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Sample records for non-axisymmetric magnetorotational instabilities

  1. Non-axisymmetric instabilities in discs with imposed zonal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanon, R.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    We conduct a linear stability calculation of an ideal Keplerian flow on which a sinusoidal zonal flow is imposed. The analysis uses the shearing sheet model and is carried out both in isothermal and adiabatic conditions, with and without self-gravity (SG). In the non-SG regime, a structure in the potential vorticity (PV) leads to a non-axisymmetric Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability; in the short-wavelength limit its growth rate agrees with the incompressible calculation by Lithwick, which only considers perturbations elongated in the streamwise direction. The instability's strength is analysed as a function of the structure's properties, and zonal flows are found to be stable if their wavelength is ≳8 H, where H is the disc's scaleheight, regardless of the value of the adiabatic index γ. The non-axisymmetric KH instability can operate in Rayleigh-stable conditions, and it therefore represents the limiting factor to the structure's properties. Introducing SG triggers a second non-axisymmetric instability, which is found to be located around a PV maximum, while the KH instability is linked to a PV minimum, as expected. In the adiabatic regime, the same gravitational instability is detected even when the structure is present only in the entropy (not in the PV) and the instability spreads to weaker SG conditions as the entropy structure's amplitude is increased. This eventually yields a non-axisymmetric instability in the non-SG regime, albeit of weak strength, localized around an entropy maximum.

  2. Non-axisymmetric instabilities in discs with imposed zonal flows

    CERN Document Server

    Vanon, R

    2016-01-01

    We conduct a linear stability calculation of an ideal Keplerian flow on which a sinusoidal zonal flow is imposed. The analysis uses the shearing sheet model and is carried out both in isothermal and adiabatic conditions, with and without self-gravity (SG). In the non-SG regime a structure in the potential vorticity (PV) leads to a non-axisymmetric Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability; in the short-wavelength limit its growth rate agrees with the incompressible calculation by Lithwick (2007), which only considers perturbations elongated in the streamwise direction. The instability's strength is analysed as a function of the structure's properties, and zonal flows are found to be stable if their wavelength is $\\gtrsim 8H$, where $H$ is the disc's scale height, regardless of the value of the adiabatic index $\\gamma$. The non-axisymmetric KH instability can operate in Rayleigh-stable conditions, and it therefore represents the limiting factor to the structure's properties. Introducing SG triggers a second non-axisym...

  3. On the Saturation of the Magnetorotational Instability via Parasitic Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Goodman, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the stability of incompressible, exact, non-ideal magnetorotational (MRI) modes against parasitic instabilities. Both Kelvin-Helmholtz and tearing-mode parasitic instabilities may occur in the dissipative regimes accessible to current numerical simulations. We suppose that a primary...... MRI mode saturates at an amplitude such that its fastest parasite has a growth rate comparable to its own. The predicted alpha parameter then depends critically on whether the fastest primary and parasitic modes fit within the computational domain and whether non-axisymmetric parasitic modes...... are allowed. Hence even simulations that resolve viscous and resistive scales may not saturate properly unless the numerical domain is large enough to allow the free evolution of both MRI and parasitic modes. To minimally satisfy these requirements in simulations with vertical background fields, the vertical...

  4. The azimuthal magnetorotational instability (AMRI)

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, G; Schultz, M; Hollerbach, R; Stefani, F

    2013-01-01

    We consider the interaction of differential rotation and toroidal fields that are current-free in the gap between two corotating axially unbounded cylinders. It is shown that nonaxisymmetric perturbations are unstable if the rotation rate and Alfven frequency of the field are of the same order almost independent of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. For the very steep rotation law \\Omega\\propto R^{-2} (the Rayleigh limit) this Azimuthal MagnetoRotational Instability (AMRI) scales with the ordinary Reynolds number and the Hartmann number, which allows a laboratory experiment with liquid metals like sodium or gallium in a Taylor-Couette container. The growth rate of AMRI scales with \\Omega^2 in the low-conductivity limit and with \\Omega in the high-conductivity limit. For the weakly nonlinear system the numerical values of the kinetic energy and the magnetic energy are derived for magnetic Prandtl numbers between 0.05 and unity. We find that the magnetic energy scales with the magnetic Reynolds number Rm, while th...

  5. Magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Salmeron, Roberto Aureliano; Salmeron, Raquel; Wardle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the linear growth and vertical structure of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in weakly ionised, stratified accretion discs. The magnetic field is initially vertical and dust grains are assumed to have settled towards the midplane, so charges are carried by electrons and ions only. Solutions are obtained at representative radial locations from the central protostar for different choices of the initial magnetic field strength, sources of ionisation, and disc surface density. The MRI is active over a wide range of magnetic field strengths and fluid conditions in low conductivity discs. For the minimum-mass solar nebula model, incorporating cosmic ray ionisation, perturbations grow at 1 AU for B < 8 G. For a significant subset of these strengths (0.2 - 5 G), the growth rate is of order the ideal MHD rate (0.75 Omega). Similarly, when cosmic rays are assumed to be excluded from the disc by the winds emitted by the magnetically active protostar, unstable modes grow at this radius for B less...

  6. The role of boundaries in the MagnetoRotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Gissinger, Christophe; Ji, Hantao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate numerically the flow of an electrically conducting fluid in a cylindrical Taylor-Couette flow when an axial magnetic field is applied. To minimize Ekman recirculation due to vertical no-slip boundaries, two independently rotating rings are used at the vertical endcaps. This configuration reproduces setup used in laboratory experiments aiming to observe the MagnetoRotational Instability (MRI). Our 3D global simulations show that the nature of the bifurcation, the non-linear saturation, and the structure of axisymmetric MRI modes are significantly affected by the presence of boundaries. In addition, large scale non-axisymmetric modes are obtained when the applied field is sufficiently strong. We show that these modes are related to Kelvin-Helmoltz destabilization of a free Shercliff shear layer created by the combined action of the applied field and the rotating rings at the endcaps. Finally, we compare our numerical simulations to recent experimental results obtained in the Prince...

  7. Radiative heat conduction and the magnetorotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2004.08329.x

    2004-01-01

    A photon or a neutrino gas, semicontained by a non-diffusive particle species through scattering, comprises a rather peculiar magnetohydrodynamic fluid where the magnetic field is truly frozen only to the comoving volume associated with the mass density. Although radiative diffusion precludes a formal adiabatic treatment of compressive perturbations, we cast the energy equation in quasi- adiabatic form by assuming a negligible rate of energy exchange among species on the time-scale of the perturbation. This leads to a simplified dispersion relation for toroidal, non-axisymmetric magnetorotational modes when the accretion disc has comparable stress contributions from diffusive and non-diffusive components. The properties of the modes of fastest growth are shown to depend strongly on the compressibility of the mode, with a reduction in growth rate consistent with the results of Blaes & Socrates for axisymmetric modes. A clumpy disc structure is anticipated on the basis of the polarization properties of the ...

  8. Non-axisymmetric vertical shear and convective instabilities as a mechanism of angular momentum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Volponi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Discs with a rotation profile depending on radius and height are subject to an axisymmetric linear instability, the vertical shear instability. Here we show that non-axisymmetric perturbations, while eventually stabilized, can sustain huge exponential amplifications with growth rate close to the axisymmetric one. Transient growths are therefore to all effects genuine instabilities. The ensuing angular momentum transport is positive. These growths occur when the product of the radial times the vertical wavenumbers (both evolving with time) is positive for a positive local vertical shear, or negative for a negative local vertical shear. We studied, as well, the interaction of these vertical shear induced growths with a convective instability. The asymptotic behaviour depends on the relative strength of the axisymmetric vertical shear (s_v) and convective (s_c) growth rates. For s_v > s_c we observed the same type of behaviour described above - large growths occur with asymptotic stabilization. When s_c > s_v th...

  9. Magnetorotational Explosive Instability in Keplerian Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Shtemler, Yuri; Mond, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that deferentially rotating disks that are in the presence of weak axial magnetic field are prone to a new nonlinear explosive instability. The latter occurs due to the near-resonance three-wave interactions of a magnetorotational instability with stable Alfven-Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. The dynamical equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of the three interacting modes are derived. Numerical solutions of the dynamical equations indicate that small frequency mismatch gives rise to two types of behavior: 1. explosive instability which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and 2. bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic solutions of the dynamical equations are obtained for the explosive instability regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  10. Explosive magnetorotational instability in Keplerian disks

    CERN Document Server

    Shtemler, Yu; Mond, M

    2016-01-01

    Differentially rotating disks under the effect of axial magnetic field are prone to a nonlinear explosive magnetorotational instability (EMRI). The dynamic equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of three weakly-detuned resonantly interacting modes are derived. As distinct from exponential growth in the strict resonance triads EMRI occurs due to the resonant interactions of a MRI mode with stable Alfv\\'en-Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. Numerical solutions of the dynamic equations for amplitudes of a triad indicate that two types of perturbations behavior can be excited for resonance conditions: (i) EMRI which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and (ii) bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic explicit solutions of the dynamic equations are obtained for EMRI regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  11. On the magnetorotational instability and elastic buckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil, Geoffrey M

    2015-05-08

    This paper demonstrates an equivalence between rotating magnetized shear flows and a stressed elastic beam. This results from finding the same form of dynamical equations after an asymptotic reduction of the axis-symmetric magnetorotational instability (MRI) under the assumption of almost-critical driving. The analysis considers the MRI dynamics in a non-dissipative near-equilibrium regime. Both the magnetic and elastic systems reduce to a simple one-dimensional wave equation with a non-local nonlinear feedback. Under transformation, the equation comprises a large number of mean-field interacting Duffing oscillators. This system was the first proven example of a strange attractor in a partial differential equation. Finding the same reduced equation in two natural applications suggests the model might result from other applications and could fall into a universal class based on symmetry.

  12. On the magnetorotational instability and elastic buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an equivalence between rotating magnetized shear flows and a stressed elastic beam. This results from finding the same form of dynamical equations after an asymptotic reduction of the axis-symmetric magnetorotational instability (MRI) under the assumption of almost-critical driving. The analysis considers the MRI dynamics in a non-dissipative near-equilibrium regime. Both the magnetic and elastic systems reduce to a simple one-dimensional wave equation with a non-local nonlinear feedback. Under transformation, the equation comprises a large number of mean-field interacting Duffing oscillators. This system was the first proven example of a strange attractor in a partial differential equation. Finding the same reduced equation in two natural applications suggests the model might result from other applications and could fall into a universal class based on symmetry. PMID:27547088

  13. Magnetorotational Instability in Liquid Metal Couette Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Noguchi, K; Colgate, S A; Nordhaus, J; Beckley, H F

    2002-01-01

    Despite the importance of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) as a fundamental mechanism for angular momentum transport in magnetized accretion disks, it has yet to be demonstrated in the laboratory. A liquid sodium alpha-omega dynamo experiment at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology provides an ideal environment to study the MRI in a rotating metal annulus (Couette flow). A local stability analysis is performed as a function of shear, magnetic field strength, magnetic Reynolds number, and turbulent Prandtl number. The later takes into account the minimum turbulence induced by the formation of an Ekman layer against the rigidly rotating end walls of a cylindrical vessel. Stability conditions are presented and unstable conditions for the sodium experiment are compared with another proposed MRI experiment with liquid gallium. Due to the relatively large magnetic Reynolds number achievable in the sodium experiment, it should be possible to observe the excitation of the MRI for a wide range of w...

  14. Explosive magnetorotational instability in Keplerian disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtemler, Yu.; Liverts, E.; Mond, M.

    2016-06-01

    Differentially rotating disks under the effect of axial magnetic field are prone to a nonlinear explosive magnetorotational instability (EMRI). The dynamic equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of three weakly detuned resonantly interacting modes are derived. As distinct from exponential growth in the strict resonance triads, EMRI occurs due to the resonant interactions of an MRI mode with stable Alfvén-Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. Numerical solutions of the dynamic equations for amplitudes of a triad indicate that two types of perturbations behavior can be excited for resonance conditions: (i) EMRI which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and (ii) bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic explicit solutions of the dynamic equations are obtained for EMRI regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  15. Explosive magnetorotational instability in Keplerian disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtemler, Yu., E-mail: shtemler@bgu.ac.il; Liverts, E., E-mail: eliverts@bgu.ac.il; Mond, M., E-mail: mond@bgu.ac.il [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Differentially rotating disks under the effect of axial magnetic field are prone to a nonlinear explosive magnetorotational instability (EMRI). The dynamic equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of three weakly detuned resonantly interacting modes are derived. As distinct from exponential growth in the strict resonance triads, EMRI occurs due to the resonant interactions of an MRI mode with stable Alfvén–Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. Numerical solutions of the dynamic equations for amplitudes of a triad indicate that two types of perturbations behavior can be excited for resonance conditions: (i) EMRI which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and (ii) bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic explicit solutions of the dynamic equations are obtained for EMRI regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  16. Magnetorotational Instability of Dissipative MHD Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERRON, ISOM H

    2010-07-10

    Executive summary Two important general problems of interest in plasma physics that may be addressed successfully by Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are: (1) Find magnetic field configurations capable of confining a plasma in equilibrium. (2) Study the stability properties of each such an equilibrium. It is often found that the length scale of many instabilities and waves that are able to grow or propagate in a system, are comparable with plasma size, such as in magnetically confined thermonuclear plasmas or in astrophysical accretion disks. Thus MHD is able to provide a good description of such large-scale disturbances. The Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is one particular instance of a potential instability. The project involved theoretical work on fundamental aspects of plasma physics. Researchers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) began to perform a series of liquid metal Couette flow experiments between rotating cylinders. Their purpose was to produce MRI, which they had predicted theoretically 2002, but was only observed in the laboratory since this project began. The personnel on the project consisted of three persons: (1) The PI, who was partially supported on the budget during each of four summers 2005-2008. (2) Two graduate research assistants, who worked consecutively on the project throughout the years 2005-2009. As a result, the first student, Fritzner Soliman, obtained an M.S. degree in 2006; the second student, Pablo Suarez obtained the Ph.D. degree in 2009. The work was in collaboration with scientists in Princeton, periodic trips were made by the PI as part of the project. There were 4 peer-reviewed publications and one book produced.

  17. Nonmodal analysis of helical and azimuthal magnetorotational instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Mamatsashvili, G

    2016-01-01

    The helical and the azimuthal magnetorotational instabilities operate in rotating magnetized flows with relatively steep negative or extremely steep positive shear. The corresponding lower and upper Liu limits of the shear, which determine the threshold of modal growth of these instabilities, are continuously connected when some axial electrical current is allowed to pass through the rotating fluid. We investigate the nonmodal dynamics of these instabilities arising from the nonnormality of shear flow in the local approximation, generalizing the results of the modal approach. It is demonstrated that moderate transient/nonmodal amplification of both types of magnetorotational instability occurs within the Liu limits, where the system is stable according to modal analysis. We show that for the helical magnetorotational instability this magnetohydrodynamic behavior is closely connected with the nonmodal growth of the underlying purely hydrodynamic problem.

  18. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  19. The Magneto-Rotational Decay Instability in Keplerian Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Shtemler, Yuri; Mond, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The saturation of the magnetorotational (MRI) instability in thin Keplerian disks through three wave resonant interactions is introduced and discussed. That mechanism is a natural generalization of the fundamental decay instability discovered five decades ago for infinite, homogeneous and immovable plasmas. The decay instability relies on the energy transfer from the MRI to stable slow Alfv'en-Coriolis (AC) as well as magnetosonic (MS) waves. A second order forced Duffing amplitude equation for the initially unstable MRI as well as two first order equations for the other two waves are derived. The solutions of those equations exhibit bounded bursty nonlinear oscillations for the MRI as well as unbounded growth for the linearly stable slow AC and MS perturbations, thus giving rise to the magneto-rotational decay instability (MRDI).

  20. Magnetorotational instability: nonmodal growth and the relationship of global modes to the shearing box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We study magnetorotational instability (MRI) using nonmodal stability techniques. Despite the spectral instability of many forms of MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very different from the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely different region of space. These ideas lead—for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes—to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using nonmodal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite timescales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that nonmodal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence.

  1. Magnetorotational Instability: Nonmodal Growth and the Relationship of Global Modes to the Shearing Box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Squire, A Bhattacharjee [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We study the magnetorotational instability (MRI) (Balbus & Hawley 1998) using non-modal stability techniques.Despite the spectral instability of many forms of the MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very diff erent to the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely di fferent region of space. These ideas lead – for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes – to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary diff erential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using non-modal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite time-scales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that non-modal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence (Squire & Bhattacharjee 2014).

  2. Magnetorotational instability in cool cores of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, L.; Ettori, S.; Bianconi, M.

    2015-10-01

    > Clusters of galaxies are embedded in halos of optically thin, gravitationally stratified, weakly magnetized plasma at the system's virial temperature. Owing to radiative cooling and anisotropic heat conduction, such intracluster medium (ICM) is subject to local instabilities, which are combinations of the thermal, magnetothermal and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. If the ICM rotates significantly, its stability properties are substantially modified and, in particular, also the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can play an important role. We study simple models of rotating cool-core clusters and we demonstrate that the MRI can be the dominant instability over significant portions of the clusters, with possible implications for the dynamics and evolution of the cool cores. Our results give further motivation for measuring the rotation of the ICM with future X-ray missions such as ASTRO-H and ATHENA.

  3. The Role of the Magnetorotational Instability in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most o...

  4. Magnetorotational Instability in a Rotating Liquid Metal Annulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Jeremy Goodman; Akira Kageyama

    2001-03-10

    Although the magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been widely accepted as a powerful accretion mechanism in magnetized accretion disks, it has not been realized in the laboratory. The possibility of studying MRI in a rotating liquid-metal annulus (Couette flow) is explored by local and global stability analysis and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Stability diagrams are drawn in dimensionless parameters, and also in terms of the angular velocities at the inner and outer cylinders. It is shown that MRI can be triggered in a moderately rapidly rotating table-top apparatus, using easy-to-handle metals such as gallium. Practical issues of this proposed experiment are discussed.

  5. Magnetorotational instability in weakly ionised, stratified accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Salmeron, Roberto Aureliano; Salmeron, Raquel; Wardle, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) (Balbus and Hawley 1991, Hawley and Balbus 1991) transports angular momentum radially outwards in accretion discs through the distortion of the magnetic field lines that connect fluid elements. In protostellar discs, low conductivity is important, especially in the inner regions (Gammie 1996, Wardle 1997). As a result, low k modes are relevant and vertical stratification is a key factor of the analysis. However, most models of the MRI in these environments have adopted either the ambipolar diffusion or resistive approximations and have not simultaneously treated stratification and Hall conductivity. We present here a linear analysis of the MRI, including the Hall effect, in a stratified disc.

  6. The Role of the Magnetorotational Instability in Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J Craig; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil

    2014-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is key physics in accretion disks and is widely considered to play some role in massive-star core collapse. Models of rotating massive stars naturally develop very strong shear at composition boundaries, a necessary condition for MRI instability, and the MRI is subject to triply-diffusive destabilizing effects in radiative regions. We have used the MESA stellar evolution code to compute magnetic effects due to the Spruit-Taylor mechanism and the MRI, separately and together, in a sample of massive star models. We find that the MRI can be active in the later stages of massive star evolution, leading to mixing effects that are not captured in models that neglect the MRI. The MRI and related magneto-rotational effects can move models of given ZAMS mass across "boundaries" from degenerate CO cores to degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores and from degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores to iron cores, thus affecting the final evolution and the physics of core collapse. The MRI acting alone can slow the...

  7. Astrophysical and experimental implications from the magnetorotational instability of toroidal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, G.; Gellert, M.; Schultz, M.; Hollerbach, R.; Stefani, F.

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of differential rotation and toroidal fields that are current-free in the gap between two corotating axially unbounded cylinders is considered. It is shown that non-axisymmetric perturbations are unstable if the rotation rate and Alfvén frequency of the field are of the same order, almost independent of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. For the very steep rotation law Ω ∝ R-2 (the Rayleigh limit) and for small Pm, the threshold values of rotation and field for this azimuthal magnetorotational instability (AMRI) scale with the ordinary Reynolds number and the Hartmann number, respectively. A laboratory experiment with liquid metals like sodium or gallium in a Taylor-Couette container has been designed on the basis of this finding. For fluids with more flat rotation laws, the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number are no longer typical quantities for the instability. For the weakly non-linear system, the numerical values of the kinetic energy and the magnetic energy are derived for magnetic Prandtl numbers ≤ 1. We find that the magnetic energy grows monotonically with the magnetic Reynolds number Rm, while the kinetic energy grows with Rm/√Pm. The resulting turbulent Schmidt number, as the ratio of the `eddy' viscosity and the diffusion coefficient of a passive scalar (such as lithium), is of the order of 20 for Pm = 1, but for small Pm it drops to the order of unity. Hence, in a stellar core with fossil fields and steep rotation law, the transport of angular momentum by AMRI is always accompanied by an intense mixing of the plasma, until the rotation becomes rigid.

  8. Azimuthal Magnetorotational Instability at low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, A; Willis, A P; Avila, M

    2016-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered to be one of the most powerful sources of turbulence in hydrodynamically stable quasi-Keplerian flows, such as those governing accretion disk flows. Although the linear stability of these flows with applied external magnetic field has been studied for decades, the influence of the instability on the outward angular momentum transport, necessary for the accretion of the disk, is still not well known. In this work we model Keplerian rotation with Taylor-Couette flow and imposed azimuthal magnetic field using both linear and nonlinear approaches. We present scalings of instability with Hartmann and Reynolds numbers via linear analysis and direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the two magnetic Prandtl numbers of $1.4 \\cdot 10^{-6}$ and $1$. Inside of the instability domains modes with different axial wavenumbers dominate, resulting in sub-domains of instabilities, which appear different for each $Pm$. The DNS show the emergence of 1- and 2-frequency spatio-te...

  9. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Turbulence Generated by the Magnetorotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Shigeo S; Suzuki, Takeru K; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigate stochastic particle acceleration in accretion flows. It is believed that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) generates turbulence inside accretion flows and that cosmic rays (CRs) are accelerated by the turbulence. We calculate equations of motion for CRs in the turbulent fields generated by MRI with the shearing box approximation without back reaction to the field. The results show that the CRs randomly gain or lose their energies through the interaction with the turbulent fields. The CRs diffuse in the configuration space anisotropically: The diffusion coefficient in direction of the unperturbed flow is about twenty times higher than the Bohm coefficient, while those in the other directions are only a few times higher than the Bohm. The momentum distribution is isotropic, and its evolution can be described by the diffusion equation in momentum space where the diffusion coefficient is a power-law function of the CR momentum. We show that the shear acceleration efficiently works for energet...

  10. Temperature Fluctuations driven by Magnetorotational Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    McNally, Colin P; Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2014-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are requ...

  11. Isotopic mixing by magnetorotational instability in the protolunar disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Steven; Carballido, Augusto; Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    One explanation for the striking similarity in isotopic ratios between the Earth and Moon is that isotopes were efficiently mixed in the protolunar disk and between the disk and the Earth. We examine the ability of the magnetorotational instability to act in the protolunar disk, calculating the ionization fraction of the vapor component and the resultant Elsasser numbers. We perform shearing box magnetohydrodynamic simulations to calculate the rate of turbulent mixing. We conclude that mixing of isotopes in the disk is effective on ~ 102 yr timescales, faster than the time for the disk to evolve and the Moon to form. We also consider the effectiveness of isotopic mixing between the disk and the Earth.

  12. Stability of compressible reduced magnetohydrodynamic equilibria - analogy with magnetorotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Philip J; Tronko, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Stability analyses for equilibria of the compressible reduced magnetohydrodynamics (CRMHD) model are carried out by means of the Energy-Casimir (EC) method. Stability results are compared with those obtained for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) from the classical {\\delta}W criterion. An identification of the terms in the second variation of the free energy functional for CRMHD with those of {\\delta}W is made: two destabilizing effects present for CRMHD turn out to correspond to the kink and interchange instabilities in usual MHD, while the stabilizing roles of field line bending and compressibility are also identified in the reduced model. Also, using the EC method, stability conditions in the presence of toroidal flow are obtained. A formal analogy between CRMHD and a reduced incompressible model for magnetized rotating disks, due to Julien and Knobloch [EAS Pub. Series, 21, 81 (2006)], is discovered. In light of this analogy, energy stability analysis shows that the condition for magnetorotational instabili...

  13. Magnetorotational instability in stratified, weakly ionised accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Salmeron, Roberto Aureliano; Salmeron, Raquel; Wardle, Mark

    2003-01-01

    We present a linear analysis of the vertical structure and growth of the magnetorotational instability in stratified, weakly ionised accretion discs, such as protostellar and quiescent dwarf novae systems. The method includes the effects of the magnetic coupling, the conductivity regime of the fluid and the strength of the magnetic field, which is initially vertical. The conductivity is treated as a tensor and assumed constant with height. We obtained solutions for the structure and growth rate of global unstable modes for different conductivity regimes, strengths of the initial magnetic field and coupling between ionised and neutral components of the fluid. The envelopes of short-wavelenght perturbations are determined by the action of competing local growth rates at different heights, driven by the vertical stratification of the disc. Ambipolar diffusion perturbations peak consistently higher above the midplane than modes including Hall conductivity. For weak coupling, perturbations including the Hall effec...

  14. Magnetorotational Instability in a Couette Flow of Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Noguchi, K; Noguchi, Koichi; Pariev, Vladimir I.

    2003-01-01

    All experiments, which have been proposed so far to model the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the laboratory, involve a Couette flow of liquid metals in a rotating annulus. All liquid metals have small magnetic Prandtl numbers, Pm, of about 10^{-6} (the ratio of kinematic viscosity to magnetic diffusivity). With plasmas both large and small Pm are achievable by varying the temperature and the density of plasma. Compressibility and fast rotation of the plasma result in radial stratification of the equilibrium plasma density. Evolution of perturbations in radially stratified viscous and resistive plasma permeated by an axial uniform magnetic field is considered. The differential rotation of the plasma is induced by the ExB drift in applied radial electric field. Global unstable eigenmodes are calculated by our newly developed matrix code. The plasma is shown to be MRI unstable for parameters easily achievable in experimental setup.

  15. Aspect ratio dependence in magnetorotational instability shearing box simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bodo, G; Cattaneo, F; Rossi, P; Ferrari, A

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We study the changes in the properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability in a shearing box, as the computational domain size in the radial direction is varied relative to the height Methods: We perform 3D simulations in the shearing box approximation, with a net magnetic flux, and we consider computational domains with different aspect ratios Results: We find that in boxes of aspect ratio unity the transport of angular momentum is strongly intermittent and dominated by channel solutions in agreement with previous work. In contrast, in boxes with larger aspect ratio, the channel solutions and the associated intermittent behavior disappear. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that, as the aspect ratio becomes larger, the characteristics of the solution become aspect ratio independent. We conclude that shearing box calculations with aspect ratio unity or near unity may introduce spurious effects.

  16. THE ROLE OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN MASSIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, J. Craig [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Kagan, Daniel [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil, E-mail: wheel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and FLASH Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is key to physics in accretion disks and is widely considered to play some role in massive star core collapse. Models of rotating massive stars naturally develop very strong shear at composition boundaries, a necessary condition for MRI instability, and the MRI is subject to triply diffusive destabilizing effects in radiative regions. We have used the MESA stellar evolution code to compute magnetic effects due to the Spruit-Tayler (ST) mechanism and the MRI, separately and together, in a sample of massive star models. We find that the MRI can be active in the later stages of massive star evolution, leading to mixing effects that are not captured in models that neglect the MRI. The MRI and related magnetorotational effects can move models of given zero-age main sequence mass across ''boundaries'' from degenerate CO cores to degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores and from degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores to iron cores, thus affecting the final evolution and the physics of core collapse. The MRI acting alone can slow the rotation of the inner core in general agreement with the observed ''initial'' rotation rates of pulsars. The MRI analysis suggests that localized fields ∼10{sup 12} G may exist at the boundary of the iron core. With both the ST and MRI mechanisms active in the 20 M {sub ☉} model, we find that the helium shell mixes entirely out into the envelope. Enhanced mixing could yield a population of yellow or even blue supergiant supernova progenitors that would not be standard SN IIP.

  17. Large-scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Blackman, Eric G.

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large-scale (planar averaged) fields in unstratified shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal (x-y) averaging, we also demonstrate the presence of large-scale fields when vertical (y-z) averaging is employed instead. By computing space-time planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large-scale dynamo action in the early MRI growth phase - a previously unidentified feature. Non-axisymmetric linear MRI modes with low horizontal wavenumbers and vertical wavenumbers near that of expected maximal growth, amplify the large-scale fields exponentially before turbulence and high wavenumber fluctuations arise. Thus the large-scale dynamo requires only linear fluctuations but not non-linear turbulence (as defined by mode-mode coupling). Vertical averaging also allows for monitoring the evolution of the large-scale vertical field and we find that a feedback from horizontal low wavenumber MRI modes provides a clue as to why the large-scale vertical field sustains against turbulent diffusion in the non-linear saturation regime. We compute the terms in the mean field equations to identify the individual contributions to large-scale field growth for both types of averaging. The large-scale fields obtained from vertical averaging are found to compare well with global simulations and quasi-linear analytical analysis from a previous study by Ebrahimi & Blackman. We discuss the potential implications of these new results for understanding the large-scale MRI dynamo saturation and turbulence.

  18. The magnetorotational instability in debris-disc gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Debris discs are commonly swathed in gas which can be observed in UV, in fine structure lines in FIR, and in resolved maps of CO emission. Carbon and oxygen are overabundant in such gas, but it is severely depleted in hydrogen. As a consequence, its ionisation fraction is remarkably high, suggesting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes may be important. In particular, the gas may be subject to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and indeed recent modelling of $\\beta$ Pictoris requires an anomalous viscosity to explain the gas's observed radial structure. In this paper we explore the possibility that the MRI is active in debris-disc gas and responsible for the observed mass transport. We find that non-ideal MHD and dust-gas interactions play a subdominant role, and that linear instability is viable at certain radii. However, owing to low gas densities, the outer parts of the disc could be stabilised by a weak ambient magnetic field, though it is difficult to constrain such a field. Even if the MRI is stabi...

  19. The magnetorotational instability in debris-disc gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Quentin; Latter, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Debris discs are commonly swathed in gas, which can be observed in UV, in fine structure lines in FIR, and in resolved maps of CO emission. Carbon and oxygen are overabundant in such gas, but it is severely depleted in hydrogen. As a consequence, its ionization fraction is remarkably high, suggesting that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes could be important. In particular, the gas may be subject to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and indeed, recent modelling of β Pictoris requires an anomalous viscosity to explain the gas's observed radial structure. In this paper, we explore the possibility that the MRI is active in debris-disc gas and responsible for the observed mass transport. We find that non-ideal MHD and dust-gas interactions play a subdominant role, and that linear instability is viable at certain radii. However, owing to low gas densities, the outer parts of the disc could be stabilized by a weak ambient magnetic field, though it is difficult to constrain such a field. Even if the MRI is stabilized by too strong a field, a magnetocentrifugal wind may be launched in its place, and this could lead to equivalent (non-turbulent) transport. Numerical simulations of the vertically stratified MRI in conditions appropriate to the debris-disc gas should be able to determine the nature of the characteristic behaviour at different radii, and decide on the importance of the MRI (and MHD more generally) on the evolution of these discs.

  20. The Role of the Magnetorotational Instability in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Daniel; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2014-05-01

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most of the convective zone, MRI modes are important in both stably stratified and convectively unstable locations near the tachocline at colatitudes θ grow faster than the corresponding axisymmetric modes; for some poloidal magnetic fields, the nonaxisymmetric MRI growth rates are similar to the angular rotation frequency Ω, while axisymmetric modes are stabilized. We briefly discuss the saturation of the field produced by MRI modes, finding that the implied field at the base of the convective zone in the Sun is comparable to that derived based on dynamos active in the tachocline and that the saturation of field resulting from the MRI may be of importance even in the upper convection zone.

  1. The role of the magnetorotational instability in the sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagan, Daniel; Wheeler, J. Craig, E-mail: kagan@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: wheel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most of the convective zone, MRI modes are important in both stably stratified and convectively unstable locations near the tachocline at colatitudes θ < 53°. Nonaxisymmetric MRI modes grow faster than the corresponding axisymmetric modes; for some poloidal magnetic fields, the nonaxisymmetric MRI growth rates are similar to the angular rotation frequency Ω, while axisymmetric modes are stabilized. We briefly discuss the saturation of the field produced by MRI modes, finding that the implied field at the base of the convective zone in the Sun is comparable to that derived based on dynamos active in the tachocline and that the saturation of field resulting from the MRI may be of importance even in the upper convection zone.

  2. Dynamo activities driven by magneto-rotational instability and Parker instability in galactic gaseous disk

    OpenAIRE

    Machida, Mami; NAKAMURA, Kenji E.; Kudoh, Takahiro; Akahori, Takuya; Yoshiaki, SOFUE; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2013-01-01

    We carried out global three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of dynamo activities in galactic gaseous disks without assuming equatorial symmetry. Numerical results indicate the growth of azimuthal magnetic fields non-symmetric to the equatorial plane. As magneto-rotational instability (MRI) grows, the mean strength of magnetic fields is amplified until the magnetic pressure becomes as large as 10% of the gas pressure. When the local plasma $\\beta$ ($ = p_{\\rm gas}/p_{\\rm mag}$) be...

  3. Temperature fluctuations driven by magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, Colin P. [Niels Bohr International Academy, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Hubbard, Alexander; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Yang, Chao-Chin, E-mail: cmcnally@nbi.dk, E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  4. Magneto-rotational instability in the protolunar disk

    CERN Document Server

    Carballido, Augusto; Taylor, G Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) We perform the first study of magnetohydrodynamic processes in the protolunar disk (PLD). With the use of published data on the chemical composition of the PLD, along with existing analytical models of the disk structure, we show that the high temperatures that were prevalent in the disk would have led to ionization of Na, K, SiO, Zn and, to a lesser extent, O$_2$. We assume that the disk has a vapor structure. The resulting ionization fractions, together with a relatively weak magnetic field, would have been sufficient to trigger the magneto-rotational instability, or MRI. We calculate the intensity of the resulting magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, as parameterized by the dimensionless ratio $\\alpha$ of turbulent stresses to gas pressure, and obtain maximum values $\\alpha\\sim 10^{-2}$ along most of the vertical extent of the disk, and at different orbital radii. Under these conditions, turbulent mixing within the PLD due to the MRI was likely capable of transporting isotopic and chemical species ef...

  5. Magnetorotational instability in neutron star mergers: impact of neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Guilet, Jerome; Just, Oliver; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The merger of two neutron stars may give birth to a long-lived hypermassive neutron star. If it harbours a strong magnetic field of magnetar strength, its spin-down could explain several features of short gamma-ray burst afterglows. The magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been proposed as a mechanism to amplify the magnetic field to the required strength. Previous studies have, however, neglected neutrinos, which may have an important impact on the MRI. We study the impact of neutrinos on the linear growth of the MRI by applying a local stability analysis to snapshots of a neutron star merger simulation. We find that neutrinos have a significant impact inside the hypermassive neutron star, but have at most a marginal effect in the torus surrounding it. Inside the hypermassive neutron star, the MRI grows in different regimes depending on the radius and on the initial magnetic field strength. For magnetic fields weaker than $10^{13}-10^{14}\\,{\\rm G}$, the growth rate of the MRI is significantly reduced due ...

  6. Experimental studies of magnetorotational instability in differentially rotating cylindrical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawn, Barbara; Lathrop, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    Given the ubiquity of rotating disks in the observable universe (e.g., galaxies, planetary rings, protoplanetary disks and accretion disks around compact objects), understanding differentially rotating, electrically conducting flows is of considerable astrophysical interest. Theoretical and numerical studies indicate that infall and accretion of orbiting material can result from a so-called magnetorotational instability (MRI) arising in such flows. Recent experimental work suggests that MRI is observable in a laboratory setting; inspired by these observations, we are building a sodium Taylor-Couette experiment, comprised of a stationary 30 cm diameter outer cylinder and a rotating 15 cm diameter inner cylinder, with liquid sodium filling the gap between the cylinders. Numerical studies indicate that MRI arises in this geometry in the presence of an external magnetic field; we will impose on the sodium flow a uniform axial magnetic field produced by Helmholtz coils at either end of the experiment. We will use ultrasound Doppler velocimetry to examine the turbulent sodium flow, and a Hall probe array to examine the induced magnetic field of the system, and will relate our observations to theoretical and numerical expectations.

  7. A Local Model for Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks Driven by the Magnetorotational Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    We develop a local model for the exponential growth and saturation of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses in turbulent flows driven by the magnetorotational instability. We first derive equations that describe the effects of the instability on the growth and pumping of the stresses. We highlight...

  8. Termination of the magnetorotational instability via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rembiasz, Tomasz; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Müller, Ewald; Aloy, Miguel-Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) can be a powerful mechanism amplifying the magnetic field in core collapse supernovae. However, whether initially weak magnetic fields can be amplified by this instability to dynamically relevant strengths is still a matter of active scientific debate. One of the main uncertainties concerns the process that terminates the growth of the instability. Parasitic instabilities of both Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and tearing-mode type have been suggested to play a crucial role in this process, disrupting MRI channel flows and quenching magnetic field amplification. We performed two-dimensional and three-dimensional sheering-disc simulations of a differentially rotating proto-neutron star layer in non-ideal MHD with unprecedented high numerical resolution. Our simulations show that KH parasitic modes dominate tearing modes in the regime of large hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, as encountered in proto-neutron stars. They also determine the maximum magnetic field stress ac...

  9. Magnetic flux concentration and zonal flows in magnetorotational instability turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xue-Ning [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Accretion disks are likely threaded by external vertical magnetic flux, which enhances the level of turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Using shearing-box simulations, we find that such external magnetic flux also strongly enhances the amplitude of banded radial density variations known as zonal flows. Moreover, we report that vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated toward low-density regions of the zonal flow. Mean vertical magnetic field can be more than doubled in low-density regions, and reduced to nearly zero in high-density regions in some cases. In ideal MHD, the scale on which magnetic flux concentrates can reach a few disk scale heights. In the non-ideal MHD regime with strong ambipolar diffusion, magnetic flux is concentrated into thin axisymmetric shells at some enhanced level, whose size is typically less than half a scale height. We show that magnetic flux concentration is closely related to the fact that the turbulent diffusivity of the MRI turbulence is anisotropic. In addition to a conventional Ohmic-like turbulent resistivity, we find that there is a correlation between the vertical velocity and horizontal magnetic field fluctuations that produces a mean electric field that acts to anti-diffuse the vertical magnetic flux. The anisotropic turbulent diffusivity has analogies to the Hall effect, and may have important implications for magnetic flux transport in accretion disks. The physical origin of magnetic flux concentration may be related to the development of channel flows followed by magnetic reconnection, which acts to decrease the mass-to-flux ratio in localized regions. The association of enhanced zonal flows with magnetic flux concentration may lead to global pressure bumps in protoplanetary disks that helps trap dust particles and facilitates planet formation.

  10. Elastorotational instability in Taylor-Couette flow with Keplerian ratio as analog of the Magnetorotational Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Bai, Yang; Crumeyrolle, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    The analogy between viscoelastic instability in the Taylor-Couette flow and the magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been found by Ogilvie & Potter. It relies on the similarity between the governing equations of viscoelastic flows of constant viscosity (Oldroyd-B model equations)and those of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We have performed linear stability analysis of the Taylor-Couette flow with a polymer solution obeying the Oldroyd-B model. A diagram of critical states shows the existence of stationary and helicoidal modes depending on the elasticity of the polymer solution. A generalized Rayleigh criterion determines the potentially unstable zone to pure elasticity-driven perturbations. Experimental results yield four type of modes : one pure elasticity mode and three elastorotational modes that are the MRI-analog modes. Anti-Keplerian case has also been investigated. There is a good agreement between experimental and theoretical results. Work supported by the CPER and ANR-LABEX EMC3.

  11. On characterizing non-locality and anisotropy for the magnetorotational instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which angular momentum transport in accretion discs is primarily local or non-local and what determines this is an important avenue of study for understanding accretion engines. Taking a step along this path, we analyse simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI...

  12. Investigating the Magnetorotational Instability with Dedalus, and Open-Souce Hydrodynamics Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Keaton J; /UC, Berkeley, aff SLAC

    2012-08-31

    The magnetorotational instability is a fluid instability that causes the onset of turbulence in discs with poloidal magnetic fields. It is believed to be an important mechanism in the physics of accretion discs, namely in its ability to transport angular momentum outward. A similar instability arising in systems with a helical magnetic field may be easier to produce in laboratory experiments using liquid sodium, but the applicability of this phenomenon to astrophysical discs is unclear. To explore and compare the properties of these standard and helical magnetorotational instabilities (MRI and HRMI, respectively), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities were added to Dedalus, an open-source hydrodynamics simulator. Dedalus is a Python-based pseudospectral code that uses external libraries and parallelization with the goal of achieving speeds competitive with codes implemented in lower-level languages. This paper will outline the MHD equations as implemented in Dedalus, the steps taken to improve the performance of the code, and the status of MRI investigations using Dedalus.

  13. A Local Model for Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks Driven by the Magnetorotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Pessah, M E; Psaltis, D; Pessah, Martin E.; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    We develop a local model for the exponential growth and saturation of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses in turbulent flows driven by the magnetorotational instability. We first derive equations that describe the effects of the instability on the growth and pumping of the stresses. We highlight the relevance of a new type of correlations that couples the dynamical evolution of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses and plays a key role in developing and sustaining the magnetorotational turbulence. We then supplement these equations with a phenomenological description of the triple correlations that lead to a saturated turbulent state. We show that the steady-state limit of the model describes successfully the correlations among stresses found in numerical simulations of shearing boxes.

  14. On the Impact of Radiation Damping on the Magnetorotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A; Araya-Gochez, Rafael A.; Vishniac, Ethan

    2002-01-01

    A photon gas--semi-contained by a neutral plasma through Compton scattering--comprises a rather peculiar MHD fluid where the magnetic field is truly frozen only to the co-moving volume associated with the mass density but for which pressure perturbations do not behave adiabatically. Using a Lagrangian displacement vector field formalism, we find analytical expressions for the magnetorotational modes of fastest growth in a background toroidal field embedded in a gaseous accretion disk with arbitrary adiabatic index. This result and the above remark are then utilized to assess the impact of radiative heat conduction on the development of the MRI. For exponentially growing, non-propagating modes, the energy equation is shown to behave mathematically in "quasi-adiabatic" fashion: A real, slow-varying function of the properly normalized scales of the perturbations, tilde{Gamma} (i tilde{k}^2 / tilde{omega}), can be used in lieu of the adiabatic index to account for loss of radiative pressure support out of compres...

  15. The signature of the magnetorotational instability in the Reynolds and Maxwell stress tensors in accretion discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability is thought to be responsible for the generation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that leads to enhanced outward angular momentum transport in accretion discs. Here, we present the first formal analytical proof showing that, during the exponential growth...... stresses during the late times of the exponential growth of the instability is determined only by the local shear and does not depend on the initial spectrum of perturbations or the strength of the seed magnetic. Even though we derived these properties of the stress tensors for the exponential growth...

  16. Magnetorotational and Tayler Instabilities in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vadim Urpin

    2017-09-01

    The magnetospheres around neutron stars should be very particular because of their strong magnetic field and rapid rotation. A study of the pulsar magnetospheres is of crucial importance since it is the key issue to understand how energy outflow to the exterior is produced. In this paper, we discuss magnetohydrodynamic processes in the pulsar magnetosphere. We consider in detail the properties of magnetohydrodynamic waves that can exist in the magnetosphere and their instabilities. These instabilities lead to formation of magnetic structures and can be responsible for short-term variability of the pulsar emission.

  17. Absolute versus convective helical magnetorotational instability in a Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Priede, Jānis

    2008-01-01

    We analyze numerically the magnetorotational instability of a Taylor-Couette flow in a helical magnetic field (HMRI) using the inductionless approximation defined by a zero magnetic Prandtl number (Pm=0). The Chebyshev collocation method is used to calculate the eigenvalue spectrum for small amplitude perturbations. First, we carry out a detailed conventional linear stability analysis with respect to perturbations in the form of Fourier modes that corresponds to the convective instability which is not in general self-sustained. The helical magnetic field is found to extend the instability to a relatively narrow range beyond its purely hydrodynamic limit defined by the Rayleigh line. There is not only a lower critical threshold at which HMRI appears but also an upper one at which it disappears again. The latter distinguishes the HMRI from a magnetically-modified Taylor vortex flow. Second, we find an absolute instability threshold as well. In the hydrodynamically unstable regime before the Rayleigh line, the t...

  18. Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo in a Collisionless Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Matthew W; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the first 3D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model of a collisionless accretion disc. The kinetic magnetorotational instability grows from a subthermal magnetic field having zero net flux over the computational domain to generate self-sustained turbulence and outward angular-momentum transport. Significant Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are accompanied by comparable viscous stresses produced by field-aligned ion pressure anisotropy, which is regulated primarily by the mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities through particle trapping and pitch-angle scattering. The latter endow the plasma with an effective viscosity that is biased with respect to the magnetic-field direction and spatio-temporally variable. Energy spectra suggest an Alfv\\'en-wave cascade at large scales and a kinetic-Alfv\\'en-wave cascade at small scales, with strong small-scale density fluctuations and weak non-axisymmetric density waves. Ions undergo n...

  19. Resonant instability of the nonlinearly-saturated magnetorotational mode in thin Keplerian discs

    CERN Document Server

    Shtemler, Yuri M; Liverts, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The magneto-rotational decay instability (MRDI) of thin Keplerian discs threaded by poloidal magnetic fields is introduced and studied. The linear magnetohydrodynamic problem decouples into eigenvalue problems for in-plane slow- and fast- Alfv'een-Coriolis (AC), and vertical magnetosonic (MS) eigenmodes. The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is composed of a discrete number of unstable slow AC eigenmodes that is determined for each radius by the local beta. In the vicinity of the first beta threshold a parent MRI eigenmode together with a stable AC eigenmode (either slow or fast) and a stable MS eigenmode form a resonant triad. The three-wave MRDI relies on the nonlinear saturation of the parent MRI mode and the exponential growth of two daughter linearly stable waves, slow-AC and MS modes with an effective growth rate that is comparable to that of the parent MRI. If, however, the role of the AC daughter wave is played by a stable fast mode, all three modes remain bounded.

  20. On the maximum magnetic field amplification by the magnetorotational instability in core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rembiasz, Tomasz; Obergaulinger, Martin; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Aloy, Miguel-Ángel; Müller, Ewald

    2016-01-01

    Whether the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can amplify initially weak magnetic fields to dynamically relevant strengths in core collapse supernovae is still a matter of active scientific debate. Recent numerical studies have shown that, in accordance with the parasitic model, given the core collapse supernova conditions, the MRI is terminated by parasitic instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type that disrupt MRI channel flows and quench further magnetic field growth. However, it remains to be properly assessed by what factor the initial magnetic field can be amplified and how it depends on the initial field strength and the amplitude of the perturbations. Different termination criteria which lead to different estimates of the amplification factor were proposed within the parasitic model. To determine the amplification factor and test which criterion is a better predictor of the MRI termination, we perform three-dimensional shearing-disc and shearing-box simulations of a region close to the surface of a...

  1. Magnetic field amplification in hypermassive neutron stars via the magnetorotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars likely lead to the formation of a hypermassive neutron star (HMNS), which is metastable and eventually collapses to a black hole. This merger scenario is thought to explain the phenomenology of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The very high energies observed in SGRBs have been suggested to stem from neutrino-antineutrino annihilation and/or from very strong magnetic fields created during or after the merger by mechanisms like the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Here, we report on results that show for the first time the development of the MRI in HMNSs in three-dimensional, fully general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. This instability amplifies magnetic fields exponentially and could be a vital ingredient in solving the SGRB puzzle.

  2. Magnetorotational Instability in Protoplanetary Disks; 2, Ionization State and Unstable Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, T; Umebayashi, T; Nakano, T; Sano, Takayoshi; Miyama, Shoken M.; Umebayashi, Toyoharu; Nakano, Takenori

    2000-01-01

    We investigate where in protoplanetary disks magnetorotational instability operates, which can cause angular momentum transport in the disks. We investigate the spatial distribution of various charged particles and the unstable regions for a variety of models for protoplanetary disks taking into account the recombination of ions and electrons at grain surfaces, which is an important process in most parts of the disks. We find that for all the models there is an inner region which is magnetorotationally stable due to ohmic dissipation. This must make the accretion onto the central star non-steady. For the model of the minimum-mass solar nebula, the critical radius, inside of which the disk is stable, is about 20 AU, and the mass accretion rate just outside the critical radius is 10^{-7} - 10^{-6} M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}. The stable region is smaller in a disk of lower column density. Dust grains in protoplanetary disks may grow by mutual sticking and may sediment toward the midplane of the disks. We find that the st...

  3. On the connection between the magneto-elliptic and magneto-rotational instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Mizerski, Krzysztof A

    2012-01-01

    It has been recently suggested that the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is a limiting case of the magneto-elliptic instability (MEI). This limit is obtained for horizontal modes in the presence of rotation and an external vertical magnetic field, when the aspect ratio of the elliptic streamlines tends to infinite. In this paper we unveil the link between these previously unconnected mechanisms, explaining both the MEI and the MRI as different manifestations of the same Magneto-Elliptic-Rotational Instability (MERI). The growth rates are found and the influence of the magnetic and rotational effects is explained, in particular the effect of the magnetic field on the range of negative Rossby numbers at which the horizontal instability is excited. Furthermore, we show how the horizontal rotational MEI in the rotating shear flow limit links to the MRI by the use of the local shearing box model, typically used in the study of accretion discs. In such limit the growth rates of the two instability types coincid...

  4. Magnetorotational instability of weakly ionized and magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdian, H.; Hajisharifi, K.; Azadnia, F.; Tajik-Nezhad, S.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetorotational instability in a differential rotating weakly ionized and magnetized plasma consisting of electron, positron, ion, and neutral particles has been investigated by using the multi-fluid model. Satisfying the current neutrality and homogeneity of the system in the equilibrium state by assuming the same unperturbed angular velocity for charge species and neutrals, the general local dispersion relation (DR) has been derived by taking into account the collision effects. By analytical examination of the obtained DR in the arbitrary and high frequency regimes, the instability conditions have been found in which the presence of light positive species (positrons) plays an important role in the instability criteria. Moreover, numerical investigation shows the broadening of instability range as well as increasing the maximum growth rate of instability (especially for the small number density ratio of light to heavy positive species) in the presence of positrons. The obtained results of the present investigation will greatly contribute to the understanding of the particles' dynamics as well as dissipation mechanism in some astrophysical environments, such as the region of accretion disks surrounding the central of black holes and protoplanetary disks.

  5. The intermediate r-process in core-collapse supernovae driven by the magneto-rotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Yamada, Shoichi; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-01-01

    Magneto-rotational supernovae are a possible astrophysical site of r-process nucleosynthesis, however, we have insufficient understanding of the explosion mechanism, especially the enhancement process of magnetic fields. We investigated the nucleosynthetic properties of magneto-rotational supernovae, based on a new explosion mechanism induced by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI). We performed a series of axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations, numerically resolving the MRI, with detailed microphysics including neutrino heating. Explosion models driven by neutrino heating enhanced by the MRI showed mildly neutron-rich ejecta producing weak r-process nuclei $A \\sim 130$, while an explosion model with a significant effect of magnetic fields reproduces a solar-like r-process pattern. More commonly seen abundance patterns in our models are in between the weak and regular r-process, producing lighter and intermediate mass nuclei. This intermediate r-process exhibits a variety of r-process abundance distribu...

  6. Non-Dissipative Saturation of the Magnetorotational Instability in Thin Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Liverts, Edward; Mond, Michael; Umurhan, Orkan M; Bisikalo, Dmitry V

    2012-01-01

    A new non-dissipative mechanism is proposed for the saturation of the axisymmetric magnetorotational (MRI) instability in thin Keplerian disks that are subject to an axial magnetic field. That mechanism relies on the energy transfer from the MRI to stable magnetosonic (MS) waves. Such mode interaction is enabled due to the vertical stratification of the disk that results in the discretization of its MRI spectrum, as well as by applying the appropriate boundary conditions. A second order Duffing-like amplitude equation for the initially unstable MRI modes is derived. The solutions of that equation exhibit bursty nonlinear oscillations with a constant amplitude that signifies the saturation level of the MRI. Those results are verified by a direct numerical solution of the full nonlinear reduced set of thin disk magnetohydrodynamics equations.

  7. Disk Winds Driven by Magnetorotational Instability and Dispersal of Proto-Planetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K

    2008-01-01

    By performing local three-dimensional MHD simulations of stratified accretion disks, we investigate disk winds driven by MHD turbulence. Initially given weak vertical magnetic fields are effectively amplified by magnetorotational instability and winding due to differential rotation. Large scale channel flows develop most effectively at 1.5 - 2 times the scale heights where the magnetic pressure is comparable to but slightly smaller than the gas pressure. The breakup of these channel flows drives structured disk winds by transporting the Poynting flux to the gas. These features are universally observed in the simulations of various initial fields. This disk wind process should play an essential role in the dynamical evaporation of proto-planetary disks. The breakup of channel flows also excites the momentum fluxes associated with Alfvenic and (magneto-)sonic waves toward the mid-plane, which possibly contribute to the sedimentation of small dust grains in protoplanetary disks.

  8. The weakly nonlinear magnetorotational instability in a thin-gap Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S E

    2016-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a fundamental process of accretion disk physics, but its saturation mechanism remains poorly understood despite considerable theoretical and computational effort. We present a multiple scales analysis of the non-ideal MRI in the weakly nonlinear regime -- that is, when the most unstable MRI mode has a growth rate asymptotically approaching zero from above. Here, we develop our theory in a thin-gap, Cartesian channel. Our results confirm the finding by Umurhan et al. (2007) that the perturbation amplitude follows a Ginzburg-Landau equation. We extend these results by performing a detailed force balance for the saturated azimuthal velocity and vertical magnetic field, demonstrating that even when diffusive effects are important, the bulk flow saturates via the combined processes of reducing the background shear and rearranging and strengthening the background vertical magnetic field. We directly simulate the Ginzburg-Landau amplitude evolution for our system and demons...

  9. Large scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi; Blackman, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large scale (planar averaged) fields in unstratified shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal ($x$-$y$) averaging, we demonstrate the presence of large scale fields when either horizontal or vertical ($y$-$z$) averaging is employed. By computing planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large scale dynamo action in the early MRI growth phase---a previously unidentified feature. Fast growing horizontal low modes and fiducial vertical modes over a narrow range of wave numbers amplify these planar averaged fields in the MRI growth phase, before turbulence sets in. The large scale field growth requires linear fluctuations but not nonlinear turbulence (as defined by mode-mode coupling) and grows as a direct global mode of the MRI. Only by vertical averaging, can it be shown that the growth of horizontal low wavenumber MRI modes directly feed-back to the initial vertica...

  10. The weakly nonlinear magnetorotational instability in a global, cylindrical Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S E

    2016-01-01

    We conduct a global, weakly nonlinear analysis of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a Taylor-Couette flow. This is a multiscale perturbative treatment of the nonideal, axisymmetric MRI near threshold, subject to realistic radial boundary conditions and cylindrical geometry. We analyze both the standard MRI, initialized by a constant vertical background magnetic field, and the helical MRI, with an azimuthal background field component. This is the first weakly nonlinear analysis of the MRI in a global Taylor-Couette geometry, as well as the first weakly nonlinear analysis of the helical MRI. We find that the evolution of the amplitude of the standard MRI is described by a real Ginzburg-Landau equation (GLE), while the amplitude of the helical MRI takes the form of a complex GLE. This suggests that the saturated state of the helical MRI may itself be unstable on long spatial and temporal scales.

  11. PIC simulations of the MagnetoRotational instability in electron-positron plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchingolo, Giannandrea; Grismayer, Thomas; Loureiro, Nuno F.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a crucial mechanism of angular momentum transport in a variety of astrophysical scenarios, as e-e+ plasmas accretion disks nearness neutron stars and black holes. The MRI has been widely studied using MHD models and simulations, in order to understand the behavior of astrophysical fluids in a state of differential rotation. When the timescale for electron and ion collisions is longer than the inflow time in the disk, the plasma is macroscopically collisionless and MHD breaks down. This is the case of the limit of weak magnetic field, i.e., as the ratio of the ion cyclotron frequency to orbital frequency becomes small. Leveraging on the recent addition of the shearing co-rotating frames equations of motion and Maxwell's equations modules in our PIC code OSIRIS 3.0, we intend to present our recent results of the analysis of MRI in electron-positron plasma in the limit of weak magnetic field. We will recall the theoretical 1D linear model of Krolik et Zweibel that describes the behavior of MRI in the limit of weak magnetic field and use it to support our results. Moving to 2D simulations, the analysis of MRI via PIC code permits to investigate also how MRI will act in comparison with other Kinetic instabilities, like mirror instability.

  12. Double-diffusive magnetorotational instability of super-rotation under the influence of azimuthal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, Guenther; Schultz, Manfred; Stefani, Frank

    2016-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the Azimuthal MagnetoRotational Instability (AMRI) also works with super-rotation contrary to the standard MRI for axial fields which requires negative shear. The stability against nonaxisymmetric perturbations of a conducting Taylor-Couette flow with positive shear under the influence of a toroidal magnetic field is considered which can indeed be unstable even if the field between the cylinders is current-free. This phenomenon is identified as a double-diffusive instability which only works for small or large magnetic Prandtl number Pm. For all Pm the unstable combinations of rotation and field lead to magnetic Mach numbers below unity. For small Pm the curves of marginal instability in the Hartmann/Reynolds number plane do not differ for differing Pm. For models with resting inner cylinder it is demonstrated that experiments to realize this form of AMRI with liquid sodium need axial electric currents of about 33 kAmp flowing inside the inner cylinder at r=0.8, independent of the glob...

  13. Semi-global simulations of the magneto-rotational instability in core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Obergaulinger, M; Müller, E; Aloy, M A

    2008-01-01

    Possible effects of magnetic fields in core collapse supernovae rely on an efficient amplification of the weak pre-collapse fields. The magneto-rotational instability (MRI) has been suggested to lead to rapid field growth. Although MRI studies exist for accretion discs, the application of their results to core collapse supernovae is inhibited as the physics of supernova cores is substantially different from that of accretion discs. We address the problem of growth and saturation of the MRI by means of semi-global simulations, which combine elements of global and local simulations by taking into account the presence of global background gradients and using a local computational grid. We analyze the dispersion relation of the MRI to identify different regimes of the instability. This analysis is complemented by simulations, where we consider a local computational box rotating at sub-Keplerian velocity, and where we allow for a radial entropy gradient. We identify six regimes of the MRI depending on the ratio of...

  14. Global multifluid simulations of the magnetorotational instability in radially stratified protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Rodgers-Lee, Donna; Downes, Turlough P

    2016-01-01

    The redistribution of angular momentum is a long standing problem in our understanding of protoplanetary disk (PPD) evolution. The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered a likely mechanism. We present the results of a study involving multifluid global simulations including Ohmic dissipation, ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect in a dynamic, self-consistent way. We focus on the turbulence resulting from the non-linear development of the MRI in radially stratified PPDs and compare with ideal MHD simulations. In the multifluid simulations the disk is initially set up to transition from a weak Hall dominated regime, where the Hall effect is the dominant non-ideal effect but approximately the same as or weaker than the inductive term, to a strong Hall dominated regime, where the Hall effect dominates the inductive term. As the simulations progress a substantial portion of the disk develops into a weak Hall dominated disk. We find a transition from turbulent to laminar flow in the inner regions of th...

  15. Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during magnetorotational instability in a kinetic accretion disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2015-02-13

    Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk are investigated using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. We show that the kinetic MRI can provide not only high-energy particle acceleration but also enhancement of angular momentum transport. We find that the plasma pressure anisotropy inside the channel flow with p(∥)>p(⊥) induced by active magnetic reconnection suppresses the onset of subsequent reconnection, which, in turn, leads to high-magnetic-field saturation and enhancement of the Maxwell stress tensor of angular momentum transport. Meanwhile, during the quiescent stage of reconnection, the plasma isotropization progresses in the channel flow and the anisotropic plasma with p(⊥)>p(∥) due to the dynamo action of MRI outside the channel flow contribute to rapid reconnection and strong particle acceleration. This efficient particle acceleration and enhanced angular momentum transport in a collisionless accretion disk may explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  16. Saturation and Thermalization of the Magnetorotational Instability Recurrent Channel Flows and Reconnections

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, T; Sano, Takayoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2001-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution and the saturation mechanism of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are investigated using three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations. A local shearing box is used for our numerical analysis and the simulations begin with a purely vertical magnetic field. We find that the magnetic stress in the nonlinear stage of the MRI is strongly fluctuating. The time evolution shows the quasi-periodic recurrence of spike-shape variations typically for a few orbits which correspond to the rapid amplification of the magnetic field by the nonlinear growth of a two-channel solution followed by the decay through magnetic reconnections. The increase rate of the total energy in the shearing box system is analytically related to the volume-averaged torque in the system. We find that at the saturated state this energy gain of the system is balanced with the increase of the thermal energy mostly due to the joule heating. The spike-shape time evolution is a general feature of the nonlinear evolution of t...

  17. Neutrino viscosity and drag: impact on the magnetorotational instability in proto-neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Guilet, Jerome; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is a promising mechanism to amplify the magnetic field in fast rotating proto-neutron stars (PNS). The diffusion of neutrinos trapped in the proto-neutron star induces a transport of momentum, which can be modeled as a viscosity on length scales longer than the neutrino mean free path. This neutrino-viscosity can slow down the growth of MRI modes to such an extent that a minimum initial magnetic field strength of $\\gtrsim 10^{12}\\, {\\rm G}$ is needed for the MRI to grow on a sufficiently short timescale to potentially affect the explosion. It is uncertain whether the magnetic field of fast rotating progenitor cores is strong enough to yield such an initial magnetic field in proto-neutron stars. At MRI wavelengths shorter than the neutrino mean free path, on the other hand, neutrino radiation does not act as a viscosity but rather induces a drag on the velocity with a damping rate independent of the wavelength. We perform a linear analysis of the MRI in this regime, and...

  18. Magnetorotational Instability Can Sustain Turbulence From Tangled Small-Scale Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi; Blackman, Eric G; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-01-01

    The initial conditions used in previous magnetorotational instability (MRI) simulations always consisted of a significant large or system-scale component, even if random. However it is of both conceptual and practical interest to assess whether the MRI can sustain when the initial field is turbulent, correlated on scales much smaller than the given system. More generally, we also study what minimum conditions the initial random small-scale field must have for the MRI to sustain the turbulence. The ubiquitous presence of turbulent or random flows in the high magnetic Reynolds number astrophysical plasmas in galaxies or stars for example, leads to a small-scale dynamo (SSD). This can generate random magnetic fields in the plasma that eventually enters an accretion disk. To simulate this scenario, we take the random field generated by the SSD as the input initial condition to a shearing box simulation that has uniform shear and rotation but with the forcing turned off. We find that the system becomes unstable to...

  19. Global Simulations of Dynamo and Magnetorotational Instability in Madison Plasma Experiments and Astrophysical Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Large-scale magnetic fields have been observed in widely different types of astrophysical objects. These magnetic fields are believed to be caused by the so-called dynamo effect. Could a large-scale magnetic field grow out of turbulence (i.e. the alpha dynamo effect)? How could the topological properties and the complexity of magnetic field as a global quantity, the so called magnetic helicity, be important in the dynamo effect? In addition to understanding the dynamo mechanism in astrophysical accretion disks, anomalous angular momentum transport has also been a longstanding problem in accretion disks and laboratory plasmas. To investigate both dynamo and momentum transport, we have performed both numerical modeling of laboratory experiments that are intended to simulate nature and modeling of configurations with direct relevance to astrophysical disks. Our simulations use fluid approximations (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD model), where plasma is treated as a single fluid, or two fluids, in the presence of electromagnetic forces. Our major physics objective is to study the possibility of magnetic field generation (so called MRI small-scale and large-scale dynamos) and its role in Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) saturation through nonlinear simulations in both MHD and Hall regimes.

  20. The Evolution and Impacts of Magnetorotational Instability in Magnetized Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sawai, Hidetomo

    2015-01-01

    We carried out 2D-axisymmetric MHD simulations of core-collapse supernovae for rapidly-rotating magnetized progenitors. By changing both the strength of the magnetic field and the spatial resolution, the evolution of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and its impacts upon the dynamics are investigated. We found that the MRI greatly amplifies the seed magnetic fields in the regime where not the Alfv\\'en mode but the buoyant mode plays a primary role in the exponential growth phase. The MRI indeed has a powerful impact on the supernova dynamics. It makes the shock expansion faster and the explosion more energetic, with some models being accompanied by the collimated-jet formations. These effects, however, are not made by the magnetic pressure except for the collimated-jet formations. The angular momentum transfer induced by the MRI causes the expansion of the heating region, by which the accreting matter gain an additional time to be heated by neutrinos. The MRI also drifts low-$Y_p$ matter from the deep i...

  1. On the maximum magnetic field amplification by the magnetorotational instability in core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembiasz, T.; Guilet, J.; Obergaulinger, M.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.

    2016-08-01

    Whether the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can amplify initially weak magnetic fields to dynamically relevant strengths in core-collapse supernovae is still a matter of active scientific debate. Recent numerical studies have shown that the first phase of MRI growth dominated by channel flows is terminated by parasitic instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type that disrupt MRI channel flows and quench further magnetic field growth. However, it remains to be properly assessed by what factor the initial magnetic field can be amplified and how it depends on the initial field strength and the amplitude of the perturbations. Different termination criteria leading to different estimates of the amplification factor were proposed within the parasitic model. To determine the amplification factor and test which criterion is a better predictor of the MRI termination, we perform three-dimensional shearing-disc and shearing-box simulations of a region close to the surface of a differentially rotating protoneutron star in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics with two different numerical codes. We find that independently of the initial magnetic field strength, the MRI channel modes can amplify the magnetic field by, at most, a factor of 100. Under the conditions found in protoneutron stars, a more realistic value for the magnetic field amplification is of the order of 10. This severely limits the role of the MRI channel modes as an agent amplifying the magnetic field in protoneutron stars starting from small seed fields. A further amplification should therefore rely on other physical processes, such as for example an MRI-driven turbulent dynamo.

  2. Magnetorotational instability in decretion disks of critically rotating stars and the outer structure of Be and Be/X-ray disks

    CERN Document Server

    Krticka, Jiri; Krtickova, Iva

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary models of fast-rotating stars show that the stellar rotational velocity may approach the critical speed. Critically rotating stars cannot spin up more, therefore they lose their excess angular momentum through an equatorial outflowing disk. The radial extension of such disks is unknown, partly because we lack information about the radial variations of the viscosity. We study the magnetorotational instability, which is considered to be the origin of anomalous viscosity in outflowing disks. We used analytic calculations to study the stability of outflowing disks submerged in the magnetic field. The magnetorotational instability develops close to the star if the plasma parameter is large enough. At large radii the instability disappears in the region where the disk orbital velocity is roughly equal to the sound speed. The magnetorotational instability is a plausible source of anomalous viscosity in outflowing disks. This is also true in the region where the disk radial velocity approaches the sound ...

  3. The Intermediate r-process in Core-collapse Supernovae Driven by the Magneto-rotational Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, N.; Sawai, H.; Takiwaki, T.; Yamada, S.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated r-process nucleosynthesis in magneto-rotational supernovae, based on a new explosion mechanism induced by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI). A series of axisymmetric magneto-hydrodynamical simulations with detailed microphysics including neutrino heating is performed, numerically resolving the MRI. Neutrino-heating dominated explosions, enhanced by magnetic fields, showed mildly neutron-rich ejecta producing nuclei up to A∼ 130 (i.e., the weak r-process), while explosion models with stronger magnetic fields reproduce a solar-like r-process pattern. More commonly seen abundance patterns in our models are in between the weak and regular r-process, producing lighter and intermediate-mass nuclei. These intermediate r-processes exhibit a variety of abundance distributions, compatible with several abundance patterns in r-process-enhanced metal-poor stars. The amount of Eu ejecta ∼ {10}-5 {M}ȯ in magnetically driven jets agrees with predicted values in the chemical evolution of early galaxies. In contrast, neutrino-heating dominated explosions have a significant amount of Fe ({}56{{Ni}}) and Zn, comparable to regular supernovae and hypernovae, respectively. These results indicate magneto-rotational supernovae can produce a wide range of heavy nuclei from iron-group to r-process elements, depending on the explosion dynamics.

  4. THE EVOLUTION AND IMPACTS OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN MAGNETIZED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, Hidetomo [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: hsawai@rist.or.jp [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    We carried out two-dimensional axisymmetric MHD simulations of core-collapse supernovae for rapidly rotating magnetized progenitors. By changing both the strength of the magnetic field and the spatial resolution, the evolution of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and its impacts upon the dynamics are investigated. We found that the MRI greatly amplifies the seed magnetic fields in the regime where the buoyant mode, not the Alfvén mode, plays a primary role in the exponential growth phase. The MRI indeed has a powerful impact on the supernova dynamics. It makes the shock expansion faster and the explosion more energetic, with some models being accompanied by the collimated jet formations. These effects, however, are not made by the magnetic pressure except for the collimated jet formations. The angular momentum transfer induced by the MRI causes the expansion of the heating region, by which the accreting matter gain additional time to be heated by neutrinos. The MRI also drifts low-Y{sub p} matter from deep inside of the core to the heating region, which makes the net neutrino heating rate larger by the reduction of the cooling due to the electron capture. These two effects enhance the efficiency of the neutrino heating, which is found to be the key to boosting the explosion. Indeed, we found that our models explode far more weakly when the net neutrino heating is switched off. The contribution of the neutrino heating to the explosion energy could reach 60% even in the case of strongest magnetic field in the current simulations.

  5. Emergence of nonlinearity and plausible turbulence in accretion disks via hydromagnetic transient growth faster than magnetorotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Sujit K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of hydromagnetic perturbations in a small section of accretion disks. It is known that molecular viscosity is negligible in accretion disks. Hence, it has been argued that Magnetorotational Instability (MRI) is responsible for transporting matter in the presence of weak magnetic field. However, there are some shortcomings, which question effectiveness of MRI. Now the question arises, whether other hydromagnetic effects, e.g. transient growth (TG), can play an important role to bring nonlinearity in the system, even at weak magnetic fields. Otherwise, whether MRI or TG, which is primarily responsible to reveal nonlinearity to make the flow turbulent? Our results prove explicitly that the flows with high Reynolds number (Re), which is the case of realistic astrophysical accretion disks, exhibit nonlinearity by best TG of perturbation modes faster than that by best modes producing MRI. For a fixed wavevector, MRI dominates over transient effects, only at low Re, lower than its value ...

  6. INFLUENCE OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY ON NEUTRINO HEATING: A NEW MECHANISM FOR WEAKLY MAGNETIZED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: hsawai@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-20

    We investigated the impact of magnetorotational instability (MRI) on the dynamics of weakly magnetized, rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae by conducting high-resolution axisymmetric MHD simulations with simplified neutrino transfer. We found that an initially sub-magnetar-class magnetic field is drastically amplified by MRI and substantially affects the dynamics thereafter. Although the magnetic pressure is not strong enough to eject matter, the amplified magnetic field efficiently transfers angular momentum from small to large radii and from higher to lower latitudes, which causes the expansion of the heating region due to the extra centrifugal force. This then enhances the efficiency of neutrino heating and eventually leads to neutrino-driven explosion. This is a new scenario of core-collapse supernovae that has never been demonstrated by past numerical simulations.

  7. Viscous, Resistive Magnetorotational Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2008-01-01

    We carry out a comprehensive analysis of the behavior of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in viscous, resistive plasmas. We find exact, non-linear solutions of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations describing the local dynamics of an incompressible, differentially rotating...

  8. Saturation of the magnetorotational instability in the unstratified shearing box with zero net flux: convergence in taller boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Huang, Chelsea X

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of the nonlinear regime of the magnetorotational instability in one particular type of shearing box model -- unstratified with no net magnetic flux -- find that without explicit dissipation (viscosity and resistivity) the saturation amplitude decreases with increasing numerical resolution. We show that this result is strongly dependent on the vertical aspect ratio of the computational domain $L_z/L_x$. When $L_z/L_x\\lesssim 1$, we recover previous results. However, when the vertical domain is extended $L_z/L_x \\gtrsim 2.5$, we find the saturation level of the stress is greatly increased (giving a ratio of stress to pressure $\\alpha \\gtrsim 0.1$), and moreover the results are independent of numerical resolution. Consistent with previous results, we find that saturation of the MRI in this regime is controlled by a cyclic dynamo which generates patches of strong toroidal field that switches sign on scales of $L_x$ in the vertical direction. We speculate that when $L_z/L_x\\lesssim 1$, the dynamo ...

  9. Angular Momentum Transport by MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disks: Gas Pressure Dependence of the Saturation Level of the Magnetorotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, T; Turner, N J; Stone, J M; Sano, Takayoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Turner, Neal J.; Stone, James M.

    2004-01-01

    The saturation level of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is investigated using three-dimensional MHD simulations. The shearing box approximation is adopted and the vertical component of gravity is ignored, so that the evolution of the MRI is followed in a small local part of the disk. We focus on the dependence of the saturation level of the stress on the gas pressure, which is a key assumption in the standard alpha disk model. From our numerical experiments it is found that there is a weak power-law relation between the saturation level of the Maxwell stress and the gas pressure in the nonlinear regime; the higher the gas pressure, the larger the stress. Although the power-law index depends slightly on the initial field geometry, the relationship between stress and gas pressure is independent of the initial field strength, and is unaffected by Ohmic dissipation if the magnetic Reynolds number is at least 10. The relationship is the same in adiabatic calculations, where pressure increases over time, an...

  10. Kinetic Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew; Stone, James; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity black-hole accretion flows, such as that at the Galactic center, are collisionless. A kinetic approach is thus necessary to understand the transport of heat and angular momentum, the acceleration of particles, and the growth and structure of the magnetic field in these systems. We present results from the first 6D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model. Special attention will be paid to the enhanced transport of angular momentum by field-aligned pressure anisotropies, as well as to the ion-Larmor-scale kinetic instabilities (firehose, mirror, ion-cyclotron) which regulate those anisotropies. Energy spectra and phase-space evolution will be discussed. Time permitting, dedicated nonlinear studies of firehose and mirror instabilities in a shearing plasma will also be presented as a complement to the study of the magnetorotational instability. The profits, perils, and price of using a kinetic approach will be briefly mentioned.

  11. Viscous, Resistive Magnetorotational Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Pessah, Martin E

    2008-01-01

    We carry out a comprehensive analysis of the behavior of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in viscous, resistive plasmas. We find exact, non-linear solutions of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations describing the local dynamics of an incompressible, differentially rotating background threaded by a vertical magnetic field when disturbances with wavenumbers perpendicular to the shear are considered. We provide a geometrical description of these viscous, resistive MRI modes and show how their physical structure is modified as a function of the Reynolds and magnetic Reynolds numbers. We demonstrate that when finite dissipative effects are considered, velocity and magnetic field disturbances are no longer orthogonal (as it is the case in the ideal MHD limit) unless the magnetic Prandtl number is unity. We generalize previous results found in the ideal limit and show that a series of key properties of the mean Reynolds and Maxwell stresses also hold for the viscous, resistive MRI. In particular, ...

  12. Stabilization of the vertical instability by non-axisymmetric coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Reiman, A. H.; Lao, L. L.; Cooper, W. A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Buttery, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    In a published Physical Review Letter (Reiman 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 135007), it was shown that axisymmetric (or vertical) stability can be improved by placing a set of parallelogram coils above and below the plasma oriented at an angle to the constant toroidal planes. The physics of this stabilization can be understood as providing an effective additional positive stability index. The original work was based on a simplified model of a straight tokamak and is not straightforwardly applicable to a finite aspect ratio, strongly shaped plasma such as in DIII-D. Numerical calculations were performed in a real DIII-D -like configuration to provide a proof of principal that 3-D fields can, in fact raise the elongation limits as predicted. A four field period trapezioid-shaped coil set was developed in toroidal geometry and 3D equilibria were computed using trapezium coil currents of 10 kA , 100 kA , and 500 kA . The ideal magnetohydrodynamics growth rates were computed as a function of the conformal wall position for the n = 0 symmetry-preserving family. The results show an insignificant relative improvement in the stabilizing wall location for the two lower coil current cases, of the order of 10-3 and less. In contrast, the marginal wall position is increased by 7% as the coil current is increased to 500 kA , confirming the main prediction from the original study in a real geometry case. In DIII-D the shift in marginal wall position of 7% would correspond to being able to move the existing wall outward by 5 to 10 cm. While the predicted effect on the axisymmetric stability is real, it appears to require higher coil currents than could be provided in an upgrade to existing facilities. Additional optimization over the pitch of the coils, the number of field periods and the coil positions, as well as plasma parameters, such as the internal inductivity {{\\ell}\\text{i}} , β , and {{q}95} would mitigate this but seem unlikely to change the conclusion.

  13. Instability of Non-uniform Toroidal Magnetic Fields in Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Kota

    2016-01-01

    A new type of instability that is expected to drive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence from a purely toroidal magnetic field in an accretion disk is presented. It is already known that in a differentially rotating system, the uniform toroidal magnetic field is unstable due to a magnetorotational instability (MRI) under a non-axisymmetric and vertical perturbation, while it is stable under a purely vertical perturbation. Contrary to the previous study, this paper proposes an unstable mode completely confined to the equatorial plane, driven by the expansive nature of the magnetic pressure gradient force under a non-uniform toroidal field. The basic nature of this growing eigenmode, to which we give a name "magneto-gradient driven instability", is studied using linear analysis, and the corresponding nonlinear evolution is then investigated using two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations. Although a single localized magnetic field channel alone cannot provide sufficient Maxwell stress to contribute significantly to...

  14. On the nature of local instabilities in rotating galactic coronae and cool cores of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing question is whether radiative cooling can lead to local condensations of cold gas in the hot atmospheres of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We address this problem by studying the nature of local instabilities in rotating, stratified, weakly magnetized, optically thin plasmas in the presence of radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction. For both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric linear perturbations we provide the general equations that can be applied locally to specific systems to establish whether they are unstable and, in case of instability, to determine the kind of evolution (monotonically growing or over-stable) and the growth rates of unstable modes. We present results for models of rotating plasmas representative of Milky Way-like galaxy coronae and cool-cores of galaxy clusters. It is shown that the unstable modes arise from a combination of thermal, magnetothermal, magnetorotational and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. Local condensation of cold clouds tends to be ha...

  15. Precession-driven flows in non-axisymmetric ellipsoids

    CERN Document Server

    Noir, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    We study the flow forced by precession in rigid non-axisymmetric ellipsoidal containers. To do so, we revisit the inviscid and viscous analytical models that have been previously developed for the spheroidal geometry by, respectively, Poincar\\'e (Bull. Astronomique, vol. XXVIII, 1910, pp. 1-36) and Busse (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 33, 1968, pp. 739-751), and we report the first numerical simulations of flows in such a geometry. In strong contrast with axisymmetric spheroids, where the forced flow is systematically stationary in the precessing frame, we show that the forced flow is unsteady and periodic. Comparisons of the numerical simulations with the proposed theoretical model show excellent agreement for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric containers. Finally, since the studied configuration corresponds to a tidally locked celestial body such as the Earth's Moon, we use our model to investigate the challenging but planetary-relevant limit of very small Ekman numbers and the particular case of our Moon.

  16. Ballistics Modeling for Non-Axisymmetric Hypervelocity Smart Bullets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-03

    1DoD PETTT, Dynamics Research Corporation, Andover, MA; on-site at NRL. Railgun 67-6754-04 Ballistics Modeling for non-Axisymmetric Hypervelocity...report is concerned with calculating the trajectory of the projectile fired from an electromagnetic launcher, or railgun , which attains supersonic...at supersonic speeds [1]. In the case of a railgun , there is no requirement involving a casing or high pressure seal. Instead, there is a requirement

  17. Non-Axisymmetric Shaping of Tokamaks Preserving Quasi-Axisymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long-Poe Ku and Allen H. Boozer

    2009-06-05

    If quasi-axisymmetry is preserved, non-axisymmetric shaping can be used to design tokamaks that do not require current drive, are resilient to disruptions, and have robust plasma stability without feedback. Suggestions for addressing the critical issues of tokamaks can only be validated when presented with sufficient specificity that validating experiments can be designed. The purpose of this paper is provide that specificity for non-axisymmetric shaping. To our knowledge, no other suggestions for the solution of a number of tokamak issues, such as disruptions, have reached this level of specificity. Sequences of three-field-period quasi-axisymmetric plasmas are studied. These sequences address the questions: (1) What can be achieved at various levels of non-axisymmetric shaping? (2) What simplifications to the coils can be achieved by going to a larger aspect ratio? (3) What range of shaping can be achieved in a single experimental facility? The sequences of plasmas found in this study provide a set of interesting and potentially important configurations.

  18. Experimental study of libration-driven zonal flows in non-axisymmetric containers

    CERN Document Server

    Noir, Jerome; Bars, Michael Le; Sauret, Alban; Aurnou, J M; 10.1016/j.pepi.2012.05.005

    2013-01-01

    Orbital dynamics that lead to longitudinal libration of celestial bodies also result in an elliptically deformed equatorial core-mantle boundary. The non-axisymmetry of the boundary leads to a topographic coupling between the assumed rigidmantle and the underlying low viscosity fluid.The present experimental study investigates theeffect of non axisymmetric boundaries on the zonal flow driven by longitudinal libration. For large enough equatorial ellipticity, we report intermittent space-filling turbulence in particular bands of resonant frequency correlated with larger amplitude zonal flow. The mechanism underlying the intermittent turbulence has yet to be unambiguously determined. Nevertheless, recent numerical simulations in triaxial and biaxial ellipsoids suggest that it may be associated with the growth and collapse of an elliptical instability (Cebron et al., 2012). Outside of the band of resonance, we find that the background flow is laminar and the zonal flow becomes independent of the geometry at firs...

  19. A dynamo model for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric solar magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, J

    2007-01-01

    Increasing observations are becoming available about a relatively weak, but persistent, non-axisymmetric magnetic field co-existing with the dominant axisymmetric field on the Sun. It indicates that the non-axisymmetric magnetic field plays an important role in the origin of solar activity. A linear non-axisymmetric alpha2-Omega dynamo model is set up to discuss the characteristics of the axisymmetric m=0 and the first non-axisymmetric m=1 modes and to provide further the theoretical bases to explain the active longitude, flip-flop and other non-axisymmetric phenomena. The model consists of a updated solar internal differential rotation, a turbulent diffusivity varied with depth and an alpha-effect working at the tachocline in rotating spherical systems. The difference between the alpha2-Omega and the alpha-Omega models and the conditions to favor the non-axisymmetric modes with the solar-like parameters are also presented.

  20. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J. [PPPL; Bhattacharjee, A. [PPPL

    2014-08-01

    We analyze turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) using quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. We find that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a very strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the quasi-linear model exhibits the same qualitative scaling of angular momentum transport with Pm as fully nonlinear turbulence. This demonstrates the relationship of recent convergence problems to the large scale dynamo and suggests possible methods for studying astrophysically relevant regimes at very low or high Pm.

  1. Statistical Simulation of the Magnetorotational Dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, Jonathan [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Max Planck Society, Garching (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Astrophysik

    2015-02-01

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  2. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-02-27

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  3. A Non-axisymmetric Spherical α2-Dynamo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using the Chebyshev-tau method, the generation of oscillatory nonaxisymmetric stellar magnetic fields by the α2-dynamo is studied in spherical geometry. Following the boundary conditions given by Schubert & Zhang, the spherical α2-dynamo consists of a fully convective spherical shell with inner radius ri and outer radius ro. A comparison of the critical dynamo numbers of axisymmetric and φ-dependent modes for different thicknesses of the convective shell and different α-profiles leads to the following qualitative results: (I) when the angular factor of α-profile is sinnθ cosθ (n = 1, 2, 4) the solutions of the α2-dynamo are oscillatory and non-axisymmetric, (ii) the thinner the convective shell, the more easily is the nonaxisymmetric mode excited and the higher is the latitudinal wave number, (iii) the thickness of the outer convective shell has an effect on the symmetries of the magnetic fields.

  4. Magnetorotational dynamo chimeras. The missing link to turbulent accretion disk dynamo models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riols, A.; Rincon, F.; Cossu, C.; Lesur, G.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Longaretti, P.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    In Keplerian accretion disks, turbulence and magnetic fields may be jointly excited through a subcritical dynamo mechanisminvolving magnetorotational instability (MRI). This dynamo may notably contribute to explaining the time-variability of various accreting systems, as high-resolution simulations of MRI dynamo turbulence exhibit statistical self-organization into large-scale cyclic dynamics. However, understanding the physics underlying these statistical states and assessing their exact astrophysical relevance is theoretically challenging. The study of simple periodic nonlinear MRI dynamo solutions has recently proven useful in this respect, and has highlighted the role of turbulent magnetic diffusion in the seeming impossibility of a dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl number (Pm), a common regime in disks. Arguably though, these simple laminar structures may not be fully representative of the complex, statistically self-organized states expected in astrophysical regimes. Here, we aim at closing this seeming discrepancy by reporting the numerical discovery of exactly periodic, yet semi-statistical "chimeral MRI dynamo states" which are the organized outcome of a succession of MRI-unstable, non-axisymmetric dynamical stages of different forms and amplitudes. Interestingly, these states, while reminiscent of the statistical complexity of turbulent simulations, involve the same physical principles as simpler laminar cycles, and their analysis further confirms the theory that subcritical turbulent magnetic diffusion impedes the sustainment of an MRI dynamo at low Pm. Overall, chimera dynamo cycles therefore offer an unprecedented dual physical and statistical perspective on dynamos in rotating shear flows, which may prove useful in devising more accurate, yet intuitive mean-field models of time-dependent turbulent disk dynamos. Movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Refraction and Shielding of Noise in Non-Axisymmetric Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the shielding effect of the mean flow and refraction of sound in non-axisymmetric jets. A general three-dimensional ray-acoustic approach is applied. The methodology is independent of the exit geometry and may account for jet spreading and transverse as well as streamwise flow gradients. We assume that noise is dominated by small-scale turbulence. The source correlation terms, as described by the acoustic analogy approach, are simplified and a model is proposed that relates the source strength to 7/2 power of turbulence kinetic energy. Local characteristics of the source such as its strength, time- or length-scale, convection velocity and characteristic frequency are inferred from the mean flow considerations. Compressible Navier Stokes equations are solved with a k-e turbulence model. Numerical predictions are presented for a Mach 1.5, aspect ratio 2:1 elliptic jet. The predicted sound pressure level directivity demonstrates favorable agreement with reported data, indicating a relative quiet zone on the side of the major axis of the elliptic jet.

  6. Non-axisymmetric equilibrium reconstruction for stellarators, reversed field pinches and tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, James D. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Anderson, D.T. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Cianciosa, M. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Franz, P. [EURATOM / ENEA, Italy; Harris, J. H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hartwell, G. H. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Hirshman, Steven Paul [ORNL; Knowlton, Stephen F. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Lao, Lang L. [General Atomics, San Diego; Lazarus, Edward Alan [ORNL; Marrelli, L. [Association EURATOM ENEA Fusion, Consorzio RFX, Padua, Italy; Maurer, D. A. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Schmitt, J. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Sontag, A. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Stevenson, B. A. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Terranova, D. [Association EURATOM ENEA Fusion, Consorzio RFX, Padua, Italy

    2013-01-01

    Axisymmetric equilibrium reconstruction using magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium solutions to the Grad Shafranov equation has long been an important tool for interpreting tokamak experiments. This paper describes recent results in non-axisymmetric (three-dimensional) equilibrium reconstruction of nominally axisymmetric plasmas (tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs)), and fully non-axisymmetric plasmas (stellarators). Results from applying the V3FIT code to CTH and HSX stellarator plasmas, RFX-mod RFP plasmas and the DIII-D tokamak are presented.

  7. Dwarf Nova Outbursts with Magnetorotational Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, M S B; Blaes, O; Lasota, J -P; Hirose, S

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenological Disc Instability Model has been successful in reproducing the observed light curves of dwarf nova outbursts by invoking an enhanced Shakura-Sunyaev $\\alpha$ parameter $\\sim0.1-0.2$ in outburst compared to a low value $\\sim0.01$ in quiescence. Recent thermodynamically consistent simulations of magnetorotational (MRI) turbulence with appropriate opacities and equation of state for dwarf nova accretion discs have found that thermal convection enhances $\\alpha$ in discs in outburst, but only near the hydrogen ionization transition. At higher temperatures, convection no longer exists and $\\alpha$ returns to the low value comparable to that in quiescence. In order to check whether this enhancement near the hydrogen ionization transition is sufficient to reproduce observed light curves, we incorporate this MRI-based variation in $\\alpha$ into the Disc Instability Model, as well as simulation-based models of turbulent dissipation and convective transport. These MRI-based models can successfully r...

  8. Dwarf nova outbursts with magnetorotational turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M. S. B.; Kotko, I.; Blaes, O.; Lasota, J.-P.; Hirose, S.

    2016-11-01

    The phenomenological disc instability model has been successful in reproducing the observed light curves of dwarf nova outbursts by invoking an enhanced Shakura-Sunyaev α parameter ˜0.1-0.2 in outburst compared to a low value ˜0.01 in quiescence. Recent thermodynamically consistent simulations of magnetorotational instability (MRI) turbulence with appropriate opacities and equation of state for dwarf nova accretion discs have found that thermal convection enhances α in discs in outburst, but only near the hydrogen ionization transition. At higher temperatures, convection no longer exists and α returns to the low value comparable to that in quiescence. In order to check whether this enhancement near the hydrogen ionization transition is sufficient to reproduce observed light curves, we incorporate this MRI-based variation in α into the disc instability model, as well as simulation-based models of turbulent dissipation and convective transport. These MRI-based models can successfully reproduce observed outburst and quiescence durations, as well as outburst amplitudes, albeit with different parameters from the standard disc instability models. The MRI-based model light curves exhibit reflares in the decay from outburst, which are not generally observed in dwarf novae. However, we highlight the problematic aspects of the quiescence physics in the disc instability model and MRI simulations that are responsible for this behaviour.

  9. Magnetic helicity in non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Pipin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The paper address the effects of magnetic helicity conservation in a non-linear nonaxisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model. We study the evolution of the shallow non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbation with the strength about 10G in the solar convection zone. The dynamo evolves from the pure axisymmetric stage through the short (about 2 years) transient phase when the non-axisymmetric m=1 dynamo mode is dominant to the final stage where the axisymmetry of the dynamo is almost restored. It is found that magnetic helicity is transferred forth and back over the spectral space during the transient phase. Also our simulations shows that the non-axisymmetric distributions of magnetic helicity tend to follows the regions of the Hale polarity rule.

  10. EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE NON-AXISYMMETRIC PERTURBATIONS IN THE MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipin, V. V. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kosovichev, A. G. [W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    We explore the response of a nonlinear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation that is anchored at 0.9 R{sub ⊙} has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric, with respect to the equator, perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fields depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number R{sub m}. In the range of R{sub m} = 10{sup 4}–10{sup 6} the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a nonlinear α-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state, the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of “active longitudes” with cyclic 180° “flip-flop” changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However, this effect disappears in the model, which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period and carries important information about the dynamo process.

  11. A viable non-axisymmetric non-force-free field to represent solar active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, A

    2016-01-01

    A combination of analytical calculations and vectormagnetogram data are utilized to develop a non-axisymmetric non-force-free magnetic field and asses its viability in describing solar active regions. For the purpose, we construct a local spherical shell where a planar surface, tangential to the inner sphere, represents a Cartesian cutout of an active region. The magnetic field defined on the surface is then correlated with magnetograms. The analysis finds the non-axisymmetric non-force-free magnetic field, obtained by a superposition of two linear-force-free fields, correlates reasonably well with magnetograms.

  12. Experimental investigation about the effect of non-axisymmetric wake impact on a low speed axial compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyong; Lu, Yajun; Li, Zhiping

    2010-05-01

    Non-axisymmetric wake impact experiments were carried out after the best exciting frequency for a low speed axial compressor had been found by axisymmetric wake impact experiments. When the number and circumferential distribution of inlet guide vanes (IGV) are logical the wakes of non-axisymmetric IGVs can exert beneficial unsteady exciting effect on their downstream rotor flow fields and improve the compressor’s performance. In the present paper, four non-axisymmetric wake impact plans were found working better than the axisymmetric wake impact plan. Compared with the base plan, the best non-axisymmetric plan increased the compressor’s peak efficiency, and the total pressure rise by 1.1 and 2%, and enhanced the stall margin by 4.4%. The main reason why non-axisymmetric plans worked better than the axisymmetric plan was explained as the change of the unsteady exciting signal arising from IGV wakes. Besides the high-frequency components, the non-axisymmetric plan generated a beneficial low-frequency square-wave exciting signal and other secondary frequency components. Compared with the axisymmetric plan, multi-frequency exciting wakes arising from the non-axisymmetric plans are easier to get coupling relation with complex vortices such as clearance vortices, passage vortices and shedding vortices.

  13. Modeling non-stationary, non-axisymmetric heat patterns in DIII-D tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Ciro, D; Caldas, I L

    2016-01-01

    Non-axisymmetric stationary magnetic perturbations lead to the formation of homoclinic tangles near the divertor magnetic saddle in tokamak discharges. These tangles intersect the divertor plates in static helical structures that delimit the regions reached by open magnetic field lines reaching the plasma column and leading the charged particles to the strike surfaces by parallel transport. In this article we introduce a non-axisymmetric rotating magnetic perturbation to model the time development of the three-dimensional magnetic field of a single-null DIII-D tokamak discharge developing a rotating tearing mode. The stable and unstable manifolds of the asymmetric magnetic saddle are calculated through an adaptive method providing the manifold cuts at a given poloidal plane and the strike surfaces. For the modeled shot, the experimental heat pattern and its time development are well described by the rotating unstable manifold, indicating the emergence of homoclinic lobes in a rotating frame due to the plasma ...

  14. Nonlinear Burn Control in Tokamaks using Heating, Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Fields, Isotopic fueling and Impurity injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Andres; Schuster, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    Plasma density and temperature regulation in future tokamaks such as ITER is arising as one of the main problems in nuclear-fusion control research. The problem, known as burn control, is to regulate the amount of fusion power produced by the burning plasma while avoiding thermal instabilities. Prior work in the area of burn control considered different actuators, such as modulation of the auxiliary power, modulation of the fueling rate, and controlled impurity injection. More recently, the in-vessel coil system was suggested as a feasible actuator since it has the capability of modifying the plasma confinement by generating non-axisymmetric magnetic fields. In this work, a comprehensive, model-based, nonlinear burn control strategy is proposed to integrate all the previously mentioned actuators. A model to take into account the influence of the in-vessel coils on the plasma confinement is proposed based on the plasma collisionality and the density. A simulation study is carried out to show the capability of the controller to drive the system between different operating points while rejecting perturbations. Supported by the US DOE under DE-SC0010661.

  15. The fundamental difference between shear alpha viscosity and turbulent magnetorotational stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent, magnetized, differentially rotating flows driven by the magnetorotational instability are often used to calculate the effective values of alpha viscosity that is invoked in analytical models of accretion discs. In this paper we use various dynamical models...... of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic stresses, as well as numerical simulations of shearing boxes, to show that angular momentum transport in MRI-driven accretion discs cannot be described by the standard model for shear viscosity. In particular, we demonstrate that turbulent magnetorotational stresses...... are not linearly proportional to the local shear and vanish identically for angular velocity profiles that increase outwards....

  16. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  17. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  18. Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo in a Collisionless Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew W.; Stone, James M.; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-12-01

    We present results from the first 3D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model of a collisionless accretion disk. The kinetic magnetorotational instability grows from a subthermal magnetic field having zero net flux over the computational domain to generate self-sustained turbulence and outward angular-momentum transport. Significant Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are accompanied by comparable viscous stresses produced by field-aligned ion pressure anisotropy, which is regulated primarily by the mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities through particle trapping and pitch-angle scattering. The latter endow the plasma with an effective viscosity that is biased with respect to the magnetic-field direction and spatiotemporally variable. Energy spectra suggest an Alfvén-wave cascade at large scales and a kinetic-Alfvén-wave cascade at small scales, with strong small-scale density fluctuations and weak nonaxisymmetric density waves. Ions undergo nonthermal particle acceleration, their distribution accurately described by a κ distribution. These results have implications for the properties of low-collisionality accretion flows, such as that near the black hole at the Galactic center.

  19. Suppression of edge localized mode crashes by multi-spectral non-axisymmetric fields in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayhyun; Park, Gunyoung; Bae, Cheonho; Yoon, Siwoo; Han, Hyunsun; Yoo, Min-Gu; Park, Young-Seok; Ko, Won-Ha; Juhn, June-Woo; Na, Yong Su; The KSTAR Team

    2017-02-01

    Among various edge localized mode (ELM) crash control methods, only non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (NAMPs) yield complete suppression of ELM crashes beyond their mitigation, and thus attract more attention than others. No other devices except KSTAR, DIII-D, and recently EAST have successfully achieved complete suppression with NAMPs. The underlying physics mechanisms of these successful ELM crash suppressions in a non-axisymmetric field environment, however, still remain uncertain. In this work, we investigate the ELM crash suppression characteristics of the KSTAR ELMy H-mode discharges in a controlled multi-spectral field environment, created by both n=2 middle reference and n=1 top/bottom proxy in-vessel control coils. Interestingly, the attempts have produced a set of contradictory findings, one expected (ELM crash suppression enhancement with the addition of n  =  1 to the n  =  2 field at relatively low heating discharges) and another unexpected (ELM crash suppression degradation at relatively high heating discharges) from the earlier findings in DIII-D. This contradiction indicates the dependence of the ELM crash suppression characteristics on the heating level and the associated kink-like plasma responses. Preliminary linear resistive MHD plasma response simulation shows the unexpected suppression performance degradation to be likely caused by the dominance of kink-like plasma responses over the island gap-filling effects.

  20. Periodic magnetorotational dynamo action as a prototype of nonlinear magnetic-field generation in shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herault, J; Rincon, F; Cossu, C; Lesur, G; Ogilvie, G I; Longaretti, P-Y

    2011-09-01

    The nature of dynamo action in shear flows prone to magnetohydrodynamc instabilities is investigated using the magnetorotational dynamo in Keplerian shear flow as a prototype problem. Using direct numerical simulations and Newton's method, we compute an exact time-periodic magnetorotational dynamo solution to three-dimensional dissipative incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with rotation and shear. We discuss the physical mechanism behind the cycle and show that it results from a combination of linear and nonlinear interactions between a large-scale axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field and nonaxisymmetric perturbations amplified by the magnetorotational instability. We demonstrate that this large-scale dynamo mechanism is overall intrinsically nonlinear and not reducible to the standard mean-field dynamo formalism. Our results therefore provide clear evidence for a generic nonlinear generation mechanism of time-dependent coherent large-scale magnetic fields in shear flows and call for new theoretical dynamo models. These findings may offer important clues to understanding the transitional and statistical properties of subcritical magnetorotational turbulence.

  1. Non-axisymmetric Structure of Accretion Disks in Be/X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hayasaki, K; Hayasaki, Kimitake; Okazaki, Atsuo T.

    2004-01-01

    The non-axisymmetric structure of accretion disks around the neutron star in Be/X-ray binaries is studied by analyzing the results from three dimensional (3D) Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. It is found that ram pressure due to the phase-dependent mass transfer from the Be-star disk excites a one-armed, trailing spiral structure in the accretion disk around the neutron star. The spiral wave has a transient nature; it is excited around the periastron, when the material is transferred from the Be disk, and is gradually damped afterwards. It is also found that the orbital phase-dependence of the mass-accretion rate is mainly caused by the inward propagation of the spiral wave excited in the accretion disk.

  2. Towards Simulating Non-Axisymmetric Influences on Aircraft Plumes for Signature Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzakowski, D. C.; Shipman, J. D.; Dash, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology for efficiently including three-dimensional effects on aircraft plume signature is presented. First, exploratory work on the use of passive mixing enhancement devices, namely chevrons and tabs, in IR signature reduction for external turbofan plumes is demonstrated numerically and experimentally. Such small attachments, when properly designed, cause an otherwise axisymmetric plume to have significant 3D structures, affecting signature prediction. Second, an approach for including non-axisymmetric and installation effects in plume signature prediction is discussed using unstructured methodology. Unstructured flow solvers, using advanced turbulence modeling and plume thermochemistry, facilitate the modeling of aircraft effects on plume structure that previously have been neglected due to gridding complexities. The capabilities of the CRUNCH unstructured Navier-Stokes solver for plume modeling is demonstrated for a passively mixed turbofan nozzle, a generic fighter nozzle, and a complete aircraft.

  3. Unsteady heat transfer in non-axisymmetric Homann stagnation-point flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, T. R.; Sidui, S.

    2017-04-01

    An analysis is carried out to study the unsteady non-axisymmetric Homann's stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of an incompressible viscous fluid over a rigid plate in the presence of time-dependent free stream. The temperature of the plate is assumed to be higher than the ambient fluid temperature. Using similarity variables, the governing partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These equations are then solved numerically using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method with shooting technique. The effects of the shear-to-strain rate ratio parameter γ (γ =b/a where a and b are the strain rate and shear rate of the stagnation-point flow, respectively) and the unsteadiness parameter λ on wall shear stress parameters, dimensionless velocities, rate of heat transfer at the wall and dimensionless temperature are analysed. It is found that the large-γ asymptotes do not depend on the parameter λ.

  4. Three-dimensional non-axisymmetric Lamb's problem for saturated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the integral transformation method with which the combinatory integral transform of the displacements and the combinatory integral transform of the stresses are presented, the three-dimensional (3-D) non-axisymmetric governing dynamic equation in the Biot's theory of two-phase medium is solved. Integral solutions with the soil skeleton displacements and pore pressure as the main unknown quantity are obtained. On the basis of this solution, a systematic study on Lamb's problems for saturated soils is performed. Considering the case of drained surface and the case of undrained surface, the integral solutions for surface radial, vertical and circumferential direction displacements under the vertical surface force and horizontal surface force are obtained,which would be reduced to the solutions of the classical Lamb's problem. So, the correctness of the solutions would be verified. The numerical example indicates that the two-dimensional (2-D) model cannot be applied to 3-D problem accurately.

  5. Three-dimensional non-axisymmetric Lamb’ s problem for saturated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄义; 张玉红

    2000-01-01

    Based on the integral transformation method with which the combinatory integral transform of the displacements and the combinatory integral transform of the stresses are presented, the three-dimensional (3-D) non-axisymmetric governing dynamic equation in the Biot’s theory of two-phase medium is solved. Integral solutions with the soil skeleton displacements and pore pressure as the main unknown quantity are obtained. On the basis of this solution, a systematic study on Lamb’ s problems for saturated soils is performed. Considering the case of drained surface and the case of undrained surface, the integral solutions for surface radial, vertical and circumferential direction displacements under the vertical surface force and horizontal surface force are obtained, which would be reduced to the solutions of the classical Lamb’s problem. So, the correctness of the solutions would be verified. The numerical example indicates that the two-dimensional (2-D) model cannot be applied to 3-D problem accurately.

  6. Non-axisymmetric flexural vibrations of free-edge circular silicon wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitriev, A.V., E-mail: dmitriev@hbar.phys.msu.ru; Gritsenko, D.S.; Mitrofanov, V.P., E-mail: mitr@hbar.phys.msu.ru

    2014-02-07

    Non-axisymmetric flexural vibrations of circular silicon (111) wafers are investigated. The modes with azimuthal index 2⩽k⩽30 are electrostatically excited and monitored by a capacitive sensor. The splitting of the mode frequencies associated with imperfection of the wafer is observed. The measured loss factors for the modes with 6≲k≲26 are close to those calculated according to the thermoelastic damping theory, while clamping losses likely dominate for k≲6, and surface losses at the level of inverse Q-factor Q{sup −1}≈4×10{sup −6} prevail for the modes with large k. The modes demonstrate nonlinear behavior of mainly geometrical origin at large amplitudes.

  7. A solvable model of axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric droplet bouncing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Matthew; Yeomans, Julia M; Pushkin, Dmitri O

    2017-02-07

    We introduce a solvable Lagrangian model for droplet bouncing. The model predicts that, for an axisymmetric drop, the contact time decreases to a constant value with increasing Weber number, in qualitative agreement with experiments, because the system is well approximated as a simple harmonic oscillator. We introduce asymmetries in the velocity, initial droplet shape, and contact line drag acting on the droplet and show that asymmetry can often lead to a reduced contact time and lift-off in an elongated shape. The model allows us to explain the mechanisms behind non-axisymmetric bouncing in terms of surface tension forces. Once the drop has an elliptical footprint the surface tension force acting on the longer sides is greater. Therefore the shorter axis retracts faster and, due to the incompressibility constraints, pumps fluid along the more extended droplet axis. This leads to a positive feedback, allowing the drop to jump in an elongated configuration, and more quickly.

  8. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear plasma response models for non-axisymmetric perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, A. D.; Ferraro, N. M.; Lao, L. L.; Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Izzo, V. A. [University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Lazarus, E. A.; Hirshman, S. P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Park, J.-K.; Lazerson, S.; Reiman, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Cooper, W. A. [Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Turco, F. [Columbia University, 116th St and Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    With the installation of non-axisymmetric coil systems on major tokamaks for the purpose of studying the prospects of ELM-free operation, understanding the plasma response to the applied fields is a crucial issue. Application of different response models, using standard tools, to DIII-D discharges with applied non-axisymmetric fields from internal coils, is shown to yield qualitatively different results. The plasma response can be treated as an initial value problem, following the system dynamically from an initial unperturbed state, or from a nearby perturbed equilibrium approach, and using both linear and nonlinear models [A. D. Turnbull, Nucl. Fusion 52, 054016 (2012)]. Criteria are discussed under which each of the approaches can yield a valid response. In the DIII-D cases studied, these criteria show a breakdown in the linear theory despite the small 10{sup −3} relative magnitude of the applied magnetic field perturbations in this case. For nonlinear dynamical evolution simulations to reach a saturated nonlinear steady state, appropriate damping mechanisms need to be provided for each normal mode comprising the response. Other issues arise in the technical construction of perturbed flux surfaces from a displacement and from the presence of near nullspace normal modes. For the nearby equilibrium approach, in the absence of a full 3D equilibrium reconstruction with a controlled comparison, constraints relating the 2D system profiles to the final profiles in the 3D system also need to be imposed to assure accessibility. The magnetic helicity profile has been proposed as an appropriate input to a 3D equilibrium calculation and tests of this show the anticipated qualitative behavior.

  9. Mechanism of non-axisymmetric pipe-wall thinning in pipeline with elbow and orifice under influence of swirling flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki, E-mail: fujisawa@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp [Visualization Research Center, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Kanatani, Nobuaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Yamagata, Takayuki, E-mail: yamagata@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp [Visualization Research Center, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Takano, Tsuyoshi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Pipe-wall thinning due to flow accelerated corrosion is studied. • Pipeline geometry consists of elbow and orifice in swirling flow. • Velocity field and mass transfer rate are measured in pipeline. • Non-axisymmetric pipe-wall thinning occurs behind orifice. - Abstract: In this study, the mechanism of non-axisymmetric pipe-wall thinning that led to a pipeline break in the Mihama nuclear power plant in 2004 is evaluated in a scale-model experiment in a water tunnel having an elbow and orifice under the influence of swirling flow. The velocity fields are measured by stereo particle image velocimetry, and the mass transfer rate is measured by a benzoic acid dissolution method at Reynolds number Re = 3 × 10{sup 4} with and without swirling flow. The non-axisymmetric swirling flow is found to be generated behind the elbow, even when the axisymmetric swirling flow is supplied in the upstream of the elbow. The secondary flow generated in the elbow is not suppressed in the pipeline 10 diameters downstream of elbow in the swirling flow, and in this flow geometry, the non-axisymmetry of the flow is greatly magnified downstream of the orifice. The measured mass transfer rates downstream of the orifice under the influence of swirling flow indicate that the Sherwood number distribution on one side of the pipe is enhanced and that on the other side is reduced owing to the appearance of the non-axisymmetric swirling flow, which results in the occurrence of non-axisymmetric pipe-wall thinning downstream of the orifice.

  10. Gravitational wave recoils in non-axisymmetric Robinson-Trautman spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aranha, R F; Tonini, E V

    2014-01-01

    We examine the gravitational wave recoil waves and the associated net kick velocities in non-axisymmetric Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. We use characteristic initial data for the dynamics corresponding to non-head-on collisions of black holes. We make a parameter study of the kick distributions, corresponding to an extended range of the incidence angle $\\rho_0$ in the initial data. For the range of $\\rho_0$ examined ($3^{\\circ} \\leq \\rho_0 \\leq 110^{\\circ}$) the kick distributions as a function of the symmetric mass parameter $\\eta$ satisfy a law obtained from an empirical modification of the Fitchett law, with a parameter $C$ that accounts for the non-zero net gravitational momentum wave fluxes for the equal mass case. The law fits accurately the kick distributions for the range of $\\rho_0$ examined, with a rms normalized error of the order of $5 \\%$. For the equal mass case the nonzero net gravitational wave momentum flux increases as $\\rho_0$ increases, up to $\\rho_0 \\simeq 55^{\\circ}$ beyond which it decr...

  11. Gravitational wave momentum extraction in non-axisymmetric Robinson-Trautman spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aranha, R F; Tonini, E V

    2014-01-01

    We examine numerically the gravitational wave recoil in non-axisymmetric Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. We construct characteristic initial data for the Robinson-Trautman dynamics which are interpreted as corresponding to the early post-merger state of two boosted colliding black holes with a common apparent horizon. Our analysis is based on the Bondi-Sachs energy-momentum conservation laws which regulate the radiative transfer processes involved in the emission of gravitational waves. We evaluate the Bondi-Sachs momentum flux carried out by gravitational waves and the associated net kick velocity defined (in a zero-initial-Bondi-momentum frame) as proportional to the total gravitational wave impulse imparted on the system. The kick velocity distributions are obtained and analyzed for two distinct classes of initial data corresponding to the early post-merger state of (i) non-head-on collisions and (ii) head-on collisions of black holes. For the first class (i), the net gravitational wave momentum fluxes and a...

  12. Non-axisymmetrical vibration of elastic circular plate on layered transversely isotropic saturated ground

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The non-axisymmetrical vibration of elastic circular plate resting on a layered transversely isotropic saturated ground was studied. First, the 3-d dynamic equations in cylindrical coordinate for transversely isotropic saturated soils were transformed into a group of governing differential equations with 1-order by the technique of Fourier expanding with respect to azimuth, and the state equation is established by Hankel integral transform method, furthermore the transfer matrixes within layered media are derived based on the solutions of the state equation. Secondly, by the transfer matrixes, the general solutions of dynamic response for layered transversely isotropic saturated ground excited by an arbitrary harmonic force were established under the boundary conditions,drainage conditions on the surface of ground as well as the contact conditions. Thirdly, the problem was led to a pair of dual integral equations describing the mixed boundaryvalue problem which can be reduced to the Fredholm integral equations of the second kind solved by numerical procedure easily. At the end of this paper, a numerical result concerning vertical and radical displacements both the surface of saturated ground and plate is evaluated.

  13. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Kanno, Ryutaro; Sugama, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially-local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport are investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight $\\delta f$ Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas $\\rm \\textbf{1}$, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transpo...

  14. Optimization of applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations using multimodal plasma response on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, D. B.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; Evans, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma response to proposed 3D coil geometries in the DIII-D tokamak is investigated using the linear MHD plasma response code MARS-F. An extensive examination of low- and high-field side coil arrangements shows the potential to optimize the coupling between imposed non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations and the total plasma response by varying the toroidal and poloidal spectral content of the applied field. Previous work has shown that n=2 and n=3 perturbations can suppress edge-localized modes (ELMs) in cases where the applied field's coupling to resonant surfaces is enhanced by amplifying marginally-stable kink modes. This research is extended to higher n-number configurations of 2 to 3 rows with up to 12 coils each in order to advance the physical understanding and optimization of both the resonant and non-resonant responses. Both in- and ex-vessel configurations are considered. The plasma braking torque is also analyzed, and coil geometries with favorable plasma coupling characteristics are discussed. Work supported by GA internal funds.

  15. Versatile controllability of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in KSTAR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hyunsun, E-mail: hyunsun@nfri.re.kr; Jeon, Y.M.; Hahn, S.H.; Ahn, H.S.; Bak, J.G.; In, Y.; Kim, J.; Woo, M.H.; Kim, H.S.; Jin, J.K.; Park, B.H.; Yoon, S.W.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A newly upgraded In-Vessel Control Coil(IVCC) system has been installed in KSTAR. • The system consists of broadband power supplies and a current connection patch panel. • The system has been confirmed for various dynamic demands of 3D magnetic field configurations. • It can help expand understanding of the 3D tokamak physics. - Abstract: A newly upgraded IVCC (In-Vessel Control Coil) system equipped with four broadband power supplies, along with a current connection patch panel, are introduced with a discussion of their capabilities on various KSTAR experiments. Until the 2014 KSTAR experimental campaign, the non-axisymmetric field configuration could not be changed in a shot, let alone the limited number of accessible configurations. With the installation of the new power supplies, such restrictions have been greatly reduced. Based on the 2015 KSTAR run-campaign, this new system was confirmed to easily cope with various dynamic demands for toroidal and poloidal phases of the 3D magnetic field in a shot. With newly equipped magnetic sensors, this enables us to extend the operational options and further explore the 3D physics for tokamak plasmas.

  16. Design, simulation, and measurement of LED reading lamp with non-axisymmetrical reflector and freeform lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yi-Yung; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei; Lu, Ming-Jun

    2011-10-01

    With the rapid development of various types of digi-readers, such as i-Pad, Kindle, and so on, non-self-luminous type has an advantage, low power consumption. This type of digi-reader reflects the surrounding light to display so it is no good at all to read under dim environment. In this paper, we design a LED lamp for a square lighted range with low power consumption. The e-book is about 12cm x 9cm, the total flux of LED is 3 Lm, and the LED lamp is put on the upper brink of the panel with 6cm height and 45 degree tilted angle. For redistributing the energy, the LED lamp has a freeform lens to control the light of small view angle and a non-axisymmetrical reflector to control the light of large view angle and create a rectangular-like spot. In accordance with the measurement data, the proposed optical structure achieves that the power consumption of LED light source is only 90mW, the average illumination is about 200 Lux, the uniformity of illumination is over 0.7, and the spot is rectangular-like with precise light/dark cutting-off line. Our designed optical structure significantly increases the efficiency of light using and meets the environmental goal of low energy consumption.

  17. Collapse of a non-axisymmetric, impact-created air cavity in water

    CERN Document Server

    Enriquez, Oscar R; Gekle, Stephan; Schmidt, Laura E; Lohse, Detlef; Van Der Meer, Devaraj

    2011-01-01

    The axisymmetric collapse of a cylindrical air cavity in water follows a universal power law with logarithmic corrections. Nonetheless, it has been suggested that the introduction of a small azimuthal disturbance induces a long term memory effect, reflecting in oscillations which are no longer universal but remember the initial condition. In this work, we show that the walls of a non-axisymmetric, impact-created cavity indeed oscillate with a nearly constant amplitude and increasing frequency as they collapse. The cavities are characterized by azimuthal harmonic disturbances with a single mode number $m$ and amplitude $a_m$. Our experimental setup allows us to investigate the influence of these two parameters in greater depth than any previous studies. For small initial distortion amplitude (1 or 2 % of the mean disc radius), the cavity walls oscillate linearly with nearly constant amplitude. Non-linear effects, if at all, are observed only at the very end of the collapse. As the amplitude is increased, non-l...

  18. Non-Axisymmetric Inflatable Pressure Structure (NAIPS) Full-Scale Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Warren, Jerry E.; Watson, Judith J.; Shariff, Khadijah; Makino, Alberto; Yount, Bryan C.

    2017-01-01

    Inflatable space structures have the potential to significantly reduce the required launch volume for large pressure vessels required for exploration applications including habitats, airlocks and tankage. In addition, mass savings can be achieved via the use of high specific strength softgoods materials, and the reduced design penalty from launching the structure in a densely packaged state. Large inclusions however, such as hatches, induce a high mass penalty at the interfaces with the softgoods and in the added rigid structure while reducing the packaging efficiency. A novel, Non-Axisymmetric Inflatable Pressure Structure (NAIPS) was designed and recently tested at NASA Langley Research Center to demonstrate an elongated inflatable architecture that could provide areas of low stress along a principal axis in the surface. These low stress zones will allow the integration of a flexible linear seal that substantially reduces the added mass and volume of a heritage rigid hatch structure. This paper describes the test of the first full-scale engineering demonstration unit (EDU) of the NAIPS geometry and a comparison of the results to finite element analysis.

  19. Finite Element Simulation on the Spin-forming of the 3D Non-axisymmetric Thin-Walled Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The roller movement trace for the 3D non-axisymmetric thin-walled tubes is a complex space curve. Besides the roller rotation caused by contact with the blank, the roller rotates around the workpiece together with the main spindle, and also moves simultaneously along the direction of the revolution radius. The method to correctly establish the finite element (FE) models of the metal spinning is based on the MSC. MARC software was introduced. The calculation formulas considering both the revolution and rotation of the roller were obtained by the mathematical deduction. The saving calculation points m should be a multiple of 4 for one revolution of the roller around the workpiece to obtain the maximum forming force for the spinning of the 3D non-axisymmetric thin-walled tubes. The simulation results conform well to the experimental ones for several spinning methods; the maximum error is less than ±15%.

  20. Variation of magnetic braking by non-axisymmetric magnetic fields depending on the perturbed field structure in the KSTAR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kimin; Jeon, Y. M.; Park, J.-K.; Ko, W. H.; In, Y.; Choe, W.; Kim, J.; Lee, S. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Kwak, J. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2017-03-01

    The variation of a magnetic braking profile by non-axisymmetric magnetic fields has been experimentally demonstrated and numerically validated in the KSTAR tokamak. Two types of n  =  2 non-resonant magnetic fields were applied by changing the relative phase of non-axisymmetric field coils. One is even parity, of which non-resonant fields deeply penetrate into the plasma core, and the other is odd parity localized at the plasma edge. The even and odd parity produced significantly different perturbed magnetic field structures, and thereby drove global and edge-dominant toroidal rotation damping, respectively. These distinct braking profiles are consistently reproduced by drift-kinetic particle simulations, indicating the possibility of the predictive utilization of non-resonant magnetic fields for rotation profile control.

  1. Oscillations of magnetic stars: II. Axisymmetric toroidal and non-axisymmetric shear Alfven modes in a spherical shell

    CERN Document Server

    Reese, D; Rieutord, M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out numerical and mathematical investigations of shear Alfven waves inside of a spherical shell filled with an incompressible conducting fluid, and bathed in a strong dipolar magnetic field. We focus on axisymmetric toroidal and non-axisymmetric modes, in continuation of a previous work by Rincon & Rieutord (2003). Analytical expressions are obtained for toroidal eigenmodes and their corresponding frequencies at low diffusivities. These oscillations behave like magnetic shear layers, in which the magnetic poles play a key role, and hence become singular when diffusivities vanish. It is also demonstrated that non-axisymmetric modes are split into two categories, namely poloidal or toroidal types, following similar asymptotic behaviours as their axisymmetric counterparts when the diffusivities become arbitrarily small.

  2. Rossby Wave Instability of Keplerian Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Lovelace, R V E; Colgate, S A; Nelson, A F

    1999-01-01

    We find a linear instability of non-axisymmetric Rossby waves in a thin non-magnetized Keplerian disk when there is a local maximum in the radial profile of a key function ${\\cal L}(r) \\equiv {\\cal F}(r) S^{2/\\Gamma}(r)$, where ${\\cal F}^{-1} = \\hat {\\bf z}\\cdot ({\\bf \

  3. Neoclassical toroidal torque generation by auxiliary heating in non-axisymmetric tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, E.; Nowak, S.; Sauter, O.

    2016-12-01

    In conditions of ideal axisymmetry, for a magnetized plasma in a generic bounded domain, necessarily toroidal, the uniform absorption of external energy (e.g. rf or isotropic alpha heating) clearly cannot give rise to net forces or torques. A rather common experimental observation on contemporary tokamaks is that the near central absorption of auxiliary heating power (often ICH, ECH, and LHCD) and current drive in presence of non axisymmetric magnetic perturbations, including tearing modes, drives a bulk plasma rotation in the co  -  I p direction. Also growing tearing modes provide a nonlinear magnetic braking that tends to flatten the rotation profile and clamp it at the q-rational surfaces. The physical origin of the torque associated with P aux absorption could be due the effects of asymmetry in deposition or in the equilibrium configuration, but here we consider also the effect of the response of the so called neoclassical offset velocity to the power dependent heat flow increment. The neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), due to error fields, internal magnetic kink or tearing modes tends to relax the plasma rotation to this asymptotic speed, which in absence of auxiliary heating is of the order of the ion diamagnetic velocity. It can be shown by a kinetic calculation, this offset velocity is a function of the absorbed heat and therefore of the injected auxiliary power, thereby forcing the plasma rotation in a direction opposite to the initial, to large values. The problem is discussed in the frame of the theoretical models of neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

  4. Non-axisymmetric ideal equilibrium and stability of ITER plasmas with rotating RMPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, C. J.; Cramp, R. G. J.; Gibson, S.; Lazerson, S. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Kirk, A.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic perturbations produced by the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coils will be rotated in ITER so that the spiral patterns due to strike point splitting which are locked to the RMP also rotate. This is to ensure even power deposition on the divertor plates. VMEC equilibria are calculated for different phases of the RMP rotation. It is demonstrated that the off harmonics rotate in the opposite direction to the main harmonic. This is an important topic for future research to control and optimize ITER appropriately. High confinement mode (H-mode) is favourable for the economics of a potential fusion power plant and its use is planned in ITER. However, the high pressure gradient at the edge of the plasma can trigger periodic eruptions called edge localized modes (ELMs). ELMs have the potential to shorten the life of the divertor in ITER (Loarte et al 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 1549) and so methods for mitigating or suppressing ELMs in ITER will be important. Non-axisymmetric RMP coils will be installed in ITER for ELM control. Sampling theory is used to show that there will be significant a {{n}\\text{coils}}-{{n}\\text{rmp}} harmonic sideband. There are nine coils toroidally in ITER so {{n}\\text{coils}}=9 . This results in a significant n  =  6 component to the {{n}\\text{rmp}}=3 applied field and a significant n  =  5 component to the {{n}\\text{rmp}}=4 applied field. Although the vacuum field has similar amplitudes of these harmonics the plasma response to the various harmonics dictates the final equilibrium. Magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n  =  3 and n  =  4 are applied to a 15 MA, {{q}95}≈ 3 burning ITER plasma. We use a three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic model (VMEC) to calculate ITER equilibria with applied RMPs and to determine growth rates of infinite n ballooning modes (COBRA). The {{n}\\text{rmp}}=4 case shows little change in ballooning mode growth rate as the RMP is

  5. Emergency Entry with One Control Torque: Non-Axisymmetric Diagonal Inertia Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llama, Eduardo Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In another work, a method was presented, primarily conceived as an emergency backup system, that addressed the problem of a space capsule that needed to execute a safe atmospheric entry from an arbitrary initial attitude and angular rate in the absence of nominal control capability. The proposed concept permits the arrest of a tumbling motion, orientation to the heat shield forward position and the attainment of a ballistic roll rate of a rigid spacecraft with the use of control in one axis only. To show the feasibility of such concept, the technique of single input single output (SISO) feedback linearization using the Lie derivative method was employed and the problem was solved for different number of jets and for different configurations of the inertia matrix: the axisymmetric inertia matrix (I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) = I(sub zz)), a partially complete inertia matrix with I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) > I(sub zz), I(sub xz) not = 0 and a realistic complete inertia matrix with I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) > I)sub zz), I(sub ij) not= 0. The closed loop stability of the proposed non-linear control on the total angle of attack, Theta, was analyzed through the zero dynamics of the internal dynamics for the case where the inertia matrix is axisymmetric (I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) = I(sub zz)). This note focuses on the problem of the diagonal non-axisymmetric inertia matrix (I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) > I(sub zz)), which is half way between the axisymmetric and the partially complete inertia matrices. In this note, the control law for this type of inertia matrix will be determined and its closed-loop stability will be analyzed using the same methods that were used in the other work. In particular, it will be proven that the control system is stable in closed-loop when the actuators only provide a roll torque.

  6. Non-axisymmetric vibrations of a transversely isotropic piezoelectric cylinder with different types of electric boundary conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, MY

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available and Department of Mathematics and Statistics P.B.X680, Pretoria 0001 FIN-40014 Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa e-mail: mshatlov@csir.co.za **School of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Po Box 2050, Johannesburg, South Africa, e-mail: arthur....every@wits.ac.za ***Sensor Science and Technology (SST) of CSIR Material Science and Manufacturing, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, CSIR, South Africa e-mail: ayenwongfai@csir.co.za Abstract: Coupled electro-mechanical non- axisymmetric vibrations are considered in a...

  7. Magnetorotationally driven wind cycles in local disc models

    CERN Document Server

    Riols, A; Latter, H; Ross, J P

    2016-01-01

    Jets, from the protostellar to the AGN context, have been extensively studied but their connection to the turbulent dynamics of the underlying accretion disc is poorly understood. Following a similar approach to Lesur et al. (2013), we examine the role of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the production and acceleration of outflows from discs. Via a suite of one-dimensional shearing-box simulations of stratified discs we show that magneto-centrifugal winds exhibit cyclic activity with a period of 10-20 Omega^{-1}, a few times the orbital period. The cycle seems to be more vigorous for strong vertical field; it is robust to the variation of relevant parameters and independent of numerical details. The convergence of these solutions (in particular the mass loss rate) with vertical box size is also studied. By considering a sequence of magnetohydrostatic equilibria and their stability, the periodic activity may be understood as the succession of the following phases: (a) a dominant MRI channel mode, (b)...

  8. Magnetorotationally driven wind cycles in local disc models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riols, A.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Latter, H.; Ross, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Jets, from the protostellar to the AGN context, have been extensively studied but their connection to the turbulent dynamics of the underlying accretion disc is poorly understood. Following a similar approach to Lesur, Fereira & Ogilvie, we examine the role of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the production and acceleration of outflows from discs. Via a suite of 1D shearing-box simulations of stratified discs, we show that magnetocentrifugal winds exhibit cyclic activity with a period of 10-20 Ω-1, a few times the orbital period. The cycle seems to be more vigorous for strong vertical field; it is robust to the variation of relevant parameters and independent of numerical details. The convergence of these solutions (in particular the mass-loss rate) with vertical box size is also studied. By considering a sequence of magnetohydrostatic equilibria and their stability, the periodic activity may be understood as the succession of the following phases: (a) a dominant MRI channel mode, (b) strong magnetic field generation, (c) consequent wind launching, and ultimately (d) vertical expulsion of the excess magnetic field by the expanding and accelerating gas associated with the wind. We discuss potential connections between this behaviour and observed time-variability in disc-jet systems.

  9. Modeling and Prediction of the Noise from Non-Axisymmetric Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Stewart J.

    2014-01-01

    mean flows which were meant to represent noise reduction concepts being considered by NASA. Testing (Ref. 5) showed that the method was feasible for the types of mean flows of interest in jet noise applications. Subsequently, this method was further developed to allow use of mean flow profiles obtained from a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solution of the flow. Preliminary testing of the generalized code was among the last tasks completed under this contract. The stringent noise-reduction goals of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program suggest that, in addition to potentially complex exhaust nozzle geometries, next generation aircraft will also involve tighter integration of the engine with the airframe. Therefore, noise generated and propagated by jet flows in the vicinity of solid surfaces is expected to be quite significant, and reduced-order noise prediction tools will be needed that can deal with such geometries. One important source of noise is that generated by the interaction of a turbulent jet with the edge of a solid surface (edge noise). Such noise is generated, for example, by the passing of the engine exhaust over a shielding surface, such as a wing. Work under this task supported an effort to develop a RANS-based prediction code for edge noise based on an extension of the classical Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) to transversely sheared base flows (Refs. 6 and 7). The RDT-based theoretical analysis was applied to the generic problem of a turbulent jet interacting with the trailing edge of a flat plate. A code was written to evaluate the formula derived for the spectrum of the noise produced by this interaction and results were compared with data taken at NASA Glenn for a variety of jet/plate configurations and flow conditions (Ref. 8). A longer-term goal of this task was to work toward the development of a high-fidelity model of sound propagation in spatially developing non-axisymmetric jets using direct numerical methods for solving the relevant

  10. The Magneto-Rotational Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Reyes Ruiz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta una revisión del problema de la acrecion de masa a través de los discos protoplanetarios. Se hace énfasis especialmente en el papel jugado por la inestabilidad magnetorotacional (MRI en el transporte de momento angular a través del disco. Se discuten las condiciones para el desarrollo de la MRI en las regiones débilmente ionizadas de discos protoplanetarios. Encontramos que la estratificación vertical del nivel de ionizacion, resultado de partículas y fotones externos de alta energía, inhibe el desarrollo de la inestabilidad aun mas del que se encuentra en modelos con ionizacion uniforme. Se discute también la inducción de una viscosidad anómala en la llamada zona muerta de los modelos de acrecion en capas, por las fluctuaciones en velocidad del material en las zonas activas que la rodean. Concluimos que el transporte de momento angular a través de la zona muerta ocurre con una eficiencia comparable a la de las zonas activas vecinas. Esto implica que los modelos actuales de discos protoplanetarios basados en la idea de acrecion en capas deben ser revisados en favor de modelos 1-D con un coeficiente de viscosidad variable.

  11. Elliptical flow instability in a conducting fluid triggered by an external magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, Konrad; Mizerski, Krzysztof

    2013-03-08

    We demonstrate that arbitrarily weak magnetic field may cause violent instability of an anticyclonic, recirculating flow with uniform mean angular velocity. This magnetohydrodynamic instability would trigger turbulence in the cores of vortices where neither centrifugal, exchange instability, nor magnetorotational instability is effective. In the accretion disk vortices this can be an important mechanism of enhanced outward transport of angular momentum.

  12. A method for the estimate of the wall diffusion for non-axisymmetric fields using rotating external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Fridström, R.; Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Volpe, F. A.; Drake, J.

    2013-08-01

    A new method for the estimate of the wall diffusion time of non-axisymmetric fields is developed. The method based on rotating external fields and on the measurement of the wall frequency response is developed and tested in EXTRAP T2R. The method allows the experimental estimate of the wall diffusion time for each Fourier harmonic and the estimate of the wall diffusion toroidal asymmetries. The method intrinsically considers the effects of three-dimensional structures and of the shell gaps. Far from the gaps, experimental results are in good agreement with the diffusion time estimated with a simple cylindrical model that assumes a homogeneous wall. The method is also applied with non-standard configurations of the coil array, in order to mimic tokamak-relevant settings with a partial wall coverage and active coils of large toroidal extent. The comparison with the full coverage results shows good agreement if the effects of the relevant sidebands are considered.

  13. Stability analysis of non-axisymmetric three-dimensional finite element rotor models with partial and full mass lumping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smitadhi Ganguly; A Nandi; S Neogy

    2014-06-01

    Unlike structural dynamics, the three-dimensional finite-element model of non-axisymmetric rotors on orthotropic bearings generates a large gyroscopic system with parametric stiffness. The present work explores the use of mass-lumping in stability analysis of such systems. Using a variant of Hill’s method, the problem reduces to a generalized Eigen value problem of order $nm \\times nm$, with as the order of the system in state vector representation and as the number of terms in the assumed solution. The matrices in both the sides of the Eigen value problem are expressed in terms of Kronecker products where the mass-matrix appears twice as a sub-matrix in both the sides of the equation. A particular one or both of them can be made diagonal. Both options produce sufficiently accurate results with considerable savings, even with a coarse mesh.

  14. Reconstruction of time-averaged temperature of non-axisymmetric turbulent unconfined sooting flame by inverse radiation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, L H

    2003-01-01

    A multi-wavelength inversion method is extended to reconstruct the time-averaged temperature distribution in non-axisymmetric turbulent unconfined sooting flame by the multi-wavelength measured data of low time-resolution outgoing emission and transmission radiation intensities. Gaussian, beta and uniform distribution probability density functions (PDF) are used to simulate the turbulent fluctuation of temperature, respectively. The reconstruction of time-averaged temperature consists of three steps. First, the time-averaged spectral absorption coefficient is retrieved from the time-averaged transmissivity data by an algebraic reconstruction technique. Then, the time-averaged blackbody spectral radiation intensity is estimated from the outgoing spectral emission radiation intensities. Finally, the time-averaged temperature is approximately reconstructed from the multi-wavelength time-averaged spectral emission radiation data by the least-squares method. Noisy input data have been used to test the performance ...

  15. Orbital Spectrum Analysis of Non-Axisymmetric Perturbations of the Guiding-Center Particle Motion in Axisymmetric Equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Zestanakis, P A; Anastassiou, G; Hizanidis, K

    2015-01-01

    The presence of non-axisymmetric perturbations in an axisymmetric magnetic field equilibrium renders the Guiding Center (GC) particle motion non-integrable and may result in particle, energy and momentum redistribution, due to resonance mechanisms. We analyse these perturbations in terms of their spectrum, as observed by the particles in the frame of unperturbed GC motion. We calculate semi-analytically the exact locations and strength of resonant spectral components of multiple perturbations. The presented Orbital Spectrum Analysis (OSA) method is based on an exact Action-Angle transform that fully takes into account Finite Orbit Width (FOW) effects. The method provides insight into the particle dynamics and enables the prediction of the effect of any perturbation to all different types of particles and orbits in a given, analytically or numerically calculated, axisymmetric equilibrium.

  16. Hydromagnetic Instabilities in Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lasky, Paul D; Kokkotas, Kostas D; Glampedakis, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    We model the non-linear ideal magnetohydrodynamics of poloidal magnetic fields in neutron stars in general relativity assuming a polytropic equation of state. We identify familiar hydromagnetic modes, in particular the 'sausage/varicose' mode and 'kink' instability inherent to poloidal magnetic fields. The evolution is dominated by the kink instability, which causes a cataclysmic reconfiguration of the magnetic field. The system subsequently evolves to new, non-axisymmetric, quasi-equilibrium end-states. The existence of this branch of stable quasi-equilibria may have consequences for magnetar physics, including flare generation mechanisms and interpretations of quasi-periodic oscillations.

  17. Magnetorotational turbulence in Taylor--Couette flow with imposed azimuthal magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, A; Hollerbach, R; Avila, M

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to be a powerful source of turbulence and momentum transport in astrophysical accretion discs, but obtaining observational evidence of its operation is challenging. Recently, laboratory experiments of Taylor--Couette flow with externally imposed axial and azimuthal magnetic fields have revealed the kinematic and dynamic properties of the MRI close to the instability onset. While good agreement was found with linear stability analyses, little is known about the transition to turbulence and transport properties of the MRI. We here report on a numerical investigation of the MRI with an imposed azimuthal magnetic field. We show that the laminar Couette flow becomes unstable to a wave rotating in the azimuthal direction and standing in the axial direction via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. Subsequently, the flow features a catastrophic transition to spatio-temporal defects which is mediated by a subcritical subharmonic Hopf bifurcation. Our results are in agree...

  18. Progress in the analysis of non-axisymmetric wave propagation in a homogeneous solid circular cylinder of a piezoelectric transversely isotropic material

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Every, AG

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available at www.sciencedirect.com Physics Procedia 00 (2009) 000?000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia International Congress on Ultrasonics, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, January 2009 Progress in the analysis of non-axisymmetric wave propagation in a...

  19. Characterisation of a refurbished 1½ stage turbine test rig for flowfield mapping behind blading with non-axisymmetric contoured endwalls

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snedden, Glen C

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available to performing tests on blading featuring non-axisymmetric endwalls in a lowspeed, rotating environment. The test rig has been refurbished in such a way as to dramatically improve the measurement standards and to provide the highest degree of commonality...

  20. Optimisation of non-axisymmetric end wall contours for the rotor of a low speed, 1 1/2 stage research turbine with unshrouded blades

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bergh, J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available improvements could be obtained through the design of custom end walls for the turbine. This investigation therefore covers the design of custom non-axisymmetric end wall contours for the rotor row of an annular turbine rig with unshrouded blades (the same rig...

  1. Flow instability of buoyant-Marangoni convection in the LEC GaAs melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flow transitions and instabilities have significant effects on the quality of the crystals. The flow and heat transfer in the LEC GaAs melt are numerically studied by a time-dependent and three-dimensional turbulent flow model. The effects of the change of the buoyancy and Marangoni force on the flow state are analyzed by changing the temperature difference between the crystal and the crucible walls. The results show that the flow will transform from axisymmetric steady flow to non-axisymmetric oscillatory flow when the temperature difference exceeds the critical value, and that the mechanism of the transition is attributed to the Marangoni instability. The critical temperature differences for the flow transitions corresponding to different melt depth H are numerically predicted. Several important characteristics of the non-axisymmetric buoyant-Marangoni convection are numerically observed and compared with that of the non-axisymmetric mixed convection coupled with crystal rotation.

  2. Global Structure of Magnetorotationally Turbulent Protoplanetary Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Flaig, M; Kley, W; Kissmann, R

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to investigate the spatial structure of a protoplanetary disc whose dynamics is governed by magnetorotational turbulence. We perform a series of local 3D chemo-radiative MHD simulations located at different radii of a disc which is twice as massive as the standard minimum mass solar nebula of Hayashi (1981). The ionisation state of the disc is calculated by including collisional ionisation, stellar X-rays, cosmic rays and the decay of radionuclides as ionisation sources, and by solving a simplified chemical network which includes the effect of the absorption of free charges by {\\mu}m-sized dust grains. In the region where the ionisation is too low to assure good coupling between matter and magnetic fields, a non-turbulent central "dead zone" forms, which ranges approximately from a distance of 2 AU to 4 AU from the central star. The approach taken in the present work allows for the first time to derive the global spatial structure of a protoplanetary disc from a set of physical...

  3. Reconstruction of time-averaged temperature of non-axisymmetric turbulent unconfined sooting flame by inverse radiation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.H. E-mail: liulh_hit@263.net; Man, G.L

    2003-05-01

    A multi-wavelength inversion method is extended to reconstruct the time-averaged temperature distribution in non-axisymmetric turbulent unconfined sooting flame by the multi-wavelength measured data of low time-resolution outgoing emission and transmission radiation intensities. Gaussian, {beta} and uniform distribution probability density functions (PDF) are used to simulate the turbulent fluctuation of temperature, respectively. The reconstruction of time-averaged temperature consists of three steps. First, the time-averaged spectral absorption coefficient is retrieved from the time-averaged transmissivity data by an algebraic reconstruction technique. Then, the time-averaged blackbody spectral radiation intensity is estimated from the outgoing spectral emission radiation intensities. Finally, the time-averaged temperature is approximately reconstructed from the multi-wavelength time-averaged spectral emission radiation data by the least-squares method. Noisy input data have been used to test the performance of the proposed inversion method. The results show that the time-averaged temperature distribution can be estimated with good accuracy, even with noisy input data. The accuracy of the estimation decreases with the increase of turbulent fluctuation intensity of temperature and the effects of assumed PDF on the reconstruction of temperature are small.

  4. Impact of toroidal and poloidal mode spectra on the control of non-axisymmetric fields in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanctot, M. J.; Park, J.-K.; Piovesan, P.; Sun, Y.; Buttery, R. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Grierson, B. A.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; In, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; La Haye, R. J.; Logan, N. C.; Marrelli, L.; Orlov, D. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wang, H. H.; Strait, E. J.

    2017-05-01

    In several tokamaks, non-axisymmetric magnetic field studies show that applied magnetic fields with a toroidal harmonic n = 2 can lead to disruptive n = 1 locked modes. In Ohmic plasmas, n = 2 magnetic reconnection thresholds in otherwise stable discharges are readily accessed at edge safety factors q ˜ 3, low density, and low rotation. Similar to previous studies with n = 1 fields, the thresholds are correlated with the "overlap" field computed with the IPEC code. The overlap field quantifies the plasma-mediated coupling of the external field to the resonant field. Remarkably, the "critical overlap fields" at which magnetic islands form are similar for applied n = 1 and 2 fields. The critical overlap field increases with plasma density and edge safety factor but is independent of the toroidal field. Poloidal harmonics m > nq dominate the drive for resonant fields while m 1 field control including the need for multiple rows of coils to control selected plasma parameters for specific functions (e.g., rotation control or ELM suppression).

  5. Evaluation of the toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Maassberg, Henning [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant magnetic perturbations (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) is an important momentum source affecting the toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. The well-known force-flux relation directly links this torque to the non-ambipolar neoclassical particle fluxes arising due to the violation of the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field. Here, a quasilinear approach for the numerical computation of these fluxes is described, which reduces the dimension of a standard neoclassical transport problem by one without model simplifications of the linearized drift kinetic equation. The only limiting condition is that the non-axisymmetric perturbation field is small enough such that the effect of the perturbation field on particle motion within the flux surface is negligible. Therefore, in addition to most of the transport regimes described by the banana (bounce averaged) kinetic equation also such regimes as, e.g., ripple-plateau and resonant diffusion regimes are naturally included in this approach. Based on this approach, a quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 [W. Kernbichler et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 3, S1061 (2008).] has been developed and benchmarked against a few analytical and numerical models. Results from NEO-2 stay in good agreement with results from these models in their pertinent range of validity.

  6. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The DIII-D Team; The Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m  =  qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, ν \\text{ped}\\ast≤slant 0.4 : (a) a reduction of the global plasma density by up to 61 % and (b) a reduction of the energy loss associated with edge localised modes (ELMs) by a factor of up to 9. A comprehensive database of ELM mitigation pulses at low {ν\\ast} in ASDEX Upgrade shows that the degree of ELM mitigation correlates with the reduction of pedestal pressure which in turn is limited and defined by the onset of ELMs, i. e. a modification of the ELM stability limit by the magnetic perturbation.

  7. Non-axisymmetric equilibrium reconstruction of a current-carrying stellarator using external magnetic and soft x-ray inversion radius measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X., E-mail: xzm0005@auburn.edu; Maurer, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.; ArchMiller, M. C.; Ennis, D. A.; Hanson, J. D.; Hartwell, G. J.; Hebert, J. D.; Herfindal, J. L.; Pandya, M. D.; Roberds, N. A.; Traverso, P. J. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Cianciosa, M. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Non-axisymmetric free-boundary equilibrium reconstructions of stellarator plasmas are performed for discharges in which the magnetic configuration is strongly modified by ohmically driven plasma current. These studies were performed on the compact toroidal hybrid device using the V3FIT reconstruction code with a set of 50 magnetic diagnostics external to the plasma. With the assumption of closed magnetic flux surfaces, the reconstructions using external magnetic measurements allow accurate estimates of the net toroidal flux within the last closed flux surface, the edge safety factor, and the plasma shape of these highly non-axisymmetric plasmas. The inversion radius of standard sawteeth is used to infer the current profile near the magnetic axis; with external magnetic diagnostics alone, the current density profile is imprecisely reconstructed.

  8. THE r-PROCESS IN MAGNETOROTATIONAL SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Nishimura, Nobuya, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, ST5 5BG Keele (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-20

    One of the hottest open issues involving the chemical evolution of r-process elements is fast enrichment in the early universe. Clear evidence for the chemical enrichement of r-process elements is seen in the stellar abundances of extremely metal poor stars in the Galactic halo. However, small-mass galaxies are the ideal testbed for studying the evolutionary features of r-process enrichment given the potential rarity of production events yielding heavy r-process elements. Their occurrences become countable and thus an enrichment path due to each event can be found in the stellar abundances. We examine the chemical feature of Eu abundance at an early stage of [Fe/H] ≲ −2 in the Draco and Sculptor dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. Accordingly, we constrain the properties of Eu production in the early dSphs. We find that the Draco dSph experienced a few Eu production events, whereas Eu enrichment took place more continuously in the Sculptor dSph due to its larger stellar mass. The event rate of Eu production is estimated to be about one per 100−200 core-collapse supernovae, and a Eu mass of ∼ (1–2) × 10{sup −5}M{sub ⊙} per single event is deduced by associating this frequency with the observed plateau value of [Eu/H] ∼ −1.3 for [Fe/H] ≳ −2. The observed plateau implies that early Eu enrichment ceases at [Fe/H] ≈ −2. Such a selective operation only in low-metallicity stars supports magnetorotational supernovae, which require very fast rotation, as the site of early Eu production. We show that the Eu yields deduced from chemical evolution agree well with the nucleosynthesis results from corresponding supernovae models.

  9. Magnetorotational dynamo chimeras. The missing link to turbulent accretion disk dynamo models?

    CERN Document Server

    Riols, A; Cossu, C; Lesur, G; Ogilvie, G I; Longaretti, P-Y

    2016-01-01

    In Keplerian accretion disks, turbulence and magnetic fields may be jointly excited through a subcritical dynamo process involving the magnetorotational instability (MRI). High-resolution simulations exhibit a tendency towards statistical self-organization of MRI dynamo turbulence into large-scale cyclic dynamics. Understanding the physical origin of these structures, and whether they can be sustained and transport angular momentum efficiently in astrophysical conditions, represents a significant theoretical challenge. The discovery of simple periodic nonlinear MRI dynamo solutions has recently proven useful in this respect, and has notably served to highlight the role of turbulent magnetic diffusion in the seeming decay of the dynamics at low magnetic Prandtl number Pm (magnetic diffusivity larger than viscosity), a common regime in accretion disks. The connection between these simple structures and the statistical organization reported in turbulent simulations remained elusive, though. Here, we report the n...

  10. Sustained Magnetorotational Turbulence in Local Simulations of Stratified Disks with Zero Net Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, S W; Pessah, M E

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effects of density stratification on magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability in local simulations that adopt the shearing box approximation. Our primary result is that, even in the absence of explicit dissipation, the addition of vertical gravity leads to convergence in the turbulent energy densities and stresses as the resolution increases, contrary to results for zero net flux, unstratified boxes. The ratio of total stress to midplane pressure has a mean of ~0.01, although there can be significant fluctuations on long (>~50 orbit) timescales. We find that the time averaged stresses are largely insensitive to both the radial or vertical aspect ratio of our simulation domain. For simulations with explicit dissipation, we find that stratification extends the range of Reynolds and magnetic Prandtl numbers for which turbulence is sustained. Confirming the results of previous studies, we find oscillations in the large scale toroidal field with periods of ~10 orbit...

  11. Simulations of Magnetorotational Turbulence with a Higher-Order Godunov Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Jacob B; Beckwith, Kris

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) We apply a second-order Godunov code, Athena, to studies of the magnetorotational instability using the local shearing box formalism. We present a set of ideal magnetohydrodynamic, unstratified shearing box simulations using two initial magnetic field configurations: a net uniform vertical field, and a sinusoidally varying zero-net vertical field. We find that our simulations agree well with previously published results. We next carry out analyses to study the flow of energy from differential rotation to turbulent fluctuations to thermalization. The first analysis is based on a direct measurement of the time-evolution of volume-averaged quantities. We find that the timescale over which energy is injected into turbulent fluctuations and then dissipated is on the order of \\Omega^{-1}, where \\Omega is the orbital frequency of the local domain. Magnetic dissipation dominates over kinetic dissipation, although not by as great a factor as the ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy. The second analysis exami...

  12. Angular momentum transport and large eddy simulations in magnetorotational turbulence: the small Pm limit

    CERN Document Server

    Meheut, H; Lesur, G; Joos, M; Longaretti, P -Y

    2015-01-01

    Angular momentum transport in accretion discs is often believed to be due to magnetohydrodynamic turbulence mediated by the magnetorotational instability. Despite an abundant literature on the MRI, the parameters governing the saturation amplitude of the turbulence are poorly understood and the existence of an asymptotic behavior in the Ohmic diffusion regime is not clearly established. We investigate the properties of the turbulent state in the small magnetic Prandtl number limit. Since this is extremely computationally expensive, we also study the relevance and range of applicability of the most common subgrid scale models for this problem. Unstratified shearing boxes simulations are performed both in the compressible and incompressible limits, with a resolution up to 800 cells per disc scale height. The latter constitutes the largest resolution ever attained for a simulation of MRI turbulence. In the presence of a mean magnetic field threading the domain, angular momentum transport converges to a finite va...

  13. Impact of toroidal and poloidal mode spectra on the control of non-axisymmetric fields in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanctot, Matthew J.

    2016-10-01

    In several tokamaks, non-axisymmetric magnetic field studies show applied n=2 fields can lead to disruptive n=1 locked modes, suggesting nonlinear mode coupling. A multimode plasma response to n=2 fields can be observed in H-mode plasmas, in contrast to the single-mode response found in Ohmic plasmas. These effects highlight a role for n >1 error field correction in disruption avoidance, and identify additional degrees of freedom for 3D field optimization at high plasma pressure. In COMPASS, EAST, and DIII-D Ohmic plasmas, n=2 magnetic reconnection thresholds in otherwise stable discharges are readily accessed at edge safety factors q 3 and low density. Similar to previous studies, the thresholds are correlated with the ``overlap'' field for the dominant linear ideal MHD plasma mode calculated with the IPEC code. The overlap field measures the plasma-mediated coupling of the external field to the resonant field. Remarkably, the critical overlap fields are similar for n=1 and 2 fields with m >nq fields dominating the drive for resonant fields. Complementary experiments in RFX-Mod show fields with m elicit transport responses with differing poloidal spectrum dependences, including a reduction in toroidal angular momentum that is not fully recoverable using fields that imperfectly match the applied field. These results have motivated an international effort to document n=2 error field thresholds in order to establish control requirements for ITER. This work highlights unique requirements for n >1 control, including the need for multiple rows of coils to control selected plasma parameters for specific functions (e.g., rotation control or ELM suppression). Optimal multi-harmonic (n=1 and n=2) error field control may be achieved using control algorithms that continuously respond to time-varying 3D field sources and plasma parameters. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  14. Waves and Instabilities in Accretion Disks MHD Spectroscopic Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Keppens, R; Goedbloed, J P

    2002-01-01

    A complete analytical and numerical treatment of all magnetohydrodynamic waves and instabilities for radially stratified, magnetized accretion disks is presented. The instabilities are a possible source of anomalous transport. While recovering results on known hydrodynamicand both weak- and strong-field magnetohydrodynamic perturbations, the full magnetohydrodynamic spectra for a realistic accretion disk model demonstrates a much richer variety of instabilities accessible to the plasma than previously realized. We show that both weakly and strongly magnetized accretion disks are prone to strong non-axisymmetric instabilities.The ability to characterize all waves arising in accretion disks holds great promise for magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopic analysis.

  15. Nonaxisymmetric linear instability of cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Child, Adam; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    We consider the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability present in Taylor-Couette flow under the application of helical magnetic fields, mainly for magnetic Prandtl numbers close to the inductionless limit, and conduct a full examination of marginal stability in the resulting parameter space. We allow for the azimuthal magnetic field to be generated by a combination of currents in the inner cylinder and fluid itself, and introduce a parameter governing the relation between the strength of these currents. A set of governing eigenvalue equations for the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability are derived and solved by spectral collocation with Chebyshev polynomials over the relevant parameter space, with the resulting instabilities examined in detail. We find that by altering the azimuthal magnetic field profiles the azimuthal magnetorotational instability, nonaxisymmetric helical magnetorotational instability, and Tayler instability yield interesting dynamics, such as different preferred mode types, and modes with a...

  16. Local Dynamical Instabilities in Magnetized, Radiation Pressure Supported Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Blaes, Omer M; Blaes, Omer; Socrates, Aristotle

    2000-01-01

    We present a general linear dispersion relation which describes the coupled behavior of magnetorotational, photon bubble, and convective instabilities in weakly magnetized, differentially rotating accretion disks. We presume the accretion disks to be geometrically thin and supported vertically by radiation pressure. We fully incorporate the effects of a nonzero radiative diffusion length on the linear modes. In an equilibrium with purely vertical magnetic field, the vertical magnetorotational modes are completely unaffected by compressibility, stratification, and radiative diffusion. However, in the presence of azimuthal fields, which are expected in differentially rotating flows, the growth rate of all magnetorotational modes can be reduced substantially below the orbital frequency. This occurs if diffusion destroys radiation sound waves on the length scale of the instability, and the magnetic energy density of the azimuthal component exceeds the non-radiative thermal energy density. While sluggish in this c...

  17. DiskFit: a code to fit simple non-axisymmetric galaxy models either to photometric images or to kinematic maps

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2015-01-01

    This posting announces public availability of version 1.2 of the DiskFit software package developed by the authors, which may be used to fit simple non-axisymmetric models either to images or to velocity fields of disk galaxies. Here we give an outline of the capability of the code and provide the link to downloading executables, the source code, and a comprehensive on-line manual. We argue that in important respects the code is superior to rotcur for fitting kinematic maps and to galfit for fitting multi-component models to photometric images.

  18. Label-acquired magnetorotation for biosensing: An asynchronous rotation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ariel, E-mail: hecht@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Kinnunen, Paivo, E-mail: pkkinn@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); McNaughton, Brandon, E-mail: bmcnaugh@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); Kopelman, Raoul, E-mail: kopelman@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents a novel application of magnetic particles for biosensing, called label-acquired magnetorotation (LAM). This method is based on a combination of the traditional sandwich assay format with the asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) method. In label-acquired magnetorotation, an analyte facilitates the binding of a magnetic label bead to a nonmagnetic solid phase sphere, forming a sandwich complex. The sandwich complex is then placed in a rotating magnetic field, where the rotational frequency of the sandwich complex is a function of the amount of analyte attached to the surface of the sphere. Here, we use streptavidin-coated beads and biotin-coated particles as analyte mimics, to be replaced by proteins and other biological targets in future work. We show this sensing method to have a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude.

  19. Impurity ion flow and temperature measured in a detached divertor with externally applied non-axisymmetric fields on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briesemeister, A.R., E-mail: briesemeister@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Isler, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Allen, S.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 700 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Ahn, J.-W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); McLean, A.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 700 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Unterberg, E.A.; Hillis, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Fenstermacher, M.E.; Meyer, W.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 700 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic fields are shown to have little effect on the impurity ion flow velocity and temperature as measured by the multichord divertor spectrometer in the DIII-D divertor for both attached and detached conditions. These experiments were performed in H-mode plasmas with the grad-B drift toward the target plates, with and without n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). The flow velocity in the divertor is shown to change by as much as 30% when deuterium gas puffing is used to create detachment of the divertor plasma. No measurable changes in the C III flow were observed in response to the RMP fields for the conditions used in this work. Images of the C III emission are used along with divertor Thomson scattering to show that the local electron and C III temperatures are equilibrated for the conditions shown.

  20. Flow Instability of Molten GaAs in the Czochralski Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuxian CHEN; Mingwei LI

    2007-01-01

    The flow and heat transfer of molten GaAs under the interaction of buoyancy, Marangoni and crystal rotation in the Czochralski configuration are numerically studied by using a time-dependent and three-dimensional turbulent flow model for the first time. The transition from axisymmetric flow to non-axisymmetric flow and then returning to axisymmetric flow again with increasing centrifugal and coriolis forces by increasing the crystal rotation rate was numerically observed. The origin of the transition to non-axisymmetric flow has been proved to be baroclinic instability. Several important characteristics of baroclinic instability in the CZ GaAs melt have been predicted. These characteristics are found to be in agreement with experimental observations.

  1. Libration driven multipolar instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Herreman, Wietze

    2014-01-01

    We consider rotating flows in non-axisymmetric enclosures that are driven by libration, i.e. by a small periodic modulation of the rotation rate. Thanks to its simplicity, this model is relevant to various contexts, from industrial containers (with small oscillations of the rotation rate) to fluid layers of terrestial planets (with length-of-day variations). Assuming a multipolar $n$-fold boundary deformation, we first obtain the two-dimensional basic flow. We then perform a short-wavelength local stability analysis of the basic flow, showing that an instability may occur in three dimensions. We christen it the Libration Driven Multipolar Instability (LDMI). The growth rates of the LDMI are computed by a Floquet analysis in a systematic way, and compared to analytical expressions obtained by perturbation methods. We then focus on the simplest geometry allowing the LDMI, a librating deformed cylinder. To take into account viscous and confinement effects, we perform a global stability analysis, which shows that...

  2. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence II: turbulent energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetorotational turbulence draws its energy from gravity and ultimately releases it via dissipation. However, the quantitative details of this energy flow have not been assessed for global disk models. In this work we examine the energetics of a well-resolved, three-dimensional, global magnetohydrodynamic accretion disk simulation by evaluating statistically-averaged mean-field equations for magnetic, kinetic, and internal energy using simulation data. The results reveal that turbulent magnetic (kinetic) energy is primarily injected by the correlation between Maxwell (Reynolds) stresses and shear in the (almost Keplerian) mean flow, and removed by dissipation. This finding differs from previous work using local (shearing-box) models, which indicated that turbulent kinetic energy was primarily sourced from the magnetic energy reservoir. Lorentz forces provide the bridge between the magnetic and kinetic energy reservoirs, converting ~ 1/5 of the total turbulent magnetic power input into turbulent kinetic ener...

  3. Impact of time-dependent non-axisymmetric velocity perturbations on dynamo action of von-K\\'arm\\'an-like flows

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Burguete, Javier

    2012-01-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of the kinematic induction equation in order to examine the dynamo efficiency of an axisymmetric von-K\\'arm\\'an-like flow subject to time-dependent non-axisymmetric velocity perturbations. The numerical model is based on the setup of the French Von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium dynamo (VKS) and on the flow measurements from a model water experiment conducted at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain. Our simulations show that the interactions of azimuthally drifting flow perturbations with the fundamental drift of the magnetic eigenmode (caused by the inevitable equatorial symmetry breaking of the basic flow) essentially determine the temporal behavior of the dynamo state. We find two distinct regimes of dynamo action that depend on the (prescribed) drift frequency of an ($m=2$) vortex-like flow perturbation. For comparatively slowly drifting vortices we observe a narrow window with enhanced growth-rates and a drift of the magnetic eigenmode that is synchronized with the pert...

  4. Global non-axisymmetric perturbation configurations in a composite disc system with an isopedic magnetic field: relation between dark matter halo and magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang-Gruess, M; Duschl, W J

    2009-01-01

    We study global non-axisymmetric stationary perturbations of aligned and unaligned logarithmic spiral configurations in an axisymmetric composite differentially rotating disc system of scale-free stellar and isopedically magnetized gas discs coupled by gravity. The gas disc is threaded across by a vertical magnetic field $B_z$ with a constant dimensionless isopedic ratio $\\lambda\\equiv 2\\pi\\sqrt{G} \\Sigma^{(g)}/B_z$ of surface gas mass density $\\Sigma^{(g)}$ to $B_z$ with $G$ being the gravitational constant. Our exploration focuses on the relation between $\\lambda$ and the dark matter amount represented by a ratio $f\\equiv\\bar{\\Phi}/\\Phi$ in order to sustain stationary perturbation configurations, where $\\bar{\\Phi}$ is the gravitational potential of a presumed axisymmetric halo of dark matter and $\\Phi$ is the gravitational potential of the composite disc matter. High and low $\\lambda$ values correspond to relatively weak and strong magnetic fields given the same gas surface mass density, respectively. The m...

  5. STUDY ON THE NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MULTI-STAGE ROTARY FORGING OF A NON-AXISYMMETRIC PART AND THE CAE ANALYSIS OF THE DIE STRENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Tian; J. Wang; W.P. Dong; J. Chen; Z. Zhao; G.M. Wu

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally a rotary forging process is a kind of metal forming method where a conic upper die, whose axis is deviated an angle from the axis of machine, forges a billet continuously and partially to finish the whole deformation. For the rotary forging process simulation, more researches were focused on simulating the simple stage forming process with axisymmetric part geometry. Whereas in this paper, the upper die is not cone-shaped, and the billet is non-axisymmetric. So the movement of the punch is much more complicated than ever. The 3D FEM simulation models for the preforming & final forming processes are set up after carefully studying the complicated movement pattern. Deform-3D is used to simulate the material flow, and the boundary nodal resisting forces calculated by the final stage process simulation is used to analyze the final forming die strength. The CAE analysis of the die shows that the design of the final forming die is not reasonable with lower pre-stress which is easy to crack at the critical comers. An optimum die design is also provided with higher pre-stress, and verified by CAE analysis.

  6. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.; Rossi, P.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  7. Non-axisymmetric structure in the satellite dwarf galaxy NGC 2976: Implications for its dark/bright mass distribution and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, Octavio; Hernandez-Toledo, Hector; Cano, Mariana; Pichardo, Bárbara [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autonóma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Puerari, Ivanio [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Optica y Electrónica, Calle Luis Enrique Erro 1, 72840 Sta. Maria Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Buta, Ronald [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Groess, Robert, E-mail: octavio@astro.unam.mx [School of Computational and Applied Mathematics, University of Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050 (South Africa)

    2014-02-01

    We present the result of an extensive search for non-axisymmetric structures in the dwarf satellite galaxy of M81, NGC 2976, using multiwavelength archival observations. The galaxy is known to present kinematic evidence for a bisymmetric distortion; however, the stellar bar presence is controversial. This controversy motivated the possible interpretation of NGC 2976 as presenting an elliptical disk triggered by a prolate dark matter halo. We applied diagnostics used in spiral galaxies in order to detect stellar bars or spiral arms. The m = 2 Fourier phase has a jump around 60 arcsec, consistent with a central bar and bisymmetric arms. The CO, 3.6 μm surface brightness, and the dust lanes are consistent with a gas-rich central bar and possibly with gaseous spiral arms. The bar-like feature is offset close to 20° from the disk position angle, in agreement with kinematic estimations. The kinematic jumps related to the dust lanes suggest that the bar perturbation in the disk kinematics is non-negligible and the reported non-circular motions, the central gas excess, and the nuclear X-ray source (active galactic nucleus/starburst) might be produced by the central bar. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of disks inside triaxial dark halos suggest that the two symmetric spots at 130 arcsec and the narrow arms may be produced by gas at turning points in an elliptical disk, or, alternatively, the potential ellipticity can be produced by a tidally induced strong stellar bar/arms; in both cases the rotation curve interpretation is, importantly, biased. The M81 group is a natural candidate to trigger the bisymmetric distortion and the related evolution as suggested by the H I tidal bridge detected by Chynoweth et al. We conclude that both mechanisms, the gas-rich bar and spiral arms triggered by the environment (tidal stirring) and primordial halo triaxiality, can explain most of the NGC 2976 non-circular motions, mass redistribution, and nuclear activity

  8. Nonaxisymmetric linear instability of cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic Taylor-Couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Adam; Kersalé, Evy; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    We consider the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability present in Taylor-Couette flow under the application of helical magnetic fields, mainly for magnetic Prandtl numbers close to the inductionless limit, and conduct a full examination of marginal stability in the resulting parameter space. We allow for the azimuthal magnetic field to be generated by a combination of currents in the inner cylinder and fluid itself and introduce a parameter governing the relation between the strength of these currents. A set of governing eigenvalue equations for the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability are derived and solved by spectral collocation with Chebyshev polynomials over the relevant parameter space, with the resulting instabilities examined in detail. We find that by altering the azimuthal magnetic field profiles the azimuthal magnetorotational instability, nonaxisymmetric helical magnetorotational instability, and Tayler instability yield interesting dynamics, such as different preferred mode types and modes with azimuthal wave number m>1. Finally, a comparison is given to the recent WKB analysis performed by Kirillov et al. [Kirillov, Stefani, and Fukumoto, J. Fluid Mech. 760, 591 (2014)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2014.614] and its validity in the linear regime.

  9. An Instability-driven Dynamo for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A

    2000-01-01

    We show that an MHD-instability driven dynamo (IDD) operating in a hot accretion disk is capable of generating energetically adequate magnetic flux deposition rates above and below a mildly advective accretion disk structure. The dynamo is driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) of a toroidal field in a shear flow and is limited by the buoyancy of `horizontal' flux and by reconnection in the turbulent medium. The efficiency of magnetic energy deposition is estimated to be comparable to the neutrino losses although an MHD collimation mechanism may deem this process a more viable alternative to neutrino-burst-driven models of gamma ray bursts.

  10. Diffusive Magnetohydrodynamic Instabilities beyond the Chandrasekhar Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Günther; Schultz, Manfred; Stefani, Frank; Mond, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We consider the stability of axially unbounded cylindrical flows that contain a toroidal magnetic background field with the same radial profile as their azimuthal velocity. For ideal fluids, Chandrasekhar had shown the stability of this configuration if the Alfvén velocity of the field equals the velocity of the background flow, i.e., if the magnetic Mach number {Mm}=1. We demonstrate that magnetized Taylor-Couette flows with such profiles become unstable against non-axisymmetric perturbations if at least one of the diffusivities is finite. We also find that for small magnetic Prandtl numbers {Pm} the lines of marginal instability scale with the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number. In the limit {Pm}\\to 0 the lines of marginal instability completely lie below the line for {Mm}=1 and for {Pm}\\to ∞ they completely lie above this line. For any finite value of {Pm}, however, the lines of marginal instability cross the line {Mm}=1, which separates slow from fast rotation. The minimum values of the field strength and the rotation rate that are needed for the instability (slightly) grow if the rotation law becomes flat. In this case, the electric current of the background field becomes so strong that the current-driven Tayler instability (which also exists without rotation) appears in the bifurcation map at low Hartmann numbers.

  11. The Effect of Electron Heating on Magnetorotational Turbulence in Protoplanetary Disks: Self-regulation and Reduced Turbulence Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives vigorous turbulence in a region of protoplanetary disks where the ionization fraction is sufficiently high. It has recently been shown that the electric field induced by the MRI can heat up electrons and thereby affect the ionization balance in the gas. In particular, in a disk where abundant dust grains are present, the electron heating causes a reduction of the electron abundance, thereby preventing further growth of the MRI. By using the nonlinear Ohm's law that takes into account electron heating, we investigate where in protoplanetary disks this negative feedback between the MRI and ionization chemistry becomes important. We find that the "e-heating zone," the region where the electron heating limits the saturation of the MRI, extends out to 80 AU in the minimum-mass solar nebula with abundant submicron-sized grains. This region is considerably larger than the conventional dead zone whose radial extent is $\\sim20$ AU in the same disk model. Our simple estima...

  12. Connections between centrifugal, stratorotational and radiative instabilities in viscous Taylor--Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Leclercq, Colin; Kerswell, Rich R

    2016-01-01

    The `Rayleigh line' mu=eta^2, where mu=Omega_o/Omega_i and eta=r_i/r_o are respectively the rotation and radius ratios between inner (subscript `i') and outer (subscript `o') cylinders, is regarded as marking the limit of centrifugal instability (CI) in unstratified inviscid Taylor--Couette flow, for both axisymmetric [1] and non-axisymmetric [2] modes. Non-axisymmetric stratorotational instability (SRI) is known to set in for anticyclonic rotation ratios beyond that line, i.e. eta^2<\\mu<1 for axially stably-stratified Taylor--Couette flow [3,4], but the competition between CI and SRI in the range muinstabilities at finite Reynolds number Re, as previously suggested by [5], making them indistinguishable at onset. Both instabilities are also continuously connected to the radiative instability (RI) of [6], but here at finite Re and with finite gap. These results demonstrate the complex impact viscosity...

  13. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Florence

    2016-01-01

    We present a new scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect-ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, an hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterised by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by non-axisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  14. Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations on magnetic instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, F; Kasprzyk, Ch; Paredes, A; Ruediger, G; Seilmayer, M

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields of planets, stars and galaxies are generated by self-excitation in moving electrically conducting fluids. Once produced, magnetic fields can play an active role in cosmic structure formation by destabilizing rotational flows that would be otherwise hydrodynamically stable. For a long time, both hydromagnetic dynamo action as well as magnetically triggered flow instabilities had been the subject of purely theoretical research. Meanwhile, however, the dynamo effect has been observed in large-scale liquid sodium experiments in Riga, Karlsruhe and Cadarache. In this paper, we summarize the results of some smaller liquid metal experiments devoted to various magnetic instabilities such as the helical and the azimuthal magnetorotational instability, the Tayler instability, and the different instabilities that appear in a magnetized spherical Couette flow. We conclude with an outlook on a large scale Tayler-Couette experiment using liquid sodium, and on the prospects to observe magnetically triggered ...

  15. Evolution of self-gravitating magnetized disks. II- Interaction between MHD turbulence and gravitational instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Fromang, S; Terquem, C; De Villiers, J P; Fromang, Sebastien; Balbus, Steven A.; Terquem, Caroline; Villiers, Jean-Pierre De

    2004-01-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of the evolution of self--gravitating and weakly magnetized disks with an adiabatic equation of state. Such disks are subject to the development of both the magnetorotational and gravitational instabilities, which transport angular momentum outward. As in previous studies, our hydrodynamical simulations show the growth of strong m=2 spiral structure. This spiral disturbance drives matter toward the central object and disappears when the Toomre parameter Q has increased well above unity. When a weak magnetic field is present as well, the magnetorotational instability grows and leads to turbulence. In that case, the strength of the gravitational stress tensor is lowered by a factor of about~2 compared to the hydrodynamical run and oscillates periodically, reaching very small values at its minimum. We attribute this behavior to the presence of a second spiral mode with higher pattern speed than the one which dominates in the hydrodynamical simulations...

  16. Diffusive MHD Instabilities: Beyond the Chandrasekhar Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, Guenther; Stefani, Frank; Mond, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic stability of axially unbounded cylindrical flows is considered which contain a toroidal magnetic background field with the same radial profile as the linear azimuthal velocity. Chandrasekhar (1956) has shown for ideal fluids the stability of this configuration if the Alfven velocity of the field equals the velocity of the background flow. It is demonstrated for magnetized Taylor-Couette flows at the Rayleigh line, however, that for finite diffusivity such flows become unstable against nonaxisymmetric perturbations where the critical magnetic Reynolds number of the rotation rate does not depend on the magnetic Prandtl number Pm if Pm much << 1. In order to study this new diffusive azimuthal magnetorotational instability, flows and fields with the same radial profile but with different amplitudes are considered. For Pm << 1 the instability domain with the weakest fields and the slowest rotation rates lies below the Chandrasekhar line of equal amplitudes for Alfven velocity an...

  17. On magnetic instabilities and dynamo action in stellar radiation zones

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, J -P; Mathis, S

    2007-01-01

    We examine the MHD instabilities arising in the radiation zone of a differentially rotating star, in which a poloidal field of fossil origin is sheared into a toroidal field. We focus on the non-axisymmetric instability that affects the toroidal magnetic field in a rotating star, which was first studied by Pitts and Tayler in the non-dissipative limit. According to Spruit, it could also drive a dynamo. The Pitts & Tayler instability is manifestly present in our simulations, with its conspicuous m=1 dependence in azimuth. But its analytic treatment used so far is too simplified to be applied to the real stellar situation. Although the instability generated field reaches an energy comparable to that of the mean poloidal field, that field seems unaffected by the instability: it undergoes Ohmic decline, and is neither eroded nor regenerated by the instability. The toroidal field is produced by shearing the poloidal field and it draws its energy from the differential rotation. The small scale motions behave as...

  18. Singular diffusionless limits of double-diffusive instabilities in magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kirillov, Oleg N

    2016-01-01

    We study local instabilities of a differentially rotating viscous flow of electrically conducting incompressible fluid subject to an external azimuthal magnetic field. In the presence of the magnetic field the hydrodynamically stable flow can demonstrate the azimuthal magnetorotational instability (AMRI) both in the diffusionless case and in the double--diffusive case with viscous and ohmic dissipation. Performing stability analysis of the amplitude transport equations of the short--wavelength approximation, we find that the threshold of the diffusionless AMRI via the Hamilton-Hopf bifurcation is a singular limit of the thresholds of the viscous and resistive AMRI corresponding to the dissipative Hopf bifurcation and manifests itself as the Whitney umbrella singular point. A smooth transition between the two types of instabilities is possible only if the magnetic Prandtl number is equal to unity, $\\rm Pm=1$. At a fixed ${\\rm Pm}\

  19. Vertical shear instability in accretion disc models with radiation transport

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, Moritz H R

    2014-01-01

    The origin of turbulence in accretion discs is still not fully understood. While the magneto-rotational instability is considered to operate in sufficiently ionized discs, its role in the poorly ionized protoplanetary disc is questionable. Recently, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has been suggested as a possible alternative. Our goal is to study the characteristics of this instability and the efficiency of angular momentum transport, in extended discs, under the influence of radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. We use multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to model a larger section of an accretion disc. First we study inviscid and weakly viscous discs using a fixed radial temperature profile in two and three spatial dimensions. The simulations are then extended to include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. In agreement with previous studies we find for the isothermal disc a sustained unstable state with a weak positive angular momentum transport of the o...

  20. Nonaxisymmetric Rossby vortex instability with toroidal magnetic fields in structured disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Cong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the global nonaxisymmetric Rossby vortex instability (RVI) in a differentially rotating, compressible magnetized accretion disk with radial density structures. Equilibrium magnetic fields are assumed to have only the toroidal component. Using linear theory analysis, we show that the density structure can be unstable to nonaxisymmetric modes. We find that, for the magnetic field profiles we have studied, magnetic fields always provide a stabilizing effect to the unstable RVI modes. We discuss the physical mechanism of this stabilizing effect. The threshold and properties of the unstable modes are also discussed in detail. In addition, we present linear stability results for the global magnetorotational instability when the disk is compressible.

  1. 非轴对称磁场排种元件磁场特性分析及排种性能%Magnetic field characteristics analysis and performance test of seeding element with non-axisymmetric magnetic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路传同; 胡建平; 周春健; 侯冲

    2012-01-01

    传统磁吸式精密播种机所采用的排种元件是单个的圆柱形磁体,产生的磁场是轴对称的,因此处于对称位置的磁粉包衣种子所受磁吸力相等,磁力差为零.研究发现这类排种元件容易吸附到处于对称位置的多粒种子,导致重播率增加.为提高磁粉包衣种子间的磁力差、降低重播率,该文提出一种能够在排种空间中产生非轴对称磁场的磁力排种元件,所设计的排种元件采用添加磁场偏置永磁体的方法来使磁场成为非轴对称的.通过磁场有限元分析的方法对两类排种元件在排种空间里的磁场特性进行分析.分析表明,该非轴对称磁场的磁场能够增加磁场中对称位置的磁场力差.排种性能对比试验也表明非轴对称磁场排种元件相对于轴对称磁场排种元件能够降低4%的重播率.%Traditional magnetic precision seeding element is a single cylindrical magnet,and it generates axisymmetric magnetic field,therefore the magnetic force that the magnetic powder coated seeds suffered in the symmetrical position is equal,and it's magnetic force deviation is zero.Studies showed that this kind of seeding elements easily adsorbed multiple seed in the symmetrical position,resulting multiple index increased.In order to increase the magnetic force deviation between seeds and reduce the multiple indexes,this paper put forward a new magnetic seeding element which was added a bias magnet in the main magnets,producing non-axisymmetric magnetic field.The magnetic field characteristics of the two kinds of seeding element were analyzed in the seed-metering space by using the method of the magnetic field tinite element.The analysis showed that the non-axisymmetric magnetic seeding element can increased the magnetic force deviation in the symmetrical position.The comparison tests of seed-metering performance also showed that the non-axisymmetric magnetic seeding element can significantly reduced the multiple

  2. Noise-sustained convective instability in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  3. Noise-Sustained Convective Instability in a Magnetized Taylor-Couette Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  4. Noise-Sustained Convective Instability in a Magnetized Taylor-Couette Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Liu

    2009-02-20

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  5. Linear Instabilities Driven by Differential Rotation in Very Weakly Magnetized Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Quataert, Eliot; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    We study the linear stability of weakly magnetized differentially rotating plasmas in both collisionless kinetic theory and Braginskii's theory of collisional, magnetized plasmas. We focus on the very weakly magnetized limit that is important for understanding how astrophysical magnetic fields originate and are amplified at high redshift. We show that the single instability of fluid theory - the magnetorotational instability mediated by magnetic tension - is replaced by two distinct instabilities, one associated with ions and one with electrons. Each of these has a different way of tapping into the free energy of differential rotation. The ion instability is driven by viscous transport of momentum across magnetic field lines due to a finite ion cyclotron frequency (gyroviscosity); the fastest growing modes have wavelengths significantly longer than MHD and Hall MHD predictions. The electron instability is a whistler mode driven unstable by the temperature anisotropy generated by differential rotation; the gro...

  6. Capillary instability of a streaming cylindrical liquid jet submerged in a streaming fluid under the influence of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.

    1990-05-01

    The instability of a streaming cylindrical liquid jet embedded in a streaming different fluid, acted upon by the capilarity, electromagnetic and the fluids inertia forces is investigated analytically and numerically for all axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric disturbances. The non-streaming system is capillary unstable only for small axisymmetric disturbances and in that domain the area under the instability curves is decreased with increasing densities ratio but never suppressed. The magnetic fields interior and exterior to the cylindrical jet have strong stabilizing influences on all different parameters of the problem. Above a certain value of the basic magnetic field the capillary instability is completely suppressed. The streaming has a strong destabilizing influence on all different parameters of the system. Due to the streaming effect, there will be unstable states, not only in the axisymmetric disturbances but also in the non-axisymmetric modes, whether the system is acting upon the capilarity force or electromagnetic force or the combined effect on both. The streaming system is magnetohydrodymanics stable if and only if the perturbed Alfvén wave velocity is greater than the velocity of the basic flow, and this is confirmed numerically. Numerous reported works are obtained as limiting cases from the present general result.

  7. Bulge growth through disk instabilities in high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The role of disk instabilities, such as bars and spiral arms, and the associated resonances, in growing bulges in the inner regions of disk galaxies have long been studied in the low-redshift nearby Universe. There it has long been probed observationally, in particular through peanut-shaped bulges. This secular growth of bulges in modern disk galaxies is driven by weak, non-axisymmetric instabilities: it mostly produces pseudo-bulges at slow rates and with long star-formation timescales. Disk instabilities at high redshift (z>1) in moderate-mass to massive galaxies (10^10 to a few 10^11 Msun of stars) are very different from those found in modern spiral galaxies. High-redshift disks are globally unstable and fragment into giant clumps containing 10^8-10^9 Msun of gas and stars each, which results in highly irregular galaxy morphologies. The clumps and other features associated to the violent instability drive disk evolution and bulge growth through various mechanisms, on short timescales. The giant clumps can...

  8. Effects of Fluid Instabilities on Accretion Disk Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, S W; Turner, N J; Socrates, A

    2003-01-01

    Numerical calculations and linear theory of radiation magnetohydrodynamic flows indicate that the photon bubble and magnetorotational instability (MRI) may produce large density inhomogeneities in radiation pressure supported media. We study the effects of the photon bubble instability on accretion disk spectra using 2-D Monte Carlo (MC) and 1-D Feautrier radiative transfer calculations on a snapshot of a 2-D numerical simulation domain. We find an enhancement in the thermalization of the MC spectra over that of the Feautrier calculation. In the inner-most regions of these disks, the turbulent magnetic pressure may greatly exceed that of the gas. It is then possible for bulk turbulent Alfvenic motions driven by the MRI to exceed the thermal velocity making turbulent Comptonization the dominant radiative process. We estimate the spectral distortion due to turbulent Comptonization utilizing a 1-D MC calculation.

  9. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberg, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Relativistic jets naturally occur in astrophysical systems that involve accretion onto compact objects, such as core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and accretion onto supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN). It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetised rotation of a central compact object. However, how they produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven non-axisymmetric instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic, Poynting flux dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetised central compact object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a globa...

  10. Numerical simulation on the non-axisymmetric distribution of thermal characteristics in a steam generator%蒸汽发生器热工特性非轴对称分布数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史建新; 孙宝芝; 刘尚华; 韩文静; 张国磊; 赵颍杰; 干依燃

    2015-01-01

    Taking the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor ( HTGR) steam generator ( SG) at Argonne National La-boratory ( ANL) as the prototype, in combination with the structural characteristics and working process of the SG, a physical model of single helically coiled tube was made. The processes of flow, single phase convective heat trans-fer and boiling phase change heat transfer of secondary loop fluid in a helically coiled tube were simulated to inves-tigate the non-axisymmetric distribution of thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a HTGR steam generator. The results show that the distribution of key parameters around the circumference of a HTGR steam generator, such as wall temperature and velocity, is non-axisymmetric; besides, in the single-phase area, the circumferential distribution of key parameters along the cross section of tube is completely opposite to that in the two-phase area. The velocity is greater, heat transfer is more intense and wall temperature is lower along the outside of helically coiled tubes in the single-phase area due to centrifugal force. Steam gathers along the inside of the helically coiled tube due to the dual role of buoyancy lift and centrifugal force in the two vapor-liquid phases after having entered the two-phase flow are-a. Heat transfer is enhanced because of bubble disturbance, and therefore wall temperature is lower at this location.%为了研究高温气冷堆蒸汽发生器热工水力参数非轴对称分布特性,以阿贡国家实验室蒸汽发生器为原型,结合其结构特点及工作过程建立单根螺旋管物理模型,模拟蒸汽发生器螺旋管内二回路流体的流动、单相对流换热及相变换热过程. 计算结果表明:高温气冷堆蒸汽发生器的壁温、流速等关键参数均呈非轴对称分布,且单相区和相变区关键参数沿管截面周向分布趋势完全相反. 单相区由于离心力作用螺旋管外侧水的流速大,换热剧烈,壁温低;进入相变区后由于汽液

  11. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence III: influence of field configuration and mass injection

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2014-01-01

    The stresses produced by magnetorotational turbulence can provide effective angular momentum transport in accretion disks. However, questions remain about the ability of simulated disks to reproduce observationally inferred stress-to-gas-pressure ratios. In this paper we present a set of high resolution global magnetohydrodynamic disk simulations which are initialised with different field configurations: purely toroidal, vertical field lines, and nested poloidal loops. A mass source term is included which allows the total disk mass to equilibrate in simulations with long run times, and also enables the impact of rapid mass injection to be explored. Notably different levels of angular momentum transport are observed during the early-time transient disk evolution. However, given sufficient time to relax, the different models evolve to a statistically similar quasi-steady state with a stress-to-gas-pressure ratio, $\\alpha \\sim 0.032-0.036$. The indication from our results is that {\\it steady, isolated} disks may...

  12. Geometric stabilization of the electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient driven instability. I. Nearly axisymmetric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocco, A.; Plunk, G. G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of a non-axisymmetric (3D) equilibrium magnetic field on the linear ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven mode are investigated. We consider the strongly driven, toroidal branch of the instability in a global (on the magnetic surface) setting. Previous studies have focused on particular features of non-axisymmetric systems, such as strong local shear or magnetic ripple, that introduce inhomogeneity in the coordinate along the magnetic field. In contrast, here we include non-axisymmetry explicitly via the dependence of the magnetic drift on the field line label α, i.e., across the magnetic field, but within the magnetic flux surface. We consider the limit where this variation occurs on a scale much larger than that of the ITG mode, and also the case where these scales are similar. Close to axisymmetry, we find that an averaging effect of the magnetic drift on the flux surface causes global (on the surface) stabilization, as compared to the most unstable local mode. In the absence of scale separation, we find destabilization is also possible, but only if a particular resonance occurs between the magnetic drift and the mode, and finite Larmor radius effects are neglected. We discuss the relative importance of surface global effects and known radially global effects.

  13. Variations of Solar Non-axisymmetric Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Gyenge, N; Ludmány, A

    2014-01-01

    The temporal behaviour of solar active longitudes has been examined by using two sunspot catalogues, the Greenwich Photoheliographic Results (GPR) and the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD). The time-longitude diagrams of the activity distribution reveal the preferred longitudinal zones and their migration with respect to the Carrington frame. The migration paths outline a set of patterns in which the activity zone has alternating prograde/retrograde angular velocities with respect to the Carrington rotation rate. The time profiles of these variations can be described by a set of successive parabolae. Two similar migration paths have been selected from these datasets, one northern path during cycles 21 - 22 and one southern path during cycles 13 - 14, for closer examination and comparison of their dynamical behaviours. The rates of sunspot emergence exhibited in both migration paths similar periodicities, close to 1.3 years. This behaviour may imply that the active longitude is connected to the bottom of c...

  14. Long-term Nonlinear Behaviour of the Magnetorotational Instability in a Localised Model of an Accretion Disc

    CERN Document Server

    Silvers, L J

    2007-01-01

    For more than a decade, the so-called shearing box model has been used to study the fundamental local dynamics of accretion discs. This approach has proved to be very useful because it allows high resolution and long term studies to be carried out, studies that would not be possible for a global disc. Localised disc studies have largely focused on examining the rate of enhanced transport of angular momentum, essentially a sum of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. The dominant radial-azimuthal component of this stress tensor is, in the classic Shakura-Sunayaev model, expressed as a constant alpha times the pressure. Previous studies have estimated alpha based on a modest number of orbital times. Here we use much longer baselines, and perform a cumulative average for alpha. Great care must be exercised when trying to extract numerical alpha values from simulations: dissipation scales, computational box aspect ratio, and even numerical algorithms all affect the result. This study suggests that estimating alpha b...

  15. Magnetorotational Turbulence Transports Angular Momentum in Stratified Disks with Low Magnetic Prandtl Number but Magnetic Reynolds Number above a Critical Value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.

    2012-02-14

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) may dominate outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks, allowing material to fall onto the central object. Previous work has established that the MRI can drive a mean-field dynamo, possibly leading to a self-sustaining accretion system. Recently, however, simulations of the scaling of the angular momentum transport parameter {alpha}{sub SS} with the magnetic Prandtl number Pm have cast doubt on the ability of the MRI to transport astrophysically relevant amounts of angular momentum in real disk systems. Here, we use simulations including explicit physical viscosity and resistivity to show that when vertical stratification is included, mean field dynamo action operates, driving the system to a configuration in which the magnetic field is not fully helical. This relaxes the constraints on the generated field provided by magnetic helicity conservation, allowing the generation of a mean field on timescales independent of the resistivity. Our models demonstrate the existence of a critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub crit}, below which transport becomes strongly Pm-dependent and chaotic, but above which the transport is steady and Pm-independent. Prior simulations showing Pm-dependence had Rm < Rm{sub crit}. We conjecture that this steady regime is possible because the mean field dynamo is not helicity-limited and thus does not depend on the details of the helicity ejection process. Scaling to realistic astrophysical parameters suggests that disks around both protostars and stellar mass black holes have Rm >> Rm{sub crit}. Thus, we suggest that the strong Pm dependence seen in recent simulations does not occur in real systems.

  16. Mechanical instability

    CERN Document Server

    Krysinski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a study of the stability of mechanical systems, i.e. their free response when they are removed from their position of equilibrium after a temporary disturbance. After reviewing the main analytical methods of the dynamical stability of systems, it highlights the fundamental difference in nature between the phenomena of forced resonance vibration of mechanical systems subjected to an imposed excitation and instabilities that characterize their free response. It specifically develops instabilities arising from the rotor-structure coupling, instability of control systems, the se

  17. Collective instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  18. Termination of the MRI via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae: influence of numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Rembiasz, T; Cerdá-Durán, P; Aloy, M Á; Müller, E

    2016-01-01

    We study the influence of numerical methods and grid resolution on the termination of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) by means of parasitic instabilities in three-dimensional shearing-disc simulations reproducing typical conditions found in core-collapse supernovae. Whether or not the MRI is able to amplify weak magnetic fields in this context strongly depends, among other factors, on the amplitude at which its growth terminates. The qualitative results of our study do not depend on the numerical scheme. In all our models, MRI termination is caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, consistent with theoretical predictions. Quantitatively, however, there are differences, but numerical convergence can be achieved even at relatively low grid resolutions if high-order reconstruction methods are used.

  19. Nonlinear density excitations in a magnetorotating relativistic plasma with warm ions and non-Maxwellian electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ali [National Centre for Physics, Shahdara Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Centre for Physics, Shahdara Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan); COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-05-15

    Linear and nonlinear electrostatic ion acoustic waves in a weakly relativistic magnetorotating plasma in the presence of non-Maxwellian electrons and warm ions have been examined. The system under consideration has yielded two solutions, namely, the fast and slow acoustic modes which have been observed to depend on the streaming velocity, ion to electron temperature ratio, and the nonthermality parameter of the non-Maxwellian electrons. Using the multiple time scale analysis, we have derived the three dimensional nonlinear Zakharov–Kuznetsov equation and also presented its solution. Both compressive and rarefactive solitary structures have been found in consonance with the satellite observations. It has been observed that although the linear dispersion relation gives both fast and slow ion acoustic waves, the solitary structures form only for the fast acoustic mode. The dependence of the characteristics of the solitary structures on several plasma parameters has also been explored. The present investigation may be beneficial to understanding the rotating plasma environments such as those found in the planetary magnetospheres of Saturn and Jupiter.

  20. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence I: convergence and the quasi-steady state

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetorotational turbulence provides a viable mechanism for angular momentum transport in accretion disks. We present global, three dimensional (3D), MHD accretion disk simulations that investigate the dependence of the turbulent stresses on resolution. Convergence in the time-and-volume-averaged stress-to-gas-pressure ratio, at a value of $\\sim0.04$, is found for a model with radial, vertical, and azimuthal resolution of 12-51, 27, and 12.5 cells per scale-height (the simulation mesh is such that cells per scale-height varies in the radial direction). A control volume analysis is performed on the main body of the disk (|z|<2H) to examine the production and removal of magnetic energy. Maxwell stresses in combination with the mean disk rotation are mainly responsible for magnetic energy production, whereas turbulent dissipation (facilitated by numerical resistivity) predominantly removes magnetic energy from the disk. Re-casting the magnetic energy equation in terms of the power injected by Maxwell stresse...

  1. The Instability in Accretion Flows: GvMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardimci, Melis; Ebru Devlen, Doç.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we discuss the physical instability defining the expected turbulence in Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows (RIAFs) around the supermassive black holes (e.g., Sagittarius A* in the center of our Galaxy). These flows, with a high probability, include weakly collisional hot, optically thin and dilute plasmas. Within these flows, gravitational potential energy brought about by turbulent stresses is trapped as heat energy. Thus, in order accretion to be realized, outward transport of heat as well as angular momentum is required. This outward heat transport may reduce the mass inflow rate on black hole. We solve MHD equations including variation of viscosity coefficients with pressure in the momentum conservation equation. We plot the wave number-frequency diagrams for the wave modes. We show that one of the most probable candidates for definition of mass accretion and the source of excess heat energy in RIAFs is the gyroviscous modified magnetorotational instabilitiy (GvMRI).

  2. Dynamical Instability of Laminar Axisymmetric Flow of Perfect Fluid with Stratification

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravlev, V V

    2007-01-01

    The instability of non-homoentropic axisymmetric flow of perfect fluid with respect to non-axisymmetric infinitesimal perturbations was investigated by numerical integration of hydrodynamical differential equations in two-dimensional approximation. The non-trivial influence of entropy gradient on unstable sound and surface gravity waves was revealed. In particular, both decrease and growth of entropy against the direction of effective gravitational acceleration $g_{eff}$ give rise to growing surface gravity modes which are stable with the same parameters in the case of homoentropic flow. At the same time increment of sound modes either grows monotonically while the rate of entropy decrease against $g_{eff}$ gets higher or vanishes at some values of positive and negative entropy gradient in the basic flow. The calculations have showed also that growing internal gravity modes appear only in the flow unstable to axisymmetric perturbations. At last, the analysis of boundary problem with free boundaries uncovered ...

  3. Gravitational Wave Signatures from Low-mode Spiral Instabilities in Rapidly Rotating Supernova Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of gravitational waves (GWs) from rotating core-collapse of a 15 solar mass star by performing three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations with an approximate neutrino transport. By parametrically changing the precollapse angular momentum, we focus on the effects of rotation on the GW signatures in the early postbounce evolution. Regarding three-flavor neutrino transport, we solve the energy-averaged set of radiation energy and momentum. In addition to the gravitational quadrupole radiation from matter motions, we take into account GWs from anisotropic neutrino emission. With these computations, our results present evidence that non-axisymmetric instabilities play an essential role in determining the GW signatures in the rotating postbounce evolution. For our rapidly rotating models, we show that precollapse density inhomogeneities give rise to millisecond variations in the waveforms. During prompt convection, we find that the waveforms show narrow-band and highly quasi...

  4. Progress in theory of instabilities in a rotating plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2009-04-01

    A review is given of the basic results of modern theory of instabilities in a rotating plasma. Both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations are considered. Main attention is given to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), discovered earlier by Velikhov, and the rotational-convective instability (RCI) discussed in a number of papers of astrophysical trend. For qualitative explanation of the results, a local approach is used which, with equilibrium plasma pressure gradient and/or nonsymmetry of perturbations, requires operation with nonlocal azimuthal perturbed magnetic field. The gravity and effects of pressure anisotropy are taken into account. In addition to hydrodynamic, the electrodynamic approach is formulated. The drift effects are considered. Analyzed are the ideal instabilities and those depending on the dissipative effects: viscosity and heat conductivity. The MRI is considered at presence of the charged dust particles. Besides the local approach, the nonlocal approach is formulated for the plasma model with a steplike profile of angular rotation frequency. Alongside with perturbations which frequencies are small compared to the ion cyclotron frequency, the perturbations are analyzed with frequencies larger than the ion cyclotron frequency. The latter corresponds to the Hall regime and subregime of nonmagnetized plasma.

  5. Recombination instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.

    1967-01-01

    A recombination instability is considered which may arise in a plasma if the temperature dependence of the volume recombination coefficient, alpha, is sufficiently strong. Two cases are analyzed: (a) a steady-state plasma produced in a neutral gas by X-rays or high energy electrons; and (b) an af...

  6. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence - I. Convergence and the quasi-steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, E. R.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-11-01

    Magnetorotational turbulence provides a viable mechanism for angular momentum transport in accretion discs. We present global, three-dimensional (3D), magnetohydrodynamic accretion disc simulations that investigate the dependence of the turbulent stresses on resolution. Convergence in the time- and volume-averaged stress-to-gas-pressure ratio, overline{}, at a value of ˜0.04, is found for a model with radial, vertical and azimuthal resolution of 12-51, 27 and 12.5 cells per scaleheight (the simulation mesh is such that cells per scaleheight varies in the radial direction). The gas pressure dependence of the quasi-steady state stress level is also examined using models with different scaleheight-to-radius aspect ratio (H/R), revealing a weak dependence of overline{ } on pressure. A control volume analysis is performed on the main body of the disc (|z| casting the magnetic energy equation in terms of the power injected by Maxwell stresses on the boundaries of, and by Lorentz forces within, the control volume highlights the importance of the boundary conditions (of the control volume). The different convergence properties of shearing-box and global accretion disc simulations can be readily understood on the basis of choice of boundary conditions and the magnetic field configuration. Periodic boundary conditions restrict the establishment of large-scale gradients in the magnetic field, limiting the power that can be delivered to the disc by Lorentz forces and by stresses at the surfaces. The factor of 3 lower resolution required for convergence in for our global disc models compared to stratified shearing-boxes is explained by this finding.

  7. Rossby Wave Instability of Thin Accretion Disks; 2, Detailed Linear Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, J M; Colgate, S A

    1999-01-01

    In earlier work we identified a global, non-axisymmetric instability associated with the presence of an extreme in the radial profile of the key function ${\\cal L}(r) \\equiv (\\Sigma \\Omega/\\kappa^2) S^{2/\\Gamma}$ in a thin, inviscid, nonmagnetized accretion disk. Here, $\\Sigma(r)$ is the surface mass density of the disk, $\\Omega(r)$ the angular rotation rate, $S(r)$ the specific entropy, $\\Gamma$ the adiabatic index, and $\\kappa(r)$ the radial epicyclic frequency. The dispersion relation of the instability was shown to be similar to that of Rossby waves in planetary atmospheres. In this paper, we present the detailed linear theory of this Rossby wave instability and show that it exists for a wider range of conditions, specifically, for the case where there is a ``jump'' over some range of $r$ in $\\Sigma(r)$ or in the pressure $P(r)$. We elucidate the physical mechanism of this instability and its dependence on various parameters, including the magnitude of the ``bump'' or ``jump,'' the azimuthal mode number, ...

  8. [Carpal instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, J; Vogt, P M

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability can be understood as a disturbed anatomical alignment between bones articulating in the carpus. This disturbed balance occurs either only dynamically (with movement) under the effect of physiological force or even statically at rest. The most common cause of carpal instability is wrist trauma with rupture of the stabilizing ligaments and adaptive misalignment following fractures of the radius or carpus. Carpal collapse plays a special role in this mechanism due to non-healed fracture of the scaphoid bone. In addition degenerative inflammatory alterations, such as chondrocalcinosis or gout, more rarely aseptic bone necrosis of the lunate or scaphoid bones or misalignment due to deposition (Madelung deformity) can lead to wrist instability. Under increased pressure the misaligned joint surfaces lead to bone arrosion with secondary arthritis of the wrist. In order to arrest or slow down this irreversible process, diagnosis must occur as early as possible. Many surgical methods have been thought out to regain stability ranging from direct reconstruction of the damaged ligaments, through ligament replacement to partial stiffening of the wrist joint.

  9. FINANCIAL INSTABILITY AND POLITICAL INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Cristian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an important link between the following two variables: financial instability and political instability. Often, the link is bidirectional, so both may influence each other. This is way the lately crisis are becoming larger and increasingly complex. Therefore, the academic environment is simultaneously talking about economic crises, financial crises, political crises, social crises, highlighting the correlation and causality between variables belonging to the economic, financial, political and social areas, with repercussions and spillover effects that extend from one area to another. Given the importance, relevance and the actuality of the ones described above, I consider that at least a theoretical analysis between economic, financial and political factors is needed in order to understand the reality. Thus, this paper aims to find links and connections to complete the picture of the economic reality.

  10. Instabilities of Shercliff and Stewartson layers in spherical Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2010-01-01

    We explore numerically the flow induced in a spherical shell by differentially rotating the inner and outer spheres. The fluid is also taken to be electrically conducting (in the low magnetic Reynolds number limit), and a magnetic field is imposed parallel to the axis of rotation. If the outer sphere is stationary, the magnetic field induces a Shercliffe layer on the tangent cylinder, the cylinder just touching the inner sphere and parallel to the field. If the magnetic field is absent, but a strong overall rotation is present, Coriolis effects induce a Stewartson layer on the tangent cylinder. The non-axisymmetric instabilities of both types of layer separately have been studied before; here we consider the two cases side by side, as well as the mixed case, and investigate how magnetic and rotational effects interact. We find that if the differential rotation and the overall rotation are in the same direction, the overall rotation may have a destabilizing influence, whereas if the differential rotation and t...

  11. Dynamics of the Innermost Accretion Flows Around Compact Objects: Magnetosphere-Disc Interface, Global Oscillations and Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wen

    2012-01-01

    We study global non-axisymmetric oscillation modes and instabilities in magnetosphere- disc systems, as expected in neutron star X-ray binaries and possibly also in accreting black hole systems. Our two-dimensional magnetosphere-disc model consists of a Keplerian disc in contact with an uniformly rotating magnetosphere with low plasma density. Two types of global overstable modes exist in such systems, the interface modes and the disc inertial-acoustic modes. We examine various physical effects and parameters that influence the properties of these oscillation modes, particularly their growth rates, including the magnetosphere field configuration, the velocity and density contrasts across the magnetosphere-disc interface, the rotation profile (with Newtonian or General Relativistic potential), the sound speed and magnetic field of the disc. The interface modes are driven unstable by Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz in- stabilities, but can be stabilized by the toroidal field (through magnetic tension) and ...

  12. Viscous Instability Triggered by Layered Accretion in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Layered accretion is one of the inevitable ingredients in protoplanetary disks when disk turbulence is excited by magnetorotational instabilities (MRIs). In the accretion, disk surfaces where MRIs fully operate have a high value of disk accretion rate ($\\dot{M}$), while the disk midplane where MRIs are generally quenched ends up with a low value of $\\dot{M}$. Significant progress on understanding MRIs has recently been made by a number of dedicated MHD simulations, which requires improvement of the classical treatment of $\\alpha$ in 1D disk models. To this end, we obtain a new expression of $\\alpha$ by utilizing an empirical formula that is derived from recent MHD simulations of stratified disks with Ohmic diffusion. It is interesting that this new formulation can be regarded as a general extension of the classical $\\alpha$. Armed with the new $\\alpha$, we perform a linear stability analysis of protoplanetary disks that undergo layered accretion, and find that a viscous instability can occur around the outer ...

  13. EVIDENCE OF ACTIVE MHD INSTABILITY IN EULAG-MHD SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, Nicolas; Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul, E-mail: nicolas.laws@gmail.ca, E-mail: strugarek@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Qc H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2015-11-10

    We investigate the possible development of magnetohydrodynamical instabilities in the EULAG-MHD “millennium simulation” of Passos and Charbonneau. This simulation sustains a large-scale magnetic cycle characterized by solar-like polarity reversals taking place on a regular multidecadal cadence, and in which zonally oriented bands of strong magnetic fields accumulate below the convective layers, in response to turbulent pumping from above in successive magnetic half-cycles. Key aspects of this simulation include low numerical dissipation and a strongly sub-adiabatic fluid layer underlying the convectively unstable layers corresponding to the modeled solar convection zone. These properties are conducive to the growth and development of two-dimensional instabilities that are otherwise suppressed by stronger dissipation. We find evidence for the action of a non-axisymmetric magnetoshear instability operating in the upper portions of the stably stratified fluid layers. We also investigate the possibility that the Tayler instability may be contributing to the destabilization of the large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component at high latitudes. On the basis of our analyses, we propose a global dynamo scenario whereby the magnetic cycle is driven primarily by turbulent dynamo action in the convecting layers, but MHD instabilities accelerate the dissipation of the magnetic field pumped down into the overshoot and stable layers, thus perhaps significantly influencing the magnetic cycle period. Support for this scenario is found in the distinct global dynamo behaviors observed in an otherwise identical EULAG-MHD simulations, using a different degree of sub-adiabaticity in the stable fluid layers underlying the convection zone.

  14. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  15. Nanoparticle induced cell magneto-rotation: monitoring morphology, stress and drug sensitivity of a suspended single cancer cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remy Elbez

    Full Text Available Single cell analysis has allowed critical discoveries in drug testing, immunobiology and stem cell research. In addition, a change from two to three dimensional growth conditions radically affects cell behavior. This already resulted in new observations on gene expression and communication networks and in better predictions of cell responses to their environment. However, it is still difficult to study the size and shape of single cells that are freely suspended, where morphological changes are highly significant. Described here is a new method for quantitative real time monitoring of cell size and morphology, on single live suspended cancer cells, unconfined in three dimensions. The precision is comparable to that of the best optical microscopes, but, in contrast, there is no need for confining the cell to the imaging plane. The here first introduced cell magnetorotation (CM method is made possible by nanoparticle induced cell magnetization. By using a rotating magnetic field, the magnetically labeled cell is actively rotated, and the rotational period is measured in real-time. A change in morphology induces a change in the rotational period of the suspended cell (e.g. when the cell gets bigger it rotates slower. The ability to monitor, in real time, cell swelling or death, at the single cell level, is demonstrated. This method could thus be used for multiplexed real time single cell morphology analysis, with implications for drug testing, drug discovery, genomics and three-dimensional culturing.

  16. DUST DYNAMICS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISK WINDS DRIVEN BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE: A MECHANISM FOR FLOATING DUST GRAINS WITH CHARACTERISTIC SIZES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: miyake.tomoya@e.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: stakeru@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2016-04-10

    We investigate the dynamics of dust grains of various sizes in protoplanetary disk winds driven by magnetorotational turbulence, by simulating the time evolution of the dust grain distribution in the vertical direction. Small dust grains, which are well-coupled to the gas, are dragged upward with the upflowing gas, while large grains remain near the midplane of a disk. Intermediate-size grains float near the sonic point of the disk wind located at several scale heights from the midplane, where the grains are loosely coupled to the background gas. For the minimum mass solar nebula at 1 au, dust grains with size of 25–45 μm float around 4 scale heights from the midplane. Considering the dependence on the distance from the central star, smaller-size grains remain only in an outer region of the disk, while larger-size grains are distributed in a broader region. We also discuss the implications of our result for observations of dusty material around young stellar objects.

  17. Evaluating shoulder instability treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linde, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder instability common occurs. When treated nonoperatively, the resulting societal costs based on health care utilization and productivity losses are significant. Shoulder function can be evaluated using patient reported outcome measurements (PROMs). For shoulder instability, these include the

  18. Jeans instability in superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hason, Itamar; Oz, Yaron [Tel-Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    We analyze the effect of a gravitational field on the sound modes of superfluids. We derive an instability condition that generalizes the well-known Jeans instability of the sound mode in normal fluids. We discuss potential experimental implications. (orig.)

  19. Rossby wave instability does not require sharp resistivity gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Lyra, W; McNally, C

    2014-01-01

    Rossby wave instability (RWI) at dead zone boundaries may play an important role in planet formation. Viscous hydrodynamics results suggest RWI is excited only when the viscosity changes over a radial distance less than two density scale heights. However in the disks around Solar-mass T Tauri stars, it is not viscosity but magnetic forces that provide the accretion stress beyond about 10 AU, where surface densities are low enough so stellar X-rays and interstellar cosmic rays can penetrate. Here we aim to explore the conditions for RWI in the smooth transition with increasing distance, from resistive and magnetically-dead to conducting and magnetically-active. We perform 3D unstratified MHD simulations with the Pencil Code, using static resistivity profiles. As a result, we find that in MHD, contrary to viscous models, the RWI is triggered even with a gradual change in resistivity extending from 10 to 40 AU (i.e., spanning 15 scale heights for aspect ratio 0.1). This is because magneto-rotational turbulence s...

  20. Relativistic Gravothermal Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Roupas, Zacharias

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic instabilities of the self-gravitating, classical ideal gas are studied in the case of static, spherically symmetric configurations in General Relativity taking into account the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. One type of instabilities is found at low energies, where thermal energy becomes too weak to halt gravity and another at high energies, where gravitational attraction of thermal pressure overcomes its stabilizing effect. These turning points of stability are found to depend on the total rest mass $\\mathcal{M}$ over the radius $R$. The low energy instability is the relativistic generalization of Antonov instability, which is recovered in the limit $G\\mathcal{M} \\ll R c^2$ and low temperatures, while in the same limit and high temperatures, the high energy instability recovers the instability of the radiation equation of state. In the temperature versus energy diagram of series of equilibria, the two types of gravothermal instabilities make themselves evident as a double spiral! The two energy l...

  1. Shoulder instability; Schulterinstabilitaeten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainiz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2014-06-15

    In the shoulder, the advantages of range of motion are traded for the disadvantages of vulnerability to injury and the development of instability. Shoulder instability and the lesion it produces represent one of the main causes of shoulder discomfort and pain. Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to their causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options: instabilities are classified in traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome, and in microtraumatic instabilities. Plain radiographs ('trauma series') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful reposition. Direct MR arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation the different injury patterns on the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast CT-arthrography with use of multidetector CT scanners may be an alternative imaging modality, however, regarding the younger patient age, MR imaging should be preferred in the diagnostic work-up of shoulder instabilities. (orig.)

  2. Gravitational instabilities in a protosolar-like disc I: dynamics and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, M G; Boley, A C; Caselli, P; Durisen, R H; Hartquist, T W; Rawlings, J M C

    2015-01-01

    To date, most simulations of the chemistry in protoplanetary discs have used 1+1D or 2D axisymmetric $\\alpha$-disc models to determine chemical compositions within young systems. This assumption is inappropriate for non-axisymmetric, gravitationally unstable discs, which may be a significant stage in early protoplanetary disc evolution. Using 3D radiative hydrodynamics, we have modelled the physical and chemical evolution of a 0.17 M$_{\\odot}$ self-gravitating disc over a period of 2000 yr. The 0.8 M$_{\\odot}$ central protostar is likely to evolve into a solar-like star, and hence this Class 0 or early Class I young stellar object may be analogous to our early Solar System. Shocks driven by gravitational instabilities enhance the desorption rates, which dominate the changes in gas-phase fractional abundances for most species. We find that at the end of the simulation, a number of species distinctly trace the spiral structure of our relatively low-mass disc, particularly CN. We compare our simulation to that o...

  3. Non-axisymmetric vertical velocity dispersion distributions produced by bars

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P

    2016-01-01

    In barred galaxies, the contours of stellar velocity dispersions ($\\sigma$) are generally expected to be oval and aligned with the orientation of bars. However, many double-barred (S2B) galaxies exhibit distinct $\\sigma$ peaks on the minor axis of inner bar, which we termed "$\\sigma$-humps," while two local $\\sigma$ minima are present close to the ends of inner bars, i.e., "$\\sigma$-hollows." Analysis of numerical simulations shows that $\\sigma_z$-humps or hollows should play an important role in generating the observed $\\sigma$-humps+hollows in low-inclination galaxies. In order to systematically investigate the properties of $\\sigma_z$ in barred galaxies, we apply the vertical Jeans equation to a group of well-designed three-dimensional bar+disk(+bulge) models. A vertically thin bar can lower $\\sigma_z$ along the bar and enhance it perpendicular to the bar, thus generating $\\sigma_z$-humps+hollows. Such a result suggests that $\\sigma_z$-humps+hollows can be generated by the purely dynamical response of star...

  4. Modeling Sound Propagation Through Non-Axisymmetric Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Stewart J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for computing the far-field adjoint Green's function of the generalized acoustic analogy equations under a locally parallel mean flow approximation is presented. The method is based on expanding the mean-flow-dependent coefficients in the governing equation and the scalar Green's function in truncated Fourier series in the azimuthal direction and a finite difference approximation in the radial direction in circular cylindrical coordinates. The combined spectral/finite difference method yields a highly banded system of algebraic equations that can be efficiently solved using a standard sparse system solver. The method is applied to test cases, with mean flow specified by analytical functions, corresponding to two noise reduction concepts of current interest: the offset jet and the fluid shield. Sample results for the Green's function are given for these two test cases and recommendations made as to the use of the method as part of a RANS-based jet noise prediction code.

  5. Cavitation Instabilities in Inducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    gas handling turbomachines . The fluctuation of the cavity length is plotted in Fig.8 under the surge mode oscillation vi . The major differences...Cavitation Instabilities of Turbomachines .” AIAA Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol.17, No.3, 636-643. [5] Tsujimoto, Y., (2006), “Flow Instabilities in

  6. Instability in evolutionary games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimo Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phenomena of instability are widely observed in many dissimilar systems, with punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution and economic crises being noticeable examples. Recent studies suggested that such instabilities, quantified by the abrupt changes of the composition of individuals, could result within the framework of a collection of individuals interacting through the prisoner's dilemma and incorporating three mechanisms: (i imitation and mutation, (ii preferred selection on successful individuals, and (iii networking effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We study the importance of each mechanism using simplified models. The models are studied numerically and analytically via rate equations and mean-field approximation. It is shown that imitation and mutation alone can lead to the instability on the number of cooperators, and preferred selection modifies the instability in an asymmetric way. The co-evolution of network topology and game dynamics is not necessary to the occurrence of instability and the network topology is found to have almost no impact on instability if new links are added in a global manner. The results are valid in both the contexts of the snowdrift game and prisoner's dilemma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The imitation and mutation mechanism, which gives a heterogeneous rate of change in the system's composition, is the dominating reason of the instability on the number of cooperators. The effects of payoffs and network topology are relatively insignificant. Our work refines the understanding on the driving forces of system instability.

  7. Treatment of hip instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, G M; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Greidanus, N; Duncan, C P

    2001-10-01

    Instability after total hip arthroplasty is a major source of patient morbidity, second only to aseptic loosening. Certain patient groups have been identified as having a greater risk of instability, including patients undergoing revision arthroplasty as early or late treatment for proximal femoral fractures.

  8. The behavior of magnetic Prandtl number on the Rossby wave instability in the protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Mahmoud; Ebadi, Hossein; Shaji, Zeynab

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the Rossby wave instability (RWI) has become the target of intense theoretical and simulation investigations in dealing to some ambiguous problems such as the planet formation and angular momentum transport in the protoplanetary discs. The role of hydrodynamic turbulence on the RWI theory has been well understood by many theoretical and simulation works. However, less attention has been paid to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in theoretical works related to the RWI. However, the turbulent magnetic Prandtl numbers (Prm), i.e., the ratio of the turbulent viscosity to the turbulent magnetic diffusivity, is one of the significant parameters in (MHD) turbulence. On the other hand, the gradient and strength of the toroidal magnetic field can affect some variables and parameters in the stationary and perturbation states in some radii which may be lead to important results. In this paper, the whole range of Prm is considered in details with considering the gradient and strength of the toroidal magnetic field. Although complicating the problem, it gives us a comprehensive view on the RWI occurrence in the cold and hot discs. The results show that the Prm can significantly control the RWI occurrence as well as the growth rate of unstable modes. While the magneto-rotational instability cannot be responsible for the angular momentum transport in the protoplanetary discs, our results indicate that the RWI is responsible about this subject in these discs.

  9. Nonlinear helical MHD instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueva, N.M.; Solov' ev, L.S.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the boundary problem on the development of MHD instability in a toroidal plasma. Two types of local helical instability are noted - Alfven and thermal, and the corresponding criteria of instability are cited. An evaluation is made of the maximum attainable kinetic energy, limited by the degree to which the law of conservation is fulfilled. An examination is made of a precise solution to a kinematic problem on the helical evolution of a cylindrical magnetic configuration at a given velocity distribution in a plasma. A numerical computation of the development of MHD instability in a plasma cylinder by a computerized solution of MHD equations is made where the process's helical symmetry is conserved. The development of instability is of a resonance nature. The instability involves the entire cross section of the plasma and leads to an inside-out reversal of the magnetic surfaces when there is a maximum unstable equilibrium configuration in the nonlinear stage. The examined instability in the tore is apparently stabilized by a magnetic hole when certain limitations are placed on the distribution of flows in the plasma. 29 references, 8 figures.

  10. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D. (Privatpraxis fuer Upright MRT, Koeln (Germany)); Simons, P.; Kuchta, J. (Media Park Klinik, Koeln (Germany))

    2009-04-15

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI.

  11. Instabilities in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Csernai, László P; Papp, G

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of dynamical perturbations is examined in nuclear multifragmentation in the frame of Vlasov equation. Both plane wave and bubble type of perturbations are investigated in the presence of surface (Yukawa) forces. An energy condition is given for the allowed type of instabilities and the time scale of the exponential growth of the instabilities is calculated. The results are compared to the mechanical spinodal region predictions. PACS: 25.70 Mn

  12. Prediction of Algebraic Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretzky, Paula; King, Kristina; Hill, Nicole; Keithley, Kimberlee; Barlow, Nathaniel; Weinstein, Steven; Cromer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A widely unexplored type of hydrodynamic instability is examined - large-time algebraic growth. Such growth occurs on the threshold of (exponentially) neutral stability. A new methodology is provided for predicting the algebraic growth rate of an initial disturbance, when applied to the governing differential equation (or dispersion relation) describing wave propagation in dispersive media. Several types of algebraic instabilities are explored in the context of both linear and nonlinear waves.

  13. Propagating Instabilities in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakides, Stelios

    1998-03-01

    Instability is one of the factors which limit the extent to which solids can be loaded or deformed and plays a pivotal role in the design of many structures. Such instabilities often result in localized deformation which precipitates catastrophic failure. Some materials have the capacity to recover their stiffness following a certain amount of localized deformation. This local recovery in stiffness arrests further local deformation and spreading of the instability to neighboring material becomes preferred. Under displacement controlled loading the propagation of the transition fronts can be achieved in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level known as the propagation stress. The stresses in the transition fronts joining the highly deformed zone to the intact material overcome the instability nucleation stresses and, as a result, the propagation stress is usually much lower than the stress required to nucleate the instability. The classical example of this class of material instabilities is L/"uders bands which tend to affect mild steels and other metals. Recent work has demonstrated that propagating instabilities occur in several other materials. Experimental and analytical results from four examples will be used to illustrate this point: First the evolution of L=FCders bands in mild steel strips will be revisited. The second example involves the evolution of stress induced phase transformations (austenite to martensite phases and the reverse) in a shape memory alloy under displacement controlled stretching. The third example is the crushing behavior of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams made from metals and polymers. The fourth example involves the axial broadening/propagation of kink bands in aligned fiber/matrix composites under compression. The microstructure and, as a result, the micromechanisms governing the onset, localization, local arrest and propagation of instabilities in each of the four materials are vastly different. Despite this

  14. Multi-region approach to free-boundary three-dimensional tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Jardin, S. C.; Lao, L. L.; Shephard, M. S.; Zhang, F.

    2016-05-01

    Free-boundary 3D tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities are calculated using a new resistive wall model in the two-fluid M3D-C1 code. In this model, the resistive wall and surrounding vacuum region are included within the computational domain. This implementation contrasts with the method typically used in fluid codes in which the resistive wall is treated as a boundary condition on the computational domain boundary and has the advantage of maintaining purely local coupling of mesh elements. This new capability is used to simulate perturbed, free-boundary non-axisymmetric equilibria; the linear evolution of resistive wall modes; and the linear and nonlinear evolution of axisymmetric vertical displacement events (VDEs). Calculated growth rates for a resistive wall mode with arbitrary wall thickness are shown to agree well with the analytic theory. Equilibrium and VDE calculations are performed in diverted tokamak geometry, at physically realistic values of dissipation, and with resistive walls of finite width. Simulations of a VDE disruption extend into the current-quench phase, in which the plasma becomes limited by the first wall, and strong currents are observed to flow in the wall, in the SOL, and from the plasma to the wall.

  15. Multi-region approach to free-boundary three-dimensional tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, N. M., E-mail: nferraro@pppl.gov; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics, La Jolla, California 92186 (United States); Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Shephard, M. S.; Zhang, F. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Free-boundary 3D tokamak equilibria and resistive wall instabilities are calculated using a new resistive wall model in the two-fluid M3D-C1 code. In this model, the resistive wall and surrounding vacuum region are included within the computational domain. This implementation contrasts with the method typically used in fluid codes in which the resistive wall is treated as a boundary condition on the computational domain boundary and has the advantage of maintaining purely local coupling of mesh elements. This new capability is used to simulate perturbed, free-boundary non-axisymmetric equilibria; the linear evolution of resistive wall modes; and the linear and nonlinear evolution of axisymmetric vertical displacement events (VDEs). Calculated growth rates for a resistive wall mode with arbitrary wall thickness are shown to agree well with the analytic theory. Equilibrium and VDE calculations are performed in diverted tokamak geometry, at physically realistic values of dissipation, and with resistive walls of finite width. Simulations of a VDE disruption extend into the current-quench phase, in which the plasma becomes limited by the first wall, and strong currents are observed to flow in the wall, in the SOL, and from the plasma to the wall.

  16. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishnu M Bannur

    2001-10-01

    We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dispersion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming instability. It contains new, nonelectromagnetic, neutrino-plasma (or electroweak) stable and unstable modes also. The growth of the instability is weak for the highly relativistic neutrino flux, but becomes stronger for weakly relativistic neutrino flux in the case of parameters appropriate to the early universe and supernova explosions. However, this mode is dominant only for the beam velocity greater than 0.25 and in the other limit electroweak unstable mode takes over.

  17. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other...... scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis.......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...

  18. Mixing through shear instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggen, M

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of numerical simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a stratified shear layer. This shear instability is believed to be responsible for extra mixing in differentially rotating stellar interiors and is the prime candidate to explain the abundance anomalies observed in many rotating stars. All mixing prescriptions currently in use are based on phenomenological and heuristic estimates whose validity is often unclear. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we study the mixing efficiency as a function of the Richardson number and compare our results with some semi-analytical formalisms of mixing.

  19. Shock instability in dissipative gases

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Sirmas, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves in thermally relaxing gases, such as ionizing, dissociating and vibrationally excited gases, can become unstable. To date, the mechanism controlling this instability has not been resolved. Previous accounts of the D'yakov-Kontorovich instability, and Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson behaviour could not predict the experimentally observed instability. To address the mechanism controlling the instability, we study the propagation of shock waves in a ...

  20. High resolution polarimeter-interferometer system for fast equilibrium dynamics and MHD instability studies on Joint-TEXT tokamak (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Zhuang, G; Li, Q; Liu, Y; Gao, L; Zhou, Y N; Jian, X; Xiong, C Y; Wang, Z J; Brower, D L; Ding, W X

    2014-11-01

    A high-performance Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system has been developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. This system has time response up to 1 μs, phase resolution dynamics as well as magnetic and density perturbations associated with intrinsic Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) instabilities and external coil-induced Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMP). The 3-wave technique, in which the line-integrated Faraday angle and electron density are measured simultaneously by three laser beams with specific polarizations and frequency offsets, is used. In order to achieve optimum resolution, three frequency-stabilized HCOOH lasers (694 GHz, >35 mW per cavity) and sensitive Planar Schottky Diode mixers are used, providing stable intermediate-frequency signals (0.5-3 MHz) with S/N > 50. The collinear R- and L-wave probe beams, which propagate through the plasma poloidal cross section (a = 0.25-0.27 m) vertically, are expanded using parabolic mirrors to cover the entire plasma column. Sources of systematic errors, e.g., stemming from mechanical vibration, beam non-collinearity, and beam polarization distortion are individually examined and minimized to ensure measurement accuracy. Simultaneous density and Faraday measurements have been successfully achieved for 14 chords. Based on measurements, temporal evolution of safety factor profile, current density profile, and electron density profile are resolved. Core magnetic and density perturbations associated with MHD tearing instabilities are clearly detected. Effects of non-axisymmetric 3D RMP in ohmically heated plasmas are directly observed by polarimetry for the first time.

  1. High resolution polarimeter-interferometer system for fast equilibrium dynamics and MHD instability studies on Joint-TEXT tokamak (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G., E-mail: ge-zhuang@hust.edu.cn; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Zhou, Y. N.; Jian, X.; Xiong, C. Y.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system has been developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. This system has time response up to 1 μs, phase resolution < 0.1° and minimum spatial resolution ∼15 mm. High resolution permits investigation of fast equilibrium dynamics as well as magnetic and density perturbations associated with intrinsic Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) instabilities and external coil-induced Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMP). The 3-wave technique, in which the line-integrated Faraday angle and electron density are measured simultaneously by three laser beams with specific polarizations and frequency offsets, is used. In order to achieve optimum resolution, three frequency-stabilized HCOOH lasers (694 GHz, >35 mW per cavity) and sensitive Planar Schottky Diode mixers are used, providing stable intermediate-frequency signals (0.5–3 MHz) with S/N > 50. The collinear R- and L-wave probe beams, which propagate through the plasma poloidal cross section (a = 0.25–0.27 m) vertically, are expanded using parabolic mirrors to cover the entire plasma column. Sources of systematic errors, e.g., stemming from mechanical vibration, beam non-collinearity, and beam polarization distortion are individually examined and minimized to ensure measurement accuracy. Simultaneous density and Faraday measurements have been successfully achieved for 14 chords. Based on measurements, temporal evolution of safety factor profile, current density profile, and electron density profile are resolved. Core magnetic and density perturbations associated with MHD tearing instabilities are clearly detected. Effects of non-axisymmetric 3D RMP in ohmically heated plasmas are directly observed by polarimetry for the first time.

  2. Genetic instability in Gynecological Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-hua; ZHOU Hong-lin

    2003-01-01

    Defects of mismatch repair (MMR) genes also have beenidentified in many kinds of tumors. Loss of MMR functionhas been linked to genetic instability especially microsatelliteinstability that results in high mutation rate. In this review, wediscussed the microsatellite instability observed in thegynecological tumors. We also discussed defects in the DNAmismatch repair in these tumors and their correlation to themicrosatellite instability, as well as the gene mutations due tothe microsatellite instability in these tumors. From thesediscussion, we tried to understand the mechanism ofcarcinogenesis in gynecological tumors from the aspect ofgenetic instability due to mismatch repair defects.

  3. Instabilities in sensory processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2014-07-01

    In any organism there are different kinds of sensory receptors for detecting the various, distinct stimuli through which its external environment may impinge upon it. These receptors convey these stimuli in different ways to an organism's information processing region enabling it to distinctly perceive the varied sensations and to respond to them. The behavior of cells and their response to stimuli may be captured through simple mathematical models employing regulatory feedback mechanisms. We argue that the sensory processes such as olfaction function optimally by operating in the close proximity of dynamical instabilities. In the case of coupled neurons, we point out that random disturbances and fluctuations can move their operating point close to certain dynamical instabilities triggering synchronous activity.

  4. Modulation instability: The beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Kivshar, Yuri

    2012-11-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles plays a central role in the emerging novel technologies employing optics beyond the diffraction limit. Combining strong surface plasmon resonances, high intrinsic nonlinearities and deeply subwavelength scales, arrays of metal nanoparticles offer a unique playground to develop novel concepts for light manipulation at the nanoscale. Here we suggest a novel principle to control localized optical energy in chains of nonlinear subwavelength metal nanoparticles based on the fundamental nonlinear phenomenon of modulation instability. In particular, we demonstrate that modulation instability can lead to the formation of long-lived standing and moving nonlinear localized modes of several distinct types such as bright and dark solitons, oscillons, and domain walls. We analyze the properties of these nonlinear localized modes and reveal different scenarios of their dynamics including transformation of one type of mode to another. We believe this work paves a way towards the development of nonlinear nanophotonics circuitry.

  5. Instability and internet design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Braman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instability - unpredictable but constant change in one’s environment and the means with which one deals with it - has replaced convergence as the focal problem for telecommunications policy in general and internet policy in particular. Those who designed what we now call the internet during the first decade of the effort (1969-1979, who in essence served simultaneously as its policy-makers, developed techniques for coping with instability of value for network designers today and for those involved with any kind of large-scale sociotechnical infrastructure. Analysis of the technical document series that was medium for and record of that design process reveals coping techniques that began with defining the problem and went on to include conceptual labour, social practices, and technical approaches.

  6. Gravitational instabilities of superspinars

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor

    2010-01-01

    Superspinars are ultracompact objects whose mass M and angular momentum J violate the Kerr bound (cJ/GM^2>1). Recent studies analyzed the observable consequences of gravitational lensing and accretion around superspinars in astrophysical scenarios. In this paper we investigate the dynamical stability of superspinars to gravitational perturbations, considering either purely reflecting or perfectly absorbing boundary conditions at the "surface" of the superspinar. We find that these objects are unstable independently of the boundary conditions, and that the instability is strongest for relatively small values of the spin. Also, we give a physical interpretation of the various instabilities that we find. Our results (together with the well-known fact that accretion tends to spin superspinars down) imply that superspinars are very unlikely astrophysical alternatives to black holes.

  7. The instability of markets

    CERN Document Server

    Huberman, B A; Huberman, Bernardo A; Youssefmir, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Recent developments in the global liberalization of equity and currency markets, coupled to advances in trading technologies, are making markets increasingly interdependent. This increased fluidity raises questions about the stability of the international financial system. In this paper, we show that as couplings between stable markets grow, the likelihood of instabilities is increased, leading to a loss of general equilibrium as the system becomes increasingly large and diverse.

  8. Modulation instability: The beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Ostrovsky, L. A.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the early history of an important field of “sturm and drang” in modern theory of nonlinear waves. It is demonstrated how scientific demand resulted in independent and almost simultaneous publications by many different authors on modulation instability, a phenomenon resulting in a variety of nonlinear processes such as envelope solitons, envelope shocks, freak waves, etc. Examples from water wave hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, nonlinear optics, and convection theory are given.

  9. Carpal instability nondissociative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Kitay, Alison

    2012-09-01

    Carpal instability nondissociative (CIND) represents a spectrum of conditions characterized by kinematic dysfunction of the proximal carpal row, often associated with a clinical "clunk." CIND is manifested at the midcarpal and/or radiocarpal joints, and it is distinguished from carpal instability dissociative (CID) by the lack of disruption between bones within the same carpal row. There are four major subcategories of CIND: palmar, dorsal, combined, and adaptive. In palmar CIND, instability occurs across the entire proximal carpal row. When nonsurgical management fails, surgical options include arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy, soft-tissue reconstruction, or limited radiocarpal or intercarpal fusions. In dorsal CIND, the capitate subluxates dorsally from its reduced resting position. Dorsal CIND usually responds to nonsurgical management; refractory cases respond to palmar ligament reefing and/or dorsal intercarpal capsulodesis. Combined CIND demonstrates signs of both palmar and dorsal CIND and can be treated with soft-tissue or bony procedures. In adaptive CIND, the volar carpal ligaments are slackened and are less capable of inducing the physiologic shift of the proximal carpal row from flexion into extension as the wrist ulnarly deviates. Treatment of choice is a corrective osteotomy to restore the normal volar tilt of the distal radius.

  10. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  11. 题目:弹性空心圆柱体中对称与非对称导波的磁致伸缩换能器激励%Excitation of axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric guided waves in elastic hollow cylinders by magnetostrictive transducers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-wei ZHANG; Zhi-feng TANG; Fu-zai LV; Xiao-hong PAN

    2016-01-01

    high inspection efficiency. Compared with other ultrasonic guided wave actuators, magnetostrictive transducers are more cost-effective, involve simpler fabrication process, and have higher possible transduction efficiency. The normal mode expansion (NME) method is adopted to analyze the forced response and perturbation analysis of elastic hollow cylinders with respect to magnetostrictive loadings, including partial loading, axial array loading, and circular array loading. The phase velocity and frequency spectra of axisymmetric/non-axisymmetric guided waves excited by magnetostrictive transducers are analyzed. The theoretically predicted trends are verified by finite element numerical simulations and experiments.

  12. Dust Dynamics in Protoplanetary Disk Winds Driven by Magneto-Rotational Turbulence: A Mechanism for Floating Dust Grains with Characteristic Size

    CERN Document Server

    Miyake, Tomoya; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of dust grains with various sizes in protoplanetary disk winds driven by magnetorotational turbulence, by simulating the time evolution of the dust grain distribution in the vertical direction. Small dust grains, which are well coupled to the gas, are dragged upward with the upflowing gas, while large grains remain near the midplane of a disk. Intermediate--size grains float at several scale heights from the midplane in time-averated force balance between the downward gravity and the upward gas drag. For the minimum mass solar nebula at 1 AU, dust grains with size of 20 -- 40 $\\mu m$ float at 5-10 scale heights from the midplane. Considering the dependence on the distance from the central star, smaller-size grains remain only in an outer region of the disk, while larger-size grains are distributed in a broader region. This implies that the dust depletion is expected to take place in small-to-large and inside-out manners. We also discuss the implication of our result to the observat...

  13. Shoulder instability; Schultergelenkinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, J.; Imhof, H. [Abteilung Osteoradiologie, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    Shoulder instability is a common clinical feature leading to recurrent pain and limitated range of motion within the glenohumeral joint. Instability can be due a single traumatic event, general joint laxity or repeated episodes of microtrauma. Differentiation between traumatic and atraumatic forms of shoulder instability requires careful history and a systemic clinical examination. Shoulder laxity has to be differentiated from true instability followed by the clinical assessment of direction and degree of glenohumeral translation. Conventional radiography and CT are used for the diagnosis of bony lesions. MR imaging and MR arthrography help in the detection of soft tissue affection, especially of the glenoid labrum and the capsuloligamentous complex. The most common lesion involving the labrum is the anterior labral tear, associated with capsuloperiostal stripping (Bankart lesion). A number of variants of the Bankart lesion have been described, such as ALPSA, SLAP or HAGL lesions. The purpose of this review is to highlight different forms of shoulder instability and its associated radiological findings with a focus on MR imaging. (orig.) [German] Die Schultergelenkinstabilitaet ist haeufig fuer wiederholt auftretende Schmerzen sowie eine eingeschraenkte Beweglichkeit im Glenohumeralgelenk verantwortlich. Sie kann als Folge eines vorangegangenen Traumas, einer generellen Hyperlaxitaet oder infolge wiederholter Mikrotraumen entstehen. Die Differenzierung zwischen traumatischer und atraumatischer Form der Gelenkinstabilitaet erfordert eine sorgfaeltige Anamnese und eine genaue klinische Untersuchung. Die Gelelenklaxitaet als Differenzialdiagnose muss von der echten Instabilitaet unterschieden werden, die Instabilitaet wird dann im Rahmen des klinischen Status nach Grad und Richtung der glenohumeralen Translation unterteilt. Zur Diagnose knoecherner Laesionen werden das konventionelle Roentgen sowie die CT herangezogen. MRT sowie MR-Arthrographie dienen zur Detektion

  14. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  15. Modulational instability of nematic phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Mithun; K Porsezian

    2014-02-01

    We numerically observe the effect of homogeneous magnetic field on the modulationally stable case of polar phase in = 2 spinor Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs). Also we investigate the modulational instability of uniaxial and biaxial (BN) states of polar phase. Our observations show that the magnetic field triggers the modulational instability and demonstrate that irrespective of the magnetic field effect the uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases show modulational instability.

  16. Political Instability and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Swagel, Phillip; Roubini, Nouriel; Ozler, Sule; Alesina, Alberto

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between political instability and per capita GDP growth in a sample of 113 countries for the period 1950-1982. We define ?political instability? as the propensity of a government collapse, and we estimate a model in which political instability and economic growth are jointly determined. The main result of this paper is that in countries and time periods with a high propensity of government collapse, growth is significantly lower than otherwise. This ef...

  17. Weibel instability with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Hui-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bing [Strong-field and Ultrafast Photonics Lab, Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Weibel instability in plasma, where the ion distribution is isotropic and the electron component of the plasma possesses the anisotropic temperature distribution, is investigated based on the kinetic theory in context of nonextensive statistics mechanics. The instability growth rate is shown to be dependent on the nonextensive parameters of both electron and ion, and in the extensive limit, the result in Maxwellian distribution plasma is recovered. The instability growth rate is found to be enhanced as the nonextensive parameter of electron increases.

  18. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilities such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.

  19. [Aspirin suppresses microsatellite instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallinger, S; Dietmaier, W; Beyser, K; Bocker, T; Hofstädter, F; Fishel, R; Rüschoff, J

    1999-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exhibit cancer preventive effects and have been shown to induce regression of adenomas in FAP patients. In order to elucidate the probable underlying mechanism, the effect of NSAIDs on mismatch repair related microsatellite instability was investigated. Six colorectal cancer cell lines all but one deficient for human mismatch repair (MMR) genes were examined for microsatellite instability (MSI) prior and after treatment with Aspirin or Sulindac. For rapid in vitro analysis of MSI a microcloning assay was developed by combining Laser microdissection and random (PEP-) PCR prior to specific MSI-PCR. Effects of NSAIDs on cell cycle and apoptosis were systematically investigated by using flow cytometry and cell-sorting. MSI frequency in cells deficient of MMR genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6) was markedly reduced after long-term (> 10 weeks) NSAID treatment. This effect was reversible, time- and concentration dependent. However, in the hPMS2 deficient endometrial cancer cell line (HEC-1-A) the MSI phenotype kept unchanged. According to cell sorting, non-apoptotic cells were stable and apoptotic cells were unstable. These results suggest that aspirin/sulindac induces a genetic selection for microsatellite stability in a subset of MMR-deficient cells and may thus provide an effective prophylactic therapy for HNPCC related colorectal carcinomas.

  20. Instability of enclosed horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, Bernard S

    2013-01-01

    We study the classical massless scalar wave equation on the region of 1+1-dimensional Minkowski space between the two branches of the hyperbola $x^2-t^2=1$ with vanishing boundary conditions on it. We point out that there are initially finite-energy initially, say, right-going waves for which the stress-energy tensor becomes singular on the null-line $t+x=0$. We also construct the quantum theory of this system and show that, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state, there are coherent states built on this for which there is a similar singularity in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in 1+3-dimensional situations with 'enclosed horizons' such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a stationary box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be a similar singularity at the horizon and that would signal an instability when matter perturbations and/or gravity are switched on. Such an instability ...

  1. Bony instability of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Creighton, R Alexander; Herring, Marion M

    2008-09-01

    Instability of the shoulder is a common problem treated by many orthopaedists. Instability can result from baseline intrinsic ligamentous laxity or a traumatic event-often a dislocation that injures the stabilizing structures of the glenohumeral joint. Many cases involve soft-tissue injury only and can be treated successfully with repair of the labrum and ligamentous tissues. Both open and arthroscopic approaches have been well described, with recent studies of arthroscopic soft-tissue techniques reporting results equal to those of the more traditional open techniques. Over the last decade, attention has focused on the concept of instability of the shoulder mediated by bony pathology such as a large bony Bankart lesion or an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Recent literature has identified unrecognized large bony lesions as a primary cause of failure of arthroscopic reconstruction for instability, a major cause of recurrent instability, and a difficult diagnosis to make. Thus, although such bony lesions may be relatively rare compared with soft-tissue pathology, they constitute a critically important entity in the management of shoulder instability. Smaller bony lesions may be amenable to arthroscopic treatment, but larger lesions often require open surgery to prevent recurrent instability. This article reviews recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of bony instability.

  2. Cinerama sickness and postural instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Ledegang, W.D.; Lubeck, A.J.A.; Stins, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min af

  3. Marital instability after midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z; Penning, M J

    1997-09-01

    "Divorce in later life has been shown to produce dramatic declines in the economic, psychological, and physical well-being of marital partners. This study examines the prevalence and determinants of marital disruption after midlife using Becker's theory of marital instability. Using recent Canadian national data, the marital outcomes of women and men who were married as of age 40 are tracked across the remaining years of the marriage. Cox proportional hazard regression models indicate stabilizing effects of the duration of the marriage, the age at first marriage, the presence of young children, as well as of remarriage for middle-aged and older persons. Other significant risk factors include education, heterogamous marital status, premarital cohabitation, number of siblings, and region."

  4. Instability and Information

    CERN Document Server

    Patzelt, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Many complex systems exhibit extreme events far more often than expected for a normal distribution. This work examines how self-similar bursts of activity across several orders of magnitude can emerge from first principles in systems that adapt to information. Surprising connections are found between two apparently unrelated research topics: hand-eye coordination in balancing tasks and speculative trading in financial markets. Seemingly paradoxically, locally minimising fluctuations can increase a dynamical system's sensitivity to unpredictable perturbations and thereby facilitate global catastrophes. This general principle is studied in several domain-specific models and in behavioural experiments. It explains many findings in both fields and resolves an apparent antinomy: the coexistence of stabilising control or market efficiency and perpetual instabilities resembling critical phenomena in physical systems.

  5. Structural and Material Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes, Gustavo Cifuentes

    This work is a small contribution to the general problem of structural and material instability. In this work, the main subject is the analysis of cracking and failure of structural elements made from quasi-brittle materials like concrete. The analysis is made using the finite element method. Three...... use of interface elements) is used successfully to model cases where the path of the discontinuity is known in advance, as is the case of the analysis of pull-out of fibers embedded in a concrete matrix. This method is applied to the case of non-straight fibers and fibers with forces that have....... Numerical problems associated with the use of elements with embedded cracks based on the extended finite element method are presented in the next part of this work. And an alternative procedure is used in order to successfully remove these numerical problems. In the final part of this work, a computer...

  6. The bar instability revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodi, Filippo; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relation does not present any maximum of the growth rate when the sediment transport is assumed to be locally saturated. The analysis therefore reveals the fundamental importance of the relaxation of sediment transport towards equilibrium as it it is responsible for the stabilisation of small wavelength modes. This dynamical mechanism is characterised by the saturation number, defined as the ratio of the saturation length to the water depth Lsat/H. This dimensionless number controls the transition from ripples (transverse patte...

  7. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions.

  8. Equilibrium Electro-osmotic Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Isaak

    2014-01-01

    Since its prediction fifteen years ago, electro-osmotic instability has been attributed to non-equilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current in the course of concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface. This attribution had a double basis. Firstly, it has been recognized that equilibrium electro-osmosis cannot yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. Secondly, it has been shown that non-equilibrium electro-osmosis can. First theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent numerical studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential in the solid) allows for equilibrium electro-osmotic instability. Moreover, we s...

  9. Instability in Shocked Granular Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  10. Instability in shocked granular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmas, Nick; Falle, Sam; Radulescu, Matei

    2014-05-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  11. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability, and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability, supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the non-linear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analyt...

  12. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  13. Abelianization of QCD plasma instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Peter; Lenaghan, Jonathan

    2004-12-01

    QCD plasma instabilities appear to play an important role in the equilibration of quark-gluon plasmas in heavy-ion collisions in the theoretical limit of weak coupling (i.e. asymptotically high energy). It is important to understand what nonlinear physics eventually stops the exponential growth of unstable modes. It is already known that the initial growth of plasma instabilities in QCD closely parallels that in QED. However, once the unstable modes of the gauge fields grow large enough for non-Abelian interactions between them to become important, one might guess that the dynamics of QCD plasma instabilities and QED plasma instabilities become very different. In this paper, we give suggestive arguments that non-Abelian self-interactions between the unstable modes are ineffective at stopping instability growth, and that the growing non-Abelian gauge fields become approximately Abelian after a certain stage in their growth. This in turn suggests that understanding the development of QCD plasma instabilities in the nonlinear regime may have close parallels to similar processes in traditional plasma physics. We conjecture that the physics of collisionless plasma instabilities in SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theory becomes equivalent, respectively, to (i) traditional plasma physics, which is U(1) gauge theory, and (ii) plasma physics of U(1)×U(1) gauge theory.

  14. High resolution polarimeter-interferometer system for fast equilibrium dynamics and MHD instability studies on Joint-TEXT tokamak (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Zhou, Y. N.; Jian, X.; Xiong, C. Y.; Wang, Z. J.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2014-11-01

    A high-performance Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system has been developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. This system has time response up to 1 μs, phase resolution dynamics as well as magnetic and density perturbations associated with intrinsic Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) instabilities and external coil-induced Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMP). The 3-wave technique, in which the line-integrated Faraday angle and electron density are measured simultaneously by three laser beams with specific polarizations and frequency offsets, is used. In order to achieve optimum resolution, three frequency-stabilized HCOOH lasers (694 GHz, >35 mW per cavity) and sensitive Planar Schottky Diode mixers are used, providing stable intermediate-frequency signals (0.5-3 MHz) with S/N > 50. The collinear R- and L-wave probe beams, which propagate through the plasma poloidal cross section (a = 0.25-0.27 m) vertically, are expanded using parabolic mirrors to cover the entire plasma column. Sources of systematic errors, e.g., stemming from mechanical vibration, beam non-collinearity, and beam polarization distortion are individually examined and minimized to ensure measurement accuracy. Simultaneous density and Faraday measurements have been successfully achieved for 14 chords. Based on measurements, temporal evolution of safety factor profile, current density profile, and electron density profile are resolved. Core magnetic and density perturbations associated with MHD tearing instabilities are clearly detected. Effects of non-axisymmetric 3D RMP in ohmically heated plasmas are directly observed by polarimetry for the first time.

  15. Rossby wave instability at dead zone boundaries in 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamical global models of protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Lyra, Wladimir

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that the transition between magnetorotationally active and dead zones in protoplanetary disks should be prone to the excitation of vortices via Rossby wave instability (RWI). However, the only numerical evidence for this has come from alpha disk models, where the magnetic field evolution is not followed, and the effect of turbulence is parametrized by Laplacian viscosity. We aim to establish the phenomenology of the flow in the transition in 3D resistive-magnetohydrodynamical models. We model the transition by a sharp jump in resistivity, as expected in the inner dead zone boundary, using the Pencil Code to simulate the flow. We find that vortices are readily excited in the dead side of the transition. We measure the mass accretion rate finding similar levels of Reynolds stress at the dead and active zones, at the $\\alpha\\approx 10^{-2}$ level. The vortex sits in a pressure maximum and does not migrate, surviving until the end of the simulation. A pressure maximum in the active zone also...

  16. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... exact instability solutions are complex to derive, not to mention the extra complexity introducing dimensional instability from the temperature gradients. Using an inverse variable substitution and comparing an exact theory with an analytical instability solution a method to design tie...

  17. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K;

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes...

  18. Subject to Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bouwer

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available For Plantier, language constitutes reality and is male dominated. Readers of texts, she says, are at a disadvantage because the author imposes a logic that we must accept in order to understand the text. The discourses shaping our social reality have the same effect. Plantier has struggled against individual voices, discourses, and the very fabric of language informed by these discourses. "Subject to Instability" examines the impact on her generic evolution of a changing sense of self, of who her interlocutors are, and of those for whom she is speaking. I argue that her increasing attempt to juggle many different voices destabilizes her "monologic," poetical voice, resulting in a blurring of generic boundaries and eventually the abandonment of poetry. Recognizing that our entry into language is a form of alienation also unsettles Plantier because it undermines the very identity that allows her to speak for others. She concludes that each woman needs to become a Subject in her own right, but she continues to struggle against dominant discourses, modeling "resisting reader" strategies. If she can no longer practice "monologic steadfastness," this does not deter her from attempting to dismantle patriarchal language and striving to make her voice prevail over others.

  19. Atlantoaxial instability in Down's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1987-01-01

    The radiographs and clinical evaluations of 90 children with Down’s syndrome were reassessed after an interval of 5 years in a study of atlantoaxial instability (AAI) at the Derbyshire Children’s Hospital and Infirmary, Derby, UK.

  20. Evaporative instabilities in climbing films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, A. E.; Bush, John W. M.

    2001-09-01

    We consider flow in a thin film generated by partially submerging an inclined rigid plate in a reservoir of ethanol or methanol water solution and wetting its surface. Evaporation leads to concentration and surface tension gradients that drive flow up the plate. An experimental study indicates that the climbing film is subject to two distinct instabilities. The first is a convective instability characterized by flattened convection rolls aligned in the direction of flow and accompanied by free-surface deformations; in the meniscus region, this instability gives rise to pronounced ridge structures aligned with the mean flow. The second instability, evident when the plate is nearly vertical, takes the form of transverse surface waves propagating up the plate.

  1. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  2. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  3. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  4. Midcarpal instability: a radiological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toms, Andoni Paul [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Radiology Academy, Cotman Centre, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Chojnowski, Adrian [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Cahir, John G. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Midcarpal instability (MCI) is the result of complex abnormal carpal motion at the midcarpal joint of the wrist. It is a form of non-dissociative carpal instability (CIND) and can be caused by various combinations of extrinsic ligament injuries that then result in one of several subtypes of MCI. The complex patterns of injury and the kinematics are further complicated by competing theories, terminology and classifications of MCI. Palmar, dorsal, ulna midcarpal instability, and capitolunate or chronic capitolunate instability are all descriptions of types of MCI with often overlapping features. Palmar midcarpal instability (PMCI) is the most commonly reported type of MCI. It has been described as resulting from deficiencies in the ulna limb of the palmar arcuate ligament (triquetrohamate-capitate) or the dorsal radiotriquetral ligaments, or both. Unstable carpal articulations can be treated with limited carpal arthrodesis or the ligamentous defects can be treated with capsulorrhaphy or ligament reconstruction. Conventional radiographic abnormalities are usually limited to volar intercalated segment instability (VISI) patterns of carpal alignment and are not specific. For many years stress view radiographs and videofluoroscopy have been the methods of choice for demonstrating carpal instability and abnormal carpal kinematics respectively. Dynamic US can be also used to demonstrate midcarpal dyskinesia including the characteristic triquetral ''catch-up'' clunk. Tears of the extrinsic ligaments can be demonstrated with MR arthrography, and probably with CT arthrography, but intact yet redundant ligaments are more difficult to identify. The exact role of these investigations in the diagnosis, categorisation and management of midcarpal instability has yet to be determined. (orig.)

  5. Instability of enclosed horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  6. Vector-Resonance-Multimode Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kbashi, H.; Tarasov, N.; Loiko, Yu.; Kolpakov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The modulation and multimode instabilities are the main mechanisms which drive spontaneous spatial and temporal pattern formation in a vast number of nonlinear systems ranging from biology to laser physics. Using an Er-doped fiber laser as a test bed, here for the first time we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically a new type of a low-threshold vector-resonance-multimode instability which inherits features of multimode and modulation instabilities. The same as for the multimode instability, a large number of longitudinal modes can be excited without mode synchronization. To enable modulation instability, we modulate the state of polarization of the lasing signal with the period of the beat length by an adjustment of the in-cavity birefringence and the state of polarization of the pump wave. As a result, we show the regime's tunability from complex oscillatory to periodic with longitudinal mode synchronization in the case of resonance matching between the beat and cavity lengths. Apart from the interest in laser physics for unlocking the tunability and stability of dynamic regimes, the proposed mechanism of the vector-resonance-multimode instability can be of fundamental interest for the nonlinear dynamics of various distributed systems.

  7. Elliptic and magneto-elliptic instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyra Wladimir

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vortices are the fundamental units of turbulent flow. Understanding their stability properties therefore provides fundamental insights on the nature of turbulence itself. In this contribution I briely review the phenomenological aspects of the instability of elliptic streamlines, in the hydro (elliptic instability and hydromagnetic (magneto-elliptic instability regimes. Vortex survival in disks is a balance between vortex destruction by these mechanisms, and vortex production by others, namely, the Rossby wave instability and the baroclinic instability.

  8. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  9. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-12

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results.

  10. Evaporative Instability in Binary Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ranga; Uguz, Erdem

    2012-11-01

    In this talk we depict the physics of evaporative convection for binary systems in the presence of surface tension gradient effects. Two results are of importance. The first is that a binary system, in the absence of gravity, can generate an instability only when heated from the vapor side. This is to be contrasted with the case of a single component where instability can occur only when heated from the liquid side. The second result is that a binary system, in the presence of gravity, will generate an instability when heated from either the vapor or the liquid side provided the heating is strong enough. In addition to these results we show the conditions at which interfacial patterns can occur. Support from NSF OISE 0968313, Partner Univ. Fund and a Chateaubriand Fellowship is acknowledged.

  11. Laboratory blast wave driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn

    2008-11-01

    This presentation discusses experiments involving the evolution of hydrodynamic instabilities in the laboratory under high-energy-density (HED) conditions. These instabilities are driven by blast waves, which occur following a sudden, finite release of energy, and consist of a shock front followed by a rarefaction wave. When a blast wave crosses an interface with a decrease in density, hydrodynamic instabilities will develop. Instabilities evolving under HED conditions are relevant to astrophysics. These experiments include target materials scaled in density to the He/H layer in SN1987A. About 5 kJ of laser energy from the Omega Laser facility irradiates a 150 μm plastic layer that is followed by a low-density foam layer. A blast wave structure similar to those in supernovae is created in the plastic layer. The blast wave crosses an interface having a 2D or 3D sinusoidal structure that serves as a seed perturbation for hydrodynamic instabilities. This produces unstable growth dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the nonlinear regime. We have detected the interface structure under these conditions using x-ray backlighting. Recent advances in our diagnostic techniques have greatly improved the resolution of our x-ray radiographic images. Under certain conditions, the improved images show some mass extending beyond the RT spike and penetrating further than previously observed or predicted by current simulations. The observed effect is potentially of great importance as a source of mass transport to places not anticipated by current theory and simulation. I will discuss the amount of mass in these spike extensions, the associated uncertainties, and hypotheses regarding their origin We also plan to show comparisons of experiments using single mode and multimode as well as 2D and 3D initial conditions. This work is sponsored by DOE/NNSA Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058 (Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances) and DE-FG52-04NA00064 (National Laser User

  12. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  13. Stringy bounces and gradient instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Bouncing solutions are obtained from a generally covariant action characterized by a potential which is a nonlocal functional of the dilaton field at two separated space-time points. Gradient instabilities are shown to arise in this context but they are argued to be nongeneric. After performing a gauge-invariant and frame-invariant derivation of the evolution equations of the fluctuations, a heuristic criterium for the avoidance of pathological instabilities is proposed and corroborated by a number of explicit examples that turn out to be compatible with a quasi-flat spectrum of curvature inhomogeneities for typical wavelengths larger than the Hubble radius.

  14. Research on aviation fuel instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    The problems associated with aircraft fuel instability are discussed. What is currently known about the problem is reviewed and a research program to identify those areas where more research is needed is discussed. The term fuel instability generally refers to the gums, sediments, or deposits which can form as a result of a set of complex chemical reactions when a fuel is stored for a long period at ambient conditions or when the fuel is thermally stressed inside the fuel system of an aircraft.

  15. Mechanical Instabilities of Biological Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2012-07-01

    We study theoretically the morphologies of biological tubes affected by various pathologies. When epithelial cells grow, the negative tension produced by their division provokes a buckling instability. Several shapes are investigated: varicose, dilated, sinuous, or sausagelike. They are all found in pathologies of tracheal, renal tubes, or arteries. The final shape depends crucially on the mechanical parameters of the tissues: Young’s modulus, wall-to-lumen ratio, homeostatic pressure. We argue that since tissues must be in quasistatic mechanical equilibrium, abnormal shapes convey information as to what causes the pathology. We calculate a phase diagram of tubular instabilities which could be a helpful guide for investigating the underlying genetic regulation.

  16. Political instability and illegal immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, J E; Lien, D

    1995-01-01

    "Economic theory suggests that transnational migration results from the push-pull effect of wage differentials between host and source countries. In this paper, we argue that political instability exacerbates the migration flow, with greater instability leading to relatively larger flows. We conclude then that an optimal solution to the illegal immigration problem requires proper coordination of immigration and foreign policies by the host country. A narrow preoccupation with tougher immigration laws is wasteful and may be marginally effective." Emphasis is on the United States as a host country.

  17. Undulation Instability of Epithelial Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Basan, Markus; Prost, Jacques; Risler, Thomas; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.158101

    2011-01-01

    Treating the epithelium as an incompressible fluid adjacent to a viscoelastic stroma, we find a novel hydrodynamic instability that leads to the formation of protrusions of the epithelium into the stroma. This instability is a candidate for epithelial fingering observed in vivo. It occurs for sufficiently large viscosity, cell-division rate and thickness of the dividing region in the epithelium. Our work provides physical insight into a potential mechanism by which interfaces between epithelia and stromas undulate, and potentially by which tissue dysplasia leads to cancerous invasion.

  18. Secondary instabilities of linearly heated falling films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jun; SUN Dejun; HU Guohui; YIN Xieyuan

    2005-01-01

    Secondary instabilities of linearly heated failing films are studied through three steps. Firstly, the analysis of the primary linear instability on Miladinova's long wave equation of the linearly heated film is performed. Secondly, the similar Landau equation is derived through weak nonlinear theory, and a two-dimensional nonlinear saturation solution of primary instability is obtained within the weak nonlinear domain. Thirdly, the secondary (three-dimensional) instability of the two-dimensional wave is studied by the Floquet theorem.Our secondary instability analysis shows that the Marangoni number has destabilization effect on the secondary instability.

  19. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  20. Lending sociodynamics and economic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2011-11-01

    We show how the dynamics of economic instability and financial crises articulated by Keynes in the General Theory and developed by Minsky as the Financial Instability Hypothesis can be formalized using Weidlich’s sociodynamics of opinion formation. The model addresses both the lending sentiment of a lender in isolation as well as the impact on that lending sentiment of the behavior of other lenders. The risk associated with lending is incorporated through a stochastic treatment of loan dynamics that treats prepayment and default as competing risks. With this model we are able to generate endogenously the rapid changes in lending opinion that attend slow changes in lending profitability and find these dynamics to be consistent with the rise and collapse of the non-Agency mortgage-backed securities market in 2007/2008. As the parameters of this model correspond to well-known phenomena in cognitive and social psychology, we can both explain why economic instability has proved robust to advances in risk measurement and suggest how policy for reducing economic instability might be formulated in an experimentally sound manner.

  1. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-01-01

    Brewing of beer, one of the oldest biotechnology industries was one of the earliest processes to be undertaken on commercial basis. Biological instability involves contamination of bacteria, yeast, or mycelia fungi and there is always a risk in brewing that beer can become contaminated by micro-organisms.

  2. Size effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavi...... as the void grows to a size well above the characteristic material length....

  3. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Liu

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in these notes are selective and tend to emphasize more on kinetic-theory approaches to waves and instabilities in both uniform and non-uniform plasmas, students are assumed to have some basic knowledge of plasma dynamics in terms of single-particle and fluid descriptions.

  4. GENETIC INSTABILITY IN CERVICAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵旻; 伍欣星; 邱小萍; 李晖; 戴天力; 谭云

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of cervical carcinoma has been clearly established but other factors could be involved in cervical tumorigenesis such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic instability in cervical carcinoma tissues and provide evidence for discoveringnew tumor suppressor genes and screening diagnostic molecular marker of cervical carcinoma. Methods: Fifty primary cervical carcinoma samples from high-incidence area were analyzed by PCR for HPV16 infection, LOH and microsatellite instability. Results: HPV16 was detected in 88% of the cases. Sixty-six percent of total cases showed LOH with no more than 3 different loci per case. The highest frequency of the allelic loss was found in D18S474 (18q21, 40.5%). MI was detected in 4 cases (8%) only. Conclusion: Different percentages of LOH on specific chromosomal regions were found and MI was very infrequent in cervical carcinoma. The putative suppressor gene(s) could be located on specific chromosome regions such as 18q, and genetic instability could be involved in cervical tumorigenesis.

  5. Singlet and triplet instability theorems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomonori; Hirata, So

    2015-09-01

    A useful definition of orbital degeneracy—form-degeneracy—is introduced, which is distinct from the usual energy-degeneracy: Two canonical spatial orbitals are form-degenerate when the energy expectation value in the restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave function is unaltered upon a two-electron excitation from one of these orbitals to the other. Form-degenerate orbitals tend to have isomorphic electron densities and occur in the highest-occupied and lowest-unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) of strongly correlated systems. Here, we present a mathematical proof of the existence of a triplet instability in a real or complex RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of real or complex unrestricted Hartree-Fock wave functions when HOMO and LUMO are energy- or form-degenerate. We also show that a singlet instability always exists in a real RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of complex RHF wave functions, when HOMO and LUMO are form-degenerate, but have nonidentical electron densities, or are energy-degenerate. These theorems provide Hartree-Fock-theory-based explanations of Hund's rule, a singlet instability in Jahn-Teller systems, biradicaloid electronic structures, and a triplet instability during some covalent bond breaking. They also suggest (but not guarantee) the spontaneous formation of a spin density wave (SDW) in a metallic solid. The stability theory underlying these theorems extended to a continuous orbital-energy spectrum proves the existence of an oscillating (nonspiral) SDW instability in one- and three-dimensional homogeneous electron gases, but only at low densities or for strong interactions.

  6. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  7. Analogy between thermal convective and magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdmanis, Ya.Ya.; Kukainis, O.A.

    1977-01-01

    An examination is made of the analogy between thermo-convective instability and instability produced by various electromagnetic forces both in steady and alternating thermal and electromagnetic fields. An example is given for calculating an assumed bubble instability which could occur in an alternating magnetic field. 17 references.

  8. Amplitude Equation for Instabilities Driven at Deformable Surfaces - Rosensweig Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiner, Harald; Bohlius, Stefan; Brand, Helmut R.

    2008-11-01

    The derivation of amplitude equations from basic hydro-, magneto-, or electrodynamic equations requires the knowledge of the set of adjoint linear eigenvectors. This poses a particular problem for the case of a free and deformable surface, where the adjoint boundary conditions are generally non-trivial. In addition, when the driving force acts on the system via the deformable surface, not only Fredholm's alternative in the bulk, but also the proper boundary conditions are required to get amplitude equations. This is explained and demonstrated for the normal field (or Rosensweig) instability in ferrofluids as well as in ferrogels. An important aspect of the problem is its intrinsic dynamic nature, although at the end the instability is stationary. The resulting amplitude equation contains cubic and quadratic nonlinearities as well as first and (in the gel case) second order time derivatives. Spatial variations of the amplitudes cannot be obtained by using simply Newell's method in the bulk.

  9. Asymmetric supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Akiyama, Shizuka

    2010-03-01

    Spectropolarimetry of core collapse supernovae has shown that they are asymmetric and often, but not universally, bi-polar. Jet-induced supernova models give a typical jet/torus structure that is reminiscent of some objects like the Crab nebula, SN 1987A and Cas A. Asymmetry in the strength of polar jets is a plausible mechanism to produce substantial pulsar "kick" velocities. Jets may arise from the intrinsic rotation and magnetic fields that are expected to accompany core collapse. We summarize the potential importance of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) for the core collapse problem in the context of the non-monotonic behavior expected: increasing centrifugal support will lead to a maximum rotation and magnetic field production as a function of the initial rotation of the iron core. Non-axisymmetric instabilities are predicted for differentially rotating proto-neutron stars with values of the ratio of rotational kinetic energy to binding energy, T/∣ W∣≳0.01. The non-axisymmetric instabilities are likely to drive magnetosonic waves into the surrounding time-dependent density structure. These waves represent a mechanism of the dissipation of the rotational energy of the proto-neutron star, and the outward deposition of this energy may play a role in the supernova explosion process. The phase of deleptonization and contraction of the proto-neutron star lasting several seconds is likely to be an important phase of magnetic non-axisymmetric evolution. In the special circumstance that the proto-neutron star is born sufficiently rapidly rotating that it is subject to bar-mode instabilities on secular timescales, a possible outcome is that the deleptonizing neutron star will evolve along the locus T/∣ W∣˜0.14 releasing a significant fraction of its binding energy as MHD power sufficient to account for a GRB. This power will be provided over an extended time, 10 s, that is strongly reminiscent of the timescale of long GRBs and is also comparable to the

  10. Competing structural instabilities in cubic perovskites

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderbilt, D

    1994-01-01

    We study the antiferrodistortive instability and its interaction with ferroelectricity in cubic perovskite compounds. Our first-principles calculations show that coexistence of both instabilities is very common. We develop a first-principles scheme to study the thermodynamics of these compounds when both instabilities are present, and apply it to SrTiO$_3$. We find that increased pressure enhances the antiferrodistortive instability while suppressing the ferroelectric one. Moreover, the presence of one instability tends to suppress the other. A very rich $P$--$T$ phase diagram results.

  11. Quad-Bike Operational Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross H. Macmillan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The stake-holders in the quad-bike (QB industry in Australia have failed to reach a satisfactory resolution of the present impasse that exists with respect to the causes and mitigation of the trauma suffered by riders due to QB instability. In an effort to provide purchasers with data enabling them to discriminate between safer and less safe machines, static longitudinal and lateral tests have been conducted by various interested parties; quasi-static lateral tests have also been conducted under some operational conditions. It is argued that while these static tests are valid, under many operating conditions QBs will not reach such unstable slopes due to poor traction. Further, these tests do not include the quasi-static and dynamic factors which also influence the processes associated with operational instability. For these reasons, the static tests do not provide an adequate basis for discrimination between safer and less safe machines.

  12. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation.

  13. Streaming Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Youdin, A N; Youdin, Andrew N.; Goodman, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Interpenetrating streams of solids and gas in a Keplerian disk produce a local, linear instability. The two components mutually interact via aerodynamic drag, which generates radial drift and triggers unstable modes. The secular instability does not require self-gravity, yet it generates growing particle density perturbations that could seed planetesimal formation. Growth rates are slower than dynamical, but faster than radial drift, timescales. Growth rates, like streaming velocities, are maximized for marginal coupling (stopping times comparable dynamical times). Fastest growth occurs when the solid to gas density ratio is order unity and feedback is strongest. Curiously, growth is strongly suppressed when the densities are too nearly equal. The relation between background drift and wave properties is explained by analogy with Howard's semicircle theorem. The three-dimensional, two-fluid equations describe a sixth order (in the complex frequency) dispersion relation. A terminal velocity approximation allows...

  14. Instability of supersymmetric microstate geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Eperon, Felicity C; Santos, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the classical stability of supersymmetric, asymptotically flat, microstate geometries with five non-compact dimensions. Such geometries admit an "evanescent ergosurface": a timelike hypersurface of infinite redshift. On such a surface, there are null geodesics with zero energy relative to infinity. These geodesics are stably trapped in the potential well near the ergosurface. We present a heuristic argument indicating that this feature is likely to lead to a nonlinear instability of these solutions. We argue that the precursor of such an instability can be seen in the behaviour of linear perturbations: nonlinear stability would require that all linear perturbations decay sufficiently rapidly but the stable trapping implies that some linear perturbation decay very slowly. We study this in detail for the most symmetric microstate geometries. By constructing quasinormal modes of these geometries we show that generic linear perturbations decay slower than any inverse power of time.

  15. Buckling instability of squeezed droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Elfring, Gwynn J

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we consider theoretically the compression of droplets pinned at the bottom on a surface of finite area. We show that if the droplet is sufficiently compressed at the top by a surface, it will always develop a shape instability at a critical compression. When the top surface is flat, the shape instability occurs precisely when the apparent contact angle of the droplet at the pinned surface is pi, regardless of the contact angle of the upper surface, reminiscent of past work on liquid bridges and sessile droplets as first observed by Plateau. After the critical compression, the droplet transitions from a symmetric to an asymmetric shape. The force required to deform the droplet peaks at the critical point then progressively decreases indicative of catastrophic buckling. We characterize the transition in droplet shape using illustrative examples in two dimensions followed by perturbative analysis as well as numerical simulation in three dimensions. When the upper surface is not f...

  16. Stretching Folding Instability and Nanoemulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chon U

    2009-01-01

    Here we show a folding-stretching instability in a microfluidic flow focusing device using silicon oil (100cSt) and water. The fluid dynamics video demonstrates an oscillating thread of oil focused by two co-flowing streams of water. We show several high-speed sequences of these oscillations with 30,000 frames/s. Once the thread is decelerated in a slower moving pool downstream an instability sets in and water-in-oil droplets are formed. We reveal the details of the pinch-off with 500,000 frames/s. The pinch-off is so repeatable that complex droplet patterns emerge. Some of droplets are below the resolution limit, thus smaller than 1 micrometer in diameter.

  17. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... the temperature gradient between the outer and the inner wall, which results in critical increase of the bending moments in the ties. Since the ties are loaded by combined compression and moment forces, the loadbearing capacity is derived from instability equilibrium equations. Most of them are iterative, since......-connectors in cavity walls was developed. The method takes into account constraint conditions limiting the free length of the wall tie, and the instability in case of pure compression which gives an optimal load bearing capacity. The model is illustrated with examples from praxis....

  18. Instability of supersymmetric microstate geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eperon, Felicity C.; Reall, Harvey S.; Santos, Jorge E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-07

    We investigate the classical stability of supersymmetric, asymptotically flat, microstate geometries with five non-compact dimensions. Such geometries admit an “evanescent ergosurface”: a timelike hypersurface of infinite redshift. On such a surface, there are null geodesics with zero energy relative to infinity. These geodesics are stably trapped in the potential well near the ergosurface. We present a heuristic argument indicating that this feature is likely to lead to a nonlinear instability of these solutions. We argue that the precursor of such an instability can be seen in the behaviour of linear perturbations: nonlinear stability would require that all linear perturbations decay sufficiently rapidly but the stable trapping implies that some linear perturbation decay very slowly. We study this in detail for the most symmetric microstate geometries. By constructing quasinormal modes of these geometries we show that generic linear perturbations decay slower than any inverse power of time.

  19. Modern management of patellar instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Shin-Jae; Pavlou, George; Oakley, Jeremy; Barlow, David; Haddad, Farres

    2012-12-01

    Recurrent patellofemoral instability is a disabling condition, attributed to a variety of anatomical aetiologies. Trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, an increased tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance of greater than 20 mm and soft tissue abnormalities such as a torn medial patellofemoral ligament and inadequate vastus medialis obliquus are all factors to be considered. Management of this condition remains difficult and controversial and knowledge of the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint, a detailed history and clinical examination, and an accurate patient assessment are all imperative to formulate an appropriate management plan. Surgical treatment is based on the underlying anatomical pathology with an aim to restore normal patellofemoral kinematics. We summarise aspects of assessment, treatment and outcome of patellofemoral instability and propose an algorithm of treatment.

  20. Mechanical Instabilities of Biological Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hannezo, Edouard; Prost, Jacques; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.018101

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the shapes of biological tubes affected by various pathologies. When epithelial cells grow at an uncontrolled rate, the negative tension produced by their division provokes a buckling instability. Several shapes are investigated : varicose, enlarged, sinusoidal or sausage-like, all of which are found in pathologies of tracheal, renal tubes or arteries. The final shape depends crucially on the mechanical parameters of the tissues : Young modulus, wall-to-lumen ratio, homeostatic pressure. We argue that since tissues must be in quasistatic mechanical equilibrium, abnormal shapes convey information as to what causes the pathology. We calculate a phase diagram of tubular instabilities which could be a helpful guide for investigating the underlying genetic regulation.

  1. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  2. Placing Marangoni instabilities under arrest

    CERN Document Server

    Bhamla, M Saad

    2016-01-01

    Soap bubbles occupy the rare position of delighting and fascinating both young children and scientific minds alike. Sir Isaac Newton, Joseph Plateau, Carlo Marangoni, and Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, not to mention countless others, have discovered remarkable results in optics, molecular forces and fluid dynamics from investigating this seemingly simple system. We present here a compilation of curiosity-driven experiments that systematically investigate the surface flows on a rising soap bubble. From childhood experience, we are familiar with the vibrant colors and mesmerizing display of chaotic flows on the surface of a soap bubble. These flows arise due to surface tension gradients, also known as Marangoni flows or instabilities. In Figure 1, we show the surprising effect of layering multiple instabilities on top of each other, highlighting that unexpected new phenomena are still waiting to be discovered, even in the simple soap bubble.

  3. Circulation in blast driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Mixing in many natural phenomena (e.g. supernova collapse) and engineering applications (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) is often initiated through hydrodynamic instabilities. Explosions in these systems give rise to blast waves which can interact with perturbations at interfaces between different fluids. Blast waves are formed by a shock followed by a rarefaction. This wave profile leads to complex time histories of interface acceleration. In addition to the instabilities induced by the acceleration field, the rarefaction from the blast wave decompresses the material at the interface, further increasing the perturbation growth. After the passage of the wave, circulation circulation generated by the blast wave through baroclinic vorticity continues to act upon the interface. In this talk, we provide scaling laws for the circulation and amplitude growth induced by the blast wave. Numerical simulations of the multifluid Euler equations solved using a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method are used to validate the theoretical results.

  4. MD 751: Train Instability Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Carver, Lee Robert; Metral, Elias; Salvant, Benoit; Levens, Tom; Nisbet, David; Zobov, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this MD is to measure the octupole current thresholds for stability for a single bunch, and then make an immediate comparison (with the same operational settings) for a train of 72 bunches separated by 25ns. From theory, the expected thresholds should be similar. Any discrepancy between the two cases will be of great interest as it could indicate the presence of additional mechanisms that contribute to the instability threshold, for example electron cloud.

  5. Polygonal instabilities on interfacial vorticities

    CERN Document Server

    Labousse, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical investigation of the stability of a toroidal vortex bound by an interface. Two distinct instability mechanisms are identified that rely on, respectively, surface tension and fluid inertia, either of which may prompt the transformation from a circular to a polygonal torus. Our results are discussed in the context of three experiments, a toroidal vortex ring, the hydraulic jump, and the hydraulic bump.

  6. Instability of colliding metastable strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Eto, Minoru [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Ookouchi, Yutaka [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research

    2013-04-15

    We investigate the collision dynamics of two metastable strings which can be viewed as tube-like domain walls with winding numbers interpolating a false vacuum and a true vacuum. We find that depending on the relative angle and speed of two strings, instability of strings increases and the false vacuum is filled out by rapid expansion of the strings or of a remnant of the collision.

  7. Gravitational instabilities in astrophysical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohline, Joel E.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past decade, the significant advancements that have been made in the development of computational tools and numerical techniques have allowed astrophysicists to begin to model accurately the nonlinear growth of gravitational instabilities in a variety of physical systems. The fragmentation or rotationally driven fission of dynamically evolving, self-gravitating ``drops and bubbles'' is now routinely modeled in full three-dimensional generality as we attempt to understand the behavior of protostellar clouds, rotating stars, galaxies, and even the primordial soup that defined the birth of the universe. A brief review is presented here of the general insights that have been gained from studies of this type, followed by a somewhat more detailed description of work, currently underway, that is designed to explain the process of binary star formation. A short video animation sequence, developed in conjunction with some of the research being reviewed, illustrates the basic-nature of the fission instability in rotating stars and of an instability that can arise in a massive disk that forms in a protostellar cloud.

  8. Microphysics of cosmic ray driven plasma instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M; Malkov, M A; Osipov, S M

    2013-01-01

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  9. Orbital Instability and Relaxation in Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluri, Monica; Merritt, David

    We review recent progress in understanding the role of chaos in influencing the structure and evolution of galaxies. The orbits of stars in galaxies are generically chaotic: the chaotic behavior arises in part from the intrinsically grainy nature of a potential that is composed of point masses. Even if the potential is assumed to be smooth, however, much of the phase space of non-axisymmetric galaxies is chaotic due to the presence of central density cusps or black holes. The chaotic nature of orbits implies that perturbations will grow exponentially and this in turn is expected to result in a diffusion in phase space. We show that the degree of orbital evolution is not well predicted by the growth rate of infinitesimal perturbations, i.e. by the Liapunov exponent. A more useful criterion is whether perturbations continue to grow exponentially until their scale is of order the size of the system. We illustrate these ideas in a potential consisting of N fixed point masses. Liapunov exponents are large for all values of N, but orbits become increasingly regular in their behavior as N increases; the reason is that the exponential divergence saturates at smaller and smaller distances as N is increased. The objects which lend phase space its structure and impede diffusion are the invariant tori; in the triaxial potentials we consider, a large fraction of the tori correspond to resonant (thin) orbits and their associated families of regular orbits. Perturbations to the potential destroy the resonant tori. When only a few stable resonances remain, we find that the phase space distribution of an ensemble of chaotic orbits evolves rapidly toward a nearly stationary state. This mixing process is shown to occur on timescales of a few crossing times in triaxial potentials containing massive central singularities, consistent with the rapid evolution observed in N-body simulations of galaxies with central black holes.

  10. Modes of storage ring coherent instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    Longitudinal impedance in a beam and various modes of longitudinal coherent instabilities are discussed. The coasting beam coherent instability, microwave instability, and single-bunch longitudinal coherent instabilities are considered. The Vlasov equation is formulated, and a method of solving it is developed. The synchrotron modes are treated, which take the possible bunch shape distortion fully into consideration. A method of treating the synchrotron mode coupling in the case of a small bunch is discussed which takes advantage of the fact that only a few of the synchrotron modes can contribute in such a case. The effect of many bunches on the coherent motion of the beam and the longitudinal symmetric coupled bunch modes are discussed. The transverse impedance is then introduced, and the transverse coasting beam instability is discussed. Various bunched beam instabilities are discussed, including both single bunch instabilities and coupled bunch instabilities. The Vlasov equation for transverse as well as longitudinal motion of particles is introduced as well as a method of solving it within a linear approximation. Head-tail modes and short bunch instabilities and strong coupling instabilities in the long bunch case are covered. (LEW)

  11. Compressor instability with integral methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.K. Eddie [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Liu, Ningyu [Singapore National Univ. (Singapore). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    ''Compressor Instability with Integral Methods'' is a book, to bring together the quick integral approaches and advances in the field for the prediction of stall and surge problem in compressor. This book is useful for people involved in the flow analysis, design and testing of rotating machinery. For students, it can be used as a specialized topic of senior undergraduate or graduate study. The book can also be served as a self-study material to those who keen to acquire this knowledge. In brief, this book focuses on the numerical/computational analysis for the effect of distorted inlet flow propagation on the rotating stall and surge in axial compressors. It gains insight into the basic phenomena controlling these flow instabilities, and reveals the influence of inlet parameters on rotating stall and surge. The book starts from the confirmation and application of Kim et al's integral method and then follows by a development to this method through the proposing and applying a critical distortion line. This line is applied successfully on the stall prediction of in-flight compressor due to flaming of refueling leakage near inlet, a typical real and interesting example of compressor stall and surge operation. Further, after a parametric study on the integral method and the distorted flow field of compressor using Taguchi method, a novel integral method is formulated using more appropriate and practical airfoil characteristics, with a less assumptions needed for derivation. Finally, as an extended work, the famous Greitzer's instability flow model, the well-known B-parameter model applied for analyzing the stall and surge characteristics, is studied parametrically using Taguchi method. (orig.)

  12. Bathtub vortex induced by instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Jiro; Abe, Kazuki; Yokoyama, Naoto

    2014-10-01

    The driving mechanism and the swirl direction of the bathtub vortex are investigated by the linear stability analysis of the no-vortex flow as well as numerical simulations. We find that only systems having plane symmetries with respect to vertical planes deserve research for the swirl direction. The bathtub vortex appearing in a vessel with a rectangular cross section having a drain hole at the center of the bottom is proved to be induced by instability when the flow rate exceeds a threshold. The Coriolis force is capable of determining the swirl direction to be cyclonic.

  13. Spatiotemporal chaos involving wave instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenstein, Igal; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate pattern formation in a model of a reaction confined in a microemulsion, in a regime where both Turing and wave instability occur. In one-dimensional systems, the pattern corresponds to spatiotemporal intermittency where the behavior of the systems alternates in both time and space between stationary Turing patterns and traveling waves. In two-dimensional systems, the behavior initially may correspond to Turing patterns, which then turn into wave patterns. The resulting pattern also corresponds to a chaotic state, where the system alternates in both space and time between standing wave patterns and traveling waves, and the local dynamics may show vanishing amplitude of the variables.

  14. Nonlinear Instability of Liquid Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Lori Ann

    The nonlinear instability of two superposed viscous liquid layers in planar and axisymmetric configurations is investigated. In the planar configuration, the light layer fluid is bounded below by a wall and above by a heavy semiinfinite fluid. Gravity drives the instability. In the first axisymmetric configuration, the layer is confined between a cylindrical wall and a core of another fluid. In the second, a thread is suspended in an infinite fluid. Surface tension forces drive the instability in the axisymmetric configurations. The nonlinear evolution of the fluid-fluid interface is computed for layers of arbitrary thickness when their dynamics are fully coupled to those of the second fluid. Under the assumption of creeping flow, the flow field is represented by an interfacial distribution of Green's functions. A Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the strength of the distribution is derived and then solved using an iterative technique. The Green's functions produce flow fields which are periodic in the direction parallel to the wall and have zero velocity on the wall. For small and moderate surface tension, planar layers evolve into a periodic array of viscous plumes which penetrate into the overlying fluid. The morphology of the plumes depends on the surface tension and the ratio of the fluid viscosities. As the viscosity of the layer increases, the plumes change from a well defined drop on top of a narrow stem to a compact column of rising fluid. The capillary instability of cylindrical interfaces and interfaces in which the core thickness varies in the axial direction are investigated. In both the unbounded and wall bounded configurations, the core evolves into a periodic array of elongated fluid drops connected by thin, almost cylindrical fluid links. The characteristics of the drop-link structure depend on the core thickness, the ratio of the core radius to the wall radius, and the ratio of the fluid viscosities. The factors controlling the

  15. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system--spectrally dependent losses--achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  16. Transverse Instabilities in the Fermilab Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Burov, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.M.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Transverse instabilities of the antiproton beam have been observed in the Recycler ring soon after its commissioning. After installation of transverse dampers, the threshold for the instability limit increased significantly but the instability is still found to limit the brightness of the antiprotons extracted from the Recycler for Tevatron shots. In this paper, we describe observations of the instabilities during the extraction process as well as during dedicated studies. The measured instability threshold phase density agrees with the prediction of the rigid beam model within a factor of 2. Also, we conclude that the instability threshold can be significantly lowered for a bunch contained in a narrow and shallow potential well due to effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping.

  17. Optimal excitation of two dimensional Holmboe instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Navid C

    2010-01-01

    Highly stratified shear layers are rendered unstable even at high stratifications by Holmboe instabilities when the density stratification is concentrated in a small region of the shear layer. These instabilities may cause mixing in highly stratified environments. However these instabilities occur in tongues for a limited range of parameters. We perform Generalized Stability analysis of the two dimensional perturbation dynamics of an inviscid Boussinesq stratified shear layer and show that Holmboe instabilities at high Richardson numbers can be excited by their adjoints at amplitudes that are orders of magnitude larger than by introducing initially the unstable mode itself. We also determine the optimal growth that obtains for parameters for which there is no instability. We find that there is potential for large transient growth regardless of whether the background flow is exponentially stable or not and that the characteristic structure of the Holmboe instability asymptotically emerges for parameter values ...

  18. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  19. Instabilities and transition in boundary layers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Vinod; Rama Govindarajan

    2005-03-01

    Some recent developments in boundary layer instabilities and transition are reviewed. Background disturbance levels determine the instability mechanism that ultimately leads to turbulence. At low noise levels, the traditional Tollmien–Schlichting route is followed, while at high levels, a `by-pass' route is more likely. Our recent work shows that spot birth is related to the pattern of secondary instability in either route.

  20. Beam Instabilities in the Scale Free Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Folli, Viola; Conti, Claudio; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.033901

    2012-01-01

    The instabilities arising in a one-dimensional beam sustained by the diffusive photorefractive nonlinearity in out-of-equilibrium ferroelectrics are theoretically and numerically investigated. In the "scale-free model", in striking contrast with the well-known spatial modulational instability, two different beam instabilities dominate: a defocusing and a fragmenting process. Both are independent of the beam power and are not associated to any specific periodic pattern.

  1. Electron proton instability in the CSNS ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Na; QIN Qing; LIU Yu-Dong

    2009-01-01

    The electron proton(e-p)instability has been observed in many proton accelerators.It will induce transverse beam size blow-up,cause beam loss and restrict the machine performance.Much research work has been done on the causes,dynamics and cures of this instability.A simulation code is developed to study the e-p instability in the ring of the China Spallation Neutron Source(CSNS).

  2. Fishbone Instability Excited by Barely Trapped Electrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-Tian; LONG Yong-Xing; DONG Jia-Qi; WANG Long; Fulvio Zonca

    2006-01-01

    Fishbone instability excited by barely trapped suprathermal electrons (BTSEs) in tokamaks is investigated theoretically. The frequency of the mode is found to close to procession frequency of BTSEs. The growth rate of the mode is much smaller than that of the ideal magnetohytrodynamic (MHD) internal kink mode that is in contrast to the case of trapped ion driven fishbone instability. The analyses also show that spatial density gradient reversal is necessary for the instability. The correlation of the results with experiments is discussed.

  3. A non-axisymmetric linearized supersonic wave drag analysis: Mathematical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Paul J.

    1996-01-01

    A Mathematical theory is developed to perform the calculations necessary to determine the wave drag for slender bodies of non-circular cross section. The derivations presented in this report are based on extensions to supersonic linearized small perturbation theory. A numerical scheme is presented utilizing Fourier decomposition to compute the pressure coefficient on and about a slender body of arbitrary cross section.

  4. Non-axisymmetric accretion on the classical TTS RW Aur A

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, P P; Gameiro, J F; Duemmler, R; Ilyin, I V; Laakkonen, T; Lago, M T V T; Tuominen, I

    2001-01-01

    (Abridged) High-resolution spectroscopic monitoring of RW Aur A was carried out in 1996, 1998 and 1999 with simultaneous B, V photometry. A multicomponent spectrum is revealed with a veiled photospheric spectrum, broad emissions, narrow emission lines of helium, and accretion, wind and shell features. Periodic modulations in many spectral features were found. The photospheric absorption lines show sinusoidal variations in radial velocity with an amplitude of +-6 km/s and a period of about 2.77 days. The radial velocities of the narrow emission lines of He vary with the same period but in anti-phase to the photospheric lines. The equivalent widths of the narrow emissions vary with a phase-shift with respect to the velocity curve. The strength of the red-shifted accretion components of Na D and other lines is also modulated with the same period. The broad emission lines of metals vary mostly with the double period of about 5.5 days. One unexpected result is that no correlation was found between the veiling and ...

  5. Non Axisymmetric Relativistic Wind Accretion with Velocity Gradients onto a Rotating Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Osorio, A

    2016-01-01

    We model, for the first time, the Bondi-Hoyle accretion of a fluid with velocity gradients onto a Kerr black hole, by numerically solving the fully relativistic hydrodynamics equations. Specifically, we consider a supersonic ideal gas, which has velocity gradients perpendicular to the relative motion. We measure the mass and specific angular accretion rates to illustrate whether the fluid presents unstable patterns or not. The initial parameters, we consider in this work, are the velocity gradient $\\epsilon_{v}$, the black hole spin $a$, the asymptotic Mach number ${\\cal M}_{\\infty}$ and adiabatic index $\\Gamma$. We show that the flow accretion reaches a fairly stationary regime, unlike in the Newtonian case, where significant fluctuations of the mass and angular momentum accretion rates are found. On the other hand, we consider a special case where both density and velocity gradients of the fluid are taken into account. The spin of the black hole and the asymptotic Newtonian Mach number, for this case, are $...

  6. The 3-D non-axisymmetrical Lamb's problem in transversely isotropic saturated poroelastic media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Yi; WANG; Xiaogang

    2004-01-01

    Based on Biot's theory on fluid-saturated porous media, the displacement functions are adopted to convert the 3-D Biot's wave equations in the cylindrical coordinate for transversely isotropic saturated poroelastic media into two--one 6-order and one 2-order--uncoupling differential governing equations. Then, the differential equations are solved by the Fourier expanding and Hankel integral transform method.Integral solutions of soil skeleton displacements and pore pressure as well as the total stresses for poroelastic media are obtained. Furthermore, the systematic study on Lamb's problems for the transversely isotropic saturated poroelastic media is performed. Integral solutions for surface radial, vertical and circumferential displacements are obtained in both cases of drained surface and undrained surface under the vertical and horizontal harmonic excitation force. In the end of this paper, the numerical examples are presented.The calculation results indicate that the difference between the model of isotropic saturated poroelastic media and that of transversely isotropic saturated poroelastic media is obvious.

  7. Monte-Carlo fluid approaches to detached plasmas in non-axisymmetric divertor configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Reiter, D.

    2017-03-01

    Fluid transport modeling in three-dimensional boundaries of toroidal confinement devices is reviewed with the emphasis on a Monte-Carlo approach to simulate detached plasmas. The loss of axisymmetry in such configurations presents a major challenge for numerical implementation of the standard fluid model widely applied to fusion experimental devices. A large-scale effort has been made to address this problem under complementary aspects including different magnetic topologies and numerical techniques. In this paper, we give a brief review of the different strategies pioneered and the challenges involved. A more detailed description is provided for the Monte-Carlo code—EMC3-Eirene, where the physics model and the basic idea behind the applied Monte-Carlo method are presented. The focus is put on its applications to detachment studies for stellarators and tokamaks. Here, major achievements and difficulties encountered are described. Model limitations and further development plans are discussed.

  8. Impurities in a non-axisymmetric plasma: Transport and effect on bootstrap current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollén, A., E-mail: albertm@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Landreman, M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Smith, H. M.; Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Braun, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); German Aerospace Center, Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Impurities cause radiation losses and plasma dilution, and in stellarator plasmas the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field is often unfavorable for avoiding strong impurity peaking. In this work we use a new continuum drift-kinetic solver, the SFINCS code (the Stellarator Fokker-Planck Iterative Neoclassical Conservative Solver) [M. Landreman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 042503 (2014)] which employs the full linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau operator, to calculate neoclassical impurity transport coefficients for a Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) magnetic configuration. We compare SFINCS calculations with theoretical asymptotes in the high collisionality limit. We observe and explain a 1/ν-scaling of the inter-species radial transport coefficient at low collisionality, arising due to the field term in the inter-species collision operator, and which is not found with simplified collision models even when momentum correction is applied. However, this type of scaling disappears if a radial electric field is present. We also use SFINCS to analyze how the impurity content affects the neoclassical impurity dynamics and the bootstrap current. We show that a change in plasma effective charge Z{sub eff} of order unity can affect the bootstrap current enough to cause a deviation in the divertor strike point locations.

  9. Impurities in a non-axisymmetric plasma: transport and effect on bootstrap current

    CERN Document Server

    Mollén, Albert; Smith, Håkan M; Braun, Stefanie; Helander, Per

    2015-01-01

    Impurities cause radiation losses and plasma dilution, and in stellarator plasmas the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field is often unfavorable for avoiding strong impurity peaking. In this work we use a new continuum drift-kinetic solver, the SFINCS code (the Stellarator Fokker-Planck Iterative Neoclassical Conservative Solver) [M. Landreman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014) 042503] which employs the full linearized Fokker-Planck operator, to calculate neoclassical impurity transport coefficients for a Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) magnetic configuration. We compare SFINCS calculations with theoretical asymptotes in the high collisionality limit. In intermediate and high collisionality regimes, a momentum conserving collision operator is critical to correctly determine the impurity transport coefficients, and a simple pitch-angle scattering approximation can lead to transport predictions in the wrong direction. In the low collisionality regime pitch-angle scattering is sufficient to accurately describe impuri...

  10. Non-axisymmetric reflectors concentrating radiation from an asymmetric heliostat field onto a circular absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spirkl, W.; Timinger, A.; Muschaweck, J. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany). Sektion Physik; Ries, H. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Kribus, A. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Environmental Sciences and Energy Research Dept.

    1998-07-01

    In solar tower plants, where a rotationally symmetric field of heliostats surrounds the tower, an axisymmetric secondary concentrator such as a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) or a tailored concentrator or a cone is the obvious choice. For locations at higher latitudes, however, the reflecting area of the heliostats may be used more efficiently if the field of heliostats is located opposite to the sun as seen from the tower. Then the field is asymmetric with regard to the tower. In the case of an asymmetric field, an axisymmetric concentrator necessarily has a concentration significantly lower than the upper limit. Furthermore, the area on the ground from which a tilted axisymmetric concentrator accepts radiation is an ellipse, including also heliostats very distant to the tower producing a large image of the sun. For these reasons we investigate asymmetric secondaries. From the shape of the edge ray reflectors constructed for rays in the central south-north plane we conclude that a skew cone reflector might be appropriate for the field, and optimize its free parameters by means of ray tracing. Asymmetric concentrators may increase the concentration by up to 25% at the same efficiency compared to optimized axisymmetric CPC or cone reflectors. (author)

  11. MECHANISM RESEARCH FOR 3D NON-AXISYMMETRIC THIN-WALL TUBE OFFSET SPINNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Weihua; XIA Qinxiang; RUAN Feng

    2006-01-01

    Difference of offset spinning with conventional symmetric spinning is analyzed. A 3D FEM model for offset tube neck-spinning is established and the spinning process is simulated by means of ANSYS software. Dynamic boundary and contact problems in simulation are solved. Transient stress distribution of contact area, transient strain distribution of nodes in typical section and strain distribution of the workpiece at last are attained, the place and the cause of crack are analyzed.Strain variation curves with time of offset spinning and conventional spinning are compared. It shows the mechanism difference between offset spinning and conventional spinning. In addition, simulation results show how strain distribution of typical section, thickness of some typical nodes, axial extension in left section and force of three rollers change with time. According to the study of the variation curve, material flow law along radial, tangential and axial direction is attained and the whole spinning process is studied. The simulation results discover that offset distance is the key to manufacture offset non-symmetric tube, and process parameters change with spinning angle. Experiment data really reflect different process parameters' influence on conventional symmetric and offset spinning force.Experiments accord well with simulation.

  12. Non-Axisymmetric Disruption SOL Current Measurement In DIII-D Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Joshua; Hanson, J.; Navratil, G.; Bialek, J.

    2016-10-01

    J. Cabrera, J. Hanson, G. Navratil, J. Bialek, Columbia U-During tokamak disruptions known as vertical displacement events (VDEs) currents which flow between the plasma core and plasma facing components can reach nearly 20% of the total plasma current. These scrape off layer (SOL) currents are thought to affect the dynamics of plasma disruption. We have made use of an array of tile current monitors installed on the DIII-D tokamak to perform low toroidal mode number (n VDEs. In all cases examined (over 30 shots) currents exhibited toroidal asymmetry with toroidal peaking factor 2. Strong initial peaking in n=1 current measurements are correlated with n=1 magnetic fluctuations during VDEs. Following the peak SOL current and after observation of the final last closed flux surface (LCFS), n=1 mode activity 20% of n=0 peak amplitude persists for 10ms. Predictions from the VALEN-IVB simulation code utilizing current profile reconstructions from magnetic sensor array measurements will be compared with SOL current measurements. Possible effects of these SOL currents on plasma dynamics during disruption are considered. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  13. Development of non-axisymmetric structures during MHD disruptions in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Strauss, H. R.; Breslau, Joshua

    2009-11-01

    Recently the problem of 3D simulations of vertical displacement events (VDEs) and disruptions in tokamak plasmas has been addressed [R.Paccagnella, H. Strauss, J. Breslau, Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 035003] by using the M3D code, in the relatively ``benign'' cases where the on-axis q is above 1 and vertical plasma movement is mainly driven by a resistive wall mode (RWM) on the time scale of the magnetic field penetration of the conducting wall. In this paper we extend the previous simulations to cases in which the on-axis q is below 1 and the driving mode is an external resistive kink able to drive a reconnection process in the central plasma region. In these cases the disruptions are faster and evolve on the Alfv'en time scale. Amplitudes and asymmetries of the halo currents and forces at the wall are calculated in both cases. Comparisons with tokamak experimental data and predictions for ITER are also given.

  14. Experimental investigation into the unsteady effects on non-axisymmetric turbine endwall contouring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dunn, Dwain I

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available angle from the design rotor exit yaw angle was reduced. Furthermore it was found that the passage vortex of the contoured rotor was not as tightly wrapped around the horse shoe vortices as the annular rotor passage vortex. Due to the passage vortex being...

  15. Numerical investigation into the unsteady effects of non-axisymmetric turbine endwall contouring on secondary flows

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dunn, Dwain I

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available oscillations. Thus there could be a greater advantage to contouring blade rows downstream to the first rotor; however this remains to be investigated. It was found that the computed efficiencies of the unsteady and the steady state analysis were different...

  16. Influences of Inflow Condition on Non-Axisymmetric Flows in Turbine Exhaust Hoods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingLun FU; JianJun LIU

    2008-01-01

    The complex 3D flow in a steam turbine exhaust hood model with different inlet swirl and inlet total pressure ra-dial distributions has been simulated by employing CFX-5 and analyzed in this paper. It's found that the inlet tangential flow angle at hub has a negative effect on the exhaust hood performance, while a negative gradient of inlet total pressure radial distribution has a positive impact on the hood performances. It's also numerically con-firmed that a proper distribution of total pressure at hood inlet can successfully eliminate the negative effects caused by the inappropriate inlet swirl distribution and improve the hood aerodynamic performance.

  17. Gaps, rings, and non-axisymmetric structures in protoplanetary disks - Emission from large grains

    CERN Document Server

    Ruge, J P; Wolf, S; Dzyurkevich, N; Fromang, S; Henning, Th; Klahr, H; Meheut, H

    2016-01-01

    Dust grains with sizes around (sub)mm are expected to couple only weakly to the gas motion in regions beyond 10 au of circumstellar disks. In this work, we investigate the influence of the spatial distribution of such grains on the (sub)mm appearance of magnetized protoplanetary disks. We perform non-ideal global 3D magneto-hydrodynamic stratified disk simulations including particles of different sizes (50 micron to 1 cm), using a Lagrangian particle solver. We calculate the spatial dust temperature distribution, including the dynamically coupled submicron-sized dust grains, and derive ideal continuum re-emission maps of the disk through radiative transfer simulations. Finally, we investigate the feasibility to observe specific structures in the thermal re-emission maps with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The pressure bump close to the outer edge of the dead-zone leads to particle trapping in ring structures. More specifically, vortices in the disk concentrate the dust and create an ...

  18. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  19. Two-Fluid Interface Instability Being Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    The interface between two fluids of different density can experience instability when gravity acts normal to the surface. The relatively well known Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability results when the gravity is constant with a heavy fluid over a light fluid. An impulsive acceleration applied to the fluids results in the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. The RM instability occurs regardless of the relative orientation of the heavy and light fluids. In many systems, the passing of a shock wave through the interface provides the impulsive acceleration. Both the RT and RM instabilities result in mixing at the interface. These instabilities arise in a diverse array of circumstances, including supernovas, oceans, supersonic combustion, and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The area with the greatest current interest in RT and RM instabilities is ICF, which is an attempt to produce fusion energy for nuclear reactors from BB-sized pellets of deuterium and tritium. In the ICF experiments conducted so far, RM and RT instabilities have prevented the generation of net-positive energy. The $4 billion National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being constructed to study these instabilities and to attempt to achieve net-positive yield in an ICF experiment.

  20. Aeroelastic instability problems for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the aeroelostic instabilities that have occurred and may still occur for modem commercial wind turbines: stall-induced vibrations for stall-turbines, and classical flutter for pitch-regulated turbines. A review of previous works is combined with derivations of analytical...... stiffness and chordwise position of the center of gravity along the blades are the main parameters for flutter. These instability characteristics are exemplified by aeroelastic stability analyses of different wind turbines. The review of each aeroelastic instability ends with a list of current research...... issues that represent unsolved aeroelostic instability problems for wind turbines. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  1. Review of two-phase instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Han Ok; Seo, Han Ok; Kang, Hyung Suk; Cho, Bong Hyun; Lee, Doo Jeong

    1997-06-01

    KAERI is carrying out a development of the design for a new type of integral reactors. The once-through helical steam generator is important design features. The study on designs and operating conditions which prevent flow instability should precede the introduction of one-through steam generator. Experiments are currently scheduled to understand two-phase instability, evaluate the effect of each design parameter on the critical point, and determine proper inlet throttling for the prevention of instability. This report covers general two-phase instability with review of existing studies on this topics. The general classification of two phase flow instability and the characteristics of each type of instability are first described. Special attention is paid to BWR core flow instability and once-through steam generator instability. The reactivity feedback and the effect of system parameters are treated mainly for BWR. With relation to once-through steam generators, the characteristics of convective heating and dryout point oscillation are first investigated and then the existing experimental studies are summarized. Finally chapter summarized the proposed correlations for instability boundary conditions. (author). 231 refs., 5 tabs., 47 figs

  2. Systems and methods for controlling flame instability

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2016-07-21

    A system (62) for controlling flame instability comprising: a nozzle (66) coupled to a fuel supply line (70), an insulation housing (74) coupled to the nozzle, a combustor (78) coupled to the nozzle via the insulation housing, where the combustor is grounded (80), a pressure sensor (82) coupled to the combustor and configured to detect pressure in the combustor, and an instability controlling assembly coupled to the pressure sensor and to an alternating current power supply (86), where, the instability controlling assembly can control flame instability of a flame in the system based on pressure detected by the pressure sensor.

  3. Instabilities of flows and transition to turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sengupta, Tapan K

    2012-01-01

    Introduction to Instability and TransitionIntroductionWhat Is Instability?Temporal and Spatial InstabilitySome Instability MechanismsComputing Transitional and Turbulent FlowsFluid Dynamical EquationsSome Equilibrium Solutions of the Basic EquationBoundary Layer TheoryControl Volume Analysis of Boundary LayersNumerical Solution of the Thin Shear Layer (TSL) EquationLaminar Mixing LayerPlane Laminar JetIssues of Computing Space-Time Dependent FlowsWave Interaction: Group Velocity and Energy FluxIssues of Space-Time Scale Resolution of FlowsTemporal Scales in Turbulent FlowsComputing Time-Averag

  4. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-07-01

    Compared to most other alcoholic beverages, beer is unique because it is unstable when in the final package. This instability can be divided into biological and nonbiological instability. Nonbiological stability of beer involves a wide range of chemical processes and can be considered in a number of categories: physical, flavor, light, foam, and gushing. It is the balance between flavanoid polyphenols (tannoids) and sensitive proteins that specifically combine with polyphenols to form haze that largely dictates physical stability. The flavor stability of beer primarily depends on the oxygen concentration of packaged beer but is influenced by all stages of the brewing process. Foam stability in a glass of beer reflects the quality of the beverage. The backbone of foam is hydrophobic polypeptides. Novel brewing processes such as high-gravity brewing result in a disproportionate loss of these polypeptides and have a negative effect on the foam stability of the resulting beer. Beer is light sensitive, especially in the 350 500 nm range. Beer exposed to this wavelength range in clear or green glass containers quickly develop nauseous skunky-like off-flavors resulting from the formation of 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. Methods of enhancing all of these types of beer stability are discussed.

  5. Option price and market instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Yu, Miao

    2017-04-01

    An option pricing formula, for which the price of an option depends on both the value of the underlying security as well as the velocity of the security, has been proposed in Baaquie and Yang (2014). The FX (foreign exchange) options price was empirically studied in Baaquie et al., (2014), and it was found that the model in general provides an excellent fit for all strike prices with a fixed model parameters-unlike the Black-Scholes option price Hull and White (1987) that requires the empirically determined implied volatility surface to fit the option data. The option price proposed in Baaquie and Cao Yang (2014) did not fit the data during the crisis of 2007-2008. We make a hypothesis that the failure of the option price to fit data is an indication of the market's large deviation from its near equilibrium behavior due to the market's instability. Furthermore, our indicator of market's instability is shown to be more accurate than the option's observed volatility. The market prices of the FX option for various currencies are studied in the light of our hypothesis.

  6. Cosmic Rays and Radiative Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Hartquist, T W; Falle, S A E G; Pittard, J M; Van Loo, S

    2011-01-01

    In the absence of magnetic fields and cosmic rays, radiative cooling laws with a range of dependences on temperature affect the stability of interstellar gas. For about four and a half decades, astrophysicists have recognised the importance of the thermal instablity for the formation of clouds in the interstellar medium. Even in the past several years, many papers have concerned the role of the thermal instability in the production of molecular clouds. About three and a half decades ago, astrophysicists investigating radiative shocks noticed that for many cooling laws such shocks are unstable. Attempts to address the effects of cosmic rays on the stablity of radiative media that are initially uniform or that have just passed through shocks have been made. The simplest approach to such studies involves the assumption that the cosmic rays behave as a fluid. Work based on such an approach is described. Cosmic rays have no effect on the stability of initially uniform, static media with respect to isobaric perturb...

  7. Visco-Resistive Plasmoid Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Comisso, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The plasmoid instability in visco-resistive current sheets is analyzed in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. The linear growth rate and the wavenumber are found to scale as $S^{1/4} {\\left( {1 + {P_m}} \\right)}^{-5/8}$ and $S^{3/8} {\\left( {1 + {P_m}} \\right)}^{-3/16}$ with respect to the Lundquist number $S$ and the magnetic Prandtl number $P_m$. Furthermore, the linear layer width is shown to scale as $S^{-1/8} {(1+P_m)}^{1/16}$. The growth of the plasmoids slows down from an exponential growth to an algebraic growth when they enter into the nonlinear regime. In particular, the time-scale of the nonlinear growth of the plasmoids is found to be $\\tau_{NL} \\sim S^{-3/16} {(1 + P_m)^{19/32}}{\\tau _{A,L}}$. The nonlinear growth of the plasmoids is radically different from the linear one and it is shown to be essential to understand the global current sheet disruption. It is also discussed how the plasmoid instability enables fast magnetic reconnection in visco-resistive plasmas. In particular, it is shown t...

  8. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Clearly, the key to successful gas turbine development is based on understanding the effects of geometry and operating conditions on combustion instability, emissions (including UHC, CO and NO{sub x}) and performance. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors.

  9. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  10. On the descriptions of beam instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Maillard, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We investigate two interesting features of beam instabilities in accelerators : First, we provide the equivalence between two models to describe transverse instabilities, the circulant matrix model (based on a longitudinal phase space discretization) and the Vlasov formalism. Secondly, we show how to derive dispersion integrals for transverse detuning effects in the Vlasov formalism, thus allowing for Landau damping mechanism.

  11. Parametric Instability: An Elementary Demonstration and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, William

    1980-01-01

    Discusses parametric oscillators and parametric instability. A simple, easy-to-construct system which exhibits parametric instability is presented. The two lowest-order resonances are described and analyzed in detail. The analysis stresses the physical and intuitive aspects of the problem. (Author/HM)

  12. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Alper, B.; Berk, H. L.; Borba, D. N.; Breizman, B. N.; Challis, C. D.; Classen, I.G.J.; Edlund, E. M.; Eriksson, J.; Fasoli, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Gassner, T.; Ghantous, K.; Goloborodko, V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Hacquin, S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hellesen, C.; Kiptily, V. G.; Kramer, G. J.; Lauber, P.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisak, M.; Nabais, F.; Nazikian, R.; Nyqvist, R.; Osakabe, M.; C. Perez von Thun,; Pinches, S. D.; Podesta, M.; Porkolab, M.; Shinohara, K.; Schoepf, K.; Todo, Y.; Toi, K.; VanZeeland, M. A.; Voitsekhovich, I.; White, R. B.; Yavorskij, V.; ITPA EP TG Contributors,; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfvén instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and discus

  13. Cultural diversity, economic development and societal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, D.; Grace, J.B.; Choisy, M.; Cornell, H.V.; Guegan, J.-F.; Hochberg, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Social scientists have suggested that cultural diversity in a nation leads to societal instability. However, societal instability may be affected not only by within-nation on ?? diversity, but also diversity between a nation and its neighbours or ?? diversity. It is also necessary to distinguish different domains of diversity, namely linguistic, ethnic and religious, and to distinguish between the direct effects of diversity on societal instability, and effects that are mediated by economic conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings. We assembled a large cross-national dataset with information on ?? and ?? cultural diversity, economic conditions, and indices of societal instability. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of cultural diversity on economics and societal stability. Results show that different type and domains of diversity have interacting effects. As previously documented, linguistic ?? diversity has a negative effect on economic performance, and we show that it is largely through this economic mechanism that it affects societal instability. For ?? diversity, the higher the linguistic diversity among nations in a region, the less stable the nation. But, religious ?? diversity has the opposite effect, reducing instability, particularly in the presence of high linguistic diversity. Conclusions. Within-nation linguistic diversity is associated with reduced economic performance, which, in turn, increases societal instability. Nations which differ linguistically from their neighbors are also less stable. However, religious diversity between, neighboring nations has the opposite effect, decreasing societal instability.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in glenohumeral instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Manisha; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint of the body and anterior instability is the most common type of shoulder instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and more recently, MR arthrography, have become the essential investigation modalities of glenohumeral instability, especially for pre-procedure evaluation before arthroscopic surgery. Injuries associated with glenohumeral instability are variable, and can involve the bones, the labor-ligamentous components, or the rotator cuff. Anterior instability is associated with injuries of the anterior labrum and the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, in the form of Bankart lesion and its variants; whereas posterior instability is associated with reverse Bankart and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. Multidirectional instability often has no labral pathology on imaging but shows specific osseous changes such as increased chondrolabral retroversion. This article reviews the relevant anatomy in brief, the MR imaging technique and the arthrographic technique, and describes the MR findings in each type of instability as well as common imaging pitfalls. PMID:22007285

  15. Hydrodynamic Instabilities in Rotating Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KarlBuehler

    2000-01-01

    Rotating flow systems are often used to study stability phenomena and structure developments.The closed spherical gap prblem is generalized into an open flow system by superimposing a mass flux in meridional direction.The basic solutions at low Reynolds numbers are described by analytical methods.The nonlinear supercritical solutions are simulated numerically and realized in experiments.Novel steady and time-dependent modes of flows are obtained.The extensive results concern the stability behaviour.non-uniqueness of supercritical solutions,symmetry behaviour and transitions between steady and time-dependent solutions.The experimental investigations concern the visualization of the various instabilities and the quatitative description of the flow structures including the laminar-turbulent transition.A Comparison between theoretical and experimental results shows good agreement within the limit of rotational symmetric solutions from the theory.

  16. Transient spirals as superposed instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence that recurrent spiral activity, long manifested in simulations of disk galaxies, results from the super-position of a few transient spiral modes. Each mode lasts between five and ten rotations at its corotation radius where its amplitude is greatest. The scattering of stars as each wave decays takes place over narrow ranges of angular momentum, causing abrupt changes to the impedance of the disk to subsequent traveling waves. Partial reflections of waves at these newly created features, allows new standing-wave instabilities to appear that saturate and decay in their turn, scattering particles at new locations, creating a recurring cycle. The spiral activity causes the general level of random motion to rise, gradually decreasing the ability of the disk to support further activity unless the disk contains a dissipative gas component from which stars form on near-circular orbits. We also show that this interpretation is consistent with the behavior reported in other recent simulations with l...

  17. Gravitational Instability of a Kink

    CERN Document Server

    Barreto, W; Lehner, L; Winicour, J

    1996-01-01

    We study the equilibria of a self-gravitating scalar field in the region outside a reflecting barrier. By introducing a potential difference between the barrier and infinity, we create a kink which cannot decay to a zero energy state. In the realm of small amplitude, the kink decays to a known static solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equation. However, for larger kinks the static equilibria are degenerate, forming a system with two energy levels. The upper level is unstable and, under small perturbations, decays to the lower energy stable equilibrium. Under large perturbations, the unstable upper level undergoes collapse to a black hole. The equilibrium of the system provides a remarkably simple and beautiful illustration of a turning point instability.

  18. Mapping Instabilities in Polymer Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Charles; Crosby, Alfred

    2005-03-01

    Schallamach waves are instabilities that occur as interfaces between a soft elastomer and rigid surface slide past each other.(1) The presence of Schallamach waves can lead to drastic changes in frictional properties. Although the occurrence of Schallamach waves has been studied for the past several decades, a general map relating fundamental material properties, geometry, and operating conditions (i.e. speed and temperature) has not been established. Using a combinatorial approach, we illustrate the role of modulus, testing velocity and surface energetics of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) on the generation Schallamach waves. This knowledge will be used with polymer patterning processes to fabricate responsive coatings for applications such as anti-fouling coatings. (1)Schallamach, A.;Wear 1971,17, 301-312.

  19. Rotation and Magnetic Fields in Supernovae and Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. Craig

    2005-10-01

    Spectropolarimetry of core collapse supernovae has shown that they are asymmetric and often, but not universally, bi-polar; in some the dominant axes associated with hydrogen, oxygen, and calcium are oriented substantially differently. Jet-induced supernova models give a typical jet/torus structure that is reminiscent of some objects like the Crab nebula, SN 1987A and perhaps Cas A. Jets, in turn, may arise from the intrinsic rotation and magnetic fields that are expected to accompany core collapse. We summarize the potential importance of the magneto-rotational instability for the core collapse problem, stress the non- monotonic response of the final rotation and magnetic field to the initial iron core rotation, and the potential role of non-axisymmetric instabilities in the new-born neutron star. We sketch some of the effects that large magnetic fields, ˜10^15 - 10^17 G, may have on the physics at core bounce and in the subsequent cooling, de-leptonization phase. Production and dissipation of MHD waves in this strongly differentially rotating environment may affect the success of the supernova explosion, the nature of the compact remnant -- neutron star or black hole, pulsar or magnetar -- and whether the outcome is a normal supernova or a gamma-ray burst. In collaboration with Shizuka Akiyama, University of Texas at Austin.

  20. Secondary instability in boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Bozatli, A. N.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of a secondary Tollmien-Schlichting wave, whose wavenumber and frequency are nearly one half those of a fundamental Tollmien-Schlichting instability wave is analyzed using the method of multiple scales. Under these conditions, the fundamental wave acts as a parametric exciter for the secondary wave. The results show that the amplitude of the fundamental wave must exceed a critical value to trigger this parametric instability. This value is proportional to a detuning parameter which is the real part of k - 2K, where k and K are the wavenumbers of the fundamental and its subharmonic, respectively. For Blasius flow, the critical amplitude is approximately 29% of the mean flow, and hence many other secondary instabilities take place before this parametric instability becomes significant. For other flows where the detuning parameter is small, such as free-shear layer flows, the critical amplitude can be small, thus the parametric instability might play a greater role.

  1. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  2. Whipping Instabilities in Electrified Liquid Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; Loscertales, Ignacio G; Barrero, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A liquid jet may develop different types of instabilities, like the so-called Rayleigh-Plateau instability, which breaks the jet into droplets. However, another type of instabilities may appear when we electrify a liquid jet and induce some charge at his surface. Among them, the most common is the so-called Whipping Instability, which is characterized by violent and fast lashes of the jet. In the submitted fluid dynamic video(see http://hdl.handle.net/1813/11422), we will show an unstable charged glycerine jet in a dielectric liquid bath, which permits an enhanced visualization of the instability. For this reason, it is probably the first time that these phenomena are visualized with enough clarity to analyze features as the effect of the feeding liquid flow rate through the jet or as the surprising spontaneous stabilization at some critical distance to the ground electrode.

  3. 3-D nonlinear evolution of MHD instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, G.; Hicks, H. R.; Wooten, J. W.

    1977-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution of ideal MHD internal instabilities is investigated in straight cylindrical geometry by means of a 3-D initial-value computer code. These instabilities are characterized by pairs of velocity vortex cells rolling off each other and helically twisted down the plasma column. The cells persist until the poloidal velocity saturates at a few tenths of the Alfven velocity. The nonlinear phase is characterized by convection around these essentially fixed vortex cells. For example, the initially centrally peaked temperature profile is convected out and around to form an annulus of high temperature surrounding a small region of lower temperature. Weak, centrally localized instabilities do not alter the edge of the plasma. Strong, large-scale instabilities, resulting from a stronger longitudinal equilibrium current, drive the plasma against the wall. After three examples of instability are analyzed in detail, the numerical methods and their verification are discussed.

  4. Tensile Instability in a Thick Elastic Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Dykstra, David M. J.; de Rooij, Rijk; Weaver, James; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-08-01

    A range of instabilities can occur in soft bodies that undergo large deformation. While most of them arise under compressive forces, it has previously been shown analytically that a tensile instability can occur in an elastic block subjected to equitriaxial tension. Guided by this result, we conducted centimeter-scale experiments on thick elastomeric samples under generalized plane strain conditions and observed for the first time this elastic tensile instability. We found that equibiaxial stretching leads to the formation of a wavy pattern, as regions of the sample alternatively flatten and extend in the out-of-plane direction. Our work uncovers a new type of instability that can be triggered in elastic bodies, enlarging the design space for smart structures that harness instabilities to enhance their functionality.

  5. Three-dimensional instability analysis of an annular swirling viscous liquid sheet%圆环旋转粘性液膜射流三维不稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎凯; 宁智; 吕明

    2012-01-01

    利用线性稳定性理论进行了射流液体粘性对圆环旋转液膜射流稳定性影响的研究,推导出了三维扰动下具有固体旋涡型速度分布的圆环旋转粘性液膜射流的色散方程;在此基础上进行了类反对称模式与类对称模式下的圆环旋转粘性液膜射流的三维不稳定性分析。研究结果表明,在类反对称模式下,液体粘性超过一定值后,射流最大扰动增长率随液体粘性的增加而迅速减小;轴对称模态的射流特征频率产生一个突降变化;随液体粘性增加,轴对称模态不稳定波数范围减小,非轴对称模态不稳定波数范围呈现出先减小后增大趋势。在类对称模式下,液体粘性对射流最大扰动增长率的影响主要体现在对非轴对称模态的影响上;液体粘性只在粘性较大时才会对非轴对称模态射流特征频率产生一定影响;液体粘性超过一定值后,轴对称模态与非轴对称模态的不稳定波数范围都会快速下降。%The effect of liquid viscosity on an annular swirling viscous liquid sheet is studied with linear instability analysis. An analytical form of dispersion relation is derived, which depicts an annular swirling viscous liquid sheet with solid vortex swirl velocity profile subjected to three-dimensional disturbances. The spatial mode instability analysis of an annular swirling viscous liquid sheet for para-sinuous mode and para-varicose mode is carried out. The results show that,in the para-sinuous mode, the maximum growth rate decrease fast and the domain frequency of axisymmetric mode dump when the liquid viscosity exceed a value, the range of unstable wave number of axisymmetric mode decrease and the range of insta- bility wave number decease first and increase secondly with the increase of liquid viscosity. In the para- varicose mode, the liquid viscosity affects the maximum growth rate of non-axisymmetric mode, the domain frequency of non-axisymmetric

  6. Capillary Instability in Nanoimprinted Polymer Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Ding, Yifu; Douglas, Jack F.; Ro, Hyun W.; Okerberg, Brian C.; Karim, Alamgir; Soles, Christopher L.

    2009-07-01

    Capillary forces play an active role in defining the equilibrium structure of nanoscale structures. This effect can be especially pronounced in soft materials such as polymers near or above their glass transition temperature Tg where material flow is possible. In these situations, the effect of surface tension can produce varied and complex capillary instabilities, even in relatively simple geometries such as parallel line-space grating patterns. Here we investigate a novel capillary instability that arises in polystyrene line-space gratings with a residual layer connecting these structures (created by nanoimprint lithography) upon thermal annealing of these patterns. This novel instability is characterized by the development of lateral undulations of the lines that culminates in the local coalescence of adjacent imprinted lines. An exact analytic model of this undulatory instability is not possible, but we introduce a simple physical model for this lateral instability based on the driving force to reduce the surface energy, as in the well-known Rayleigh-Plateau instability which is likewise surface energy driven. Good agreement is obtained between this simplified model and our observations. Our insights into the nature of this instability have implications for controlling the thermal stability of nanoscale patterns made by nanoimprint lithography or other lithography techniques.

  7. The Growth Effects of Institutional Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggren, Niclas; Bergh, Andreas; Bjørnskov, Christian

    . While institutional instability is negatively related to growth in the baseline case, there are indications that the effect can be positive in rich countries, suggesting that institutional reform is not necessarily costly even during a transition period. Sensitivity analysis, e.g., decomposing...... the growth effects of institutional quality and instability, using the political risk index from the ICRG in a cross-country study of 132 countries, measuring instability as the coefficient of variation. Using the aggregate index, we find evidence that institutional quality is positively linked to growth...

  8. The short circuit instability in protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubbard, A.; McNally, C.P.; Mac Low, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a magneto-hydrodynamic instability which occurs, among other locations, in the inner, hot regions of protoplanetary disks, and which alters the way in which resistive dissipation of magnetic energy into heat proceeds. This instability can be likened to both an electrical short circuit...... and lightning, as it concentrates the dissipation of magnetic energy by means of the enhanced release of free electrons. This instability can generate very high temperatures, making it an excellent candidate for thermally processing protoplanetary disk solids, from annealing silicates to melting chondrules...

  9. Quantum effects in beam-plasma instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A

    2015-01-01

    Among the numerous works on quantum effects that have been published in recent years, streaming instabilities in plasma have also been revisited. Both the fluid quantum and the kinetic Wigner-Maxwell models have been used to explore quantum effects on the Weibel, Filamentation and Two-Stream instabilities. While quantum effects usually tend to reduce the instabilities, they can also spur new unstable branches. A number of theoretical results will be reviewed together with the implications to one physical setting, namely the electron driven fast ignition scenario.

  10. More on core instabilities of magnetic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Striet, J

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present new results on the core instability of the 't Hooft Polyakov monopoles we reported on before. This instability, where the spherical core decays in a toroidal one, typically occurs in models in which charge conjugation is gauged. In this paper we also discuss a third conceivable configuration denoted as ``split core'', which brings us to some details of the numerical methods we employed. We argue that a core instability of 't Hooft Polyakov type monopoles is quite a generic feature of models with charged Higgs particles.

  11. Taylor Instability of Incompressible Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, E.; von Neumann, J.

    1955-11-01

    A discussion is presented in simplified form of the problem of the growth of an initial ripple on the surface of an incompressible liquid in the presence of an acceleration, g, directed from the outside into the liquid. The model is that of a heavy liquid occupying at t = 0 the half space above the plane z = 0, and a rectangular wave profile is assumed. The theory is found to represent correctly one feature of experimental results, namely the fact that the half wave of the heavy liquid into the vacuum becomes rapidly narrower while the half wave pushing into the heavy liquid becomes more and more blunt. The theory fails to account for the experimental results according to which the front of the wave pushing into the heavy liquid moves with constant velocity. The case of instability at the boundary of 2 fluids of different densities is also explored. Similar results are obtained except that the acceleration of the heavy liquid into the light liquid is reduced.

  12. Pulsational-Pair Instability Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E

    2016-01-01

    The final evolution of stars in the mass range 60 - 150 solar masses is explored. Depending upon their mass loss and rotation rates, many of these stars will end their lives as pulsational pair-instability supernovae. Even a non-rotating 70 solar mass star is pulsationally unstable during oxygen shell burning and can power a sub-luminous supernova. Rotation decreases the limit further. For more massive stars, the pulsations are less frequent, span a longer time, and are more powerful. Violent pulsations eject not only any residual low density envelope, but also that fraction of the helium core mass outside about 35 - 50 solar masses. The remaining core of helium and heavy elements continues to evolve, ultimately forming an iron core of about 2.5 solar masses that probably collapses to a black hole. A variety of observational transients result with total durations ranging from days to 10,000 years, and luminosities from 10$^{41}$ to 10$^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Many transients resemble ordinary Type IIp supernovae,...

  13. Transient spirals as superposed instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellwood, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Carlberg, R. G., E-mail: sellwood@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: carlberg@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2014-04-20

    We present evidence that recurrent spiral activity, long manifested in simulations of disk galaxies, results from the superposition of a few transient spiral modes. Each mode lasts between 5 and 10 rotations at its corotation radius where its amplitude is greatest. The scattering of stars as each wave decays takes place over narrow ranges of angular momentum, causing abrupt changes to the impedance of the disk to subsequent traveling waves. Partial reflections of waves at these newly created features allows new standing-wave instabilities to appear that saturate and decay in their turn, scattering particles at new locations, creating a recurring cycle. The spiral activity causes the general level of random motion to rise, gradually decreasing the ability of the disk to support further activity unless the disk contains a dissipative gas component from which stars form on near-circular orbits. We also show that this interpretation is consistent with the behavior reported in other recent simulations with low-mass disks.

  14. Boyle's law and gravitational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardi, M; Lombardi, Marco; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    We have re-examined the classical problem of the macroscopic equation of state for a hydrostatic isothermal self-gravitating gas cloud bounded by an external medium at constant pressure. We have obtained analytical conditions for its equilibrium and stability without imposing any specific shape and symmetry to the cloud density distribution. The equilibrium condition can be stated in the form of an upper limit to the cloud mass; this is found to be inversely proportional to the power 3/2 of a form factor \\mu characterizing the shape of the cloud. In this respect, the spherical solution, associated with the maximum value of the form factor, \\mu = 1, turns out to correspond to the shape that is most difficult to realize. Surprisingly, the condition that defines the onset of the Bonnor instability (or gravothermal catastrophe) can be cast in the form of an upper limit to the density contrast within the cloud that is independent of the cloud shape. We have then carried out a similar analysis in the two-dimensiona...

  15. Thermal instability of cell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmt, Enrico; Kießling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2014-07-01

    DNA is known to be a mechanically and thermally stable structure. In its double stranded form it is densely packed within the cell nucleus and is thermo-resistant up to 70\\:^\\circ {\\rm{C}}. In contrast, we found a sudden loss of cell nuclei integrity at relatively moderate temperatures ranging from 45 to 55\\:^\\circ {\\rm{C}}. In our study, suspended cells held in an optical double beam trap were heated under controlled conditions while monitoring the nuclear shape. At specific critical temperatures, an irreversible sudden shape transition of the nuclei was observed. These temperature induced transitions differ in abundance and intensity for various normal and cancerous epithelial breast cells, which clearly characterizes different cell types. Our results show that temperatures slightly higher than physiological conditions are able to induce instabilities of nuclear structures, eventually leading to cell death. This is a surprising finding since recent thermorheological cell studies have shown that cells have a lower viscosity and are thus more deformable upon temperature increase. Since the nucleus is tightly coupled to the outer cell shape via the cytoskeleton, the force propagation of nuclear reshaping to the cell membrane was investigated in combination with the application of cytoskeletal drugs.

  16. Careers in conditions of instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlova Valentina Vasil'evna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is the research of the social-economic phenomenon of a career as a result of conscious human position and behaviour in the field of employment, which is connected with job and professional growth, as a chain of events which are components of life, the sequence of professional activities and other biographical roles, which all together express the commitment of a person’s activity according to his generalized model of self-development. On the basis of the theoretical analysis the dependence of making a career in the condition of instability and indefiniteness on job market flexibility, erosion and even the destruction of the usual way of life and labor relations. The career concepts under the conditions of flexible capitalism and of career policy as the typology of empiric differences of job biographic models are considered. The peculiarity of the proposed career policy concept is that its individual alternatives of career making oppose to organization management and personal demands: the difference between a professional’s wishes and a specific strategy of the development phases are quite noticeable. According to the results of empiric research carried out through the methods of interview, polling, expert assessment, the analysis of the received results, the mathematical data processing the basic types of the career policy and its connection with the organization’s personal development are revealed.

  17. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting chromos...... resistance but carboplatin sensitivity, indicating that CIN may determine MTS response in vivo. Thus, pretherapeutic assessment of CIN may optimize treatment stratification and clinical trial design using these agents....... chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival'' genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor......-positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane...

  18. Shear instabilities in shallow-water magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Julian; Hughes, D W

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of shallow-water magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate the linear instability of horizontal shear flows, influenced by an aligned magnetic field and stratification. Various classical instability results, such as H{\\o}iland's growth rate bound and Howard's semi-circle theorem, are extended to this shallow-water system for quite general profiles. Two specific piecewise-constant velocity profiles, the vortex sheet and the rectangular jet, are studied analytically and asymptotically; it is found that the magnetic field and stratification (as measured by the Froude number) are generally both stabilising, but weak instabilities can be found at arbitrarily large Froude number. Numerical solutions are computed for corresponding smooth velocity profiles, the hyperbolic-tangent shear layer and the Bickley jet, for a uniform background field. A generalisation of the long-wave asymptotic analysis of Drazin & Howard (1962) is employed in order to understand the instability characteristics for both ...

  19. Elliptical instability in terrestrial planets and moons

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Moutou, Claire; Gal, Patrice Le; 10.1051/0004-6361/201117741

    2012-01-01

    The presence of celestial companions means that any planet may be subject to three kinds of harmonic mechanical forcing: tides, precession/nutation, and libration. These forcings can generate flows in internal fluid layers, such as fluid cores and subsurface oceans, whose dynamics then significantly differ from solid body rotation. In particular, tides in non-synchronized bodies and libration in synchronized ones are known to be capable of exciting the so-called elliptical instability, i.e. a generic instability corresponding to the destabilization of two-dimensional flows with elliptical streamlines, leading to three-dimensional turbulence. We aim here at confirming the relevance of such an elliptical instability in terrestrial bodies by determining its growth rate, as well as its consequences on energy dissipation, on magnetic field induction, and on heat flux fluctuations on planetary scales. Previous studies and theoretical results for the elliptical instability are re-evaluated and extended to cope with ...

  20. Interfacial fluid instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Madison Ski

    2015-01-01

    The onset and development of instabilities is one of the central problems in fluid mechanics. Here we develop a connection between instabilities of free fluid interfaces and inverted pendula. When acted upon solely by the gravitational force, the inverted pendulum is unstable. This position can be stabilised by the Kapitsa phenomenon, in which high-frequency low-amplitude vertical vibrations of the base creates a fictitious force which opposes the gravitational force. By transforming the dynamical equations governing a fluid interface into an appropriate pendulum, we demonstrate how stability can be induced in fluid systems by properly tuned vibrations. We construct a "dictionary"-type relationship between various pendula and the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Plateau and the self-gravitational instabilities. This makes several results in control theory and dynamical systems directly applicable to the study of "tunable" fluid instabilities, where the critical wavelength depends on the e...

  1. Zonostrophic instability driven by discrete particle noise

    CERN Document Server

    St-Onge, D A

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of discrete particle noise for a system possessing a possibly unstable collective mode are discussed. It is argued that a zonostrophic instability (of homogeneous turbulence to the formation of zonal flows) occurs just below the threshold for linear instability. The scenario provides a new interpretation of the random forcing that is ubiquitously invoked in stochastic models such as the second-order cumulant expansion (CE2) or stochastic structural instability theory (SSST); neither intrinsic turbulence nor coupling to extrinsic turbulence is required. A representative calculation of the zonostrophic neutral curve is made for a simple two-field model of toroidal ion-temperature-gradient-driven modes. To the extent that the damping of zonal flows is controlled by the ion--ion collision rate, the point of zonostrophic instability is independent of that rate.

  2. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in solar spicules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ebadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magneto hydrodynamic waves, propagating along spicules, may become unstable and the expected instability is of Kelvin-Helmholtz type. Such instability can trigger the onset of wave turbulence leading to an effective plasma heating and particle acceleration. In present study, two-dimensional magneto hydrodynamic simulations performed on a Cartesian grid is presented in spicules with different densities, moving at various speeds depending on their environment. Simulations being applied in this study show the onset of Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and transition to turbulent flow in spicules. Development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to momentum and energy transport, dissipation, and mixing of fluids. When magnetic fields are involved, field amplification is also possible to take place

  3. Fluid description for the resonant Weibel instability

    CERN Document Server

    Sarrat, M; Ghizzo, A

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a fluid model with inclusion of the complete pressure tensor dynamics for the description of Weibel type instabilities in a counterstreaming beams configuration. Differently from the case recently studied in Sarrat et al. 2016, where perturbations perpendicular to the beams were considered, here we focus only on modes propagating along the beams. Such a configuration is responsible for the growth of two kind of instabilities, the Two-Stream Instability and the Weibel instability, which in this geometry becomes "time-resonant", i.e. propagative. This fluid description agrees with the kinetic one and makes it possible e.g. to identify the transition between non-propagative and propagative Weibel modes, already evidenced by Lazar et al. 2009 as a "slope-breaking" of the growth rate, in terms of a merger of two non propagative Weibel modes.

  4. Can dust coagulation trigger streaming instability?

    CERN Document Server

    Drazkowska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Streaming instability can be a very efficient way of overcoming growth and drift barriers to planetesimal formation. However, it was shown that strong clumping, which leads to planetesimal formation, requires a considerable number of large grains. State-of-the-art streaming instability models do not take into account realistic size distributions resulting from the collisional evolution of dust. We investigate whether a sufficient quantity of large aggregates can be produced by sticking and what the interplay of dust coagulation and planetesimal formation is. We develop a semi-analytical prescription of planetesimal formation by streaming instability and implement it in our dust coagulation code based on the Monte Carlo algorithm with the representative particles approach. We find that planetesimal formation by streaming instability may preferentially work outside the snow line, where sticky icy aggregates are present. The efficiency of the process depends strongly on local dust abundance and radial pressure g...

  5. Electrocapillary instability of magnetic fluid peak

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, Levon; Dikansky, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental study of the capillary electrostatic instability occurring under effect of a constant electric field on a magnetic fluid individual peak. The peaks under study occur at disintegration of a magnetic fluid layer applied on a flat electrode surface under effect of a perpendicular magnetic field. The electrocapillary instability shows itself as an emission of charged drops jets from the peak point in direction of the opposing electrode. The charged drops emission repeats periodically and results in the peak shape pulsations. It is shown that a magnetic field affects the electrocapillary instability occurrence regularities and can stimulate its development. The critical electric and magnetic field strengths at which the instability occurs have been measured; their dependence on the peak size is shown. The hysteresis in the system has been studied; it consists in that the charged drops emission stops at a lesser electric (or magnetic) field strength than that of the initial occurr...

  6. Experimental Replication of an Aeroengine Combustion Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2000-01-01

    Combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines are most frequently encountered during the late phases of engine development, at which point they are difficult and expensive to fix. The ability to replicate an engine-traceable combustion instability in a laboratory-scale experiment offers the opportunity to economically diagnose the problem (to determine the root cause), and to investigate solutions to the problem, such as active control. The development and validation of active combustion instability control requires that the causal dynamic processes be reproduced in experimental test facilities which can be used as a test bed for control system evaluation. This paper discusses the process through which a laboratory-scale experiment was designed to replicate an instability observed in a developmental engine. The scaling process used physically-based analyses to preserve the relevant geometric, acoustic and thermo-fluid features. The process increases the probability that results achieved in the single-nozzle experiment will be scalable to the engine.

  7. Nonlinear electrostatic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Srivastava, Krishna M.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of electrostatic drift Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is performed. It is shown that the analysis leads to the propagation of the weakly nonlinear dispersive waves, and the nonlinear behavior is governed by the nonlinear Burger's equation.

  8. Overview of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this talk is to survey Rayleigh-Taylor instability, describing the phenomenology that occurs at a Taylor unstable interface, and reviewing attempts to understand these phenomena quantitatively.

  9. Summary of impedance issues and beam instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the session on impedance issues and beam instabilities at the ICFA workshop on future circular electron-positron factories “eeFACT2016” [1] held at the Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, from 24 to 27 October 2016. This session also covered active beam stabilization by feedback systems. Beam-beam effects and coherent beambeam instabilities were addressed separately and, therefore, are not included here.

  10. Jeans instability in the linearized Burnett regime

    CERN Document Server

    García-Colin, L S

    2005-01-01

    Jeans instability is derived for the case of a low density self-gravitating gas beyond the Navier-Stokes equations. The Jeans instability criterium is shown to depend on a Burnett coefficient if the formalism is taken up to fourth order in the wave number. It is also shown that previously known viscosity corrections to the Jeans wave-number are enhanced if the full fourth order formalism is applied to the stability analysis.

  11. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, S E; Berk, H L; Borba, D N; Breizman, B N; Challis, C D; Classen, I G J; Edlund, E M; Eriksson, J; Fasoli, A; Fredrickson, E D; Fu, G Y; Garcia-Munoz, M; Gassner, T; Ghantous, K; Goloborodko, V; Gorelenkov, N N; Gryaznevich, M P; Hacquin, S; Heidbrink, W W; Hellesen, C; Kiptily, V G; Kramer, G J; Lauber, P; Lilley, M K; Lisak, M; Nabais, F; Nazikian, R; Nyqvist, R; Osakabe, M; von Thun, C Perez; Pinches, S D; Podesta, M; Porkolab, M; Shinohara, K; Schoepf, K; Todo, Y; Toi, K; Van Zeeland, M A; Voitsekhovich, I; White, R B; Yavorskij, V; TG, ITPA EP; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfven instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and discusses progress in interpreting the observed phenomena. A multi-machine comparison is presented giving information on the performance of both diagnostics and modelling tools for different plasma conditions outlining expectations for ITER based on our present knowledge.

  12. Plasma wave instabilities in nonequilibrium graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aryal, Chinta M.; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    We study two-stream instabilities in a nonequilibrium system in which a stream of electrons is injected into doped graphene. As with equivalent nonequilibrium parabolic band systems, we find that the graphene systems can support unstable charge-density waves whose amplitudes grow with time. We...... of the injected electrons that maximizes the growth rate increases with increasing | q |. We compare the range and strength of the instability in graphene to that of two- and three-dimensional parabolic band systems....

  13. Resonant Triad Instability in Stratified Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Joubaud, Sylvain; Odier, Philippe; Dauxois, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Internal gravity waves contribute to fluid mixing and energy transport, not only in oceans but also in the atmosphere and in astrophysical bodies. We provide here the first experimental measurement of the growth rate of a resonant triad instability (also called parametric subharmonic instability) transferring energy to smaller scales where it is dissipated. We make careful and quantitative comparisons with theoretical predictions for propagating vertical modes in laboratory experiments.

  14. On viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    The 3D Lagrangian Integral Method is used to simulate the effects of surface tension on the viscoelastic end-plate instability, occuring in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is shovn that the surface tension delays the onset of the instability. Furthermore...... it is demonstrated that surface tension plays a key role in the selection of the most unstable mode...

  15. ON THE INSTABILITY OF THE RAILWAY VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian MAZILU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The railway vehicles have two sources of instability. The most common is the hunting induced by the reversed conic shape of the rolling surfaces of the wheels. The other one is related by the anomalous Doppler effect that can occurs when the train velocity exceeds the phase velocity of the waves induced in the track structure. Some aspects regarding the two sources of instability are presented.

  16. Studies of elastic-plastic instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of plastic instabilities are reviewed, with focus on results in structural mechanics as well as continuum mechanics. First the basic theories for bifurcation and post-bifurcation behavior are briefly presented. Then, localization of plastic flow is discussed, including shear band formation...... in solids, localized necking in biaxially stretched metal sheets, and the analogous phenomenon of buckling localization in structures. Also some recent results for cavitation instabilities in elastic-plastic solids are reviewed....

  17. Systematics of shoulder instability; Systematik der Schulterinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Maehringer-Kunz, A. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to the causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options. Instabilities are classified into traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome and into microtraumatic instabilities. For diagnostics plain radiographs (''trauma series'') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful repositioning. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation of the different injury patterns of the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast computed tomography (CT) arthrography with the use of multidetector CT scanners represents an alternative imaging modality; however, MR imaging should be preferred in the work-up of shoulder instabilities due to the mostly younger age of patients. (orig.) [German] Unter einer Schulterinstabilitaet versteht man jede zu Beschwerden fuehrende Translation des Humeruskopfs in Relation zur Gelenkpfanne waehrend einer aktiven Bewegung der Schulter. Glenohumerale Instabilitaeten werden heute nach ihrer Aetiologie eingeteilt, da bei der Wahl der Therapie der Entstehungsmechanismus der Instabilitaet eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Danach unterscheidet man primaer traumatisch von atraumatisch entstandenen Instabilitaeten sowie Mikroinstabilitaeten. Bei der Diagnostik dienen konventionelle Roentgenuebersichtsaufnahmen nur noch zur Dokumentation einer Luxation und zur Beurteilung der Reposition. Die durch eine Instabilitaet hervorgerufenen Verletzungsfolgen am labroligamentaeren Komplex und den knoechernen Strukturen werden heute bevorzugt mit der direkten MR-Arthrographie dargestellt. Hierbei koennen unterschiedliche Verletzungsmuster dargestellt werden. Nach

  18. Weibel instability in relativistic quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Brodin, G.

    2015-08-01

    Generation of quasi-static magnetic fields, due to the Weibel instability is studied in a relativistic quantum plasma. This instability is induced by a temperature anisotropy. The dispersion relation and growth rates for low frequency electromagnetic perturbations are derived using a wave-kinetic equation which describes the evolution of the electron Wigner quasi-distribution. The influence of parallel kinetic effects is discussed in detail.

  19. A hydrodynamic approach to QGP instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, E

    2013-01-01

    We show that the usual linear analysis of QGP Weibel instabilities based on the Maxwell-Boltzmann equation may be reproduced in a purely hydrodynamic model. The latter is derived by the Entropy Production Variational Method from a transport equation including collisions, and can describe highly nonequilibrium flow. We find that, as expected, collisions slow down the growth of Weibel instabilities. Finally, we discuss the strong momentum anisotropy limit.

  20. Correlation of OPLL with spinal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Chul; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between spinal instability and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament(OPLL). Materials and Methods: In 70 patients(M:F=45:25, mean age=53 years) diagnosed as OPLL on the basis of surgical operation field findings and radiological evaluation [plain film(n=70), CT(n=64),MRI(n=55)], involved levels were the cervical spine(n=32), lumbar spine(n=23), and both the cervical and lumbar spine(n=15). Spinal instability was radiologically diagnosed as horizontal displacement of one vertebra by another of more than 3.5 mm, or a difference in rotation from either adjacent vertebra by more than 11 degree in lateral cervical spine and a difference of more than 1.5 mm from the posterior body margins to the point of intersection of two lines drawn parallel to the opposing segmental endplate in extension lateral lumbar spine. We divided OPLL into group I(continuous, segmental, mixed) and group II(retrodiscal), and compared spinal instability in these two groups. Results: In cervical OPLL, group I comprised 33 cases and group II 14. In group I, spinal instability was noted in 8/33 cases(24%) or 10/123 segments(8.1%). Spinal instability in group II, on the other hand, was found in 13/14 cases(93%) or 17/26 segments(65%). Ossification occurred at the retrodiscal level in 37 cases, byt in case was continuous. In group II, spinal instability was found in 25 of 37 cases(69%), oe in 29 of 55 segments(53%). Conclusion: Compared to other types of OPLL, the frequency of retrodiscal OPLL in association with spinal instability was high. Spinal instability may thus be the most important cause of retrodiscal OPLL.

  1. Beam Instabilities in Circular Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, Elias

    2017-01-01

    The theory of impedance-induced bunched-beam coherent instabilities is reviewed following Laclare's formalism, adding the effect of an electronic damper in the transverse plane. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are discussed, both low-intensity and high-intensity regimes are analysed, both longitudinal and transverse planes are studied, and both short-bunch and long-bunch regimes are considered. Observables and mitigation measures are also examined.

  2. Spinal instability in ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badve Siddharth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unstable spinal lesions in patients with ankylosing spondylitis are common and have a high incidence of associated neurological deficit. The evolution and presentation of these lesions is unclear and the management strategies can be confusing. We present retrospective analysis of the cases of ankylosing spondylitis developing spinal instability either due to spondylodiscitis or fractures for mechanisms of injury, presentations, management strategies and outcome. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective analysis of 16 cases of ankylosing spondylitis, treated surgically for unstable spinal lesions over a period of 12 years (1995-2007; 87.5% (n=14 patients had low energy (no obvious/trivial trauma while 12.5% (n=2 patients sustained high energy trauma. The most common presentation was pain associated with neurological deficit. The surgical indications included neurological deficit, chronic pain due to instability and progressive deformity. All patients were treated surgically with anterior surgery in 18.8% (n=3 patients, posterior in 56.2% (n=9 patients and combined approach in 25% (n=4 patients. Instrumented fusion was carried out in 87.5% (n=14 patients. Average surgical duration was 3.84 (Range 2-7.5 hours, blood loss 765.6 (± 472.5 ml and follow-up 54.5 (Range 18-54 months. The patients were evaluated for pain score, Frankel neurological grading, deformity progression and radiological fusion. One patient died of medical complications a week following surgery. Results: Intra-operative adverse events like dural tears and inadequate deformity correction occurred in 18.7% (n=3 patients (Cases 6, 7 and 8 which could be managed conservatively. There was a significant improvement in the Visual analogue score for pain from a pre-surgical median of 8 to post-surgical median of 2 (P=0.001, while the neurological status improved in 90% (n=9 patients among those with preoperative neurological deficit who could be followed-up (n =10. Frankel

  3. The Abelianization of QCD Plasma Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, P; Arnold, Peter; Lenaghan, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    QCD plasma instabilities appear to play an important role in the equilibration of quark-gluon plasmas in heavy-ion collisions in the theoretical limit of weak coupling (i.e. asymptotically high energy). It is important to understand what non-linear physics eventually stops the exponential growth of unstable modes. It is already known that the initial growth of plasma instabilities in QCD closely parallels that in QED. However, once the unstable modes of the gauge-fields grow large enough for non-Abelian interactions between them to become important, one might guess that the dynamics of QCD plasma instabilities and QED plasma instabilities become very different. In this paper, we give suggestive arguments that non-Abelian self-interactions between the unstable modes are ineffective at stopping instability growth, and that the growing non-Abelian gauge fields become approximately Abelian after a certain stage in their growth. This in turn suggests that understanding the development of QCD plasma instabilities i...

  4. On the chiral imbalance and Weibel instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2016-06-01

    We study the chiral-imbalance and the Weibel instabilities in presence of the quantum anomaly using the Berry-curvature modified kinetic equation. We argue that in many realistic situations, e.g. relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both the instabilities can occur simultaneously. The Weibel instability depends on the momentum anisotropy parameter ξ and the angle (θn) between the propagation vector and the anisotropy direction. It has maximum growth rate at θn = 0 while θn = π / 2 corresponds to a damping. On the other hand the pure chiral-imbalance instability occurs in an isotropic plasma and depends on difference between the chiral chemical potentials of right and left-handed particles. It is shown that when θn = 0, only for a very small values of the anisotropic parameter ξ ∼ξc, growth rates of the both instabilities are comparable. For the cases ξc Weibel modes dominate over the chiral-imbalance instability if μ5 / T ≤ 1. However, when μ5 / T ≥ 1, it is possible to have dominance of the chiral-imbalance modes at certain values of θn for an arbitrary ξ.

  5. [Capsular retensioning in anterior unidirectional glenohumeral instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Pozos, Leonel; Martínez Molina, Oscar; Castañeda Landa, Ezequiel

    2007-01-01

    To present the experience of the Orthopedics Service PEMEX South Central Hospital in the management of anterior unidirectional shoulder instability with an arthroscopic technique consisting of capsular retensioning either combined with other anatomical repair procedures or alone. Thirty-one patients with anterior unidirectional shoulder instability operated-on between January 1999 and December 2005 were included. Fourteen patients underwent capsular retensioning and radiofrequency, and in 17 patients, capsular retensioning was combined with suture anchors. Patients with a history of relapsing glenohumeral dislocations and subluxations, with anterior instability with or without associated Bankart lesions were selected; all of them were young. The results were assessed considering basically the occurrence of instability during the postoperative follow-up. No cases of recurring instability occurred. Two cases had neuroma and one experienced irritation of the suture site. Six patients had residual limitation of combined lateral rotation and abduction movements, of a mean of 10 degrees compared with the healthy contralateral side. The most frequent incident was the leak of solutions to the soft tissues. Capsular retensioning, whether combined or not with other anatomical repair techniques, has proven to result in a highly satisfactory rate of glenohumeral stabilization in cases of anterior unidirectional instabilities. The arthroscopic approach offers the well-known advantages of causing less damage to the soft tissues, and a shorter time to starting rehabilitation therapy and exercises.

  6. Beam-Ion Instability in PEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifets, S.; Kulikov, A.; Wang, Min-Huey; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    The instability in the PEP-II electron ring has been observed while reducing the clearing gap in the bunch train. We study the ion effects in the ring summarizing existing theories of the beam-ion interaction, comparing them with observations, and estimating effect on luminosity in the saturation regime. Considering the gap instability we suggest that the instability is triggered by the beam-ion instability, and discuss other mechanisms pertinent to the instability.

  7. Laser pulse modulation instabilities in partially stripped plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Qiang-Lin; Liu Shi-Bing; Jiang Yi-Jian

    2005-01-01

    The laser pulse modulation instabilities in partially stripped plasma were discussed based on the phase and group velocities of the laser pulse and the two processes that modulation instabilities excited. The excitation condition and growth rate of the modulation instability were obtained. It was found that the positive chirp and competition between normal and abnormal dispersions play important roles in the modulation instability. In the partially stripped plasma,the increased positive chirp enhances the modulation instability, and the dispersion competition reduces it.

  8. Instabilities in Interacting Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, I. L.; Andrych, K. D.; Antoniuk, K. A.; Baklanov, A. V.; Beringer, P.; Breus, V. V.; Burwitz, V.; Chinarova, L. L.; Chochol, D.; Cook, L. M.; Cook, M.; Dubovský, P.; Godlowski, W.; Hegedüs, T.; Hoňková, K.; Hric, L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Juryšek, J.; Kim, C.-H.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Kusakin, A. V.; Marsakova, V. I.; Mason, P. A.; Mašek, M.; Mishevskiy, N.; Nelson, R. H.; Oksanen, A.; Parimucha, S.; Park, J.-W.; Petrík, K.; Quiñones, C.; Reinsch, K.; Robertson, J. W.; Sergey, I. M.; Szpanko, M.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Tkachuk, L. G.; Traulsen, I.; Tremko, J.; Tsehmeystrenko, V. S.; Yoon, J.-N.; Zola, S.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    2017-07-01

    The types of instability in the interacting binary stars are briefly reviewed. The project “Inter-Longitude Astronomy” is a series of smaller projects on concrete stars or groups of stars. It has no special funds, and is supported from resources and grants of participating organizations, when informal working groups are created. This “ILA” project is in some kind similar and complementary to other projects like WET, CBA, UkrVO, VSOLJ, BRNO, MEDUZA, AstroStatistics, where many of us collaborate. Totally we studied 1900+ variable stars of different types, including newly discovered variables. The characteristic timescale is from seconds to decades and (extrapolating) even more. The monitoring of the first star of our sample AM Her was initiated by Prof. V.P. Tsesevich (1907-1983). Since more than 358 ADS papers were published. In this short review, we present some highlights of our photometric and photo-polarimetric monitoring and mathematical modeling of interacting binary stars of different types: classical (AM Her, QQ Vul, V808 Aur = CSS 081231:071126+440405, FL Cet), asynchronous (BY Cam, V1432 Aql), intermediate (V405 Aql, BG CMi, MU Cam, V1343 Her, FO Aqr, AO Psc, RXJ 2123, 2133, 0636, 0704) polars and magnetic dwarf novae (DO Dra) with 25 timescales corresponding to different physical mechanisms and their combinations (part “Polar”); negative and positive superhumpers in nova-like (TT Ari, MV Lyr, V603 Aql, V795 Her) and many dwarf novae stars (“Superhumper”); eclipsing “non-magnetic” cataclysmic variables(BH Lyn, DW UMa, EM Cyg; PX And); symbiotic systems (“Symbiosis”); super-soft sources (SSS, QR And); spotted (and not spotted) eclipsing variables with (and without) evidence for a current mass transfer (“Eclipser”) with a special emphasis on systems with a direct impact of the stream into the gainer star's atmosphere, which we propose to call “Impactor” (short from “Extreme Direct Impactor”), or V361 Lyr-type stars. Other

  9. Dynamic Instability of Rapidly Rotating Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, B. K.; Durisen, R. H.; Johnson, M. S.; Davis, G. A.

    1994-12-01

    Modern studies of collapse and fragmentation of protostellar clouds suggest a wide variety of outcomes, depending on the assumed initial conditions. Individual equilibrium objects which result from collapse are likely to be in rapid rotation and can have a wide range of structures. We have undertaken a survey of parameter space in order to examine the role of dynamic instabilities in the subsequent evolution of these objects. For the purposes of conducting a systematic study, we so far have considered only the n = 3/2 polytropic equilibrium states that might form from the collapse of uniformly rotating spherical clouds. By varying the central concentration of the assumed initial cloud, we obtain equilibrium states distinguished primarily by their different specific angular momentum distributions. These equilibrium states span the range between starlike objects with angular momentum distributions analogous to the Maclaurin spheroids and objects more accurately described as massive Keplerian disks around stars. Using a new SCF code to generate the n = 3/2 axisymmetric equilibrium states and an improved 3D hydrodynamics code, we have investigated the the onset and nature of global dynamic instabilities in these objects. The starlike objects are unstable to barlike instabilities at T/|W| gtorder 0.27, where T/|W| is the ratio of total rotational kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy. These instabilities are vigorous and lead to violent ejection of mass and angular momentum. As the angular momentum distribution shifts to the other extreme, one- and two-armed spiral instabilities begin to dominate at considerably lower T/|W|. These instabilities appear to be driven by the SLING and swing mechanisms. In extremely flattened disks, one-armed spirals dominate all other disturbances but eventually saturate at nonlinear amplitude without producing fragmentation. We conclude that the nature of the global instabilities encountered during the process of star formation

  10. Intimate partner violence and housing instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavao, Joanne; Alvarez, Jennifer; Baumrind, Nikki; Induni, Marta; Kimerling, Rachel

    2007-02-01

    The mental and physical health consequences of intimate partner violence (IPV) have been well established, yet little is known about the impact of violence on a woman's ability to obtain and maintain housing. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between recent IPV and housing instability among a representative sample of California women. It is expected that women who have experienced IPV will be at increased risk for housing instability as evidenced by: (1) late rent or mortgage, (2) frequent moves because of difficulty obtaining affordable housing, and/or (3) without their own housing. Data were taken from the 2003 California Women's Health Survey, a population-based, random-digit-dial, annual probability survey of adult California women (N=3619). Logistic regressions were used to predict housing instability in the past 12 months, adjusting for the following covariates; age, race/ethnicity, education, poverty status, marital status, children in the household, and past year IPV. In the multivariate model, age, race/ethnicity, marital status, poverty, and IPV were significant predictors of housing instability. After adjusting for all covariates, women who experienced IPV in the last year had almost four times the odds of reporting housing instability than women who did not experience IPV (adjusted odds ratio=3.98, 95% confidence interval: 2.94-5.39). This study found that IPV was associated with housing instability among California women. Future prospective studies are needed to learn more about the nature and direction of the relationship between IPV and housing instability and the possible associated negative health consequences.

  11. Dynamical instabilities in disc-planet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Protoplanetary discs may become dynamically unstable due to structure induced by an embedded giant planet. In this thesis, I discuss the stability of such systems and explore the consequence of instability on planetary migration. I begin with non-self-gravitating, low viscosity discs and show that giant planets induce shocks inside its co-orbital region, leading to a profile unstable to vortex formation around a potential vorticity minimum. This instability is commonly known as the vortex or Rossby wave instability. Vortex-planet interaction lead to episodic phases of migration, which can be understood in the framework of type III migration. I then examine the effect of disc self-gravity on gap stability. The linear theory of the Rossby wave instability is extended to include disc gravity, which shows that self-gravity is effective at stabilising the vortex instability at small azimuthal wavenumber. This is consistent with the observation that more vortices develop with increasing disc mass in hydrodynamic si...

  12. Coherent Instabilities of ILC Damping Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifets, S.; Stupakov, G.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The paper presents the first attempt to estimates the ILC damping ring impedance and compare thresholds of the classical instabilities for several designs initially proposed for the DR. The work was carried out in the spring of 2006. Since then the choice of the DR is narrowed. Nevertheless, the analysis described may be useful for the next iterations of the beam stability. Overall, the conventional instabilities will have little impact on the ring performance provided the careful design of the ring minimizes the impedance below acceptable level indicated above. The only exception is the transverse CB instability. The longitudinal CB is less demanding. However, even the transverse CB instability would have threshold current above nominal provided the aperture in the wigglers is increased from 8 mm to 16 mm. The microwave instability needs more studies. Nevertheless, we should remember that the ILC DR is different from existing high-current machines at least in two respects: absence of the beam-beam tune spread stabilizing beams in colliders, and unusual strict requirements for low emittance. That may cause new problems such as bunch emittance dilution due to high-frequency wakes (BPMs, grooves), etc. Even if such a possibility exists, it probably universal for all machines and ought be addressed in the design of vacuum components rather than have effect on the choice of the machine design.

  13. Tidal instability in exoplanetary systems evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Gal P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new element is proposed to play a role in the evolution of extrasolar planetary systems: the tidal (or elliptical instability. It comes from a parametric resonance and takes place in any rotating fluid whose streamlines are (even slightly elliptically deformed. Based on theoretical, experimental and numerical works, we estimate the growth rate of the instability for hot-jupiter systems, when the rotation period of the star is known. We present the physical process, its application to stars, and preliminary results obtained on a few dozen systems, summarized in the form of a stability diagram. Most of the systems are trapped in the so-called "forbidden zone", where the instability cannot grow. In some systems, the tidal instability is able to grow, at short timescales compared to the system evolution. Implications are discussed in the framework of misaligned transiting systems, as the rotational axis of the star would be unstable in systems where this elliptical instability grows.

  14. Soliton modulation instability in fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D. Y.; Zhao, L. M.; Wu, X.; Zhang, H.

    2009-08-01

    We report experimental evidence of soliton modulation instability in erbium-doped fiber lasers. An alternate type of spectral sideband generation was always experimentally observed on the soliton spectrum of the erbium-doped soliton fiber lasers when energy of the formed solitons reached beyond a certain threshold value. Following this spectral sideband generation, if the pump power of the lasers was further increased, either a new soliton would be formed or the existing solitons would experience dynamical instabilities, such as the period-doubling bifurcations or period-doubling route to chaos. We point out that the mechanism for this soliton spectral sideband generation is the modulation instability of the solitons in the lasers. We further show that, owing to the internal energy balance of a dissipative soliton, modulation instability itself does not destroy the stable soliton evolution in a laser cavity. It is the strong resonant wave coupling between the soliton and dispersive waves that leads to the dynamic instability of the solitons.

  15. Competition between Buneman and Langmuir Instabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jun; YU Bin

    2012-01-01

    The electron-ion beam instabilities are studied by one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation.The simulation results show that both the low-frequency Buneman mode and high-frequency Langmuir wave (LW) are excited in the nonlinear phase. The power of Buneman instability is stronger than that of the LW.The Buneman instability is firstly excited.Then the backward LW appears,which is probably excited by the particles trapped in the wave potential and moving opposite to the original beam direction.After some time,the forward LW can be found,which has a larger maximum frequency than that of the backward LW.With the decrease of the electron drift velocity,the instabilities become weaker; the LW appears to have almost equal intensities and becomes symmetric for forward and backward propagation directions. The LW can also heat the electron,so the relative drift speed cannot far exceed the electron thermal speed,which is not helpful to the development of Buneman instability.

  16. On the Chiral imbalance and Weibel Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Kaw, Predhiman K

    2016-01-01

    We study the chiral-imbalance and the Weibel instabilities in presence of the quantum anomaly using the Berry-curvature modified kinetic equation. We argue that in many realistic situations, e.g. relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both the instabilities can occur simultaneously. The Weibel instability depends on the momentum anisotropy parameter $\\xi$ and the angle ($\\theta_n$) between the propagation vector and the anisotropy direction. It has maximum growth rate at $\\theta_n=0$ while $\\theta_n=\\pi/2$ corresponds to a damping. On the other hand the pure chiral-imbalance instability occurs in an isotropic plasma and depends on difference between the chiral chemical potentials of right and left-handed particles. It is shown that when $\\theta_n=0$, only for a very small values of the anisotropic parameter $\\xi\\sim \\xi_c$, growth rates of the both instabilities are comparable. For the cases $\\xi_c<\\xi\\ll1$, $\\xi\\approx 1$ or $\\xi \\geq 1$ at $\\theta_n=0$, the Weibel modes dominate over the chiral-imbalance ins...

  17. Pressure-driven instabilities in astrophysical jets

    CERN Document Server

    Longaretti, Pierre-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Astrophysical jets are widely believed to be self-collimated by the hoop-stress due to the azimuthal component of their magnetic field. However this implies that the magnetic field is largely dominated by its azimuthal component in the outer jet region. In the fusion context, it is well-known that such configurations are highly unstable in static columns, leading to plasma disruption. It has long been pointed out that a similar outcome may follow for MHD jets, and the reasons preventing disruption are still not elucidated, although some progress has been accomplished in the recent years. In these notes, I review the present status of this open problem for pressure-driven instabilities, one of the two major sources of ideal MHD instability in static columns (the other one being current-driven instabilities). I first discuss in a heuristic way the origin of these instabilities. Magnetic resonances and magnetic shear are introduced, and their role in pressure-driven instabilities discussed in relation to Suydam'...

  18. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  19. The effects of a magnetic field on planetary migration in laminar and turbulent discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comins, Megan L.; Romanova, Marina M.; Koldoba, Alexander V.; Ustyugova, Galina V.; Blinova, Alisa A.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the migration of low-mass planets (1, 5 and 20 M⊕) in accretion discs threaded with a magnetic field using 2D magnetohydrodynamic code in polar coordinates. We observed that, in the case of a strong azimuthal magnetic field where the plasma parameter is β ˜ 2-4, density waves at the magnetic resonances exert a positive torque on the planet and may slow down or reverse its migration. However, when the magnetic field is weaker (i.e. the plasma parameter β is relatively large), then non-axisymmetric density waves excited by the planet lead to growth of the radial component of the field and, subsequently, to development of the magnetorotational instability, such that the disc becomes turbulent. Migration in a turbulent disc is stochastic, and the migration direction may change as such. To understand migration in a turbulent disc, both the interaction between a planet and individual turbulent cells, as well as the interaction between a planet and ordered density waves, have been investigated.

  20. The effects of a magnetic field on planetary migration in laminar and turbulent discs

    CERN Document Server

    Comins, M L; Koldoba, A V; Ustyugova, G V; Lovelace, R V E

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the migration of low-mass planets ($5 M_{\\oplus}$ and $20 M_{\\oplus}$) in accretion discs threaded with a magnetic field using 2D MHD code in polar coordinates. We observed that, in the case of a strong azimuthal magnetic field where the plasma parameter is $\\beta\\sim 1-2$, density waves at the magnetic resonances exert a positive torque on the planet and may slow down or reverse its migration. However, when the magnetic field is weaker (i.e., the plasma parameter $\\beta$ is relatively large), then non-axisymmetric density waves excited by the planet lead to growth of the radial component of the field and, subsequently, to development of the magneto-rotational instability, such that the disc becomes turbulent. Migration in a turbulent disc is stochastic, and the migration direction may change as such. To understand migration in a turbulent disc, both the interaction between a planet and individual turbulent cells, as well as the interaction between a planet and ordered density waves, have been ...

  1. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Narges; Germaschewski, Kai; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron-free energy so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  2. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Narges; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  3. Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-07-01

    The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

  4. Pathways towards instability in financial networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoscia, Marco; Battiston, Stefano; Caccioli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2017-02-01

    Following the financial crisis of 2007-2008, a deep analogy between the origins of instability in financial systems and complex ecosystems has been pointed out: in both cases, topological features of network structures influence how easily distress can spread within the system. However, in financial network models, the details of how financial institutions interact typically play a decisive role, and a general understanding of precisely how network topology creates instability remains lacking. Here we show how processes that are widely believed to stabilize the financial system, that is, market integration and diversification, can actually drive it towards instability, as they contribute to create cyclical structures which tend to amplify financial distress, thereby undermining systemic stability and making large crises more likely. This result holds irrespective of the details of how institutions interact, showing that policy-relevant analysis of the factors affecting financial stability can be carried out while abstracting away from such details.

  5. Ion sound instability driven by ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Koshkarov, O; Kaganovich, I D; Ilgisonis, V I

    2014-01-01

    In many natural and laboratory conditions, plasmas are often in the non-equilibrium state due to presence of stationary flows, when one particle species (or a special group, such as group of high energy particles, i.e. beam) is mowing with respect to the other plasma components. Such situations are common for a number of different plasma application such as diagnostics with emissive plasma probes, plasma electronics devices and electric propulsion devices. The presence of plasma flows often lead to the instabilities in such systems and subsequent development of large amplitude perturbations. The goal of this work is to develop physical insights and numerical tools for studies of stability of the excitation of the ion sound waves by the ion beam in the configuration similar to the plasma Pierce diode. This systems, in some limiting cases, reduce to mathematically similar equations originally proposed for Pierce instability. The finite length effect are crucial for this instability which generally belong to the...

  6. Modulational instability arising from collective Rayleigh scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, G R M; McNeil, B W J

    2003-02-01

    It is shown that under certain conditions a collection of dielectric Rayleigh particles suspended in a viscous medium and enclosed in a bidirectional ring cavity pumped by a strong laser field can produce a new modulational instability transverse to the wave-propagation direction. The source of the instability is collective Rayleigh scattering i.e., the spontaneous formation of periodic longitudinal particle-density modulations and a backscattered optical field. Using a linear stability analysis a dispersion relation is derived which determines the region of parameter space in which modulational instability of the backscattered field and the particle distribution occurs. In the linear regime the pump is modulationally stable. A numerical analysis is carried out to observe the dynamics of the interaction in the nonlinear regime. In the nonlinear regime the pump field also becomes modulationally unstable and strong pump depletion occurs.

  7. The Parker Instability in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Luiz Felippe S; Shukurov, Anvar; Bushby, Paul J; Fletcher, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We examine the evolution of the Parker instability in galactic disks using 3D numerical simulations. We consider a local Cartesian box section of a galactic disk, where gas, magnetic fields and cosmic rays are all initially in a magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. This is done for different choices of initial cosmic ray density and magnetic field. The growth rates and characteristic scales obtained from the models, as well as their dependences on the density of cosmic rays and magnetic fields, are in broad agreement with previous (linearized, ideal) analytical work. However, this non-ideal instability develops a multi-modal 3D structure, which cannot be quantitatively predicted from the earlier linearized studies. This 3D signature of the instability will be of importance in interpreting observations. As a preliminary step towards such interpretations, we calculate synthetic polarized intensity and Faraday rotation measure maps, and the associated structure functions of the latter, from our simulations; these sug...

  8. Rational Instability in the Natural Coalition Forming

    CERN Document Server

    Vinogradova, Galina

    2012-01-01

    We are investigating a paradigm of instability in coalition forming among countries, which indeed is intrinsic to any collection of individual groups or other social aggregations. Coalitions among countries are formed by the respective attraction or repulsion caused by the historical bond propensities between the countries, which produced an intricate circuit of bilateral bonds. Contradictory associations into coalitions occur due to the independent evolution of the bonds. Those coalitions tend to be unstable and break down frequently. The model extends some features of the physical theory of Spin Glasses. Within the frame of this model, the instability is viewed as a consequence of decentralized maximization processes searching for the best coalition allocations. In contrast to the existing literature, a rational instability is found to result from forecast rationality of countries. Using a general theoretical framework allowing to analyze the countries' decision making in coalition forming, we feature a sys...

  9. INSTABILITY OF GAS/LIQUID COAXIAL JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article the emphasis was given to the discussion of the effects of diameter ratio and swirling on instability character for the gas/liquid coaxial jet used by Liao, et al.[1]. The results indicate that the finite diameter ratio markedly increases the maximum growth rate, the most unstable wavenumber, as well as the cutoff wavenumber. It implies that the finite diameter ratio will lead to the liquid jet breakup length shorter and the liquid drop size smaller. The effect of the swirling jets is much more complex: for the axisymmetric perturbation mode, the swirling enhances the flow stability, for helical perturbation, the dominant instability mode occurs at n<0. And it is found that in long wave region there exists a new kind of instability modes at n=1 that was not mentioned in Liao et al.'s article. For this new mode, there appears a dominated swirling ratio at which the flow has the maximum growth rate.

  10. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Strong variations between the electrical conductivities of electrolyte and metal layers in a liquid metal battery indicate the possibility of 'metal pad' instabilities. Deformations of the electrolyte-metal interfaces cause strong perturbations of electric currents, which, hypothetically, can generate Lorentz forces enhancing the deformations. We investigate this possibility using two models: a mechanical analogy and a two-dimensional linearized approximation. It is found that the battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the sloshing-wave instability observed in the Hall-Héroult aluminum reduction cells. Another is new and related to the interactions of current perturbations with the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current. Financial support was provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation (Grant CBET 1435269).

  11. Magnetic interchange instability of accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisig, M.; Tajima, T.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the magnetic interchange or buoyancy instability of a differentially rotating disk threaded by an ordered vertical magnetic field is investigated. A 2D ideal fluid in the equatorial plane of a central mass in the corotating frame of reference is considered as a model for the disk. If the rotation rate of the disk is Keplerian, the disk is found to be stable. If the vertical magnetic field is sufficiently strong, and the field strength decreases with distance from the central object, and thus the rotation of the disk deviates from Keplerian, if is found that an instability develops. The magnetic flux and disk matter expand outward in certain ranges of azimuth, while disk matter with less magnetic flux moves inward over the remaining range of azimuth, showing a characteristic development of an interchange instability.

  12. Mirror Instability in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, Petr; Landi, Simone; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and the mirror instability in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly polarized, random-phase Alfvénic fluctuations that have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and a vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops, magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a Kolmogorov-like power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at sub-ion scales. The imposed expansion (taking a strictly transverse ambient magnetic field) leads to the generation of an important perpendicular proton temperature anisotropy that eventually drives the mirror instability. This instability generates large-amplitude, nonpropagating, compressible, pressure-balanced magnetic structures in a form of magnetic enhancements/humps that reduce the perpendicular temperature anisotropy.

  13. On stability and instability criteria for magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Susan; Vishik, Misha M.

    1995-06-01

    It is shown that for most, but not all, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria the second variation of the energy is indefinite. Thus the class of such equilibria whose stability might be determined by the so-called Arnold criterion is very restricted. The converse question, namely conditions under which MHD equilibria will be unstable is considered in this paper. The following sufficient condition for linear instability in the Eulerian representation is presented: The maximal real part of the spectrum of the MHD equations linearized about an equilibrium state is bounded from below by the growth rate of an operator defined by a system of local partial differential equations (PDE). This instability criterion is applied to the case of axisymmetric toroidal equilibria. Sufficient conditions for instability, stronger than those previously known, are obtained for rotating MHD. (c) 1995 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Photofluid Instabilities of Hot Stellar Envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegel, E A; Spiegel, Edward A.; Tao, Louis

    1999-01-01

    Beginning from a relatively simple set of dynamical equations for a fluid permeated by a radiative field strong enough to produce significant forces, we find the structure of plane-parallel equilibria and study their stability to small acoustic disturbances. In doing this, we neglect viscous effects and complications of nongreyness. We find that acoutic instabilities occur over a wide range of conditions below the Eddington limit. This result is in line with findings reported twenty years ago but it contradicts some more recent reports of the absence of instabilities. We briefly attempt to identify the causes of the discrepancies and then close with a discussion of the possible astrophysical interest of such instabilities.

  15. Control and simulation of thermoacoustic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsot, Thierry

    2014-11-01

    Combustion instabilities (CI), due to thermoacoustic coupling between acoustic waves and chemical reaction, constitute a major danger for all combustion systems. They can drive the system to unstable states where the whole combustor can oscillate, vibrate, quench or in extreme cases explode or burn. Such phenomena are commonly observed in the final phases of development programs, leading to major difficulties and significant additional costs. One of the most famous examples of combustion instabilities is the F1 engine of the Apollo program which required more than 1000 engine tests to obtain a stable regime satisfying all other constraints (performance, ignition, etc). CIs constitute one of the most challenging problems in fluid mechanics: they combine turbulence, acoustics, chemistry, unsteady two-phase flow in complex geometries. Since combustion instabilities have been identified (more than hundred years ago), the combustion community has followed two paths: (1) improve our understanding of the phenomena controlling stability to build engines which would be ``stable by design'' and (2) give up on a detailed understanding of mechanisms and add control systems either in open or closed loop devices to inhibit unstable modes. Of course, understanding phenomena driving combustion instabilities to suppress them would be the most satisfying approach but there is no fully reliable theory or numerical method today which can predict whether a combustor will be stable or not before it is fired. This talk will present an overview of combustion instabilities phenomenology before focusing on: (1) active control methods for combustion instabilities and (2) recent methods to predict unstable modes in combustors. These methods are based on recent Large Eddy Simulation codes for compressible reacting flows on HPC systems but we will also describe recent fully analytical methods which provide new insights into unstable modes in annular combustion chambers. Support: European

  16. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthroscopic shoulder anatomy, anatomic variants, and arthroscopic findings in anterior shoulder instability, is presented. In addition, correlation of arthroscopic findings with physical examination and advanced imaging (CT and MRI) in order to improve our understanding in anterior shoulder instability pathology is discussed. Results: Shoulder instability represents a broad spectrum of disease and a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy is the key for a successful treatment of the unstable shoulder. Patients can have a variety of pathologies concomitant with a traditional Bankart lesion, such as injuries of the glenoid (bony Bankart), injuries of the glenoid labrum, superiorly (SLAP) or anteroinferiorly (e.g. anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion, and Perthes), capsular lesions (humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament), and accompanying osseous-cartilage lesions (Hill-Sachs, glenolabral articular disruption). Shoulder arthroscopy allows for a detailed visualization and a dynamic examination of all anatomic structures, identification of pathologic findings, and treatment of all concomitant lesions. Conclusion: Surgeons must be well prepared and understanding the normal anatomy of the glenohumeral joint, including its anatomic variants to seek for the possible pathologic lesions in anterior shoulder instability during shoulder arthroscopy. Patient selection criteria, improved surgical techniques, and implants available have contributed to the enhancement of

  17. INTRINSIC INSTABILITY OF THE LATTICE BGK MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊鳌魁

    2002-01-01

    Based on the stability analysis with no linearization and expansion,it is argued that instability in the lattice BGK model is originated from the linearrelaxation hypothesis of collision in the model. The hypothesis stands up only whenthe deviation from the local equilibrium is weak. In this case the computation is abso-lutely stable for real fluids. But for flows of high Reynolds number, this hypothesis isviolated and then instability takes place physically. By performing a transformationa quantified stability criteria is put forward without those approximation. From thecriteria a sufficient condition for stability can be obtained and serve as an estimationof the limited Reynolds number as high as possible.

  18. Nonlinear evolution of whistler wave modulational instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpman, V.I.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul;

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the modulational instability of whistler waves coupled to fast magnetosonic waves (FMS) and to slow magnetosonic waves (SMS) is investigated. Results from direct numerical solutions in two spatial dimensions agree with simplified results from a set of ordinary different......The nonlinear evolution of the modulational instability of whistler waves coupled to fast magnetosonic waves (FMS) and to slow magnetosonic waves (SMS) is investigated. Results from direct numerical solutions in two spatial dimensions agree with simplified results from a set of ordinary...

  19. Transient convective instabilities in directional solidification

    CERN Document Server

    Meca, Esteban

    2010-01-01

    We study the convective instability of the melt during the initial transient in a directional solidification experiment in a vertical configuration. We obtain analytically the dispersion relation, and perform an additional asymptotic expansion for large Rayleigh number that permits a simpler analytical analysis and a better numerical behavior. We find a transient instability, i.e. a regime in which the system destabilizes during the transient whereas the final unperturbed steady state is stable. This could be relevant to growth mode predictions in solidification.

  20. Relativistic Cyclotron Instability in Anisotropic Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Navarro, Roberto E.; Araneda, Jaime A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Alejandro Valdivia, J.

    2016-11-01

    A sufficiently large temperature anisotropy can sometimes drive various types of electromagnetic plasma micro-instabilities, which can play an important role in the dynamics of relativistic pair plasmas in space, astrophysics, and laboratory environments. Here, we provide a detailed description of the cyclotron instability of parallel propagating electromagnetic waves in relativistic pair plasmas on the basis of a relativistic anisotropic distribution function. Using plasma kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we study the influence of the relativistic temperature and the temperature anisotropy on the collective and noncollective modes of these plasmas. Growth rates and dispersion curves from the linear theory show a good agreement with simulations results.

  1. Composition driven structural instability in perovskite ferroelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ferroelectric solid solutions usually exhibit enhanced functional properties at the morphotropic phase boundary separating two ferroelectric phases with different orientations of polarization. The underlying mechanism is generally associated with polarization rotational instability and the flattened free energy profile. In this work we show that the polarization extensional instability can also be induced at the morphotropic phase boundary beyond the reported polar-nonpolar phase boundary. The piezoelectricity enhanced by this mechanism exhibits excellent thermal stability, which helps to develop high performance piezoelectric materials with good temperature stability.

  2. White-light parametric instabilities in plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J E; Silva, L O; Bingham, R

    2007-06-08

    Parametric instabilities driven by partially coherent radiation in plasmas are described by a generalized statistical Wigner-Moyal set of equations, formally equivalent to the full wave equation, coupled to the plasma fluid equations. A generalized dispersion relation for stimulated Raman scattering driven by a partially coherent pump field is derived, revealing a growth rate dependence, with the coherence width sigma of the radiation field, scaling with 1/sigma for backscattering (three-wave process), and with 1/sigma1/2 for direct forward scattering (four-wave process). Our results demonstrate the possibility to control the growth rates of these instabilities by properly using broadband pump radiation fields.

  3. The Farley Instability: A Laboratory Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans; Petersen, P. I.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment is described that was performed in an alkali plasma (Cs) device in order to test the theory of the Farley instability. With υ E×B > Cs (the speed of sound) and νι ≳ ω cι (ν e ≪ ω ce ) wave excitation occurs, the waves traveling normal to the magnetic field B at the υ E×B speed....... The perturbations are strongly elongated along the B field lines, with λ∥ ≫ λ⊥. A comparison with theoretical predictions is given for the observed excitation conditions of the instability....

  4. Streaming instability in negative ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajith; Mathew, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    The streaming instability in an unmagnetized negative ion plasma has been studied by computational and theoretical methods. A one dimensional electrostatic Particle In Cell Simulation and fluid dynamical description of negative ion plasma showed that, if the positive ions are having a relative streaming velocity, four different wave modes corresponding to Langmuir wave, fast and slow ion waves and ion acoustic waves are produced. Below a critical wave number, instead of two distinct fast and slow ion waves, we observed a coupled wave mode. The value of the critical wave number is strongly determined by the ion streaming velocity. The thermal velocities of electrons and ions influence the growth rate of instability.

  5. Theory of electrohydrodynamic instabilities in electrolytic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, R.; Alexander, S.

    1990-01-01

    The paper develops the theory of the hydrodynamic stability of an electrolytic cell as a function of the imposed electric current. A new electrohydrodynamic instability is encountered when the current is forced to exceed the Nernst limit. The convection is driven by the volume force exerted by the electric field on space charges in the electrolyte. This intrinsic instability is found to be easily masked by extrinsic convection sources such as gravity or stirring. A linear stability analysis is performed and a dimensionless number Le is derived whose value determines the convection pattern.

  6. Instabilities in numerical loop quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, J; Khanna, G; Jung, Jae-Hun; Khanna, Gaurav; Rosen, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    In this article we perform von Neumann analysis of the difference equations that arise as a result of loop quantum gravity being applied to models of cosmology and black holes. In particular, we study the numerical stability of Bianchi I LRS (symmetric and non-symmetric constraint) and Schwarzschild interior (symmetric constraint) models, and find that there exist domains over which there are instabilities, generically. We also present explicit evolutions of wave-packets in these models and clearly demonstrate the presence of these instabilities.

  7. Combustion instability mitigation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocher, Agnes; Pitsch, Heinz; Gomez, Thomas; Bonnety, Jérôme; Legros, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    The present interdisciplinary study combines electromagnetics and combustion to unveil an original and basic experiment displaying a spontaneous flame instability that is mitigated as the non-premixed sooting flame experiences a magnetic perturbation. This magnetic instability mitigation is reproduced by direct numerical simulations to be further elucidated by a flow stability analysis. A key role in the stabilization process is attributed to the momentum and thermochemistry coupling that the magnetic force, acting mainly on paramagnetic oxygen, contributes to sustain. The spatial local stability analysis based on the numerical simulations shows that the magnetic field tends to reduce the growth rates of small flame perturbations.

  8. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  9. Plasma instabilities in high electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morawetz, K.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1994-01-01

    We analyze nonequilibrium screening with nonequilibrium Green function techniques. By employing the generalized Kadanoff-Baym ansatz to relate the correlation function to the nonequilibrium distribution function, the latter of which is assumed to be a shifted Maxwellian, an analytically tractable...... expression is derived for the nonequilibrium dielectric function epsilon(K, omega). For certain values of momenta K and frequency omega, Imepsilon(K, omega) becomes negative, implying a plasma instability. This new instability exists only for strong electric fields, underlining its nonequilibrium origin....

  10. A fast beam-ion instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupakov, G.V. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The ionization of residual gas by an electron beam in an accelerator generates ions that can resonantly couple to the beam through a wave propagating in the beam-ion system. Results of the study of a beam-ion instability are presented for a multi-bunch train taking into account the decoherence of ion oscillations due to the ion frequency spread and spatial variation of the ion frequency. It is shown that the combination of both effects can substantially reduce the growth rate of the instability. (author)

  11. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. It is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known for aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  12. Early Prevention Method for Power Systems Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dmitrova, Evgenia

    In the scope of this work, a method capable of fast identification of the proper countermeasure, that prevents emerging instability, has been developed. The focus is placed on the prevention of aperiodic small signal angular instability by means of manipulations applied to load nodes (nodes conta......’s evolution to self-curing systems, for which the human factor involved in control, will keep diminishing....... and defines which amount of countermeasure would be sufficient to bring a critical generator to the stable operation. The early prevention method is addressing the possibility of near real time analysis, utilizing computationally efficient algorithms. The method is providing efficient countermeasure matching...

  13. Managing incontinence due to detrusor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Urinary incontinence affects around 3.5 million people of all ages in the UK. For many, incontinence severely restricts their routine activities and damages their quality of life and self-esteem. In about one-third of women sufferers, and around a half of all men with incontinence, the cause is detrusor instability. This condition is characterised by involuntary bladder contractions or pressure rises during bladder filling, which result in a strong or uncontrollable urge to pass urine and, often, incontinence. Here, we consider a primary care-based approach to managing urinary incontinence in adults, concentrating on the medical management of detrusor instability.

  14. THREE-BEAM INSTABILITY IN THE LHC*

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, A

    2013-01-01

    In the LHC, a transverse instability is regularly observed at 4TeV right after the beta-squeeze, when the beams are separated by about their ten transverse rms sizes [1-3], and only one of the two beams is seen as oscillating. So far only a single hypothesis is consistent with all the observations and basic concepts, one about a third beam - an electron cloud, generated by the two proton beams in the high-beta areas of the interaction regions. The instability results from a combined action of the cloud nonlinear focusing and impedance.

  15. Low energy ghosts and the Jeans' instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümrükçüoǧlu, A. Emir; Mukohyama, Shinji; Sotiriou, Thomas P.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a massless canonical scalar field minimally coupled to general relativity can become a tachyonic ghost at low energies around a background in which the scalar's gradient is spacelike. By performing a canonical transformation we demonstrate that this low energy ghost can be recast, at the level of the action, in a form of a fluid that undergoes a Jeans-like instability affecting only modes with large wavelength. This illustrates that low energy tachyonic ghosts do not lead to a catastrophic quantum vacuum instability, unlike the usual high-energy ghost degrees of freedom.

  16. Efficiency Versus Instability in Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Valeri [Fermilab; Burov, Alexey [Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermilab

    2017-01-05

    Plasma wake-field acceleration in a strongly nonlinear (a.k.a. the blowout) regime is one of the main candidates for future high-energy colliders. For this case, we derive a universal efficiency-instability relation, between the power efficiency and the key instability parameter of the witness bunch. We also show that in order to stabilize the witness bunch in a regime with high power efficiency, the bunch needs to have high energy spread, which is not presently compatible with collider-quality beam properties. It is unclear how such limitations could be overcome for high-luminosity linear colliders.

  17. Dissipation-induced instabilities and symmetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oleg N. Kirillov; Ferdinand Verhulst

    2011-01-01

    The paradox of destabilization of a conservative or non-conservative system by small dissipation, or Ziegler's paradox (1952), has stimulated a growing interest in the sensitivity of reversible and Hamiltonian systems with respect to dissipative perturbations. Since the last decade it has been widely accepted that dissipation-induced instabilities are closely related to singularities arising on the stability boundary, associated with Whitney's umbrella. The first explanation of Ziegler's paradox was given (much earlier) by Oene Bottema in 1956. The aspects of the mechanics and geometry of dissipation-induced instabilities with an application to rotor dynamics are discussed.

  18. Stream instabilities in relativistically hot plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Shaisultanov, Rashid; Eichler, David

    2011-01-01

    The instabilities of relativistic ion beams in a relativistically hot electron background are derived for general propagation angles. It is shown that the Weibel instability in the direction perpendicular to the streaming direction is the fastest growing mode, and probably the first to appear, consistent with the aligned filaments that are seen in PIC simulations. Oblique, quasiperpendicular modes grow almost as fast, as the growth rate varies only moderately with angle, and they may distort or corrugate the filaments after the perpendicular mode saturates.

  19. Polyhedral (in-)stability of protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N.; Penkova, Anita N.

    2002-04-01

    The polyhedral (in-)stability of monoclinic hen-egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals, grown by means of PEG-6000, and that of orthorhombic trypsin crystals has been investigated experimentally. On the basis of a quantitative theoretical analysis, it is compared with the polyhedral (in-)stability of tetragonal HEWL and cubic ferritin crystals. The unambiguous conclusion is that the phenomenon is due to the diffusive supply of matter. This conclusion is also supported by the fact that the phenomenon has common features for both proteins and small molecular crystals.

  20. Methods for Simulating the Heavy Core Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Philip

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vortices have been proposed as the sites of planet formation, where dust collects and grows into planetesimals, the building blocks of planets. However, for very small dust particles that can be treated as a pressure-less fluid, we have recently discovered the “heavy core” instability, driven by the density gradient in the vortex. In order to understand the eventual outcome of this instability, we need to study its non-linear development. Here, we describe our ongoing work to develop highly accurate numerical models of a vortex with a density gradient embedded within a protoplanetary disk.