was a mean delay from first symptoms to diagnosis of 1.6 years. Cognitive impairment was present in 36% of all patients including female OTCD patients (in 31%) and those 41 patients identified presymptomatically following positive newborn screening (in 12%). In conclusion, UCD patients with non-classical clinical presentations require the interest and care of adult physicians and have a high risk of neurological complications. To improve the outcome of UCDs, a greater awareness by health professionals of the importance of hyperammonemia and UCDs, and ultimately avoidance of the still long delay to correctly diagnose the patients, is crucial.

  14. Non-classical effects of androgens on testes from neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa, Luciana Abreu; Escott, Gustavo Monteiro; Cavalari, Fernanda Carvalho; Schneider, Clara Maria Müller; de Fraga, Luciano Stürmer; Loss, Eloísa da Silveira

    2015-01-01

    The intratesticular testosterone concentration is high during the early postnatal period although the intracellular androgen receptor expression (iAR) is still absent in Sertoli cells (SCs). This study aimed to evaluate the non-classical effects of testosterone and epitestosterone on calcium uptake and the electrophysiological effects of testosterone (1μM) on SCs from rats on postnatal day (pnd) 3 and 4 with lack of expression of the iAR. In addition, crosstalk on the electrophysiological effects of testosterone and epitestosterone with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in SCs from 15-day-old rats was evaluated. The isotope (45)Ca(2+) was utilized to evaluate the effects of testosterone and epitestosterone in calcium uptake. The membrane potential of SCs was recorded using a standard single microelectrode technique. No immunoreaction concerning the iAR was observed in SCs on pnd 3 and 4. At this age, both testosterone and epitestosterone increased the (45)Ca(2+) uptake. Testosterone promoted membrane potential depolarization of SCs on pnd 4. FSH application followed by testosterone and epitestosterone reduced the depolarization of the two hormones. Application of epitestosterone 5 min after FSH resulted in a delay of epitestosterone-promoted depolarization. The cell resistance was also reduced. Thus, in SCs from neonatal Wistar rats, both testosterone and epitestosterone act through a non-classical mechanism stimulating calcium uptake in whole testes, and testosterone produces a depolarizing effect on SC membranes. Testosterone and epitestosterone stimulates non-classical actions via a membrane mechanism, which is independent of iAR. FSH and testosterone/epitestosterone affect each other's electrophysiological responses suggesting crosstalk between the intracellular signaling pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heat control in opto-mechanical system using quantum non-classicality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sushamana; Senwar, Subash

    2016-01-01

    Cooling of matter to the quantum ground state is a primary directive of quantum control. In other words, to extract entropy from a quantum system, efficient indirect quantum measurements may be implemented. The main objective is the cooling of the oscillator either to its motional ground state or to non-classical states, such as low-number Fock states, squeezed states or entangled states. It is shown that the use of quantum control procedure is better choice for even experimental realizations because it leads to a squeezed steady state with less than one phonon on average. The steady state of system corresponds to cooling of the system.

  16. Unification of Quantum and Gravity by Non Classical Information Entropy Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Fiscaletti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A quantum entropy space is suggested as the fundamental arena describing the quantum effects. In the quantum regime the entropy is expressed as the superposition of many different Boltzmann entropies that span the space of the entropies before any measure. When a measure is performed the quantum entropy collapses to one component. A suggestive reading of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics and of Bohm’s quantum potential in terms of the quantum entropy are provided. The space associated with the quantum entropy determines a distortion in the classical space of position, which appears as a Weyl-like gauge potential connected with Fisher information. This Weyl-like gauge potential produces a deformation of the moments which changes the classical action in such a way that Bohm’s quantum potential emerges as consequence of the non classical definition of entropy, in a non-Euclidean information space under the constraint of a minimum condition of Fisher information (Fisher Bohm- entropy. Finally, the possible quantum relativistic extensions of the theory and the connections with the problem of quantum gravity are investigated. The non classical thermodynamic approach to quantum phenomena changes the geometry of the particle phase space. In the light of the representation of gravity in ordinary phase space by torsion in the flat space (Teleparallel gravity, the change of geometry in the phase space introduces quantum phenomena in a natural way. This gives a new force to F. Shojai’s and A. Shojai’s theory where the geometry of space-time is highly coupled with a quantum potential whose origin is not the Schrödinger equation but the non classical entropy of a system of many particles that together change the geometry of the phase space of the positions (entanglement. In this way the non classical thermodynamic changes the classical geodetic as a consequence of the quantum phenomena and quantum and gravity are unified. Quantum

  17. Orientational dynamics of a triaxial ellipsoid in simple shear flow: Influence of inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, Tomas; Kotsubo, Yusuke; Aidun, Cyrus K; Do-Quang, Minh; Lundell, Fredrik

    2017-07-01

    The motion of a single ellipsoidal particle in simple shear flow can provide valuable insights toward understanding suspension flows with nonspherical particles. Previously, extensive studies have been performed on the ellipsoidal particle with rotational symmetry, a so-called spheroid. The nearly prolate ellipsoid (one major and two minor axes of almost equal size) is known to perform quasiperiodic or even chaotic orbits in the absence of inertia. With small particle inertia, the particle is also known to drift toward this irregular motion. However, it is not previously understood what effects from fluid inertia could be, which is of highest importance for particles close to neutral buoyancy. Here, we find that fluid inertia is acting strongly to suppress the chaotic motion and only very weak fluid inertia is sufficient to stabilize a rotation around the middle axis. The mechanism responsible for this transition is believed to be centrifugal forces acting on fluid, which is dragged along with the rotational motion of the particle. With moderate fluid inertia, it is found that nearly prolate triaxial particles behave similarly to the perfectly spheroidal particles. Finally, we also are able to provide predictions about the stable rotational states for the general triaxial ellipsoid in simple shear with weak inertia.

  18. Field Measurement of Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J. P.; Marsh, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Radiometric measurements determine thermal inertia for geologic materials. Measurements are correlated with data obtained by remote sensing, for discriminating varieties of rock encountered when exploring for minerals by aircraft or by satellites equipped with infrared scanners.

  19. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. ON THE POLARIZATION OF CREATIVE CONSCIOUSNESS IN NON-CLASSICAL ERA OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Nikolaevich Sklyarov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the phenomenon of "branch" of the total flow of philosophical and aesthetic quest in Russian postsimbolism in the early 20th century and the implications of this polarization in the literary process in the following decades. Special attention is paid to the specifics of the non-classical consciousness, an important feature of which is the intention of the "targeting" of artistic expression. The main lines of development of Russian literature in the 20th century are briefly described. The subject of primary attention of the author are mental peculiarities, features of creative thinking inherited in individuals of every from ideological and artistic "vectors", forming a common paradigm of national literature in the non-classical era. The understanding the specifics of the "middle" line of creative research, defined by the concept of "neotraditionalism" becomes the center of the problem field in the article. In understanding and presentation of the essence of the neotraditional type of creative consciousness author moves into the mainstream, a paved by work of V.I. Tyupa, who proposed in the early 90s as the term itself, taken now adopted by many scientists and methodological principles of neotraditionalism identification as a special type of mental orientation in art. 

  1. Non-classic multiscale modeling of manipulation based on AFM, in aqueous and humid ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, M. H.; Homayooni, A.; Hefzabad, R. N.

    2018-05-01

    To achieve a precise manipulation, it is important that an accurate model consisting the size effect and environmental conditions be employed. In this paper, the non-classical multiscale modeling is developed to investigate the manipulation in a vacuum, aqueous and humid ambient. The manipulation structure is considered into two parts as a macro-field (MF) and a nano-field (NF). The governing equations of the AFM components (consist of the cantilever and tip) in the MF are derived based on the modified couple stress theory. The material length scale parameter is used to study the size effect. The fluid flow in the MF is assumed as the Couette and Creeping flows. Moreover, the NF is modeled using the molecular dynamics. The Electro-Based (ELBA) model is considered to model the ambient condition in the NF. The nanoparticle in the different conditions is taken into account to study the manipulation. The results of the manipulation indicate that the predicted deflection of the non-classical model is less than the classical one. Comparison of the nanoparticle travelled distance on substrate shows that the manipulation in the submerged condition is close to the ideal manipulation. The results of humid condition illustrate that by increasing the relative humidity (RH) the manipulation force decreases. Furthermore, Root Mean Square (RMS) as a criterion of damage demonstrates that the submerged nanoparticle has the minimum damage, however, the minimum manipulation force occurs in superlative humid ambient.

  2. Structure and function of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule MR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krovi, S Harsha; Gapin, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the vertebrate adaptive immune system. By presenting short peptides derived from pathogen-derived proteins, these "classical" MHC molecules can alert the T cell branch of the immune system of infected cells and clear the pathogen. There exist other "non-classical" MHC molecules, which while similar in structure to classical MHC proteins, are contrasted by their limited polymorphism. While the functions of many class Ib MHC molecules have still to be elucidated, the nature and diversity of antigens (if any) that some of them might present to the immune system is expected to be more restricted and might function as another approach to distinguish self from non-self. The MHC-related 1 (MR1) molecule is a member of this family of non-classical MHC proteins. It was recently shown to present unique antigens in the form of vitamin metabolites found in certain microbes. MR1 is strongly conserved genetically, structurally, and functionally through mammalian evolution, indicating its necessity in ensuring an effective immune system for members of this class. Although MR1 will be celebrating 21 years this year since its discovery, most of our understanding of how this molecule functions has only been uncovered in the past decade. Herein, we discuss where MR1 is expressed, how it selectively is able to bind to its appropriate antigens and how it, then, is able to specifically activate a distinct population of T cells.

  3. Moment of inertia of liquid in a tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeong Joong Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the inertial properties of fully filled liquid in a tank were studied based on the potential theory. The analytic solution was obtained for the rectangular tank, and the numerical solutions using Green's 2nd identity were obtained for other shapes. The inertia of liquid behaves like solid in recti-linear acceleration. But under rotational acceleration, the moment of inertia of liquid becomes small compared to that of solid. The shapes of tank investigated in this study were ellipse, rectangle, hexagon, and octagon with various aspect ratios. The numerical solutions were compared with analytic solution, and an ad hoc semi-analytical approximate formula is proposed herein and this formula gives very good predictions for the moment of inertia of the liquid in a tank of several different geometrical shapes. The results of this study will be useful in analyzing of the motion of LNG/LPG tanker, liquid cargo ship, and damaged ship.

  4. Classical and non-classical HLA class I aberrations in primary cervical squamous- and adenocarcinomas and paired lymph node metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Ferns, Debbie M.; Heeren, A. Marijne; Samuels, Sanne; Bleeker, Maaike C. G.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Kenter, Gemma G.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumors avoid destruction by cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells by downregulation of classical human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and overexpression of non-classical HLA. This is the first study to investigate HLA expression in relation to histology (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) vs. adenocarcinoma (AC)), clinicopathological parameters and survival in a large cervical cancer patient cohort. Methods Classical (HLA-A and HLA-B/C)- and non-classical HLA molecules (HLA-E ...

  5. Non-classical crystallization of thin films and nanostructures in CVD and PVD processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Nong Moon

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to a recently-developed approach to the growth mechanism of thin films and nanostructures via chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Starting from the underlying principles of the low pressure synthesis of diamond films, it is shown that diamond growth occurs not by individual atoms but by charged nanoparticles. This newly-discovered growth mechanism turns out to be general to many CVD and some physical vapor deposition (PVD) processes. This non-classical crystallization is a new paradigm of crystal growth, with active research taking place on growth in solution, especially in biomineralization processes. Established understanding of the growth of thin films and nanostructures is based around processes involving individual atoms or molecules. According to the author’s research over the last two decades, however, the generation of charged gas phase nuclei is shown to be the rule rather than the exception in the CVD process, and charged gas phase nuclei are actively ...

  6. The generation of arbitrary order, non-classical, Gauss-type quadrature for transport applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented, based upon the Stieltjes method (1884), for the determination of non-classical Gauss-type quadrature rules, and the associated sets of abscissae and weights. The method is then used to generate a number of quadrature sets, to arbitrary order, which are primarily aimed at deterministic transport calculations. The quadrature rules and sets detailed include arbitrary order reproductions of those presented by Abu-Shumays in [4,8] (known as the QR sets, but labelled QRA here), in addition to a number of new rules and associated sets; these are generated in a similar way, and we label them the QRS quadrature sets. The method presented here shifts the inherent difficulty (encountered by Abu-Shumays) associated with solving the non-linear moment equations, particular to the required quadrature rule, to one of the determination of non-classical weight functions and the subsequent calculation of various associated inner products. Once a quadrature rule has been written in a standard form, with an associated weight function having been identified, the calculation of the required inner products is achieved using specific variable transformations, in addition to the use of rapid, highly accurate quadrature suited to this purpose. The associated non-classical Gauss quadrature sets can then be determined, and this can be done to any order very rapidly. In this paper, instead of listing weights and abscissae for the different quadrature sets detailed (of which there are a number), the MATLAB code written to generate them is included as Appendix D. The accuracy and efficacy (in a transport setting) of the quadrature sets presented is not tested in this paper (although the accuracy of the QRA quadrature sets has been studied in [12,13]), but comparisons to tabulated results listed in [8] are made. When comparisons are made with one of the azimuthal QRA sets detailed in [8], the inherent difficulty in the method of generation, used there, becomes apparent

  7. Comparison between Synthetic Inertia and Fast Frequency Containment Control Based on Single Phase EVs in a Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezkalla, Michel M.N.; Zecchino, Antonio; Martinenas, Sergejus

    2017-01-01

    solutions. The objective of this paper is twofold: first, it aims to implement and validate fast frequency control and synthetic (virtual) inertia control, employing single phase electric vehicles as flexibility resources. Second, it proposes a trade-off analysis between the two controllers......The increasing share of distributed and inertia-less resources entails an upsurge in balancing and system stabilisation services. In particular, the displacement of conventional generation reduces the available rotational inertia in the power system, leading to high interest in synthetic inertia...

  8. Moments of Inertia: Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Helida C.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to determine the most appropriate, cost efficient, and effective method to utilize for finding moments of inertia for the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID). A moment is a measure of the body's tendency to turn about its center of gravity (CG) and inertia is the resistance of a body to changes in its momentum. Therefore, the moment of inertia (MOI) is a body's resistance to change in rotation about its CG. The inertial characteristics of an UAV have direct consequences on aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and control. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the precise inertial characteristics of the DROID.

  9. Moments of Inertia - Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Helida C.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to determine the most appropriate, cost efficient, and effective method to utilize for finding moments of inertia for the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dryden Remotely Operated Integrated Drone (DROID). A moment is a measure of the body's tendency to turn about its center of gravity (CG) and inertia is the resistance of a body to changes in its momentum. Therefore, the moment of inertia (MOI) is a body's resistance to change in rotation about its CG. The inertial characteristics of an UAV have direct consequences on aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and control. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the precise inertial characteristics of the DROID.

  10. Role of particle inertia in adsorption at fluid-liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P; Joseph, D D; Fischer, I S; Dalal, B

    2011-04-01

    It is shown that the inertia of a particle plays an important role in its motion in the direction normal to a fluid-liquid interface, and in determining its adsorption trajectory and orientation in the adsorbed state. Although the importance of inertia diminishes with decreasing particle size, on an air-water interface the inertia continues to be important even when the size is as small as a few nanometers. Furthermore, similar to an underdamped system, an adsorbed particle has characteristic linear and rotational frequencies that can be excited by an external forcing. ©2011 American Physical Society

  11. Spatial-Temporal Expression of Non-classical MHC Class I Molecules in the C57 Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiane; Shen, Yuqing; Li, Mingli; Lv, Dan; Zhang, Aifeng; Peng, Yaqin; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies clearly demonstrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression in the brain plays an important functional role in neural development and plasticity. A previous study from our laboratory demonstrated the temporal and spatial expression patterns of classical MHC class I molecules in the brain of C57 mice. Studies regarding non-classical MHC class I molecules remain limited. Here we examine the expression of non-classical MHC class I molecules in mouse central nervous system (CNS) during embryonic and postnatal developmental stages using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. We find non-classical MHC class I molecules, M3/T22/Q1, are expressed in the cerebral cortex, neuroepithelium of the lateral ventricle, neuroepithelium of aquaeductus and developing cerebellum during embryonic developmental stages. During the postnatal period from P0 to adult, non-classical MHC class I mRNAs are detected in olfactory bulb, hippocampus, cerebellum and some nerve nuclei. Overall, the expression patterns of non-classical MHC class I molecules are similar to those of classical MHC class I molecules in the developing mouse brain. In addition, non-classical MHC class I molecules are present in the H2-K(b) and H2-D(b) double knock-out mice where their expression levels are greatly increased within the same locations as compared to wild type mice. The elucidation and discovery of the expression profile of MHC class I molecules during development is important for supporting an enhanced understanding of their physiological and potential pathological roles within the CNS.

  12. SPRED: A machine learning approach for the identification of classical and non-classical secretory proteins in mammalian genomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Hartmann, Enno; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Moeller, Steffen; Suganthan, P.N.; Martinetz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein secretion generally occurs via the classical secretory pathway that traverses the ER and Golgi apparatus. Secreted proteins usually contain a signal sequence with all the essential information required to target them for secretion. However, some proteins like fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1, FGF-2), interleukins (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta), galectins and thioredoxin are exported by an alternative pathway. This is known as leaderless or non-classical secretion and works without a signal sequence. Most computational methods for the identification of secretory proteins use the signal peptide as indicator and are therefore not able to identify substrates of non-classical secretion. In this work, we report a random forest method, SPRED, to identify secretory proteins from protein sequences irrespective of N-terminal signal peptides, thus allowing also correct classification of non-classical secretory proteins. Training was performed on a dataset containing 600 extracellular proteins and 600 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. The algorithm was tested on 180 extracellular proteins and 1380 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. We obtained 85.92% accuracy from training and 82.18% accuracy from testing. Since SPRED does not use N-terminal signals, it can detect non-classical secreted proteins by filtering those secreted proteins with an N-terminal signal by using SignalP. SPRED predicted 15 out of 19 experimentally verified non-classical secretory proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome we identified 566 protein sequences potentially undergoing non-classical secretion. The dataset and standalone version of the SPRED software is available at (http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/spred/spred).

  13. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Squeezed and Non-classical Light

    CERN Document Server

    Pike, E; Squeezed and Non-classical Light

    1988-01-01

    The recent generation in the laboratory of phase squeezed and intensity squeezed light beams has brought to fruition the theoretical predictions of such non-classical phenomena which have been made and developed in recent years by a number of workers in the field of quantum optics. A vigorous development is now underway of both theory and experiment and the first measurements have been coi:Jfirmed and extended already in some half dozen laboratories. Although the fields of application of these novellight sources are as yet somewhat hazy in our minds and some inspired thinking is required along these lines, the pace and excitement of the research is very clear. It is to he hoped that the new possibilities of: making measurements below the quantum shot noise lirnit which is made possible by these squeezed states of light willlead to further fundamental advances in the near future. In this NATO ARW a number of the leaders in the field met in the extremely pleasant surroundings of Cortina d'Ampezzo and th...

  14. Imidazolines as Non-Classical Bioisosteres of N-Acyl homoserine lactones and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Montenegro-Sustaita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of selected 2-substituted imidazolines were synthesized in moderate to excellent yields by a modification of protocols reported in the literature. They were evaluated as potential non-classical bioisosteres of AHL with the aim of counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Imidazolines 18a, 18e and 18f at various concentrations reduced the violacein production by Chromobacterium violaceum, suggesting an anti-quorum sensing profile against Gram-negative bacteria. Imidazoline 18b did not affect the production of violacein, but had a bacteriostatic effect at 100 µM and a bactericidal effect at 1 mM. Imidazoline 18a bearing a hexyl phenoxy moiety was the most active compound of the series, rendering a 72% inhibitory effect of quorum sensing at 100 µM. Imidazoline 18f bearing a phenyl nonamide substituent presented an inhibitory effect on quorum sensing at a very low concentration (1 nM, with a reduction percentage of 28%. This compound showed an irregular performance, decreasing inhibition at concentrations higher than 10 µM, until reaching 100 µM, at which concentration it increased the inhibitory effect with a 49% reduction percentage. When evaluated on Serratia marcescens, compound 18f inhibited the production of prodigiosin by 40% at 100 μM.

  15. Mechanical removal of dendritic cell-generating non-classical monocytes via ex vivo lung perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John P; Sevenoaks, Hannah; Sjöberg, Trygve; Steen, Stig; Yonan, Nizar; Fildes, James E

    2014-08-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel procedure designed to rapidly assess and recondition unusable donor lungs for transplantation (LTx). EVLP may reduce graft immunogenicity and allorecognition via removal of passenger leukocytes. We aimed to explore this hypothesis using human EVLP and in vitro analysis. Explanted human lungs (n = 7) underwent standard EVLP. Perfusate samples and the leukocyte filter were collected, and cells characterized via flow cytometry. Isolated alveolar monocytes (from post-LTx bronchoalveolar lavage) were differentiated to dendritic cells and characterized (n = 10). An in vitro (air epithelial-liquid endothelial) lung model was utilized to evaluate monocyte migration and differentiation within the lung. Non-classical monocytes (NCM, normally <1% of total white blood cell repertoire) mobilized within 30 minutes of EVLP and represented 80.04% of the passenger leukocyte population. This subset readily differentiated to dendritic cells and secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-2) after stimulation. NCM rapidly diapedesed from the vascular bed to the alveolus and, when cultured on the alveolus, differentiated to dendritic cells with inflammatory phenotypes. The lung possesses a reservoir of NCM, which can readily diapedese to the alveolus or mobilize in the circulation. After activation, NCM differentiate to inflammatory dendritic cells with T-cell co-stimulatory capacity. EVLP may impart additional benefits after LTx via the removal of passenger monocytes, which may represent a previously unidentified beneficial mechanism of action. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chimera states in coupled Kuramoto oscillators with inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmi, Simona, E-mail: simona.olmi@fi.isc.cnr.it [CNR - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sez. Firenze, via Sansone, 1 - I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of two symmetrically coupled populations of rotators is studied for different values of the inertia. The system is characterized by different types of solutions, which all coexist with the fully synchronized state. At small inertia, the system is no more chaotic and one observes mainly quasi-periodic chimeras, while the usual (stationary) chimera state is not anymore observable. At large inertia, one observes two different kind of chaotic solutions with broken symmetry: the intermittent chaotic chimera, characterized by a synchronized population and a population displaying a turbulent behaviour, and a second state where the two populations are both chaotic but whose dynamics adhere to two different macroscopic attractors. The intermittent chaotic chimeras are characterized by a finite life-time, whose duration increases as a power-law with the system size and the inertia value. Moreover, the chaotic population exhibits clear intermittent behavior, displaying a laminar phase where the two populations tend to synchronize, and a turbulent phase where the macroscopic motion of one population is definitely erratic. In the thermodynamic limit, these states survive for infinite time and the laminar regimes tends to disappear, thus giving rise to stationary chaotic solutions with broken symmetry contrary to what observed for chaotic chimeras on a ring geometry.

  17. Trade-off Analysis of Virtual Inertia and Fast Primary Frequency Control During Frequency Transients in a Converter Dominated Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezkalla, Michel M.N.; Marinelli, Mattia; Pertl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    more critical frequency excursions. Both, virtual inertia and fast primary control could serve as a solution to improvefrequency stability, however, their respective impacts on the system have different consequences, so that the trade-off is not straightforward. This study presents a comparative......Traditionally the electricity generation is based on rotating synchronous machines which provide inertia to the power system.The increasing share of converter connected energy sources reduces the available rotational inertia in the power system leading to faster frequency dynamics, which may cause...

  18. [Successful treatment and pregnancy in a women with the non-classic form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akker, E. van den; Stikkelbroeck, M.M.L.; Menheere, P.P.C.A.; Roumen, F.J.M.E.; Otten, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    In an 18-year-old woman non-classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency was diagnosed and dexamethasone treatment was instituted. Ten years later, she became pregnant for the first time; at 37 weeks unexpected intrauterine foetal death was found to have occurred. A second pregnancy ended with a spontaneous

  19. A non-classical view of the modulation of mineral precipitation by organic additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Ruiz-Agudo, Cristina; Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Questions persist on the mechanisms of crystallization of sparingly soluble minerals such as calcium carbonate, calcium oxalate or barium sulphate. Compared to CaCO3, the mechanisms of nucleation and growth in the CaC2O4-H2O or BaSO4-H2O systems have received less attention. These phases are important due to their relevance as biominerals and/or unwanted mineral deposits in technological applications. Growing evidence suggests that sparingly soluble salts form by non-classical nucleation and growth pathways, where pre-nucleation ion associates and amorphous (solid or liquid) precursor phase(s) play a critical role (e.g. Rodríguez-Navarro et al. (2015), Ruiz-Agudo et al. (2015)). Indeed the identification of pre-nucleation species in these systems and their strong interactions with organic compounds (Verch et al. 2011) raises the possibility that the control of organics on biomineralization may begin even earlier than previously thought. A sound knowledge of the physical mechanisms by which acidic macromolecules affect nucleation and early growth may offer general insights concerning the molecular control of biomineralization, as well as being critical for improving strategies to control unwanted mineral deposition or for the synthesis of biomimetic materials. Here we present investigations on the initial stages of the precipitation of these relevant minerals in organic-free solutions to identify the precipitation pathway and to look for any potential precursor phase(s) to the final, crystalline polymorph. As well, we explore the effects that several acidic organic compounds have on the different precipitation stages identified. We find that organic additives such as citric acid, polyacrilic acid or a commercial copolymer of maleic acid/allyl sulfonic acid with phosphonate groups can be active at modifying pre-nucleation stages (destabilizing of pre-nucleation species or hampering the aggregation and growth of pre-nucleation associates) and subsequently strongly

  20. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  1. An improved method in the measurement of the moment of inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jun, E-mail: pengjun@cimm.com.cn [Key Laboratory for Metrology, Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM) Beijing (China); Zhang, Li, E-mail: zhangli@cimm.com.cn [Key Laboratory for Metrology, Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM) Beijing (China); School of Instrumentation Science and Opto-electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-28

    The moment of inertia calibration system is developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). Rotation table - torsional spring system is used to generate angular vibration, and laser vibrometer is used to measure rotational angle and the vibration period. The object to be measured is mounted on the top of the rotation table. The air-bearing system is elaborately manufactured which reduce the friction of the angular movement and increase measurement accuracy. Heterodyne laser interferometer collaborates with column diffraction grating is used in the measurement of angular movement. Experiment shows the method of measuring oscillating angle and period introduced in this paper is stable and the time resolution is high. When the air damping effect can’t be neglected in moment of inertia measurement, the periodic waveform area ratio method is introduced to calculate damping ratio and obtain the moment of inertia.

  2. Caffeine gum minimizes sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Rachel A; Kamimori, Gary H; Wesensten, Nancy J; Picchioni, Dante; Balkin, Thomas J

    2013-02-01

    Naps are an effective strategy for maintaining alertness and cognitive performance; however, upon abrupt wakening from naps, sleep inertia (temporary performance degradation) may ensue. In the present study, attenuation of post-nap sleep inertia was attempted by administration of caffeine gum. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, 15 healthy, non-smoking adults were awakened at 1 hr. and again at 6 hr. after lights out (0100 and 0600, respectively) and were immediately administered a gum pellet containing 100 mg of caffeine or placebo. A 5-min. psychomotor vigilance task was administered at 0 min., 6 min., 12 min., and 18 min. post-awakening. At 0100, response speed with caffeine was significantly better at 12 min. and 18 min. post-awakening compared to placebo; at 0600, caffeine's effects were evident at 18 min. post-awakening. Caffeinated gum is a viable means of rapidly attenuating sleep inertia, suggesting that the adenosine receptor system is involved in sleep maintenance.

  3. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Bose–Einstein condensation; Bose–Einstein statistics; indistinguishability; Bosonic stimulation; condensate; quantized vortex; de Boer quantum parameter; non-classical rotational inertia; supersolid.

  4. Virtual Inertia Control-Based Model Predictive Control for Microgrid Frequency Stabilization Considering High Renewable Energy Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thongchart Kerdphol

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy sources (RESs, such as wind and solar generations, equip inverters to connect to the microgrids. These inverters do not have any rotating mass, thus lowering the overall system inertia. This low system inertia issue could affect the microgrid stability and resiliency in the situation of uncertainties. Today’s microgrids will become unstable if the capacity of RESs become larger and larger, leading to the weakening of microgrid stability and resilience. This paper addresses a new concept of a microgrid control incorporating a virtual inertia system based on the model predictive control (MPC to emulate virtual inertia into the microgrid control loop, thus stabilizing microgrid frequency during high penetration of RESs. The additional controller of virtual inertia is applied to the microgrid, employing MPC with virtual inertia response. System modeling and simulations are carried out using MATLAB/Simulink® software. The simulation results confirm the superior robustness and frequency stabilization effect of the proposed MPC-based virtual inertia control in comparison to the fuzzy logic system and conventional virtual inertia control in a system with high integration of RESs. The proposed MPC-based virtual inertia control is able to improve the robustness and frequency stabilization of the microgrid effectively.

  5. Spin dynamics with inertia in metallic ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Toru; Tatara, Gen

    2015-11-01

    The nonadiabatic contribution of environmental degrees of freedom yields an effective inertia of spin in the effective spin dynamics. In this paper, we study several aspects of the inertia of spin in metallic ferromagnets: (i) a concrete expression of the spin inertia ms: ms=ℏ Sc/(2 gsd) , where Sc is the spin polarization of conduction electrons and gsd is the s d coupling constant; (ii) a dynamical behavior of spin with inertia, discussed from the viewpoints of a spinning top and of a particle on a sphere; (iii) the behavior of spin waves and domain walls in the presence of inertia and the behavior of spin with inertia under a time-dependent magnetic field.

  6. WAYS TO MANAGE HEATING INERTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Biloshytskyi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research paper proposes to estimate the effect of heat inertia of the water heating system, in transient operation modes, on the temperature condition in the passenger car, as well as to offer technical solutions intended to reduce the heating system inertia effect and to maintain a stable temperature condition in the passenger car premises in transitional modes of the heating system. Methodology. The author developed the method for controlling the heat transfer of heating system pipes with the help of regulating casing. To control the heating system and the heat transfer of heating pipes, two types of temperature control sensors were used in the passenger car: certain sensors interacted with regulatory casings, while the others interacted with high-voltage tubular heating element control devices. To assess the efficiency of heat interchange regulation of heating pipes and the heating system control, with installed regulating casings, the operation of the heating system with regulating casings and two types of sensors was mathematically modelled. Mathematical modelling used the experimental test data. The results of experimental tests and mathematical modelling were compared. Findings. Currently in operated passenger cars, control of heating appliances is not constructively provided. Automatic maintenance of the set temperature in a passenger car is limited to switching on and off of high-voltage tubular heating elements. The use of regulating casings on heating pipes allows reducing the effects of heat inertia and maintaining stable thermal conditions in a passenger car, using the heating system as a heat accumulator, and also provides the opportunity to realize an individual control of air temperature in the compartment. Originality. For the first time, the paper studied the alternative ways of regulating the temperature condition in a passenger car. Using of the heating system as a heat accumulator. Practical value. The

  7. Improved CORF model of simple cell combined with non-classical receptive field and its application on edge detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Chai, Guobei; Liu, Wei; Bao, Wenzhuo; Zhao, Xiaoning; Ming, Delie

    2018-02-01

    Simple cells in primary visual cortex are believed to extract local edge information from a visual scene. In this paper, inspired by different receptive field properties and visual information flow paths of neurons, an improved Combination of Receptive Fields (CORF) model combined with non-classical receptive fields was proposed to simulate the responses of simple cell's receptive fields. Compared to the classical model, the proposed model is able to better imitate simple cell's physiologic structure with consideration of facilitation and suppression of non-classical receptive fields. And on this base, an edge detection algorithm as an application of the improved CORF model was proposed. Experimental results validate the robustness of the proposed algorithm to noise and background interference.

  8. Clinical Inertia and Outpatient Medical Errors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Connor, Patrick J; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M; Johnson, Paul E; Rush, William A; Biltz, George

    2005-01-01

    .... Clinical inertia is a major factor that contributes to inadequate chronic disease care in patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemias, depression, coronary heart disease, and other conditions...

  9. Non-Classical C–H···X Hydrogen Bonding and Its Role in Asymmetric Organocatalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John

    2016-08-17

    Non-classical hydrogen bonds (NCHBs) have attracted significant interest in the past decade particularly because of their important role in asymmetric catalytic systems. These weak interactions (< 4 kcal/mol) offer much flexibility in the preorganization of molecular entities required to achieve high enantioselectivity. Herein, we review some recent important organocatalytic asymmetric reactions where a NCHB serves as a critical factor in determining the stereoselectivity.

  10. Moment of inertia of liquid in a tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Gyeong Joong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the inertial properties of fully filled liquid in a tank were studied based on the potential theory. The analytic solution was obtained for the rectangular tank, and the numerical solutions using Green’s 2nd identity were obtained for other shapes. The inertia of liquid behaves like solid in recti-linear acceleration. But under rotational acceleration, the moment of inertia of liquid becomes small compared to that of solid. The shapes of tank investigated in this study were ellipse, rectangle, hexagon, and octagon with various aspect ratios. The numerical solu¬tions were compared with analytic solution, and an ad hoc semi-analytical approximate formula is proposed herein and this formula gives very good predictions for the moment of inertia of the liquid in a tank of several different geometrical shapes. The results of this study will be useful in analyzing of the motion of LNG/LPG tanker, liquid cargo ship, and damaged ship.

  11. Virtual inertia for variable speed wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeni, Lorenzo; Rudolph, Andreas Jakob; Münster-Swendsen, Janus

    2013-01-01

    Inertia provision for frequency control is among the ancillary services that different national grid codes will likely require to be provided by future wind turbines. The aim of this paper is analysing how the inertia response support from a variable speed wind turbine (VSWT) to the primary...

  12. On the carrier of inertia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Grahn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A change in momentum will inevitably perturb the all-embracing vacuum, whose reaction we understand as inertia. Since the vacuum’s physical properties relate to light, we propose that the vacuum embodies photons, but in pairs without net electromagnetic fields. In this physical form the free space houses energy in balance with the energy of matter in the whole Universe. Likewise, we reason that a local gravitational potential is the vacuum in a local balance with energy that is bound to a body. Since a body couples to the same vacuum universally and locally, we understand that inertial and gravitational masses are identical. By the same token, we infer that gravity and electromagnetism share the similar functional form because both are carried by the vacuum photons as paired and unpaired.

  13. Effect of moment of inertia to H type vertical axis wind turbine aerodynamic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C X; Li, S T

    2013-01-01

    The main aerodynamic performances (out power out power coefficient torque torque coefficient and so on) of H type Vertical Axis wind Turbine (H-VAWT) which is rotating machinery will be impacted by moment of inertia. This article will use NACA0018 airfoil profile to analyze that moment of inertia through impact performance of H type VAWT by utilizing program of Matlab and theory of Double-Multiple Streamtube. The results showed that the max out power coefficient was barely impacted when moment of inertia is changed in a small area,but the lesser moment of inertia's VAWT needs a stronger wind velocity to obtain the max out power. The lesser moment of inertia's VAWT has a big out power coefficient, torque coefficient and out power before it gets to the point of max out power coefficient. Out power coefficient, torque and torque coefficient will obviously change with wind velocity increased for VAWT of the lesser moment of inertia

  14. Effects of the racket polar moment of inertia on dominant upper limb joint moments during tennis serve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Rogowski

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of the polar moment of inertia of a tennis racket on upper limb loading in the serve. Eight amateur competition tennis players performed two sets of 10 serves using two rackets identical in mass, position of center of mass and moments of inertia other than the polar moment of inertia (0.00152 vs 0.00197 kg.m2. An eight-camera motion analysis system collected the 3D trajectories of 16 markers, located on the thorax, upper limbs and racket, from which shoulder, elbow and wrist net joint moments and powers were computed using inverse dynamics. During the cocking phase, increased racket polar moment of inertia was associated with significant increases in the peak shoulder extension and abduction moments, as well the peak elbow extension, valgus and supination moments. During the forward swing phase, peak wrist extension and radial deviation moments significantly increased with polar moment of inertia. During the follow-through phase, the peak shoulder adduction, elbow pronation and wrist external rotation moments displayed a significant inverse relationship with polar moment of inertia. During the forward swing, the magnitudes of negative joint power at the elbow and wrist were significantly larger when players served using the racket with a higher polar moment of inertia. Although a larger polar of inertia allows players to better tolerate off-center impacts, it also appears to place additional loads on the upper extremity when serving and may therefore increase injury risk in tennis players.

  15. Non-classical major histocompatibility complex class makes a crucial contribution to reproduction in the dairy cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Lei; Peng, Xiuli; Zhang, Shen; Deng, Ganzhen; Wu, Yue; He, Mingyue; Li, Beibei; Li, Chengye; Zhang, Kechun

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of classical and non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on the reproduction in the dairy cow. Nine pairs of MHC-I genes were chosen according to their homology and possible function, and their transcription levels in maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from all three trimesters and transcription levels in fetal tissues were compared to evaluate their contributions to cattle reproduction. The results showed that three non-classical genes were variably expressed in PBMCs of pregnant cows. MICB was downregulated in the first and second trimesters (P0.05). BoLA-NC1* was upregulated in the first and last trimesters (P0.05). BoLA-NC3* was upregulated in all trimesters (P<0.001). On the other hand, MICB was upregulated in fetal ear tissues (P<0.001), and BoLA-NC1* was almost silent in both fetal placenta and ear tissues (P<0.001); however, BoLA-NC3* was upregulated in both the fetal placenta and ear tissues (P<0.001). These results suggested that non-classical gene BoLA-NC1* increased maternal immunity against the fetus, which was inhibited by BoLA-NC3*. BoLA-NC3* also inhibited fetal autoimmunity. Apoptosis of the fetal placenta could reduce itself expressing MICB, and upregulated expression of MICB in ear tissues was favorable for the fetus to escape autoimmunity. On the other hand, downregulated expression of MICB in the fetal placenta allows for placental decoherence from the maternal placentome, which was beneficial to fetus delivery. Although classical genes were expressed differentially, their effects were restricted because of heavy chain deficiency.

  16. Predicting superdeformed rotational band-head spin in A∼ 190 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The band-head spin (0) of superdeformed (SD) rotational bands in ∼ 190 mass region is predicted using the variable moment of inertia (VMI) model for 66 SD rotational bands. The superdeformed rotational bands exhibited considerably good rotational property and rigid behaviour. The transition energies were ...

  17. Heterodyne non-demolition measurements on cold atomic samples: towards the preparation of non-classical states for atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernon, S; Vanderbruggen, T; Kohlhaas, R; Bertoldi, A; Bouyer, P [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France); Landragin, A, E-mail: simon.bernon@institutoptique.fr [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS and UPMC 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    We report on a novel experiment to generate non-classical atomic states via quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements on cold atomic samples prepared in a high-finesse ring cavity. The heterodyne technique developed for QND detection exhibits an optical shot-noise limited behavior for local oscillator optical power of a few hundred {mu}W, and a detection bandwidth of several GHz. This detection tool is used in a single pass to follow non-destructively the internal state evolution of an atomic sample when subjected to Rabi oscillations or a spin-echo interferometric sequence.

  18. Natural Killer Cell Interactions with Classical and Non-Classical Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I in HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzemer, Angelique; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are effector lymphocytes of the innate immune system that are able to mount a multifaceted antiviral response within hours following infection. This is achieved through an array of cell surface receptors surveilling host cells for alterations in human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) expression and other ligands as signs of viral infection, malignant transformation, and cellular stress. This interaction between HLA-I ligands and NK-cell receptor is not only important for recognition of diseased cells but also mediates tuning of NK-cell-effector functions. HIV-1 alters the expression of HLA-I ligands on infected cells, rendering them susceptible to NK cell-mediated killing. However, over the past years, various HIV-1 evasion strategies have been discovered to target NK-cell-receptor ligands and allow the virus to escape from NK cell-mediated immunity. While studies have been mainly focusing on the role of polymorphic HLA-A, -B, and -C molecules, less is known about how HIV-1 affects the more conserved, non-classical HLA-I molecules HLA-E, -G, and -F. In this review, we will focus on the recent progress in understanding the role of non-classical HLA-I ligands in NK cell-mediated recognition of HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:29184550

  19. Moments of inertia in a semiclassical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchein, K.

    1993-01-01

    Semiclassical calculations have been performed for 31 nuclei. As a result of preliminary non-fully self-consistent calculations, the moments of inertia in investigated nuclei abd spin degrees of freedom are found

  20. Moment of Inertia Dependence of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines in Pulsating Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Hara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs are unaffected by changes in wind direction, and they have a simple structure and the potential for high efficiency due to their lift driving force. However, VAWTs are affected by changes in wind speed, owing to effects originating from the moment of inertia. In this study, changes in the rotational speed of a small VAWT in pulsating wind, generated by an unsteady wind tunnel, are investigated by varying the wind cycle and amplitude parameters. It is shown that the responses observed experimentally agree with simulations based on torque characteristics obtained under steady rotational conditions. Additionally, a simple equation expressing the relationship between the rotational change width and amplitude of the pulsating wind is presented. The energy efficiency in a pulsating wind remains constant with changes in both the moment of inertia and the wind cycle; however, the energy efficiency decreases when the wind amplitude is large.

  1. Testing quantised inertia on emdrives with dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, M. E.

    2017-05-01

    Truncated-cone-shaped cavities with microwaves resonating within them (emdrives) move slightly towards their narrow ends, in contradiction to standard physics. This effect has been predicted by a model called quantised inertia (MiHsC) which assumes that the inertia of the microwaves is caused by Unruh radiation, more of which is allowed at the wide end. Therefore, photons going towards the wide end gain inertia, and to conserve momentum the cavity must move towards its narrow end, as observed. A previous analysis with quantised inertia predicted a controversial photon acceleration, which is shown here to be unnecessary. The previous analysis also mispredicted the thrust in those emdrives with dielectrics. It is shown here that having a dielectric at one end of the cavity is equivalent to widening the cavity at that end, and when dielectrics are considered, then quantised inertia predicts these results as well as the others, except for Shawyer's first test where the thrust is predicted to be the right size but in the wrong direction. As a further test, quantised inertia predicts that an emdrive's thrust can be enhanced by using a dielectric at the wide end.

  2. Non-classical logic inverter coupling a ZnO nanowire-based Schottky barrier transistor and adjacent Schottky diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Shokouh, Seyed Hossein; Raza, Syed Raza Ali; Lee, Hee Sung; Im, Seongil

    2014-08-21

    On a single ZnO nanowire (NW), we fabricated an inverter-type device comprising a Schottky diode (SD) and field-effect transistor (FET), aiming at 1-dimensional (1D) electronic circuits with low power consumption. The SD and adjacent FET worked respectively as the load and driver, so that voltage signals could be easily extracted as the output. In addition, NW FET with a transparent conducting oxide as top gate turned out to be very photosensitive, although ZnO NW SD was blind to visible light. Based on this, we could achieve an array of photo-inverter cells on one NW. Our non-classical inverter is regarded as quite practical for both logic and photo-sensing due to its performance as well as simple device configuration.

  3. New class of generalized photon-added coherent states and some of their non-classical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojaveri, B; Mahmoodi, S; Dehghani, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we construct a new class of generalized photon added coherent states (GPACSs), |z,m〉 r by excitations on a newly introduced family of generalized coherent states (GCSs) |z〉 r (A Dehghani and B Mojaveri 2012 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45 095304), obtained via generalized hypergeometric type displacement operators acting on the vacuum state of the simple harmonic oscillator. We show that these states realize resolution of the identity property through positive definite measures on the complex plane. Meanwhile, we demonstrate that the introduced states can also be interpreted as nonlinear coherent states (NLCSs), with a spacial nonlinearity function. Finally, some of their non-classical features as well as their quantum statistical properties are compared with Agarwal's photon-added coherent states (PACSs), |z,m〉. (paper)

  4. Characterization of novel StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein mutations causing non-classic lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa E Flück

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH. OBJECTIVE: StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. DESIGN: To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure and functional data on two novel StAR mutations, and to compare them with published literature. SETTING: Collaboration between the University Children's Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and the CIBERER, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain. PATIENTS: Two subjects of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family were studied. The 46,XX phenotypic normal female was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the age of 10 months, had normal pubertal development and still has no signs of hypergonodatropic hypogonadism at 32 years of age. Her 46,XY brother was born with normal male external genitalia and was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at 14 months. Puberty was normal and no signs of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism are present at 29 years of age. RESULTS: StAR gene analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygote mutations T44HfsX3 and G221S. T44HfsX3 is a loss-of-function StAR mutation. G221S retains partial activity (∼30% and is therefore responsible for a milder, non-classic phenotype. G221S is located in the cholesterol binding pocket and seems to alter binding/release of cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: StAR mutations located in the cholesterol binding pocket (V187M, R188C, R192C, G221D/S seem to cause non-classic lipoid CAH. Accuracy of genotype-phenotype prediction by in vitro testing may vary with the assays employed.

  5. Effect of Process Variables on the Inertia Friction Welding of Superalloys LSHR and Mar-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, D. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Shivpuri, R.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of inertia friction welding process parameters on microstructure evolution, weld plane quality, and the tensile behavior of welds between dissimilar nickel-base superalloys was established. For this purpose, the fine-grain, powder metallurgy alloy LSHR was joined to coarse-grain cast Mar-M247 using a fixed level of initial kinetic energy, but different combinations of the flywheel moment of inertia and initial rotation speed. It was found that welds made with the largest moment of inertia resulted in a sound bond with the best microstructure and room-temperature tensile strength equal to or greater than that of the parent materials. A relationship between the moment of inertia and weld process efficiency was established. The post-weld tensile behavior was interpreted in the context of observed microstructure gradients and weld-line defects.

  6. Development and Validation of the Sleep Inertia Questionnaire (SIQ) and Assessment of Sleep Inertia in Analogue and Clinical Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Kanady, Jennifer C.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep inertia is the transitional state from sleep to wake. Research on sleep inertia is important in depression because many people with depression report having difficulty getting out of bed, which contributes to impairment and can impede the implementation of interventions. The first aim was to develop and validate the first self-report measure of sleep inertia, the Sleep Inertia Questionnaire (SIQ). The second aim was to compare reports of sleep inertia across three groups: (1) No-to-Mild...

  7. The Early Lunar Orbit and Principal Moments of Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Zuber, M. T.

    2007-12-01

    If taken at face value, the principal lunar moments of inertia suggest that the Moon froze in a past tidal and rotational state during a high eccentricity orbit [1]. At this time the Moon may have been in either synchronous rotation or in a 3:2 resonance of spin and mean motion. We have performed further investigations of the plausibility of past high eccentricity lunar orbits on the basis of orbital evolution, the dynamics of entry into any past 3:2 resonance, and tidal dissipation. We have found that the requisite permanent (B-A)/C (where A, B, and C are the principal moments of inertia) for a 3:2 resonance can be achieved in a magma ocean if a density anomaly is present shortly after lunar accretion. In a high eccentricity orbit, tidal dissipation will affect the Moon's ability to develop lithospheric strength. The Moon is presently able to support degree-two loads, while Io, which is approximately the same size as the Moon and strongly heated by tidal dissipation, probably cannot [2]. Therefore, somewhere between the present lunar radioactive heating rate (~1012 W), and Io's observed dissipation (~1014 W), the Moon may develop lithospheric strength. We use 1014 W as a loose upper bound on where freeze-in may begin and find that in a 3:2 resonance tidal dissipation [3] can drop below 1014 W at a = 25 RE and e = 0.17, and the present moments of inertia can be approximately reproduced for lunar values of QM = 475 (where a is the lunar semimajor axis, RE is the Earth radius, and Q is the specific dissipation function). This value of QM is somewhat large, but the biggest problem with a 3:2 resonance that lasts until 25 RE is how to achieve the current low eccentricity synchronous orbit. The required damping cannot be easily achieved unless the Moon is knocked out of a 3:2 resonance by an impactor that would produce a crater approximately 800 km in diameter. In sum, there is no single strong constraint that completely rules out a 3:2 resonance, but it would require a

  8. Virtual Inertia: Current Trends and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjwol Tamrakar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The modern power system is progressing from a synchronous machine-based system towards an inverter-dominated system, with large-scale penetration of renewable energy sources (RESs like wind and photovoltaics. RES units today represent a major share of the generation, and the traditional approach of integrating them as grid following units can lead to frequency instability. Many researchers have pointed towards using inverters with virtual inertia control algorithms so that they appear as synchronous generators to the grid, maintaining and enhancing system stability. This paper presents a literature review of the current state-of-the-art of virtual inertia implementation techniques, and explores potential research directions and challenges. The major virtual inertia topologies are compared and classified. Through literature review and simulations of some selected topologies it has been shown that similar inertial response can be achieved by relating the parameters of these topologies through time constants and inertia constants, although the exact frequency dynamics may vary slightly. The suitability of a topology depends on system control architecture and desired level of detail in replication of the dynamics of synchronous generators. A discussion on the challenges and research directions points out several research needs, especially for systems level integration of virtual inertia systems.

  9. Daytime sleep inertia in narcolepsy-cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullington, J; Broughton, R

    1994-02-01

    Eight volunteers with narcolepsy-cataplexy participated in a study of scheduled naps and performance. Sleep inertia was examined following five "short" naps of 5% and a single "long" nap of 25% of total 24-hour sleep time as determined by prior sleep log data. Contrary to some subjective reports, short naps (mean duration of just under 30 minutes) were accompanied by sleep inertia in narcoleptics. As measured by the descending subtraction task, this sleep inertia was at times quite prolonged and lasted 20 minutes after waking from midday short naps, which ended on average at 1555 hours. In addition, sleep inertia, as measured by both the descending subtraction task and the four-choice reaction-time test, was evident throughout both afternoon and evening short naps; however, it was completely absent from reaction-time test results immediately following the single long nap, which ended on average at 1640 hours. Sleep inertia was maximum after slow-wave sleep arousals and was minimal or absent following the first short nap, which also contained the highest amount of rapid eye movement sleep of all naps.

  10. Transcription of non-classic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in the bovine placenta throughout gestation and after Brucella abortus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Larissa Sarmento; da Silva Mol, Juliana Pinto; de Macedo, Auricélio Alves; Silva, Ana Patrícia Carvalho; Dos Santos Ribeiro, Diego Luiz; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Carvalho Neta, Alcina Vieira

    2015-10-15

    Transcription of non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was assessed in the bovine placenta throughout gestation. Additionally, the effect of Brucella abortus infection on expression of non-classical MHC-I was also evaluated using a chorioallantoic membrane explant model of infection. The non-classical MHC-I genes MICB and NC3 had higher levels of transcription in the intercotyledonary region when compared to the placentome, which had higher levels of transcription at the second trimester of gestation. NC1 and classical MHC-I had very low levels of transcription throughout gestation. Trophoblastic cells of B. abortus-infected chorioallantoic membrane explants had an increase in transcription of non-classical MHC-I at 4h post infection. Therefore, this study provides an analysis of non-classical MHC-I transcription at different stages of gestation and different placental tissues, and during B. abortus infection. These findings provide additional knowledge on immune regulation in placental tissues, a known immune-privileged site. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Inattention and Inertia in Household Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Campbell, John Y.; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    This paper studies inattention to mortgage refinancing incentives among Danish households. Danish data are particularly suitable for this purpose because there are minimal barriers to refinancing, yet many borrowers fail to refinance optimally, and the characteristics of these borrowers can...... inattention and inertia in the same direction, implying a positive cross-sectional correlation of 0.62 between these two household attributes. Younger, better educated, and higher-income households have less inertia and less inattention. Financial wealth and housing wealth have opposite effects...... be accurately measured. The paper estimates a mixture model of household refinancing types in which household characteristics affect both inattention (a low proportion of rational refinancers) and residual inertia (a low probability that fully inattentive households refinance). Many characteristics move...

  12. Gravity field, shape, and moment of inertia of Titan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, Luciano; Rappaport, Nicole J; Jacobson, Robert A; Racioppa, Paolo; Stevenson, David J; Tortora, Paolo; Armstrong, John W; Asmar, Sami W

    2010-03-12

    Precise radio tracking of the spacecraft Cassini has provided a determination of Titan's mass and gravity harmonics to degree 3. The quadrupole field is consistent with a hydrostatically relaxed body shaped by tidal and rotational effects. The inferred moment of inertia factor is about 0.34, implying incomplete differentiation, either in the sense of imperfect separation of rock from ice or a core in which a large amount of water remains chemically bound in silicates. The equilibrium figure is a triaxial ellipsoid whose semi-axes a, b, and c differ by 410 meters (a-c) and 103 meters (b-c). The nonhydrostatic geoid height variations (up to 19 meters) are small compared to the observed topographic anomalies of hundreds of meters, suggesting a high degree of compensation appropriate to a body that has warm ice at depth.

  13. Classical and non-classical HLA class I aberrations in primary cervical squamous- and adenocarcinomas and paired lymph node metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, Debbie M; Heeren, A Marijne; Samuels, Sanne; Bleeker, Maaike C G; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Kenter, Gemma G; Jordanova, Ekaterina S

    2016-01-01

    Tumors avoid destruction by cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells by downregulation of classical human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and overexpression of non-classical HLA. This is the first study to investigate HLA expression in relation to histology (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) vs. adenocarcinoma (AC)), clinicopathological parameters and survival in a large cervical cancer patient cohort. Classical (HLA-A and HLA-B/C)- and non-classical HLA molecules (HLA-E and HLA-G) were studied on primary tumors and paired lymph node (LN) metastases from cervical cancer patients ( n  = 136) by immunohistochemistry. The Chi 2 test was used for the comparison of clinicopathological characteristics between SCC and AC patients. The Related-Samples Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was used to compare HLA expression between the primary tumor and metastasis in LN. Patient survival rates were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and Log Rank test. The Mann-Whitney U Test was used to compare the distribution of HLA class I expression between SCC and AC. Decreased expression of HLA-A (SCC P  HLA-B/C (SCC P  HLA (SCC P  HLA-A ( P  = 0.05). SCC metastases showed more complete loss of HLA-A, while AC metastases showed more complete loss of HLA-B/C ( P  = 0.04). In addition, tumor size and parametrium involvement were also related to aberrant HLA class I expression. No significant associations between HLA expression and disease-specific (DSS) or disease-free survival (DFS) were found in this advanced disease cohort. However, in the SCC group, samples showing loss of HLA-A or loss of total classical HLA but positive for HLA-G were linked to poor patient survival (DSS P  = 0.001 and P  = 0.01; DFS P  = 0.003 and P  = 0.01, for HLA-A and total classical HLA, respectively). These results strengthen the idea of tumor immune escape variants leading to metastasis. Moreover, SCC tumors showing downregulation of HLA-A or total classical HLA in combination with HLA

  14. Mechanism of non-classical light emission from acoustically populated (311)A GaAs quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazić, S.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2012-01-01

    We employ surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to control the transfer of photo-generated carriers between interconnected quantum wells and quantum wires (QWRs) grown on pre-patterned (311)A GaAs substrates. Optical studies, carried out under remote acoustic excitation of a single QWR, have shown sharp photoluminescence lines and antibunched photons with tunable emission energy. These features are attributed to recombination of acoustically transported carriers in potential inhomogeneities within the wire. The origin of the photon antibunching is discussed in terms of a ‘bottleneck’ in the number of carriers trapped in the QWR, which restricts the number of recombination events per SAW cycle. We propose a model for antibunching based on the trapping of carriers induced by the SAW piezoelectric field in states at the interface between the GaAs QWR and the AlGaAs barriers. Non-classical light is emitted during the subsequent release of the trapped carriers into the recombination centers within the wire. The spatial distribution of the emitting recombination centers is estimated using time-resolved measurements.

  15. Increased large artery intima media thickness in adolescents with either classical or non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasniewska, M; Balsamo, A; Valenzise, M; Manganaro, A; Faggioli, G; Bombaci, S; Conti, V; Ferri, M; Aversa, T; Cicognani, A; De Luca, F

    2013-01-01

    Increased artery intima-media thickness (IMT) was found in adults with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). No data are available in patients with non-classical (NC) CAH. To evaluate IMT in adolescents with classical and NC CAH and to compare the results with those recorded in a control population. Eighteen adolescents with either classical (Subgroup A1) or NC CAH (Subgroup A2) were compared with 16 controls (Group B). All subjects underwent IMT ultrasonography measurement at different sites; results were correlated with clinical, metabolic, and insulin resistance (IR) data. When compared with Group B, both subgroups exhibited higher IMT values at all sites. No differences were found between classical and NC CAH. Univariate analysis of factors impacting on IMT of CAH patients demonstrated that: a) abdominal aorta (AA) IMT was positively correlated with cumulative glucocorticoid doses, triglyceride serum levels, and diastolic blood pressure SD score and negatively with androstenendione and ACTH levels; b) common carotid (CC) IMT was positively associated with triglycerides and triglyceride/HDL ratio. At multiple regression analysis, the independent positive predictors of AA and CC IMT were respectively triglyceride levels and triglyceride/HDL ratio. a) Even adolescents with NC CAH and not only those with classical form may be at higher risk of artery alterations; b) this risk is not necessarily associated with either obesity or waist/height ratio or dyslipidemia; c) an important role in the pathogenesis of artery alterations in CAH may be played by intermittent iatrogenic hypercortisolism and secondary IR.

  16. In Vitro Characterization of the Two-Stage Non-Classical Reassembly Pathway of S-Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Breitwieser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant bacterial surface layer (S-layer protein rSbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 is an ideal model system to study non-classical nucleation and growth of protein crystals at surfaces since the recrystallization process may be separated into two distinct steps: (i adsorption of S-layer protein monomers on silicon surfaces is completed within 5 min and the amount of bound S-layer protein sufficient for the subsequent formation of a closed crystalline monolayer; (ii the recrystallization process is triggered—after washing away the unbound S-layer protein—by the addition of a CaCl2 containing buffer solution, and completed after approximately 2 h. The entire self-assembly process including the formation of amorphous clusters, the subsequent transformation into crystalline monomolecular arrays, and finally crystal growth into extended lattices was investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Moreover, contact angle measurements showed that the surface properties of S-layers change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic as the crystallization proceeds. This two-step approach is new in basic and application driven S-layer research and, most likely, will have advantages for functionalizing surfaces (e.g., by spray-coating with tailor-made biological sensing layers.

  17. Nonlinear Inertia Classification Model and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification model of support vector machine (SVM overcomes the problem of a big number of samples. But the kernel parameter and the punishment factor have great influence on the quality of SVM model. Particle swarm optimization (PSO is an evolutionary search algorithm based on the swarm intelligence, which is suitable for parameter optimization. Accordingly, a nonlinear inertia convergence classification model (NICCM is proposed after the nonlinear inertia convergence (NICPSO is developed in this paper. The velocity of NICPSO is firstly defined as the weighted velocity of the inertia PSO, and the inertia factor is selected to be a nonlinear function. NICPSO is used to optimize the kernel parameter and a punishment factor of SVM. Then, NICCM classifier is trained by using the optical punishment factor and the optical kernel parameter that comes from the optimal particle. Finally, NICCM is applied to the classification of the normal state and fault states of online power cable. It is experimentally proved that the iteration number for the proposed NICPSO to reach the optimal position decreases from 15 to 5 compared with PSO; the training duration is decreased by 0.0052 s and the recognition precision is increased by 4.12% compared with SVM.

  18. Effects of Inertia on Evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma Game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Wenbo; Cao Xianbin; Liu Runran; Wang Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Considering the inertia of individuals in real life, we propose a modified Fermi updating rule, where the inertia of players is introduced into evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) on square lattices. We mainly focus on how the inertia affects the cooperative behavior of the system. Interestingly, we find that the cooperation level has a nonmonotonic dependence on the inertia: with small inertia, cooperators will soon be invaded by defectors; with large inertia, players are unwilling to change their strategies and the cooperation level remains the same as the initial state; while a moderate inertia can induce the highest cooperation level. Moreover, effects of environmental noise and individual inertia are studied. Our work may be helpful in understanding the emergence and persistence of cooperation in nature and society. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  19. Lunar Rotation, Orientation and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Boggs, D. H.

    2004-12-01

    The Moon is the most familiar example of the many satellites that exhibit synchronous rotation. For the Moon there is Lunar Laser Ranging measurements of tides and three-dimensional rotation variations plus supporting theoretical understanding of both effects. Compared to uniform rotation and precession the lunar rotational variations are up to 1 km, while tidal variations are about 0.1 m. Analysis of the lunar variations in pole direction and rotation about the pole gives moment of inertia differences, third-degree gravity harmonics, tidal Love number k2, tidal dissipation Q vs. frequency, dissipation at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and emerging evidence for an oblate boundary. The last two indicate a fluid core, but a solid inner core is not ruled out. Four retroreflectors provide very accurate positions on the Moon. The experience with the Moon is a starting point for exploring the tides, rotation and orientation of the other synchronous bodies of the solar system.

  20. Experimental study of the moment of inertia of a cone-angular variation and inertia ellipsoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintao, Carlos A F; Souza de Filho, Moacir P; Usida, Wesley F; Xavier, Jose A

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental set-up which differs from the traditional ones is established in order to determine the moment of inertia of a right circular cone. Its angular variation and inertia ellipsoid are determined by means of an experimental study. In addition, a system that allows for the evaluation of the angular acceleration and torque through electric current or frequency measurement is utilized

  1. Resonant excitation of coastal Kelvin waves by inertia-gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznik, G.M.; Zeitlin, V.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal a mechanism of resonant excitation of non-dispersive coastal Kelvin waves by pairs of incident/reflected inertia-gravity waves in the rotating stratified fluid. In the simplest rotating shallow water model on the semi-infinite plane we show that the mechanism works for a continuum of incoming waves, and thus should be ubiquitous in the ocean. Subsequent slow evolution of thus excited Kelvin waves is governed by harmonically forced simple-wave equation and leads to nontrivial transport and mixing properties

  2. The latent effect of inertia in the modal choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchi, Elisabetta; Meloni, Italo; Ortúzar, Juan de Dios

    2014-01-01

    The existence of habit (leading to inertia) in the choice process has been approached in the literature in a number of ways. In transport, inertia has been studied mainly using “long panel” data, or mixed revealed and stated preference data. In these studies inertia links the choice made in two o...

  3. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class 1 proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-class...

  4. The non-classical nuclear import carrier Transportin 1 modulates circadian rhythms through its effect on PER1 nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korge, Sandra; Maier, Bert; Brüning, Franziska; Ehrhardt, Lea; Korte, Thomas; Mann, Matthias; Herrmann, Andreas; Robles, Maria S; Kramer, Achim

    2018-01-01

    Circadian clocks are molecular timekeeping mechanisms that allow organisms to anticipate daily changes in their environment. The fundamental cellular basis of these clocks is delayed negative feedback gene regulation with PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME containing protein complexes as main inhibitory elements. For a correct circadian period, it is essential that such clock protein complexes accumulate in the nucleus in a precisely timed manner, a mechanism that is poorly understood. We performed a systematic RNAi-mediated screen in human cells and identified 15 genes associated with the nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation machinery, whose expression is important for circadian clock dynamics. Among them was Transportin 1 (TNPO1), a non-classical nuclear import carrier, whose knockdown and knockout led to short circadian periods. TNPO1 was found in endogenous clock protein complexes and particularly binds to PER1 regulating its (but not PER2's) nuclear localization. While PER1 is also transported to the nucleus by the classical, Importin β-mediated pathway, TNPO1 depletion slowed down PER1 nuclear import rate as revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. In addition, we found that TNPO1-mediated nuclear import may constitute a novel input pathway of how cellular redox state signals to the clock, since redox stress increases binding of TNPO1 to PER1 and decreases its nuclear localization. Together, our RNAi screen knocking down import carriers (but also export carriers) results in short and long circadian periods indicating that the regulatory pathways that control the timing of clock protein subcellular localization are far more complex than previously assumed. TNPO1 is one of the novel players essential for normal circadian periods and potentially for redox regulation of the clock.

  5. Characterization of SLCO5A1/OATP5A1, a solute carrier transport protein with non-classical function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sebastian

    Full Text Available Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP/SLCO have been identified to mediate the uptake of a broad range of mainly amphipathic molecules. Human OATP5A1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of many cancerous and non-cancerous tissues throughout the body but protein characterization and functional analysis have not yet been performed. This study focused on the biochemical characterization of OATP5A1 using Xenopus laevis oocytes and Flp-In T-REx-HeLa cells providing evidence regarding a possible OATP5A1 function. SLCO5A1 is highly expressed in mature dendritic cells compared to immature dendritic cells (∼6.5-fold and SLCO5A1 expression correlates with the differentiation status of primary blood cells. A core- and complex- N-glycosylated polypeptide monomer of ∼105 kDa and ∼130 kDa could be localized in intracellular membranes and on the plasma membrane, respectively. Inducible expression of SLCO5A1 in HeLa cells led to an inhibitory effect of ∼20% after 96 h on cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling with these cells identified immunologically relevant genes (e.g. CCL20 and genes implicated in developmental processes (e.g. TGM2. A single nucleotide polymorphism leading to the exchange of amino acid 33 (L→F revealed no differences regarding protein expression and function. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OATP5A1 might be a non-classical OATP family member which is involved in biological processes that require the reorganization of the cell shape, such as differentiation and migration.

  6. Bounds on the mass and the moment of inertia of nonrotating neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbadini, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    Bounds are placed on the mass and the moment of inertia of relativistic, spherical, perfect fluid neutron stars, under minimal assumptions on the equation of state of neutron star matter above nuclear densities. The assumptions are: the pressure p, the density rho, and the derivative dp/d rho are positive. The equation of state is assumed to be known below the density rho 0 = 5 x 10 14 g/cm 3 . The upper bound on the mass of a nonrotating neutron star, under these assumptions, is found to be 5 M/sub solar mass/. Upper and lower bounds on the moment of inertia are derived: for a spherical star of given mass and radius (without assuming a specific equation of state in any density region); for a spherical neutron star of arbitrary mass and radius; for a spherical neutron star of given mass. These bounds are optimum ones, in the sense that there always exists a configuration consistent with the assumptions, having a moment of inertia equal to the bound. Using these results for the moment of inertia, the correction to the upper bound on the mass due to slow rotation is discussed

  7. Color Feature-Based Object Tracking through Particle Swarm Optimization with Improved Inertia Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Siqiu; Zhang, Tao; Song, Yulong; Qian, Feng

    2018-04-23

    This paper presents a particle swarm tracking algorithm with improved inertia weight based on color features. The weighted color histogram is used as the target feature to reduce the contribution of target edge pixels in the target feature, which makes the algorithm insensitive to the target non-rigid deformation, scale variation, and rotation. Meanwhile, the influence of partial obstruction on the description of target features is reduced. The particle swarm optimization algorithm can complete the multi-peak search, which can cope well with the object occlusion tracking problem. This means that the target is located precisely where the similarity function appears multi-peak. When the particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied to the object tracking, the inertia weight adjustment mechanism has some limitations. This paper presents an improved method. The concept of particle maturity is introduced to improve the inertia weight adjustment mechanism, which could adjust the inertia weight in time according to the different states of each particle in each generation. Experimental results show that our algorithm achieves state-of-the-art performance in a wide range of scenarios.

  8. Predicting superdeformed rotational band-head spin in A ∼ 190 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The band-head spin (0) of superdeformed (SD) rotational bands in ∼ 190 mass region is predicted using the variable moment of inertia (VMI) model for 66 SD rotational bands. The superdeformed rotational bands exhibited considerably good rotational property and rigid behaviour. The transition energies were ...

  9. Discovery of spin-rate-dependent asteroid thermal inertia

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Alan; Drube, Line

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. Using WISE/NEOWISE data and our new asteroid thermal-inertia estimator we show that the thermal inertia of main-belt asteroids (MBAs) appears to increase with spin period. Similar behavior is found in the case of thermophysically-modeled thermal inertia values of near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increa...

  10. Tidal variations of earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Parke, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The periodic variations of the earths' rotation resulting from the tidal deformation of the earth by the sun and moon were rederived including terms with amplitudes of 0.002 millisec and greater. The series applies to the mantle, crust, and oceans which rotate together for characteristic tidal periods; the scaling parameter is the ratio of the fraction of the Love number producing tidal variations in the moment of inertia of the coupled mantle and oceans (k) to the dimensionless polar moment of inertia of the coupled moments (C). The lunar laser ranging data shows that k/C at monthly and fortnightly frequencies equals 0.99 + or - 0.15 and 0.99 + or - 0.20 as compared to the theoretical value of 0.94 + or - 0.04.

  11. Realization of Thermal Inertia in Frequency Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boe-Shong Hong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To realize the lagging behavior in heat conduction observed in these two decades, this paper firstly theoretically excludes the possibility that the underlying thermal inertia is a result of the time delay in heat diffusion. Instead, we verify in experiments the electro-thermal analogy, wherein the thermal inertial is parameterized by thermal inductance that formulates hyperbolic heat-conduction. The thermal hyperbolicity exhibits a special frequency response in Bode plot, wherein the amplitude ratios is kept flat after crossing some certain frequency, as opposed to Fourier heat-conduction. We apply this specialty to design an instrument that reliably identifies thermal inductances of some materials in frequency domain. The instrument is embedded with a DSP-based frequency synthesizer capable of modulating frequencies in utmost high-resolution. Thermal inertia implies a new possibility for energy storage in analogy to inductive energy storage in electricity or mechanics.

  12. Determining the Products of Inertia for Small Scale UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, Joseph S.; Banuelos, Leonel C.; Clarke, Robert; Murillo, Oscar J.; Bowers, Albion H.

    2017-01-01

    Moments of inertia and products of inertia often need to be determined for aircraft. As complex bodies, their mass properties need to be determined experimentally for best accuracy. While several moment of inertia experimental techniques have been developed, there are few to determine the products of inertia. Products of inertia can be easily determined mathematically if the angle between the aircraft x body axis and principal x axis is known. This method finds the principal inclination angle by mathematically correlating the measured moments of inertia about a range of axes of the aircraft. This correlation uses a least squares error minimization of a mathematical model that describes the ellipse of inertia in the aircraft's x-z axes plane. Results from a test conducted on a small scale UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center is also presented, which is an example of the intended application of this technique.

  13. Realization of Thermal Inertia in Frequency Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Boe-Shong; Chou, Chia-Yu

    2014-01-01

    To realize the lagging behavior in heat conduction observed in these two decades, this paper firstly theoretically excludes the possibility that the underlying thermal inertia is a result of the time delay in heat diffusion. Instead, we verify in experiments the electro-thermal analogy, wherein the thermal inertial is parameterized by thermal inductance that formulates hyperbolic heat-conduction. The thermal hyperbolicity exhibits a special frequency response in Bode plot, wherein the amplitu...

  14. Magnitude and Time Course of Sleep Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-10

    protein content and snacks with high sugar content were not provided. 7 Each participant had access to a colour television and game console/DVD...measures considered in this report, that these facets of mood and functioning are sensitive enough to detect sleep inertia effects. We therefore predict...Gillen K, Powell J, Ott G, et al. Cumulative sleepiness, Mood disturbance, and psychomotor vigilance performance decrements during a week of sleep

  15. Rotation of a synchronous viscoelastic shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyelles, Benoît

    2018-03-01

    Several natural satellites of the giant planets have shown evidence of a global internal ocean, coated by a thin, icy crust. This crust is probably viscoelastic, which would alter its rotational response. This response would translate into several rotational quantities, i.e. the obliquity, and the librations at different frequencies, for which the crustal elasticity reacts differently. This study aims at modelling the global response of the viscoelastic crust. For that, I derive the time-dependence of the tensor of inertia, which I combine with the time evolution of the rotational quantities, thanks to an iterative algorithm. This algorithm combines numerical simulations of the rotation with a digital filtering of the resulting tensor of inertia. The algorithm works very well in the elastic case, provided the problem is not resonant. However, considering tidal dissipation adds different phase lags to the oscillating contributions, which challenge the convergence of the algorithm.

  16. Problems of rotational mass in passenger vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander UBYSZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an overview of methods for calculation of inertia mass in vehicles which impact on inertial resistance. Different opinions in references on rotational mass (engine with clutch mechanism and the road wheels provided the author an impulse to verify them with respect to currently manufactured vehicles.

  17. Superdeformed rotational bands in Pu-240

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunyadi, M; Gassmann, D; Krasznahorkay, A; Habs, D; Csatlos, M; Eisermann, Y; Faestermann, T; Graw, G; Gulyas, J; Hertenberger, R; Maier, HJ; Mate, Z; Metz, A; Thirolf, P; Chromik, M; van der Werf, SY

    The intermediate structure of the fission resonances has been observed in Pu-240. A resonance structure found around the excitation energy of 4.5 MeV was interpreted as a group of K-pi = 0(+) superdeformed rotational bands. The moments of inertia and level density distributions were also deduced for

  18. Classical and non-classical MHC I molecule manipulation by human cytomegalovirus: so many targets—but how many arrows in the quiver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halenius, Anne; Gerke, Carolin; Hengel, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Major mechanisms for the recognition of pathogens by immune cells have evolved to employ classical and non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules. Classical MHC I molecules present antigenic peptide ligands on infected cells to CD8+ T cells, whereas a key function for non-classical MHC I molecules is to mediate inhibitory or activating stimuli in natural killer (NK) cells. The structural diversity of MHC I puts immense pressure on persisting viruses, including cytomegaloviruses. The very large coding capacity of the human cytomegalovirus allows it to express a whole arsenal of immunoevasive factors assigned to individual MHC class I targets. This review summarizes achievements from more than two decades of intense research on how human cytomegalovirus manipulates MHC I molecules and escapes elimination by the immune system. PMID:25418469

  19. Pairing effects in rotating nuclei: a semi classical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, M.

    1985-10-01

    The semi-classical phase-space distribution ρ(r,p) is calculated for rotating superfluid nuclei, taking into account the reaction of the pairing field to the rotational motion. Moments of inertia and current distributions calculated by means of this distribution pass continuously from a rigid to an irrotational behaviour

  20. Plasma dynamics with electron-inertia effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivamoggi, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    Some aspects of plasma dynamics with electron-inertia effects are considered. The behaviour of (i) one-dimensional steady current sheets, (ii) two-dimensional steady reconnection models, (iii) one-dimensional current-sheet evolution, (iv) linear tearing-mode evaluation and (v) nonlinear magnetic-island evolution in this regime is investigated. Stability of the two-dimensional plasma in this regime is then discussed, and necessary conditions for linear stability in the Liapunov sense for steady states are then given. (author)

  1. Thermal inertia mapping. [for lithologic materials in earth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Gillespie, A. R.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Addington, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A thermal model of the earth's surface has been developed and used to determine the thermal inertia of a test site in the Mojave Desert, California. The model, which includes meteorological heating terms as well as radiation and conduction heating terms, is used with remotely sensed surface temperature data to determine thermal inertia of materials. The thermal inertia is displayed in image form, and can aid in the differentiation of the various lithologic materials in the test site.

  2. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasar, Parveen; Wilhelm, Amanda; Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Teng, Lihong; Shi, Bi; Davis, William C; Suarez, Carlos E; New, Daniel D; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-classical MHC-I isoforms, we expressed the MHC proteins in murine P815 and human K562 (MHC-I deficient) cells. Following antibiotic selection, stably transfected cell lines were stained with H1A or W6/32 antibodies to detect expression of the MHC-I proteins by flow cytometry. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00501 and BoLA-NC3*00101) were expressed on the cell surface in both cell lines. Surprisingly, the BoLA-NC4*00201 protein was expressed on the cell membrane of human K562 but not mouse P815 cells. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00401, which lacks a transmembrane domain, and BoLA-NC2*00102) did not exhibit cell surface expression. Nevertheless, Western blot analyses demonstrated expression of the MHC-I heavy chain in all transfected cell lines. Ammonium-sulfate precipitation of proteins from culture supernatants showed that BoLA-NC1*00401 was secreted and that all surface expressed proteins where shed from the cell membrane by the transfected cells. Interestingly, the surface expressed MHC-I proteins were present in culture supernatants at a much higher concentration than BoLA-NC1*00401. This comprehensive study shows that bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins BoLA-NC1*00501, BoLA-NC3*00101, and BoLA-NC4*00201 are expressed as surface isoforms with the latter reaching the cell membrane only in K562 cells. Furthermore, it demonstrated that BoLA-NC1*00401 is a secreted isoform and that significant quantities of membrane associated MHC-I proteins can be shed from the cell membrane. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency Stability Enhancement for Low Inertia Systems using Synthetic Inertia of Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Ha Thi; Yang, Guangya; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2017-01-01

    -based system using-real time digital simulator (RTDS) to propose the best one for the synthetic inertia controller. From the comparative simulation results, it can be concluded that the method using a combination of both the frequency deviation and derivative as input signals, and the under-frequency trigger...

  4. Magnetically actuated artificial cilia: the effect of fluid inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaderi, S N; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2012-05-22

    Natural cilia are hairlike microtubule-based structures that are able to move fluid on the micrometer scale using asymmetric motion. In this article, we follow a biomimetic approach to design artificial cilia lining the inner surfaces of microfluidic channels with the goal of propelling fluid. The artificial cilia consist of polymer films filled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, which can mimic the motion of natural cilia when subjected to a rotating magnetic field. To obtain the magnetic field and associated magnetization local to the cilia, we solve the Maxwell equations, from which the magnetic body moments and forces can be deduced. To obtain the ciliary motion, we solve the dynamic equations of motion, which are then fully coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations that describe the fluid flow around the cilia, thus taking full account of fluid inertial forces. The dimensionless parameters that govern the deformation behavior of the cilia and the associated fluid flow are arrived at using the principle of virtual work. The physical response of the cilia and the fluid flow for different combinations of elastic, fluid viscous, and inertia forces are identified.

  5. Principal direction of inertia for 3D trajectories from patient-specific TMJ movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Seung; Choi, Soon-Chul; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Hwang, Soon-Jung; Kim, Seong-Ha; Yi, Won-Jin

    2013-03-01

    Accurate simulation and evaluation of mandibular movement is fundamental for the analysis of functional changes and effects of the mandible and maxilla before and after surgical treatments. We applied principal axes of inertia to the three-dimensional (3D) trajectories generated by patient-specific simulations of TMJ movements for the functional evaluations of mandible movement. Three-dimensional movements of the mandible and the maxilla were tracked based on a patient-specific splint and an optical tracking system. The dental occlusion recorded on the sprint provided synchronization for initial movement in the tracking and the simulation phases. The translation and rotation recorded during movement tracking was applied sequentially to the mandibular model in relation to a fixed maxilla model. The sequential 3D positions of selected landmarks on the mandible were calculated based on the reference coordinate system. The landmarks selected for analysis were bilateral condyles and pogonion points. The moment of inertia tensor was calculated with respect to the 3D trajectory points. Using the unit vectors along the principal axes derived from the tensor matrix, α, β and γ rotations around z-, y- and x-axes were determined to represent the principal directions as principal rotations respectively. The γ direction showed the higher standard deviation, variation of directions, than other directions at all the landmarks. The mandible movement has larger kinematic redundancy in the γ direction than α and β during mouth opening and closing. Principal directions of inertia would be applied to analyzing the changes in angular motion of trajectories introduced by mandibular shape changes from surgical treatments and also to the analysis of the influence of skeletal deformities on mandibular movement asymmetry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. GyroVR: Simulating Inertia in Virtual Reality using Head Worn Flywheels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gugenheimer, Jan; Wolf, Dennis; Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar

    2016-01-01

    We present GyroVR, head worn flywheels designed to render inertia in Virtual Reality (VR. Motions such as flying, diving or floating in outer space generate kinesthetic forces onto our body which impede movement and are currently not represented in VR. We simulate those kinesthetic forces...... by attaching flywheels to the users head, leveraging the gyroscopic effect of resistance when changing the spinning axis of rotation. GyroVR is an ungrounded, wireless and self contained device allowing the user to freely move inside the virtual environment. The generic shape allows to attach it to different...

  7. Angular Momentum Transfer and Fractional Moment of Inertia in Pulsar Glitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eya, I. O.; Urama, J. O.; Chukwude, A. E., E-mail: innocent.eya@unn.edu.ng, E-mail: innocent.eya@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State (Nigeria)

    2017-05-01

    We use the Jodrell Bank Observatory glitch database containing 472 glitches from 165 pulsars to investigate the angular momentum transfer during rotational glitches in pulsars. Our emphasis is on pulsars with at least five glitches, of which there are 26 that exhibit 261 glitches in total. This paper identifies four pulsars in which the angular momentum transfer, after many glitches, is almost linear with time. The Lilliefore test on the cumulative distribution of glitch spin-up sizes in these glitching pulsars shows that glitch sizes in 12 pulsars are normally distributed, suggesting that their glitches originate from the same momentum reservoir. In addition, the distribution of the fractional moment of inertia (i.e., the ratio of the moment of inertia of neutron star components that are involved in the glitch process) have a single mode, unlike the distribution of fractional glitch size (Δ ν / ν ), which is usually bimodal. The mean fractional moment of inertia in the glitching pulsars we sampled has a very weak correlation with the pulsar spin properties, thereby supporting a neutron star interior mechanism for the glitch phenomenon.

  8. Coupling diffusion and maximum entropy models to estimate thermal inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal inertia is a physical property of soil at the land surface related to water content. We have developed a method for estimating soil thermal inertia using two daily measurements of surface temperature, to capture the diurnal range, and diurnal time series of net radiation and specific humidi...

  9. Sleep inertia: best time not to wake up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitoh, P; Kelly, T; Babkoff, H

    1993-04-01

    Sleep inertia is a brief period of inferior task performance and/or disorientation immediately after sudden awakening from sleep. Normally sleep inertia lasts sleep inertia. Since the process of falling asleep is strongly influenced by circadian time, the reverse process of awakening could be similarly affected. A group of nine subjects stayed awake for a 64-h continuous work period, except for 20-min sleep periods (naps) every 6 h. Another group of 10 subjects stayed awake for 64 h without any sleep. The differences between these two groups in performance degradation are expected to show sleep inertia on the background of sleep deprivation. Sleep inertia was measured with Baddeley's logical reasoning task, which started within 1 min of awakening and lasted for 5 min. There appeared to be no specific circadian time when sleep inertia is either maximal or minimal. An extreme form of sleep inertia was observed, when the process of waking up during the period of the circadian body temperature trough became so traumatic that it created "sleep (nap) aversion." The findings lead to the conclusion that there are no advantages realized on sleep inertia by waking up from sleep at specific times of day.

  10. The moments of inertia of mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bills, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    The mean moment of inertia of Mars is, at present, very poorly constrained. The generally accepted value of 0.365 MR 2 is obtained by assuming that the observed second degree gravity field can be decomposed into a hydrostatic oblate spheroid and a nonhydrostatic prolate spheroid with an equatorial axis of symmetry. An alternative decomposition is advocated in the present analysis. If the nonhydrostatic component is a maximally triaxial ellipsoid (intermediate moment midway between greatest and least) the hydrostatic component is consistent with a mean moment of 0.345 MR 2 . The plausibility of this decomposition is supported by statistical arguments and comparison with the Earth, Moon and Venus. If confirmed, this new value would have significant implications for the inferred composition and climatic history of Mars. The Mars Observer mission may help resolve this issue

  11. Regulation of non-classical immune parameters in immune thrombocytopenic purpura mice by a spleen-invigorating, qi-replenishing and blood-containing formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Li

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The SQBF had a similar effect to prednisone with regards to enhancing peripheral blood platelet counts in ITP mice. Furthermore, it decreased β-EP levels and increased VIP and SIgA, and protected the thymus. This shows that, on base of the brain-gut axis functions, some non-classical immune vascular active factors or neurotransmitters are also involved in immune responses, and also have relationship with the onset of ITP and bleeding and/or hemostasis. It needs further study to determine whether a change in these active factors is related to immediate hemostasis.

  12. Expression and phylogenetic analyses reveal paralogous lineages of putatively classical and non-classical MHC-I genes in three sparrow species (Passer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Anna; Strandh, Maria; Råberg, Lars; Westerdahl, Helena

    2017-06-26

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) plays a central role in immunity and has been given considerable attention by evolutionary ecologists due to its associations with fitness-related traits. Songbirds have unusually high numbers of MHC class I (MHC-I) genes, but it is not known whether all are expressed and equally important for immune function. Classical MHC-I genes are highly expressed, polymorphic and present peptides to T-cells whereas non-classical MHC-I genes have lower expression, are more monomorphic and do not present peptides to T-cells. To get a better understanding of the highly duplicated MHC genes in songbirds, we studied gene expression in a phylogenetic framework in three species of sparrows (house sparrow, tree sparrow and Spanish sparrow), using high-throughput sequencing. We hypothesize that sparrows could have classical and non-classical genes, as previously indicated though never tested using gene expression. The phylogenetic analyses reveal two distinct types of MHC-I alleles among the three sparrow species, one with high and one with low level of polymorphism, thus resembling classical and non-classical genes, respectively. All individuals had both types of alleles, but there was copy number variation both within and among the sparrow species. However, the number of highly polymorphic alleles that were expressed did not vary between species, suggesting that the structural genomic variation is counterbalanced by conserved gene expression. Overall, 50% of the MHC-I alleles were expressed in sparrows. Expression of the highly polymorphic alleles was very variable, whereas the alleles with low polymorphism had uniformly low expression. Interestingly, within an individual only one or two alleles from the polymorphic genes were highly expressed, indicating that only a single copy of these is highly expressed. Taken together, the phylogenetic reconstruction and the analyses of expression suggest that sparrows have both classical and non-classical

  13. Electroencephalographic sleep inertia of the awakening brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, C; Ferrara, M; Moroni, F; De Gennaro, L

    2011-03-10

    Sleep inertia (SI) denotes a period of hypovigilance, confusion and impaired cognitive and behavioral performance that immediately follows awakening. Based on the observation that the reactivation of some cortical areas is faster than other upon awakening, here we examined regional differences between presleep and postsleep waking period. Moreover, we also compared rapid eye movements (REM) and stage 2 non-rapid eye movements (NREM) awakenings in a within-subject design. Presleep and postsleep waking electroencephalogram (EEG; 5 min with eyes-closed and 5 min with eyes-open) of 18 healthy subjects (12 males, mean age=23.8±2.3 years) were recorded from 19 derivations. Participants slept for two consecutive nights in the laboratory. In one night they were awakened from stage 2 NREM, while in the other from REM sleep. EEG power spectra were calculated across the following bands: delta (1-4 Hz), theta (5-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta-1 (13-16 Hz) and beta-2 (17-24 Hz). Moreover, a detailed hertz-by-hertz analysis has been repeated in the 2-4 Hz frequency range. Postsleep wakefulness, compared to presleep, is characterized by a generalized decrease of higher beta-1 and beta-2 EEG power over almost all scalp locations. A detailed analysis of topographical modifications in the low-frequency range showed that postsleep wakefulness is characterized by an increased delta activity in the posterior scalp locations, and by a concomitant frontal decrease compared to presleep. Moreover, it was found a prevalence of EEG power in the high frequency ranges (beta-1 and beta-2) upon awakening from stage 2 compared to REM awakenings over the left anterior derivations. Altogether these findings support the hypothesis that a generalized reduction in beta activity and increased delta activity in more posterior areas upon awakening may represent the EEG substratum of the sleep inertia phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and Validation of the Sleep Inertia Questionnaire (SIQ) and Assessment of Sleep Inertia in Analogue and Clinical Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanady, Jennifer C; Harvey, Allison G

    2015-10-01

    Sleep inertia is the transitional state from sleep to wake. Research on sleep inertia is important in depression because many people with depression report having difficulty getting out of bed, which contributes to impairment and can impede the implementation of interventions. The first aim was to develop and validate the first self-report measure of sleep inertia, the Sleep Inertia Questionnaire (SIQ). The second aim was to compare reports of sleep inertia across three groups: (1) No-to-Mild-Depression, (2) Analogue-Depression, and (3) Syndromal-Depression. The SIQ demonstrates strong psychometric properties; it has good to excellent internal consistency, strong construct validity, and SIQ severity is associated with less prior sleep duration. Sleep inertia is more severe in the Analogue-Depression and Syndromal-Depression groups compared to the No-to-Mild-Depression group. In conclusion, the SIQ is a reliable measure of sleep inertia and has potential for improving the assessment of sleep inertia in clinical and research settings.

  15. Design of PID Controller for Maglev System Based on an Improved PSO with Mixed Inertia Weight

    OpenAIRE

    Rongrong Song; Zili Chen

    2014-01-01

    A Maglev system was modeled by the exact feedback linearization to achieve two same linear subsystems. The proportional-integral-differential controllers (PID) based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm with four different inertia weights were then used to regulate both linear subsystems. These different inertia weights were Fixed Inertia Weight (FIW), Linear Descend Inertia Weight (LIW), Linear Differential Descend Inertia Weight (LDW), and mixed inertia weight (FIW–LIW-LDW)....

  16. Real-Time Measurement of Machine Efficiency during Inertia Friction Welding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Daniel Joseph [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Mahaffey, David [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Senkov, Oleg [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Semiatin, Sheldon [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Zhang, Wei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Process efficiency is a crucial parameter for inertia friction welding (IFW) that is largely unknown at the present time. A new method has been developed to determine the transient profile of the IFW process efficiency by comparing the workpiece torque used to heat and deform the joint region to the total torque. Particularly, the former is measured by a torque load cell attached to the non-rotating workpiece while the latter is calculated from the deceleration rate of flywheel rotation. The experimentally-measured process efficiency for IFW of AISI 1018 steel rods is validated independently by the upset length estimated from an analytical equation of heat balance and the flash profile calculated from a finite element based thermal stress model. The transient behaviors of torque and efficiency during IFW are discussed based on the energy loss to machine bearings and the bond formation at the joint interface.

  17. Thermal inertia mapping - A new view of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal response of a substance to a time-varying surface power input is determined by its thermal inertia. Remote sensing (e.g., from satellites) can be utilized to measure this property, which is related to surface composition or to near-surface soil moisture. An algorithm is developed which relates thermal inertia to remote measurements of surface temperature and reflectance. Application to geosynchronous satellite data illustrates the contrast between irrigated and desert areas in the region north of the Gulf of California. The effect of local weather conditions (latent and sensible heat transfer to the atmosphere) must be estimated before precise values for thermal inertia can be specified.

  18. Thermal inertia imaging - A new geologic mapping tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Gillespie, A. R.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A thermal model of the earth's surface has been developed and used to determine the thermal inertia of a test site in the Mojave Desert, California. The model, which includes meteorological heating terms as well as radiation and conduction heating terms, is used with remotely sensed surface temperature and reflectance data to determine the thermal inertia of the surface materials at the test site. The thermal inertia is displayed in image form, and can aid in the differentiation of the various lithologic materials in the test site. Since this thermal property is representative of the upper several cm of the surface, it complements visible and reflected near-IR image data.

  19. The cranking moment of inertia in a static potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, R.; Hamamoto, I.; Ibarra, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Taking into account the self-consistency condition for the deformation, the authors estimate the cranking moment of inertia in the absence of pair-correlations for the Woods-Saxon potential and various versions of the modified oscillator potential. The authors investigate the expectation that in a static potential the moment of inertia is almost equal to the rigid-body moment of inertia at the self-consistent deformation. They examine especially the consequence of the presence of the l 2 term in the conventional modified oscillator potential. (Auth.)

  20. Modeling Inertia and Variety Seeking Tendencies in Brand Choice Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kapil Bawa

    1990-01-01

    Theories of exploratory behavior suggest that inertia and variety-seeking tendencies may coexist within the individual, implying that the same individual may exhibit inertia and variety-seeking at different times depending on his/her choice history. Past research has not allowed for such -consumer variability in these tendencies. The purpose of this study is to present a choice model that allows us to identify such “hybrid” behavior (i.e., a mixture of inertia and variety-seeking), and to dis...

  1. Remarks on anisotropy of inertia in an anisotropic cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treder, Hans-Juergen

    1992-03-01

    The astronomical and physical meaning of the anisotropy of inertia is analyzed with respect to the relativity of inertia and anisotropic distributions of gravitating matter in the universe. Attention is given to the theoretical compatibility of the anisotropy of inertial masses with Mach's principle of the relativity of inertia and the Mach-Einstein doctrine of general relativity. Mach's principle does not imply anisotropy of inertial masses in an anisotropic universe, and the isotropy of cosmological mass is supported by the Mach-Einstein theories.

  2. Microscopic approaches to nuclear rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, W.Y.

    1973-01-01

    The Skyrme formula for the nuclear moment of inertia, which was first derived from a variational principle, can also be deduced from the presumption of rotational bands and intrinsic states. In the present work a formula complementary to the Skyrme formula is first developed using the same technique and approximations. A statistial interpretation indicates that this new formula and the usual Skyrme formula provide reasonable upper and lower bounds for the true inertial parameter. A third formula is then developed which yields values between these bounds. It is concluded that the third Skyrme formula gives superior results. (author)

  3. Functional contribution of elevated circulating and hepatic non-classical CD14CD16 monocytes to inflammation and human liver fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning W Zimmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocyte-derived macrophages critically perpetuate inflammatory responses after liver injury as a prerequisite for organ fibrosis. Experimental murine models identified an essential role for the CCR2-dependent infiltration of classical Gr1/Ly6C(+ monocytes in hepatic fibrosis. Moreover, the monocyte-related chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR5 were recently recognized as important fibrosis modulators in mice. In humans, monocytes consist of classical CD14(+CD16(- and non-classical CD14(+CD16(+ cells. We aimed at investigating the relevance of monocyte subpopulations for human liver fibrosis, and hypothesized that 'non-classical' monocytes critically exert inflammatory as well as profibrogenic functions in patients during liver disease progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed circulating monocyte subsets from freshly drawn blood samples of 226 patients with chronic liver disease (CLD and 184 healthy controls by FACS analysis. Circulating monocytes were significantly expanded in CLD-patients compared to controls with a marked increase of the non-classical CD14(+CD16(+ subset that showed an activated phenotype in patients and correlated with proinflammatory cytokines and clinical progression. Correspondingly, CD14(+CD16(+ macrophages massively accumulated in fibrotic/cirrhotic livers, as evidenced by immunofluorescence and FACS. Ligands of monocyte-related chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR1 and CCR5 were expressed at higher levels in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers, while CCL3 and CCL4 were also systemically elevated in CLD-patients. Isolated monocyte/macrophage subpopulations were functionally characterized regarding cytokine/chemokine expression and interactions with primary human hepatic stellate cells (HSC in vitro. CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes released abundant proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, CD14(+CD16(+, but not CD14(+CD16(- monocytes could directly activate collagen-producing HSC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data

  4. Evaluation of algorithms for geological thermal-inertia mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1977-01-01

    The errors incurred in producing a thermal inertia map are of three general types: measurement, analysis, and model simplification. To emphasize the geophysical relevance of these errors, they were expressed in terms of uncertainty in thermal inertia and compared with the thermal inertia values of geologic materials. Thus the applications and practical limitations of the technique were illustrated. All errors were calculated using the parameter values appropriate to a site at the Raft River, Id. Although these error values serve to illustrate the magnitudes that can be expected from the three general types of errors, extrapolation to other sites should be done using parameter values particular to the area. Three surface temperature algorithms were evaluated: linear Fourier series, finite difference, and Laplace transform. In terms of resulting errors in thermal inertia, the Laplace transform method is the most accurate (260 TIU), the forward finite difference method is intermediate (300 TIU), and the linear Fourier series method the least accurate (460 TIU).

  5. Thermal inertia characteristics of the Martian crater Curie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, V. M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal inertia characteristics have been determined for the martian crater Curie from high resolution groundtracks of Viking Thermal Infrared Mapper (IRTM) data. Flow features near the southeastern edge of the ejecta indicate that at least part of the Curie ejecta was emplaced in a manner similar to the ejecta of rampart craters. Within the study region there appears to be a general southeastern trend towards lower thermal inertia values. This trend may be related to the proximity of the Arabia region, which is mainly to the south and east of Curie. Curie is in a region where the overall thermal inertias change over relatively short distances radial to Arabia. Therefore, the observed general decrease in thermal inertia may represent increasing regional dust accumulation in the direction of Arabia.

  6. Einstein's equivalence principle instead of the inertia forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros Mateos, F.

    1997-01-01

    In this article I intend to show that Einstein's equivalence principle substitutes advantageously the inertia forces in the study and resolution of problems in which non-inertial systems appear. (Author) 13 refs

  7. Rock Concentration and Thermal Inertia of Selected Lunar Study Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, K. E.; Hiesinger, H.

    2012-04-01

    Temperature variations of lunar and planetary surfaces are directly influenced by their surface and subsurface thermophysical properties [1, 2]. These properties, namely bulk density, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity, are represented by thermal inertia, which is the ability of a surface and subsurface to conduct and store heat [2]. Materials with a low thermal inertia, such as dust and other fine-grained material, quickly respond to temperature changes, which results in a large temperature amplitude during the lunar cycle. Surfaces with high thermal inertia material, e.g. rocks or bedrock, take more time to heat up during the lunar day and reradiate the heat over extended periods. We derived maps of thermal inertia from LRO-Diviner nighttime temperature data [3]. The data was binned in one hour intervals with a minimum spatial resolution of 32 pixels/degree. For each surface facet we generated temperature-to-inertia look-up tables using a thermal model that solves the 1-D heat conduction equation. Model temperatures were then compared to measured data to find the best-fitting thermal inertia value. This approach is similar to martian thermal inertia derivations, as described by Mellon et al. (2000) and Putzig et al. (2005) [2, 4]. Due to the relatively large footprints of the used remote sensing data, anisothermal surfaces are observed within the field of view. Consequently, multiple thermal inertia units having variable temperatures are merged to a single observed temperature. However, the brightness temperature is a function of wavelength - it increases with decreasing wavelength. This nonlinearity of the Planck radiance can be used to determine rock concentrations [e.g., 5-7]. Therefore we used our model surface temperatures calculated with different thermal inertia and rock concentrations and compared these results to the LRO-Diviner temperature data at several wavelengths. The results were also compared to high-resolution Apollo and Lunar Reconnaissance

  8. The Earth's Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity and Thermal Inertia

    OpenAIRE

    Royce, B. S. H.; Lam, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's equilibrium climate sensitivity has received much attention because of its relevance and importance for global warming policymaking. This paper focuses on the Earth's \\emph{thermal inertia time scale} which has received relatively little attention. The difference between the observed transient climate sensitivity and the equilibrium climate sensitivity is shown to be proportional to the thermal inertia time scale, and the numerical value of the proportionality factor is determined...

  9. A new inertia weight control strategy for particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xianming; Wang, Hongbo

    2018-04-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization is a member of swarm intelligence algorithms, which is inspired by the behavior of bird flocks. The inertia weight, one of the most important parameters of PSO, is crucial for PSO, for it balances the performance of exploration and exploitation of the algorithm. This paper proposes a new inertia weight control strategy and PSO with this new strategy is tested by four benchmark functions. The results shows that the new strategy provides the PSO with better performance.

  10. Time to wake up: reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia

    OpenAIRE

    HILDITCH, Cassie J.; DORRIAN, Jillian; BANKS, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Sleep inertia is the period of impaired performance and grogginess experienced after waking. This period of impairment is of concern to workers who are on-call, or nap during work hours, and need to perform safety-critical tasks soon after waking. While several studies have investigated the best sleep timing and length to minimise sleep inertia effects, few have focused on countermeasures -especially those that can be implemented after waking (i.e. reactive countermeasures). This structured r...

  11. Squeezing and other non-classical features in k-photon anharmonic oscillator in binomial and negative binomial states of the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, A.; Lawande, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study of squeezing obtained from k-photon anharmonic oscillator (with interaction hamiltonian of the form (a † ) k , k ≥ 2) interacting with light whose statistics can be varied from sub-Poissonian to poissonian via binomial state of field and super-Poissonian to poissonian via negative binomial state of field is presented. The authors predict that for all values of k there is a tendency increase in squeezing with increased sub-Poissonian character of the field while the reverse is true with super-Poissonian field. They also present non-classical behavior of the first order coherence function explicitly for k = 2 case (i.e., for two-photon anharmonic oscillator model used for a Kerr-like medium) with variation in the statistics of the input light

  12. Effects of moment of inertia on restricted motion swing speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorah, David; Choppin, Simon; James, David

    2015-06-01

    In many sports, the maximum swing speed of a racket, club, or bat is a key performance parameter. Previous research in multiple sports supports the hypothesis of an inverse association between the swing speed and moment of inertia of an implement. The aim of this study was to rigorously test and quantify this relationship using a restricted swinging motion. Eight visually identical rods with a common mass but variable moment of inertia were manufactured. Motion capture technology was used to record eight participants' maximal effort swings with the rods. Strict exclusion criteria were applied to data that did not adhere to the prescribed movement pattern. The study found that for all participants, swing speed decreased with respect to moment of inertia according to a power relationship. However, in contrast to previous studies, the rate of decrease varied from participant to participant. With further analysis it was found that participants performed more consistently at the higher end of the moment of inertia range tested. The results support the inverse association between swing speed and moment of inertia but only for higher moment of inertia implements.

  13. Hysteretic transitions in the Kuramoto model with inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcini, Alessandro; Olmi, Simona; Navas, Adrian; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    We report finite size numerical investigations and mean field analysis of a Kuramoto model with inertia for fully coupled and diluted systems. In particular, we examine the transition from incoherence to coherence for increasingly large system size and inertia. For sufficiently large inertia the transition is hysteretic and within the hysteretic region clusters of locked oscillators of various sizes and different levels of synchronization coexist. A modification of the mean field theory developed by Tanaka, Lichtenberg, and Oishi allows to derive the synchronization curve associated to each of these clusters. We have also investigated numerically the limits of existence of the coherent and of the incoherent solutions. The minimal coupling required to observe the coherent state is largely independent of the system size and it saturates to a constant value already for moderately large inertia values. The incoherent state is observable up to a critical coupling whose value saturates for large inertia and for finite system sizes, while in the thermodinamic limit this critical value diverges proportionally to the mass. By increasing the inertia the transition becomes more complex, and the synchronization occurs via the emergence of clusters of coherently drifting oscillators. Financial support has been provided by the Italian Ministry of University and Research within the project CRISIS LAB PNR 2011-2013.

  14. Motion planning for variable inertia mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammas, Elie A.; Choset, Howie; Rizzi, Alfred A.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we generate gaits for mixed systems, that is, dynamic systems that are subject to a set of nonholonomic constraints. What is unique about mixed systems is that when we express their dynamics in body coordinates, the motion of these systems can be attributed to two decoupled terms: the geometric and dynamic phase shifts. In our prior work, we analyzed systems whose dynamic phase shift was null by definition. Purely mechanical and principally kinematic systems are two classes of mechanical systems that have this property. We generated gaits for these two classes of systems by intuitively evaluating their geometric phase shift and relating it to a volume integral under well-defined height functions. One of the contributions of this paper is to present a similar intuitive approach for computing the dynamic phase shift. We achieve this, by introducing a new scaled momentum variable that not only simplifies the momentum evolution equation but also allows us to introduce a new set of well-defined gamma functions which enable us to intuitively evaluate the dynamic phase shift. More specifically, by analyzing these novel gamma functions in a similar way to how we analyzed height functions, and by analyzing the sign-definiteness of the scaled momentum variable, we are able to ensure that the dynamic phase shift is non-zero solely along the desired fiber direction. Finally, we also introduce a novel mechanical system, the variable inertia snakeboard, which is a generalization of the original snakeboard that was previously studied in the literature. Not only does this general system help us identify regions of the base space where we can not define a certain type of gaits, but also it helps us verify the generality and applicability of our gait generation approach.

  15. Sequence-dependent rotation axis changes in tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Clint; Martin, Caroline; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe; Bideau, Benoit; Isableu, Brice

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of rotation axes during a tennis serve. A motion capture system was used to evaluate the contribution of the potential axes of rotation (minimum inertia axis, shoulder-centre of mass axis and the shoulder-elbow axis) during the four discrete tennis serve phases (loading, cocking, acceleration and follow through). Ten ranked athletes (International Tennis Number 1-3) repeatedly performed a flat service aiming at a target on the other side of the net. The four serve phases are distinct and thus, each movement phase seems to be organised around specific rotation axes. The results showed that the limbs' rotational axis does not necessarily coincide with the minimum inertia axis across the cocking phase of the tennis serve. Even though individual serving strategies were exposed, all participants showed an effect due to the cocking phase and changed the rotation axis during the task. Taken together, the results showed that despite inter-individual differences, nine out of 10 participants changed the rotation axis towards the minimum inertia and/or the mass axis in an endeavour to maximise external rotation of the shoulder to optimally prepare for the acceleration phase.

  16. Rotational seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    Rotational seismology is an emerging study of all aspects of rotational motions induced by earthquakes, explosions, and ambient vibrations. It is of interest to several disciplines, including seismology, earthquake engineering, geodesy, and earth-based detection of Einstein’s gravitation waves.Rotational effects of seismic waves, together with rotations caused by soil–structure interaction, have been observed for centuries (e.g., rotated chimneys, monuments, and tombstones). Figure 1a shows the rotated monument to George Inglis observed after the 1897 Great Shillong earthquake. This monument had the form of an obelisk rising over 19 metres high from a 4 metre base. During the earthquake, the top part broke off and the remnant of some 6 metres rotated about 15° relative to the base. The study of rotational seismology began only recently when sensitive rotational sensors became available due to advances in aeronautical and astronomical instrumentations.

  17. Isovector pairing effect on nuclear moment of inertia at finite temperature in N = Z even–even systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ami, I.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M.R.; Belabbas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Expressions of temperature-dependent perpendicular (ℑ⊥) and parallel (ℑ‖) moments of inertia, including isovector pairing effects, have been established using the cranking method. They are derived from recently proposed temperature-dependent gap equations. The obtained expressions generalize the conventional finite-temperature BCS (FTBCS) ones. Numerical calculations have been carried out within the framework of the schematic Richardson model as well as for nuclei such as N = Z, using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods–Saxon mean-field. ℑ⊥ and ℑ‖ have been studied as a function of the temperature. It has been shown that the isovector pairing effect on both the perpendicular and parallel moments of inertia is non-negligible at finite temperature. These correlations must thus be taking into account in studies of warm rotating nuclei in the N ≃ Z region. (author)

  18. Inertia in nursing care of hospitalized patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero-López, Consuelo; Márquez-Hernández, Verónica V; Estevez-Morales, María Teresa; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva

    2018-02-03

    To assess the existence of therapeutic inertia in the nursing care of patients with urinary incontinence during the patient's time in hospital, together with the socio-demographic and professional variables involved. Inertia in care is a problem which appears in the nursing care process. Actions related to inertia can be attributed to not adhering to protocols, clinical guidelines and the lack of prevention measures which have undesirable effects on the efficiency of care. This was a prospective observational study. 132 nursing professionals participated over two consecutive months. Data were collected randomly through the method of systematic, non-participative observation of medical practice units and patients' medical records. The results showed a pattern of severely compromised action in the assessment of the pattern of urinary elimination, in actions related to urinary continence, in therapeutic behaviour and in patient satisfaction, and were found to be consistent with professional experience (p continuity of care report were recommendations regarding incontinence included, nor was the type of continence products recommended indicated. It is clear that inertia exists in nursing care in the hospital environment while the patient is hospitalised, in prevention care, in the treatment of urinary incontinence, and in the management of records. Contributing to the understanding of the existence of inertia in nursing care raises questions regarding its causes and interventions to predict or monitor it. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Inertia and Double Bending of Light from Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Careful examination of light paths in an accelerated reference frame, with use of Special Relativity, can account fully for the observed bending of light in a gravitational field, not just half of it as reported in 1911. This analysis also leads to a Machian formulation of inertia similar to the one proposed by Einstein in 1912 and later derived from gravitational field equations in Minkowsky Space by Sciama in 1953. There is a clear inference from equivalence that there is some type of inertial mass increase in a gravitational field. It is the purpose of the current paper to suggest that equivalence provides a more complete picture of gravitational effects than previously thought, correctly predicting full light bending, and that since the theory of inertia is derivable from equivalence, any theory based on equivalence must take account of it. Einstein himself clearly was not satisfied with the status of inertia in GRT, as our quotes have shown. Many have tried to account for inertia and met with less than success, for example Davidson s integration of Sciama s inertia into GRT but only for a steady state cosmology [10], and the Machian gravity theory of Brans and Dicke [11]. Yet Mach s idea hasn t gone away, and now it seems that it cannot go away without also disposing of equivalence.

  20. Observing the variation of asteroid thermal inertia with heliocentric distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozitis, B.; Green, S. F.; MacLennan, E.; Emery, J. P.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal inertia is a useful property to characterise a planetary surface since it can be used as a qualitative measure of the regolith grain size. It is expected to vary with heliocentric distance because of its dependence on temperature. However, no previous investigation has conclusively observed a change in thermal inertia for any given planetary body. We have addressed this by using NEOWISE data and the Advanced Thermophysical Model to study the thermophysical properties of the near-Earth asteroids (1036) Ganymed, (1580) Betulia, and (276049) 2002 CE26 as they moved around their highly eccentric orbits. We confirm that the thermal inertia values of Ganymed and 2002 CE26 do vary with heliocentric distance, although the degree of variation observed depends on the spectral emissivity assumed in the thermophysical modelling. We also confirm that the thermal inertia of Betulia did not change for three different observations obtained at the same heliocentric distance. Depending on the spectral emissivity, the variations for Ganymed and 2002 CE26 are potentially more extreme than that implied by theoretical models of heat transfer within asteroidal regoliths, which might be explained by asteroids having thermal properties that also vary with depth. Accounting for this variation reduces a previously observed trend of decreasing asteroid thermal inertia with increasing size, and suggests that the surfaces of small and large asteroids could be much more similar than previously thought. Furthermore, this variation can affect Yarkovsky orbital drift predictions by a few tens of per cent.

  1. Efficiency of the Inertia Friction Welding Process and Its Dependence on Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkov, O. N.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Tung, D. J.; Zhang, W.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2017-07-01

    It has been widely assumed, but never proven, that the efficiency of the inertia friction welding (IFW) process is independent of process parameters and is relatively high, i.e., 70 to 95 pct. In the present work, the effect of IFW parameters on process efficiency was established. For this purpose, a series of IFW trials was conducted for the solid-state joining of two dissimilar nickel-base superalloys (LSHR and Mar-M247) using various combinations of initial kinetic energy ( i.e., the total weld energy, E o), initial flywheel angular velocity ( ω o), flywheel moment of inertia ( I), and axial compression force ( P). The kinetics of the conversion of the welding energy to heating of the faying sample surfaces ( i.e., the sample energy) vs parasitic losses to the welding machine itself were determined by measuring the friction torque on the sample surfaces ( M S) and in the machine bearings ( M M). It was found that the rotating parts of the welding machine can consume a significant fraction of the total energy. Specifically, the parasitic losses ranged from 28 to 80 pct of the total weld energy. The losses increased (and the corresponding IFW process efficiency decreased) as P increased (at constant I and E o), I decreased (at constant P and E o), and E o (or ω o) increased (at constant P and I). The results of this work thus provide guidelines for selecting process parameters which minimize energy losses and increase process efficiency during IFW.

  2. The Effect of Inertia on the Flow and Mixing Characteristics of a Chaotic Serpentine Mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Gon Kang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As an extension of our previous study, the flow and mixing characteristics of a serpentine mixer in non-creeping flow conditions are investigated numerically. A periodic velocity field is obtained for each spatially periodic channel with the Reynolds number (Re ranging from 0.1 to 70 and the channel aspect ratio from 0.25 to one. The flow kinematics is visualized by plotting the manifold of the deforming interface between two fluids. The progress of mixing affected by the Reynolds number and the channel geometry is characterized by a measure of mixing, the intensity of segregation, calculated using the concentration distribution. A mixer with a lower aspect ratio, which is a poor mixer in the creeping flow regime, turns out to be an efficient one above a threshold value of the Reynolds number, Re = 50. This is due to the combined effect of the enhanced rotational motion of fluid particles and back flows near the bends of the channel driven by inertia. As for a mixer with a higher aspect ratio, the intensity of segregation has its maximum around Re = 30, implying that inertia does not always have a positive influence on mixing in this mixer.

  3. An itinerant oscillator model with cage inertia for mesorheological granular experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasanta, Antonio; Puglisi, Andrea

    2015-08-14

    Recent experiments with a rotating probe immersed in weakly fluidized granular materials show a complex behavior on a wide range of time scales. Viscous-like relaxation at high frequency is accompanied by an almost harmonic dynamical trapping at intermediate times, with possibly anomalous long time behavior in the form of super-diffusion. Inspired by the itinerant oscillator model for diffusion in molecular liquids, and other models with coupled thermostats acting at different time scales, here we discuss a new model able to account for fast viscous relaxation, dynamical trapping, and super-diffusion at long times. The main difference with respect to liquids is a non-negligible cage inertia for the surrounding (granular) fluid, which allows it to sustain a slow but persistent motion for long times. The computed velocity power density spectra and mean-squared displacement qualitatively reproduce the experimental findings. We also discuss the linear response to external perturbations and the tail of the distribution of persistency time, which is associated with superdiffusion, and whose cut-off time is determined by cage inertia.

  4. S100A13-C2A binary complex structure-a key component in the acidic fibroblast growth factor for the non-classical pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Sepuru K.; Rani, Sandhya G.; Kumar, Sriramoju M.; Yu Chin

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are key regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, tumor-induced angiogenesis and migration. FGFs are essential for early embryonic development, organ formation and angiogenesis. They play important roles in tumor formation, inflammation, wound healing and restenosis. The biological effects of FGFs are mediated through the activation of the four transmembrane phosphotyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs) in the presence of heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and therefore require the release of FGFs into the extracellular space. However, FGF-1 lacks the signal peptide required for the releasing of these proteins through the classical endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi secretary pathway. Maciag et al. demonstrated that FGF-1 is exported through a non-classical release pathway involving the formation of a specific multiprotein complex [M. Landriscina, R. Soldi, C. Bagala, I. Micucci, S. Bellum, F. Tarantini, I. Prudovsky, T. Maciag, S100A13 participates in the release of fibroblast growth factor 1 in response to heat shock in vitro, J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 22544-22552; C.M. Carreira, T.M. LaVallee, F. Tarantini, A. Jackson, J.T. Lathrop, B. Hampton, W.H. Burgess, T. Maciag, S100A13 is involved in the regulation of fibroblast growth factor-1 and p40 synaptotagmin-1 release in vitro, J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 22224-22231; T.M. LaValle, F. Tarantini, S. Gamble, C.M. Carreira, A. Jackson, T. Maciag, Synaptotagmin-1 is required for fibroblast growth factor-1 release, J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 22217-22223; C. Bagala, V. Kolev, A. Mandinova, R. Soldi, C. Mouta, I. Graziani, I, Prudovsky, T. Maciag, The alternative translation of synaptotagmin 1 mediates the non-classical release of FGF1, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 310 (2003) 1041-1047]. The protein constituents of this complex include FGF-1, S100A13 (a Ca 2+ -binding protein), and the p40 form of synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1). To understand the molecular events in the FGF-1 releasing

  5. Global rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosquist, K.

    1980-01-01

    Global rotation in cosmological models is defined on an observational basis. A theorem is proved saying that, for rigid motion, the global rotation is equal to the ordinary local vorticity. The global rotation is calculated in the space-time homogeneous class III models, with Godel's model as a special case. It is shown that, with the exception of Godel's model, the rotation in these models becomes infinite for finite affine parameter values. In some directions the rotation changes sign and becomes infinite in a direction opposite to the local vorticity. The points of infinite rotation are identified as conjugate points along the null geodesics. The physical interpretation of the infinite rotation is discussed, and a comparison with the behaviour of the area distance at conjugate points is given. (author)

  6. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) and Immune Regulation: How Do Classical and Non-Classical HLA Alleles Modulate Immune Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crux, Nicole B.; Elahi, Shokrollah

    2017-01-01

    The genetic factors associated with susceptibility or resistance to viral infections are likely to involve a sophisticated array of immune response. These genetic elements may modulate other biological factors that account for significant influence on the gene expression and/or protein function in the host. Among them, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in viral pathogenesis in particular human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), is very well documented. We, recently, added a novel insight into the field by identifying the molecular mechanism associated with the protective role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27/B57 CD8+ T cells in the context of HIV-1 infection and why these alleles act as a double-edged sword protecting against viral infections but predisposing the host to autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review will be reexamining the role of classical and non-classical HLA alleles, including class Ia (HLA-A, -B, -C), class Ib (HLA-E, -F, -G, -H), and class II (HLA-DR, -DQ, -DM, and -DP) in immune regulation and viral pathogenesis (e.g., HIV and HCV). To our knowledge, this is the very first review of its kind to comprehensively analyze the role of these molecules in immune regulation associated with chronic viral infections. PMID:28769934

  8. Convective storms and non-classical low-level jets during high ozone level episodes in the Amazon region: An ARM/GOAMAZON case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Junior, Cléo Q.; Dias, Nelson Luís; Fuentes, José D.; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the ozone dynamics during the occurrence of both downdrafts associated with mesoscale convective storms and non-classical low-level jets. Extensive data sets, comprised of air chemistry and meteorological observations made in the Amazon region of Brazil over the course of 2014-15, are analyzed to address several questions. A first objective is to investigate the atmospheric thermodynamic and dynamic conditions associated with storm-generated ozone enhancements in the Amazon region. A second objective is to determine the magnitude and the frequency of ground-level ozone enhancements related to low-level jets. Ozone enhancements are analyzed as a function of wind shear, low-level jet maximum wind speed, and altitude of jet core. Strong and sudden increases in ozone levels are associated with simultaneous changes in variables such as horizontal wind speed, convective available potential energy, turbulence intensity and vertical velocity skewness. Rapid increases in vertical velocity skewness give support to the hypothesis that the ozone enhancements are directly related to downdrafts. Low-level jets associated with advancing density currents are often present during and after storm downdrafts that transport ozone-enriched air from aloft to the surface.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA and Immune Regulation: How Do Classical and Non-Classical HLA Alleles Modulate Immune Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole B. Crux

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic factors associated with susceptibility or resistance to viral infections are likely to involve a sophisticated array of immune response. These genetic elements may modulate other biological factors that account for significant influence on the gene expression and/or protein function in the host. Among them, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in viral pathogenesis in particular human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, is very well documented. We, recently, added a novel insight into the field by identifying the molecular mechanism associated with the protective role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B27/B57 CD8+ T cells in the context of HIV-1 infection and why these alleles act as a double-edged sword protecting against viral infections but predisposing the host to autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review will be reexamining the role of classical and non-classical HLA alleles, including class Ia (HLA-A, -B, -C, class Ib (HLA-E, -F, -G, -H, and class II (HLA-DR, -DQ, -DM, and -DP in immune regulation and viral pathogenesis (e.g., HIV and HCV. To our knowledge, this is the very first review of its kind to comprehensively analyze the role of these molecules in immune regulation associated with chronic viral infections.

  10. Peptide binding characteristics of the non-classical class Ib MHC molecule HLA-E assessed by a recombinant random peptide approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joly Etienne

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing evidence suggests that the effect of HLA-E on Natural Killer (NK cell activity can be affected by the nature of the peptides bound to this non-classical, MHC class Ib molecule. However, its reduced cell surface expression, and until recently, the lack of specific monoclonal antibodies hinder studying the peptide-binding specificity HLA-E. Results An in vitro refolding system was used to assess binding of recombinant HLA-E to either specific peptides or a nonamer random peptide library. Peptides eluted from HLA-E molecules refolded around the nonamer library were then used to determine a binding motif for HLA-E. Hydrophobic and non-charged amino acids were found to predominate along the peptide motif, with a leucine anchor at P9, but surprisingly there was no methionine preference at P2, as suggested by previous studies. Conclusions Compared to the results obtained with rat classical class Ia MHC molecules, RT1-A1c and RT1-Au, HLA-E appears to refold around a random peptide library to reduced but detectable levels, suggesting that this molecule's specificity is tight but probably not as exquisite as has been previously suggested. This, and a previous report that it can associate with synthetic peptides carrying a viral sequence, suggests that HLA-E, similar to its mouse counterpart (Qa-1b, could possibly bind peptides different from MHC class I leader peptides and present them to T lymphocytes.

  11. Peptide binding characteristics of the non-classical class Ib MHC molecule HLA-E assessed by a recombinant random peptide approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, James; Joly, Etienne; Trowsdale, John; Butcher, Geoffrey W

    2001-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that the effect of HLA-E on Natural Killer (NK) cell activity can be affected by the nature of the peptides bound to this non-classical, MHC class Ib molecule. However, its reduced cell surface expression, and until recently, the lack of specific monoclonal antibodies hinder studying the peptide-binding specificity HLA-E. Results An in vitro refolding system was used to assess binding of recombinant HLA-E to either specific peptides or a nonamer random peptide library. Peptides eluted from HLA-E molecules refolded around the nonamer library were then used to determine a binding motif for HLA-E. Hydrophobic and non-charged amino acids were found to predominate along the peptide motif, with a leucine anchor at P9, but surprisingly there was no methionine preference at P2, as suggested by previous studies. Conclusions Compared to the results obtained with rat classical class Ia MHC molecules, RT1-A1c and RT1-Au, HLA-E appears to refold around a random peptide library to reduced but detectable levels, suggesting that this molecule's specificity is tight but probably not as exquisite as has been previously suggested. This, and a previous report that it can associate with synthetic peptides carrying a viral sequence, suggests that HLA-E, similar to its mouse counterpart (Qa-1b), could possibly bind peptides different from MHC class I leader peptides and present them to T lymphocytes. PMID:11432755

  12. Finite Element Modeling of the Inertia Friction Welding of Dissimilar High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. J.; Attallah, M. M.; Preuss, M.; Shipway, P. H.; Hyde, T. H.; Bray, S.

    2013-11-01

    Finite element (FE) process modeling of inertia friction welding between dissimilar high-strength steels, AerMet® 100 and SCMV, has been carried out using the DEFORM™-2D (v10.0) software. This model was validated against experimental data collected for a test weld performed between the materials; this included process data such as upset and rotational velocities as well as thermal data collected during the process using embedded thermocouples. The as-welded hoop residual stress from the FE model was also compared with experimental measurements taken on the welded component using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. The modeling work considered the solid-state phase transformations which occur in the steels, and the trends in the residual stress data were well replicated by the model.

  13. Use of thermal-inertia properties for material identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieldge, J. P.; Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a knowledge of the thermal inertia of the earth's surface can be used in geologic mapping as a complement to surface reflectance data as provided by Landsat. Thermal inertia, which is a body property, cannot be determined directly but can be inferred from radiation temperature measurements made at various times in the diurnal heating cycle, combined with a model of the surface heating processes. A model of this type is developed and applied along with temperature measurements made in the field and by satellite to determine thermal properties of surface materials. An example from a test site in western Nevada is used to demonstrate the utility of this technique.

  14. Geologic application of thermal inertia imaging using HCMM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, H. N.; Kahle, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using thermal inertia, inferred from remotely sensed temperature data, to complement LANDSAT reflectivity data for reconnaissance geologic mapping and mineral exploration is under investigation. The bulk of HCMM data tapes was received and processed, and a thermal inertia image of one data set was made. Additional areas of interest were identified on the HCMM photographic products and data tapes were ordered for these areas. During analysis of selected subareas, various sedimentary rock units were distinguished in the Death Valley, California test site and areas of altered rock were identified in the Cuprite/Goldifield, Nevada test site.

  15. Moments of inertia and the shapes of Brownian paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fougere, F.; Desbois, J.

    1993-01-01

    The joint probability law of the principal moments of inertia of Brownian paths (open or closed) is computed, using constrained path integrals and Random Matrix Theory. The case of two-dimensional paths is discussed in detail. In particular, it is shown that the ratio of the average values of the largest and smallest moments is equal to 4.99 (open paths) and 3.07 (closed paths). Results of numerical simulations are also presented, which include investigation of the relationships between the moments of inertia and the arithmetic area enclosed by a path. (authors) 28 refs., 2 figs

  16. Using Simple Shapes to Constrain Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Eric M.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2015-11-01

    With the use of remote thermal infrared observations and a thermophysical model (TPM), the thermal inertia of an asteroid surface can be determined. The thermal inertia, in turn, can be used to infer physical properties of the surface, specifically to estimate the average regolith grain size. Since asteroids are often non-spherical techniques for incorporating modeled (non-spherical) shapes into calculating thermal inertia have been established. However, using a sphere as input for TPM is beneficial in reducing running time and shape models are not generally available for all (or most) objects that are observed in the thermal-IR. This is particularly true, as the pace of infrared observations has recently dramatically increased, notably due to the WISE mission, while the time to acquire sufficient light curves for accurate shape inversion remains relatively long. Here, we investigate the accuracy of using both a spherical and ellipsoidal TPM, with infrared observations obtained at pre- and post-opposition (hereafter multi-epoch) geometries to constrain the thermal inertias of a large number of asteroids.We test whether using multi-epoch observations combined with a spherical and ellipsoidal shape TPM can constrain the thermal inertia of an object without a priori knowledge of its shape or spin state. The effectiveness of this technique is tested for 16 objects with shape models from DAMIT and WISE multi-epoch observations. For each object, the shape model is used as input for the TPM to generate synthetic fluxes for different values of thermal inertia. The input spherical and ellipsoidal shapes are then stepped through different spin vectors as the TPM is used to generate best-fit thermal inertia and diameter to the synthetically generated fluxes, allowing for a direct test of the approach’s effectiveness. We will discuss whether the precision of the thermal inertia constraints from the spherical TPM analysis of multi- epoch observations is comparable to works

  17. Sequence-dependent rotation axis changes and interaction torque use in overarm throwing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Clint; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe; Venture, Gentiane; Isableu, Brice

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of rotation axes during an overarm throwing task. Participants performed such task and were asked to throw a ball at maximal velocity at a target. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the minimum inertia axis would be exploited during the throwing phases, a time when internal-external rotations of the shoulder are particularly important. A motion capture system was used to evaluate the performance and to compute the potential axes of rotation (minimum inertia axis, shoulder-centre of mass axis and the shoulder-elbow axis). More specifically, we investigated whether a velocity-dependent change in rotational axes can be observed in the different throwing phases and whether the control obeys the principle of minimum inertia resistance. Our results showed that the limbs' rotational axis mainly coincides with the minimum inertia axis during the cocking phase and with the shoulder-elbow axis during the acceleration phase. Besides these rotation axes changes, the use of interaction torque is also sequence-dependent. The sequence-dependent rotation axes changes associated with the use of interaction torque during the acceleration phase could be a key factor in the production of hand velocity at ball release.

  18. Periodic responses of a pulley-belt system with one-way clutch under inertia excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hu

    2015-09-01

    The stable steady-state periodic response of a two-pulley belt drive system coupled with an accessory by a one-way clutch is presented. For the first time, the pulley-belt system is studied under double excitations. Specifically, the dual excitations consist of harmonic motion of the driving pulley and inertia excitation. The belt spans are modeled as axially moving viscoelastic beams by considering belt bending stiffness. Therefore, integro-partial-differential equations are derived for governing the transverse vibrations of the belt spans. Moreover, the transverse vibrations of the moving belt are coupled with the rotation vibrations of the pulleys by nonlinear dynamic tension. For describing the unidirectional decoupling function of the one-way device, rotation vibrations of the driven pulley and accessory are modeled as coupled piecewise ordinary differential equations. In order to eliminate the influence of the boundary of the belt spans, the non-trivial equilibriums of the pulley-belt system are numerically determined. Furthermore, A nonlinear piecewise discrete-continuous dynamical system is derived by introducing a coordinate transform. Coupled vibrations of the pulley-belt system are investigated via the Galerkin truncation. The natural frequencies of the coupled vibrations are obtained by using the fast Fourier transform. Moreover, frequency-response curves are abstracted from time histories. Therefore, resonance areas of the belt spans, the driven pulley and the accessory are presented. Furthermore, validity of the Galerkin method is examined by comparing with the differential and integral quadrature methods (DQM & IQM). By comparing the results with and without one-way device, significant damping effect of clutch on the dynamic response is discovered. Furthermore, the effects of the intensity of the driving pulley excitation and the inertia excitation are studied. Moreover, numerical results demonstrate that the two excitations interact on the steady

  19. Energy and momentum of rotating frames in tetrad gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, G. L. Nashed

    2011-10-01

    Within the framework of the tetrad formulation of general relativity theory, we compute the total energy and momentum of four rotating frames using the gravitational energy-momentum 3-form. We show how the effect of inertia always makes the total energy divergent. We use a natural regularization method to obtain physical values for the total energy of the system and show how it works on a number of explicit examples. We also show by calculation that inertia has no effect on the momentum components.

  20. Virtual Inertia Adaptive Control of a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG Wind Power System with Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiejiang Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG wind power system with hydrogen energy storage, with a focus on its virtual inertia adaptive control. Conventionally, a synchronous generator has a large inertia from its rotating rotor, and thus its kinetic energy can be used to damp out fluctuations from the grid. However, DFIGs do not provide such a mechanism as their rotor is disconnected with the power grid, owing to the use of back-to-back power converters between the two. In this paper, a hydrogen energy storage system is utilized to provide a virtual inertia so as to dampen the disturbances and support the grid’s stability. An analytical model is developed based on experimental data and test results show that: (1 the proposed method is effective in supporting the grid frequency; (2 the maximum power point tracking is achieved by implementing this proposed system; and, (3 the DFIG efficiency is improved. The developed system is technically viable and can be applied to medium and large wind power systems. The hydrogen energy storage is a clean and environmental-friendly technology, and can increase the renewable energy penetration in the power network.

  1. Obstacles to Reasoning about Inertia in Different Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the underlying reasons for difficulties faced by students when they applied the concept of inertia across varying contexts. The participants of the study included five high school students. Data obtained from interviews were interpreted from the perspectives of the coordination class and epistemological framing…

  2. Geological applications of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A more efficient algorithm for calculating surface temperature was developed. This algorithm was determined to be essentially exact, and relative accuracies in determining thermal inertia of the finite difference and the linear Fourier series algorithms were approximately 5% for both. A procedure for performing geometric registration was developed.

  3. The inertia system coordinate transformation based on the Lobachevsky function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeev, N.G.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the interpretation of the Lobachevsky function cosΠ(ρ/k) = thρ/k as the function which expresses the constant light velocity principle at k = c (k is the Lobachevsky constant, c is the light velocity), the inertia system coordinate transformation of two kinds (one of them known as Lorentz transformation) have been obtained

  4. Determinacy, stock market dynamics and monetary policy inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfajfar, Damjan; Santoro, Emiliano

    2011-01-01

    We study equilibrium determinacy in a New-Keynesian model where the Central Bank responds to asset prices growth. Unlike Taylor-type rules that react to asset prices, the proposed alternative does not harm dynamic stability and in certain cases promotes determinacy by inducing interest-rate inertia....

  5. Caffeine eliminates psychomotor vigilance deficits from sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, H P; Price, N J; Mullington, J M; Szuba, M P; Kapoor, S C; Dinges, D F

    2001-11-01

    This study sought to establish the effects of caffeine on sleep inertia, which is the ubiquitous phenomenon of cognitive performance impairment, grogginess and tendency to return to sleep immediately after awakening. 28 normal adult volunteers were administered sustained low-dose caffeine or placebo (randomized double-blind) during the last 66 hours of an 88-hour period of extended wakefulness that included seven 2-hour naps during which polysomnographical recordings were made. Every 2 hours of wakefulness, and immediately after abrupt awakening from the naps, psychomotor vigilance performance was tested. N/A. N/A. N/A. In the placebo condition, sleep inertia was manifested as significantly impaired psychomotor vigilance upon awakening from the naps. This impairment was absent in the caffeine condition. Caffeine had only modest effects on nap sleep. Caffeine was efficacious in overcoming sleep inertia. This suggests a reason for the popularity of caffeine-containing beverages after awakening. Caffeine's main mechanism of action on the central nervous system is antagonism of adenosine receptors. Thus, increased adenosine in the brain upon awakening may be the cause of sleep inertia.

  6. The effects of sleep inertia on decision-making performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, D; Pisani, D L

    1999-06-01

    Sleep inertia, the performance impairment that occurs immediately after awakening, has not been studied previously in relation to decision-making performance. Twelve subjects were monitored in the sleep laboratory for one night and twice awoken by a fire alarm (slow wave sleep, SWS and REM sleep). Decision making was measured over 10 3-min trials using the 'Fire Chief' computer task under conditions of baseline. SWS and REM arousal. The most important finding was that sleep inertia reduces decision-making performance for at least 30 min with the greatest impairments (in terms of both performance and subjective ratings) being found within 3 min after abrupt nocturnal awakening. Decision-making performance was as little as 51% of optimum (i.e. baseline) during these first few minutes. However, after 30 min. performance may still be as much as 20% below optimum. The initial effects of sleep inertia during the first 9 min are significantly greater after SWS arousal than after REM arousal, but this difference is not sustained. Decision-making performance after REM arousal showed more variability than after SWS arousal. Subjects reported being significantly sleepier and less clear-headed following both SWS and REM awakenings compared with baseline and this was sustained across the full 30 min. In order to generalize this finding to real-life situations, further research is required on the effects of continuous noise, emotional arousal and physical activity on the severity and duration of sleep inertia.

  7. More about the moment of inertia of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, William M.; Sleep, Norman H.; Phillips, Roger J.

    1989-01-01

    Differences between Mars and other terrestrial planets are discussed. Unlike other terrestrial planets, Mars has two nonhydrostatic components of moments of inertia that are nearly equal. The most probable value of I/MR-squared is slightly less than 0.3650.

  8. Time to wake up: reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilditch, Cassie J; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-12-07

    Sleep inertia is the period of impaired performance and grogginess experienced after waking. This period of impairment is of concern to workers who are on-call, or nap during work hours, and need to perform safety-critical tasks soon after waking. While several studies have investigated the best sleep timing and length to minimise sleep inertia effects, few have focused on countermeasures -especially those that can be implemented after waking (i.e. reactive countermeasures). This structured review summarises current literature on reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia such as caffeine, light, and temperature and discusses evidence for the effectiveness and operational viability of each approach. Current literature does not provide a convincing evidence-base for a reactive countermeasure. Caffeine is perhaps the best option, although it is most effective when administered prior to sleep and is therefore not strictly reactive. Investigations into light and temperature have found promising results for improving subjective alertness; further research is needed to determine whether these countermeasures can also attenuate performance impairment. Future research in this area would benefit from study design features highlighted in this review. In the meantime, it is recommended that proactive sleep inertia countermeasures are used, and that safety-critical tasks are avoided immediately after waking.

  9. The effect of inertia, viscous damping, temperature and normal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitish Sinha

    2018-04-16

    Apr 16, 2018 ... A fundamental understanding of frictional sliding at rock surfaces is of practical importance for nucleation and propagation of earthquakes and rock slope stability. We investigate numerically the effect of different physical parameters such as inertia, viscous damping, temperature and normal stress on the ...

  10. A method for measuring the inertia properties of rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, M.; Mastinu, G.; Previati, G.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the inertia properties of rigid bodies is presented. Given a rigid body and its mass, the method allows to measure (identify) the centre of gravity location and the inertia tensor during a single test. The proposed technique is based on the analysis of the free motion of a multi-cable pendulum to which the body under consideration is connected. The motion of the pendulum and the forces acting on the system are recorded and the inertia properties are identified by means of a proper mathematical procedure based on a least square estimation. After the body is positioned on the test rig, the full identification procedure takes less than 10 min. The natural frequencies of the pendulum and the accelerations involved are quite low, making this method suitable for many practical applications. In this paper, the proposed method is described and two test rigs are presented: the first is developed for bodies up to 3500 kg and the second for bodies up to 400 kg. A validation of the measurement method is performed with satisfactory results. The test rig holds a third part quality certificate according to an ISO 9001 standard and could be scaled up to measure the inertia properties of huge bodies, such as trucks, airplanes or even ships.

  11. Geologic application of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Arizona and Powder River, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A theoretical evaluation of the proportional and linear relationship between absolute and relative thermal inertia was performed, and a potentially more accurate expression for absolute thermal inertia mapping was proposed.

  12. Zearalenone and alpha-zearalenol inhibit the synthesis and secretion of pig follicle stimulating hormone via the non-classical estrogen membrane receptor GPR30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Wei, Chao; Li, Yueqin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yue; Pan, Jirong; Liu, Jiali; Wu, Yingjie; Cui, Sheng

    2018-02-05

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is one of the most popular endocrine-disrupting chemicals and is mainly produced by fungi of the genus Fusarium. The excessive intake of ZEA severely disrupts human and animal fertility by affecting the reproductive axis. However, most studies on the effects of ZEA and its metabolite α-zearalenol (α-ZOL) on reproductive systems have focused on gonads. Few studies have investigated the endocrine-disrupting effects of ZEA and α-ZOL on pituitary gonadotropins, including follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The present study was designed to investigate the effects of ZEA and α-ZOL on the synthesis and secretion of FSH and LH and related mechanisms in female pig pituitary. Our in vivo and in vitro results demonstrated that ZEA significantly inhibited the synthesis and secretion of FSH in the pig pituitary gland, but ZEA and α-ZOL had no effects on LH. Our study also showed that ZEA and α-ZOL decreased FSH synthesis and secretion through non-classical estrogen membrane receptor GPR30, which subsequently induced protein kinase cascades and the phosphorylation of PKC, ERK and p38MAPK signaling pathways in pig pituitary cells. Furthermore, our study showed that the LIM homeodomain transcription factor LHX3 was involved in the mechanisms of ZEA and α-ZOL actions on gonadotropes in the female pig pituitary. These findings elucidate the mechanisms behind the physiological alterations resulting from endocrine-disrupting chemicals and further show that the proposed key molecules of the α-ZOL signaling pathway could be potential pharmacological targets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. GPR30, the non-classical membrane G protein related estrogen receptor, is overexpressed in human seminoma and promotes seminoma cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Chevalier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Testicular germ cell tumours are the most frequent cancer of young men with an increasing incidence all over the world. Pathogenesis and reasons of this increase remain unknown but epidemiological and clinical data have suggested that fetal exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs with estrogenic effects, could participate to testicular germ cell carcinogenesis. However, these EEDs (like bisphenol A are often weak ligands for classical nuclear estrogen receptors. Several research groups recently showed that the non classical membrane G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 mediates the effects of estrogens and several xenoestrogens through rapid non genomic activation of signal transduction pathways in various human estrogen dependent cancer cells (breast, ovary, endometrium. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that GPER was overexpressed in testicular tumours and was able to trigger JKT-1 seminoma cell proliferation. RESULTS: We report here for the first time a complete morphological and functional characterization of GPER in normal and malignant human testicular germ cells. In normal adult human testes, GPER was expressed by somatic (Sertoli cells and germ cells (spermatogonia and spermatocytes. GPER was exclusively overexpressed in seminomas, the most frequent testicular germ cell cancer, localized at the cell membrane and triggered a proliferative effect on JKT-1 cells in vitro, which was completely abolished by G15 (a GPER selective antagonist and by siRNA invalidation. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that GPER is expressed by human normal adult testicular germ cells, specifically overexpressed in seminoma tumours and able to trigger seminoma cell proliferation in vitro. It should therefore be considered rather than classical ERs when xeno-estrogens or other endocrine disruptors are assessed in testicular germ cell cancers. It may also represent a prognosis marker and/or a therapeutic target for

  14. GPR30, the Non-Classical Membrane G Protein Related Estrogen Receptor, Is Overexpressed in Human Seminoma and Promotes Seminoma Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Vega, Aurélie; Bouskine, Adil; Siddeek, Bénazir; Michiels, Jean-François; Chevallier, Daniel; Fénichel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Background Testicular germ cell tumours are the most frequent cancer of young men with an increasing incidence all over the world. Pathogenesis and reasons of this increase remain unknown but epidemiological and clinical data have suggested that fetal exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) with estrogenic effects, could participate to testicular germ cell carcinogenesis. However, these EEDs (like bisphenol A) are often weak ligands for classical nuclear estrogen receptors. Several research groups recently showed that the non classical membrane G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) mediates the effects of estrogens and several xenoestrogens through rapid non genomic activation of signal transduction pathways in various human estrogen dependent cancer cells (breast, ovary, endometrium). The aim of this study was to demonstrate that GPER was overexpressed in testicular tumours and was able to trigger JKT-1 seminoma cell proliferation. Results We report here for the first time a complete morphological and functional characterization of GPER in normal and malignant human testicular germ cells. In normal adult human testes, GPER was expressed by somatic (Sertoli cells) and germ cells (spermatogonia and spermatocytes). GPER was exclusively overexpressed in seminomas, the most frequent testicular germ cell cancer, localized at the cell membrane and triggered a proliferative effect on JKT-1 cells in vitro, which was completely abolished by G15 (a GPER selective antagonist) and by siRNA invalidation. Conclusion These results demonstrate that GPER is expressed by human normal adult testicular germ cells, specifically overexpressed in seminoma tumours and able to trigger seminoma cell proliferation in vitro. It should therefore be considered rather than classical ERs when xeno-estrogens or other endocrine disruptors are assessed in testicular germ cell cancers. It may also represent a prognosis marker and/or a therapeutic target for seminomas. PMID

  15. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  16. Rotating Wavepackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  17. The rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eva B. Vedel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    1993-01-01

    The mean particle volume can be stereologically estimated using the nucleator principle. In the present paper, we discuss another principle for estimating mean particle volume, namely the rotator. The vertical rotator has already been previously described and is supplemented in the present paper ...

  18. Rotational spectra of methane and deuterated methane in helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Robert E; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2010-05-07

    We present calculations of the rotational excitations of CH(4) and CD(4) in helium using correlated basis function theory for excited states of spherical top molecules, together with ground state helium density distributions computed by diffusion Monte Carlo simulations. We derive the rotational self-energy for symmetric top molecules, generalizing the previous analysis for linear molecules. The analysis of the self-energy shows that in helium the symmetry of a rigid spherical rotor is lost. In particular, rotational levels with J=2 split into states of E and of F(2) symmetry. This splitting can be analyzed in terms of an effective tetrahedral distortion that is induced by coupling of the molecular rotation to density fluctuations of the helium. Additional splitting occurs within each symmetry group as a result of rotational coupling to the high density of states between the roton and maxon excitations of (4)He, which also results in broad bands in the corresponding rotational absorption spectra. Connecting these pure rotational dynamics of methane to experimental rovibrational spectra, our results imply that the R(1) line of CH(4) is significantly broadened, while the P(2) is not broadened by rotational relaxation, which is consistent with experiment. Comparison of our results for CH(4) and CD(4) shows that the reduction in the moment of inertia in (4)He scales approximately quadratically with the gas phase moment of inertia, as has also been observed experimentally.

  19. Analysis and control of multi–area HVDC interconnected power systems by using virtual inertia

    OpenAIRE

    Rakhshani, Elyas

    2016-01-01

    Virtual inertia is known as an inevitable part of the modern power systems. Recent trend of research is oriented in different methods of emulating virtual inertia in different part of the systems. This dissertation is focused on modelling, analysing and application of virtual inertia concept in frequency control and Automatic Generation Control (AGC) issue in high level control AC/DC interconnected power systems. Since the virtual inertia is provided by advanced control concepts of power elec...

  20. Inertia and Couple-Stress Effects in a Curvilinear Thrust Hydrostatic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.; Jurczak, P.; Falicki, J.

    2017-08-01

    The flow of a couple-stress lubricant in a clearance of a curvilinear thrust hydrostatic bearing with impermeable walls is considered. The flow in the bearing clearance is considered with inertia forces. The equations of motion are solved by an averaged inertia method. As a result, the formulae for pressure distributions without and with inertia effects were obtained. Radial thrust bearings and spherical bearings are discussed as numerical examples. It is shown that inertia effects influence the bearing performance considerably.

  1. Rotational elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  2. Centrifugal instability in the regime of fast rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, R.; Rax, J. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-08-01

    Centrifugal instability, which stems from a difference between the azimuthal angular drift velocity of ions and electrons, is studied in the limit of fast rotation for which ions can rotate up to twice as fast as electrons. As the angular velocity approaches the so-called Brillouin limit, the growth rate for the centrifugal instability in a collisionless solid-body rotating plasma increases markedly and is proportional to the azimuthal mode number. For large wavenumbers, electron inertia effects set in and lead to a cut-off. Interestingly, conditions for the onset of this instability appear to overlap with the operating conditions envisioned for plasma mass separation devices.

  3. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  4. Semiclassical approach to giant resonances of rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, J.

    1983-01-01

    Quadrupole and isovector dipole resonances of rotating nuclei are investigated in the frame-work of Vlasov equations transformed to a rotating system of reference, which are based on the time-dependent Hartree-method for schematic forces. The parameter free model of the self-consistent vibrating harmonic oscillator potential for the quadrupole mode is extended to a coupling to rotation, which also includes large-amplitude behaviour. A generalization to an exactly solvable two-liquid model describing the isovector mode is established; for rotating nuclei Hilton's explicit result for the eigenfrequencies is obtained. The advantage of using the concept of the classical kinetic momentum in a rotating system also in quantum-mechanical descriptions is demonstrated. It completes the standard transformation of density matrices by a time-odd part realized in a phase-factor and permits a more direct interpretation of rotation effects in terms of the classical forces of inertia. (author)

  5. A Comprehensive Understanding of Machine and Material Behaviors During Inertia Friction Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Daniel J.

    Inertia Friction Welding (IFW), a critical process to many industries, currently relies on trial-and-error experimentation to optimize process parameters. Although this Edisonian approach is very effective, the high time and dollar costs incurred during process development are the driving force for better design approaches. Thermal-stress finite element modeling has been increasingly used to aid in process development in the literature; however, several fundamental questions on machine and material behaviors remain unanswered. The work presented here aims produce an analytical foundation to significantly reduce the costly physical experimentation currently required to design the inertia welding of production parts. Particularly, the work is centered around the following two major areas. First, machine behavior during IFW, which critically determines deformation and heating, had not been well understood to date. In order to properly characterize the IFW machine behavior, a novel method based on torque measurements was invented to measure machine efficiency, i.e. the ratio of the initial kinetic energy of the flywheel to that contributing to workpiece heating and deformation. The measured efficiency was validated by both simple energy balance calculations and more sophisticated finite element modeling. For the first time, the efficiency dependence on both process parameters (flywheel size, initial rotational velocity, axial load, and surface roughness) and materials (1018 steel, Low Solvus High Refractory LSHR and Waspaloy) was quantified using the torque based measurement method. The effect of process parameters on machine efficiency was analyzed to establish simple-to-use yet powerful equations for selection and optimization of IFW process parameters for making welds; however, design criteria such as geometry and material optimization were not addressed. Second, there had been a lack of understanding of the bond formation during IFW. In the present research, an

  6. Organometallic nucleosides induce non-classical leukemic cell death that is mitochondrial-ROS dependent and facilitated by TCL1-oncogene burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christian; Vasyutina, Elena; Lohmann, Gregor; Schrader, Alexandra; Romanski, Steffen; Hirschhäuser, Christoph; Mayer, Petra; Frias, Corazon; Herling, Carmen D; Hallek, Michael; Schmalz, Hans-Günther; Prokop, Aram; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Herling, Marco

    2015-06-04

    ) and maximal respiratory capacity were not affected by TCL1 overexpression, it mediated a reduced aerobic glycolysis (lactate production) and a higher fraction of oxygen consumption coupled to ATP-synthesis. Redox-active substances such as organometallic nucleosides can confer specific cytotoxicity to ROS-stressed cancer cells. Their P53- and caspase-independent induction of non-classical apoptosis implicates that redox-based strategies can overcome resistance to conventional apoptotic triggers. The high TCL1-oncogenic burden of aggressive CLL cells instructs their particular dependence on mitochondrial energetic flux and renders them more susceptible towards agents interfering in mitochondrial homeostasis.

  7. Reut and Beck columns: effects of end gravity force, translational and rotational inertias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Arboleda Monsalve

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta la estabilidad de las colunmas de Reut y Beck sometidas a cualquier combinación de fuerzas compresivas axiales de gravedad y no conservativas (fuerza fija a lo largo de una línea o seguidora utilizando la formulación dinámica. El método propuesto es general y captura el pandeo estático (o divergencia y la inestabilidad dinámica ("flameo" de columnas en voladizo. Los efectos de la fuerza de gravedad y las inercias traslacionales y rotacionales a lo largo del elemento se analizan cuidadosamente. También se presentan resultados analíticos que capturan el límite del rango de aplicabilidad del método estático o de Euler en el análisis de estabilidad de columnas esbeltas en voladizo y la transición de inestabilidad estática (con frecuencia cero a inestabilidad dinámica (Tlameo". Finalmente se presenta la comparación entre las ecuaciones características de estabilidad de columnas esbeltas de Reut y Beck.

  8. IDENTIFICATION METHOD FOR PENDULUM SYSTEM MOMENT OF INERTIA WITH VISCOUS DAMPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Alyshev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method for identification of axial moment of inertia of the mechanical system called reaction wheel pendulum with a viscous friction in the bearings of the suspension. The method is based on the reversible symmetric motions. Pendulum system motion includes a free measured motion and reverse symmetrical motion at the same angular interval. The pendulum includes a rod with a low-power DC motor with a flywheel attached to the end of the rod. The angle of rotation and velocity of the rod and the flywheel are measured by encoders. The paper introduces a new method,presents a design formula,a mathematical model of the pendulum system and a robust motor control law for it. The method is based on energy algorithm and control residing in electric motor operational changes by means of a flywheel. The mechanical system moves symmetrically that is provided by nonuniform controlled flywheel rotation. As a result, the influence of dissipative factors on identification results is eliminated. Dynamic modeling is carried out for the pendulum system and proves high accuracy of the method. The research results can be used for identification of complex mechanical systems under the action of resistance, dissipative and other forces.

  9. Rotating Hele-Shaw cell with a time-dependent angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Pedro H. A.; Alvarez, Victor M. M.; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the large number of existing studies of viscous flows in rotating Hele-Shaw cells, most investigations analyze rotational motion with a constant angular velocity, under vanishing Reynolds number conditions in which inertial effects can be neglected. In this work, we examine the linear and weakly nonlinear dynamics of the interface between two immiscible fluids in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, considering the action of a time-dependent angular velocity, and taking into account the contribution of inertia. By using a generalized Darcy's law, we derive a second-order mode-coupling equation which describes the time evolution of the interfacial perturbation amplitudes. For arbitrary values of viscosity and density ratios, and for a range of values of a rotational Reynolds number, we investigate how the time-dependent angular velocity and inertia affect the important finger competition events that traditionally arise in rotating Hele-Shaw flows.

  10. Estimation of the Rotational Terms of the Dynamic Response Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Montalvão

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of a structure can be described by both its translational and rotational receptances. The latter ones are frequently not considered because of the difficulties in applying a pure moment excitation or in measuring rotations. However, in general, this implies a reduction up to 75% of the complete model. On the other hand, if a modification includes a rotational inertia, the rotational receptances of the unmodified system are needed. In one method, more commonly found in the literature, a so called T-block is attached to the structure. Then, a force, applied to an arm of the T-block, generates a moment together with a force at the connection point. The T-block also allows for angular displacement measurements. Nevertheless, the results are often not quite satisfactory. In this work, an alternative method based upon coupling techniques is developed, in which rotational receptances are estimated without the need of applying a moment excitation. This is accomplished by introducing a rotational inertia modification when rotating the T-block. The force is then applied in its centroid. Several numerical and experimental examples are discussed so that the methodology can be clearly described. The advantages and limitations are identified within the practical application of the method.

  11. An instrument for measuring thermal inertia in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, S. E.; Schieldge, J. P.; Kahle, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    Features and test results of a thermal inertial meter (TIM) for cataloging the thermal inertial of surface material in situ as a basis for satellite remote sensing of geologic materials are described. The instrument is employed to determine the temperature rise of the materials in the field, with the assumptions that the sample and a standard are homogeneous in composition, the heat flux density is constant at the surface of each material, and the specimens are thick enough to be treated as semi-infinite bodies. A formula for calculating thermal inertia is presented, and the components of the TIM are detailed. A box with three compartments, two holding standards, is placed on the sample surface with the third compartment open to the specimen. Dolomite and quartz are used as references when all samples are measured after heating. Tests with rocks and sand in Nevada and California revealed that chert has a higher thermal inertia than barite.

  12. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  13. Estimation of the WECC System Inertia Using Observed Frequency Transients

    OpenAIRE

    Chassin, David P.; Huang, Zhenyu; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Hassler, Candee; Ramirez, Enrique; Ray, Cody

    2004-01-01

    Computer models being developed to understand the interaction between demand-response technology, power system deregulation and market transformation depend in part on understanding the relationship between system frequency and load-control. Frequency, load, and plant outage events data collected over the last several years have permitted analysis to determine the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) system's inertia during each event. This data was used to evaluate the relationshi...

  14. Explicit expression for effective moment of inertia of RC beams

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, K.A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Chaudhary, S.; Nagpal, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    AbstractDeflection is an important design parameter for structures subjected to service load. This paper provides an explicit expression for effective moment of inertia considering cracking, for uniformly distributed loaded reinforced concrete (RC) beams. The proposed explicit expression can be used for rapid prediction of short-term deflection at service load. The explicit expression has been obtained from the trained neural network considering concrete cracking, tension stiffening and entir...

  15. Electron-inertia effects on driven magnetic field reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salti, N.; Shivamoggi, B.K.

    2003-01-01

    Electron-inertia effects on the magnetic field reconnection induced by perturbing the boundaries of a slab of plasma with a magnetic neutral surface inside are considered. Energetics of the tearing mode dynamics with electron inertia which controls the linearized collisionless magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are considered with a view to clarify the role of the plasma pressure in this process. Cases with the boundaries perturbed at rates slow or fast compared with the hydromagnetic evolution rate are considered separately. When the boundaries are perturbed at a rate slow compared with the hydromagnetic evolution rate and fast compared with the resistive diffusion rate, the plasma response for early times is according to ideal MHD. A current sheet formation takes place at the magnetic neutral surface for large times in the ideal MHD stage and plasma becomes motionless. The subsequent evolution of the current sheet is found to be divided into two distinct stages: (i) the electron-inertia stage for small times (when the current sheet is very narrow); (ii) the resistive-diffusion stage for large times. The current sheet mainly undergoes exponential damping in the electron-inertia regime while the bulk of the diffusion happens in the resistivity regime. For large times of the resistive-diffusion stage when plasma flow is present, the current sheet completely disappears and the magnetic field reconnection takes place. When the boundaries are perturbed at a rate fast compared even with the hydromagnetic evolution rate, there is no time for the development of a current sheet and the magnetic field reconnection has been found not to take place

  16. Explicit expression for effective moment of inertia of RC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Patel

    Full Text Available AbstractDeflection is an important design parameter for structures subjected to service load. This paper provides an explicit expression for effective moment of inertia considering cracking, for uniformly distributed loaded reinforced concrete (RC beams. The proposed explicit expression can be used for rapid prediction of short-term deflection at service load. The explicit expression has been obtained from the trained neural network considering concrete cracking, tension stiffening and entire practical range of reinforcement. Three significant structural parameters have been identified that govern the change in effective moment of inertia and therefore deflection. These three parameters are chosen as inputs to train neural network. The training data sets for neural network are generated using finite element software ABAQUS. The explicit expression has been validated for a number of simply supported and continuous beams and it is shown that the predicted deflections have reasonable accuracy for practical purpose. A sensitivity analysis has been performed, which indicates substantial dependence of effective moment of inertia on the selected input parameters.

  17. Short period tidal variations of earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Parke, M. E.; Dickey, J. O.

    1981-01-01

    It is explained that the tidal deformation of the earth's polar moment of inertia by the moon and sun cause periodic variations in rotation. The short period oscillations give rise to a meter-sized, diurnal signature in the lunar laser ranging data obtained at McDonald Observatory. A solution is given for the scale parameter k/C at fortnightly and monthly tidal frequencies. The results are compared with those obtained by other investigators and with a theoretical estimate which includes the effect of oceans and a decoupled fluid core.

  18. Rotating preventers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs

  19. Control of Rotational Dynamics for Ground and Aerial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, Victor; Brown, David; Macchietto, Adriano; Yin, KangKang

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes a physics-based framework to control rolling, flipping and other behaviors with significant rotational components. The proposed technique is a general approach for guiding coordinated action that can be layered over existing control architectures through the purposeful regulation of specific whole-body features. Namely, we apply control for rotation through the specification and execution of specific desired `rotation indices' for whole-body orientation, angular velocity and angular momentum control and highlight the use of the angular excursion as a means for whole-body rotation control. We account for the stylistic components of behaviors through reference posture control. The novelty of the described work includes control over behaviors with considerable rotational components, both on the ground and in the air as well as a number of characteristics useful for general control, such as flight planning with inertia modeling, compliant posture tracking, and contact control planning.

  20. Rotation-induced nonlinear wavepackets in internal waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitfield, A. J., E-mail: ashley.whitfield.12@ucl.ac.uk; Johnson, E. R., E-mail: e.johnson@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The long time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual formation of a localised wavepacket. Here this initial value problem is considered within the context of the Ostrovsky, or the rotation-modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), equation and a numerical method for obtaining accurate wavepacket solutions is presented. The flow evolutions are described in the regimes of relatively-strong and relatively-weak rotational effects. When rotational effects are relatively strong a second-order soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation accurately predicts the shape, and phase and group velocities of the numerically determined wavepackets. It is suggested that these solitons may form from a local Benjamin-Feir instability in the inertia-gravity wave-train radiated when a KdV solitary wave rapidly adjusts to the presence of strong rotation. When rotational effects are relatively weak the initial KdV solitary wave remains coherent longer, decaying only slowly due to weak radiation and modulational instability is no longer relevant. Wavepacket solutions in this regime appear to consist of a modulated KdV soliton wavetrain propagating on a slowly varying background of finite extent.

  1. Lagrangian transport characteristics of a class of three-dimensional inline-mixing flows with fluid inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speetjens, M. F. M.; Demissie, E. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Energy Technology Laboratory, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Metcalfe, G. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), VIC 3190 Melbourne (Australia); Clercx, H. J. H. [Department of Applied Physics, Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Laminar mixing by the inline-mixing principle is a key to many industrial fluids-engineering systems of size extending from micrometers to meters. However, insight into fundamental transport phenomena particularly under the realistic conditions of three-dimensionality (3D) and fluid inertia remains limited. This study addresses these issues for inline mixers with cylindrical geometries and adopts the Rotated Arc Mixer (RAM) as a representative system. Transport is investigated from a Lagrangian perspective by identifying and examining coherent structures that form in the 3D streamline portrait. 3D effects and fluid inertia introduce three key features that are not found in simplified configurations: transition zones between consecutive mixing cells of the inline-mixing flow; local upstream flow (in certain parameter regimes); transition/inertia-induced breaking of symmetries in the Lagrangian equations of motion (causing topological changes in coherent structures). Topological considerations strongly suggest that there nonetheless always exists a net throughflow region between inlet and outlet of the inline-mixing flow that is strictly separated from possible internal regions. The Lagrangian dynamics in this region admits representation by a 2D time-periodic Hamiltonian system. This establishes one fundamental kinematic structure for the present class of inline-mixing flows and implies universal behavior in that all states follow from the Hamiltonian breakdown of one common integrable state. A so-called period-doubling bifurcation is the only way to eliminate transport barriers originating from this state and thus is a necessary (yet not sufficient) condition for global chaos. Important in a practical context is that a common simplification in literature, i.e., cell-wise fully-developed Stokes flow (“2.5D approach”), retains these fundamental kinematic properties and deviates from the generic 3D inertial case only in a quantitative sense. This substantiates its

  2. Lagrangian transport characteristics of a class of three-dimensional inline-mixing flows with fluid inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speetjens, M. F. M.; Demissie, E. A.; Metcalfe, G.; Clercx, H. J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Laminar mixing by the inline-mixing principle is a key to many industrial fluids-engineering systems of size extending from micrometers to meters. However, insight into fundamental transport phenomena particularly under the realistic conditions of three-dimensionality (3D) and fluid inertia remains limited. This study addresses these issues for inline mixers with cylindrical geometries and adopts the Rotated Arc Mixer (RAM) as a representative system. Transport is investigated from a Lagrangian perspective by identifying and examining coherent structures that form in the 3D streamline portrait. 3D effects and fluid inertia introduce three key features that are not found in simplified configurations: transition zones between consecutive mixing cells of the inline-mixing flow; local upstream flow (in certain parameter regimes); transition/inertia-induced breaking of symmetries in the Lagrangian equations of motion (causing topological changes in coherent structures). Topological considerations strongly suggest that there nonetheless always exists a net throughflow region between inlet and outlet of the inline-mixing flow that is strictly separated from possible internal regions. The Lagrangian dynamics in this region admits representation by a 2D time-periodic Hamiltonian system. This establishes one fundamental kinematic structure for the present class of inline-mixing flows and implies universal behavior in that all states follow from the Hamiltonian breakdown of one common integrable state. A so-called period-doubling bifurcation is the only way to eliminate transport barriers originating from this state and thus is a necessary (yet not sufficient) condition for global chaos. Important in a practical context is that a common simplification in literature, i.e., cell-wise fully-developed Stokes flow (“2.5D approach”), retains these fundamental kinematic properties and deviates from the generic 3D inertial case only in a quantitative sense. This substantiates its

  3. Sleep inertia: performance changes after sleep, rest and active waking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer-Tinguely, Gilberte; Achermann, Peter; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Regel, Sabine J; Rétey, Julia V; Dürr, Roland; Borbély, Alexander A; Gottselig, Julie M

    2005-03-01

    Napping benefits and sustains subsequent performance. Prophylactic naps have been recommended as a means to maintain performance during extended wakefulness, as required during shiftwork. However, napping may cause short-term performance impairments, because awakening from sleep is followed by sleep inertia, a period of hypovigilance and impaired cognitive and behavioral performance. We investigated sleep inertia after an afternoon nap. Healthy 18-28 year-olds (n=50, not sleep deprived) were assigned to sleep, active wake or rest groups for a 2-h experimental phase with polysomnography starting either at 14:00 or 16:00 for half of each group. Before (baseline, 12:30 or 14:30) and in five sessions during the hour after the experimental phase (16:00-17:00 or 18:00-19:00), subjects completed an addition task, an auditory reaction time task, and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale. In session one, addition speed in the sleep group was reduced compared with baseline and with active wake controls, whereas calculation accuracy did not change. Addition speed in the sleep and rest groups increased substantially from session one to session two and reached a level similar to that of the active wake group by the fifth session. In the first session, auditory reaction speed of the sleep group was reduced compared with baseline and with rest controls but did not differ from the active wake group. The slowest reaction times showed significant recovery after 20 min. The groups reported similar increases in subjective sleepiness after the experimental period. These findings provide evidence for performance slowing and recovery during the hour following a 2-h nap opportunity. They highlight the importance of employing multiple control groups and various objective and subjective measures to assess sleep inertia.

  4. Atmospheric effects on the mapping of Martian thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Joan N.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects of a dusty C02 atmosphere on the thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo of Mars and we present a new map of thermal inertias. This new map was produced using a coupled surface atmosphere (CSA) model, dust opacities from Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) data, and C02 columns based on topography. The CSA model thermal inertias are smaller than the 2% model thermal inertias, with the difference largest at large thermal inertia. Although the difference between the thermal inertias obtained with the two models is moderate for much of the region studied, it is largest in regions of either high dust opacity or of topographic lows, including the Viking Lander 1 site and some geologically interesting regions. The CSA model thermally derived albedos do not accurately predict the IRTM measured albedos and are very similar to the thermally derived albedos obtained with models making the 2% assumption.

  5. Accounting for inertia in modal choices: some new evidence using a RP/SP dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchi, Elisabetta; Manca, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    proposed for both short and long RP panel datasets. We also explore new measures of inertia to test for the effect of “learning” (in the sense of acquiring experience or getting more familiar with) along the SP experiment and we disentangle this effect from the pure inertia effect. A mixed logit model...... effect is stable along the SP experiments. Inertia has been studied more extensively with panel datasets, but few investigations have used RP/SP datasets. In this paper we extend previous work in several ways. We test and compare several ways of measuring inertia, including measures that have been...... is used that allows us to account for both systematic and random taste variations in the inertia effect and for correlations among RP and SP observations. Finally we explore the relation between the utility specification (especially in the SP dataset) and the role of inertia in explaining current choices....

  6. On the Stability of a Class of Permanent Rotations of a Heavy Asymmetric Gyrostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñarrea, Manuel; Lanchares, Víctor; Pascual, Ana I.; Elipe, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    We consider the motion of an asymmetric gyrostat under the attraction of a uniform Newtonian field. It is supposed that the center of mass lies along one of the principal axes of inertia, while a rotor spins around a different axis of inertia. For this problem, we obtain the possible permanent rotations, that is, the equilibria of the system. The Lyapunov stability of these permanent rotations is analyzed by means of the Energy-Casimir method and necessary and sufficient conditions are derived, proving that there exist permanent stable rotations when the gyrostat is oriented in any direction of the space. The geometry of the gyrostat and the value of the gyrostatic momentum are relevant in order to get stable permanent rotations. Moreover, it seems that the necessary conditions are also sufficient, but this fact can only be proved partially.

  7. Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) as a Modification of Newtonian Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzain, Mohammed

    2017-12-01

    We present a modified inertia formulation of Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) without retaining Galilean invariance. Assuming that the existence of a universal upper bound, predicted by MOND, to the acceleration produced by a dark halo is equivalent to a violation of the hypothesis of locality (which states that an accelerated observer is pointwise inertial), we demonstrate that Milgrom's law is invariant under a new space-time coordinate transformation. In light of the new coordinate symmetry, we address the deficiency of MOND in resolving the mass discrepancy problem in clusters of galaxies.

  8. A dynamic marketing model with best reply and inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischi, Gian Italo; Cerboni Baiardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider a nonlinear discrete-time dynamic model proposed by Farris et al. (2005) as a market share attraction model with two firms that decide marketing efforts over time according to best reply strategies with naïve expectations. The model also considers an adaptive adjustment toward best reply, a form of inertia or anchoring attitude, and we investigate the effects of heterogeneities among firms. A rich scenario of local and global bifurcations is obtained even with just two competing firms, and a comparison is proposed with apparently similar duopoly models based on repeated best reply dynamics with naïve expectations and adaptive adjustment.

  9. Frequency Stability Improvement of Low Inertia Systems Using Synchronous Condensers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Ha Thi; Yang, Guangya; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2016-01-01

    of converter interfaced components (wind turbine, HVDC, and Photovoltaic) may have negative effects on the stability of the power system. These components do not have enough inertia response to control frequency excursion, so the power grid can depend on few synchronous machines for frequency regulation...... turbine penetration, governor responsibility of synchronous generators, and disturbance are simulated to examine the impact of highlevel renewable energy integration on the system frequency characteristics. The effect of synchronous condensers for the frequency stability enhancement is investigated....... It can be concluded from the comparative simulation results that synchronous condenser demonstrates a satisfactory performance for improving the system frequency stability....

  10. An object oriented implementation of the Yeadon human inertia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembia, Christopher; Moore, Jason K; Hubbard, Mont

    2014-01-01

    We present an open source software implementation of a popular mathematical method developed by M.R. Yeadon for calculating the body and segment inertia parameters of a human body. The software is written in a high level open source language and provides three interfaces for manipulating the data and the model: a Python API, a command-line user interface, and a graphical user interface. Thus the software can fit into various data processing pipelines and requires only simple geometrical measures as input.

  11. Vector Rotators of Rigid Body Dynamics with Coupled Rotations around Axes without Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katica R. (Stevanović Hedrih

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vector method based on mass moment vectors and vector rotators coupled for pole and oriented axes is used for obtaining vector expressions for kinetic pressures on the shaft bearings of a rigid body dynamics with coupled rotations around axes without intersection. Mass inertia moment vectors and corresponding deviational vector components for pole and oriented axis are defined by K. Hedrih in 1991. These kinematical vectors rotators are defined for a system with two degrees of freedom as well as for rheonomic system with two degrees of mobility and one degree of freedom and coupled rotations around two coupled axes without intersection as well as their angular velocities and intensity. As an example of defined dynamics, we take into consideration a heavy gyrorotor disk with one degree of freedom and coupled rotations when one component of rotation is programmed by constant angular velocity. For this system with nonlinear dynamics, a series of tree parametric transformations of system nonlinear dynamics are presented. Some graphical visualization of vector rotators properties are presented too.

  12. Methodology for the Experimental Determination of the Powertrain’s Inertia Ellipsoid and its Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brabec Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes current scientific knowledge and the results of a study focused on the determination of a powertrain’s inertia ellipsoid. The work deals with the application of methods for the experimental determination of the inertia matrix and summarizes their basic potential. The work describes a proposed computational algorithm by means of which the inertia ellipsoid can be determined. The experimental section of the work presents the results of measurements for internal combustion engines (powertrains.

  13. Spins of superdeformed rotational bands in Tl isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadwal, Anshul; Mittal, H.M. [Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar (India)

    2017-01-15

    The two-parameter model defined for even-even nuclei viz. soft-rotor formula is used to assign the band-head spin of the 17 rotational bands in Tl isotopes. The least-squares fitting method is employed to obtain the spins of these bands in the A ∝ 190 mass region. The calculated transition energies are found to depend sensitively on the proposed spin. Whenever a correct spin assignment is made, the calculated and experimental transition energies coincide very well. The dynamic moment of inertia is also calculated and its variation with rotational frequency is explored. (orig.)

  14. Inertia and Couple-Stress Effects in a Curvilinear Thrust Hydrostatic Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walicka A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The flow of a couple-stress lubricant in a clearance of a curvilinear thrust hydrostatic bearing with impermeable walls is considered. The flow in the bearing clearance is considered with inertia forces. The equations of motion are solved by an averaged inertia method. As a result, the formulae for pressure distributions without and with inertia effects were obtained. Radial thrust bearings and spherical bearings are discussed as numerical examples. It is shown that inertia effects influence the bearing performance considerably.

  15. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at the limits: first observation of rotational bands in 255Lr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelhut, S; Greenlees, P T; Ackermann, D; Antalic, S; Clément, E; Darby, I G; Dorvaux, O; Drouart, A; Eeckhaudt, S; Gall, B J P; Görgen, A; Grahn, T; Gray-Jones, C; Hauschild, K; Herzberg, R-D; Hessberger, F P; Jakobsson, U; Jones, G D; Jones, P; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Khoo, T-L; Korten, W; Leino, M; Leppänen, A-P; Ljungvall, J; Moon, S; Nyman, M; Obertelli, A; Pakarinen, J; Parr, E; Papadakis, P; Peura, P; Piot, J; Pritchard, A; Rahkila, P; Rostron, D; Ruotsalainen, P; Sandzelius, M; Sarén, J; Scholey, C; Sorri, J; Steer, A; Sulignano, B; Theisen, Ch; Uusitalo, J; Venhart, M; Zielinska, M; Bender, M; Heenen, P-H

    2009-05-29

    The rotational band structure of 255Lr has been investigated using advanced in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopic techniques. To date, 255Lr is the heaviest nucleus to be studied in this manner. One rotational band has been unambiguously observed and strong evidence for a second rotational structure was found. The structures are tentatively assigned to be based on the 1/2-[521] and 7/2-[514] Nilsson states, consistent with assignments from recently obtained alpha decay data. The experimental rotational band dynamic moment of inertia is used to test self-consistent mean-field calculations using the Skyrme SLy4 interaction and a density-dependent pairing force.

  16. Slow rotation of a sphere with source at its centre in a viscous fluid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    like Jeffery [2], Kanwal [3], Smith [6], Watson [7], and Ram Kissoon [5]. The purpose of this paper is to study slow rotation of a sphere, assumed to be pervious, with a source at its centre. If the strength Q of the source were of the same order as the angular velocity Ω of rotating sphere, the inertia terms could still be neglected ...

  17. Thermal inertia mapping - A promising new tool for mineral exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, N. M.

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) is a NASA-sponsored program designed to acquire day visible and day and night thermal IR imagery from a satellite launched on April 26, 1978 into a near polar orbit at 620 km altitude. The data are used to produce temperature difference (12 or 36 hour interval) and apparent thermal inertia (ATI) images or numerical data sets for selected areas within much of North America, Europe, North Africa, and Australia. These data are being applied to rock type discrimination, soil moisture detection, assessment of vegetation states, thermal current monitoring in water bodies, urban heat island analysis and other multidisciplinary studies. Key geological results include (1) groups of dissimilar rock materials and some individual rock types can be separated and sometimes identified by their satellite-determined thermal inertias (dependent on their albedos, densities, and conductivities), (2) large lineaments (including some faults) are often recognized by their thermal signatures (may relate to moisture content and/or reduced bulk density), and (3) visually striking expressions of geomorphic units (types) at a regional scale are especially enhanced in the night IR imagery.

  18. Dynamical density functional theory for arbitrary-shape colloidal fluids including inertia and hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Goddard, Ben; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades the classical density-functional theory (DFT) and its dynamic extensions (DDFTs) have become a remarkably powerful tool in the study of colloidal fluids. Recently there has been extensive research to generalise all previous DDFTs finally yielding a general DDFT equation (for spherical particles) which takes into account both inertia and hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which strongly influence non-equilibrium properties. The present work will be devoted to a further generalisation of such a framework to systems of anisotropic particles. To this end, the kinetic equation for the Brownian particle distribution function is derived starting from the Liouville equation and making use of Zwanzig's projection-operator techniques. By averaging over all but one particle, a DDFT equation is finally obtained with some similarities to that for spherical colloids. However, there is now an inevitable translational-rotational coupling which affects the diffusivity of asymmetric particles. Lastly, in the overdamped (high friction) limit the theory is notably simplified leading to a DDFT equation which agrees with previous derivations. We acknowledge financial support from European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  19. The principal moments of inertia calculated with the hydrostatic equilibrium figure of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjun Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As an indication of the Earth's mass distribution, the principal moments of inertia (PMOI, i.e., A, B, C of the Earth are the basic parameters in studies of the global dynamics of the earth, like earth nutation, and the geophysics. From the aspect of observation, the PMOI can be calculated from the spherical coefficients of observed gravity field. In this paper, the PMOI are calculated directly according to its definition with the figures of the Earth's interior derived by a generalized theory of the hydrostatic equilibrium figure of the Earth. We obtain that the angle between the principal axis of the maximum moment of PMOI and the rotational axis is 0.184°, which means that the other two principal axes are very closely in the equatorial plane. Meanwhile, B-A is 1.60 × 10−5 MR2, and the global dynamical flattening (H is calculated to be 3.29587 × 10−3, which is 0.67% different from the latest observation derived value Hobs(3.273795 × 10−3 (Petit and Luzum, 2010, and this is a significant improvement from the 1.1% difference between the value of H derived from traditional theories of the figure of the Earth and the value of Hobs. It shows that we can calculate the PMOI and H with an appropriate accuracy by a generalized theory of the hydrostatic equilibrium figure of the Earth.

  20. Elevation of Non-Classical (CD14+/lowCD16++) Monocytes Is Associated with Increased Albuminuria and Urine TGF-β1 in HIV-Infected Individuals on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brooks I; Byron, Mary Margaret; Ng, Roland C; Chow, Dominic C; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Shikuma, Cecilia M

    2016-01-01

    High rates of albuminuria are observed among HIV-infected individuals on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART). Though pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses are described as components of albuminuria in the general population, it is unclear how these responses are associated to albuminuria in ART-treated chronic HIV. We investigated the relationship of monocyte subsets and urine inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers to albuminuria in ART-treated HIV-infected participants. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on Hawaii Aging with HIV-cardiovascular disease study cohort participants who were required at entry to be ≥40 years old and on ART ≥3 months. Monocyte subpopulations were determined in banked peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using multi-parametric flow-cytometry. Entry random urine samples were assessed for albumin-to-creatinine ratios (UACR). Urine samples were measured for inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers using Luminex technology. Among 96 HIV-infected subjects with measured UACR (87% male, 59% Caucasian, and 89% undetectable HIV RNA with median CD4 of 495.5 cells/μL), 18 patients (19%) had albuminuria. Non-classical (CD14low/+CD16++) monocytes were significantly elevated in subjects with albuminuria (p = 0.034) and were correlated to UACR (r = 0.238, p = 0.019). Elevated non-classical monocyte counts were significant predictors of worsening albuminuria, independent of traditional- and ART-associated risk factors (β = 0.539, p = 0.007). Urine TGF-β1 and collagen-IV were significantly higher in albuminuric compared to non-albuminuric participants (TGF-β1; p = 0.039 and collagen-IV; p = 0.042). Urine TGF-β1 was significantly correlated with non-classical monocyte counts (r = 0.464, p = 0.017). Alterations in monocyte subpopulations and urine pro-fibrotic factors may play a role in kidney dysfunction during chronic HIV infection and warrants further study.

  1. Effect of torsional stiffness and inertia on the dynamics of low aspect ratio flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qing; Hu, Jianxin; Liu, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Micro air vehicle-motivated aerodynamics in biological flight has been an important subject in the past decade. Inspired by the novel flapping wing mechanisms in insects, birds and bats, we have carried out a numerical study systematically investigating a three-dimensional flapping rigid wing with passively actuated lateral and rotational motion. Distinguishing it from the limited existing studies, this work performs a systematic examination on the effects of wing aspect ratio (AR = 1.0 to infinity), inertia (density ratio σ = 4-32), torsional stiffness (frequency ratio F = 1.5-10 and infinity) and pivot point (from chord-center to leading edge) on the dynamics response of a low AR rectangular wing under an initial zero speed flow field condition. The simulation results show that the symmetry breakdown of the flapping wing results in a forward/backward motion with a rotational pitching. When the wing reaches its stable periodic state, the induced pitching frequency is identical to its forced flapping frequency. However, depending on various kinematic and dynamic system parameters, (i.e. flapping frequency, density ratio and pitching axis), the lateral induced velocity shows a number of different oscillating frequencies. Furthermore, compared with a one degree of freedom (DoF) wing in the lateral direction only, the propulsion performance of such a two DoF wing relies very much on the magnitude of torsional stiffness adding on the pivot point, as well as its pitching axis. In all cases examined here, thrust force and moment generated by a long span wing is larger than that of a short wing, which is remarkably linked to the strong reverse von Kármán vortex street formed in the wake of a wing.

  2. Moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, Love number of neutron star and their relations with strange-matter equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Debades; Bhat, Sajad A.; Char, Prasanta; Chatterjee, Debarati

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the impact of strange-matter equations of state involving Λ hyperons, Bose-Einstein condensate of K- mesons and first-order hadron-quark phase transition on moment of inertia, quadrupole moment and tidal deformability parameter of slowly rotating neutron stars. All these equations of state are compatible with the 2 M_{solar} constraint. The main findings of this investigation are the universality of the I- Q and I -Love number relations, which are preserved by the EoSs including Λ hyperons and antikaon condensates, but broken in the presence of a first-order hadron-quark phase transition. Furthermore, it is also noted that the quadrupole moment approaches the Kerr value of a black hole for maximum-mass neutron stars.

  3. Earthquake response reduction of mid-story isolated system due to semi-active control using magnetorheological rotary inertia mass damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mai; Yoshida, Shohei; Fujitani, Hideo; Sato, Yusuke

    2015-04-01

    The dynamic characteristics of mid-story isolated buildings and seismic response reduction due to a semi-active control system were investigated using a three-lumped-mass model that simplified the sixteen story building with an isolation layer in the sixth story. A semi-active control method using a rotary inertia mass damper filled with magnetorheological fluid (MR fluid) was proposed. The damper shows both mass amplification effect due to rotational inertia and variable damping effect due to the MR fluid. The damping force is controlled by the strength of the magnetic field that is applied to the MR fluid. It is determined by using the electric current, which is calculated by the proposed semi-active control method based on the velocity of the isolation layer relative to the layer just underneath it. Real-time hybrid tests using an actual damper and simulations using a building model were conducted to check the damper model; the test results were in good agreement with the simulation results. The simulation results suggest that the response displacement of the structure above the isolation layer is significantly reduced, without increasing the response acceleration of the entire structure against near-fault pulse and long-period ground motions. The proposed semi-active control using an MR rotary inertia mass damper was confirmed to be effective for mid-story isolated buildings.

  4. Residual Stresses in Inertia-Friction-Welded Dissimilar High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, R. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Steuwer, A.; Iqbal, N.; Preuss, M.; Bray, S. E.; Rawson, M.

    2009-09-01

    The welding of dissimilar alloys is seen increasingly as a way forward to improve efficiencies in modern aeroengines, because it allows one to tailor varying material property demands across a component. Dissimilar inertia friction welding (IFW) of two high-strength steels, Aermet 100 and S/CMV, has been identified as a possible joint for rotating gas turbine components and the resulting welds are investigated in this article. In order to understand the impact of the welding process and predict the life expectancy of such structures, a detailed understanding of the residual stress fields present in the welded component is needed. By combining energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction (EDSXRD) and neutron diffraction, it has been possible to map the variations in lattice spacing of the ferritic phase on both sides of two tubular Aermet 100-S/CMV inertia friction welds (as-welded and postweld heat-treated condition) with a wall thickness of 37 mm. Laboratory-based XRD measurements were required to take into account the variation in the strain-free d-spacing across the weld region. It was found that, in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) slightly away from the weld line, residual stress fields showed tensile stresses increasing most dramatically in the hoop direction toward the weld line. Closer to the weld line, in the plastically affected zone, a sharp drop in the residual stresses was observed on both sides, although more dramatically in the S/CMV. In addition to residual stress mapping, synchrotron XRD measurements were carried out to map microstructural changes in thin slices cut from the welds. By studying the diffraction peak asymmetry of the 200- α diffraction peak, it was possible to demonstrate that a martensitic phase transformation in the S/CMV is responsible for the significant stress reduction close to the weld line. The postweld heat treatment (PWHT) chosen to avoid any overaging of the Aermet 100 and to temper the S/CMV martensite resulted in little

  5. Geologic application of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offield, T. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The proportional and linear relationship between absolute and relative thermal inertia was theoretically evaluated, and a more accurate expression for thermal inertia was proposed. Radiometric and meteorological data from three stations in the Powder River Basin were acquired, as well as 400 miles of low altitude scanner data between July 25-28.

  6. Thermal inertia of eclipsing binary asteroids : the role of component shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; van de Weijgaert, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    Thermal inertia controls the temperature distribution on asteroid surfaces. This is of crucial importance to the Yarkovsky effect and for the planning of spacecraft operations on or near the surface. Additionally, thermal inertia is a sensitive indicator for regolith structure.A uniquely direct way

  7. Inertia in travel choice : The role of risk aversion and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, C.; Dellaert, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper contributes to literature by showing how travellers that make normatively rational choices exhibit inertia during a series of risky choices. Our analyses complement other studies that conceive inertia as the result of boundedly rational or even non-deliberate, habitual decision-making. We

  8. Constraints on the Moment of Inertia of a Proto Neutron Star from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is found that for a proto neu- tron star, the mass, the moment of inertia and their own maximum values as a function of radius R or M/R are all more sensitive to the hyperon coupling constants. For all the different hyperon coupling constants men- tioned, the case of no hyperons corresponds to the largest moment of inertia.

  9. Constraints on the Moment of Inertia of a Proto Neutron Star from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The influence of the hyperon coupling constants on the moment of inertia of a proto neutron star has been investigated within the framework of relativistic mean field theory for the baryon octet {, , , -, 0, +, Ξ-, Ξ0} system. It is found that for a proto neutron star, the mass, the moment of inertia and their own maximum ...

  10. Path integral studies of the rotations of methane and its heavier isotopomers in 4He nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovskiy, N D; Mak, C H

    2009-08-13

    Path integral Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to study the rotations of a methane molecule and its heavier isotopomers inside a small cluster of 4He atoms at 0.3 K in order to determine how the renormalization in the methane's rotational constant is related to the quantum statistics and superfluidity of the helium shell. By changing the mass of the hydrogens and systematically varying the moment of inertia of the methane, we were able to study the effects of its rotations on the quantum statistics of the helium atoms and their countereffects on the methane's effective rotational constant. The renormalized rotational constant depends strongly on the intrinsic moment of inertia of the methane. A heavy probe favors strong templating of the helium density as well as a large renormalization in the probe's rotational constant, but a light probe shows almost no effect on the shell density or the effective rotational constant. These results suggest that in order to fully understand the superfluidity of the helium shell, the probe must be treated as an integral part of the system. We rationalize the findings in terms of a rotational smearing effect and suggest that there is no clearly quantifiable relationship between the superfluid fraction of the shell and the renormalized rotational constant of the probe for cases where the probe molecule is either light or has weak anisotropic interactions with the helium atoms.

  11. The radiobrightness thermal inertia measure of soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Anthony W.; Galantowicz, John F.; Schretter, Mindy S.

    1992-01-01

    Radiobrightness thermal inertia (RTI) is proposed as a method for using day-night differences in satellite-sensed radiobrightness to monitor the moisture of Great Plains soils. Diurnal thermal and radiobrightness models are used to examine the sensitivity of the RTI method. Model predictions favor use of the 37.0 and 85.5 GHz, H-polarized channels of the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The model further predicts that overflight times near 2:00 AM/PM would be nearly optimal for RTI, that midnight/noon and 4:00 AM/PM are nearly as good, but that the 6:00 AM/PM overflight times of the current SSM/I are particularly poor. Data from the 37.0 GHz channel of the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) are used to demonstrate that the method is plausible.

  12. Dynamic modeling of hydrostatic guideway considering compressibility and inertia effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yikang; Mao, Kuanmin; Zhu, Yaming; Wang, Fengyun; Mao, Xiaobo; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Hydrostatic guideways are used as an alternative to contact bearings due to high stiffness and high damping in heavy machine tools. To improve the dynamic characteristic of bearing structure, the dynamic modeling of the hydrostatic guidway should be accurately known. This paper presents a "mass-spring-Maxwell" model considering the effects of inertia, squeeze, compressibility and static bearing. To determine the dynamic model coefficients, numerical simulation of different cases between displacement and dynamic force of oil film are performed with fluent code. Simulation results show that hydrostatic guidway can be taken as a linear system when it is subjected to a small oscillation amplitude. Based on a dynamic model and numerical simulation, every dynamic model's parameters are calculated by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Identification results show that "mass-spring-damper" model is the most appropriate dynamic model of the hydrostatic guidway. This paper provides a reference and preparation for the analysis of the dynamic model of the similar hydrostatic bearings.

  13. Therapeutic Inertia in the New Landscape of Multiple Sclerosis Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Saposnik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The landscape of multiple sclerosis (MS treatment is constantly changing. Significant heterogeneity exists in the efficacy and risks associated with these therapies. Therefore, clinicians have the challenge to tailor treatment based on several factors (disease activity level, risk of progression, individual patient preferences and characteristics, personal expertise, etc., to identify the optimal balance between safety and efficacy. However, most clinicians have limited education in decision-making and formal training in risk management. Together, these factors may lead to therapeutic inertia (TI; defined as the absence of treatment initiation or intensification when therapeutic goals are unmet. TI may lead to suboptimal treatments choices, worse clinical outcomes, and more disability. This article provides a succinct overview on factors influencing TI in MS care.

  14. The Problem of Inertia in a Friedmann Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2012-01-01

    In this talk I will discuss the origin of inertia in a curved spacetime, particularly the spatially flat, open and closed Friedmann universes. This is done using Sciama's law of inertial induction, which is based on Mach's principle, and expresses the analogy between the retarded far fields of electrodynamics and those of gravitation. After obtaining covariant expressions for electromagnetic fields due to an accelerating point charge in Friedmann models, we adopt Sciama's law to obtain the inertial force on an accelerating mass $m$ by integrating over the contributions from all the matter in the universe. The resulting inertial force has the form $F = -kma$ where the constant $k < 1 $ depends on the choice of the cosmological parameters such as $\\Omega_{M},\\ \\Omega_{\\Lambda}, $ and $\\Omega_{R}$. The values of $k$ obtained suggest that inertial contribution from dark matter can be the source for the missing part of the inertial force.

  15. Parallel algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin-Javaheri, Masoud; Orin, David E.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an O(log2N) parallel algorithm for the manipulator inertia matrix is presented. It is based on the most efficient serial algorithm which uses the composite rigid body method. Recursive doubling is used to reformulate the linear recurrence equations which are required to compute the diagonal elements of the matrix. It results in O(log2N) levels of computation. Computation of the off-diagonal elements involves N linear recurrences of varying-size and a new method, which avoids redundant computation of position and orientation transforms for the manipulator, is developed. The O(log2N) algorithm is presented in both equation and graphic forms which clearly show the parallelism inherent in the algorithm.

  16. Kidney organ donation: developing family practice initiatives to reverse inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is associated with greater long term survival rates and improved quality of life compared with dialysis. Continuous growth in the number of patients with kidney failure has not been matched by an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplantation. This leads to long waiting lists, higher treatment costs and negative health outcomes. Discussion Misunderstandings, public uncertainty and issues of trust in the medical system, that limit willingness to be registered as a potential donor, could be addressed by community dissemination of information and new family practice initiatives that respond to individuals' personal beliefs and concerns regarding organ donation and transplantation. Summary Tackling both personal and public inertia on organ donation is important for any community oriented kidney donation campaign. PMID:20478042

  17. Martian particle size based on thermal inertia corrected for elevation-dependent atmospheric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N. T.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal inertia is commonly used to derive physical properties of the Martian surface. If the surface is composed of loosely consolidated grains, then the thermal conductivity derived from the inertia can theoretically be used to compute the particle size. However, one persistent difficulty associated with the interpretation of thermal inertia and the derivation of particle size from it has been the degree to which atmospheric properties affect both the radiation balance at the surface and the gas conductivity. These factors vary with atmospheric pressure so that derived thermal inertias and particle sizes are a function of elevation. By utilizing currently available thermal models and laboratory information, a fine component thermal inertia map was convolved with digital topography to produce particle size maps of the Martian surface corrected for these elevation-dependent effects. Such an approach is especially applicable for the highest elevations on Mars, where atmospheric back radiation and gas conductivity are low.

  18. Thermal inertia mapping of Mars from 60 deg S to 60 deg N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palluconi, F. D.; Kieffer, H. H.

    1981-01-01

    The considered region comprises 81% of the surface of Mars. Thermal inertia I is a composite surface property, which is equal to the square root of the product of three factors, including the thermal conductivity, the density, and the specific heat. I is the sole thermal parameter which governs the temperature variation of a periodically heated homogeneous surface, and, as such, is the prime intermediary between remote temperature observations and their geologic interpretation. The values for the thermal inertia found imply particulate surface materials. The variation in Martian surface thermal conductivity is about two orders of magnitude. Three large regions of low-inertia material are defined. Low-inertia material always possesses high albedo. There is a general tendency for higher-thermal-inertia surfaces to be darker but exceptions occur which may be related to a thin mantling of light dust or bonding of light material.

  19. Analyzing Effect of System Inertia on Grid Frequency Forecasting Usnig Two Stage Neuro-Fuzzy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourey, Divyansh R.; Gupta, Himanshu; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Jitesh; Kumar, Anand; Mishra, Anup

    2018-04-01

    Frequency forecasting is an important aspect of power system operation. The system frequency varies with load-generation imbalance. Frequency variation depends upon various parameters including system inertia. System inertia determines the rate of fall of frequency after the disturbance in the grid. Though, inertia of the system is not considered while forecasting the frequency of power system during planning and operation. This leads to significant errors in forecasting. In this paper, the effect of inertia on frequency forecasting is analysed for a particular grid system. In this paper, a parameter equivalent to system inertia is introduced. This parameter is used to forecast the frequency of a typical power grid for any instant of time. The system gives appreciable result with reduced error.

  20. Analyzing Effect of System Inertia on Grid Frequency Forecasting Usnig Two Stage Neuro-Fuzzy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourey, Divyansh R.; Gupta, Himanshu; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Jitesh; Kumar, Anand; Mishra, Anup

    2017-12-01

    Frequency forecasting is an important aspect of power system operation. The system frequency varies with load-generation imbalance. Frequency variation depends upon various parameters including system inertia. System inertia determines the rate of fall of frequency after the disturbance in the grid. Though, inertia of the system is not considered while forecasting the frequency of power system during planning and operation. This leads to significant errors in forecasting. In this paper, the effect of inertia on frequency forecasting is analysed for a particular grid system. In this paper, a parameter equivalent to system inertia is introduced. This parameter is used to forecast the frequency of a typical power grid for any instant of time. The system gives appreciable result with reduced error.

  1. Emotional inertia prospectively predicts the onset of depressive disorder in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, Peter; Sheeber, Lisa B; Yap, Marie B H; Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G; Allen, Nicholas B

    2012-04-01

    Emotional inertia refers to the degree to which a person's current emotional state is predicted by their prior emotional state, reflecting how much it carries over from one moment to the next. Recently, in a cross-sectional study, we showed that high inertia is an important characteristic of the emotion dynamics observed in psychological maladjustment such as depression. In the present study, we examined whether emotional inertia prospectively predicts the onset of first-episode depression during adolescence. Emotional inertia was assessed in a sample of early adolescents (N = 165) based on second-to-second behavioral coding of videotaped naturalistic interactions with a parent. Greater inertia of both negative and positive emotional behaviors predicted the emergence of clinical depression 2.5 years later. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the etiology and early detection of depression are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Distributed Power System Virtual Inertia Implemented by Grid-Connected Power Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Jingyang; Li, Hongchang; Tang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    to decreased power system inertia. As a result, the grid frequency may easily go beyond the acceptable range under severe frequency events, resulting in undesirable load-shedding, cascading failures, or even large-scale blackouts. To address the ever-decreasing inertia issue, this paper proposes the concept...... of distributed power system virtual inertia, which can be implemented by grid-connected power converters. Without modifications of system hardware, power system inertia can be emulated by the energy stored in the dc-link capacitors of grid-connected power converters. By regulating the dc-link voltages......Renewable energy sources (RESs), e.g. wind and solar photovoltaics, have been increasingly used to meet worldwide growing energy demands and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, RESs are normally coupled to the power grid through fast-response power converters without any inertia, leading...

  3. Option selection in whole-body rotation movements in gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas HEINEN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract When a gymnast performs a somersault, the linear and angular momentum along with a particular control of inertia during the flight phase constrain the possibilities for action. Given the complexity and dynamic nature of the human moving system, one could argue that there exist a particular amount of stable coordination states when performing somersaults. The goal of this study was to explore the manifold of movement options and coordination states along with their differentiating parameters for a single somersault in gymnastics based on a simple mathematical model reflecting gymnast’s rotation behavior during the flight phase. Biomechanical parameters determining rotation behavior during a somersault were systematically varied with regard to a particular set of biomechanical constraints defining a successful somersault performance. Batch simulations revealed that from 10229760 simulation cycles only 655346 (approximately 6.41% led to successful somersault performance. A subsequent analysis of the movement option landscape for the optimum angular momentum revealed ten coordination states for a single somersault that could be clearly distinguished based on the simulation parameters. Taken the results together, it becomes apparent that it may be most advisable to perform a single somersault with a larger moment of inertia when achieving the tucked position, a longer duration to achieve the tucked position, a longer duration of staying tucked, and an intermediate moment of inertia during landing. This strategy comprises the largest amount of movement options associated with an upright landing and thus the highest probability of success when performing a single somersault.

  4. Rotational scanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.; Amplatz, K.

    1981-01-01

    With rotational scanography contrast and resolution of X-ray images are improved. The technique bases on the principle of a narrow X-ray passing along an object, thus exposing the whole film. The X-ray is limited by a primary shield next to the X-ray tube. A second shield between object and film prevents that scattered rays spoil the film. The X-ray tube is turned around a horizontal axis, whilst the shield is shifted so that the irradiation intensity remains constant and the smallest projected focal size is obtained. This technique permits to enlarge the X-ray images by 3 or 6 times its size. Thus, films up to a length of 96 cm can be exposed. Main advantages of rotary scanography are reduced exposure to radiation of patient and applicant, improved contrast and resolution of the X-ray image, and a larger play of exposure for the X-ray technique. Disadvantages are a longer exposure time and the consequently increased demands on X-ray generator and treatment head. When a multi-slit shield is used, the patient must be cooperative in order to prevent movement artifacts. This imaging technique is highly sensitive to artifacts, particularly if the tube voltage provides large fluctuations. Supplementary units are necessary. The significance of the rotational scanography is that it permits the reduction of the radiation dose, whilst contrast and resolution of the images are improved. This can be illustrated by X-ray images of a CT-phantom and of pelvic, hand and gastrointenstinal phantoms. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Load inertia estimation using white and grey-box estimators for power systems with high wind penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Bank Tavakoli, M. Reza; Power, Michael; Ruttledge, Lisa; Flynn, Damian

    2012-01-01

    The increasing penetration of wind farms in power systems has increased concerns over the frequency behaviour and control of synchronous power systems due to a low contribution from modern wind turbines to overall system inertia. With this trend of conventional generators being displaced by variable speed wind turbines, the contribution from load inertia becomes more significant. The need for greater consideration towards load inertia estimation, or even on-line tracking of load inertia, seem...

  6. High-Resolution Thermal Inertia Mapping from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, M.T.; Jakosky, B.M.; Kieffer, H.H.; Christensen, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution thermal inertia mapping results are presented, derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations of the surface temperature of Mars obtained during the early portion of the MGS mapping mission. Thermal inertia is the key property controlling the diurnal surface temperature variations, and is dependent on the physical character of the top few centimeters of the surface. It represents a complex combination of particle size, rock abundance, exposures of bedrock, and degree of induration. In this work we describe the derivation of thermal inertia from TES data, present global scale analysis, and place these results into context with earlier work. A global map of nighttime thermal-bolometer-based thermal inertia is presented at 14?? per pixel resolution, with approximately 63% coverage between 50??S and 70??N latitude. Global analysis shows a similar pattern of high and low thermal inertia as seen in previous Viking low-resolution mapping. Significantly more detail is present in the high-resolution TES thermal inertia. This detail represents horizontal small-scale variability in the nature of the surface. Correlation with albedo indicates the presence of a previously undiscovered surface unit of moderate-to-high thermal inertia and intermediate albedo. This new unit has a modal peak thermal inertia of 180-250 J m-2 K-1 s-12 and a narrow range of albedo near 0.24. The unit, covering a significant fraction of the surface, typically surrounds the low thermal inertia regions and may comprise a deposit of indurated fine material. Local 3-km-resolution maps are also presented as examples of eolian, fluvial, and volcanic geology. Some impact crater rims and intracrater dunes show higher thermal inertias than the surrounding terrain; thermal inertia of aeolian deposits such as intracrater dunes may be related to average particle size. Outflow channels and valleys consistently show higher thermal inertias than the

  7. Role of rotational energy component in the dynamics of 16O+198Pt reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Manoj K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of rotational energy is investigated in reference to the dynamics of 16O+198Pt →214Rn∗ reaction using the sticking (IS and the non-sticking (INS limits of moment of inertia within the framework of dynamical cluster decay model. The decay barrier height and barrier position get significantly modified for the use of sticking or non-sticking choice, which in turn reproduce the evaporation residue and the fusion-fission cross-sections nicely by the IS approach, while the INS approach provides feasible addressal of data only for evaporation residue channel. Moreover, the fragmentation path of decaying fragments of 214Rn∗ compound nucleus gets influenced for different choices of moment of inertia. Beside this, the role of nuclear deformations i.e. static, dynamic quadurpole (β2 and higher order static deformation up to β4 are duly investigated for both choices of the moment of inertia.

  8. Elevation of Non-Classical (CD14+/lowCD16++ Monocytes Is Associated with Increased Albuminuria and Urine TGF-β1 in HIV-Infected Individuals on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks I Mitchell

    Full Text Available High rates of albuminuria are observed among HIV-infected individuals on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART. Though pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses are described as components of albuminuria in the general population, it is unclear how these responses are associated to albuminuria in ART-treated chronic HIV. We investigated the relationship of monocyte subsets and urine inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers to albuminuria in ART-treated HIV-infected participants.Cross-sectional analyses were performed on Hawaii Aging with HIV-cardiovascular disease study cohort participants who were required at entry to be ≥40 years old and on ART ≥3 months. Monocyte subpopulations were determined in banked peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using multi-parametric flow-cytometry. Entry random urine samples were assessed for albumin-to-creatinine ratios (UACR. Urine samples were measured for inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers using Luminex technology.Among 96 HIV-infected subjects with measured UACR (87% male, 59% Caucasian, and 89% undetectable HIV RNA with median CD4 of 495.5 cells/μL, 18 patients (19% had albuminuria. Non-classical (CD14low/+CD16++ monocytes were significantly elevated in subjects with albuminuria (p = 0.034 and were correlated to UACR (r = 0.238, p = 0.019. Elevated non-classical monocyte counts were significant predictors of worsening albuminuria, independent of traditional- and ART-associated risk factors (β = 0.539, p = 0.007. Urine TGF-β1 and collagen-IV were significantly higher in albuminuric compared to non-albuminuric participants (TGF-β1; p = 0.039 and collagen-IV; p = 0.042. Urine TGF-β1 was significantly correlated with non-classical monocyte counts (r = 0.464, p = 0.017.Alterations in monocyte subpopulations and urine pro-fibrotic factors may play a role in kidney dysfunction during chronic HIV infection and warrants further study.

  9. Thermal inertia mapping of Mars from 60°S to 60°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palluconi, Frank Don; Kieffer, Hugh H.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-micrometer brightness temperatures are used to derive the thermal inertia for 81% of the Martian surface between latitudes ±60°. These data were acquired by the two Viking Infrared Thermal Mappers in 1977 and 1978 following the two global dust storms of 1977. The spatial resolution used is 2° in latitude by 2° in longitude and the total range in derived inertia is . The distribution of thermal inertia is strongly bimodal with all values of thermal inertia less than  being associated with three disjoint bright regions mostly in the northern hemisphere. Sufficient dust is raised in global storms to provide fine material adequate to produce these low-inertia areas but the specific deposition mechanism has not been defined. At the low resolution used, no complete exposures of clean rock were found. There is some tendency for darker material to be associated with higher thermal inertia, although the trend is far from one to one. The distribution of high- and low-inertia areas is sufficiently nonrandom to produce a variation in whole-disk brightness temperature with central meridian longitude. This variation and the change in surface kinetic temperature associated with dust storms are factors in establishing the whole-disk brightness temperature at radio and infrared wavelengths and will be important for those who use Mars as a calibration source.

  10. Emotional Inertia is Associated with Lower Well-Being when Controlling for Differences in Emotional Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Peter; Sütterlin, Stefan; Kuppens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have linked higher emotional inertia (i.e., a stronger autoregressive slope of emotions) with lower well-being. We aimed to replicate these findings, while extending upon previous research by addressing a number of unresolved issues and controlling for potential confounds. Specifically, we report results from two studies (Ns = 100 and 202) examining how emotional inertia, assessed in response to a standardized sequence of emotional stimuli in the lab, correlates with several measures of well-being. The current studies build on previous research by examining how inertia of both positive emotions (PE) and negative emotions (NE) relates to positive (e.g., life satisfaction) and negative (e.g., depressive symptoms) indicators of well-being, while controlling for between-person differences in the mean level and variability of emotions. Our findings replicated previous research and further revealed that (a) NE inertia was more strongly associated with lower well-being than PE inertia; (b) emotional inertia correlated more consistently with negative indicators (e.g., depressive symptoms) than positive indicators (e.g., life satisfaction) of well-being; and (c) these relationships were independent of individual differences in mean level and variability of emotions. We conclude, in line with recent findings, that higher emotional inertia, particularly of NE, may be an indicator of increased vulnerability to depression.

  11. Emotional Inertia is Associated with Lower Well-Being Controlling for Differences in Emotional Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eKoval

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have linked higher emotional inertia (i.e., a stronger autoregressive slope of emotions with lower well-being. We aimed to replicate these findings, while extending upon previous research by addressing a number of unresolved issues and controlling for potential confounds. Specifically, we report results from two studies (Ns = 100 & 202 examining how emotional inertia, assessed in response to a standardized sequence of emotional stimuli in the lab, correlates with several measures of well-being. The current studies build on previous research by examining how inertia of both positive emotions (PE and negative emotions (NE are related to both positive (e.g., life satisfaction and negative (e.g., depressive symptoms indicators of well-being, while controlling for between-person differences in the mean level and variability of emotions. Our findings replicated previous research and further revealed that a NE inertia was more strongly associated with lower well-being than PE inertia; b emotional inertia correlated more consistently with negative indicators (e.g., depressive symptoms than positive indicators (e.g., life satisfaction of well-being; and c these relationships were independent of individual differences in mean level and variability of emotions. We conclude, in line with recent findings, that higher emotional inertia, particularly of NE, may indicate increased vulnerability to depression.

  12. Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film Flowing over a Rotating Disk by Integral Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Cetegen, B. M.

    2005-01-01

    An integral analysis of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in a thin liquid film flowing over a rotating disk surface is presented for both constant temperature and constant heat flux boundary conditions. The model is found to capture the correct trends of the liquid film thickness variation over the disk surface and compare reasonably well with experimental results over the range of Reynolds and Rossby numbers covering both inertia and rotation dominated regimes. Nusselt number variation over the disk surface shows two types of behavior. At low rotation rates, the Nusselt number exhibits a radial decay with Nusselt number magnitudes increasing with higher inlet Reynolds number for both constant wall temperature and heat flux cases. At high rotation rates, the Nusselt number profiles exhibit a peak whose location advances radially outward with increasing film Reynolds number or inertia. The results also compare favorably with the full numerical simulation results from an earlier study as well as with the reported experimental results.

  13. Influence of sticking vs non-sticking limits of moment of inertia and higher order deformations in the decay of 214,216Rn* compound systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajni; Jain, Deepika; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-12-01

    The dynamical cluster decay model (DCM) is employed to explore the relative effect of sticking (IS) and non-sticking (INS) limits of moment of inertia (MOI) in the decay of hot and rotating 214,216Rn* compound nuclei, formed in 16,18O + 198Pt reactions. Beside this, the nuclear deformation effects i.e. quadrupole β2 (static and dynamic) and higher order static deformations up to hexadecapole (β4) are duly incorporated and studied within DCM. The influence of both 'INS/IS' addressing rotational energy component and 'deformations' is gauged through the barrier characteristics, preformation factor and barrier lowering effects. The experimentally given ER and ff data is addressed by optimizing the neck-length ΔR, that strongly depends on the limiting angular momentum, which in turn depends on the sticking or non-sticking limits of interaction. In addition to this, the influence of increase in energy and neutron number is probed in reference to ER survival probability of Rn compound nucleus. Finally, the ff cross-sections of 214,216Rn* nuclei are predicted within sticking limit of moment of inertia as the same seems to be more suitable for such decay paths.

  14. Cluster rotational bands in 11B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilov A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential cross-sections of 11B+α inelastic scattering at E(α =65 MeV leading to most of the known 11B states at excitation energies up to 14 MeV were measured [1]. The data analysis was done using Modified diffraction model (MDM [2] allowing determining radii of excited states. Radii of the states with excitation energies less than ∼ 7 MeV coincide with the radius of the ground state with an accuracy not less than 0.1 - 0.15 fm. This result is consistent with traditional view on shell structure of low-lying states in 11B. Most of the observed high-energy excited states are distributed among four rotational bands. Moments of inertia of band states are close to the moment of inertia of the Hoyle state of 12C. The calculated radii, related to these bands, are 0.7 - 1.0 fm larger than the radius of the ground state, and are close to the Hoyle state radius. These results are in agreement with existing predictions about various cluster structure of 11B at high excitation energies.

  15. Inertia and friction welding of aluminum alloy 1100 to type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inertia and friction-welding processes were evaluated for joining aluminum alloy 1100-H14 and Type 316 vacuum-induction melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VIM VAR) stainless steel. While both processes consistently produced joints in which the strength exceeded the strength of the aluminum base metal, 100 percent bonding was not reliably achieved with inertia welding. The deficiency points out the need for development of nondestructive testing techniques for this type of joint. Additionally, solid-state volume diffusion did not appear to be a satisfactory explanation for the inertia and friction-welding bonding mechanism

  16. The Inertia Weight Updating Strategies in Particle Swarm Optimisation Based on the Beta Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Maca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with the comparison of selected random updating strategies of inertia weight in particle swarm optimisation. Six versions of particle swarm optimization were analysed on 28 benchmark functions, prepared for the Special Session on Real-Parameter Single Objective Optimisation at CEC2013. The random components of tested inertia weight were generated from Beta distribution with different values of shape parameters. The best analysed PSO version is the multiswarm PSO, which combines two strategies of updating the inertia weight. The first is driven by the temporally varying shape parameters, while the second is based on random control of shape parameters of Beta distribution.

  17. A class of parallel algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel and parallel/pipeline algorithms for computation of the manipulator inertia matrix are presented. An algorithm based on composite rigid-body spatial inertia method, which provides better features for parallelization, is used for the computation of the inertia matrix. Two parallel algorithms are developed which achieve the time lower bound in computation. Also described is the mapping of these algorithms with topological variation on a two-dimensional processor array, with nearest-neighbor connection, and with cardinality variation on a linear processor array. An efficient parallel/pipeline algorithm for the linear array was also developed, but at significantly higher efficiency.

  18. Influence of Total Inertia Effects in a Thrust Curvilinear Bearing Lubricated with Newtonian Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.; Jurczak, P.

    2017-12-01

    In the paper, the flow of a Newtonian type of lubricant in the clearance of a curvilinear bearing is considered. It is assumed that the bearing walls are modelled as smooth and impermeable. In analytical considerations, full inertia of the longitudinal flow and partial inertia of the circumferential flow are taken into account. The equation of motion of the lubricant is solved by the modified method of averaged inertia. A thrust bearing and spherical bearing are considered, for which dimensionless pressure distributions and the bearing capacity are given.

  19. Influence of Total Inertia Effects in a Thrust Curvilinear Bearing Lubricated with Newtonian Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walicka A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the flow of a Newtonian type of lubricant in the clearance of a curvilinear bearing is considered. It is assumed that the bearing walls are modelled as smooth and impermeable. In analytical considerations, full inertia of the longitudinal flow and partial inertia of the circumferential flow are taken into account. The equation of motion of the lubricant is solved by the modified method of averaged inertia. A thrust bearing and spherical bearing are considered, for which dimensionless pressure distributions and the bearing capacity are given.

  20. Time course of sleep inertia after nighttime and daytime sleep episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achermann, P; Werth, E; Dijk, D J; Borbely, A A

    1995-12-01

    Sleep inertia refers to the period of reduced vigilance following upon awakening from sleep. To investigate the time course of sleep inertia, self-ratings of alertness and reaction time in a memory task were repeatedly assessed after nighttime and daytime sleep episodes in healthy young men. Alertness gradually increased and reaction time gradually decreased within the first hour after awakening. Their time course could be described by exponential functions with time constants of 0.45 h and 0.3 h, respectively. The data demonstrate that sleep inertia is a robust, quantifiable process that can be incorporated in models of sleep and vigilance.

  1. Thermal inertia associated with ultrapulse technology in phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Marielle; Waite, Aaron; Olson, Randall J

    2006-06-01

    To determine whether very short pulses of ultrasound (5 to 6 milliseconds) have less heat propagation in biological tissue (thermal inertia) than traditional pulses (50 milliseconds). Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. Thermal testing was done in balanced salt solution (BSS) and in eye-bank eyes. In the same fresh human eye-bank eye, net temperature increase after 20 seconds of ultrasound (50 milliseconds on and 50 milliseconds off) was compared with the increase after 6 milliseconds on and 12 milliseconds off with the same phacoemulsification unit. The same experiment and setting was run in BSS and the eye-bank ratios compared with the BSS ratios. Twenty runs were done at each power setting in BSS and 22 in the eye-bank eye. There was 10.9% less heat generated with 6-millisecond pulses of ultrasound in limbal tissue than in BSS compared with 50-millisecond pulses of ultrasound (P = .0002). Very short pulses of ultrasound (5 to 6 milliseconds) propagated less thermal energy in limbal tissue than in BSS compared with 50-millisecond ultrasound pulses.

  2. Can the Emdrive Be Explained by Quantised Inertia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCulloch M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that cone-shaped cavities with microwaves resonating within them move slightly towards their narrow ends (the emdrive. There is no accepted explanation for this. Here it is shown that this effect can be predicted by assuming that the inertial mass of the photons in the cavity is caused by Unruh radiation whose wavelengths must fit exactly within the cavity, using a theory already applied with some success to astrophysical anomalies where the cavity is the Hubble volume. For the emdrive this means that more Unruh waves are “allowed” at the wide end, lea ding to a greater inertial mass for the photons there. The gain of inertia of the photons when they move from the narrow to the wide end, and the conservation of momentum, predicts that the cavity must then move towards the narrow end, as observed. This mode l predicts the available observations quite well, although the observational uncertainties are not well known.

  3. Nuclear collective rotation in the SU3 model, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinouchi, Shin-ichi; Kishimoto, Teruo; Kammuri, Tetsuo.

    1989-05-01

    The collective rotation of a nuclear system with the SU 3 Hamiltonian is described by the quantal dynamical nuclear field theory. An angular frequency in the Coriolis interaction of the driving Hamiltonian is replaced by a total angular momentum operator divided by the corresponding moment of inertia. We consider here the low spin states for a triaxial intrinsic configuration. The rotational effect is taken into account by using the effective quadrupole and angular momentum operators, whose expressions are different depending on whether they refer to the laboratory frame or the body-fixed one. Effective forms of the total Hamiltonian and the particle angular momentum are compared with the exact SU 3 energy and the rotor's angular momentum, respectively. In order to dissolve the disagreement for the effective operators, the perturbing interaction should be supplemented by a residual part of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction, which restores the rotational invariance of the intrinsic Hamiltonian. (author)

  4. High spin rotations of nuclei with the harmonic oscillator potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerkaski, M.; Szymanski, Z.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations of the nuclear properties at high angular momentum have been performed recently. They are based on the liquid drop model of a nucleus and/or on the assumption of the single particle shell structure of the nucleonic motion. The calculations are usually complicated and involve long computer codes. In this article we shall discuss general trends in fast rotating nuclei in the approximation of the harmonic oscillator potential. We shall see that using the Bohr Mottelson simplified version of the rigorous solution of Valatin one can perform a rather simple analysis of the rotational bands, structure of the yrast line, moments of inertia etc. in the rotating nucleus. While the precision fit to experimental data in actual nuclei is not the purpose of this paper, one can still hope to reach some general understanding within the model of the simple relations resulting in nuclei at high spin. (author)

  5. Emotion regulation and the temporal dynamics of emotions: Effects of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression on emotional inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Peter; Butler, Emily A; Hollenstein, Tom; Lanteigne, Dianna; Kuppens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The tendency for emotions to be predictable over time, labelled emotional inertia, has been linked to low well-being and is thought to reflect impaired emotion regulation. However, almost no studies have examined how emotion regulation relates to emotional inertia. We examined the effects of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression on the inertia of behavioural, subjective and physiological measures of emotion. In Study 1 (N = 111), trait suppression was associated with higher inertia of negative behaviours. We replicated this finding experimentally in Study 2 (N = 186). Furthermore, in Study 2, instructed suppressors and reappraisers both showed higher inertia of positive behaviours, and reappraisers displayed higher inertia of heart rate. Neither suppression nor reappraisal were associated with the inertia of subjective feelings in either study. Thus, the effects of suppression and reappraisal on the temporal dynamics of emotions depend on the valence and emotional response component in question.

  6. Rotating Cavitation Supression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a rotating cavitation (RC) suppressor for liquid rocket engine turbopump inducers. Cavitation instabilities, such as rotating cavitation,...

  7. MGS MARS TES DERIVED THERMAL INERTIA MAPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains thermal inertia maps derived from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the surface temperatures of Mars taken...

  8. THE EFFECT OF THE THERMAL INERTIA ON THE TEMPERATURE OF A HEATING SLAB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D ABBAZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the influence of the thermal inertia on the temperature of a heated concrete slab. This is a solar sensor provides a solar heating system floor, which the energy input. The concept of thermal inertia is not easy to grasp. It is defined as the speed that helps a system ((building in our case reacts to the change in operating conditions. The response of the building facing to the stresses is largely depending on the thermal properties of constituent materials. This feature is related to good performance, good use, and comfort of the thermal machine which is called ‘‘habitat’’. The objective of this work aims to study the influence of the inertia on the surface temperature of the floor, to design the future of homes with high inertia and very low energy consumption with satisfactory comfort conditions.

  9. Performance Guaranteed Inertia Emulation forDiesel-Wind System Feed Microgrid via ModelReference Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, Alexander M. [ORNL; Zhang, Yichen [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Djouadi, Seddik [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Olama, Mohammed M. [ORNL

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a model reference control based inertia emulation strategy is proposed. Desired inertia can be precisely emulated through this control strategy so that guaranteed performance is ensured. A typical frequency response model with parametrical inertia is set to be the reference model. A measurement at a specific location delivers the information of disturbance acting on the diesel-wind system to the referencemodel. The objective is for the speed of the diesel-wind system to track the reference model. Since active power variation is dominantly governed by mechanical dynamics and modes, only mechanical dynamics and states, i.e., a swing-engine-governor system plus a reduced-order wind turbine generator, are involved in the feedback control design. The controller is implemented in a three-phase diesel-wind system feed microgrid. The results show exact synthetic inertia is emulated, leading to guaranteed performance and safety bounds.

  10. Don't just do something, stand there! The value and art of deliberate clinical inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijzers, Gerben; Cullen, Louise; Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Fatovich, Daniel M

    2018-01-12

    It can be difficult to avoid unnecessary investigations and treatments, which are a form of low-value care. Yet every intervention in medicine has potential harms, which may outweigh the potential benefits. Deliberate clinical inertia is the art of doing nothing as a positive response. This paper provides suggestions on how to incorporate deliberate clinical inertia into our daily clinical practice, and gives an overview of current initiatives such as 'Choosing Wisely' and the 'Right Care Alliance'. The decision to 'do nothing' can be complex due to competing factors, and barriers to implementation are highlighted. Several strategies to promote deliberate clinical inertia are outlined, with an emphasis on shared decision-making. Preventing medical harm must become one of the pillars of modern health care and the art of not intervening, that is, deliberate clinical inertia, can be a novel patient-centred quality indicator to promote harm reduction. © 2018 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Thermal inertia effect in an axisymmetric thermoelastic problem based on generalized thermoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yushu; Li Fatao

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study thermal inertia effect due to the fact of the properties of the hyperbolic equations based on LS theory in generalized thermoelasticity. Simulations in a 2D hollow cylinder for uncoupled dynamic thermal stresses and thermal displacements were predicted by use of finite element method with Newmark algorithm. The thermal inertia effect on LS theory in rapid transient heat transfer process is also investigated in comparison with in steady heat transfer process. When different specific heat capacity is chosen, dynamic thermal stresses appear different types of vibration, in which less heat capacity causes more violent dynamic thermal stresses because of the thermal inertia effect. Both dynamic thermal stresses and thermal displacements in rapid transient heat transfer process have the larger amplitude and higher frequency than in steady heat transfer process due to thermal inertia from the results of simulation, which is consistent with the nature of the generalized thermoelasticity.

  12. Cooperation is enhanced by inhomogeneous inertia in spatial prisoner's dilemma game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuhua; Zhang, Zhipeng; Wu, Yu'e.; Xie, Yunya

    2018-01-01

    Inertia is an important factor that cannot be ignored in the real world for some lazy individuals in the process of decision making. In this work, we introduce a simple classification mechanism of strategy changing in evolutionary prisoner's dilemma games on different topologies. In this model, a part of players update their strategies according to not only the payoff difference, but also the inertia factor, which makes nodes heterogeneous and the system inhomogeneous. Moreover, we also study the impact of the number of neighbors on the evolution of cooperation. The results show that the evolution of cooperation will be promoted to a high level when the inertia factor and the inhomogeneous system are combined. In addition, we find that the more neighbors one player has, the higher density of cooperators is sustained in the optimal position. This work could be conducive to understanding the emergence and persistence of cooperative behavior caused by the inertia factor in reality.

  13. Electro-mechanical coupling of rotating 3D beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoykov S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A rotating thin-walled beam with piezoelectric element is analysed. The beam is considered to vibrate in space, hence the longitudinal, transverse and torsional deformations are taken into account. The bending deformations of the beam are modelled by assuming Timoshenko's theory. Torsion is included by considering that the cross section rotates as a rigid body but can deform in longitudinal direction due to warping. The warping function is computed preliminary by the finite element method. The equation of motion is derived by the principle of virtual work and discretized in space by the Ritz method. Electro-mechanical coupling is included in the model by considering the internal electrical energy and the electric charge output. The piezo-electric constitutive relations are used in reduced form. The beam is assumed to rotate about a fixed axis with constant speed. The equation of motion is derived in rotating coordinate system, but the influence of the rotation of the coordinate system is taken into account through the inertia forces. Results in time domain are presented for different speeds of rotation and frequencies of vibration. The influence of the speed of rotation and of the frequency of vibration on the electrical output is presented and analysed.

  14. The Role of Atmospheric Pressure on Surface Thermal Inertia for Early Mars Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischna, M.; Piqueux, S.

    2017-12-01

    On rocky bodies such as Mars, diurnal surface temperatures are controlled by the surface thermal inertia, which is a measure of the ability of the surface to store heat during the day and re-radiate it at night. Thermal inertia is a compound function of the near-surface regolith thermal conductivity, density and specific heat, with the regolith thermal conductivity being strongly controlled by the atmospheric pressure. For Mars, current best maps of global thermal inertia are derived from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft using bolometric brightness temperatures of the surface. Thermal inertia is widely used in the atmospheric modeling community to determine surface temperatures and to establish lower boundary conditions for the atmosphere. Infrared radiation emitted from the surface is key in regulating lower atmospheric temperatures and driving overall global circulation. An accurate map of surface thermal inertia is thus required to produce reasonable results of the present-day atmosphere using numerical Mars climate models. Not surprisingly, thermal inertia is also a necessary input into climate models of early Mars, which assume a thicker atmosphere, by as much as one to two orders of magnitude above the present-day 6 mb mean value. Early Mars climate models broadly, but incorrectly, assume the present day thermal inertia surface distribution. Here, we demonstrate that, on early Mars, when pressures were larger than today's, the surface layer thermal inertia was globally higher because of the increased thermal conductivity driven by the higher gas pressure in interstitial pore spaces within the soil. Larger thermal inertia reduces the diurnal range of surface temperature and will affect the size and timing of the modeled seasonal polar ice caps. Additionally, it will globally alter the frequency of when surface temperatures are modeled to exceed the liquid water melting point, and so results may

  15. Thermal inertias in the upper millimeters of the Martian surface derived using Phobos' shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Bruce H.; Murray, Bruce C.; Svitek, Tomas

    1995-01-01

    The first thermal images of Phobos' shadow on the surface of Mars, in addition to simultaneous visible images, were obtained by the Phobos'88 Termoskan instrument. The best observed shadow occurrence was on the flanks of Arsia Mons. For this occurrence, we combined the observed decrease in visible illumination of the surface with the observed decrease in brightness temperature to calculate thermal inertias of the Martian surface. The most realistic of our three models of eclipse cooling improves upon our preliminary model by including nonisothermal initial conditions and downward atmospheric flux. Most of our derived inertias fall within the range 38 to 59 J/(sq m s(exp 1/2) K), (0.9 to 1.4 x 10(exp -3) cal/(sq cm s(exp 1/2) K)) corresponding to dust-sized particles (for a homogeneous surface), consistent with previous theories of Tharsis as a current area of dust deposition. Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) inertias are diurnally derived and are sensitive to centimeter depths, whereas the shadow-derived inertias sample the upper tenths of a millimeter of the surface. The shadow-derived inertias are lower than those derived from Viking IRTM measurements (84 to 147), however, uncertainties in both sets of derived inertias make conclusions about layering tenuous. Thus, near-surface millimeter versus centimeter layering may exist in this region, but if it does, it is likely not very significant. Both eclipse and diurnal inertias appear to increase near the eastern end of the shadow occurrence. We also analyzed a shadow occurrence near the crater Herschel that showed no observed cooling. This analysis was limited by cool morning temperatures and instrument sensitivity, but yielded a lower bound of 80 on eclipse inertias in that region. Based upon our results, we strongly recommend future spacecraft thermal observations of Phobos' shadow, and suggest that they will be most useful if they improve upon Terinoskan's geographic and temporal coverage and its accuracy.

  16. Thermal inertias in the upper millimeters of the Martian surace derived using Phobus' shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Bruce H.; Murray, Bruce C.; Svitek, Tomas

    1995-01-01

    The first thermal images of Phobos' shadow on the surface of Mars, in addition to simultaneous visible images, were obtained by the Phobus '88 Termoskan instrument. The best observed shadow occurence was on the flanks of Arsia Mons. For this occurence, we combined the observed decrease in visible illumination of the surface with the observed decrease in brightness temperature to calculate thermal inertias of the Martian surface. The most realistic of our three models of eclipse cooling improves upon our preliminary model by including nonisothermal initial conditions and downward atmospheric flux. Most of our derived inertias fall within the range 38 to 59 J/Sq m/S(exp 0.5)K (0.9 to 1.4 10(exp -3)Cal/Sq m/S(exp 0.5)/K), corresponding to dust-sized particles (for a homogeneous surface), consistent with previous theories of Tharsis as a currrent area of dust deposition. Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) inertias are diurnally derived and are sensitive to centimeter depths, whereas the shadow-derived inertias sample the upper tenths of a millimeter of the surface. The shadow-derived inertias are lower than those derived from Viking IRTM measurements (84 to 147), however, uncertainties in both sets of derived inertias make conclusions about layering tenuous. Thus, near-surface millimeter versus centimeter layering may exist in this region, but if it does, it is likely not very significant. Both eclipse and diurnal inertias appear to increase near the eastern end of the shadow occurence. We also analyzed a shadow occurence near the crater Herschel that showed no observed cooling. This analysis was limited by cool morning temperatures and instrument sensitivity, but yielded a lower bound of 80 on eclipse inertias in that region. Based upon our results, we strongly recommend future spacecraft thermal observations of Phobus' shadow, and suggest that they will be most useful if they improve upon Termoskan's geographic and temporal coverage and its accuracy.

  17. Thermal inertia in buildings : a review of impacts across climate and building use

    OpenAIRE

    Verbeke, Stijn; Audenaert, Amaryllis

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: A building with a great amount of thermal mass is able to time-shift and flatten out heat flow fluctuations; this is referred to as the thermal inertia of a building. This paper presents a literature review focussing on the reported impacts of building thermal inertia on thermal comfort and energy use for space heating and cooling. A wide range in research methods, building types and climatic conditions considered by the respective authors, contributes to a large spread in research ...

  18. Propagation of ion-acoustic waves in a warm dusty plasma with electron inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, S. N.; Talukdar, A.

    2011-08-01

    The KdV equation is derived for weakly nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized warm dusty plasma with electron inertia. It has been shown that the inclusion of electron inertia and pressure variation of the species not only significantly modifies the basic features (width and amplitude) of dust ion-acoustic solitions, but also introduces a new parametric regime for the existence of positive and negative solitons.

  19. Influence of Turbine and Compressor Wheel Mass and Inertia on the Rotor Dynamics of Turbocharger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Knotek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the influence of the compressor and turbine wheel mass and inertia change on the turbocharger rotor dynamics. The model of the turbocharger is presented, the hydrodynamic model of the journal bearing is described and assembly of the whole model in MBS is also presented. The article presents various results describing rotor dynamics on which the influence of compressor and turbine wheel mass and inertia change is discussed.

  20. Damping torque analysis of virtual inertia control for DFIG-based wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, C.; Du, W.; Littler, T.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing penetration of large-scale wind generation in power systems will challenge the power system inertia due to the reason that the converter based variable speed wind turbines have no contribution to the system inertia. Traditionally, a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG)-based wind power plant naturally does not provide frequency response because of the decoupling between the output power and the frequency. Moreover, DFIGs also lack power reserve margin because of the maxi mum p...

  1. Morning Sleep Inertia in Alertness and Performance: Effect of Cognitive Domain and White Light Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Santhi, Nayantara; Groeger, John A.; Archer, Simon N.; Gimenez, Marina; Schlangen, Luc J. M.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia. The extent to which its severity varies with task and cognitive processes remains unclear. We examined sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), n-back and add tasks, respectively. The tasks were administered 2 hours before bedtime and at r...

  2. Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic, and circadian influences on higher-order cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Tina M.; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic, and circadian processes modulate cognition, including reaction time, memory, mood, and alertness. How these processes influence higher-order cognitive functions is not well known. Six participants completed a 73-daylong study that included two 14-daylong 28h forced desynchrony protocols, to examine separate and interacting influences of sleep inertia, sleep homeostasis, and circadian phase on higher-order cognitive functions of inhibitory control and selectiv...

  3. [The concentration of ionized and total calcium in the blood of female dogs with uterine inertia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, A; Schwab, A

    1990-12-01

    Blood values of calcium, inorganic phosphate and magnesium were estimated in 26 bitches one day before parturition, on the day of parturition and daily for 6 days post partum. In 17 of these 26 animals the diagnosis was dystocia because of uterine inertia. A comparison of calcium levels between those bitches giving birth spontaneously and those requiring assistance gave no indication that blood calcium deficiency was the cause of uterine inertia.

  4. Precession relaxation of viscoelastic oblate rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouard, Julien; Efroimsky, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Perturbations of all sorts destabilize the rotation of a small body and leave it in a non-principal spin state. In such a state, the body experiences alternating stresses generated by the inertial forces. This yields nutation relaxation, i.e. evolution of the spin towards the principal rotation about the maximal-inertia axis. Knowledge of the time-scales needed to damp the nutation is crucial in studies of small bodies' dynamics. In the literature hitherto, nutation relaxation has always been described with aid of an empirical quality factor Q introduced to parametrize the energy dissipation rate. Among the drawbacks of this approach was its inability to describe the dependence of the relaxation rate upon the current nutation angle. This inability stemmed from our lack of knowledge of the quality factor's dependence on the forcing frequency. In this article, we derive our description of nutation damping directly from the rheological law obeyed by the material. This renders us the nutation damping rate as a function of the current nutation angle, as well as of the shape and the rheological parameters of the body. In contradistinction from the approach based on an empirical Q factor, our development gives a zero damping rate in the spherical-shape limit. Our method is generic and applicable to any shape and to any linear rheological law. However, to simplify the developments, here we consider a dynamically oblate rotator with a Maxwell rheology.

  5. Particle Swarm Optimization with Various Inertia Weight Variants for Optimal Power Flow Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Umapathy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an efficient method to solve the optimal power flow problem in power systems using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The objective of the proposed method is to find the steady-state operating point which minimizes the fuel cost, while maintaining an acceptable system performance in terms of limits on generator power, line flow, and voltage. Three different inertia weights, a constant inertia weight (CIW, a time-varying inertia weight (TVIW, and global-local best inertia weight (GLbestIW, are considered with the particle swarm optimization algorithm to analyze the impact of inertia weight on the performance of PSO algorithm. The PSO algorithm is simulated for each of the method individually. It is observed that the PSO algorithm with the proposed inertia weight yields better results, both in terms of optimal solution and faster convergence. The proposed method has been tested on the standard IEEE 30 bus test system to prove its efficacy. The algorithm is computationally faster, in terms of the number of load flows executed, and provides better results than other heuristic techniques.

  6. Observation of skin thermal inertia distribution during reactive hyperaemia using a single-hood measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M; Togawa, T

    2001-02-01

    An attempt was made to image the thermal inertia (defined as the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) of the skin to observe the distribution of blood in the skin during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia in normal healthy volunteers. The method was based on the ability to calculate thermal inertia by successive thermographic measurements of the skin after stepwise change in ambient radiation temperature surrounding the skin area. The stepwise change was achieved within 0.1 s through a single hood. Experimentation on the undisturbed volar forearm of normal subjects at the same site showed that the measurements thus achieved were reproducible. The thermal inertia values of forearm skin in normal subjects were scattered throughout the range 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.7 x 10(3) W s(1/2) m(-2) K(-1). Experiments on forearm skin subjected to arterial cuff occlusion indicated that thermal inertia can be detected at a low level of blood perfusion. A linear relationship was observed between thermal inertia and blood perfusion measured by laser Doppler imager before and during blood flow occlusion. During reactive hyperaemia, the thermal inertia image exhibited a non-uniform island-shaped pattern of distribution over the forearm, suggesting that, after release from occlusion, recovery of blood flow is non-uniform.

  7. Surface energy budget and thermal inertia at Gale Crater: Calculations from ground-based measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G M; Rennó, N; Fischer, E; Borlina, C S; Hallet, B; de la Torre Juárez, M; Vasavada, A R; Ramos, M; Hamilton, V; Gomez-Elvira, J; Haberle, R M

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of the surface energy budget (SEB) yields insights into soil-atmosphere interactions and local climates, while the analysis of the thermal inertia ( I ) of shallow subsurfaces provides context for evaluating geological features. Mars orbital data have been used to determine thermal inertias at horizontal scales of ∼10 4  m 2 to ∼10 7  m 2 . Here we use measurements of ground temperature and atmospheric variables by Curiosity to calculate thermal inertias at Gale Crater at horizontal scales of ∼10 2  m 2 . We analyze three sols representing distinct environmental conditions and soil properties, sol 82 at Rocknest (RCK), sol 112 at Point Lake (PL), and sol 139 at Yellowknife Bay (YKB). Our results indicate that the largest thermal inertia I  = 452 J m -2  K -1  s -1/2 (SI units used throughout this article) is found at YKB followed by PL with I  = 306 and RCK with I  = 295. These values are consistent with the expected thermal inertias for the types of terrain imaged by Mastcam and with previous satellite estimations at Gale Crater. We also calculate the SEB using data from measurements by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station and dust opacity values derived from measurements by Mastcam. The knowledge of the SEB and thermal inertia has the potential to enhance our understanding of the climate, the geology, and the habitability of Mars.

  8. Emotional inertia and external events: The roles of exposure, reactivity, and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Peter; Brose, Annette; Pe, Madeline L; Houben, Marlies; Erbas, Yasemin; Champagne, Dominique; Kuppens, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Increased moment-to-moment predictability, or inertia, of negative affect has been identified as an important dynamic marker of psychological maladjustment, and increased vulnerability to depression in particular. However, little is known about the processes underlying emotional inertia. The current article examines how the emotional context, and people's responses to it, are related to emotional inertia. We investigated how individual differences in the inertia of negative affect (NA) are related to individual differences in exposure, reactivity, and recovery from emotional events, in daily life (assessed using experience sampling) as well as in the lab (assessed using an emotional film-clip task), among 200 participants commencing their first year of tertiary education. This dual-method approach allowed us to assess affective responding on different timescales, and in response to standardized as well as idiographic emotional stimuli. Our most consistent finding, across both methods, was that heightened NA inertia is related to decreased NA recovery following negative stimuli, suggesting that higher levels of inertia may be mostly driven by impairments in affect repair following negative events. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Controlling inertia dominated flows with super-repellent surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybert, Christophe

    2009-11-01

    The possibility to affect liquid flows through surface properties was naturally put forward by the recent emergence of small-scales fluidic devices, as downsizing invariably emphasizes the role of surfaces, with respect to bulk properties. Such strategy of flow modification by surface effects is a priori restricted to the natural scales setting the interactions between the surface and the nearby liquid that is, essentially to nanometric scales. In this context, super-repellent surfaces have emerged as possessing not only remarkable (non-)wetting properties but also unique dynamical properties. The latter manifest on their ability to promote large boundary slippage, characterized by slip lengths from 1 to hundreds of microns, that make them capable of modifying flows up such micro-scales. More fundamentally, this raises the question of how far this strategy of flow control through surfaces can be pushed, and of how deep the modification of liquid flows close to super-repellent surface is: can it persist at large scales or large velocities? After briefly going through the properties of super-repellent surfaces in laminar viscous flows, I will discuss their impact on different macro-scale experimental configurations involving inertia-dominated flows. Focusing on splashing and dripping phenomena - the latter being associated to the well-known teapot effect- I will show that although surface effects are usually ignored in such situations, in view of the large values of the Weber number, it is still possible to shape the liquid flows by tailoring surface properties, with optimized effects obtained for super-repellent surfaces.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of rotating shallow water methods and advances

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitlin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    The rotating shallow water (RSW) model is of wide use as a conceptual tool in geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD), because, in spite of its simplicity, it contains all essential ingredients of atmosphere and ocean dynamics at the synoptic scale, especially in its two- (or multi-) layer version. The book describes recent advances in understanding (in the framework of RSW and related models) of some fundamental GFD problems, such as existence of the slow manifold, dynamical splitting of fast (inertia-gravity waves) and slow (vortices, Rossby waves) motions, nonlinear geostrophic adjustment and wa

  11. Velocity-dependent changes of rotational axes in the non-visual control of unconstrained 3D arm motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isableu, B; Rezzoug, N; Mallet, G; Bernardin, D; Gorce, P; Pagano, C C

    2009-12-29

    We examined the roles of inertial (e(3)), shoulder-centre of mass (SH-CM) and shoulder-elbow articular (SH-EL) rotation axes in the non-visual control of unconstrained 3D arm rotations. Subjects rotated the arm in elbow configurations that yielded either a constant or variable separation between these axes. We hypothesized that increasing the motion frequency and the task complexity would result in the limbs' rotational axis to correspond to e(3) in order to minimize rotational resistances. Results showed two velocity-dependent profiles wherein the rotation axis coincided with the SH-EL axis for S and I velocities and then in the F velocity shifted to either a SH-CM/e(3) trade-off axis for one profile, or to no preferential axis for the other. A third profile was velocity-independent, with the SH-CM/e(3) trade-off axis being adopted. Our results are the first to provide evidence that the rotational axis of a multi-articulated limb may change from a geometrical axis of rotation to a mass or inertia based axis as motion frequency increases. These findings are discussed within the framework of the minimum inertia tensor model (MIT), which shows that rotations about e(3) reduce the amount of joint muscle torque that must be produced by employing the interaction torque to assist movement.

  12. Hydraulic modeling of the flows with counter-rotating coaxial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuykov Andrey L'vovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to hydraulic modeling of flows with counter-rotating coaxial layers. Dynamic similarity criteria of such flows were found by the inspection analysis of the Reynolds equations. It was found that the hydrodynamic similarity criteria for physical modeling of unsteady turbulent circular-longitudinal flows with counter-rotating coaxial layers of viscous incompressible fluid are: Strouhal number - the ratio of forces of local and convective inertia, Rossby number characterizes the ratio of the azimuthal and axial velocity, Froude number - the ratio of forces of convective inertia to the forces of gravity, Euler number - the ratio of pressure forces to the convective forces of inertia, Weber number - the ratio of the convective inertia forces to surface tension forces, Reynolds number - the ratio of the convective inertia forces to the forces of molecular viscosity, Karman number - the ratio of dispersion velocity vector of fluid particles to the flow velocity. The limit value of the Reynolds number was found at the lower boundary conditions of automodel zone of such flow. It is shown that Weber and Rossby criteria for physical modeling of such flows are not determinative. It was found out that turbulent circular-longitudinal flow with counter-rotating coaxial layers are not modeled using Karman criterion. In this connection, there is a need to conduct experimental methodological research of turbulent flows with counter-rotating coaxial layers on stands equipped means of three-dimensional laser Doppler anemometry. Integral criteria of dynamic similarity of circular-longitudinal flows was considered - Heeger-Baer number (swirl number and Abramovich number, characterizing the ratio of the angular momentum and momentum of such flows. In comparison with the swirl number, Heeger-Baer number is more preferable. Abramovich number is equal to the geometric characteristics of the local swirler as similarity criterion of circular

  13. Do axes of rotation change during fast and slow motions of the dominant and non-dominate arms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagano Christopher

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The velocity-dependent change in rotational axes observed in the control of unconstrained 3D arm rotations for the dominant limb seems to conform to a minimum inertia resistance (MIR principle [4]. This is an efficient biomechanical solution that allows for the reduction of torques. We tested whether the MIR principle governs rotating movement when subjects were instructed to maintain the shoulder-elbow joint axis close to horizontal for both dominant and non dominant limbs. Subjects (n=12 performed externalinternal rotations of their arms in two angular positions (90° versus 150°, two angular velocities (slow (S versus fast (F, and in two sensory conditions (kinaesthetic (K versus visuo- kinaesthetic (VK. We expected more scattered displacements of the rotation axis employed for rotating the non dominant limb compared to the dominant limb. The results showed that the rotational axis of a multiarticulated limb coincided with SH-EL at S & F velocity for both arms.

  14. The effect of directional inertias added to pelvis and ankle on gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Gait training robots should display a minimum added inertia in order to allow normal walking. The effect of inertias in specific directions is yet unknown. We set up two experiments to assess the effect of inertia in anteroposterior (AP) direction to the ankle and AP and mediolateral (ML) direction to the pelvis. Methods We developed an experimental setup to apply inertia in forward backward and or sideways directions. In two experiments nine healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.5 km/h and 4.5 km/h with no load and with AP loads of 0.3, 1.55 and 3.5 kg to the left ankle in the first experiment and combinations of AP and ML loads on the pelvis (AP loads 0.7, 4.3 and 10.2 kg; ML loads 0.6, 2.3 and 5.3 kg). We recorded metabolic rate, EMG of major leg muscles, gait parameters and kinematics. Results & discussion Adding 1.55 kg or more inertia to the ankle in AP direction increases the pelvis acceleration and decreases the foot acceleration in AP direction both at speeds of 4.5 km/h. Adding 3.5 kg of inertia to the ankle also increases the swing time as well as AP motions of the pelvis and head-arms-trunk (HAT) segment. Muscle activity remains largely unchanged. Adding 10.2 kg of inertia to the pelvis in AP direction causes a significant decrease of the pelvis and HAT segment motions, particularly at high speeds. Also the sagittal back flexion increases. Lower values of AP inertia and ML inertias up to 5.3 kg had negligible effect. In general the found effects are larger at high speeds. Conclusions We found that inertia up to 2 kg at the ankle or 6 kg added to the pelvis induced significant changes, but since these changes were all within the normal inter subject variability we considered these changes as negligible for application as rehabilitation robotics and assistive devices. PMID:23597391

  15. Thermodynamic stability of asymptotically anti-de Sitter rotating black holes in higher dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, Brian P

    2014-01-01

    Conditions for thermodynamic stability of asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS) rotating black holes in D-dimensions are determined. Local thermodynamic stability requires not only positivity conditions on the specific heat and the moment of inertia tensor but it is also necessary that the adiabatic compressibility be positive. It is shown that, in the absence of a cosmological constant, neither rotation nor charge is sufficient to ensure full local thermodynamic stability of a black hole. Thermodynamic stability properties of AdS Myers–Perry black holes are investigated for both singly spinning and multi-spinning black holes. Simple expressions are obtained for the specific heat and moment of inertia tensor in any dimension. An analytic expression is obtained for the boundary of the region of parameter space in which such space-times are thermodynamically stable. (paper)

  16. Velocity-dependent changes of rotational axes during the control of unconstrained 3D arm motions depend on initial instruction on limb position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isableu, Brice; Hansen, Clint; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe; Pagano, Christopher C

    2013-04-01

    The velocity-dependent change in rotational axes observed during the control of unconstrained 3D arm rotations may obey the principle of minimum inertia resistance (MIR). Rotating the arm around the minimum inertia tensor axis (e3) reduces the contribution of muscle torque to net torque by employing interaction torque. The present experiment tested whether the MIR principle still governs rotational movements when subjects were instructed to maintain the humeral long axis (SH-EL) as closely as possible to horizontal. With this view, the variability of 3D trajectories of the minimum inertia axis (e3), shoulder-center of mass axis (SH-CM) and shoulder-elbow axis (SH-EL) was quantified using a VICON V8i motion capture system. The axis for which the 3D variability displacement is minimal is considered as the one constraining the control of arm rotation. Subjects (n=15) rotated their arm in two elbow angular configurations (Elb90° vs. Elb140°), two angular velocity conditions (slow S vs. fast F), and two sensory conditions (kinaesthetic K vs. visuo-kinaesthetic VK). The minimum inertia axis e3 is angled 5.4° away from SH-CM axis, and varied from 27° to 15° away from de SH-EL axis, for Elb90° and Elb140°, respectively. We tested whether the participants would be able to maintain the instructed SH-EL rotation axis or if increasing the frequency of the arm rotations would override the initial rotation instructions and cause the limb to rotate around an axis closely aligned with e3. We expected that VK inputs would minimize the variability of the SH-EL axis and that K should facilitate the detection and rotation around e3 at the faster velocity. Taken together the results showed that the initial instruction, favoring rotation around the SH-EL axis, prevented the velocity-dependent change towards the minimum inertia (e3) and/or the mass axis (SH-CM), i.e., use of the MIR principle. However, the variability of the SH-EL axis was significantly increased in the F

  17. On the macroscopic modeling of dilute emulsions under flow in the presence of particle inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwasame, Paul M.; Wagner, Norman J.; Beris, Antony N.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, Mwasame et al. ["On the macroscopic modeling of dilute emulsions under flow," J. Fluid Mech. 831, 433 (2017)] developed a macroscopic model for the dynamics and rheology of a dilute emulsion with droplet morphology in the limit of negligible particle inertia using the bracket formulation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics of Beris and Edwards [Thermodynamics of Flowing Systems: With Internal Microstructure (Oxford University Press on Demand, 1994)]. Here, we improve upon that work to also account for particle inertia effects. This advance is facilitated by using the bracket formalism in its inertial form that allows for the natural incorporation of particle inertia effects into macroscopic level constitutive equations, while preserving consistency to the previous inertialess approximation in the limit of zero inertia. The parameters in the resultant Particle Inertia Thermodynamically Consistent Ellipsoidal Emulsion (PITCEE) model are selected by utilizing literature-available mesoscopic theory for the rheology at small capillary and particle Reynolds numbers. At steady state, the lowest level particle inertia effects can be described by including an additional non-affine inertial term into the evolution equation for the conformation tensor, thereby generalizing the Gordon-Schowalter time derivative. This additional term couples the conformation and vorticity tensors and is a function of the Ohnesorge number. The rheological and microstructural predictions arising from the PITCEE model are compared against steady-shear simulation results from the literature. They show a change in the signs of the normal stress differences that is accompanied by a change in the orientation of the major axis of the emulsion droplet toward the velocity gradient direction with increasing Reynolds number, capturing the two main signatures of particle inertia reported in simulations.

  18. The concept and definition of therapeutic inertia in hypertension in primary care: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeau, Jean-Pierre; Cadwallader, Jean-Sébastien; Aubin-Auger, Isabelle; Mercier, Alain; Pasquet, Thomas; Rusch, Emmanuel; Hendrickx, Kristin; Vermeire, Etienne

    2014-07-02

    Therapeutic inertia has been defined as the failure of health-care provider to initiate or intensify therapy when therapeutic goals are not reached. It is regarded as a major cause of uncontrolled hypertension. The exploration of its causes and the interventions to reduce it are plagued by unclear conceptualizations and hypothesized mechanisms. We therefore systematically searched the literature for definitions and discussions on the concept of therapeutic inertia in hypertension in primary care, to try and form an operational definition. A systematic review of all types of publications related to clinical inertia in hypertension was performed. Medline, EMbase, PsycInfo, the Cochrane library and databases, BDSP, CRD and NGC were searched from the start of their databases to June 2013. Articles were selected independently by two authors on the basis of their conceptual content, without other eligibility criteria or formal quality appraisal. Qualitative data were extracted independently by two teams of authors. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative qualitative method. The final selection included 89 articles. 112 codes were grouped in 4 categories: terms and definitions (semantics), "who" (physician, patient or system), "how and why" (mechanisms and reasons), and "appropriateness". Regarding each of these categories, a number of contradictory assertions were found, most of them relying on little or no empirical data. Overall, the limits of what should be considered as inertia were not clear. A number of authors insisted that what was considered deleterious inertia might in fact be appropriate care, depending on the situation. Our data analysis revealed a major lack of conceptualization of therapeutic inertia in hypertension and important discrepancies regarding its possible causes, mechanisms and outcomes. The concept should be split in two parts: appropriate inaction and inappropriate inertia. The development of consensual and operational definitions

  19. Sleep inertia during a simulated 6-h on/6-h off fixed split duty schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilditch, Cassie J; Short, Michelle; Van Dongen, Hans P A; Centofanti, Stephanie A; Dorrian, Jillian; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    Sleep inertia is a safety concern for shift workers returning to work soon after waking up. Split duty schedules offer an alternative to longer shift periods, but introduce additional wake-ups and may therefore increase risk of sleep inertia. This study investigated sleep inertia across a split duty schedule. Sixteen participants (age range 21-36 years; 10 females) participated in a 9-day laboratory study with two baseline nights (10 h time in bed, [TIB]), four 24-h periods of a 6-h on/6-h off split duty schedule (5-h TIB in off period; 10-h TIB per 24 h) and two recovery nights. Two complementary rosters were evaluated, with the timing of sleep and wake alternating between the two rosters (2 am/2 pm wake-up roster versus 8 am/8 pm wake-up roster). At 2, 17, 32 and 47 min after scheduled awakening, participants completed an 8-min inertia test bout, which included a 3-min psychomotor vigilance test (PVT-B), a 3-min Digit-Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and the Samn-Perelli Fatigue Scale (SP-Fatigue). Further testing occurred every 2 h during scheduled wakefulness. Performance was consistently degraded and subjective sleepiness/fatigue was consistently increased during the inertia testing period as compared to other testing times. Morning wake-ups (2 am and 8 am) were associated with higher levels of sleep inertia than later wake-ups (2 pm and 8 pm). These results suggest that split duty workers should recognise the potential for sleep inertia after waking, especially during the morning hours.

  20. Impact of sleep inertia on visual selective attention for rare targets and the influence of chronotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Hannah K; Burke, Tina M; Dear, Tristan B; Mchill, Andrew W; Axelsson, John; Wright, Kenneth P

    2017-10-01

    Sleep inertia is affected by circadian phase, with worse performance upon awakening from sleep during the biological night than biological day. Visual search/selective visual attention performance is known to be sensitive to sleep inertia and circadian phase. Individual differences exist in the circadian timing of habitual wake time, which may contribute to individual differences in sleep inertia. Because later chronotypes awaken at an earlier circadian phase, we hypothesized that later chronotypes would have worse visual search performance during sleep inertia than earlier chronotypes if awakened at habitual wake time. We analysed performance from 18 healthy participants [five females (22.1 ± 3.7 years; mean ± SD)] at ~1, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 60 min following electroencephalogram-verified awakening from an 8 h in-laboratory sleep opportunity. Cognitive throughput and reaction times of correct responses were impaired by sleep inertia and took ~10-30 min to improve after awakening. Regardless whether chronotype was defined by dim light melatonin onset or mid-sleep clock hour on free days, derived from the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire, the duration of sleep inertia for cognitive throughput and reaction times was longer for later chronotypes (n = 7) compared with earlier chronotypes (n = 7). Specifically, performance for earlier chronotypes showed significant improvement within ~10-20 min after awakening, whereas performance for later chronotypes took ~30 min or longer to show significant improvement (P sleep, and are consistent with circadian theory suggesting that sleep inertia contributes to longer-lasting impairments in morning performance in later chronotypes. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  1. Characteristics of steady vibration in a rotating hub-beam system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Caishan; Ma, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A rotating beam features a puzzling character in which its frequencies and modal shapes may vary with the hub's inertia and its rotating speed. To highlight the essential nature behind the vibration phenomena, we analyze the steady vibration of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam with a quasi-steady-state stretch. Newton's law is used to derive the equations governing the beam's elastic motion and the hub's rotation. A combination of these equations results in a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) that fully reflects the mutual interaction between the two kinds of motion. Via the Fourier series expansion within a finite interval of time, we reduce the PDE into an infinite system of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) in spatial domain. We further nondimensionalize the ODE and discretize it via a difference method. The frequencies and modal shapes of a general rotating beam are then determined numerically. For a low-speed beam where the ignorance of geometric stiffening is feasible, the beam's vibration characteristics are solved analytically. We validate our numerical method and the analytical solutions by comparing with either the past experiments or the past numerical findings reported in existing literature. Finally, systematic simulations are performed to demonstrate how the beam's eigenfrequencies vary with the hub's inertia and rotating speed.

  2. ORF73 LANA homologs of RRV and MneRV2 contain an extended RGG/RG-rich nuclear and nucleolar localization signal that interacts directly with importin β1 for non-classical nuclear import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kellie; Cherezova, Lidia; DeMaster, Laura K; Rose, Timothy M

    2017-11-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigens (LANA) of KSHV and macaque RFHVMn, members of the RV1 rhadinovirus lineage, are closely related with conservation of complex nuclear localization signals (NLS) containing bipartite KR-rich motifs and RG-rich domains, which interact distinctly with importins α and ß1 for nuclear import via classical and non-classical pathways, respectively. RV1 LANAs are expressed in the nucleus of latently-infected cells where they inhibit replication and establish a dominant RV1 latency. Here we show that LANA homologs of macaque RRV and MneRV2 from the more distantly-related RV2 lineage, lack the KR-rich NLS, and instead have a large RG-rich NLS with multiple RG dipeptides and a conserved RGG motif. The RG-NLS interacts uniquely with importin β1, which mediates nuclear import and accumulation of RV2 LANA in the nucleolus. The alternative nuclear import and localization of RV2 LANA homologs may contribute to the dominant RV2 lytic replication phenotype. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Subtle Changes in Peptide Conformation Profoundly Affect Recognition of the Non-Classical MHC Class I Molecule HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoare, Hilary L; Sullivan, Lucy C; Clements, Craig S; Ely, Lauren K; Beddoe, Travis; Henderson, Kate N; Lin, Jie; Reid, Hugh H; Brooks, Andrew G; Rossjohn, Jamie [Monash; (Melbourne)

    2008-03-31

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule that binds peptides derived from the leader sequences of other HLA class I molecules. Natural killer cell recognition of these HLA-E molecules, via the CD94-NKG2 natural killer family, represents a central innate mechanism for monitoring major histocompatibility complex expression levels within a cell. The leader sequence-derived peptides bound to HLA-E exhibit very limited polymorphism, yet subtle differences affect the recognition of HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 receptors. To better understand the basis for this peptide-specific recognition, we determined the structure of HLA-E in complex with two leader peptides, namely, HLA-Cw*07 (VMAPRALLL), which is poorly recognised by CD94-NKG2 receptors, and HLA-G*01 (VMAPRTLFL), a high-affinity ligand of CD94-NKG2 receptors. A comparison of these structures, both of which were determined to 2.5-Å resolution, revealed that allotypic variations in the bound leader sequences do not result in conformational changes in the HLA-E heavy chain, although subtle changes in the conformation of the peptide within the binding groove of HLA-E were evident. Accordingly, our data indicate that the CD94-NKG2 receptors interact with HLA-E in a manner that maximises the ability of the receptors to discriminate between subtle changes in both the sequence and conformation of peptides bound to HLA-E.

  4. The thermal inertia of Mars from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Mellon, Michael T.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Christensen, Philip R.; Varnes, E. Stacy; Lee, Steven W.

    2000-01-01

    We have used Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer thermal emission measurements to derive the thermal inertia of the Martian surface at the ∼100-km spatial scale. We have validated the use of nighttime-only measurements to derive thermal inertia as well as the use of a single wavelength band versus bolometric thermal emission measurements. We have also reanalyzed the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data set in a similar manner in order to allow a direct comparison between the two. Within the uncertainties of the fit of the data to the model, and the uncertainties inherent in the model, the thermal inertia has not changed substantially in the 21 years between the Viking and the MGS measurements. Although some differences are seen, they are most likely due to changes in albedo during the intervening years or to residual effects of airborne dust that are not fully accounted for in the thermal models. The thermal inertia values that we derive, between about 24 and 800 J m-2 s-1/2 K-1, are thought to better represent the actual thermal inertia of the Martian surface than previous estimates.

  5. Morning sleep inertia in alertness and performance: effect of cognitive domain and white light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, Nayantara; Groeger, John A; Archer, Simon N; Gimenez, Marina; Schlangen, Luc J M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia. The extent to which its severity varies with task and cognitive processes remains unclear. We examined sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), n-back and add tasks, respectively. The tasks were administered 2 hours before bedtime and at regular intervals for four hours, starting immediately after awakening in the morning, in eleven participants, in a four-way cross-over laboratory design. We also investigated whether exposure to Blue-Enhanced or Bright Blue-Enhanced white light would reduce sleep inertia. Alertness and all cognitive processes were impaired immediately upon awakening (psleep inertia varies with cognitive domain and that it's spectral/intensity response to light is different from that of sleepiness. That is, just increasing blue-wavelength in light may not be sufficient to reduce sleep inertia. These findings have implications for critical professions like medicine, law-enforcement etc., in which, personnel routinely wake up from night-time sleep to respond to emergency situations.

  6. Waking up is the hardest thing I do all day: Sleep inertia and sleep drunkenness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotti, Lynn M

    2017-10-01

    The transition from sleep to wake is marked by sleep inertia, a distinct state that is measurably different from wakefulness and manifests as performance impairments and sleepiness. Although the precise substrate of sleep inertia is unknown, electroencephalographic, evoked potential, and neuroimaging studies suggest the persistence of some features of sleep beyond the point of awakening. Forced desynchrony studies have demonstrated that sleep inertia impacts cognition differently than do homeostatic and circadian drives and that sleep inertia is most intense during awakenings from the biological night. Recovery sleep after sleep deprivation also amplifies sleep inertia, although the effects of deep sleep vary based on task and timing. In patients with hypersomnolence disorders, especially but not exclusively idiopathic hypersomnia, a more pronounced period of confusion and sleepiness upon awakening, known as "sleep drunkenness", is common and problematic. Optimal treatment of sleep drunkenness is unknown, although several medications have been used with benefit in small case series. Difficulty with awakening is also commonly endorsed by individuals with mood disorders, disproportionately to the general population. This may represent an important treatment target, but evidence-based treatment guidance is not yet available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sleep inertia varies with circadian phase and sleep stage in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Edward J; Duffy, Jeanne F

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of our analysis was to determine if older adults show sleep inertia effects on performance at scheduled wake time, and whether these effects depend on circadian phase or sleep stage at awakening. Using the Digit Symbol Substitution Test, effects of sleep inertia on performance were assessed over the first 30 min after wake time on baseline days and when sleep was scheduled at different circadian phases. Mixed model analyses revealed that performance improved as time awake increased; that beginning levels of performance were poorest when wake time was scheduled to occur during the biological night; and that effects of sleep inertia on performance during the biological night were greater when awaking from non-REM (NREM) sleep than from REM sleep. Based on our current understanding of sleep inertia effects in young subjects, and previous reports that older subjects awaken at an earlier circadian phase and are more likely to have their final awakening from NREM sleep than younger adults, our findings suggest older adults may be more vulnerable to sleep inertia effects than young adults.

  8. Rigid Body Inertia Estimation Using Extended Kalman and Savitzky-Golay Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inertia properties of rigid body such as ground, aerial, and space vehicles may be changed by several occasions, and this variation of the properties influences the control accuracy of the rigid body. For this reason, accurate inertia properties need to be obtained for precise control. An estimation process is required for both noisy gyro measurements and the time derivative of the gyro measurements. In this paper, an estimation method is proposed for having reliable estimates of inertia properties. First, the Euler equations of motion are reformulated to obtain a regressor matrix. Next, the extended Kalman filter is adopted to reduce the noise effects in gyro angular velocity measurements. Last, the inertia properties are estimated using linear least squares. To achieve reliable and accurate angular accelerations, a Savitzky-Golay filter based on an even number sampled data is utilized. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm for the case of a space vehicle. The numerical simulation results show that the proposed algorithm provides accurate inertia property estimates in the presence of noisy measurements.

  9. Role of electron-inertia-linked current source terms in the physics of cylindrically symmetric imploding snowplow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auluck, S.K.H.

    2002-01-01

    Snowplow shocks are supersonic flows in plasmas driven by a magnetic piston, in which the material impacted by the piston 'sticks' to it, resulting in accretion of the plasma near the piston. The density front and the magnetic piston move together as a single structure. A typical example of a snowplow shock is the plasma focus sheath. When normally neglected electron-inertia (EI) terms in the fluid model of the plasma are taken into account, a time scale ω p -1 and a space scale cω p -1 are introduced which are negligible in the bulk of the plasma but are non-negligible in a transition region between the no-plasma region and the dense plasma. As a result 'no-plasma' initial conditions are not valid for the fluid equations obtained by neglecting EI. A resonant coupling between two electron plasma modes via the Hall term is shown to result in spontaneous generation of axial magnetic field and rotation even in the presence of perfect azimuthal symmetry in the low density precursor plasma formed before the ideal plasma phase. Related physics issues such as spontaneous symmetry breaking mechanism are discussed

  10. Study on Inertia as a Gravity Induced Property of Mass, in an Infinite Hubble Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen van Engelshoven

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass is experienced to have two intrinsic properties: inertia (resistance to acceleration and gravity (attraction to other masses. In this paper we evaluate the gravitational effect of all masses of the universe on an accelerated mass, starting from linearized general relativity. The gravitational interaction of all masses in a finite static universe model is shown to create a finite resistance to acceleration, which is inertia. Then, we propose a generalization of the linearized theory and evaluate the Hubble expanding universe. It is shown that the gravitational impact of an infinite expanding universe creates finite inertia, according to . The Friedmann critical mass density is found to be valid. The Mach principle is made explicit. The value and sign of the gravitational constant G are found to be of no consequence on an astronomical scale.

  11. Atmospheric effects on the remote determination of thermal inertia on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the IR brightness temperature at the Martian surface at many different times of day are presently compared with temperatures predicted by thermal models which allow sunlight to reach the surface unattenuated, in order to determine the thermal inertia of the uppermost 1-10 cm of the Martian surface. The consequences of the assumptions made are assessed in view of results from a different thermal model which invokes radiation-transfer through a dusty CO2 atmosphere, as well as sensible heat-exchange with the surface. Smaller thermal inertias imply smaller particle sizes; the results obtained suggest that low thermal-inertia regions consist of 5-micron, rather than 50-micron, particle sizes.

  12. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations and Implications for Landing Hazards on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks represent an obvious potential hazard to a landing spacecraft. They also represent an impediment to rover travel and objects of prime scientific interest. Although Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images are of high enough resolution to distinguish the largest rocks (an extremely small population several meters diameter or larger), traditionally the abundance and distribution of rocks on Mars have been inferred from thermal inertia and radar measurements, our meager ground truth sampling of landing sites, and terrestrial rock populations. In this abstract, we explore the effective thermal inertia of rocks and rock populations, interpret the results in terms of abundances and populations of potentially hazardous rocks, and conclude with interpretations of rock hazards on the Martian surface and in extremely high thermal inertia areas.

  13. Inertia Effects in the Flow of a Herschel-Bulkley ERF between Fixed Surfaces of Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Walicka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many electrorheological fluids (ERFs as fluids with microstructure demonstrate viscoplastic behaviours. Rheometric measurements indicate that some flows of these fluids may be modelled as the flows of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid. In this paper, the flow of a Herschel-Bulkley ER fluid—with a fractional power-law exponent—in a narrow clearance between two fixed surfaces of revolution with common axis of symmetry is considered. The flow is externally pressurized, and it is considered with inertia effect. In order to solve this problem, the boundary layer equations are used. The influence of inertia forces on the pressure distribution is examined by using the method of averaged inertia terms of the momentum equation. Numerical examples of externally pressurized ERFs flows in the clearance between parallel disks and concentric spherical surfaces are presented.

  14. Piezoelectric Inertia Motors—A Critical Review of History, Concepts, Design, Applications, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hunstig

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric inertia motors—also known as stick-slip motors or (smooth impact drives—use the inertia of a body to drive it in small steps by means of an uninterrupted friction contact. In addition to the typical advantages of piezoelectric motors, they are especially suited for miniaturisation due to their simple structure and inherent fine-positioning capability. Originally developed for positioning in microscopy in the 1980s, they have nowadays also found application in mass-produced consumer goods. Recent research results are likely to enable more applications of piezoelectric inertia motors in the future. This contribution gives a critical overview of their historical development, functional principles, and related terminology. The most relevant aspects regarding their design—i.e., friction contact, solid state actuator, and electrical excitation—are discussed, including aspects of control and simulation. The article closes with an outlook on possible future developments and research perspectives.

  15. A hybrid mode choice model to account for the dynamic effect of inertia over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchi, Elisabetta; Börjesson, Maria; Bierlaire, Michel

    The influence of habits, giving rise to inertia effect, in the choice process has been intensely debated in the literature. Typically inertia is accounted for by letting the indirect utility functions of the alternatives of the choice situation at time t depend on the outcome of the choice made...... gathered over a continuous period of time, six weeks, to study both inertia and the influence of habits. Tendency to stick with the same alternative is measured through lagged variables that link the current choice with the previous trip made with the same purpose, mode and time of day. However, the lagged...... effect of the previous trips is not constant but it depends on the individual propensity to undertake habitual trips which is captured by the individual specific latent variable. And the frequency of the trips in the previous week is used as an indicator of the habitual behavior. The model estimation...

  16. Optimum Design of 3-3 Stewart Platform Considering Inertia Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Feng Shao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum design is a pivotal approach to fulfill the potential advantages of the parallel manipulator in practical applications. This paper concerns the optimum design issue of the 3-3 Stewart platform considering the inertia property, in addition to the kinematic performance. On the basis of spherical usable workspace, global conditioning index (GCI is analyzed. Atlases of the workspace and GCI are deduced with the established nondimensional design space. Further, after dynamic modeling, the global inertia index (GII is deduced from the joint-space inertia matrix, and corresponding GII atlases are drawn. In particular, an example is presented to illustrate the process of obtaining the practical optimum results based on these non-dimensional atlases. Since both kinematic and dynamic properties are considered, the optimum result will possess comprehensive performance improvements.

  17. Changing Provider Behavior in the Context of Chronic Disease Management: Focus on Clinical Inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Kim L; Rash, Joshua A; Campbell, Tavis S

    2017-01-06

    Widespread acceptance of evidence-based medicine has led to the proliferation of clinical practice guidelines as the primary mode of communicating current best practices across a range of chronic diseases. Despite overwhelming evidence supporting the benefits of their use, there is a long history of poor uptake by providers. Nonadherence to clinical practice guidelines is referred to as clinical inertia and represents provider failure to initiate or intensify treatment despite a clear indication to do so. Here we review evidence for the ubiquity of clinical inertia across a variety of chronic health conditions, as well as the organizational and system, patient, and provider factors that serve to maintain it. Limitations are highlighted in the emerging literature examining interventions to reduce clinical inertia. An evidence-based framework to address these limitations is proposed that uses behavior change theory and advocates for shared decision making and enhanced guideline development and dissemination.

  18. Nonlinear Inertia Weighted Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization for Solving Global Optimization Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zong-Sheng; Fu, Wei-Ping; Xue, Ru

    2015-01-01

    Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) algorithm is proposed in recent years that simulates the teaching-learning phenomenon of a classroom to effectively solve global optimization of multidimensional, linear, and nonlinear problems over continuous spaces. In this paper, an improved teaching-learning-based optimization algorithm is presented, which is called nonlinear inertia weighted teaching-learning-based optimization (NIWTLBO) algorithm. This algorithm introduces a nonlinear inertia weighted factor into the basic TLBO to control the memory rate of learners and uses a dynamic inertia weighted factor to replace the original random number in teacher phase and learner phase. The proposed algorithm is tested on a number of benchmark functions, and its performance comparisons are provided against the basic TLBO and some other well-known optimization algorithms. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm has a faster convergence rate and better performance than the basic TLBO and some other algorithms as well.

  19. THERMAL-INERTIA MAPPING IN VEGETATED TERRAIN FROM HEAT CAPACITY MAPPING MISSION SATELLITE DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ken; Hummer-Miller, Susanne

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-inertia data, derived from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite, were analyzed in areas of varying amounts of vegetation cover. Thermal differences which appear to correlate with lithologic differences have been observed previously in areas of substantial vegetation cover. However, the energy exchange occurring within the canopy is much more complex than that used to develop the methods employed to produce thermal-inertia images. Because adequate models are lacking at present, the interpretation is largely dependent on comparison, correlation, and inference. Two study areas were selected in the western United States: the Richfield, Utah and the Silver City, Arizona-New Mexico, 1 degree multiplied by 2 degree quadrangles. Many thermal-inertia highs were found to be associated with geologic-unit boundaries, faults, and ridges. Lows occur in valleys with residual soil cover.

  20. Neutron-proton isovector pairing effect on the nuclear moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, D.; Ami, I.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    The neutron-proton (n-p) isovector pairing effect on the nuclear moment of inertia has been studied within the framework of the BCS approximation. An analytical expression of the moment of inertia, that explicitly depends upon the n-p pairing, has been established using the Inglis cranking model. The model was first tested numerically for nuclei such as N = Z and whose experimental values of the moment of inertia are known (i.e. such as 16 ≤ Z ≤ 40). It has been shown that the n-p pairing effect is non-negligible and clearly improves the theoretical predictions when compared to those of the pairing between like particles. Secondly, predictions have been established for even-even proton-rich rare-earth nuclei. It has been shown that the n-p pairing effect is non-negligible when N = Z and rapidly decreases with increasing values of (N-Z). (author)

  1. Newton's second law versus modified-inertia MOND: A test using the high-latitude effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, A. Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The modified-inertia MOND is an approach that proposes a change in Newton's second law at small accelerations as an alternative to dark matter. Recently it was suggested that this approach can be tested in terrestrial laboratory experiments. One way of doing the test is based on the static high-latitude equinox modified-inertia effect: around each equinox date, 2 spots emerge on the Earth where static bodies experience spontaneous displacement due to the violation of Newton's second law required by the modified-inertia MOND. Here, a detailed theory of this effect is developed and estimates of the magnitude of the signal due to the effect are obtained. The expected displacement of a mirror in a gravitational-wave interferometer is found to be about 10 -14 m. Some experimental aspects of the proposal are discussed

  2. Vibration and Dynamic Response Control of Nonuniform Composite Rotating Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the free vibration, dynamic response, and the active control of composite rotating pretwisted blades modeled as nonuniform thin-walled beams, fixed at the hub at a setting angle, and incorporating piezoelectrically induced damping capabilities. In this sense, a distributed piezoelectric actuator system activated through the application of an out-of-phase electrical current is used to suppress the dynamic response of the rotating beam subjected to a Heaviside pulse. The blade model incorporates nonclassical effects such as transverse shear, secondary warping, and rotary inertias, and includes the centrifugal and Coriolis force fields. A velocity feedback control law relating the piezoelectrically induced bending moment at the beam tip with appropriately selected kinematical response quantities is used, and the beneficial effects of its implementation upon the closed loop eigenvibration and dynamic characteristics of the blade are highlighted.

  3. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion...

  4. On the relationship between molecular spectroscopy and statistical mechanics: calculation of vibrational–rotational energy levels and partition functions in the ground electronic state of BC2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STANKA JEROSIMIĆ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of extensive ab initio calculations of the vibrational–rotational energy spectrum in the ground electronic state of the BC2 molecule are presented. These data were employed to discuss the evaluation of the corresponding partition functions. Special attention was paid to the problems connected with the calculation of the partition functions for the bending vibrations and rotations about the axis corresponding to the smallest moment of inertia.

  5. Parameterization of rotational spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunmei; Liu Tong

    1992-01-01

    The rotational spectra of the strongly deformed nuclei with low rotational frequencies and weak band mixture are analyzed. The strongly deformed nuclei are commonly encountered in the rare-earth region (e. g., 150 220). A lot of rotational band knowledge are presented

  6. Impact of Thermal Inertia on Urban Climatology: A Case Study of Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwal, S.; Kumar, D.; Singh, V. P.; Pandey, A. K.; Kumar, K.

    2016-12-01

    The ability with which a material can absorb, restore the heat and release it later during the nighttime is known as thermal inertia. In the context to urban areas, it measures the sub-surface's ability to store heat during the day and release it during the night. It prevents the overheating in summer and maintains heat during the winter thereby safeguarding the building comfort level. Due to huge population and urban sprawl this study can be very useful for Delhi and cities like it. The climatic modification in the context of urban areas due to human activities in relation to rural areas is termed as the urban heat island effect (UHI). The modelling for formation of urban UHI has been done using the geospatial technique. Apart from temperature, the amount of dust in the atmosphere is also a significant contributor in modifying the UHI formation. It is also an attempt to establish the role of land use and land cover patterns and respective thermal inertia affecting this phenomenon. The thermal inertia over Delhi-NCR was estimated using surface albedo and daytime-nighttime temperature differences from MODIS datasets. Higher thermal inertia were observed in urban areas than that of rural areas during the analysis of the thermal inertia maps. Furthermore, the study also reveals that the urban heat island intensity (UHI) and the thermal inertia has a relationship of strong inverse correlation. The results of this study will provide useful insights for urban planners and the local governments to devise appropriate strategies for making the urban climate favourable for the city residents.

  7. A Review on Inertia and Linear Friction Welding of Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanfar, Ahmad; Jahazi, Mohammad; Cormier, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Inertia and linear friction welding are being increasingly used for near-net-shape manufacturing of high-value materials in aerospace and power generation gas turbines because of providing a better quality joint and offering many advantages over conventional fusion welding and mechanical joining techniques. In this paper, the published works up-to-date on inertia and linear friction welding of Ni-based superalloys are reviewed with the objective to make clarifications on discrepancies and uncertainties reported in literature regarding issues related to these two friction welding processes as well as microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of the Ni-based superalloy weldments. Initially, the chemical composition and microstructure of Ni-based superalloys that contribute to the quality of the joint are reviewed briefly. Then, problems related to fusion welding of these alloys are addressed with due consideration of inertia and linear friction welding as alternative techniques. The fundamentals of inertia and linear friction welding processes are analyzed next with emphasis on the bonding mechanisms and evolution of temperature and strain rate across the weld interface. Microstructural features, texture development, residual stresses, and mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar polycrystalline and single crystal Ni-based superalloy weldments are discussed next. Then, application of inertia and linear friction welding for joining Ni-based superalloys and related advantages over fusion welding, mechanical joining, and machining are explained briefly. Finally, present scientific and technological challenges facing inertia and linear friction welding of Ni-based superalloys including those related to modeling of these processes are addressed.

  8. Time course of sleep inertia dissipation in human performance and alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, M. E.; Wyatt, J. K.; Ritz-De Cecco, A.; Khalsa, S. B.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Alertness and performance on a wide variety of tasks are impaired immediately upon waking from sleep due to sleep inertia, which has been found to dissipate in an asymptotic manner following waketime. It has been suggested that behavioural or environmental factors, as well as sleep stage at awakening, may affect the severity of sleep inertia. In order to determine the time course of sleep inertia dissipation under normal entrained conditions, subjective alertness and cognitive throughput were measured during the first 4 h after habitual waketime from a full 8-h sleep episode on 3 consecutive days. We investigated whether this time course was affected by either sleep stage at awakening or behavioural/environmental factors. Sleep inertia dissipated in an asymptotic manner and took 2-4 h to near the asymptote. Saturating exponential functions fitted the sleep inertia data well, with time constants of 0.67 h for subjective alertness and 1.17 h for cognitive performance. Most awakenings occurred out of stage rapid eye movement (REM), 2 or 1 sleep, and no effect of sleep stage at awakening on either the severity of sleep inertia or the time course of its dissipation could be detected. Subjective alertness and cognitive throughput were significantly impaired upon awakening regardless of whether subjects got out of bed, ate breakfast, showered and were exposed to ordinary indoor room light (approximately 150 lux) or whether subjects participated in a constant routine (CR) protocol in which they remained in bed, ate small hourly snacks and were exposed to very dim light (10-15 lux). These findings allow for the refinement of models of alertness and performance, and have important implications for the scheduling of work immediately upon awakening in many occupational settings.

  9. Theory of superfluidity and drag force in the one-dimensional Bose gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherny, A.Y.; Caux, J.-S.; Brand, J.

    2012-01-01

    The one-dimensional Bose gas is an unusual superfluid. In contrast to higher spatial dimensions, the existence of non-classical rotational inertia is not directly linked to the dissipationless motion of infinitesimal impurities. Recently, experimental tests with ultracold atoms have begun and

  10. Neutron scattering study of the excitation spectrum of solid helium at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. There has been a resurgence of interest in the properties of solid helium due to the recent discovery of non-classical rotational inertia (NCRI) in solid 4He by Chan and coworkers below 200 mK which they have interpreted as a transition to a 'supersolid' phase. We have carried out a series of elastic and inelastic ...

  11. A review of short naps and sleep inertia: do naps of 30 min or less really avoid sleep inertia and slow-wave sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilditch, Cassie J; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2017-04-01

    Napping is a widely used countermeasure to sleepiness and impaired performance caused by sleep loss and circadian pressure. Sleep inertia, the period of grogginess and impaired performance experienced after waking, is a potential side effect of napping. Many industry publications recommend naps of 30 min or less to avoid this side effect. However, the evidence to support this advice is yet to be thoroughly reviewed. Electronic databases were searched, and defined criteria were applied to select articles for review. The review covers literature on naps of 30 min or less regarding (a) sleep inertia, (b) slow-wave sleep (SWS) and (c) the relationship between sleep inertia and SWS. The review found that although the literature on short afternoon naps is relatively comprehensive, there are very few studies on naps of 30 min or less at night. Studies have mixed results regarding the onset of SWS and the duration and severity of sleep inertia following short naps, making guidelines regarding their use unclear. The varying results are likely due to differing sleep/wake profiles before the nap of interest and the time of the day at waking. The review highlights the need to have more detailed guidelines about the implementation of short naps according to the time of the day and prior sleep/wake history. Without this context, such a recommendation is potentially misleading. Further research is required to better understand the interactions between these factors, especially at night, and to provide more specific recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Four-dimensional Hooke's law can encompass linear elasticity and inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoci, S.; Mihich, L.

    1999-01-01

    The question is examined whether the formally straightforward extension of Hooke's time-honoured stress-strain relation to the four dimensions of special and of general relativity can make physical sense. The four-dimensional Hooke law is found able to account for the inertia of matter; in the flat-space, slow-motion approximation the field equations for the displacement four-vector field ξ i can encompass both linear elasticity and inertia. In this limit one just recovers the equations of motion of the classical theory of elasticity

  13. The role of porosity in thermal inertia variations on basaltic lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal inertia, defined as the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat, has been noted to vary in inverse proportion to porosity in Hawaiian basalts. It is presently suggested that porosities of the order of more than 80 percent are required if the low thermal inertias observed in Martian shield volcanoes are the result of pristine lava flow surface properties. An aeolian origin is held to be most likely in view of thermal measurements on Mars; the volcanic surfaces in question are anticipated to have a short lifetime in their environment.

  14. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model associated with inertia and slip effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The inertia and slip effects have a significant impact on the coal seam gas extraction. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model is established in this study, which takes into account the influence of non-Darcy gas flow and Klinkenberg effect on the coal seam deformation and coalbed methane migration. The numerical result shows that the coalbed methane migration and transport evolution coal bed methane reservoir is not only dependent on the coal matrix deformation, gas pressure and gas adsorption, but also closely related to inertia effect and slip effect.

  15. Compensating for environmental variability in the thermal inertia approach to remote sensing of soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure is developed for removing data scatter in the thermal-inertia approach to remote sensing of soil moisture which arises from environmental variability in time and space. It entails the utilization of nearby National Weather Service air temperature measurements to normalize measured diurnal surface temperature variations to what they would have been for a day of standard diurnal air temperature variation, arbitrarily assigned to be 18 C. Tests of the procedure's basic premise on a bare loam soil and a crop of alfalfa indicate it to be conceptually sound. It is possible that the technique could also be useful in other thermal-inertia applications, such as lithographic mapping.

  16. THE EFFECT OF THE THERMAL INERTIA ON THE TEMPERATURE OF A HEATING SLAB.

    OpenAIRE

    D ABBAZ; A CHAKER

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of the thermal inertia on the temperature of a heated concrete slab. This is a solar sensor provides a solar heating system floor, which the energy input. The concept of thermal inertia is not easy to grasp. It is defined as the speed that helps a system ((building in our case) reacts to the change in operating conditions. The response of the building facing to the stresses is largely depending on the thermal properties of constituent materials. This featu...

  17. Ice Protection of Turbojet Engines by Inertia Separation of Water I : Alternate-duct System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Glahn, Uwe

    1948-01-01

    Aerodynamic and icing investigations of internal water-inertia separation inlets designed to prevent automatically entrance of large quantities of water into a turbojet engine in icing conditions was conducted on a one-half scale model. A simplified analytical approach to the design of internal water-inertia separation inlets is included. Results show that in order to be effective in preventing screen and guide-vane icing for an inlet of this type, a ram-pressure recovery of 75 percent was attained at design inlet-velocity ratio in an icing condition. For nonicing operation, ram-pressure recovery is comparable to direct-ram inlet.

  18. Time and space, weight and inertia a chronogeometrical introduction to Einstein's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fokker, Adriaan Daniel

    1965-01-01

    Time and Space Weight and Inertia covers the relationship between time, space weight, and inertia using the principles of theory of relativity and chronogeometry. This book is composed of 12 chapters, and begins with a brief overview of the fundamental aspects of space and time within events. The subsequent chapters deal with the chronogeometry of time and space, and the concept of the Lorentz transformations and pseudo-revolutions. These topics are followed by discussions on the dynamical relationships of metric and other tensors and a presentation of the equations of the theory of electrons

  19. Extended I-Love relations for slowly rotating neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon-Bischoff, Jérémie; Green, Stephen R.; Landry, Philippe; Ortiz, Néstor

    2018-03-01

    Observations of gravitational waves from inspiralling neutron star binaries—such as GW170817—can be used to constrain the nuclear equation of state by placing bounds on stellar tidal deformability. For slowly rotating neutron stars, the response to a weak quadrupolar tidal field is characterized by four internal-structure-dependent constants called "Love numbers." The tidal Love numbers k2el and k2mag measure the tides raised by the gravitoelectric and gravitomagnetic components of the applied field, and the rotational-tidal Love numbers fo and ko measure those raised by couplings between the applied field and the neutron star spin. In this work, we compute these four Love numbers for perfect fluid neutron stars with realistic equations of state. We discover (nearly) equation-of-state independent relations between the rotational-tidal Love numbers and the moment of inertia, thereby extending the scope of I-Love-Q universality. We find that similar relations hold among the tidal and rotational-tidal Love numbers. These relations extend the applications of I-Love universality in gravitational-wave astronomy. As our findings differ from those reported in the literature, we derive general formulas for the rotational-tidal Love numbers in post-Newtonian theory and confirm numerically that they agree with our general-relativistic computations in the weak-field limit.

  20. Human periodontal ligament stem cells suppress T-cell proliferation via down-regulation of non-classical major histocompatibility complex-like glycoprotein CD1b on dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, C; Kim, M; Han, J-A; Choi, B; Hwang, D; Do, Y; Yun, J-H

    2017-02-01

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) from the periodontal ligament tissue were recently identified as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The capabilities of PDLSCs in periodontal tissue or bone regeneration have been reported, but their immunomodulatory role in T-cell immune responses via dendritic cells (DCs), known as the most potent antigen-presenting cell, has not been studied. The aim of this study is to understand the immunological function of homogeneous human STRO-1 + CD146 + PDLSCs in DC-mediated T-cell immune responses to modulate the periodontal disease process. We utilized highly purified (> 95%) human STRO-1 + CD146 + PDLSCs and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Each stem cell was co-cultured with human monocyte-derived DCs in the presence of lipopolysaccharide isolated from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogenic bacterium responsible for periodontal disease, in vitro to examine the immunological effect of each stem cell on DCs and DC-mediated T-cell proliferation. We discovered that STRO-1 + CD146 + PDLSCs, as well as BMSCs, significantly decreased the level of non-classical major histocompatibility complex glycoprotein CD1b on DCs, resulting in defective T-cell proliferation, whereas most human leukocyte antigens and the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in/on DCs were not significantly affected by the presence of BMSCs or STRO-1 + CD146 + PDLSCs. This study unveiled an immunomodulatory role of STRO-1 + CD146 + PDLSCs in negatively regulating DC-mediated T-cell immune responses, demonstrating their potential to be utilized in promising new stem cell therapies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergioulas Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on the equilibrium properties and on the nonaxisymmetric instabilities in f-modes and r-modes have been updated and several new sections have been added on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity.

  2. Visualizing molecular unidirectional rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kang; Song, Qiying; Gong, Xiaochun; Ji, Qinying; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-07-01

    We directly visualize the spatiotemporal evolution of a unidirectional rotating molecular rotational wave packet. Excited by two time-delayed polarization-skewed ultrashort laser pulses, the cigar- or disk-shaped rotational wave packet is impulsively kicked to unidirectionally rotate as a quantum rotor which afterwards disperses and exhibits field-free revivals. The rich dynamics can be coherently controlled by varying the timing or polarization of the excitation laser pulses. The numerical simulations very well reproduce the experimental observations and intuitively revivify the thoroughgoing evolution of the molecular rotational wave packet of unidirectional spin.

  3. On the rotational equations of motion in rigid body dynamics when using Euler parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Karim; Nachbagauer, Karin; Steiner, Wolfgang

    Many models of three-dimensional rigid body dynamics employ Euler parameters as rotational coordinates. Since the four Euler parameters are not independent, one has to consider the quaternion constraint in the equations of motion. This is usually done by the Lagrange multiplier technique. In the present paper, various forms of the rotational equations of motion will be derived, and it will be shown that they can be transformed into each other. Special attention is hereby given to the value of the Lagrange multiplier and the complexity of terms representing the inertia forces. Particular attention is also paid to the rotational generalized external force vector, which is not unique when using Euler parameters as rotational coordinates.

  4. An Algorithm for Online Inertia Identification and Load Torque Observation via Adaptive Kalman Observer-Recursive Least Squares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an on-line parameter identification algorithm to iteratively compute the numerical values of inertia and load torque is proposed. Since inertia and load torque are strongly coupled variables due to the degenerate-rank problem, it is hard to estimate relatively accurate values for them in the cases such as when load torque variation presents or one cannot obtain a relatively accurate priori knowledge of inertia. This paper eliminates this problem and realizes ideal online inertia identification regardless of load condition and initial error. The algorithm in this paper integrates a full-order Kalman Observer and Recursive Least Squares, and introduces adaptive controllers to enhance the robustness. It has a better performance when iteratively computing load torque and moment of inertia. Theoretical sensitivity analysis of the proposed algorithm is conducted. Compared to traditional methods, the validity of the proposed algorithm is proved by simulation and experiment results.

  5. Effects of artificial dawn on sleep inertia, skin temperature, and the awakening cortisol response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Werken, M.; Gimenez, M.C.; de Vries, B.; Beersma, D.G.M.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Gordijn, M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of artificial dawn during the last 30 min of sleep on subsequent dissipation of sleep inertia was investigated, including possible involvement of cortisol and thermoregulatory processes. Sixteen healthy subjects who reported difficulty with waking up participated in random order in a

  6. Thermal inertia of near-Earth asteroids and implications for the magnitude of the Yarkovsky effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo', Marco; dell'Oro, Aldo; Harris, Alan W.; Mottola, Stefano; Mueller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Thermal inertia determines the temperature distribution over the surface of an asteroid and therefore governs the magnitude the Yarkovsky effect. The latter causes gradual drifting of the orbits of km-sized asteroids and plays an important role in the delivery of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) from the

  7. Thermal Inertia of near-Earth Asteroids and Strength of the Yarkovsky Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo, Marco; Dell'Oro, A.; Harris, A. W.; Mottola, S.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal inertia is the physical parameter that controls the temperature distribution over the surface of an asteroid. It affects the strength of the Yarkovsky effect, which causes orbital drift of km-sized asteroids and is invoked to explain the delivery of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) from the main

  8. Thermal inertia of near-Earth asteroids and magnitude of the Yarkovsky effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo, M.; Dell'Oro, A.; Harris, A. W.; Mottola, S.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal inertia of near-Earth asteroids and magnitude of the Yarkovsky effect M. Delbo* (1,2), A. Dell'Oro (2), A. W. Harris (3), S. Mottola (3), M. Mueller (3) (1) Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur B.P. 4229, 06034 Nice Cedex 4, France. (2) INAF-Osservatorio Astr. di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, 10025

  9. A Global Map of Thermal Inertia from Mars Global Surveyor Mapping-Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, M. T.; Kretke, K. A.; Smith, M. D.; Pelkey, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    TES (thermal emission spectrometry) has obtained high spatial resolution surface temperature observations from which thermal inertia has been derived. Seasonal coverage of these data now provides a nearly global view of Mars, including the polar regions, at high resolution. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. The neutron–proton pairing and the moments of inertia of the rare ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, the possible effect of the neutron–proton pairing interaction in the heavy nuclei has been investigated in the framework of the BCS model by making a simple approximation. This effect has been searched realistically by calculating the moments of inertia of deformed even–even nuclei. Calculations ...

  11. Constraints on the Moment of Inertia of a Proto Neutron Star from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    0} system. It is found that for a proto neu- tron star, the mass, the moment of inertia and their own maximum values as a function of radius R or M/R are all more sensitive to the hyperon coupling constants. For all the different hyperon coupling ...

  12. The neutron–proton pairing and the moments of inertia of the rare ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    inertia of rare earth nuclei changed dramatically and approached the experimental values. Keywords. Moments of ... proton (np) pairing interaction may be ignored in medium and heavy nuclei due to the energy differences ..... with the np-pairing to the experimental values vs. atomic mass number A, are seen. In figure 1, the ...

  13. A Virtual Inertia Control Strategy for DC Microgrids Analogized with Virtual Synchronous Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Wenhua; Chen, Yandong; Luo, An

    2017-01-01

    synchronous machine (VSM) is proposed to enhance the inertia of the DC-MG, and to restrain the dc bus voltage fluctuation. The small-signal model of the BGC system is established, and the small-signal transfer function between the dc bus voltage and the dc output current of the BGC is deduced. The dynamic...

  14. Moving the Weber fraction: the perceptual precision for moment of inertia increases with exploration force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debats, N.B.; Kingma, I.; Beek, P.J.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    How does the magnitude of the exploration force influence the precision of haptic perceptual estimates? To address this question, we examined the perceptual precision for moment of inertia (i.e., an object's "angular mass") under different force conditions, using the Weber fraction to quantify

  15. The neutron–proton pairing and the moments of inertia of the rare ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the possible effect of the neutron–proton pairing interaction in the heavy nuclei has been investigated in the framework of the BCS model by making a simple approximation. This effect has been searched realistically by calculating the moments of inertia of deformed even–even nuclei. Calculations show that the ...

  16. Combined influence of inertia, gravity, and surface tension on the linear stability of Newtonian fiber spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, M.; Scheid, B.

    2017-11-01

    The draw resonance effect appears in fiber spinning processes if the ratio of take-up to inlet velocity, the so-called draw ratio, exceeds a critical value and manifests itself in steady oscillations of flow velocity and fiber diameter. We study the effect of surface tension on the draw resonance behavior of Newtonian fiber spinning in the presence of inertia and gravity. Utilizing an alternative scaling makes it possible to visualize the results in stability maps of highly practical relevance. The interplay of the destabilizing effect of surface tension and the stabilizing effects of inertia and gravity lead to nonmonotonic stability behavior and local stability maxima with respect to the dimensionless fluidity and the dimensionless inlet velocity. A region of unconditional instability caused by the influence of surface tension is found in addition to the region of unconditional stability caused by inertia, which was described in previous works [M. Bechert, D. W. Schubert, and B. Scheid, Eur. J. Mech B 52, 68 (2015), 10.1016/j.euromechflu.2015.02.005; Phys. Fluids 28, 024109 (2016), 10.1063/1.4941762]. Due to its importance for a particular group of fiber spinning applications, a viscous-gravity-surface-tension regime, i.e., negligible effect of inertia, is analyzed separately. The mechanism underlying the destabilizing effect of surface tension is discussed and established stability criteria are tested for validity in the presence of surface tension.

  17. Parameter identification and model validation for the piezoelectric actuator in an inertia motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunstig, Matthias; Hemsel, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Piezoelectric inertia motors make use of the inertia of a slider to drive the slider by friction contact in a series of small steps which are generally composed of a stick phase and a slip phase. If the best electrical drive signal for the piezoelectric actuator in an inertia motor is to be determined, its dynamical behaviour must be known. A classic dynamic lumped parameter model for piezoelectric actuators is valid only in resonance and, therefore, is not suitable for modelling the actuator in an inertia motor. A reduced dynamic model is used instead. Its parameters are identified using a step response measurement. This model is used to predict the movement of the actuator in response to a velocity-optimized signal introduced in a separate contribution. Results show that the model cannot represent the dynamical characteristics of the actuator completely. For determining voltage signals that let piezoelectric actuators follow a calculated movement pattern exactly, the model can, therefore, only be used with limitations.

  18. A generic inertia emulation controller for multi-terminal VSC-HVDC systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiebei; Guerrero, Josep M.; Booth, Campbell

    2013-01-01

    A generic Inertia Emulation Controller (INEC) for Multi-Terminal Voltage-source-converter based HVDC (VSC-MTDC) is proposed in this paper. The proposed INEC can be incorporated in any grid-side-voltage-source-converter (GVSC) station, allowing the MTDC terminal to contribute an inertial response ...

  19. Moment inertia pump analysis used in the Rsg-Gas primary coolant loop under lofa condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarmono; Setiyanto; Dhandhang, P.; Dibyo, S.; Royadi

    1998-01-01

    The moment inertia of primary cooling system analysis under LOFA condition has been done. It is potentially one of limiting design constraints of the RSG-GAS safety because the coolant flow rate reduces very rapidly under LOFA condition due to the low inertia circulation pumps. If a loss of flow accident occurs, the mass flow will decrease rapidly and the heat transfer coefficient between cladding and coolant will also decreases. As a consequence the fuel and cladding temperature will increase. The whole core was represented by the 1/4 sector and divided into 19 subchannels and 40 axial nodes. In the present study, moment inertia of pump analysis for RSG-GAS reactor was performed with COBRA-IV-I subchannel code. As the DNB correlation, W-3 Correlation was selected for base case. The flow and power transients under pump trip accident were determined from experiments. The result above compared with the design data are 75 kg m 2 and 81 Kg m 2 respectively. The result shows that the RSG-GAS requires the inertia more than 75 kg m 2

  20. Effects of artificial dawn on sleep inertia, skin temperature, and the awakening cortisol response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Werken, Maan; Gimenez, Marina C.; de Vries, Bonnie; Beersma, Domien G. M.; van Someren, Eus J. W.; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.

    P>The effect of artificial dawn during the last 30 min of sleep on subsequent dissipation of sleep inertia was investigated, including possible involvement of cortisol and thermoregulatory processes. Sixteen healthy subjects who reported difficulty with waking up participated in random order in a

  1. 40 CFR 86.1772-99 - Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.1772-99 Road load power, test weight, and inertia... requirements shall also apply to this subpart: (1) For electric and hybrid electric vehicle lines where it is... vehicle under all-electric power to complete the running loss test fuel tank temperature profile test...

  2. On the origin of the inertia: The modified Newtonian dynamics theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gine, Jaume

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that the identity between inertial mass and gravitational mass is an assumption to establish the equivalence principle. In the context of Sciama's inertia theory, the identity between the inertial mass and the gravitational mass is discussed and a certain condition which must be experimentally satisfied is given. The inertial force proposed by Sciama, in a simple case, is derived from Assis' inertia theory based in the introduction of a Weber type force. The origin of the inertial force is totally justified taking into account that the Weber force is, in fact, an approximation of a simple retarded potential, see [Gine J. On the origin of the anomalous precession of Mercury's perihelion. . Gine J. On the origin of deflection of the light. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2008;35(1):1-6]. The way how the inertial forces are also derived from some solutions of the general relativistic equations is presented. We wonder whether the theory of inertia of Assis is included in the framework the General Relativity. In the context of the inertia developed in the present paper, we establish the relation between the constant acceleration a 0 , that appears in the classical modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theory, with the Hubble constant H 0 , i.e. a 0 ∼ cH 0 .

  3. Frequency participation by using virtual inertia in wind turbines including energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Zhao xia; Huang, Yu; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    (WT) and battery unit (BU). A central controller forecasts wind speed and determines system operation states to be sent to the local controllers. These local controllers include MPPT, virtual inertia, and pitch control for the WT; and power control loops for the BU. The proposed approach achieve...

  4. Origin of inertia in large-amplitude collective motion in finite Fermi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Origin of inertia in large-amplitude collective motion in finite Fermi systems. SUDHIR R JAIN. Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085, India. E-mail: srjain@barc.gov.in. MS received 6 January 2011; revised 27 July 2011; accepted 26 August 2011. Abstract. We argue that mass ...

  5. 40 CFR 86.529-98 - Road load force and inertia weight determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... km/h on a smooth, level track under balanced wind conditions. The driver must have a mass of 80 ±10... used. (b) The inertia given in Figure F98-9 shall be used. Motorcycles with loaded vehicle mass outside these limits shall be tested at an equivalent inertial mass and road load force specified by the...

  6. Measurement of the thermal inertia of the skin using successive thermograms taken at a stepwise change in ambient radiation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Togawa, T

    1995-11-01

    Skin thermal properties are difficult to measure in vivo in the steady state because there is a constant temperature gradient across the skin surface. However, measurement of skin thermal properties is postulated in quantitative evaluation for thermographic observation. In this study, imaging of the thermal inertia of the skin was attempted by thermographic measurements at a stepwise change in ambient radiation temperature achieved by quickly switching two hoods maintained at different temperatures. Using this technique, a total of 65 thermograms were sequentially recorded at intervals of 0.5 s beginning 2 s before the stepwise change. The image of skin thermal inertia was estimated by applying statistical curve fitting at each pixel of the thermograms. In addition, the emissivity and true temperature of the skin were also determined, together with thermal inertia, in a single measurement. Measurements were made at different sites on 10 subjects. The average values of thermal inertia of normal skin were scattered throughout a range from 1.4 x 10(3) to 2.1 x 10(3) W s1/2 m-2 K-1. Investigations of the relationship between skin blood flow and thermal inertia were also made by imaging thermal inertia when skin blood flow was changed by applying a vasodilator or vasoconstrictor on the skin surface. In a comparison with the data measured by laser Doppler flowmetry, the average slope of skin blood flow versus thermal inertia was 2.88 x 10(-4) V per W s1/2 m-2 K-1, and the thermal inertia of the skin with no blood flow was 1.03 x 10(3) W s1/2 m-2 K-1. The results also show an almost linear correlation between skin blood flow and thermal inertia in each individual, but inter-individual differences were also observed. The results suggest that skin blood flow distribution can be estimated by non-contact imaging of thermal inertia.

  7. Time-course of sleep inertia upon awakening from nighttime sleep with different sleep homeostasis conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, M; De Gennaro, L; Bertini, M

    2000-03-01

    We assessed the time-course of sleep inertia during the first 75 min after morning awakening from regular nocturnal sleep, as well as from nighttime sleep episodes with altered sleep homeostasis conditions. Ten normal males slept for 6 nights in the laboratory: 1 adaptation (AD), 2 baseline (BSL, BSL-A), 2 selective Slow-Wave Sleep (SWS) deprivation (DEP-1, DEP-2), and 1 recovery night (REC). On morning awakening, performance was assessed by means of: a) Descending Subtraction Task (DST); b) Auditory Reaction Time task (ART); and c) Finger Tapping Task (FTT). The test battery, lasting about 13 min, was repeated for 5 times. In regard to DST, the Correct Response ratio (CR/NR) showed a great increase of sleep inertia on the first testing session of REC. Regarding sleep inertia time-course, a significant linear decrease across the testing sessions during the BSL-A and the DEP-2 was present, whereas a significant quadratic trend during the AD, the DEP-1 and the REC was found. On the other hand, ART performance showed a significant quadratic trend across testing sessions, while FTT performance did not show any significant variation. A uniform pattern of variation of time-course of sleep inertia as a function of the different sleep homeostasis conditions was not recognized. Performance accuracy (CR/NR) on the DST showed the hypothesized increasing linear trend across testing sessions only during 2 out of 6 nights, while the unexpected quadratic trend of ART performance is probably due to a fatigue effect. During sleep inertia, cognitive performance reached the baseline level about 30 min after awakening, while motor performance was still below the baseline levels 75 min after awakening. The finding that cognitive performance recovery is greater and more rapid than motor performance recovery could be very important for operational settings and in sustained operations.

  8. Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Marina C; Hessels, Martijn; van de Werken, Maan; de Vries, Bonnie; Beersma, Domien G M; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2010-07-01

    The timing of work and social requirements has a negative impact on performance and well-being of a significant proportion of the population in our modern society due to a phenomenon known as social jetlag. During workdays, in the early morning, late chronotypes, in particular, suffer from a combination of a nonoptimal circadian phase and sleep deprivation. Sleep inertia, a transient period of lowered arousal after awakening, therefore, becomes more severe. In the present home study, the authors tested whether the use of an alarm clock with artificial dawn could reduce complaints of sleep inertia in people having difficulties in waking up early. The authors also examined whether these improvements were accompanied by a shift in the melatonin rhythm. Two studies were performed: Study 1: three conditions (0, 50, and 250 lux) and Study 2: two conditions (0 lux and self-selected dawn-light intensity). Each condition lasted 2 weeks. In both studies, the use of the artificial dawn resulted in a significant reduction of sleep inertia complaints. However, no significant shift in the onset of melatonin was observed after 2 weeks of using the artificial dawn of 250 lux or 50 lux compared to the control condition. A multilevel analysis revealed that only the presence of the artificial dawn, rather than shift in the dim light melatonin onset or timing of sleep offset, is related to the observed reduction of sleep inertia complaints. Mechanisms other than shift of circadian rhythms are needed to explain the positive results on sleep inertia of waking up with a dawn signal.

  9. Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic and circadian influences on higher-order cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Tina M; Scheer, Frank A J L; Ronda, Joseph M; Czeisler, Charles A; Wright, Kenneth P

    2015-08-01

    Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic and circadian processes modulate cognition, including reaction time, memory, mood and alertness. How these processes influence higher-order cognitive functions is not well known. Six participants completed a 73-day-long study that included two 14-day-long 28-h forced desynchrony protocols to examine separate and interacting influences of sleep inertia, sleep homeostasis and circadian phase on higher-order cognitive functions of inhibitory control and selective visual attention. Cognitive performance for most measures was impaired immediately after scheduled awakening and improved during the first ~2-4 h of wakefulness (decreasing sleep inertia); worsened thereafter until scheduled bedtime (increasing sleep homeostasis); and was worst at ~60° and best at ~240° (circadian modulation, with worst and best phases corresponding to ~09:00 and ~21:00 hours, respectively, in individuals with a habitual wake time of 07:00 hours). The relative influences of sleep inertia, sleep homeostasis and circadian phase depended on the specific higher-order cognitive function task examined. Inhibitory control appeared to be modulated most strongly by circadian phase, whereas selective visual attention for a spatial-configuration search task was modulated most strongly by sleep inertia. These findings demonstrate that some higher-order cognitive processes are differentially sensitive to different sleep-wake regulatory processes. Differential modulation of cognitive functions by different sleep-wake regulatory processes has important implications for understanding mechanisms contributing to performance impairments during adverse circadian phases, sleep deprivation and/or upon awakening from sleep. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  10. Morning sleep inertia in alertness and performance: effect of cognitive domain and white light conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayantara Santhi

    Full Text Available The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia. The extent to which its severity varies with task and cognitive processes remains unclear. We examined sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT, n-back and add tasks, respectively. The tasks were administered 2 hours before bedtime and at regular intervals for four hours, starting immediately after awakening in the morning, in eleven participants, in a four-way cross-over laboratory design. We also investigated whether exposure to Blue-Enhanced or Bright Blue-Enhanced white light would reduce sleep inertia. Alertness and all cognitive processes were impaired immediately upon awakening (p<0.01. However, alertness and sustained attention were more affected than cognitive throughput and working memory. Moreover, speed was more affected than accuracy of responses. The light conditions had no differential effect on performance except in the 3-back task (p<0.01, where response times (RT at the end of four hours in the two Blue-Enhanced white light conditions were faster (200 ms than at wake time. We conclude that the effect of sleep inertia varies with cognitive domain and that it's spectral/intensity response to light is different from that of sleepiness. That is, just increasing blue-wavelength in light may not be sufficient to reduce sleep inertia. These findings have implications for critical professions like medicine, law-enforcement etc., in which, personnel routinely wake up from night-time sleep to respond to emergency situations.

  11. Clinical Inertia in a Randomized Trial of Telemedicine-Based Chronic Disease Management: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Anna Beth; Okorodudu, Daniel E; Bosworth, Hayden B; Crowley, Matthew J

    2018-01-17

    Treatment nonadherence and clinical inertia perpetuate poor cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor control. Telemedicine interventions may counter both treatment nonadherence and clinical inertia. We explored why a telemedicine intervention designed to reduce treatment nonadherence and clinical inertia did not improve CVD risk factor control, despite enhancing treatment adherence versus usual care. In this analysis of a randomized trial, we studied recipients of the 12-month telemedicine intervention. This intervention comprised two nurse-administered components: (1) monthly self-management education targeting improved treatment adherence; and (2) quarterly medication management facilitation designed to support treatment intensification by primary care (thereby reducing clinical inertia). For each medication management facilitation encounter, we ascertained whether patients met treatment goals, and if not, whether primary care recommended treatment intensification following the encounter. We assessed disease control associated with encounters, where intensification was/was not recommended. We examined 455 encounters across 182 intervention recipients (100% African Americans with type 2 diabetes). Even after accounting for valid reasons for deferring intensification (e.g., treatment nonadherence), intensification was not recommended in 67.5% of encounters in which hemoglobin A1c was above goal, 72.5% in which systolic blood pressure was above goal, and 73.9% in which low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was above goal. In each disease state, treatment intensification was more likely with poorer control. Despite enhancing treatment adherence, this intervention was unsuccessful in countering clinical inertia, likely explaining its lack of effect on CVD risk factors. We identify several lessons learned that may benefit investigators and healthcare systems.

  12. Rotations with Rodrigues' vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, E

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears to be a fundamental matrix that is used to express the components of the angular velocity, the rotation matrix and the angular momentum vector. The Hamiltonian formalism of rotational dynamics in terms of this vector uses the same matrix. The quantization of the rotational dynamics is performed with simple rules if one uses Rodrigues' vector and similar formal expressions for the quantum operators that mimic the Hamiltonian classical dynamics.

  13. Shell-structure and pairing interaction in superheavy nuclei: rotational properties of the z=104 nucleus (256)rf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlees, P T; Rubert, J; Piot, J; Gall, B J P; Andersson, L L; Asai, M; Asfari, Z; Cox, D M; Dechery, F; Dorvaux, O; Grahn, T; Hauschild, K; Henning, G; Herzan, A; Herzberg, R-D; Heßberger, F P; Jakobsson, U; Jones, P; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Ketelhut, S; Khoo, T-L; Leino, M; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lozeva, R; Nieminen, P; Pakarinen, J; Papadakis, P; Parr, E; Peura, P; Rahkila, P; Rinta-Antila, S; Ruotsalainen, P; Sandzelius, M; Sarén, J; Scholey, C; Seweryniak, D; Sorri, J; Sulignano, B; Theisen, Ch; Uusitalo, J; Venhart, M

    2012-07-06

    The rotational band structure of the Z=104 nucleus (256)Rf has been observed up to a tentative spin of 20ℏ using state-of-the-art γ-ray spectroscopic techniques. This represents the first such measurement in a superheavy nucleus whose stability is entirely derived from the shell-correction energy. The observed rotational properties are compared to those of neighboring nuclei and it is shown that the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia are sensitive to the underlying single-particle shell structure and the specific location of high-j orbitals. The moments of inertia therefore provide a sensitive test of shell structure and pairing in superheavy nuclei which is essential to ensure the validity of contemporary nuclear models in this mass region. The data obtained show that there is no deformed shell gap at Z=104, which is predicted in a number of current self-consistent mean-field models.

  14. Heating and Cooling Anomaly of a Rotating Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Brůha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an effect which appears when heating or cooling a rotating body. No external forces acting on the body are supposed. Due to thermal expansion, the moment of inertia of the body varies together with the temperature changes. In agreement with the principle of conservation of angular momentum [1], the angular momentum is constant. This results in angular velocity changes and subsequently in kinetic energy changes. Also the stress energy varies together with the changes in thermal dimension. To satisfy the principle of energy conservation we have to suppose that the changes in kinetic and stress energy are compensated by the changes in internal energy, which is correlated with temperature changes of the body. This means that the rules for the heating or cooling process of a rotating body are not the same as those for a body at rest. This idea, applied to a cylinder rotating around its geometric axis under specific parameters, has been mathematically treated. As a result, the difference between the final temperature of the rotating cylinder and the temperature of the cylinder at rest has been found. 

  15. [INERTIA study: Clinical inertia in non-insulinized patients on oral hypoglycemic treatment. A study in Spanish primary and specialty care settings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Clemente, José Miguel; Font, Beatriu; Lahoz, Raquel; Llauradó, Gemma; Gambús, Gemma

    2014-06-06

    To study clinical inertia in the management of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) in non-insulin treated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Spain. Epidemiological, cross-sectional, retrospective (2 years), multicenter study. Clinical inertia was measured as the total number of patients without OHA treatment intensification divided by the total number of patients with inadequate HbA1c values (≥7%), multiplied by 100. Total clinical inertia (TCI) was the absence of OHA treatment intensification in all visits with a HbA1c≥7% values in the previous 2 years; partial clinical inertia (PCI) occurred when this absence only occurred in some of these visits. We assessed OHA treatment compliance with the Morisky-Green test. We included 2,971 patients, 1,416 adequately controlled (HbA1c<7%) and 1,555 inadequately controlled (HbA1c≥7%). PCI prevalence was 52.5%(95% confidence interval [95% CI] 52.4-52.6%) while TCI prevalence was 12.8% (95% CI 12.2-13.8%). PCI was lower in patients adequately controlled as compared with those inadequately controlled (31.4% vs. 71.8%; P<.001). PCI was associated with sedentary lifestyle, hypertension and higher prevalence of micro and macrovascular complications. Only 38.0% of patients were compliant with the OHA treatment, being this percentage even lower in subjects with ICP. Two variables were independently associated with ICP: female sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.43; 95% CI 1.09-1.86%) and a shorter duration of DM2 (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.95-0.99). One out of 2 patients with T2DM and treated with OHA without insulin suffer from PCI. Only 4 out of 10 patients are compliant with OHA treatment. Female sex and a shorter duration of T2DM are independently associated with PCI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. The spatial rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan; Hahn, Ute; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making...

  17. Units of rotational information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Chiribella, Giulio; Hu, Qinheping

    2017-12-01

    Entanglement in angular momentum degrees of freedom is a precious resource for quantum metrology and control. Here we study the conversions of this resource, focusing on Bell pairs of spin-J particles, where one particle is used to probe unknown rotations and the other particle is used as reference. When a large number of pairs are given, we show that every rotated spin-J Bell state can be reversibly converted into an equivalent number of rotated spin one-half Bell states, at a rate determined by the quantum Fisher information. This result provides the foundation for the definition of an elementary unit of information about rotations in space, which we call the Cartesian refbit. In the finite copy scenario, we design machines that approximately break down Bell states of higher spins into Cartesian refbits, as well as machines that approximately implement the inverse process. In addition, we establish a quantitative link between the conversion of Bell states and the simulation of unitary gates, showing that the fidelity of probabilistic state conversion provides upper and lower bounds on the fidelity of deterministic gate simulation. The result holds not only for rotation gates, but also to all sets of gates that form finite-dimensional representations of compact groups. For rotation gates, we show how rotations on a system of given spin can simulate rotations on a system of different spin.

  18. Deconstructing Mental Rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    A random walk model of the classical mental rotation task is explored in two experiments. By assuming that a mental rotation is repeated until sufficient evidence for a match/mismatch is obtained, the model accounts for the approximately linearly increasing reaction times (RTs) on positive trials...

  19. BREAKDOWN OF I-LOVE-Q UNIVERSALITY IN RAPIDLY ROTATING RELATIVISTIC STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doneva, Daniela D.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    It was shown recently that normalized relations between the moment of inertia (I), the quadrupole moment (Q), and the tidal deformability (Love number) exist and for slowly rotating neutron stars they are almost independent of the equation of state (EOS). We extend the computation of the I-Q relation to models rotating up to the mass-shedding limit and show that the universality of the relations is lost. With increasing rotation rate, the normalized I-Q relation departs significantly from its slow-rotation limit, deviating up to 40% for neutron stars and up to 75% for strange stars. The deviation is also EOS dependent and for a broad set of hadronic and strange matter EOSs the spread due to rotation is comparable to the spread due to the EOS, if one considers sequences with fixed rotational frequency. Still, for a restricted sample of modern realistic EOSs one can parameterize the deviations from universality as a function of rotation only. The previously proposed I-Love-Q relations should thus be used with care, because they lose their universality in astrophysical situations involving compact objects rotating faster than a few hundred Hz

  20. The rotating universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, G.; Treder, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    For a long time the question whether the universe rotates or not is discussed. Aspects of Huygens, Newton, Mach and other important historical scientists in this field are reported. The investigations of the mathematician Kurt Groedel in order to prove the rotation of the universe are illustrated. Kurt Groedel has shown that Einstein's gravitational equations of general relativity theory and the cosmological postulate of global homogeneity of cosmic matter (that is the Copernical principle) are not contradictionary to a rotating universe. Abberation measurements, position determination by means of radiointerferometry and methods for the determination of the rotation of the universe from the isotropy of the background radiation are presented. From these experiments it can be concluded that the universe seems not to rotate as already Einstein expected

  1. Rotation sensor switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevec, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops is comprised of a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal

  2. Rotating stars in relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  3. Heavy ellipsoids in creeping shear flow: transitions of the particle rotation rate and orbit shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundell, Fredrik; Carlsson, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The motion of an inertial ellipsoid in a creeping linear shear flow of a Newtonian fluid is studied numerically. This constitutes a fundamental system that is used as a basis for simulations and analysis of flows with heavy nonspherical particles. The torque on the ellipsoid is given analytically by Jeffery [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 102, 161 (1922)]. This torque is coupled with the angular-momentum equation for the particle. The motion is then governed by the Stokes number St=rho(e)gammal(2)/mu, where rho(e) is the density of the ellipsoid, gamma is the rate of shear, l is the length of the major axis of the ellipsoid, and mu is the dynamic viscosity of the fluid. For low St (the numerical value depends on the aspect ratio of the particle), the particle motion is similar to the Jeffery orbits obtained for inertia-free particles with the addition of an orbit drift so that the particle eventually lies in the flow-gradient plane. At higher St, more drastic effects are seen. For particles oriented in the flow-gradient plane, the rotation rate increases rather abruptly to half the shear rate in a narrow range of St. For particles with other orientations, the motion goes from a kayaking motion to rotation around an oblique axis. It is suggested that, depending on aspect and density ratios, particle inertia might be sufficient to explain and model orbit drift observed previously at low Reynolds numbers. It is discussed how and when the assumption of negligible fluid inertia and strong particle inertia can be justified from a fundamental perspective for particles of different aspect ratios.

  4. Interaction of Saturn's dual rotation periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. G. A.

    2018-03-01

    We develop models of the interaction of Rossby wave disturbances in the northern and southern ionospheres of Saturn. We show that interhemispheric field-aligned currents allow the exchange of vorticity, modifying the background Rossby wave propagation speed. This leads to interaction of the northern and southern Rossby wave periods. In a very simple symmetric model without a plasma disk the periods merge when the overall conductivity is sufficiently high. A more complex model taking account of the inertia of the plasma disk and the asymmetry of the two hemispheres predicts a rich variety of possible wave modes. We find that merging of the northern and southern periods can only occur when (i) the conductivities of both hemispheres are sufficiently low (a criterion that is fulfilled for realistic parameters) and (ii) the background Rossby wave periods in the two hemispheres are identical. We reconcile the second criterion with the observations of a merged period that also drifts by noting that ranges of Rossby wave propagation speeds are possible in each hemisphere. We suggest that a merged disturbance in the plasma disk may act as an 'anchor' and drive Rossby waves in each hemisphere within the range of possible propagation speeds. This suggestion predicts behaviour that qualitatively matches the observed merging and splitting of the northern and southern rotation periods that occurred in 2013 and 2014. Low conductivity modes also show long damping timescales that are consistent with the persistence of the periodic signals.

  5. Forma no clásica de hiperplasia adrenal congénita en la niñez y adolescencia Non-classic way of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in childhood and adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carvajal Martínez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: la hiperplasia adrenal congénita es un trastorno hereditario de la esteroidogénesis suprarrenal, trasmitido por mutaciones genéticas con carácter autosómico recesivo, las cuales afectan las enzimas que intervienen en la biosíntesis del cortisol. La causa la constituye en 90 a 95 % de los casos la deficiencia de la enzima 21 hidroxilasa. OBJETIVO: exponer la experiencia de los autores de este trabajo en la forma no clásica de esta enfermedad. MÉTODOS: se realizó la caracterización de 7 pacientes diagnosticados en la sala de endocrinología pediátrica del Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología, ubicada en el Hospital Pediátrico del Cerro, durante el período 1998-2008. Todos los pacientes pertenecían al sexo femenino. RESULTADOS: los síntomas se iniciaron a una edad promedio de 8,8 años y más de la mitad de los casos presentaron pubarquia precoz. La menarquia se produjo a una edad media de 10,7 años. Se logró el diagnóstico bioquímico al obtenerse valores elevados de 17 hidroxiprogesterona (en condiciones basales. Se emplearon distintas modalidades de tratamiento según la edad de cada paciente y los síntomas predominantes en cada caso. CONCLUSIONES: se corroboró la mayor frecuencia de diagnóstico de esta enfermedad en el sexo femenino, así como la importancia del estudio y el seguimiento ante un paciente con pubarquia precoz.INTRODUCTION: the congenital adrenal hyperplasia is an inherited disorder of suprarenal esteroidogenesis, transmitted by genetic mutations with a autosomal recessive character affecting the enzymes intervening in cortisol biosynthesis. In the 90 to 95% of cases, the cause is a deficiency of Hydroxylase enzyme 21. OBJECTIVE: to show the current paper authors' experience in the non-classic way of this entity. METHODS: we made a characterization of 7 female patients diagnosed in the Children Endocrinology Ward of the National Institute of Endocrinology located in the Children Hospital, Cerro

  6. An infrared transient method for determining the thermal inertia, conductivity, and diffusivity of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, A W

    1968-09-01

    A novel method has been developed for nondestructively determining the thermal inertia (k(p)C(p)) of solids near room temperature. The method involves heating, with radiant energy, for a short time a small area on the surface of a solid whose dimensions are such that it appears semi-infinite during this period. Simultaneously, the characteristically shaped temperature rise of the central region of this area is observed using an ir radiometer as the sensor. A comparison of this history with that for a reference standard yields the local thermal inertia value. The localized thermal conductivity and diffusivity can then be determined if the density and specific heat are known. Present technique precision for good conductors is slightly less than that for destructive measuring techniques.

  7. Material inertia and size effects in the Charpy V-notch test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desandre, D. A.; Benzerga, A. A.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    The effect of material inertia on the size dependence of the absorbed energy in the Charpy V-notch test is investigated. The material response is characterized by an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a porous plastic solid, with adiabatic heating due to plastic dissipation and the re......The effect of material inertia on the size dependence of the absorbed energy in the Charpy V-notch test is investigated. The material response is characterized by an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a porous plastic solid, with adiabatic heating due to plastic dissipation...... and the resulting thermal softening accounted for. The onset of cleavage is taken to occur when a critical value of the maximum principal stress is attained over a critical volume. Plane strain dynamic analyses are carried out for geometrically similar specimens of various sizes with all parameters adjusted so...

  8. The effect of the thermal inertia on the thermal transfer in building wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellahcene, Lahcene; Cheknane, Ali; Bekkouche, SMA.; Sahel, Djemal

    2017-11-01

    In a hot and dry climate, the design and construction of buildings involve the adoption of combination between shape of building envelope and construction materials. The objective of this work is to study the thermal behavior of a multilayer wall submitted to varying climatic conditions. We have proposed four configurations of an element of an outer wall. A numerical simulation was used to understand the phenomenon of thermal inertia, especially its influence on the resulting temperatures. The study is based on the modeling of heat transfer in a 2D unsteady-state using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The comparison of numerical results was affected with an available experimental data and shows a satisfactory agreement. In addition, this work highlights the importance of the study of the thermal inertia of the wall in order to ensure a comfortable indoor climate of building located in hot and dry climate.

  9. The effect of the thermal inertia on the thermal transfer in building wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellahcene Lahcene

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In a hot and dry climate, the design and construction of buildings involve the adoption of combination between shape of building envelope and construction materials. The objective of this work is to study the thermal behavior of a multilayer wall submitted to varying climatic conditions. We have proposed four configurations of an element of an outer wall. A numerical simulation was used to understand the phenomenon of thermal inertia, especially its influence on the resulting temperatures. The study is based on the modeling of heat transfer in a 2D unsteady-state using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD code. The comparison of numerical results was affected with an available experimental data and shows a satisfactory agreement. In addition, this work highlights the importance of the study of the thermal inertia of the wall in order to ensure a comfortable indoor climate of building located in hot and dry climate.

  10. Grid Frequency Support by Single-Phase Electric Vehicles Employing an Innovative Virtual Inertia Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezkalla, Michel M.N.; Zecchino, Antonio; Pertl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    to limit the rate of change of frequency of power systems, thus, improving frequency dynamics. Electric vehicles (EVs) can represent a reliable solution to enhance frequency stability due to their fast response and capability to provide a large amount of aggregated power. On one hand, EVs are capable...... of adjusting the battery charging process (i.e., power flow) according to pre-defined algorithms. On the other hand, in case of islanded operation (i.e., low inertia), some of the EV's technical constraints might cause oscillations. This study presents two control algorithms which show that the EVs are capable...... of providing virtual inertia support. The first controller employs a traditional droop control, while the second one is equipped with an innovative control algorithm to eliminate likely oscillations. It is shown that, the proposed innovative control algorithm compared to the traditional droop control, assures...

  11. Effects of fluid inertia and bearing flexibility on the performance of finite length journal bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorova, Juliana; Alexandrov, Vassil

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the theoretical study concerning the effect of lubricant inertia forces and deformability of the bearing elastic layer on the performance of a plane journal bearing. The problem is investigated for a Newtonian lubricant under isothermal and isoviscous conditions. The analysis considers the generalized Reynolds equation governing the flow of lubricant in the clearance space and the linear elasticity equation governing the displacement field in the bearing shell. An iterative numerical procedure with successive over relaxation is used to pressure distribution within the lubricated conjunction. Bearing performance characteristics have been presented for typically selected values of generalized Reynolds number Re* and elasticity parameters of the elastic liner. It has been observed that the combined effect of fluid inertia forces and bearing flexibility affects the performance characteristics of dynamically loaded journal bearing.

  12. Macroevolution of life-history traits in passerine birds: adaptation and phylogenetic inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, Jason; Ilany, Amiyaal; Geffen, Eli; Yom-Tov, Yoram

    2013-05-01

    We used a recent passerine phylogeny and comparative method to evaluate the macroevolution of body and egg mass, incubation and fledging periods, time to independence and time with parents of the main passerine lineages. We hypothesised that passerine reproductive traits are affected by adaptation to both past and present environmental factors and phenotypic attributes such as body mass. Our results suggest that the evolution of body and egg mass, time to independence, incubation and fledging times are affected by strong phylogenetic inertia and that these breeding traits are all affected by body mass. Time with parents, where major lineages exhibit their own fixed optima and body mass does not have an effect, and clutch size which is affected by body mass and additionally by climate regimes, do not exhibit any phylogenetic inertia. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  13. Effects of the Inertia Barbell Training on Lumbar Muscle T2 relaxation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Yun; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Ma, Zu-Chang; Lu, Jiao-Jiao; Huang, Qing; Sun, Yi-Ning; Liu, Yu

    2017-04-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in T2 relaxation time in normal human lumbar muscles caused by inertia barbell training. Thirty undergraduate healthy males (mean age=19 ± 1.2 years, weight=72 ± 10.0 kilograms, height=1.78 ± 0.1 meters) were recruited to participate in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups: an inertia barbell training group (IBTG) (n=15) and a normal barbell-training group (NBTG) (n=15). All subjects participated in lumbar flexion and extension muscle strength training for 1 hour per time, 3 times per week for a total of 8 weeks. The lumbar of each participant was scanned before and after the experiment using a 3.0T superconductive magnetic resonance imaging system. The T2 values measured after intervention were significantly different compared to the T2 values measured before the experiment in both the IBTG and NBTG groups (pbarbell training.

  14. The effect of self-awakening from nocturnal sleep on sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroki; Hayashi, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of self-awakening on sleep inertia after nocturnal sleep. Ten undergraduate and graduate students participated in the study. Their polysomnograms were recorded for five consecutive nights; the first, second, and third to fifth nights were adaptation, forced-awakening, and self-awakening nights, respectively. Participants rated sleepiness, fatigue, comfort, and work motivation, and these ratings were followed by switching (7 min) and auditory reaction time tasks (6 min), both before bedtime (15 min) and immediately after awakening (4 min x 15 min). Although reaction times on the auditory were task prolonged, and participants complained of feeling uncomfortable immediately after forced-awakening, reaction times were shortened after self-awakening, and the participants did not complain of feeling uncomfortable on these nights. The results of this study suggest that sleep inertia occurs after forced-awakening and that it can be prevented by self-awakening.

  15. Inertia and gravitation the fundamental nature and structure of space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Pfister, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the phenomena of inertia and gravitation, one objective being to shed some new light on the basic laws of gravitational interaction and the fundamental nature and structures of spacetime. Chapter 1 is devoted to an extensive, partly new analysis of the law of inertia. The underlying mathematical and geometrical structure of Newtonian spacetime is presented from a four-dimensional point of view, and some historical difficulties and controversies - in particular the concepts of free particles and straight lines - are critically analyzed, while connections to projective geometry are also explored. The relativistic extensions of the law of gravitation and its intriguing consequences are studied in Chapter 2. This is achieved, following the works of Weyl, Ehlers, Pirani and Schild, by adopting a point of view of the combined conformal and projective structure of spacetime. Specifically, Mach’s fundamental critique of Newton’s concepts of ‘absolute space’ and ‘absolute time’ was a d...

  16. Humiliation and the Inertia Effect: Implications for Understanding Violence and Compromise in Intractable Intergroup Conflicts

    OpenAIRE

    Ginges, Jeremy; Atran, Scott

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the influence of humiliation on inter-group conflict in three studies of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza. We demonstrate that experienced humiliation produces an inertia effect; a tendency towards inaction that suppresses rebellious or violent action but which paradoxically also suppresses support for acts of inter-group compromise. In Study 1, Palestinians who felt more humiliated by the Israeli occupation were less likely to support suicide attacks against Isra...

  17. Chaotic noisy transport of electron pairs in a superconducting junction device: thermal-inertia ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-hui

    2006-07-01

    Chaotic noisy transport of electron pairs in a superconducting junction device (thermal-inertia ratchets) is investigated. The study shows that when the temperature is low enough, the transport of the electron pairs can be mainly chaotic; when the temperature is high enough, it can be mainly stochastic. By controlling the temperature and the amplitude of the input ac signal, the current of electron pairs can be reversed.

  18. Regional thermal-inertia mapping from an experimental satellite ( Powder River basin, Wyoming).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, K.

    1982-01-01

    A new experimental satellite has provided, for the first time, thermal data that should be useful in reconnaissance geologic exploration. Thermal inertia, a property of geologic materials, can be mapped from these data by applying an algorithm that has been developed using a new thermal model. A simple registration procedure was used on a pair of day and night images of the Powder River basin, Wyoming, to illustrate the method.-from Author

  19. Global distribution of bedrock exposures on Mars using THEMIS high-resolution thermal inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, C.S.; Bandfield, J.L.; Christensen, P.R.; Fergason, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate high thermal inertia surfaces using the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) nighttime temperature images (100 m/pixel spatial sampling). For this study, we interpret any pixel in a THEMIS image with a thermal inertia over 1200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 as "bedrock" which represents either in situ rock exposures or rock-dominated surfaces. Three distinct morphologies, ranked from most to least common, are associated with these high thermal inertia surfaces: (1) valley and crater walls associated with mass wasting and high surface slope angles; (2) floors of craters with diameters >25 km and containing melt or volcanics associated with larger, high-energy impacts; and (3) intercrater surfaces with compositions significantly more mafic than the surrounding regolith. In general, bedrock instances on Mars occur as small exposures (less than several square kilometers) situated in lower-albedo (thermal inertia (>350 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2), and relatively dust-free (dust cover index <0.95) regions; however, there are instances that do not follow these generalizations. Most instances are concentrated in the southern highlands, with very few located at high latitudes (poleward of 45oN and 58oS), suggesting enhanced mechanical breakdown probably associated with permafrost. Overall, Mars has very little exposed bedrock with only 960 instances identified from 75oS to 75oN with likely <3500 km2 exposed, representing???1% of the total surface area. These data indicate that Mars has likely undergone large-scale surface processing and reworking, both chemically and mechanically, either destroying or masking a majority of the bedrock exposures on the planet. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. AUTONOMOUS HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM OF CONSUMERS WITH CONSIDERABLE DIFFERENT THERMAL INERTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berzan V.P.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There are examined problems occurring at the adoption of the decentralized heat energy supply system of the group of objects, which contains buildings with thermal inertia differed in thousands of times one from the other. It is studied the influence of water volume of hot-water boiler on greenhouse dynamics. It is conducted the comparison between the use ob biomass and natural gas boilers for such as objects.

  1. New approach to thermal inertia determination using NOAA-AVHRR data: application to the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Jose A.; El Kharraz, Mohamed H.; Hurtado, Emilia

    1998-12-01

    The thermal inertia, P, is defined as a measure of the resistance offered by materials to change their temperature. P is the most important single thermal property which governs surface temperature variation. Therefore thermal inertia is of great interest to geological and hydrological studies and climate modeling. An attractive and unique way to map and monitoring this parameter over large scale is to use space observation from satellite in the visible and thermal infrared bands. In this paper we present a new algorithm, based on Xue and Cracknell's model, which allows to obtain the thermal inertia combining afternoon and morning NOAA satellites. The algorithm was tested with a set of measurements made on a region of Niger in the frame of HAPEX-Sahel experiment. The behavior of the model was analyzed by comparing the predicted surface temperatures with the measured ones every ten minutes along the daytime, and by comparing the predicted and measured maximum and minimum surface temperature values as well as their times in the daytime. Our results indicate that for the 90 per cent of the cases the absolute difference between predicted and measured surface temperature is lower than 2 K, with a standard deviation of 1.5 K that improves to 1 K when predicting the maximum and minimum surface temperatures. In this situation the FTM predicts also their respective times with a standard deviation lower than 30 minutes, this makes possible building images of minimum surface temperature and their date from NOAA data. This fact is of great interest in the case of frosting with clear sky conditions. Following the proposed algorithm a map of thermal inertia of the Iberian peninsula is presented. The results are consistent with the known properties of this area.

  2. The effect of the thermal inertia on the thermal transfer in building wall

    OpenAIRE

    Bellahcene Lahcene; Cheknane Ali; Bekkouche SMA.; Sahel Djemal

    2017-01-01

    In a hot and dry climate, the design and construction of buildings involve the adoption of combination between shape of building envelope and construction materials. The objective of this work is to study the thermal behavior of a multilayer wall submitted to varying climatic conditions. We have proposed four configurations of an element of an outer wall. A numerical simulation was used to understand the phenomenon of thermal inertia, especially its influence on the resulting temperatures. Th...

  3. Ground Thermal Inertia for Energy Efficient Building Design: A Case Study on Food Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mazarrón, Fernando R.; Cid-Falceto, Jaime; Cañas, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The search for energy efficient construction solutions is still pending in the agro-food industry, in which a large amount of energy is often consumed unnecessarily when storing products. The main objective of this research is to promote high energy efficiency built environments, which aim to reduce energy consumption in this sector. We analyze the suitability of using the thermal inertia of the ground to provide an adequate environment for the storage and conservation of agro-food products. ...

  4. Models for the transient stability of conventional power generating stations connected to low inertia systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarifakis, Marios; Coffey, William T.; Kalmykov, Yuri P.; Titov, Sergei V.

    2017-06-01

    An ever-increasing requirement to integrate greater amounts of electrical energy from renewable sources especially from wind turbines and solar photo-voltaic installations exists and recent experience in the island of Ireland demonstrates that this requirement influences the behaviour of conventional generating stations. One observation is the change in the electrical power output of synchronous generators following a transient disturbance especially their oscillatory behaviour accompanied by similar oscillatory behaviour of the grid frequency, both becoming more pronounced with reducing grid inertia. This behaviour cannot be reproduced with existing mathematical models indicating that an understanding of the behaviour of synchronous generators, subjected to various disturbances especially in a system with low inertia requires a new modelling technique. Thus two models of a generating station based on a double pendulum described by a system of coupled nonlinear differential equations and suitable for analysis of its stability corresponding to infinite or finite grid inertia are presented. Formal analytic solutions of the equations of motion are given and compared with numerical solutions. In particular the new finite grid model will allow one to identify limitations to the operational range of the synchronous generators used in conventional power generation and also to identify limits, such as the allowable Rate of Change of Frequency which is currently set to ± 0.5 Hz/s and is a major factor in describing the volatility of a grid as well as identifying requirements to the total inertia necessary, which is currently provided by conventional power generators only, thus allowing one to maximise the usage of grid connected non-synchronous generators, e.g., wind turbines and solar photo-voltaic installations.

  5. The Optimization on Ranks and Inertias of a Quadratic Hermitian Matrix Function and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yirong Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We solve optimization problems on the ranks and inertias of the quadratic Hermitian matrix function subject to a consistent system of matrix equations and . As applications, we derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability to the systems of matrix equations and matrix inequalities , and in the Löwner partial ordering to be feasible, respectively. The findings of this paper widely extend the known results in the literature.

  6. The effect of inertia force in water lubricated thrust bearings of canned reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Liping

    1994-01-01

    The water lubricated thrust bearings are analyzed. According to characteristic of low viscosity of water the lubricated equation for design and calculation of water lubricated thrust bearings is established. The calculation and analyses show that the effect of inertia force in water lubricated thrust bearings should not be neglected except the conditions of low speed, high angle of inclination and low radius ratio of pad

  7. Comparing sleep-loss sleepiness and sleep inertia: lapses make the difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, Laura; Versace, Francesco; Koterle, Sara; Cavallero, Corrado

    2008-09-01

    To compare the behavioral effects of sleep-loss sleepiness (performance impairment due to sleep loss) and sleep inertia (period of impaired performance that follows awakening), mean response latencies and number of lapses from a visual simple reaction-time task were analyzed. Three experimental conditions were designed to manipulate sleepiness and sleep-inertia levels: uninterrupted sleep, partial sleep reduction, and total sleep deprivation. Each condition included two consecutive nights (the first always a night of uninterrupted sleep, and the second either a night of uninterrupted sleep, a night when sleep was reduced to 3 h, or a night of total sleep deprivation), as well as two days in which performance was assessed at 10 different time points (08:00, 08:30, 09:00, 09:30, 10:00, 11:00, 14:00, 17:00, 20:00, and 23:00 h). From 08:00 to 09:00 h, reaction times in the partial sleep-reduction and total sleep-deprivation conditions were at a similar level and were slower than those observed in the uninterrupted sleep condition. In the same time period, the frequency of lapses in the total sleep-deprivation condition was higher than in the partial sleep-reduction condition, while this latter condition never differed from the uninterrupted sleep condition. The results indicate that both sleep inertia and sleep-loss sleepiness lead to an increase in response latencies, but only extreme sleepiness leads to an increase in lapse frequency. We conclude that while reaction times slow as a result of both sleep inertia and sleep-loss sleepiness, lapses appear to be a specific feature of sleep-loss sleepiness.

  8. Evaluation of a Moments-Based Formulation for the Transport and Deposition of Small Inertia Aerosols

    OpenAIRE

    Romain Guichard; Emmanuel Belut; Nicolas Nimbert; Anne Tanière

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces and evaluates a formulation for the modeling of transport and wall deposition of aerosols, written in terms of moments of the particle size distribution (PSD). This formulation allows coupling the moment methods with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to track the space and time evolution of the PSD of an aerosol undergoing transport, deposition and coagulation. It consists in applying the quadrature method of moments (QMOM) to the diffusion-inertia model of Zaichik et a...

  9. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  10. A rotating quantum vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenci, V.A. de; Svaiter, N.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-11-01

    It was investigated which mapping has to be used to compare measurements made in a rotating frame to those made in an inertial frame. Using a non-Galilean coordinate transformation, the creation-annihilation operators of a massive scalar field in the rotating frame are not the same as those of an inertial observer. This leads to a new vacuum state(a rotating vacuum) which is a superposition of positive and negative frequency Minkowski particles. Polarization effects in circular accelerators in the proper frame of the electron making a connection with the inertial frame point of view were analysed. 65 refs.

  11. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Pairs of HCMM day-night thermal infrared (IR) data were selected during the 1978-79 winter to examine patterns of surface temperature and thermal inertia (TI) of peninsular Florida. The GOES and NOAA-6 thermal IR, as well as National Climatic Center temperatures and rainfall, were also used. The HCMM apparent thermal inertia (ATI) images closely corresponded to the general soil map of Florida, based on soil drainage classes. Areas with low ATI overlay well-drained soils, such as deep sands and drained organic soils, whereas with high ATI overlay areas with wetlands and bodies of water. The HCMM ATI images also corresponded well with GOES-detected winter nocturnal cold-prone areas. Use of HCMM data with Carlson's energy balance model showed both high moisture availability (MA) and high thermal inertia (TI) of wetland-type surfaces and low MA and low TI of upland, well-drained soils. Since soil areas with low TI develop higher temperatures during the day, then antecedent patterns of highest maximum daytime surface temperature can also be used to predict nocturnal cold-prone areas in Florida.

  12. The Effect of Moment of Inertia on the Liquids in Centrifugal Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmail Pishbin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The flow of liquids in centrifugal microfluidics is unidirectional and dominated by centrifugal and Coriolis forces (i.e., effective only at T-junctions. Developing mechanisms and discovering efficient techniques to propel liquids in any direction other than the direction of the centrifugal force has been the subject of a large number of studies. The capillary force attained by specific surface treatments, pneumatic energy, active and passive flow reciprocation and Euler force have been previously introduced in order to manipulate the liquid flow and push it against the centrifugal force. Here, as a new method, the moment of inertia of the liquid inside a chamber in a centrifugal microfluidic platform is employed to manipulate the flow and propel the liquid passively towards the disc center. Furthermore, the effect of the moment of inertia on the liquid in a rectangular chamber is evaluated, both in theory and experiments, and the optimum geometry is defined. As an application of the introduced method, the moment of inertia of the liquid is used in order to mix two different dyed deionized (DI waters; the mixing efficiency is evaluated and compared to similar mixing techniques. The results show the potential of the presented method for pumping liquids radially inward with relatively high flow rates (up to 23 mm3/s and also efficient mixing in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

  13. Inertia effects on the rigid displacement approximation of tokamak plasma vertical motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, R.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Azizov, E.A.; Montalvo, E.; Dong, J.Q.

    1991-01-01

    Elongated plasmas in tokamaks are unstable to axisymmetric vertical displacements. The vacuum vessel and passive conductors can stabilize the plasma motion in the short time scale. For stabilization of the plasma movement in the long time scale an active feedback control system is required. A widely used method of plasma stability analysis uses the Rigid Displacement Model (RDM) of plasma behavior. In the RDM it is assumed that the plasma displacement is small and usually plasma inertia effects are neglected. In addition, it is considered that no changes in plasma shape, plasma current, and plasma current profile take place throughout the plasma motion. It has been demonstrated that the massless-filament approximation (instantaneous force-balance) accurately reproduces the unstable root of the passive stabilization problem. Then, on the basis that the instantaneous force-balance approximation is correct in the passive stabilization analysis, the massless approximation is utilized also in the study of the plasma vertical stabilization by active feedback. The authors show here that the RDM (without mass effects included) does not provide correct stability results for a tokamak configuration (plasma column, passive conductors, and feedback control coils). Therefore, it is concluded that inertia effects have to be retained in the RDM system of equations. It is shown analytically and numerically that stability diagrams with and without plasma-mass corrections differ significantly. When inertia effects are included, the stability region is more restricted than obtained in the massless approximation

  14. Effects of tooling on the residual stress distribution in an inertia weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, J.W.L.; Preuss, M.; Withers, P.J.; Baxter, G.J.; Small, C.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron diffraction residual strain measurements have been made on a tubular structure formed by joining two nickel-based superalloy RR1000 parts by inertia welding. Residual strains in the radial, hoop and axial directions of the tube cross-section have been measured. The corresponding residual stress field has been calculated accounting for the stress-free lattice parameter variations in the region close to the weld line. Tensile residual stresses were observed near the inner diameter of the tube with magnitudes of the order of +500, +1100 and +1300 MPa in the radial, axial and hoop directions, respectively. By comparison near the outer diameter (OD) of the weld the corresponding stresses are of the order of -200, -1000 and 150 MPa. The final stress state reflects the influence of the gripping fixture tooling and thermal gradients during inertia welding. Additional X-ray (at the surface) and hole-drilling (at the near surface) measurements show a steep residual stress gradient in the near surface region. Tensile hoop and axial machining stresses at the surface indicate the potential for improving the inertia weld tooling and the machining parameters used when removing the flash

  15. Effects of artificial dawn on sleep inertia, skin temperature, and the awakening cortisol response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Werken, Maan; Giménez, Marina C; De Vries, Bonnie; Beersma, Domien G M; Van Someren, Eus J W; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2010-09-01

    The effect of artificial dawn during the last 30 min of sleep on subsequent dissipation of sleep inertia was investigated, including possible involvement of cortisol and thermoregulatory processes. Sixteen healthy subjects who reported difficulty with waking up participated in random order in a control and an artificial dawn night. Sleep inertia severity was measured by subjective ratings of sleepiness and activation, and by performance on an addition and a reaction time task measured at 1, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 90 min after waking up at habitual wake up time at workdays. At all intervals, saliva samples were collected for cortisol analysis. Sleep electroencephalogram was recorded during the 30 min prior to waking up; core body temperature and skin temperatures were recorded continuously until 90 min after waking up. Subjective sleepiness was significantly decreased and subjective activation increased after waking up in the artificial dawn condition as compared with control, in which lights were turned on at waking up. These effects can be explained by effects of artificial dawn on skin temperature and amount of wakefulness during the 30 min prior to the alarm. Artificial dawn accelerated the decline in skin temperature and in the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient after getting up. No significant effects of artificial dawn on performance, core body temperature, and cortisol were found. These results suggest that the physiology underlying the positive effects of artificial dawn on the dissipation of sleep inertia involves light sleep and an accelerated skin temperature decline after awakening.

  16. Progress in establishing a connection between the electromagnetic zero-point field and inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Rueda, Alfonso

    1999-01-01

    We report on the progress of a NASA-funded study being carried out at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto and the California State University in Long Beach to investigate the proposed link between the zero-point field of the quantum vacuum and inertia. It is well known that an accelerating observer will experience a bath of radiation resulting from the quantum vacuum which mimics that of a heat bath, the so-called Davies-Unruh effect. We have further analyzed this problem of an accelerated object moving through the vacuum and have shown that the zero-point field will yield a non-zero Poynting vector to an accelerating observer. Scattering of this radiation by the quarks and electrons constituting matter would result in an acceleration-dependent reaction force that would appear to be the origin of inertia of matter (Rueda and Haisch 1998a, 1998b). In the subrelativistic case this inertia reaction force is exactly newtonian and in the relativistic case it exactly reproduces the well known relativistic extension of Newton's Law. This analysis demonstrates then that both the ordinary, F-vector=ma-vector, and the relativistic forms of Newton's equation of motion may be derived from Maxwell's equations as applied to the electromagnetic zero-point field. We expect to be able to extend this analysis in the future to more general versions of the quantum vacuum than just the electromagnetic one discussed herein

  17. The Use of Force Sensors and a Computer System to Introduce the Concept of Inertia at a School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2014-01-01

    A classical experiment used to introduce the concept of body inertia, breaking of a thread below and above a hanging weight, is described mathematically and presented in a new way, using force sensors and a computer system.

  18. Free Vibration Analysis of a Rotating Composite Shaft Using the -Version of the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boukhalfa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the dynamic behavior of the rotating composite shaft on rigid bearings. A -version, hierarchical finite element is employed to define the model. A theoretical study allows the establishment of the kinetic energy and the strain energy of the shaft, necessary to the result of the equations of motion. In this model the transverse shear deformation, rotary inertia and gyroscopic effects, as well as the coupling effect due to the lamination of composite layers have been incorporated. A hierarchical beam finite element with six degrees of freedom per node is developed and used to find the natural frequencies of a rotating composite shaft. A program is elaborate for the calculation of the eigenfrequencies and critical speeds of a rotating composite shaft. To verify the present model, the critical speeds of composite shaft systems are compared with those available in the literature. The efficiency and accuracy of the methods employed are discussed.

  19. Geometric integrator for Langevin systems with quaternion-based rotational degrees of freedom and hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidchack, R. L.; Ouldridge, T. E.; Tretyakov, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    We introduce new Langevin-type equations describing the rotational and translational motion of rigid bodies interacting through conservative and non-conservative forces and hydrodynamic coupling. In the absence of non-conservative forces, the Langevin-type equations sample from the canonical ensemble. The rotational degrees of freedom are described using quaternions, the lengths of which are exactly preserved by the stochastic dynamics. For the proposed Langevin-type equations, we construct a weak 2nd order geometric integrator that preserves the main geometric features of the continuous dynamics. The integrator uses Verlet-type splitting for the deterministic part of Langevin equations appropriately combined with an exactly integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Numerical experiments are presented to illustrate both the new Langevin model and the numerical method for it, as well as to demonstrate how inertia and the coupling of rotational and translational motion can introduce qualitatively distinct behaviours.

  20. Optimal Cable Tension Distribution of the High-Speed Redundant Driven Camera Robots Considering Cable Sag and Inertia Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Su; Yuanying Qiu; Peng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Camera robots are high-speed redundantly cable-driven parallel manipulators that realize the aerial panoramic photographing. When long-span cables and high maneuverability are involved, the effects of cable sags and inertias on the dynamics must be carefully dealt with. This paper is devoted to the optimal cable tension distribution (OCTD for short) of the camera robots. Firstly, each fast varying-length cable is discretized into some nodes for computing the cable inertias. Secondly, the dyna...