WorldWideScience

Sample records for noise signal monitoring

  1. Listening to the Deep: live monitoring of ocean noise and cetacean acoustic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M; van der Schaar, M; Zaugg, S; Houégnigan, L; Sánchez, A M; Castell, J V

    2011-01-01

    The development and broad use of passive acoustic monitoring techniques have the potential to help assessing the large-scale influence of artificial noise on marine organisms and ecosystems. Deep-sea observatories have the potential to play a key role in understanding these recent acoustic changes. LIDO (Listening to the Deep Ocean Environment) is an international project that is allowing the real-time long-term monitoring of marine ambient noise as well as marine mammal sounds at cabled and standalone observatories. Here, we present the overall development of the project and the use of passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) techniques to provide the scientific community with real-time data at large spatial and temporal scales. Special attention is given to the extraction and identification of high frequency cetacean echolocation signals given the relevance of detecting target species, e.g. beaked whales, in mitigation processes, e.g. during military exercises. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Noise and DC balanced outlet temperature signals for monitoring coolant flow in LMFBR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, M.

    1977-01-01

    Local cooling disturbances in LMFBR fuel elements may have serious safety implications for the whole reactor core. They have to be detected reliably in an early stage of their formation therefore. This can be accomplished in principle by individual monitoring of the coolant flow rate or the coolant outlet temperature of the sub-assemblies with high precision. In this paper a method is proposed to increase the sensitivity of outlet temperature signals to cooling disturbances. Using balanced temperature signals provides a means for eliminating the normal variations from the original signals which limit the sensitivity and speed of response to cooling disturbances. It is shown that a balanced signal can be derived easily from the original temperature signal by subtracting an inlet temperature and a neutron detector signal with appropriate time shift. The method was tested with tape-recorded noise signals of the KNK I reactor at Karlsruhe. The experimental results confirm the theoretical predictions. A significant reduction of the uncertainty of measured outlet temperatures was achieved. This enables very sensitive and fast response monitoring of coolant flow. Furthermore, it was found that minimizing the variance of the balanced signal offers the possibility for a rough determination of the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel rods during normal reactor operation at power. (author)

  3. Reactor noise monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Hiroto.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor noise monitoring device by detecting abnormal sounds in background noises. Vibration sounds detected by accelerometers are applied to a loose parts detector. The detector generates high alarm if there are sudden impact sounds in the background noises and applies output signals to an accumulation device. If there is slight impact sounds in the vicinity of any of the accelerometers, the accumulation device accumulates the abnormal sounds assumed to be generated from an identical site while synchronizing the waveforms for all of the channels. Then, the device outputs signals in which the background noises are cancelled, as detection signals. Therefore, S/N ratio can be improved and the abnormal sounds contained in the background noises can be detected, to thereby improve the accuracy for estimating the position where the abnormal sounds are generated. (I.S.)

  4. A noise reconfigurable current-reuse resistive feedback amplifier with signal-dependent power consumption for fetal ECG monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Shuang; Rooijakkers, M.J.; Harpe, P.; Rabotti, C.; Mischi, M.; Van Roermund, A.H.M.; Cantatore, E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a noise-reconfigurable resistive feedback amplifier with current-reuse technique for fetal ECG monitoring. The proposed amplifier allows for both tuning of the noise level and changing the power consumption according to the signal properties, minimizing the total power

  5. Listening to the Deep: Live monitoring of ocean noise and cetacean acoustic signals

    OpenAIRE

    André, Michel; Van der Schaar, Mike Connor Roger Malcolm; Zaugg, Serge Alain; Houégnigan, Ludwig; Sánchez, A.M.; Castell, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The development and broad use of passive acoustic monitoring techniques have the potential to help assessing the large-scale influence of artificial noise on marine organisms and ecosystems. Deep-sea observatories have the potential to play a key role in understanding these recent acoustic changes. LIDO(Listening to the Deep Ocean Environment) is an international project that is allowing the real-time longterm monitoring of marine ambient noise as well as marine mammal sounds at cabled and...

  6. Yesterday's noise - today's signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdula, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Plant performance can be improved by noise analysis. This paper describes noise characteristics, imposed noise and response functions, a case history of cost benefits derived from application of noise analysis techniques, areas for application of noise analysis techniques with special reference to the Gentilly-1 nuclear generating station, and the validity of noise measurement results. (E.C.B.)

  7. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Anthony D; Declaris, Nicholas

    1971-01-01

    Detection of Signals in Noise serves as an introduction to the principles and applications of the statistical theory of signal detection. The book discusses probability and random processes; narrowband signals, their complex representation, and their properties described with the aid of the Hilbert transform; and Gaussian-derived processes. The text also describes the application of hypothesis testing for the detection of signals and the fundamentals required for statistical detection of signals in noise. Problem exercises, references, and a supplementary bibliography are included after each c

  8. Noise reduction in the beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeaki.

    1982-02-01

    A simple noise reduction system using a pulse transformer and a pair of L C low pass filters has been introduced to the beam current monitor of a current transformer type at the INS electron linac. With this system, the pick-up noise has been reduced to be 1% of the noise without noise reduction. Signal deformation caused by this system is relatively small and the beam current pulse down to 20 mA is successfully monitored in the actual accelerator operation. (author)

  9. Measurement of resonance modes causative of beam position monitor signal noise in vacuum chamber of storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Youngdo; Hwang, Ilmoon; Park, Sungju; Kim, Changbum

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the position reading obtained from the beam position monitor (BPM) mounted at the storage ring can be corrupted by the resonance mode. We carried out a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation of vacuum chambers of the storage ring of the Pohang Light Source (PLS) without simplified modeling to measure the frequencies of resonance modes excited in the vacuum chamber. The frequencies of resonance modes obtained by the eigenmode simulation are well matched with the peak frequencies of RF transmission scattering matrix (S 21 ) graph of sector vacuum chamber measured using a network analyzer. It is found that a transverse electric (TE) resonance mode exists in the operation frequency band of BPM and the vertically oriented electric field of TE resonance mode is linked to the BPM position reading noise. Based on this study, we can easily design a vacuum chamber free from the BPM position reading noise caused by the TE resonance mode.

  10. Audibility of modulation noise in stationary signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelen, J.J.M.

    1970-01-01

    Recordings of an acoustic signal on magnetic tape often show noise, which may be divided into two main classes: additive noise and multiplicative noise. A characteristic of the latter is that it is weak with weak signals and strong with strong signals. This modulation noise has been subjected to a

  11. Measurement of resonance modes causative of beam position monitor signal noise in vacuum chamber of storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Youngdo; Hwang, Ilmoon; Park, Sungju [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changbum, E-mail: chbkim@postech.ac.k [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-11

    It is known that the position reading obtained from the beam position monitor (BPM) mounted at the storage ring can be corrupted by the resonance mode. We carried out a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation of vacuum chambers of the storage ring of the Pohang Light Source (PLS) without simplified modeling to measure the frequencies of resonance modes excited in the vacuum chamber. The frequencies of resonance modes obtained by the eigenmode simulation are well matched with the peak frequencies of RF transmission scattering matrix (S{sub 21}) graph of sector vacuum chamber measured using a network analyzer. It is found that a transverse electric (TE) resonance mode exists in the operation frequency band of BPM and the vertically oriented electric field of TE resonance mode is linked to the BPM position reading noise. Based on this study, we can easily design a vacuum chamber free from the BPM position reading noise caused by the TE resonance mode.

  12. The Signal Importance of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Michael; Tsvetkova, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Noise is widely regarded as a residual category--the unexplained variance in a linear model or the random disturbance of a predictable pattern. Accordingly, formal models often impose the simplifying assumption that the world is noise-free and social dynamics are deterministic. Where noise is assigned causal importance, it is often assumed to be a…

  13. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  14. Signal processing method for Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. G.; Moon, B. S.; Kinser, Rpger

    2003-01-01

    The development of Johnson Noise Thermometry requires a high sensitive preamplifier circuit to pick up the temperature-related noise on the sensing element. However, the random noise generated in this amplification circuit causes a significant erroneous influence to the measurement. This paper describes signal processing mechanism of the Johnson Noise Thermometry system which is underway of development in collaboration between KAERI and ORNL. It adopts two identical amplifier channels and utilizes a digital signal processing technique to remove the independent noise of each channel. The CPSD(Cross Power Spectral Density) function is used to cancel the independent noise and the differentiation of narrow or single frequency peak from the CPSD data separates the common mode electromagnetic interference noise

  15. Advanced digital signal processing and noise reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Vaseghi, Saeed V

    2008-01-01

    Digital signal processing plays a central role in the development of modern communication and information processing systems. The theory and application of signal processing is concerned with the identification, modelling and utilisation of patterns and structures in a signal process. The observation signals are often distorted, incomplete and noisy and therefore noise reduction, the removal of channel distortion, and replacement of lost samples are important parts of a signal processing system. The fourth edition of Advanced Digital Signal Processing and Noise Reduction updates an

  16. Orbiter CCTV video signal noise analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, R. M.; Blanke, L. R.; Pannett, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The amount of steady state and transient noise which will couple to orbiter CCTV video signal wiring is predicted. The primary emphasis is on the interim system, however, some predictions are made concerning the operational system wiring in the cabin area. Noise sources considered are RF fields from on board transmitters, precipitation static, induced lightning currents, and induced noise from adjacent wiring. The most significant source is noise coupled to video circuits from associated circuits in common connectors. Video signal crosstalk is the primary cause of steady state interference, and mechanically switched control functions cause the largest induced transients.

  17. Core component vibration monitoring in BWRs using neutron noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, D.N.; Robinson, J.C.; Kryter, R.C.; Cole, O.C.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron noise from in-core fission detectors in a BWR was investigated to determine its effectiveness as a monitor of mechanical vibrations of core components. In this study the general properties of BWR neutron noise were characterized, and a signal enhancement method was implemented to improve the measurement sensitivity. (auth)

  18. Voltage fluctuations in neurons: signal or noise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Yosef; Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    , we discuss noise-free neuronal signaling and detrimental and beneficial forms of noise in large-scale functional neural networks. Evidence that noise and variability in some cases go hand in hand with behavioral variability and increase behavioral choice, richness, and adaptability opens new avenues......Noise and variability are fundamental companions to ion channels and synapses and thus inescapable elements of brain function. The overriding unresolved issue is to what extent noise distorts and limits signaling on one hand and at the same time constitutes a crucial and fundamental enrichment...... that allows and facilitates complex adaptive behavior in an unpredictable world. Here we review the growing experimental evidence that functional network activity is associated with intense fluctuations in membrane potential and spike timing. We trace origins and consequences of noise and variability. Finally...

  19. ”Sound [signal] noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnsten, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the intricate relationship between sound and signification through notions of noise. The emergence of new fields of sonic artistic practices has generated several questions of how to approach sound as aesthetic form and material. During the past decade an increased attention...... has been paid to, for instance, a category such as ‘sound art’ together with an equally strengthened interest in phenomena and concepts that fall outside the accepted aesthetic procedures and constructions of what we traditionally would term as musical sound – a recurring example being ‘noise’....

  20. A study on the method for cancelling the background noise of the impact signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Ham, C. S.; Park, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we compared the noise canceller (time domain analysis method) to the spectral subtraction (frequency domain analysis method) for cancelling background noise when the Loose Part Monitoring System's accelerometers combined the noise signal with the impact signal if the impact signal exists. In the operation of a nuclear power plant monitoring, alarm triggering occurs due to a peak signal in the background noise, an amplitude increase by component operation such as control rod movement or abrupt pump operation. This operation causes the background noise in LPMS. Thus this noise inputs to LPMS together with the impact signal. In case that this noise amplitude is very large comparing to that of the impact signal, we may not analyze the impact position and mass estimation. We analyzed two methods for cancelling background noise. First, we evaluate the signal to noise ratio utilizing the noise canceller. Second, we evaluate the signal to noise ratio utilizing the spectral subtraction. The evaluation resulted superior the noise canceller to the spectral subtraction on the signal to noise ratio

  1. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    McDonough, Robert N

    1995-01-01

    The Second Edition is an updated revision to the authors highly successful and widely used introduction to the principles and application of the statistical theory of signal detection. This book emphasizes those theories that have been found to be particularly useful in practice including principles applied to detection problems encountered in digital communications, radar, and sonar.Detection processing based upon the fast Fourier transform

  2. Seismic signal and noise on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panning, Mark; Stähler, Simon; Bills, Bruce; Castillo Castellanos, Jorge; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Husker, Allen; Kedar, Sharon; Lorenz, Ralph; Pike, William T.; Schmerr, Nicholas; Tsai, Victor; Vance, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Seismology is one of our best tools for detailing interior structure of planetary bodies, and a seismometer is included in the baseline and threshold mission design for the upcoming Europa Lander mission. Guiding mission design and planning for adequate science return, though, requires modeling of both the anticipated signal and noise. Assuming ice seismicity on Europa behaves according to statistical properties observed in Earth catalogs and scaling cumulative seismic moment release to the moon, we can simulate long seismic records and estimate background noise and peak signal amplitudes (Panning et al., 2017). This suggests a sensitive instrument comparable to many broadband terrestrial instruments or the SP instrument from the InSight mission to Mars will be able to record signals, while high frequency geophones are likely inadequate. We extend this analysis to also begin incorporation of spatial and temporal variation due to the tidal cycle, which can help inform landing site selection. We also begin exploration of how chaotic terrane at the bottom of the ice shell and inter-ice heterogeneities (i.e. internal melt structures) may affect anticipated seismic observations using 2D numerical seismic simulations.M. P. Panning, S. C. Stähler, H.-H. Huang, S. D. Vance, S. Kedar, V. C. Tsai, W. T. Pike, R. D. Lorenz, “Expected seismicity and the seismic noise environment of Europa,” J. Geophys. Res., in revision, 2017.

  3. Sensor response time monitoring using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Thie, J.A.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Holbert, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    Random noise techniques in nuclear power plants have been developed for system surveillance and for analysis of reactor core dynamics. The noise signals also contain information about sensor dynamics, and this can be extracted using frequency, amplitude and time domain analyses. Even though noise analysis has been used for sensor response time testing in some nuclear power plants, an adequate validation of this method has never been carried out. This paper presents the results of limited work recently performed to examine the validity of the noise analysis for sensor response time testing in nuclear power plants. The conclusion is that noise analysis has the potential for detecting gross changes in sensor response but it cannot be used for reliable measurement of response time until more laboratory and field experience is accumulated. The method is more advantageous for testing pressure sensors than it is for temperature sensors. This is because: 1) for temperature sensors, a method called Loop Current Step Response test is available which is quantitatively more exact than noise analysis, 2) no method currently exists for on-line testing of pressure transmitters other than the Power-Interrupt test which is applicable only to force balance pressure transmitters, and 3) pressure sensor response time is affected by sensing line degradation which is inherently taken into account by testing with noise analysis. (author)

  4. Noise control of radiological monitoring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubick, R.D.; Stevens, W.W.; Burke, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    Although vacuum pumps on continuous air monitors (CAMs) do not produce noise levels above regulatory limits, engineering controls were used to establish a safer work environment. Operations performed in areas where CAMs are located are highly specialized and require precision work when handling nuclear materials, heavy metals, and inert gases. Traditional methods for controlling noise such as enclosing or isolating the source and the use of personal protection equipment were evaluated. An innovative solution was found by retrofitting CAMs with air powered multistage ejectors pumps. By allowing the air to expand in several chambers to create a vacuum, one can eliminate the noise hazard altogether. In facilities with adequate pressurized air, use of these improved ejector pumps may be a cost-effective replacement for noisy vacuum pumps. A workplace designed or engineered with noise levels as low as possible or as close to background adds to increased concentration, attention to detail, and increased production

  5. Flow measurements using noise signals of axially displaced thermocouples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozma, R.; Hoogenboom, J.E. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    Determination of the flow rate of the coolant in the cooling channels of nuclear reactors is an important aspect of core monitoring. It is usually impossible to measure the flow by flowmeters in the individual channels due to the lack of space and safety reasons. An alternative method is based on the analysis of noise signals of the available in-core detectors. In such a noise method, a transit time which characterises the propagation of thermohydraulic fluctuations (density or temperature fluctuations) in the coolant is determined from the correlation between the noise signals of axially displaced detectors. In this paper, the results of flow measurements using axially displaced thermocouples in the channel wall will be presented. The experiments have been performed in a simulated MRT-type fuel assembly located in the research reactor HOR of the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft. It was found that the velocities obtained via temperature noise correlation methods are significantly larger than the area-averaged velocity in the single-phase coolant flow. Model calculations show that the observed phenomenon can be explained by effects due to the radial velocity distribution in the channel. (author).

  6. Adaptive EMG noise reduction in ECG signals using noise level approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Mohamed; Saranovac, Lazar

    2017-12-01

    In this paper the usage of noise level approximation for adaptive Electromyogram (EMG) noise reduction in the Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals is introduced. To achieve the adequate adaptiveness, a translation-invariant noise level approximation is employed. The approximation is done in the form of a guiding signal extracted as an estimation of the signal quality vs. EMG noise. The noise reduction framework is based on a bank of low pass filters. So, the adaptive noise reduction is achieved by selecting the appropriate filter with respect to the guiding signal aiming to obtain the best trade-off between the signal distortion caused by filtering and the signal readability. For the evaluation purposes; both real EMG and artificial noises are used. The tested ECG signals are from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database Directory, while both real and artificial records of EMG noise are added and used in the evaluation process. Firstly, comparison with state of the art methods is conducted to verify the performance of the proposed approach in terms of noise cancellation while preserving the QRS complex waves. Additionally, the signal to noise ratio improvement after the adaptive noise reduction is computed and presented for the proposed method. Finally, the impact of adaptive noise reduction method on QRS complexes detection was studied. The tested signals are delineated using a state of the art method, and the QRS detection improvement for different SNR is presented.

  7. Monitoring Unstable Glaciers with Seismic Noise Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiswerk, L. E.; Walter, F.

    2016-12-01

    Gravity-driven glacier instabilities are a threat to human infrastructure in alpine terrain, and this hazard is likely to increase with future changes in climate. Seismometers have been used previously on hazardous glaciers to monitor the natural englacial seismicity. In some situations, an increase in "icequake" activity may indicate fracture growth and thus an imminent major break-off. However, without independent constraints on unstable volumes, such mere event counting is of little use. A promising new approach to monitor unstable masses in Alpine terrain is coda wave interferometry of ambient noise. While already established in the solid earth, application to glaciers is not straightforward, because the lack of inhomogeneities typically suppresses seismic coda waves in glacier ice. Only glaciers with pervasive crevasses provide enough scattering to generate long codas. This is requirement is likely met for highly dynamic unstable glaciers. Here, we report preliminary results from a temporary 5-station on-ice array of seismometers (corner frequencies: 1 Hz, array aperture: 500m) on Bisgletscher (Switzerland). The seismometers were deployed in shallow boreholes, directly above the unstable tongue of the glacier. In the frequency band 4-12 Hz, we find stable noise cross-correlations, which in principle allows monitoring on a subdaily scale. The origin and the source processes of the ambient noise in these frequencies are however uncertain. As a first step, we evaluate the stability of the sources in order to separate effects of changing source parameters from changes of englacial properties. Since icequakes occurring every few seconds may dominate the noise field, we compare their temporal and spatial occurrences with the cross-correlation functions (stability over time, the asymmetry between causal and acausal parts of the cross-correlation functions) as well as with results from beamforming to assess the influence of these transient events on the noise field.

  8. Theory and Measurement of Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Continuous-Wave Noise Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Bronisław; Susek, Waldemar

    2018-05-06

    Determination of the signal power-to-noise power ratio on the input and output of reception systems is essential to the estimation of their quality and signal reception capability. This issue is especially important in the case when both signal and noise have the same characteristic as Gaussian white noise. This article considers the problem of how a signal-to-noise ratio is changed as a result of signal processing in the correlation receiver of a noise radar in order to determine the ability to detect weak features in the presence of strong clutter-type interference. These studies concern both theoretical analysis and practical measurements of a noise radar with a digital correlation receiver for 9.2 GHz bandwidth. Firstly, signals participating individually in the correlation process are defined and the terms signal and interference are ascribed to them. Further studies show that it is possible to distinguish a signal and a noise on the input and output of a correlation receiver, respectively, when all the considered noises are in the form of white noise. Considering the above, a measurement system is designed in which it is possible to represent the actual conditions of noise radar operation and power measurement of a useful noise signal and interference noise signals—in particular the power of an internal leakage signal between a transmitter and a receiver of the noise radar. The proposed measurement stands and the obtained results show that it is possible to optimize with the use of the equipment and not with the complex processing of a noise signal. The radar parameters depend on its prospective application, such as short- and medium-range radar, ground-penetrating radar, and through-the-wall detection radar.

  9. Mitigating Wind Induced Noise in Outdoor Microphone Signals Using a Singular Spectral Subspace Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Eldwaik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind induced noise is one of the major concerns of outdoor acoustic signal acquisition. It affects many field measurement and audio recording scenarios. Filtering such noise is known to be difficult due to its broadband and time varying nature. In this paper, a new method to mitigate wind induced noise in microphone signals is developed. Instead of applying filtering techniques, wind induced noise is statistically separated from wanted signals in a singular spectral subspace. The paper is presented in the context of handling microphone signals acquired outdoor for acoustic sensing and environmental noise monitoring or soundscapes sampling. The method includes two complementary stages, namely decomposition and reconstruction. The first stage decomposes mixed signals in eigen-subspaces, selects and groups the principal components according to their contributions to wind noise and wanted signals in the singular spectrum domain. The second stage reconstructs the signals in the time domain, resulting in the separation of wind noise and wanted signals. Results show that microphone wind noise is separable in the singular spectrum domain evidenced by the weighted correlation. The new method might be generalized to other outdoor sound acquisition applications.

  10. Monitoring and diagnosis in situ: noise analysis; Vigilancia y diagnostico in situ analisis de ruido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalvo, C.; Garcia-Berrocal, A.

    2014-04-01

    Predictive maintenance based on surveillance and breakdowns diagnostics can be achieved through the analysis of the noise hidden in the signals. At the beginning noise analysis was development to monitor the power signals coming from neutron detectors. Nowadays its applications are very diverse. For instance: process sensors surveillance such us Resistance Temperature detectors, thermocouples and pressure transmitters, internals vibration monitoring, abnormal vibrations detection, etc. In this work some examples from the literature and from the authors experience are presented. (Author)

  11. Explicit signal to noise ratio in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Chova, Luis; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Camps-Valls, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a nonlinear feature extraction method based on kernels for remote sensing data analysis. The proposed approach is based on the minimum noise fraction (MNF) transform, which maximizes the signal variance while also minimizing the estimated noise variance. We here propose...... an alternative kernel MNF (KMNF) in which the noise is explicitly estimated in the reproducing kernel Hilbert space. This enables KMNF dealing with non-linear relations between the noise and the signal features jointly. Results show that the proposed KMNF provides the most noise-free features when confronted...

  12. Elimination of noise peak for signal processing in Johnson noise thermometry development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. G.; Moon, B. S.; Jeong, J. E.; Jeo, Y. H.; Kisner, Roger A.

    2003-01-01

    The internal and external noise is the most considering obstacle in development of Johnson Noise Thermometry system. This paper addresses an external noise elimination issue of the Johnson Noise Thermometry system which is underway of development in collaboration between KAERI and ORNL. Although internal random noise is canceled by Cross Power Spectral Density function, a continuous wave penetrating into the electronic circuit is eliminated by the difference of peaks between Johnson signal and external noise. The elimination logic using standard deviation of CPSD and energy leakage problem in discrete CPSD function are discussed in this paper

  13. Detection of Noise in Composite Step Signal Pattern by Visualizing Signal Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaman Verma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Step Composite Signals is the combination of vital informative signals that are compressed and coded to produce a predefined test image on a display device. It carries the desired sequence of information from source to destination. This information may be transmitted as digital signal, video information or data signal required as an input for the destination module. For testing of display panels, Composite Test Signals are the most important attribute of test signal transmission system. In the current research paper we present an approach for the noise detection in Composite Step Signal by analysing Composite Step Signal waveforms. The analysis of the signal waveforms reveals that the noise affected components of the signal and subsequently noise reduction process is initiated which targets noisy signal component only. Thus the quality of signal is not compromised during noise reduction process.

  14. Background noise of acoustic emission signals in sodium piping loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Y.; Aoki, K.; Kuribayashi, K.; Kishi, T.; Sakakibara, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Background noise measurement in the frequency range of acoustic emission (AE) signals was made on the sodium piping loops of a 50 MW steam generator test facility in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). During the dynamic characteristics test of the steam generator over a wide range of operating conditions, the background noise generated on the pipe surface was measured using wideband AE sensor externally mounted with waveguide. Data were obtained for the effect of power loads of steam generator on both amplitude and frequency spectra of background noise signals. Source and nature of background noise were established

  15. Signal noise/interferer combiner unit programmable (SINCUP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinezdepison, Emilio

    1988-12-01

    The Signal Noise Interferer Combiner Unit Programmable (SINCUP) has been developed to facilitate laboratory performance testing of Very Low Frequency (VLF/Low Frequency (LF) receivers. To accomplish this, the unit allows the combining in controlled amounts of various real-world environmental and manmade interference with an information carrying signal. The externally modulated signal is combined with internally/externally generated Gaussian noise and/or with an internally/externally generated interferer. In order to test modern digital processing techniques, such as Adaptive Null Steering, Eigenvector Sorting, and Widrow-Hoff adaptive filters, SINCUP is capable of generating and meeting much higher signal-to-noise plus interference ratios than earlier channel simulators. The present software has been written to accommodate a dynamic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) range from -60 to +60 dB. Higher dynamic range units could be implemented.

  16. Fractal characterization for noise signal validation in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Martinez, Omar

    2003-01-01

    Up to now, a great variety of methods is used for the dynamical characterization of different components of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). With this aim, time and spectral analysis are usually considered, and different tools of non-stationary and non-gaussian analysis are also presented. When applying non-lineal dynamics theory for noise signal validation purposes in power reactors, the extraction of fractal echoes plays a main role. Fractal characterization for noise signal validation purposes can be integrated to the task of processing and acquisition of time signals in noise (fluctuation parameters) analysis systems. The possibility of discrimination between deterministic chaotic signals and pure noise signals has been incorporated, as a complement; to noise signals analysis in normal and anomalous operational conditions in NPPs using a fractal approach. In this work the detailed analysis of a neutronic sensor response is considered and the fractal characterization of its dynamics state (i.e. sensor line) for noise signal classification, it is presented. The experiment from where the time series (signals) were obtained, was carried out at the Research Reactor of the Technical University of Budapest, Hungary, during a model experiment for ageing process study of in-core neutron detectors (author)

  17. Urban Noise Recorded by Stationary Monitoring Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąkowski, Andrzej; Radziszewski, Leszek; Dekýš, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the analysis results of equivalent sound level recorded by two road traffic noise monitoring stations. The stations were located in Kielce (an example of a medium-size town in Poland) at the roads in the town in the direction of Łódź and Lublin. The measurements were carried out through stationary stations monitoring the noise and traffic of motor vehicles. The RMS values based on A-weighted sound level were recorded every 1 s in the buffer and the results were registered every 1 min over the period of investigations. The registered data were the basis for calculating the equivalent sound level for three time intervals: from 6:00 to 18:00, from 18:00 to 22:00 and from 22:00 to 6:00. Analysis included the values of the equivalent sound level recorded for different days of the week split into 24h periods, nights, days and evenings. The data analysed included recordings from 2013. The agreement of the distribution of the variable under analysis with normal distribution was evaluated. It was demonstrated that in most cases (for both roads) there was sufficient evidence to reject the null hypothesis at the significance level of 0.05. It was noted that compared with Łódź Road, in the case of Lublin Road data, more cases were recorded for which the null hypothesis could not be rejected. Uncertainties of the equivalent sound level measurements were compared within the periods under analysis. The standard deviation, coefficient of variation, the positional coefficient of variation, the quartile deviation was proposed for performing a comparative analysis of the obtained data scattering. The investigations indicated that the recorded data varied depending on the traffic routes and time intervals. The differences concerned the values of uncertainties and coefficients of variation of the equivalent sound levels.

  18. Determination of signal intensity affected by Gaussian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blostein, Jeronimo J.; Bennun, Leonardo

    1999-01-01

    A methodology based on maximum likelihood criteria, to identify and quantify an arbitrary signal affected by Gaussian noise is shown. To use this methodology it is necessary to know the position in the spectrum where the signal of interest should appear, and the shape of the signal when the background is null or unappreciable. (author)

  19. Preliminary study of acoustic emission (ae) noise signal identification for crude oil storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Ain Ahmad Latif; Shukri Mohd

    2008-08-01

    This preliminary work was carried out to simulate the Acoustic Emission (AE) signal contributed by pitting corrosion, and noise signal from environment during crude oil storage tanks monitoring. The purpose of this study is to prove that acoustic emission (AE) could be used to detect the formation of pitting corrosion in the crude oil storage tank and differentiated it from other sources of noise signal. In this study, the pitting corrosion was simulated by inducing low voltage and low amperage current onto the crude oil storage tank material (ASTM 516 G 70). Water drop, air blow and surface rubbing were applied onto the specimen surface. To simulate the noise signal produce by rain fall, wind blow and other sources of noise during AE crude oil storage tanks monitoring. AE sensor was attached onto the other surface of specimen to acquire all of these AE signals which then has send to AE DiSP 24 data acquisition system for signal conditioning. AE win software has been used to analyse this entire signal. It is found that, simulated pitting corrosion could be detected by AE system and differentiated from other sources of noise by using amplitude analysis. From the amplitude analysis is shown that 20-30 dB is the range amplitude for the blow test, 50-60 dB for surface rubbing test and over than 60 dB for water drop test. (Author)

  20. Measurement of MOSFET LF Noise Under Large Signal RF Excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    A new measurement technique is presented that allows measurement of MOSFET LF noise under large signal RF excitation. Measurements indicate that MOSFETS exhibit a reduction in LF noise when they are cycled from inversion to accummulation and that this reduction does not depend on the frequency of

  1. Removing Background Noise with Phased Array Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary; Stephens, David

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test conducted to determine how well microphone phased array processing software could pull an acoustic signal out of background noise. The array consisted of 24 microphones in an aerodynamic fairing designed to be mounted in-flow. The processing was conducted using Functional Beam forming software developed by Optinav combined with cross spectral matrix subtraction. The test was conducted in the free-jet of the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig at NASA GRC. The background noise was produced by the interaction of the free-jet flow with the solid surfaces in the flow. The acoustic signals were produced by acoustic drivers. The results show that the phased array processing was able to pull the acoustic signal out of the background noise provided the signal was no more than 20 dB below the background noise level measured using a conventional single microphone equipped with an aerodynamic forebody.

  2. Coherence method of identifying signal noise model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrin, J.

    1981-01-01

    The noise analysis method is discussed in identifying perturbance models and their parameters by a stochastic analysis of the noise model of variables measured on a reactor. The analysis of correlations is made in the frequency region using coherence analysis methods. In identifying an actual specific perturbance, its model should be determined and recognized in a compound model of the perturbance system using the results of observation. The determination of the optimum estimate of the perturbance system model is based on estimates of related spectral densities which are determined from the spectral density matrix of the measured variables. Partial and multiple coherence, partial transfers, the power spectral densities of the input and output variables of the noise model are determined from the related spectral densities. The possibilities of applying the coherence identification methods were tested on a simple case of a simulated stochastic system. Good agreement was found of the initial analytic frequency filters and the transfers identified. (B.S.)

  3. Signal processing for boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledwidge, T.J.; Black, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the KNS I loop at KfK Karlsruhe. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. (author). 6 refs, figs

  4. Traffic noise monitoring at road intersections in urban settlement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traffic noise monitoring at road intersections in urban settlement: Case study of Ramat Park Benin City. ... bus drivers) were responsible for the noise emission while enforcement of traffic laws in the state and relocation of the motor park close to the square were recommended control measures for noise reduction.

  5. The Signal and Noise Analysis of Direct Conversion EHM Transceivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayegh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct conversion modulator-demodulator with even harmonic mixers with emphasis on noise analysis is presented. The circuits consist of even harmonic mixers (EHMs realized with antiparallel diode pairs (APDPs. We evaluate the different levels of I/Q imbalances and DC offsets and use signal space concepts to analyze the bit error rate (BER of the proposed transceiver using M-ary QAM schemes. Moreover, the simultaneous analysis of the signal and noise has been presented.

  6. Pump to signal noise transfer in parametric fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Toke; Rottwitt, Karsten; Peucheret, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Fiber optic parametric amplifiers have been suggested due to their potential low spontaneous emission. However, by nature the parametric amplifier only work in a forward pumped configuration, which result in transfer of relative intensity noise in the pump to the signal.......Fiber optic parametric amplifiers have been suggested due to their potential low spontaneous emission. However, by nature the parametric amplifier only work in a forward pumped configuration, which result in transfer of relative intensity noise in the pump to the signal....

  7. Empirical mode decomposition of the ECG signal for noise removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Jesmin; Bhuiyan, Sharif; Murphy, Gregory; Alam, Mohammad

    2011-04-01

    Electrocardiography is a diagnostic procedure for the detection and diagnosis of heart abnormalities. The electrocardiogram (ECG) signal contains important information that is utilized by physicians for the diagnosis and analysis of heart diseases. So good quality ECG signal plays a vital role for the interpretation and identification of pathological, anatomical and physiological aspects of the whole cardiac muscle. However, the ECG signals are corrupted by noise which severely limit the utility of the recorded ECG signal for medical evaluation. The most common noise presents in the ECG signal is the high frequency noise caused by the forces acting on the electrodes. In this paper, we propose a new ECG denoising method based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD). The proposed method is able to enhance the ECG signal upon removing the noise with minimum signal distortion. Simulation is done on the MIT-BIH database to verify the efficacy of the proposed algorithm. Experiments show that the presented method offers very good results to remove noise from the ECG signal.

  8. Experience with a PC-based system for noise and DC signal analysis in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    A data acquisition system that was originally developed for noise diagnostics in PWRs was expanded to include DC signal analysis in addition to noise analysis. The system has been used in PWRs for reactor diagnostics, determination of root cause of process anomalies, instrument calibration verification, measurement of drop time of control and shutdown rods, testing of timing and sequencing of control rod drive mechanisms, emergency diesel generator monitoring, etc. These applications are reviewed in this paper. (author)

  9. Noise Maps for Quantitative and Clinical Severity Towards Long-Term ECG Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everss-Villalba, Estrella; Melgarejo-Meseguer, Francisco Manuel; Blanco-Velasco, Manuel; Gimeno-Blanes, Francisco Javier; Sala-Pla, Salvador; Rojo-Álvarez, José Luis; García-Alberola, Arcadi

    2017-10-25

    Noise and artifacts are inherent contaminating components and are particularly present in Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring. The presence of noise is even more significant in long-term monitoring (LTM) recordings, as these are collected for several days in patients following their daily activities; hence, strong artifact components can temporarily impair the clinical measurements from the LTM recordings. Traditionally, the noise presence has been dealt with as a problem of non-desirable component removal by means of several quantitative signal metrics such as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), but current systems do not provide any information about the true impact of noise on the ECG clinical evaluation. As a first step towards an alternative to classical approaches, this work assesses the ECG quality under the assumption that an ECG has good quality when it is clinically interpretable. Therefore, our hypotheses are that it is possible (a) to create a clinical severity score for the effect of the noise on the ECG, (b) to characterize its consistency in terms of its temporal and statistical distribution, and (c) to use it for signal quality evaluation in LTM scenarios. For this purpose, a database of external event recorder (EER) signals is assembled and labeled from a clinical point of view for its use as the gold standard of noise severity categorization. These devices are assumed to capture those signal segments more prone to be corrupted with noise during long-term periods. Then, the ECG noise is characterized through the comparison of these clinical severity criteria with conventional quantitative metrics taken from traditional noise-removal approaches, and noise maps are proposed as a novel representation tool to achieve this comparison. Our results showed that neither of the benchmarked quantitative noise measurement criteria represent an accurate enough estimation of the clinical severity of the noise. A case study of long-term ECG is reported

  10. Light field reconstruction robust to signal dependent noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kun; Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-11-01

    Capturing four dimensional light field data sequentially using a coded aperture camera is an effective approach but suffers from low signal noise ratio. Although multiplexing can help raise the acquisition quality, noise is still a big issue especially for fast acquisition. To address this problem, this paper proposes a noise robust light field reconstruction method. Firstly, scene dependent noise model is studied and incorporated into the light field reconstruction framework. Then, we derive an optimization algorithm for the final reconstruction. We build a prototype by hacking an off-the-shelf camera for data capturing and prove the concept. The effectiveness of this method is validated with experiments on the real captured data.

  11. Digital signal processing for the Johnson noise thermometry: a time series analysis of the Johnson noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Byung Soo; Hwang, In Koo; Chung, Chong Eun; Kwon, Kee Choon; David, E. H.; Kisner, R.A.

    2004-06-01

    In this report, we first proved that a random signal obtained by taking the sum of a set of signal frequency signals generates a continuous Markov process. We used this random signal to simulate the Johnson noise and verified that the Johnson noise thermometry can be used to improve the measurements of the reactor coolant temperature within an accuracy of below 0.14%. Secondly, by using this random signal we determined the optimal sampling rate when the frequency band of the Johnson noise signal is given. Also the results of our examination on how good the linearity of the Johnson noise is and how large the relative error of the temperature could become when the temperature increases are described. Thirdly, the results of our analysis on a set of the Johnson noise signal blocks taken from a simple electric circuit are described. We showed that the properties of the continuous Markov process are satisfied even when some channel noises are present. Finally, we describe the algorithm we devised to handle the problem of the time lag in the long-term average or the moving average in a transient state. The algorithm is based on the Haar wavelet and is to estimate the transient temperature that has much smaller time delay. We have shown that the algorithm can track the transient temperature successfully

  12. Compressed Sensing with Linear Correlation Between Signal and Measurement Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    reconstruction algorithms, but is not known in existing literature. The proposed technique reduces reconstruction error considerably in the case of linearly correlated measurements and noise. Numerical experiments confirm the efficacy of the technique. The technique is demonstrated with application to low......Existing convex relaxation-based approaches to reconstruction in compressed sensing assume that noise in the measurements is independent of the signal of interest. We consider the case of noise being linearly correlated with the signal and introduce a simple technique for improving compressed...... sensing reconstruction from such measurements. The technique is based on a linear model of the correlation of additive noise with the signal. The modification of the reconstruction algorithm based on this model is very simple and has negligible additional computational cost compared to standard...

  13. ECG signal performance de-noising assessment based on threshold tuning of dual-tree wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El B'charri, Oussama; Latif, Rachid; Elmansouri, Khalifa; Abenaou, Abdenbi; Jenkal, Wissam

    2017-02-07

    Since the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal has a low frequency and a weak amplitude, it is sensitive to miscellaneous mixed noises, which may reduce the diagnostic accuracy and hinder the physician's correct decision on patients. The dual tree wavelet transform (DT-WT) is one of the most recent enhanced versions of discrete wavelet transform. However, threshold tuning on this method for noise removal from ECG signal has not been investigated yet. In this work, we shall provide a comprehensive study on the impact of the choice of threshold algorithm, threshold value, and the appropriate wavelet decomposition level to evaluate the ECG signal de-noising performance. A set of simulations is performed on both synthetic and real ECG signals to achieve the promised results. First, the synthetic ECG signal is used to observe the algorithm response. The evaluation results of synthetic ECG signal corrupted by various types of noise has showed that the modified unified threshold and wavelet hyperbolic threshold de-noising method is better in realistic and colored noises. The tuned threshold is then used on real ECG signals from the MIT-BIH database. The results has shown that the proposed method achieves higher performance than the ordinary dual tree wavelet transform into all kinds of noise removal from ECG signal. The simulation results indicate that the algorithm is robust for all kinds of noises with varying degrees of input noise, providing a high quality clean signal. Moreover, the algorithm is quite simple and can be used in real time ECG monitoring.

  14. Reducing Noise by Repetition: Introduction to Signal Averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Umer; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes theory and experiments, taken from biophysics and physiological measurements, to illustrate the technique of signal averaging. In the process, students are introduced to the basic concepts of signal processing, such as digital filtering, Fourier transformation, baseline correction, pink and Gaussian noise, and the cross- and…

  15. Signal Detection with Criterion Noise: Applications to Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Diaz, Michael; Wee, Serena

    2009-01-01

    A tacit but fundamental assumption of the theory of signal detection is that criterion placement is a noise-free process. This article challenges that assumption on theoretical and empirical grounds and presents the noisy decision theory of signal detection (ND-TSD). Generalized equations for the isosensitivity function and for measures of…

  16. Muon Signals at a Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Zakareishvili, Tamar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Calorimeters provide high-resolution energy measurements for particle detection. Muon signals are important for evaluating electronics performance, since they produce a signal that is close to electronic noise values. This work provides a noise RMS analysis for the Demonstrator drawer of the 2016 Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) Test Beam in order to help reconstruct events in a low signal-to-noise environment. Muon signals were then found for a beam penetrating through all three layers of the drawer. The Demonstrator drawer is an electronic candidate for TileCal, part of the ATLAS experiment for the Large Hadron Collider that operates at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

  17. Comparison of methods for removing electromagnetic noise from electromyographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W; Stock, Matt S

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare three different methods of removing noise from monopolar electromyographic (EMG) signals: (a) electrical shielding with a Faraday cage, (b) denoising with a digital notch-filter and (c) applying a bipolar differentiation with another monopolar EMG signal. Ten men and ten women (mean age = 24.0 years) performed isometric muscle actions of the leg extensors at 10-100% of their maximal voluntary contraction on two separate occasions. One trial was performed inside a Faraday tent (a flexible Faraday cage made from conductive material), and the other was performed outside the Faraday tent. The EMG signals collected outside the Faraday tent were analyzed three separate ways: as a raw signal, as a bipolar signal, and as a signal digitally notch filtered to remove 60 Hz noise and its harmonics. The signal-to-noise ratios were greatest after notch-filtering (range: 3.0-33.8), and lowest for the bipolar arrangement (1.6-10.2). Linear slope coefficients for the EMG amplitude versus force relationship were also used to compare the methods of noise removal. The results showed that a bipolar arrangement had a significantly lower linear slope coefficient when compared to the three other conditions (raw, notch and tent). These results suggested that an appropriately filtered monopolar EMG signal can be useful in situations that require a large pick-up area. Furthermore, although it is helpful, a Faraday tent (or cage) is not required to achieve an appropriate signal-to-noise ratio, as long as the correct filters are applied.

  18. Comparison of methods for removing electromagnetic noise from electromyographic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W; Stock, Matt S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare three different methods of removing noise from monopolar electromyographic (EMG) signals: (a) electrical shielding with a Faraday cage, (b) denoising with a digital notch-filter and (c) applying a bipolar differentiation with another monopolar EMG signal. Ten men and ten women (mean age = 24.0 years) performed isometric muscle actions of the leg extensors at 10–100% of their maximal voluntary contraction on two separate occasions. One trial was performed inside a Faraday tent (a flexible Faraday cage made from conductive material), and the other was performed outside the Faraday tent. The EMG signals collected outside the Faraday tent were analyzed three separate ways: as a raw signal, as a bipolar signal, and as a signal digitally notch filtered to remove 60 Hz noise and its harmonics. The signal-to-noise ratios were greatest after notch-filtering (range: 3.0–33.8), and lowest for the bipolar arrangement (1.6–10.2). Linear slope coefficients for the EMG amplitude versus force relationship were also used to compare the methods of noise removal. The results showed that a bipolar arrangement had a significantly lower linear slope coefficient when compared to the three other conditions (raw, notch and tent). These results suggested that an appropriately filtered monopolar EMG signal can be useful in situations that require a large pick-up area. Furthermore, although it is helpful, a Faraday tent (or cage) is not required to achieve an appropriate signal-to-noise ratio, as long as the correct filters are applied. (paper)

  19. Noise estimation of beam position monitors at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, X.; Bai, M.

    2014-01-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) are used to record the average orbits and transverse turn-by-turn displacements of the beam centroid motion. The Relativistic Hadron Ion Collider (RHIC) has 160 BPMs for each plane in each of the Blue and Yellow rings: 72 dual-plane BPMs in the insertion regions (IR) and 176 single-plane modules in the arcs. Each BPM is able to acquire 1024 or 4096 consecutive turn-by-turn beam positions. Inevitably, there are broadband noisy signals in the turn-by-turn data due to BPM electronics as well as other sources. A detailed study of the BPM noise performance is critical for reliable optics measurement and beam dynamics analysis based on turn-by-turn data.

  20. Structural Parameters of Star Clusters: Signal to Noise Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narbutis D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the impact of photometric signal to noise on the accuracy of derived structural parameters of unresolved star clusters using MCMC model fitting techniques. Star cluster images were simulated as a smooth surface brightness distribution following a King profile convolved with a point spread function. The simulation grid was constructed by varying the levels of sky background and adjusting the cluster’s flux to a specified signal to noise. Poisson noise was introduced to a set of cluster images with the same input parameters at each node of the grid. Model fitting was performed using “emcee” algorithm. The presented posterior distributions of the parameters illustrate their uncertainty and degeneracies as a function of signal to noise. By defining the photometric aperture containing 80% of the cluster’s flux, we find that in all realistic sky background level conditions a signal to noise ratio of ~50 is necessary to constrain the cluster’s half-light radius to an accuracy better than ~20%. The presented technique can be applied to synthetic images simulating various observations of extragalactic star clusters.

  1. Innovative signal processing for Johnson Noise thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezell, N. Dianne Bull [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Britton, Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roberts, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report summarizes the newly developed algorithm that subtracted the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The EMI performance is very important to this measurement because any interference in the form on pickup from external signal sources from such as fluorescent lighting ballasts, motors, etc. can skew the measurement. Two methods of removing EMI were developed and tested at various locations. This report also summarizes the testing performed at different facilities outside Oak Ridge National Laboratory using both EMI removal techniques. The first EMI removal technique reviewed in previous milestone reports and therefore this report will detail the second method.

  2. Subspace Signal Processing in Structured Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    1.7 Motivation for the Model ....... ........................... 8 1.8 E x am p les...S). We do not require that H be orthogonal to S. * 1.7 Motivation for the Model The linear model is quite versatile in terms of the types of signals...cross terms zero, we choose . = (SHs)- mS~u’ (3.69) This implies that = Ps4 , (3.70) and S t s (3.71) : = Ps . RPs -. The last step is to maximize

  3. Noise in Neural Networks: Thresholds, Hysteresis, and Neuromodulation of Signal-To-Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, James D.; Pichler, Elgar E.; Ross, John

    1989-03-01

    We study a neural-network model including Gaussian noise, higher-order neuronal interactions, and neuromodulation. For a first-order network, there is a threshold in the noise level (phase transition) above which the network displays only disorganized behavior and critical slowing down near the noise threshold. The network can tolerate more noise if it has higher-order feedback interactions, which also lead to hysteresis and multistability in the network dynamics. The signal-to-noise ratio can be adjusted in a biological neural network by neuromodulators such as norepinephrine. Comparisons are made to experimental results and further investigations are suggested to test the effects of hysteresis and neuromodulation in pattern recognition and learning. We propose that norepinephrine may ``quench'' the neural patterns of activity to enhance the ability to learn details.

  4. Plant monitoring and signal validation at HFIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullens, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a monitoring system for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL'S) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). HFIR is an 85 MW pressurized water reactor designed to produce isotopes and intense neutron beams. The monitoring system is described with respect to plant signals and computer system; monitoring overview; data acquisition, logging and network distribution; signal validation; status displays; reactor condition monitoring; reactor operator aids. Future work will include the addition of more plant signals, more signal validation and diagnostic capabilities, improved status display, integration of the system with the RELAP plant simulation and graphical interface, improved operator aids, and an alarm filtering system. 8 refs., 7 figs. (MB)

  5. Algorithm Development for a Real-Time Military Noise Monitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vipperman, Jeffrey S; Bucci, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The long-range goal of this 1-year SERDP Exploratory Development (SEED) project was to create an improved real-time, high-energy military impulse noise monitoring system that can detect events with peak levels (Lpk...

  6. Frequency-domain method for separating signal and noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new method for separation of signal and noise (SSN) is put forward. Frequency is redefined according to the features of signal and its derivative in the sampl ing time interval, thus double orthogonal basis (DOB) is constructed so that a signal can be precisely signified with a linear combination of low-frequency DOB . Under joint consideration in time domain (TD) and frequency domain (FD), a method on SSN with high accuracy is derived and a matched algorithm is designed and analyzed. This method is applicable to SSN in multiple frequency bands, and convenient in applying signal characteristics in TD and FD synthetically with highe raccuracy.

  7. Frequency-domain method for separating signal and noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王正明; 段晓君

    2000-01-01

    A new method for separation of signal and noise (SSN) is put forward. Frequency is redefined according to the features of signal and its derivative in the sampling time interval, thus double orthogonal basis (DOB) is constructed so that a signal can be precisely signified with a linear combination of low-frequency DOB. Under joint consideration in time domain (TD) and frequency domain (FD), a method on SSN with high accuracy is derived and a matched algorithm is designed and analyzed. This method is applicable to SSN in multiple frequency bands, and convenient in applying signal characteristics in TD and FD synthetically with higher accuracy.

  8. First evaluation of low frequency noise measurements of in core detector signals in the measuring assembly Rheinsberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collatz, S.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor noise spectra of in core neutron detectors are measured in the low frequency range (0.03 Hz to 1 Hz) and evaluated. The increase of the effective noise signal value is due to pressure oscillations or oscillations of special steam volume portions. Thus boiling monitoring of reactor cores in PWR type reactors may be possible, if the low frequency noise of the whole set of in core detectors is taken into account

  9. Calibration of Correlation Radiometers Using Pseudo-Random Noise Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pantoja

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers’ outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called “baseline errors” associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver’s output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network.

  10. Stochastic model for detection of signals in noise

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Stanley A.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years ago Birdsall, Tanner, and colleagues made rapid progress in developing signal detection theory into a powerful psychophysical tool. One of their major insights was the utility of adding external noise to the signals of interest. These methods have been enhanced in recent years by the addition of multipass and classification-image methods for opening up the black box. There remain a number of as yet unresolved issues. In particular, Birdsall developed a theorem that large amounts o...

  11. Spectrogram Image Analysis of Error Signals for Minimizing Impulse Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeakwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the theoretical and experimental study on the spectrogram image analysis of error signals for minimizing the impulse input noises in the active suppression of noise. Impulse inputs of some specific wave patterns as primary noises to a one-dimensional duct with the length of 1800 mm are shown. The convergence speed of the adaptive feedforward algorithm based on the least mean square approach was controlled by a normalized step size which was incorporated into the algorithm. The variations of the step size govern the stability as well as the convergence speed. Because of this reason, a normalized step size is introduced as a new method for the control of impulse noise. The spectrogram images which indicate the degree of the attenuation of the impulse input noises are considered to represent the attenuation with the new method. The algorithm is extensively investigated in both simulation and real-time control experiment. It is demonstrated that the suggested algorithm worked with a nice stability and performance against impulse noises. The results in this study can be used for practical active noise control systems.

  12. Autonomous data acquisition system for Paks NPP process noise signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipcsei, S.; Kiss, S.; Czibok, T.; Dezso, Z.; Horvath, Cs.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype of a new concept noise diagnostics data acquisition system has been developed recently to renew the aged present system. This new system is capable of collecting the whole available noise signal set simultaneously. Signal plugging and data acquisition are performed by autonomous systems (installed at each reactor unit) that are controlled through the standard plant network from a central computer installed at a suitable location. Experts can use this central unit to process and archive data series downloaded from the reactor units. This central unit also provides selected noise diagnostics information for other departments. The paper describes the hardware and software architecture of the new system in detail, emphasising the potential benefits of the new approach. (author)

  13. Operating regimes of signaling cycles: statics, dynamics, and noise filtering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gomez-Uribe

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A ubiquitous building block of signaling pathways is a cycle of covalent modification (e.g., phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in MAPK cascades. Our paper explores the kind of information processing and filtering that can be accomplished by this simple biochemical circuit. Signaling cycles are particularly known for exhibiting a highly sigmoidal (ultrasensitive input-output characteristic in a certain steady-state regime. Here, we systematically study the cycle's steady-state behavior and its response to time-varying stimuli. We demonstrate that the cycle can actually operate in four different regimes, each with its specific input-output characteristics. These results are obtained using the total quasi-steady-state approximation, which is more generally valid than the typically used Michaelis-Menten approximation for enzymatic reactions. We invoke experimental data that suggest the possibility of signaling cycles operating in one of the new regimes. We then consider the cycle's dynamic behavior, which has so far been relatively neglected. We demonstrate that the intrinsic architecture of the cycles makes them act--in all four regimes--as tunable low-pass filters, filtering out high-frequency fluctuations or noise in signals and environmental cues. Moreover, the cutoff frequency can be adjusted by the cell. Numerical simulations show that our analytical results hold well even for noise of large amplitude. We suggest that noise filtering and tunability make signaling cycles versatile components of more elaborate cell-signaling pathways.

  14. Increasing the Signal to Noise Ratio in a Chemistry Laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing the Signal to Noise Ratio in a Chemistry Laboratory - Improving a Practical for Academic Development Students. ... Analysis of data collected in 2001 shows that the changes made a significant impact on the effectiveness of the laboratory session. South African Journal of Chemistry Vol.56 2003: 47-53 ...

  15. Investigations of SPND noise signals in VVER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, S.; Lipcsei, S.; Hazi, G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes and characterises SPND noise measurements of an operating VVER-440 nuclear reactor. Characteristics of the signal can be radically influenced by the geometrical properties of the detector and the cable and by the measuring arrangement. Structure of phase spectra showing propagating perturbations measured on uncompensated SPN detectors is studied through models.(author)

  16. Removal of Stationary Sinusoidal Noise from Random Vibration Signals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Brian; Cap, Jerome S.

    2018-02-01

    In random vibration environments, sinusoidal line noise may appear in the vibration signal and can affect analysis of the resulting data. We studied two methods which remove stationary sine tones from random noise: a matrix inversion algorithm and a chirp-z transform algorithm. In addition, we developed new methods to determine the frequency of the tonal noise. The results show that both of the removal methods can eliminate sine tones in prefabricated random vibration data when the sine-to-random ratio is at least 0.25. For smaller ratios down to 0.02 only the matrix inversion technique can remove the tones, but the metrics to evaluate its effectiveness also degrade. We also found that using fast Fourier transforms best identified the tonal noise, and determined that band-pass-filtering the signals prior to the process improved sine removal. When applied to actual vibration test data, the methods were not as effective at removing harmonic tones, which we believe to be a result of mixed-phase sinusoidal noise.

  17. Signal and noise modeling in confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberich, Gerlind; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf E; Aach, Til

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has revolutionized imaging of subcellular structures in biomedical research by enabling the acquisition of 3D time-series of fluorescently-tagged proteins in living cells, hence forming the basis for an automated quantification of their morphological and dynamic characteristics. Due to the inherently weak fluorescence, CLSM images exhibit a low SNR. We present a novel model for the transfer of signal and noise in CLSM that is both theoretically sound as well as corroborated by a rigorous analysis of the pixel intensity statistics via measurement of the 3D noise power spectra, signal-dependence and distribution. Our model provides a better fit to the data than previously proposed models. Further, it forms the basis for (i) the simulation of the CLSM imaging process indispensable for the quantitative evaluation of CLSM image analysis algorithms, (ii) the application of Poisson denoising algorithms and (iii) the reconstruction of the fluorescence signal.

  18. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2001-12-18

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  19. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2001-01-01

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  20. Validation of the dynamics of SDS and RRS flux, flow, pressure and temperature signals using noise analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glockler, O.; Cooke, D.F.; Tulett, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, a program was initiated to establish reactor noise analysis as a practical tool for plant performance monitoring and system diagnostics in Ontario Hydro's CANDU reactors. Since then, various CANDU-specific noise analysis applications have been developed and validated. The noise-based statistical techniques are being successfully applied as powerful troubleshooting and diagnostic tools to a wide variety of actual operational I and C problems. Critical plant components, instrumentation and processes are monitored on a regular basis, and their dynamic characteristics are verified on-power. Recent applications of noise analysis include (1) validating the dynamics of in-core flux detectors (ICFDS) and ion chambers, (2) estimating the prompt fraction ICFDs in noise measurements at full power and in power rundown tests, (3) identifying the cause of excessive signal fluctuations in certain flux detectors, (4) validating the dynamic coupling between liquid zone control signals, (5) detecting and monitoring mechanical vibrations of detector tubes, reactivity devices and fuel channels induced by moderator/coolant flow, (6) estimating the dynamics and response time of RTD temperature signals, (7) isolating the cause of RTD signal anomalies, (8) investigating the source of abnormal flow signal behaviour, (9) estimating the overall response time of flow and pressure signals, (1 0) detecting coolant boiling in fully instrumented fuel channels, (1 1) monitoring moderator circulation via temperature noise, and (12) predicting the performance of shut-off rods. Some of these applications are performed on an as needed basis. The noise analysis program, in the Pickering-B station alone, has saved Ontario Hydro millions of dollars during its first three years. The results of the noise analysis program have been also reviewed by the regulator (Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada) with favorable results. The AECB have expressed interest in Ontario Hydro further exploiting the

  1. Photonic microwave signals with zeptosecond-level absolute timing noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaopeng; Bouchand, Romain; Nicolodi, Daniele; Giunta, Michele; Hänsel, Wolfgang; Lezius, Matthias; Joshi, Abhay; Datta, Shubhashish; Alexandre, Christophe; Lours, Michel; Tremblin, Pierre-Alain; Santarelli, Giorgio; Holzwarth, Ronald; Le Coq, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Photonic synthesis of radiofrequency (RF) waveforms revived the quest for unrivalled microwave purity because of its ability to convey the benefits of optics to the microwave world. In this work, we perform a high-fidelity transfer of frequency stability between an optical reference and a microwave signal via a low-noise fibre-based frequency comb and cutting-edge photodetection techniques. We demonstrate the generation of the purest microwave signal with a fractional frequency stability below 6.5 × 10-16 at 1 s and a timing noise floor below 41 zs Hz-1/2 (phase noise below -173 dBc Hz-1 for a 12 GHz carrier). This outperforms existing sources and promises a new era for state-of-the-art microwave generation. The characterization is achieved through a heterodyne cross-correlation scheme with the lowermost detection noise. This unprecedented level of purity can impact domains such as radar systems, telecommunications and time-frequency metrology. The measurement methods developed here can benefit the characterization of a broad range of signals.

  2. Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR Enhancement Comparison of Impulse-, Coding- and Novel Linear-Frequency-Chirp-Based Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR for Passive Optical Network (PON Monitoring Based on Unique Combinations of Wavelength Selective Mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Bentz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We compare optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR techniques based on conventional single impulse, coding and linear frequency chirps concerning their signal to noise ratio (SNR enhancements by measurements in a passive optical network (PON with a maximum one-way attenuation of 36.6 dB. A total of six subscribers, each represented by a unique mirror pair with narrow reflection bandwidths, are installed within a distance of 14 m. The spatial resolution of the OTDR set-up is 3.0 m.

  3. Signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    At the Specialists' Meeting on Sodium Boiling Detection organized by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency at Chester in the United Kingdom in 1981 various methods of detecting sodium boiling were reported. But, it was not possible to make a comparative assessment of these methods because the signal condition in each experiment was different from others. That is why participants of this meeting recommended that a benchmark test should be carried out in order to evaluate and compare signal processing methods for boiling detection. Organization of the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection was also recommended at the 16th meeting of the IWGFR. The CRP on Signal Processing Techniques for Sodium Boiling Noise Detection was set up in 1984. Eight laboratories from six countries have agreed to participate in this CRP. The overall objective of the programme was the development of reliable on-line signal processing techniques which could be used for the detection of sodium boiling in an LMFBR core. During the first stage of the programme a number of existing processing techniques used by different countries have been compared and evaluated. In the course of further work, an algorithm for implementation of this sodium boiling detection system in the nuclear reactor will be developed. It was also considered that the acoustic signal processing techniques developed for boiling detection could well make a useful contribution to other acoustic applications in the reactor. This publication consists of two parts. Part I is the final report of the co-ordinated research programme on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection. Part II contains two introductory papers and 20 papers presented at four research co-ordination meetings since 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 22 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Optimal Noise Enhanced Signal Detection in a Unified Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new framework for variable detectors is formulated in order to solve different noise enhanced signal detection optimal problems, where six different disjoint sets of detector and discrete vector pairs are defined according to the two inequality-constraints on detection and false-alarm probabilities. Then theorems and algorithms constructed based on the new framework are presented to search the optimal noise enhanced solutions to maximize the relative improvements of the detection and the false-alarm probabilities, respectively. Further, the optimal noise enhanced solution of the maximum overall improvement is obtained based on the new framework and the relationship among the three maximums is presented. In addition, the sufficient conditions for improvability or non-improvability under the two certain constraints are given. Finally, numerous examples are presented to illustrate the theoretical results and the proofs of the main theorems are given in the Appendix.

  5. Current applications of vibration monitoring and neutron noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; Kryter, R.C.

    1990-02-01

    Monitoring programs using vibration monitoring or neutron noise analysis have demonstrated the ability to detect and, in some cases, diagnose the nature of reactor vessel internals structural degradation. Detection of compromised mechanical integrity of reactor vessel internal components in its early stages allows corrective action to be taken before weakening or damage occurs. In addition to the economic benefits early detection and correction can provide, they can also help maintain plant safety. Information on the condition of reactor vessel internal components gained from a monitoring program supplements in-service inspection results and may be useful in justifying plant license extension. This report, which was prepared under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, discusses the application of vibration monitoring and neutron noise analysis for monitoring light-water reactor vessel internals. The report begins by describing the effects of structural integrity loss on internals vibration and how measurable parameters can be used to detect and track the progress of degradation. This is followed by a description and comparison of vibration monitoring and neutron noise analysis, two methods for monitoring the mechanical integrity of reactor vessel internals condition monitoring programs in the United States, Federal Republic of Germany, and France, three countries having substantial commitments to nuclear power. The last section presents guidelines for US utilities wishing to establish reactor internals condition monitoring programs. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  6. A high signal-to-noise ratio composite quasar spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, P.J.; Hewett, P.C.; Foltz, C.B.; Chaffee, F.H.; Weymann, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    A very high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N of about 400) composite spectrum of the rest-frame ultraviolet and optical region of high luminosity quasars is presented. The spectrum is derived from 718 individual spectra obtained as part of the Large Bright Quasar Survey. The moderate resolution, 4A or less, and high signal-to-noise ratio allow numerous weak emission features to be identified. Of particular note is the large equivalent-width of the Fe II emission in the rest-frame ultraviolet and the blue continuum slope of the composite. The primary aim of this paper is to provide a reference spectrum for use in line identifications, and a series of large-scale representations of the composite spectrum are shown. A measure of the standard deviation of the individual quasar spectra from the composite spectrum is also presented. 12 refs

  7. Blind signal processing algorithms under DC biased Gaussian noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namyong; Byun, Hyung-Gi; Lim, Jeong-Ok

    2013-05-01

    Distortions caused by the DC-biased laser input can be modeled as DC biased Gaussian noise and removing DC bias is important in the demodulation process of the electrical signal in most optical communications. In this paper, a new performance criterion and a related algorithm for unsupervised equalization are proposed for communication systems in the environment of channel distortions and DC biased Gaussian noise. The proposed criterion utilizes the Euclidean distance between the Dirac-delta function located at zero on the error axis and a probability density function of biased constant modulus errors, where constant modulus error is defined by the difference between the system out and a constant modulus calculated from the transmitted symbol points. From the results obtained from the simulation under channel models with fading and DC bias noise abruptly added to background Gaussian noise, the proposed algorithm converges rapidly even after the interruption of DC bias proving that the proposed criterion can be effectively applied to optical communication systems corrupted by channel distortions and DC bias noise.

  8. Signal-to-noise limitations in white light holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribak, E; Roddier, C; Roddier, F; Breckinridge, J B

    1988-03-15

    A simple derivation is given for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in images reconstructed from incoherent holograms. Dependence is shown to be on the hologram SNR, object complexity, and the number of pixels in the detector. Reconstruction of involved objects becomes possible with high dynamic range detectors such as charge coupled devices. We have produced such white light holograms by means of a rotational shear interferometer combined with a chromatic corrector. A digital inverse transform recreated the object.

  9. Linear signal noise summer accurately determines and controls S/N ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundry, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Linear signal noise summer precisely controls the relative power levels of signal and noise, and mixes them linearly in accurately known ratios. The S/N ratio accuracy and stability are greatly improved by this technique and are attained simultaneously.

  10. Performance Analysis of Recurrence Matrix Statistics for the Detection of Deterministic Signals in Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michalowicz, Joseph V; Nichols, Jonathan M; Bucholtz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the limitations to detecting deterministic signals in the presence of noise, especially additive, white Gaussian noise, is of importance for the design of LPI systems and anti-LPI signal defense...

  11. Evaluation of signal processing for boiling noise detection. Further analysis of BOR-60 reactor noise data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledwidge, T.J.; Black, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the BOR 60 reactor in the USSR. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. A proposal for in-service boiling monitoring by acoustic means is described. (author). 3 refs, 16 figs

  12. Image restoration by Wiener filtering in the presence of signal-dependent noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Ichioka, Y; Suzuki, T

    1977-09-01

    An optimum filter to restore the degraded image due to blurring and the signal-dependent noise is obtained on the basis of the theory of Wiener filtering. Computer simulations of image restoration using signal-dependent noise models are carried out. It becomes clear that the optimum filter, which makes use of a priori information on the signal-dependent nature of the noise and the spectral density of the signal and the noise showing significant spatial correlation, is potentially advantageous.

  13. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  14. Robustness of digitally modulated signal features against variation in HF noise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Mobien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High frequency (HF band has both military and civilian uses. It can be used either as a primary or backup communication link. Automatic modulation classification (AMC is of an utmost importance in this band for the purpose of communications monitoring; e.g., signal intelligence and spectrum management. A widely used method for AMC is based on pattern recognition (PR. Such a method has two main steps: feature extraction and classification. The first step is generally performed in the presence of channel noise. Recent studies show that HF noise could be modeled by Gaussian or bi-kappa distributions, depending on day-time. Therefore, it is anticipated that change in noise model will have impact on features extraction stage. In this article, we investigate the robustness of well known digitally modulated signal features against variation in HF noise. Specifically, we consider temporal time domain (TTD features, higher order cumulants (HOC, and wavelet based features. In addition, we propose new features extracted from the constellation diagram and evaluate their robustness against the change in noise model. This study is targeting 2PSK, 4PSK, 8PSK, 16QAM, 32QAM, and 64QAM modulations, as they are commonly used in HF communications.

  15. An Overview of Sensor networks for Environmental Noise Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wessels, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has shown a growing number and wide variety of systems for monitoring environmental noise. This ongoing development is made possible by the availability of cheaper and smaller hardware and innovations in communication networks. The developments are fed by a growing interest in

  16. Kernel-based noise filtering of neutron detector signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Ghu; Shin, Ho Cheol; Lee, Eun Ki

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes recently developed techniques for effective filtering of neutron detector signal noise. In this paper, three kinds of noise filters are proposed and their performance is demonstrated for the estimation of reactivity. The tested filters are based on the unilateral kernel filter, unilateral kernel filter with adaptive bandwidth and bilateral filter to show their effectiveness in edge preservation. Filtering performance is compared with conventional low-pass and wavelet filters. The bilateral filter shows a remarkable improvement compared with unilateral kernel and wavelet filters. The effectiveness and simplicity of the unilateral kernel filter with adaptive bandwidth is also demonstrated by applying it to the reactivity measurement performed during reactor start-up physics tests

  17. Exponential signaling gain at the receptor level enhances signal-to-noise ratio in bacterial chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Neumann

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling systems show astonishing precision in their response to external stimuli despite strong fluctuations in the molecular components that determine pathway activity. To control the effects of noise on signaling most efficiently, living cells employ compensatory mechanisms that reach from simple negative feedback loops to robustly designed signaling architectures. Here, we report on a novel control mechanism that allows living cells to keep precision in their signaling characteristics - stationary pathway output, response amplitude, and relaxation time - in the presence of strong intracellular perturbations. The concept relies on the surprising fact that for systems showing perfect adaptation an exponential signal amplification at the receptor level suffices to eliminate slowly varying multiplicative noise. To show this mechanism at work in living systems, we quantified the response dynamics of the E. coli chemotaxis network after genetically perturbing the information flux between upstream and downstream signaling components. We give strong evidence that this signaling system results in dynamic invariance of the activated response regulator against multiplicative intracellular noise. We further demonstrate that for environmental conditions, for which precision in chemosensing is crucial, the invariant response behavior results in highest chemotactic efficiency. Our results resolve several puzzling features of the chemotaxis pathway that are widely conserved across prokaryotes but so far could not be attributed any functional role.

  18. Feasibility of Johnson Noise Thermometry based on Digital Signal Processing Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Yang Mo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an implementation strategy of noise thermometry based on a digital signal processing technique and demonstrates its feasibilities. A key factor in its development is how to extract the small thermal noise signal from other noises, for example, random noise from amplifiers and continuous electromagnetic interference from the environment. The proposed system consists of two identical amplifiers and uses a cross correlation function to cancel the random noise of the amplifiers. Then, the external interference noises are eliminated by discriminating the difference in the peaks between the thermal signal and external noise. The gain of the amplifiers is estimated by injecting an already known pilot signal. The experimental simulation results of signal processing methods have demonstrated that the proposed approach is an effective method in eliminating an external noise signal and performing gain correction for development of the thermometry

  19. Stochastic resonance in a single-mode laser driven by frequency modulated signal and coloured noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Guo-Xiang; Zhang Liang-Ying; Cao Li

    2009-01-01

    By adding frequency modulated signals to the intensity equation of gain-noise model of the single-mode laser driven by two coloured noises which are correlated, this paper uses the linear approximation method to calculate the power spectrum and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the laser intensity. The results show that the SNR appears typical stochastic resonance with the variation of intensity of the pump noise and quantum noise. As the amplitude of a modulated signal has effects on the SNR, it shows suppression, monotone increasing, stochastic resonance, and multiple stochastic resonance with the variation of the frequency of a carrier signal and modulated signal.

  20. Study of improving signal-noise ratio for fluorescence channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Li, Xin; Lou, Yue; Chen, Dong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Ran; Yan, Debao; Zhao, Qi

    2017-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence(LIFS), which is one of most effective discrimination methods to identify the material at the molecular level by inducing fluorescence spectrum, has been popularized for its fast and accurate probe's results. According to the research, violet laser or ultraviolet laser is always used as excitation light source. While, There is no atmospheric window for violet laser and ultraviolet laser, causing laser attenuation along its propagation path. What's worse, as the laser reaching sample, part of the light is reflected. That is, excitation laser really react on sample to produce fluorescence is very poor, leading to weak fluorescence mingled with the background light collected by LIFS' processing unit, when it used outdoor. In order to spread LIFS to remote probing under the complex background, study of improving signal-noise ratio for fluorescence channel is a meaningful work. Enhancing the fluorescence intensity and inhibiting background light both can improve fluorescence' signal-noise ratio. In this article, three different approaches of inhibiting background light are discussed to improve the signal-noise ratio of LIFS. The first method is increasing fluorescence excitation area in the proportion of LIFS' collecting field by expanding laser beam, if the collecting filed is fixed. The second one is changing field angle base to accommodate laser divergence angle. The third one is setting a very narrow gating circuit to control acquisition circuit, which is shortly open only when fluorescence arriving. At some level, these methods all can reduce the background light. But after discussion, the third one is best with adding gating acquisition circuit to acquisition circuit instead of changing light path, which is effective and economic.

  1. Method of inspecting the function of reactor noise monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Hirohito.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to inspect the function of a reactor noise monitoring device used for monitoring the operation abnormality in coolant circuits during reactor operation. Constitution: A cylinder incorporating a steel ball moved laterally by a pneumatic pressure is disposed to the main body of a reactor coolant circuit. A three-way solenoid valve disposed to a central control room outside to a radiation controlled area is connected with the cylinder by way of pneumatic pipeways. The three-way solenoid valve is operated for a certain period of time by a timer in the central control room to thereby impinge the steel ball in the cylinder against the main body of the coolant circuit and it is inspected as to whether the reactor noise monitoring system can detect the impinging energy or not. Accordingly, the remote control is possible from out of the radiation controlled area and the inspection work can be simplified. (Seki, T.)

  2. Lidar signal-to-noise ratio improvements: Considerations and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassebo, Yasser Y.

    The primary objective of this study is to improve lidar signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and hence extend attainable lidar ranges through reduction of the sky background noise (BGP), which dominates other sources of noise in daytime operations. This is particularly important for Raman lidar techniques where the Raman backscattered signal of interest is relatively weak compared with the elastic backscatter lidars. Two approaches for reduction of sky background noise are considered: (1) Improvements in lidar SNR by optimization of the design of the lidar receiver were examined by a series of simulations. This part of the research concentrated on biaxial lidar systems, where overlap between laser beam and receiver field of view (FOV) is an important aspect of noise considerations. The first optimized design evolved is a wedge shaped aperture. While this design has the virtue of greatly reducing background light, it is difficult to implement practically, requiring both changes in area and position with lidar range. A second more practical approach, which preserves some of the advantages of the wedge design, was also evolved. This uses a smaller area circular aperture optimally located in the image plane for desired ranges. Simulated numerical results for a biaxial lidar have shown that the best receiver parameters selection is one using a small circular aperture (field stop) with a small telescope focal length f, to ensure the minimum FOV that accepts all return signals over the entire lidar range while at the same time minimizing detected BGP and hence maximizing lidar SNR and attainable lidar ranges. The improvement in lidar SNR was up to 18%. (2) A polarization selection technique was implemented to reduce sky background signal for linearly polarized monostatic elastic backscatter lidar measurements. The technique takes advantage of naturally occurring polarization properties in scattered sky light, and then ensures that both the lidar transmitter and receiver track and

  3. Reactor internals vibration monitoring by neutron noise methods in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Por, G.; Lux, I.

    1983-01-01

    Certain elements of PWR cores such as control/fuel rods or cassettes, or other parts of reactor internals, often represent a vibration problem. Early analyses at operating PWR plant revealed that these vibrations can be detected by in-core neutron detectors, opening up the possibility of vibration monitoring and diagnostics by noise methods. Theoretical methods of calculating vibration induced neutron noise and its application to vibration diagnostics are summarized. Experiments to check theoretical conclusions are under way at the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. (author)

  4. Stochastic resonance in a stochastic bistable system with additive noises and square–wave signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Guo; Xiang-Dong, Luo; Shao-Fu, Li; Yu-Rong, Zhou

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the stochastic resonance in a stochastic bistable system driven by a periodic square-wave signal and a static force as well as by additive white noise and dichotomous noise from the viewpoint of signal-to-noise ratio. It finds that the signal-to-noise ratio appears as stochastic resonance behaviour when it is plotted as a function of the noise strength of the white noise and dichotomous noise, as a function of the system parameters, or as a function of the static force. Moreover, the influence of the strength of the stochastic potential force and the correlation rate of the dichotomous noise on the signal-to-noise ratio is investigated. (general)

  5. Signal-to-noise ratios of multiplexing spectrometers in high backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knacke, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios and the amount of multiplexing gain achieved with a Michelson spectrometer during detector and background noise are studied. Noise caused by the warm background is found in 10 and 20-micron atmospheric windows in high resolution Fourier spectroscopy. An equation is derived for the signal-to-noise ratio based on the number of channels, total time to obtain the complete spectrum, the signal power in one spectral element, and the detector noise equivalent power in the presence of negligible background. Similar expressions are derived for backgrounds yielding a noise equivalent power to a spectral element, and backgrounds having flat spectra in the frequency range under investigation.

  6. Systematic survey for monitor signals to reduce fake burst events in a gravitational-wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishidoshiro, Koji; Ando, Masaki; Tsubono, Kimio

    2006-01-01

    We present methods and results to reduce fake burst events induced by nonstationary noises. To reduce these fake events, we systematically surveyed monitor signals recorded with a main (or gravitational-wave) signal of a gravitational-wave detector so as to watch the detector. Our survey was to check whether or not there was a coincidence between the main and monitor signals when we found a burst event from the main signal. If there was a coincidence, we rejected this event as a fake event induced by nonstationary noises, regarding the main signal as being dominated by nonstationary noises. As a result, we succeeded to reject about 90% of the burst events of which the SNR values were larger than 10 as fake events, with an accidental probability of about 5% to reject burst-gravitational-wave candidates

  7. Intelligent Noise Removal from EMG Signal Using Focused Time-Lagged Recurrent Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Kale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromyography (EMG signals can be used for clinical/biomedical application and modern human computer interaction. EMG signals acquire noise while traveling through tissue, inherent noise in electronics equipment, ambient noise, and so forth. ANN approach is studied for reduction of noise in EMG signal. In this paper, it is shown that Focused Time-Lagged Recurrent Neural Network (FTLRNN can elegantly solve to reduce the noise from EMG signal. After rigorous computer simulations, authors developed an optimal FTLRNN model, which removes the noise from the EMG signal. Results show that the proposed optimal FTLRNN model has an MSE (Mean Square Error as low as 0.000067 and 0.000048, correlation coefficient as high as 0.99950 and 0.99939 for noise signal and EMG signal, respectively, when validated on the test dataset. It is also noticed that the output of the estimated FTLRNN model closely follows the real one. This network is indeed robust as EMG signal tolerates the noise variance from 0.1 to 0.4 for uniform noise and 0.30 for Gaussian noise. It is clear that the training of the network is independent of specific partitioning of dataset. It is seen that the performance of the proposed FTLRNN model clearly outperforms the best Multilayer perceptron (MLP and Radial Basis Function NN (RBF models. The simple NN model such as the FTLRNN with single-hidden layer can be employed to remove noise from EMG signal.

  8. Investigation on phase noise of the signal from a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinxia, Feng; Yuanji, Li; Kuanshou, Zhang

    2018-04-01

    The phase noise of the signal from a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) is investigated theoretically and experimentally. An SRO based on periodically poled lithium niobate is built up that generates the signal with a maximum power of 5.2 W at 1.5 µm. The intensity noise of the signal reaches the shot noise level for frequencies above 5 MHz. The phase noise of the signal oscillates depending on the analysis frequency, and there are phase noise peaks above the shot noise level at the peak frequencies. To explain the phase noise feature of the signal, a semi-classical theoretical model of SROs including the guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering effect within the nonlinear crystal is developed. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Noise and signal interference in optical fiber transmission systems an optimum design approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bottacchi, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive reference to noise and signal interference in optical fiber communications Noise and Signal Interference in Optical Fiber Transmission Systems is a compendium on specific topics within optical fiber transmission and the optimization process of the system design. It offers comprehensive treatment of noise and intersymbol interference (ISI) components affecting optical fiber communications systems, containing coverage on noise from the light source, the fiber and the receiver. The ISI is modeled with a statistical approach, leading to new useful computational m

  10. Measurement of two-phase flow variables in a BWR by analysis of in-core neutron detector noise signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekelenburg, A.J.C.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the state of the art of the measurement of two-phase flow variables in a boiling water reactor (BWR) by analysis of in-core neutron detector noise signals is given. It is concluded that the neutronic processes involved in neutron noise are quite well understood, but that little is known about the density fluctuations in two-phase flow which are the main cause of the neutron noise. For this reason, the neutron noise measurements, like the well known two-detector velocity measurements, are still difficult to interpret. By analyzing neutron noise measurements in a natural circulation cooled BWR, it is illustrated that, once a theory on the density fluctuations is developed, two-phase flow can be monitored with a single in-core detector. (author). 70 refs, 4 figs

  11. Noise Reduction Effect of Multiple-Sampling-Based Signal-Readout Circuits for Ultra-Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Kawahito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the noise reduction effect of multiple-sampling-based signal readout circuits for implementing ultra-low-noise image sensors. The correlated multiple sampling (CMS technique has recently become an important technology for high-gain column readout circuits in low-noise CMOS image sensors (CISs. This paper reveals how the column CMS circuits, together with a pixel having a high-conversion-gain charge detector and low-noise transistor, realizes deep sub-electron read noise levels based on the analysis of noise components in the signal readout chain from a pixel to the column analog-to-digital converter (ADC. The noise measurement results of experimental CISs are compared with the noise analysis and the effect of noise reduction to the sampling number is discussed at the deep sub-electron level. Images taken with three CMS gains of two, 16, and 128 show distinct advantage of image contrast for the gain of 128 (noise(median: 0.29 e−rms when compared with the CMS gain of two (2.4 e−rms, or 16 (1.1 e−rms.

  12. Novel Signal Noise Reduction Method through Cluster Analysis, Applied to Photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, William; Allen, John; Wightman, James; Sims, Andrew J; Beale, Thomas A W

    2018-01-01

    Physiological signals can often become contaminated by noise from a variety of origins. In this paper, an algorithm is described for the reduction of sporadic noise from a continuous periodic signal. The design can be used where a sample of a periodic signal is required, for example, when an average pulse is needed for pulse wave analysis and characterization. The algorithm is based on cluster analysis for selecting similar repetitions or pulses from a periodic single. This method selects individual pulses without noise, returns a clean pulse signal, and terminates when a sufficiently clean and representative signal is received. The algorithm is designed to be sufficiently compact to be implemented on a microcontroller embedded within a medical device. It has been validated through the removal of noise from an exemplar photoplethysmography (PPG) signal, showing increasing benefit as the noise contamination of the signal increases. The algorithm design is generalised to be applicable for a wide range of physiological (physical) signals.

  13. Identification of mechanical vibrations in a PWR reactor using neutron noise signal analysis of the standard instrumentation; Identifikacija mehanichkih varijacija analizom signala shuma standardne neutronske instrumentacije PWR reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostic, Lj [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Runkel, J [Institut fuer Kerntechnik und Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Hannover (Germany)

    1988-07-01

    The neutron noise signals in a PWR power plant were analysed in terms of auto- and cross-power spectral densities, phases and coherences. Core barrel motion, fuel element vibrations and reactivity noise effect due to pressure variations have been monitored and analysed. (author)

  14. Phase noise mitigation of QPSK signal utilizing phase-locked multiplexing of signal harmonics and amplitude saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Ziyadi, Morteza; Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Almaiman, Ahmed; Cao, Yinwen; Shamee, Bishara; Yang, Jeng-Yuan; Akasaka, Youichi; Sekiya, Motoyoshi; Takasaka, Shigehiro; Sugizaki, Ryuichi; Touch, Joseph D; Tur, Moshe; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Willner, Alan E

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate an all-optical phase noise mitigation scheme based on the generation, delay, and coherent summation of higher order signal harmonics. The signal, its third-order harmonic, and their corresponding delayed variant conjugates create a staircase phase-transfer function that quantizes the phase of quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) signal to mitigate phase noise. The signal and the harmonics are automatically phase-locked multiplexed, avoiding the need for phase-based feedback loop and injection locking to maintain coherency. The residual phase noise converts to amplitude noise in the quantizer stage, which is suppressed by parametric amplification in the saturation regime. Phase noise reduction of ∼40% and OSNR-gain of ∼3  dB at BER 10(-3) are experimentally demonstrated for 20- and 30-Gbaud QPSK input signals.

  15. Stochastic resonance for signal-modulated pump noise in a single-mode laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangying Zhang; Li Cao; Fahui Zhu

    2006-01-01

    By adopting the gain-noise model of the single-mode laser in which with bias and periodical signals serve as inputs, combining with the effect of coloured pump noise, we use the linear approximation method to calculate the power spectrum and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the laser intensity under the condition of pump noise and quantum noise cross-related in the form of δ function. It is found that with the change of pump noise correlation time, both SNR and the output power will occur stochastic resonance (SR). If the bias signal α is very small, changing the intensities of pump noise and quantum noise respectively does not lead to the appearance of SR in the SNR; while α increases to a certain number, SR appears.

  16. Characterizing noise in the global nuclear weapon monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-03-01

    Under the auspices of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, a worldwide monitoring system designed to detect the illegal testing of nuclear weaponry has been under construction since 1999. The International Monitoring System is composed of a range of sensors, including detectors for hydroacoustic and seismic signals, and when completed, will include 60 infrasound measurement arrays set to detect low-frequency sound waves produced by an atmospheric nuclear detonation.

  17. Valid measures of periodic leg movements (PLMs) during a suggested immobilization test using the PAM-RL leg activity monitors require adjusting detection parameters for noise and signal in each recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Myung Sung; Montplaisir, Jacques; Desautels, Alex; Winkelman, John W; Cramer Bornemann, Michel A; Earley, Christopher J; Allen, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with restless legs syndrome (RLS) (Willis-Ekbom disease [WED]) usually have periodic leg movements (PLMs). The suggested immobilization test (SIT) measures sensory and motor features of WED during wakefulness. Surface electromyogram (EMG) recordings of the anterior tibialis (AT) are used as the standard for counting PLMs. However, due to several limitations, leg activity meters such as the PAM-RL were advanced as a potential substitute. In our study, we assessed the validity of the measurements of PLM during wakefulness (PLMW) in the SIT for PAM-RL using both default and custom detection threshold parameters compared to AT EMG. Data were obtained from 39 participants who were diagnosed with primary WED and who were on stable medication as part of another study using the SIT to repeatedly evaluate WED symptoms over 6-12 months. EMG recordings and PAM-RL, when available, were used to detect PLMW for each SIT. Complete PAM-RL and polysomnography (PSG) EMG data were available for 253 SITs from that study. The default PAM-RL (dPAM-RL) detected leg movements based on manufacturer's noise (resting) and signal (movement) amplitude criteria developed to accurately detect PLM during sleep (PLMS). The custom PAM-RL (cPAM-RL) similarly detected leg movements except the noise and movement detection parameters were adjusted to match the PAM-RL data for each SIT. The distributions of the differences between either dPAM-RL or cPAM-RL and EMG PLMW were strongly leptokurtic (Kurtosis >2) with many small differences and a few unusually large differences. These distributions are better described by median and quartile ranges than mean and standard deviation. Despite an adequate correlation (r=0.66) between the dPAM-RL and EMG recordings, the dPAM-RL on average significantly underscored the number of PLMW (median: quartiles=-13: -51.2, 0.0) and on Bland-Altman plots had a significant magnitude bias with greater underscoring for larger average PLMW/h. There also was an

  18. Helmet-based physiological signal monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn Sung; Baek, Hyun Jae; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Haet Bit; Choi, Jong Min; Park, Kwang Suk

    2009-02-01

    A helmet-based system that was able to monitor the drowsiness of a soldier was developed. The helmet system monitored the electrocardiogram, electrooculogram and electroencephalogram (alpha waves) without constraints. Six dry electrodes were mounted at five locations on the helmet: both temporal sides, forehead region and upper and lower jaw strips. The electrodes were connected to an amplifier that transferred signals to a laptop computer via Bluetooth wireless communication. The system was validated by comparing the signal quality with conventional recording methods. Data were acquired from three healthy male volunteers for 12 min twice a day whilst they were sitting in a chair wearing the sensor-installed helmet. Experimental results showed that physiological signals for the helmet user were measured with acceptable quality without any intrusions on physical activities. The helmet system discriminated between the alert and drowsiness states by detecting blinking and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters extracted from ECG. Blinking duration and eye reopening time were increased during the sleepiness state compared to the alert state. Also, positive peak values of the sleepiness state were much higher, and the negative peaks were much lower than that of the alert state. The LF/HF ratio also decreased during drowsiness. This study shows the feasibility for using this helmet system: the subjects' health status and mental states could be monitored without constraints whilst they were working.

  19. Ultrasonic correlator versus signal averager as a signal to noise enhancement instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishoni, Doron; Pietsch, Benjamin E.

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of thick and attenuating materials is hampered by the reduced amplitudes of the propagated waves to a degree that the noise is too high to enable meaningful interpretation of the data. In order to overcome the low Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio, a correlation technique has been developed. In this method, a continuous pseudo-random pattern generated digitally is transmitted and detected by piezoelectric transducers. A correlation is performed in the instrument between the received signal and a variable delayed image of the transmitted one. The result is shown to be proportional to the impulse response of the investigated material, analogous to a signal received from a pulsed system, with an improved S/N ratio. The degree of S/N enhancement depends on the sweep rate. This paper describes the correlator, and compares it to the method of enhancing S/N ratio by averaging the signals. The similarities and differences between the two are highlighted and the potential advantage of the correlator system is explained.

  20. Photoacoustic signal and noise analysis for Si thin plate: signal correction in frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markushev, D D; Rabasović, M D; Todorović, D M; Galović, S; Bialkowski, S E

    2015-03-01

    Methods for photoacoustic signal measurement, rectification, and analysis for 85 μm thin Si samples in the 20-20 000 Hz modulation frequency range are presented. Methods for frequency-dependent amplitude and phase signal rectification in the presence of coherent and incoherent noise as well as distortion due to microphone characteristics are presented. Signal correction is accomplished using inverse system response functions deduced by comparing real to ideal signals for a sample with well-known bulk parameters and dimensions. The system response is a piece-wise construction, each component being due to a particular effect of the measurement system. Heat transfer and elastic effects are modeled using standard Rosencweig-Gersho and elastic-bending theories. Thermal diffusion, thermoelastic, and plasmaelastic signal components are calculated and compared to measurements. The differences between theory and experiment are used to detect and correct signal distortion and to determine detector and sound-card characteristics. Corrected signal analysis is found to faithfully reflect known sample parameters.

  1. Balanced detection for self-mixing interferometry to improve signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changming; Norgia, Michele; Li, Kun

    2018-01-01

    We apply balanced detection to self-mixing interferometry for displacement and vibration measurement, using two photodiodes for implementing a differential acquisition. The method is based on the phase opposition of the self-mixing signal measured between the two laser diode facet outputs. The balanced signal obtained by enlarging the self-mixing signal, also by canceling of the common-due noises mainly due to disturbances on laser supply and transimpedance amplifier. Experimental results demonstrate the signal-to-noise ratio significantly improves, with almost twice signals enhancement and more than half noise decreasing. This method allows for more robust, longer-distance measurement systems, especially using fringe-counting.

  2. Brain-computer interfaces increase whole-brain signal to noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, T Dorina; Lisinski, Jonathan M; McHenry, Monica A; White, Jason P; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-08-13

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can convert mental states into signals to drive real-world devices, but it is not known if a given covert task is the same when performed with and without BCI-based control. Using a BCI likely involves additional cognitive processes, such as multitasking, attention, and conflict monitoring. In addition, it is challenging to measure the quality of covert task performance. We used whole-brain classifier-based real-time functional MRI to address these issues, because the method provides both classifier-based maps to examine the neural requirements of BCI and classification accuracy to quantify the quality of task performance. Subjects performed a covert counting task at fast and slow rates to control a visual interface. Compared with the same task when viewing but not controlling the interface, we observed that being in control of a BCI improved task classification of fast and slow counting states. Additional BCI control increased subjects' whole-brain signal-to-noise ratio compared with the absence of control. The neural pattern for control consisted of a positive network comprised of dorsal parietal and frontal regions and the anterior insula of the right hemisphere as well as an expansive negative network of regions. These findings suggest that real-time functional MRI can serve as a platform for exploring information processing and frontoparietal and insula network-based regulation of whole-brain task signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. Suitable or optimal noise benefits in signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shujun; Yang, Ting; Tang, Mingchun; Wang, Pin; Zhang, Xinzheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Six intervals of additive noises divided according to the two constraints. • Derivation of the suitable additive noise to meet the two constraints. • Formulation of the suitable noise for improvability or nonimprovability. • Optimal noises to minimize P FA , maximize P D and maximize the overall improvement. - Abstract: We present an effective way to generate the suitable or the optimal additive noises which can achieve the three goals of the noise enhanced detectability, i.e., the maximum detection probability (P D ), the minimum false alarm probability (P FA ) and the maximum overall improvement of P D and P FA , without increasing P FA and decreasing P D in a binary hypothesis testing problem. The mechanism of our method is that we divide the discrete vectors into six intervals and choose the useful or partial useful vectors from these intervals to form the additive noise according to different requirements. The form of the optimal noise is derived and proven as a randomization of no more than two discrete vectors in our way. Moreover, how to choose suitable and optimal noises from the six intervals are given. Finally, numerous examples are presented to illustrate the theoretical analysis, where the background noises are Gaussian, symmetric and asymmetric Gaussian mixture noise, respectively.

  4. Error monitoring issues for common channel signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Victor T.; Kant, Krishna; Ramaswami, V.; Wang, Jonathan L.

    1994-04-01

    Motivated by field data which showed a large number of link changeovers and incidences of link oscillations between in-service and out-of-service states in common channel signaling (CCS) networks, a number of analyses of the link error monitoring procedures in the SS7 protocol were performed by the authors. This paper summarizes the results obtained thus far and include the following: (1) results of an exact analysis of the performance of the error monitoring procedures under both random and bursty errors; (2) a demonstration that there exists a range of error rates within which the error monitoring procedures of SS7 may induce frequent changeovers and changebacks; (3) an analysis of the performance ofthe SS7 level-2 transmission protocol to determine the tolerable error rates within which the delay requirements can be met; (4) a demonstration that the tolerable error rate depends strongly on various link and traffic characteristics, thereby implying that a single set of error monitor parameters will not work well in all situations; (5) some recommendations on a customizable/adaptable scheme of error monitoring with a discussion on their implementability. These issues may be particularly relevant in the presence of anticipated increases in SS7 traffic due to widespread deployment of Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) and Personal Communications Service (PCS) as well as for developing procedures for high-speed SS7 links currently under consideration by standards bodies.

  5. Detecting impact signal in mechanical fault diagnosis under chaotic and Gaussian background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinfeng; Duan, Jie; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Huiyong; Xie, Julan; Chen, Hanwen

    2018-01-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. Traditional methods, such like stochastic resonance (SR), which using noise to enhance weak signals instead of suppressing noise, failed in chaotic background. Neural network, which use reference sequence to estimate and reconstruct the background noise, failed in white Gaussian noise. To solve these problems, a novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting impact signal buried under heavy chaotic and Gaussian background noise is proposed. First, the proposed method obtains the virtual reference sequence by constructing the Hankel data matrix. Then an M-order optimal FIR filter is designed, which can minimize the output power of background noise and pass the weak periodic signal undistorted. Finally, detection and reconstruction of the weak periodic signal are achieved from the output SBNR (signal to background noise ratio). The simulation shows, compared with the stochastic resonance (SR) method, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in chaotic noise background while stochastic resonance (SR) method cannot. Compared with the neural network method, (a) the proposed method does not need a reference sequence while neural network method needs one; (b) the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in white Gaussian noise background while the neural network method fails, in chaotic noise background, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal under a lower SBNR (about 8-17 dB lower) than the neural network method; (c) the proposed method can reconstruct the weak periodic signal precisely.

  6. Downhole microseismic signal-to-noise ratio enhancement via strip matching shearlet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Ji, Shuo; Li, Yue; Qian, Zhihong; Lu, Weili

    2018-04-01

    Shearlet transform has been proved effective in noise attenuation. However, because of the low magnitude and high frequency of downhole microseismic signals, the coefficient values of valid signals and noise are similar in the shearlet domain. As a result, it is hard to suppress the noise. In this paper, we present a novel signal-to-noise ratio enhancement scheme called strip matching shearlet transform. The method takes into account the directivity of microseismic events and shearlets. Through strip matching, the matching degree in direction between them has been promoted. Then the coefficient values of valid signals are much larger than those of the noise. Consequently, we can separate them well with the help of thresholding. The experimental results on both synthetic records and field data illustrate that our proposed method preserves the useful components and attenuates the noise well.

  7. Study on the ratio of signal to noise for single photon resolution time spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhaomin; Huang Shengli; Xu Zizong; Wu Chong

    2001-01-01

    The ratio of signal to noise for single photon resolution time spectrometer and their influence factors were studied. A method to depress the background, to shorten the measurement time and to increase the ratio of signal to noise was discussed. Results show that ratio of signal to noise is proportional to solid angle of detector to source and detection efficiency, and inverse proportional to electronics noise. Choose the activity of the source was important for decreasing of random coincidence counting. To use a coincidence gate and a discriminator of single photon were an effective way of increasing measurement accuracy and detection efficiency

  8. CORTICAL ENCODING OF SIGNALS IN NOISE: EFFECTS OF STIMULUS TYPE AND RECORDING PARADIGM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Curtis J.; Bennett, Keri O.; Molis, Michelle R.; Leek, Marjorie R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Perception-in-noise deficits have been demonstrated across many populations and listening conditions. Many factors contribute to successful perception of auditory stimuli in noise, including neural encoding in the central auditory system. Physiological measures such as cortical auditory evoked potentials can provide a view of neural encoding at the level of the cortex that may inform our understanding of listeners’ abilities to perceive signals in the presence of background noise. In order to understand signal-in-noise neural encoding better, we set out to determine the effect of signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm on the P1-N1-P2 complex. Design Tones and speech stimuli were presented to nine individuals in quiet, and in three background noise types: continuous speech spectrum noise, interrupted speech spectrum noise, and four-talker babble at a signal-to-noise ratio of −3 dB. In separate sessions, cortical auditory evoked potentials were evoked by a passive homogenous paradigm (single repeating stimulus) and an active oddball paradigm. Results The results for the N1 component indicated significant effects of signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm. While components P1 and P2 also had significant main effects of these variables, only P2 demonstrated significant interactions among these variables. Conclusions Signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm all must be carefully considered when interpreting signal-in-noise evoked potentials. Furthermore, these data confirm the possible usefulness of CAEPs as an aid to understanding perception-in-noise deficits. PMID:20890206

  9. Measurement of signal-to-noise ratio performance of TV fluoroscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geluk, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed for direct measurement of Signal-to-Noise ratio performance on X-ray TV systems. To this end the TV signal resulting from a calibrated test object, is compared with the noise level in the image. The method is objective and produces instantaneous readout, which makes it very suitable for system evaluation under dynamic conditions. (author)

  10. Imaging resolution signal-to-noise ratio in transverse phase amplification from classical information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, Doug; Huang Zun; Pao, H.-Y.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2009-01-01

    A quantum phase amplifier operated in the spatial domain can improve the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging beyond the classical limit. The scaling of the signal-to-noise ratio with the gain of the quantum phase amplifier is derived from classical information theory

  11. Study of signal-to-noise ratio in digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    Mammography techniques have recently advanced from those using analog systems (the screen-film system) to those using digital systems; for example, computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs) are nowadays used in mammography. Further, phase contrast mammography (PCM)-a digital technique by which images with a magnification of 1.75× can be obtained-is now available in the market. We studied the effect of the air gap in PCM and evaluated the effectiveness of an antiscatter x-ray grid in conventional mammography (CM) by measuring the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and relative signal-to-noise ratio (rSNR) and comparing them between PCM and the digital CM. The results indicated that the SFRs for the CM images obtained with a grid were the lowest and that these ratios were almost the same as those for the PCM images. In contrast, the rSNRs for the PCM images were the highest, which means that the scattering of x-rays was sufficiently reduced by the air gap without the loss of primary x-rays.

  12. Interferometric Imaging of Geostationary Satellites: Signal-to-Noise Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, A.; Schmitt, H.; Mozurkewich, D.; Armstrong, J.; Restaino, S.; Hindsley, R.

    2011-09-01

    Geostationary satellites are generally too small to image at high resolution with conventional single-dish telescopes. Obtaining many resolution elements across a typical geostationary satellite body requires a single-dish telescope with a diameter of 10’s of m or more, with a good adaptive optics system. An alternative is to use an optical/infrared interferometer consisting of multiple smaller telescopes in an array configuration. In this paper and companion papers1, 2 we discuss the performance of a common-mount 30-element interferometer. The instrument design is presented by Mozurkewich et al.,1 and imaging performance is presented by Schmitt et al.2 In this paper we discuss signal-to-noise ratio for both fringe-tracking and imaging. We conclude that the common-mount interferometer is sufficiently sensitive to track fringes on the majority of geostationary satellites. We also find that high-fidelity images can be obtained after a short integration time of a few minutes to a few tens of minutes.

  13. Robust GPS autonomous signal quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndili, Awele Nnaemeka

    The Global Positioning System (GPS), introduced by the U.S. Department of Defense in 1973, provides unprecedented world-wide navigation capabilities through a constellation of 24 satellites in global orbit, each emitting a low-power radio-frequency signal for ranging. GPS receivers track these transmitted signals, computing position to within 30 meters from range measurements made to four satellites. GPS has a wide range of applications, including aircraft, marine and land vehicle navigation. Each application places demands on GPS for various levels of accuracy, integrity, system availability and continuity of service. Radio frequency interference (RFI), which results from natural sources such as TV/FM harmonics, radar or Mobile Satellite Systems (MSS), presents a challenge in the use of GPS, by posing a threat to the accuracy, integrity and availability of the GPS navigation solution. In order to use GPS for integrity-sensitive applications, it is therefore necessary to monitor the quality of the received signal, with the objective of promptly detecting the presence of RFI, and thus provide a timely warning of degradation of system accuracy. This presents a challenge, since the myriad kinds of RFI affect the GPS receiver in different ways. What is required then, is a robust method of detecting GPS accuracy degradation, which is effective regardless of the origin of the threat. This dissertation presents a new method of robust signal quality monitoring for GPS. Algorithms for receiver autonomous interference detection and integrity monitoring are demonstrated. Candidate test statistics are derived from fundamental receiver measurements of in-phase and quadrature correlation outputs, and the gain of the Active Gain Controller (AGC). Performance of selected test statistics are evaluated in the presence of RFI: broadband interference, pulsed and non-pulsed interference, coherent CW at different frequencies; and non-RFI: GPS signal fading due to physical blockage and

  14. Variability of road traffic noise recorded by stationary monitoring stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąkowski, Andrzej; Radziszewski, Leszek

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents the analysis results of equivalent sound level recorded by two road traffic noise monitoring stations. The stations were located in Kielce (an example of a medium-size town in Poland) at the roads out of the town in the direction of Kraków and Warszawa. The measurements were carried out through stationary stations monitoring the noise and traffic of motor vehicles. The RMS values based on A-weighted sound level were recorded every 1 s in the buffer and the results were registered every 1 min over the period of investigations. The registered data were the basis for calculating the equivalent sound level for three time intervals: from 6:00 to 18:00, from 18:00 to 22:00 and from 22:00 to 6:00. Analysis included the values of the equivalent sound level recorded for different days of the week split into 24h periods, nights, days and evenings. The data analysed included recordings from 2013. The coefficient of variation and positional variation were proposed for performing comparative analysis of the obtained data scattering. The investigations indicated that the recorded data varied depending on the traffic routes. The differences concerned the values of coefficients of variation of the equivalent sound levels.

  15. PMT Dark Noise Monitoring System for Neutrino Detector Borexino Based on the Devicenet Protocol and WEB-Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepurnov, A.S.; Orekhov, D.I.; Maimistov, D.A.; Sabelnikov, A.A.; Etenko, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of PMT dark noise in a neutrino detector BOREXINO is a procedure that indicates condition of the detector. Based on CAN industrial network, top level DeviceNet protocol and WEB visualization, the dark noise monitoring system having 256 channels for the internal detector and for the external muon veto was created. The system is composed as a set of controllers, converting the PMT signals to frequency and transmitting them over Can network. The software is the stack of the DeviceNet protocols, providing the data collecting and transporting. Server-side scripts build web pages of user interface and graphical visualization of data

  16. A blood pressure monitor with robust noise reduction system under linear cuff inflation and deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takeda, Sunao; Kotake, Yoshifumi

    2010-01-01

    We have developed the non-invasive blood pressure monitor which can measure the blood pressure quickly and robustly. This monitor combines two measurement mode: the linear inflation and the linear deflation. On the inflation mode, we realized a faster measurement with rapid inflation rate. On the deflation mode, we realized a robust noise reduction. When there is neither noise nor arrhythmia, the inflation mode incorporated on this monitor provides precise, quick and comfortable measurement. Once the inflation mode fails to calculate appropriate blood pressure due to body movement or arrhythmia, then the monitor switches automatically to the deflation mode and measure blood pressure by using digital signal processing as wavelet analysis, filter bank, filter combined with FFT and Inverse FFT. The inflation mode succeeded 2440 measurements out of 3099 measurements (79%) in an operating room and a rehabilitation room. The new designed blood pressure monitor provides the fastest measurement for patient with normal circulation and robust measurement for patients with body movement or severe arrhythmia. Also this fast measurement method provides comfortableness for patients.

  17. Variability of signal-to-noise ratio and the network analysis of gravitational wave burst signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, S D; Rakhmanov, M; Klimenko, S; Mitselmakher, G

    2006-01-01

    The detection and estimation of gravitational wave burst signals, with a priori unknown polarization waveforms, requires the use of data from a network of detectors. Maximizing the network likelihood functional over all waveforms and sky positions yields point estimates for them as well as a detection statistic. However, the transformation from the data to estimates can become ill-conditioned over parts of the sky, resulting in significant errors in estimation. We modify the likelihood procedure by introducing a penalty functional which suppresses candidate solutions that display large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variability as the source is displaced on the sky. Simulations show that the resulting network analysis method performs significantly better in estimating the sky position of a source. Further, this method can be applied to any network, irrespective of the number or mutual alignment of detectors

  18. Application of noise analysis technique for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on the noise analysis of neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals, is developed for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A detailed multinodal model is developed and evaluated for the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor. This model is used to study the effect of changing the sign of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity on the low-frequency phase angle relationship between the neutron detector and the core-exit temperature noise signals. Results show that the phase angle near zero frequency approaches - 180 deg for negative coefficients and 0 deg for positive coefficients when the perturbation source for the noise signals is core coolant flow, inlet coolant temperature, or random heat transfer

  19. Electrochemical noise based corrosion monitoring: FY 2001 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGAR, C.

    2001-01-01

    Underground storage tanks made of mild steel are used to contain radioactive waste generated by plutonium production at the Hanford Site. Corrosion of the walls of these tanks is a major issue. Corrosion monitoring and control are currently provided at the Hanford Site through a waste chemistry sampling and analysis program. In this process, tank waste is sampled, analyzed and compared to a selection of laboratory exposures of coupons in simulated waste. Tank wall corrosion is inferred by matching measured tank chemistries to the results of the laboratory simulant testing. This method is expensive, time consuming, and does not yield real-time data. Corrosion can be monitored through coupon exposure studies and a variety of electrochemical techniques. A small number of these techniques have been tried at Hanford and elsewhere within the DOE complex to determine the corrosivity of nuclear waste stored in underground tanks [1]. Coupon exposure programs, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and electrical resistance techniques have all been tried with limited degrees of success. These techniques are most effective for monitoring uniform corrosion, but are not well suited for early detection of localized forms of corrosion such as pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Pitting and SCC have been identified as the most likely modes of corrosion failure for Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST'S) [2-3]. Over the last 20 years, a new corrosion monitoring system has shown promise in detecting localized corrosion and measuring uniform corrosion rates in process industries [4-20]. The system measures electrochemical noise (EN) generated by corrosion. The term EN is used to describe low frequency fluctuations in current and voltage associated with corrosion. In their most basic form, EN-based corrosion monitoring systems monitor and record fluctuations in current and voltage over time from electrodes immersed in an environment of interest. Laboratory studies and field

  20. Time-frequency peak filtering for random noise attenuation of magnetic resonance sounding signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Yang; Yi, Xiaofeng; Fan, Tiehu; Wan, Ling

    2018-05-01

    When measuring in a geomagnetic field, the method of magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) is often limited because of the notably low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Most current studies focus on discarding spiky noise and power-line harmonic noise cancellation. However, the effects of random noise should not be underestimated. The common method for random noise attenuation is stacking, but collecting multiple recordings merely to suppress random noise is time-consuming. Moreover, stacking is insufficient to suppress high-level random noise. Here, we propose the use of time-frequency peak filtering for random noise attenuation, which is performed after the traditional de-spiking and power-line harmonic removal method. By encoding the noisy signal with frequency modulation and estimating the instantaneous frequency using the peak of the time-frequency representation of the encoded signal, the desired MRS signal can be acquired from only one stack. The performance of the proposed method is tested on synthetic envelope signals and field data from different surveys. Good estimations of the signal parameters are obtained at different SNRs. Moreover, an attempt to use the proposed method to handle a single recording provides better results compared to 16 stacks. Our results suggest that the number of stacks can be appropriately reduced to shorten the measurement time and improve the measurement efficiency.

  1. Parallel feedback active noise control of MRI acoustic noise with signal decomposition using hybrid RLS-NLMS adaptive algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Anshuman; Krishna Vemuri, Sri Hari; Panahi, Issa

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a cost-effective adaptive feedback Active Noise Control (FANC) method for controlling functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) acoustic noise by decomposing it into dominant periodic components and residual random components. Periodicity of fMRI acoustic noise is exploited by using linear prediction (LP) filtering to achieve signal decomposition. A hybrid combination of adaptive filters-Recursive Least Squares (RLS) and Normalized Least Mean Squares (NLMS) are then used to effectively control each component separately. Performance of the proposed FANC system is analyzed and Noise attenuation levels (NAL) up to 32.27 dB obtained by simulation are presented which confirm the effectiveness of the proposed FANC method.

  2. Monitoring of drilling process with the application of acoustic signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labaš Milan

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of rock disintegration process at drilling, scanning of input quantities: thrust F, revolution n and the course of some output quantities: the drilling rate v and the power input P are needed for the control of this process. We can calculate the specific volume work of rock disintegration w and ϕ - quotient of drilling rate v and the specific volume work of disintegration w from the presented quantities.Works on an expertimental stand showed that the correlation relationships between the input and output quantities can be found by scanning the accompanying sound of the drilling proces.Research of the rock disintegration with small-diameter diamond drill tools and different rock types is done at the Institute of Geotechnics. The aim of this research is the possibility of monitoring and controlling the rock disintegration process with the application of acoustic signal. The acoustic vibrations accompanying the drilling process are recorded by a microphone placed in a defined position in the acoustic space. The drilling device (drilling stand, the drilling tool and the rock are the source of sound. Two basic sound states exist in the drilling stand research : the noise at no-load running and the noise at the rotary drilling of rock. Suitable quantities for optimizing the rock disintegration process are searched by the study of the acoustic signal. The dominant frequencies that characterize the disintegration process for the given rock and tool are searched by the analysis of the acoustic signal. The analysis of dominant frequencies indicates the possibility of determining an optimal regime for the maximal drilling rate. Extreme of the specific disintegration energy is determinated by the dispersion of the dominant frequency.The scanned acoustic signal is processed by the Fourier transformation. The Fourier transformation facilitates the distribution of the general non-harmonic periodic process into harmonic components. The harmonic

  3. Cascaded analysis of signal and noise propagation through a heterogeneous breast model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The detectability of lesions in radiographic images can be impaired by patterns caused by the surrounding anatomic structures. The presence of such patterns is often referred to as anatomic noise. Others have previously extended signal and noise propagation theory to include variable background structure as an additional noise term and used in simulations for analysis by human and ideal observers. Here, the analytic forms of the signal and noise transfer are derived to obtain an exact expression for any input random distribution and the ''power law'' filter used to generate the texture of the tissue distribution. Methods: A cascaded analysis of propagation through a heterogeneous model is derived for x-ray projection through simulated heterogeneous backgrounds. This is achieved by considering transmission through the breast as a correlated amplification point process. The analytic forms of the cascaded analysis were compared to monoenergetic Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray propagation through power law structured backgrounds. Results: As expected, it was found that although the quantum noise power component scales linearly with the x-ray signal, the anatomic noise will scale with the square of the x-ray signal. There was a good agreement between results obtained using analytic expressions for the noise power and those from Monte Carlo simulations for different background textures, random input functions, and x-ray fluence. Conclusions: Analytic equations for the signal and noise properties of heterogeneous backgrounds were derived. These may be used in direct analysis or as a tool to validate simulations in evaluating detectability.

  4. MMSE-based algorithm for joint signal detection, channel and noise variance estimation for OFDM systems

    CERN Document Server

    Savaux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an algorithm for the detection of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in a cognitive radio context by means of a joint and iterative channel and noise estimation technique. Based on the minimum mean square criterion, it performs an accurate detection of a user in a frequency band, by achieving a quasi-optimal channel and noise variance estimation if the signal is present, and by estimating the noise level in the band if the signal is absent. Organized into three chapters, the first chapter provides the background against which the system model is pr

  5. Agatha: Disentangling period signals from correlated noise in a periodogram framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, F.; Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.

    2018-04-01

    Agatha is a framework of periodograms to disentangle periodic signals from correlated noise and to solve the two-dimensional model selection problem: signal dimension and noise model dimension. These periodograms are calculated by applying likelihood maximization and marginalization and combined in a self-consistent way. Agatha can be used to select the optimal noise model and to test the consistency of signals in time and can be applied to time series analyses in other astronomical and scientific disciplines. An interactive web implementation of the software is also available at http://agatha.herts.ac.uk/.

  6. Low noise signal-to-noise ratio enhancing readout circuit for current-mediated active pixel sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, Tony; Karim, Karim S.; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John A.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic digital fluoroscopic applications continuously expose patients to low doses of x-ray radiation, posing a challenge to both the digital imaging pixel and readout electronics when amplifying small signal x-ray inputs. Traditional switch-based amorphous silicon imaging solutions, for instance, have produced poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) at low exposure levels owing to noise sources from the pixel readout circuitry. Current-mediated amorphous silicon pixels are an improvement over conventional pixel amplifiers with an enhanced SNR across the same low-exposure range, but whose output also becomes nonlinear with increasing dosage. A low-noise SNR enhancing readout circuit has been developed that enhances the charge gain of the current-mediated active pixel sensor (C-APS). The solution takes advantage of the current-mediated approach, primarily integrating the signal input at the desired frequency necessary for large-area imaging, while adding minimal noise to the signal readout. Experimental data indicates that the readout circuit can detect pixel outputs over a large bandwidth suitable for real-time digital diagnostic x-ray fluoroscopy. Results from hardware testing indicate that the minimum achievable C-APS output current that can be discerned at the digital fluoroscopic output from the enhanced SNR readout circuit is 0.341 nA. The results serve to highlight the applicability of amorphous silicon current-mediated pixel amplifiers for large-area flat panel x-ray imagers

  7. a Universal De-Noising Algorithm for Ground-Based LIDAR Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Xiang, Chengzhi; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Ground-based lidar, working as an effective remote sensing tool, plays an irreplaceable role in the study of atmosphere, since it has the ability to provide the atmospheric vertical profile. However, the appearance of noise in a lidar signal is unavoidable, which leads to difficulties and complexities when searching for more information. Every de-noising method has its own characteristic but with a certain limitation, since the lidar signal will vary with the atmosphere changes. In this paper, a universal de-noising algorithm is proposed to enhance the SNR of a ground-based lidar signal, which is based on signal segmentation and reconstruction. The signal segmentation serving as the keystone of the algorithm, segments the lidar signal into three different parts, which are processed by different de-noising method according to their own characteristics. The signal reconstruction is a relatively simple procedure that is to splice the signal sections end to end. Finally, a series of simulation signal tests and real dual field-of-view lidar signal shows the feasibility of the universal de-noising algorithm.

  8. Sensor/signal monitoring and plant maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, Oe.; Tuerkcan, E.

    1994-02-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPO) availability is determined by the intended functionality of safety related system and components. Therefore, maintenance is an important issue in a power plant connected to the plant's reliability and safety. The traditional maintenance policies proved to be rather costly and even not effectively addressing NPP requirements. Referring to these drawbacks, in the last decade, in the nuclear reliability centered maintenance (RCM) gained substantial interest due to its merits. In the formal implementation of RCM, apparently, predictive maintenance is not considered. However, with the impact of modern real-time and on-line surveillance and monitoring methodologies, the predictive maintenance procedures like sensor/signal verification and validation are to be included into RCM. (orig.)

  9. IIR digital filter design for powerline noise cancellation of ECG signal using arduino platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatillah, Akif; Ataulkarim

    2017-05-01

    Powerline noise has been one of significant noises of Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal measurement. This noise is characterized by a sinusoidal signal which has 50 Hz of noise and 0.3 mV of maximum amplitude. This paper describes the design of IIR Notch filter design to reject a 50 Hz power line noise. IIR filter coefficients were calculated using pole placement method with three variations of band stop cut off frequencies of (49-51)Hz, (48 - 52)Hz, and (47 - 53)Hz. The algorithm and coefficients of filter were embedded to Arduino DUE (ARM 32 bit microcontroller). IIR notch filter designed has been able to reject power line noise with average square of error value of 0.225 on (49-51) Hz filter design and 0.2831 on (48 - 52)Hz filter design.

  10. Correlated and uncorrelated invisible temporal white noise alters mesopic rod signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathibelagal, Amithavikram R; Feigl, Beatrix; Kremers, Jan; Zele, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    We determined how rod signaling at mesopic light levels is altered by extrinsic temporal white noise that is correlated or uncorrelated with the activity of one (magnocellular, parvocellular, or koniocellular) postreceptoral pathway. Rod and cone photoreceptor excitations were independently controlled using a four-primary photostimulator. Psychometric (Weibull) functions were measured for incremental rod pulses (50 to 250 ms) in the presence (or absence; control) of perceptually invisible subthreshold extrinsic noise. Uncorrelated (rod) noise facilitates rod detection. Correlated postreceptoral pathway noise produces differential changes in rod detection thresholds and decreases the slope of the psychometric functions. We demonstrate that invisible extrinsic noise changes rod-signaling characteristics within the three retinogeniculate pathways at mesopic illumination depending on the temporal profile of the rod stimulus and the extrinsic noise type.

  11. Detecting modulated signals in modulated noise: (II) neural thresholds in the songbird forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Mark A; Buschermöhle, Michael; Klump, Georg M

    2007-10-01

    Sounds in the real world fluctuate in amplitude. The vertebrate auditory system exploits patterns of amplitude fluctuations to improve signal detection in noise. One experimental paradigm demonstrating these general effects has been used in psychophysical studies of 'comodulation detection difference' (CDD). The CDD effect refers to the fact that thresholds for detecting a modulated, narrowband noise signal are lower when the envelopes of flanking bands of modulated noise are comodulated with each other, but fluctuate independently of the signal compared with conditions in which the envelopes of the signal and flanking bands are all comodulated. Here, we report results from a study of the neural correlates of CDD in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We manipulated: (i) the envelope correlations between a narrowband noise signal and a masker comprised of six flanking bands of noise; (ii) the signal onset delay relative to masker onset; (iii) signal duration; and (iv) masker spectrum level. Masked detection thresholds were determined from neural responses using signal detection theory. Across conditions, the magnitude of neural CDD ranged between 2 and 8 dB, which is similar to that reported in a companion psychophysical study of starlings [U. Langemann & G.M. Klump (2007) Eur. J. Neurosci., 26, 1969-1978]. We found little evidence to suggest that neural CDD resulted from the across-channel processing of auditory grouping cues related to common envelope fluctuations and synchronous onsets between the signal and flanking bands. We discuss a within-channel model of peripheral processing that explains many of our results.

  12. Monitoring the mechanical vibration of in-core detector tubes and fuel channels via ICFD noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glockler, O.; Cooke, D.F.; Czuppon, G.J.; Kapoor, K.K.

    2000-01-01

    Vibrations of core internals are regularly monitored in the CANDU nuclear generating stations of Ontario Power Generation (OPG) via the noise analysis of in-core flux detectors (ICFDs). Voltage signals of standard station instrumentation are recorded by portable multi-channel high-speed high-resolution data acquisition systems, then statistical parameters are derived from the multi-channel time series measurements. Reactor noise analysis is a non-intrusive statistical technique regularly used in system surveillance, diagnostics and in actual operational I and C problems. It utilizes the dynamic information carried by the small fluctuations (noise) of station signals measured around their mean values during steady-state operation. The present paper discusses specific results related to the flow-induced mechanical vibrations of detector tubes and fuel channels. (author)

  13. Assessment of uniformity and signal-to-noise ratio in radiological image intensifier TV systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, J.F.; O'Connor, M.K.; Maher, K.P.

    1985-01-01

    A method of measuring the uniformity of radiological Image Intensifier-TV systems is described. Large non-uniformities were observed in the systems tested. A method of estimating the Signal-to-Noise Ratio in such systems is also presented and applied to characterise the effectiveness of the noise reduction techniques used in digital fluoroscopy. (author)

  14. Measurement of the Low Frequency Noise of MOSFETs under Large Signal RF Excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2002-01-01

    A measurement technique [1] is presented that allows measurement of MOSFET low frequency (LF) noise under large signal RF (Radio Frequency) excitation. Measurements indicate that MOSFETS exhibit a reduction in LF noise when they are cycled from inversion to accummulation and that this reduction does

  15. Influence of Signal and Noise on Statistical Fluctuation of Single-Mode Laser System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Dahai; Cheng Qinghua; Cao Li; Wu Dajin

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of calculating the steady-state mean normalized intensity fluctuation of a signal-mode laser system driven by both colored pump noise with signal modulation and the quantum noise with cross-correlation between its real and imaginary parts, we analyze the influence of modulation signal, noise, and its correlation form on the statistical fluctuation of the laser system. We have found that when the amplitude of modulation signal weakens and its frequency quickens, the statistical fluctuation will reduce rapidly. The statistical fluctuation of the laser system can be restrained by reducing the intensity of pump noise and quantum noise. Moreover, with prolonging of colored cross-correlation time, the statistical fluctuation of laser system experiences a repeated changing process, that is, from decreasing to augmenting, then to decreasing, and finally to augmenting again. With the decreasing of the value of cross-correlation coefficient, the statistical fluctuation will decrease too. When the cross-correlation form between the real part and imaginary part of quantum noise is zero correlation, the statistical fluctuation of laser system has a minimum. Compared with the influence of intensity of pump noise, the influence of intensity of quantum noise on the statistical fluctuation is smaller.

  16. The Sunet System for Monitoring Noise Pollution in Cluj-Napoca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beca Ilinca Mirela

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Europe the need for local authorities to provide a high standard of living for their communities led to the establishment of the European noise mapping directive 2002/49/EC. Whilst Noise mapping itself doesn’t need continuous noise monitoring, states must produce a noise action plan which highlights actions they intend to take to reduce the number of people affected.

  17. Signal-Noise Ratio Control Subsystem of Digital Equipment for Transmission of "Strela" Relay Protection Commands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Zabenkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurement function of relative noise and interference level in the information transmission channel is considered as an important one for controlling parameters of high-frequency signal. The present paper simulates an algorithm for measuring signal-noise ratio in the transmission channel of high-voltage lines which is used in the digital equipment for transmission of relay protection and emergency automation commands of "Strela" complex.

  18. Radiometric and signal-to-noise ratio properties of multiplex dispersive spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barducci, Alessandro; Guzzi, Donatella; Lastri, Cinzia; Nardino, Vanni; Marcoionni, Paolo; Pippi, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Recent theoretical investigations have shown important radiometric disadvantages of interferential multiplexing in Fourier transform spectrometry that apparently can be applied even to coded aperture spectrometers. We have reexamined the methods of noninterferential multiplexing in order to assess their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, relying on a theoretical modeling of the multiplexed signals. We are able to show that quite similar SNR and radiometric disadvantages affect multiplex dispersive spectrometry. The effect of noise on spectral estimations is discussed.

  19. The deterioration of signal to noise ratio due to baseline restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henein, K.L.

    1976-02-01

    The deterioration of signal to noise ratio due to baseline restoration is theoretically studied. This study brings to the conclusion that a restorer has negligible influence on the signal to noise ratio when its time constant is ten times greater than that of the main amplifier filter, and that the rapid restorers prevail over the slow ones when the time constant of the filter is increased by at least 50% of its optimal value [fr

  20. The dependence of signal-to-noise ratio on number of scans in covariance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yi; Shen, Ming; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Noda, Isao; Hu, Bingwen

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of signal-to-noise ratio on the number of scans in covariance spectroscopy has been systematically analyzed for the first time with the intriguing relationship of SNRcov∝n/2, which is different from that in FT2D spectrum with SNRFT∝n. This relationship guarantees the signal-to-noise ratio when increasing the number of scans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Remaining useful life prediction based on noisy condition monitoring signals using constrained Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Junbo; Zhou, Shiyu; Sankavaram, Chaitanya; Du, Xinyu; Zhang, Yilu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a statistical prognostic method to predict the remaining useful life (RUL) of individual units based on noisy condition monitoring signals is proposed. The prediction accuracy of existing data-driven prognostic methods depends on the capability of accurately modeling the evolution of condition monitoring (CM) signals. Therefore, it is inevitable that the RUL prediction accuracy depends on the amount of random noise in CM signals. When signals are contaminated by a large amount of random noise, RUL prediction even becomes infeasible in some cases. To mitigate this issue, a robust RUL prediction method based on constrained Kalman filter is proposed. The proposed method models the CM signals subject to a set of inequality constraints so that satisfactory prediction accuracy can be achieved regardless of the noise level of signal evolution. The advantageous features of the proposed RUL prediction method is demonstrated by both numerical study and case study with real world data from automotive lead-acid batteries. - Highlights: • A computationally efficient constrained Kalman filter is proposed. • Proposed filter is integrated into an online failure prognosis framework. • A set of proper constraints significantly improves the failure prediction accuracy. • Promising results are reported in the application of battery failure prognosis.

  2. Signals and noise in measurements of low-frequency geomagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, E.A.; Morrison, H.F.; Clarke, J.

    1988-01-01

    The apparent magnetic noise, obtained from the coherency function for two parallel magnetic sensors, generally overstimates sensor noise because the sensors do not measure the same signal. The different signals result from the nonparallel alignment of the sensors and from the additional magnetic signal induced in each sensor by its motion in the Earth's magnetic field. A magnetometer array experiment was completed in Grass Valley, Nevada, to determine the minimum magnetic signal that could be detected in the presence of background natural field variations and motion of the sensor. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers with interval biaxial tiltmeters were used to record the magnetic fields and the motion of the sensors

  3. Robust signal extraction for on-line monitoring data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, P.L.; Fried, R.; Gather, U.

    2004-01-01

    Data from the automatic monitoring of intensive care patients exhibits trends, outliers, and level changes as well as periods of relative constancy. All this is overlaid with a high level of noise and there are dependencies between the different items measured. Current monitoring systems tend to

  4. On signal design by the R/0/ criterion for non-white Gaussian noise channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The use of the cut-off rate criterion for modulation system design is investigated for channels with non-white Gaussian noise. A signal space representation of the waveform channel is developed, and the cut-off rate for vector channels with additive non-white Gaussian noise and unquantized demodulation is derived. When the signal input to the channel is a continuous random vector, maximization of the cut-off rate with constrained average signal energy leads to a water-filling interpretation of optimal energy distribution in signal space. The necessary condition for a finite signal set to maximize the cut-off rate with constrained energy and an equally likely probability assignment of signal vectors is presented, and an algorithm is outlined for numerically computing the optimum signal set. As an example, the rectangular signal set which has the water-filling average energy distribution and the optimum rectangular set are compared.

  5. Chronic anthropogenic noise disrupts glucocorticoid signaling and has multiple effects on fitness in an avian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, Nathan J; Guralnick, Robert P; Cruz, Alexander; Lowry, Christopher A; Francis, Clinton D

    2018-01-23

    Anthropogenic noise is a pervasive pollutant that decreases environmental quality by disrupting a suite of behaviors vital to perception and communication. However, even within populations of noise-sensitive species, individuals still select breeding sites located within areas exposed to high noise levels, with largely unknown physiological and fitness consequences. We use a study system in the natural gas fields of northern New Mexico to test the prediction that exposure to noise causes glucocorticoid-signaling dysfunction and decreases fitness in a community of secondary cavity-nesting birds. In accordance with these predictions, and across all species, we find strong support for noise exposure decreasing baseline corticosterone in adults and nestlings and, conversely, increasing acute stressor-induced corticosterone in nestlings. We also document fitness consequences with increased noise in the form of reduced hatching success in the western bluebird ( Sialia mexicana ), the species most likely to nest in noisiest environments. Nestlings of all three species exhibited accelerated growth of both feathers and body size at intermediate noise amplitudes compared with lower or higher amplitudes. Our results are consistent with recent experimental laboratory studies and show that noise functions as a chronic, inescapable stressor. Anthropogenic noise likely impairs environmental risk perception by species relying on acoustic cues and ultimately leads to impacts on fitness. Our work, when taken together with recent efforts to document noise across the landscape, implies potential widespread, noise-induced chronic stress coupled with reduced fitness for many species reliant on acoustic cues.

  6. Electromagnetic Signals and Earthquakes 2.0: Increasing Signals and Reducing Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, J. C.; Bleier, T.; Heraud, J. A.; Muller, S.; Lindholm, C.; Christman, L.; King, R.; Lemon, J.

    2013-12-01

    QuakeFinder has an international network of 150+ Magnetometers and air conductivity instruments located in California, Peru, Chile, Taiwan, and Greece. Since 2000, QuakeFinder has been collecting electromagnetic data and applying simple algorithms to identify and characterize electromagnetic signals that occur in the few weeks prior to earthquakes greater than M4.5. In this presentation, we show refinements to several aspects of our signal identification techniques that enhance detection of pre-earthquake patterns. Our magnetometers have been improved to show longer pulses, and we are now using second generation algorithms that have been refined to detect the proper shape of the earthquake-generated pulses and to allow individual site adjustments. Independent lightning strike data has also now been included to mask out lightning based on amplitude and distance from a given instrument site. Direction of arrival (Azimuth) algorithms have been added to identify patterns of pulse clustering that occur prior to nearby earthquakes. Likewise, positive and negative air ion concentration detection has been improved by building better enclosures, using stainless screens to eliminate insects and some dirt sources, conformal coating PC boards to reduce moisture contamination, and filtering out contaminated data segments based on relative humidity measurements at each site. Infra Red data from the western GOES satellite has been time-filtered, cloud-filtered, and compared to 3 year averages of each pixel's output (by seasonal month) to arrive at a relevant comparison baseline for each night's temperature/cooling slope. All these efforts have helped improve the detection of multiple, nearly simultaneous, electromagnetic signals due to earthquake preparation processes, while reducing false positive indications due to environmental noise sources.

  7. Characterization of Transient Noise in Advanced LIGO Relevant to Gravitational Wave Signal GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adamo, M.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Camp, Jordan B.

    2016-01-01

    On 14 September 2015, a gravitational wave signal from a coalescing black hole binary system was observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors. This paper describes the transient noise backgrounds used to determine the significance of the event (designated GW150914) and presents the results of investigations into potential correlated or uncorrelated sources of transient noise in the detectors around the time of the event. The detectors were operating nominally at the time of GW150914. We have ruled out environmental influences and non-Gaussian instrument noise at either LIGO detector as the cause of the observed gravitational wave signal.

  8. Broadband squeezing of quantum noise in a Michelson interferometer with Twin-Signal-Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thüring, André; Gräf, Christian; Vahlbruch, Henning; Mehmet, Moritz; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2009-03-15

    Twin-Signal-Recycling (TSR) builds on the resonance doublet of two optically coupled cavities and efficiently enhances the sensitivity of an interferometer at a dedicated signal frequency. We report on what we believe to be the first experimental realization of a TSR Michelson interferometer and also its broadband enhancement by squeezed light injection. The complete setup was stably locked, and a broadband quantum noise reduction of the interferometers shot noise by a factor of up to 4 dB was demonstrated. The system was characterized by measuring its quantum noise spectra for several tunings of the TSR cavities. We found good agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulations.

  9. Comparative analysis of chosen transforms in the context of de-noising harmonic signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Zacniewski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article, comparison of popular transforms used i.a. in denoising harmonical signals was presented. The division of signals submitted to mathematical analysis was shown and chosen transforms such as Short Time Fourier Transform, Wigner-Ville Distribution, Wavelet Transform and Discrete Cosine Transform were presented. Harmonic signal with white noise added was submitted for research. During research, the parameters of noise were changed to analyze the effects of using particular transform on noised signal. The importance of right choice for transform and its parameters (different for particular kind of transform was shown. Small changes in parameters or different functions used in transform can lead to considerably different results.[b]Keywords[/b]: denoising of harmonical signals, wavelet transform, discrete cosine transform, DCT

  10. Traffic background level and signal duration effects on aircraft noise judgment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, G W; Haasz, A A

    1977-04-22

    The effects of background traffic noise level and signal duration on perceived aircraft noise levels during a flyover event are investigated. Tapes of traffic noise at different levels on which aircraft flyover noise events of different durations were superimposed were played to groups of observers in a room simulating indoor conditions. It is found that the presence of steady background traffic noise reduces the perceived noisiness of aircraft flyovers provided that the duration of the flyover event is sufficiently short in relation to flyover time. For a given event level, a reduction of 21 dB(A) in background noise level leads to the perception of a 5.5 dB(A) increase in peak event level. Regressions of observer response with the noise pollution index show a lower correlation than those with variables based on background noise level and peak signal level, although the data are found to exhibit a number of significant trends associated with noise pollution index variations.

  11. Acoustics of fish shelters: background noise and signal-to-noise ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Fish shelters (flat stones, shells, artificial covers, etc., with a hollow beneath) increase the sound pressure levels of low frequency sounds (noise ratio (SNR) in the nest. Background noise amplification by the shelter was examined under both laboratory (stones and shells) and field (stones) conditions, and the SNR of tones inside the nest cavity was measured by performing acoustic tests on stones in the stream. Stone and shell shelters amplify the background noise pressure levels inside the cavity with comparable gains and at similar frequencies of an active sound source. Inside the cavity of stream stones, the mean SNR of tones increased significantly below 125 Hz and peaked at 65 Hz (+10 dB). Implications for fish acoustic communication inside nest enclosures are discussed.

  12. Application of a Magnetostrictive Guided wave Technique to Monitor the Evolution of Defect Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Yong-Moo; Oh, Se-Beom; Lee, Duck-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    An advantage of a magnetostrictive strip transducer for a long-range guided wave inspection is that wave patterns are clear and simple when compared to a conventional piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer. Therefore, if we can characterize the evolution of defect signals, it could be a promising tool for a structural health monitoring of pipes for a long period of time as well as an identification of flaw. Of course, when evaluating a signal during a realistic field examination, it should be careful because of some spurious signals or false indications, such as signals due to a directionality, multiple reflections, mode conversion, geometrical reflections etc. Therefore, the different frequency components of the guided waves will travel at different speeds and the shape of the received signal will changed as it propagates along the pipe. Once the magnetostrictive sensors are attached in the pipe permanently and the signal shape and phase can be compared to the signals before and after, we can monitor the evolution of the flow for the given period. We developed a program to subtract the guided wave signal. The program has a capability of adjusting the time scale and can minimize the noise level after subtraction. By applying the newly developed program, a notch with 2% of CSA can be detected with increased accuracy with noise reduction.

  13. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar N Alagramam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  14. Hardware Design and Implementation of a Wavelet De-Noising Procedure for Medical Signal Preprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szi-Wen Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a discrete wavelet transform (DWT based de-noising with its applications into the noise reduction for medical signal preprocessing is introduced. This work focuses on the hardware realization of a real-time wavelet de-noising procedure. The proposed de-noising circuit mainly consists of three modules: a DWT, a thresholding, and an inverse DWT (IDWT modular circuits. We also proposed a novel adaptive thresholding scheme and incorporated it into our wavelet de-noising procedure. Performance was then evaluated on both the architectural designs of the software and. In addition, the de-noising circuit was also implemented by downloading the Verilog codes to a field programmable gate array (FPGA based platform so that its ability in noise reduction may be further validated in actual practice. Simulation experiment results produced by applying a set of simulated noise-contaminated electrocardiogram (ECG signals into the de-noising circuit showed that the circuit could not only desirably meet the requirement of real-time processing, but also achieve satisfactory performance for noise reduction, while the sharp features of the ECG signals can be well preserved. The proposed de-noising circuit was further synthesized using the Synopsys Design Compiler with an Artisan Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC, Hsinchu, Taiwan 40 nm standard cell library. The integrated circuit (IC synthesis simulation results showed that the proposed design can achieve a clock frequency of 200 MHz and the power consumption was only 17.4 mW, when operated at 200 MHz.

  15. Hardware design and implementation of a wavelet de-noising procedure for medical signal preprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Chen, Yuan-Ho

    2015-10-16

    In this paper, a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) based de-noising with its applications into the noise reduction for medical signal preprocessing is introduced. This work focuses on the hardware realization of a real-time wavelet de-noising procedure. The proposed de-noising circuit mainly consists of three modules: a DWT, a thresholding, and an inverse DWT (IDWT) modular circuits. We also proposed a novel adaptive thresholding scheme and incorporated it into our wavelet de-noising procedure. Performance was then evaluated on both the architectural designs of the software and. In addition, the de-noising circuit was also implemented by downloading the Verilog codes to a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based platform so that its ability in noise reduction may be further validated in actual practice. Simulation experiment results produced by applying a set of simulated noise-contaminated electrocardiogram (ECG) signals into the de-noising circuit showed that the circuit could not only desirably meet the requirement of real-time processing, but also achieve satisfactory performance for noise reduction, while the sharp features of the ECG signals can be well preserved. The proposed de-noising circuit was further synthesized using the Synopsys Design Compiler with an Artisan Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC, Hsinchu, Taiwan) 40 nm standard cell library. The integrated circuit (IC) synthesis simulation results showed that the proposed design can achieve a clock frequency of 200 MHz and the power consumption was only 17.4 mW, when operated at 200 MHz.

  16. Facial soft tissue thicknesses: Noise, signal, and P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Carl N; Munn, Lachlan; Caple, Jodi

    2015-12-01

    Facial soft tissue thicknesses (FSTTs) hold an important role in craniofacial identification, forming the underlying quantitative basis of craniofacial superimposition and facial approximation methods. It is, therefore, important that patterns in FSTTs be correctly described and interpreted. In prior FSTT literature, small statistically significant differences have almost universally been overemphasized and misinterpreted to reflect sex and ancestry effects when they instead largely encode nuisance statistical noise. Here we examine FSTT data and give an overview of why P-values do not mean everything. Scientific inference, not mechanical evaluation of P, should be awarded higher priority and should form the basis of FSTT analysis. This hinges upon tempered consideration of many factors in addition to P, e.g., study design, sampling, measurement errors, repeatability, reproducibility, and effect size. While there are multiple lessons to be had, the underlying message is foundational: know enough statistics to avoid misinterpreting background noise for real biological effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Noise-aware dictionary-learning-based sparse representation framework for detection and removal of single and combined noises from ECG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Udit; Ramkumar, Barathram; Sabarimalai Manikandan, M

    2017-02-01

    Automatic electrocardiogram (ECG) signal enhancement has become a crucial pre-processing step in most ECG signal analysis applications. In this Letter, the authors propose an automated noise-aware dictionary learning-based generalised ECG signal enhancement framework which can automatically learn the dictionaries based on the ECG noise type for effective representation of ECG signal and noises, and can reduce the computational load of sparse representation-based ECG enhancement system. The proposed framework consists of noise detection and identification, noise-aware dictionary learning, sparse signal decomposition and reconstruction. The noise detection and identification is performed based on the moving average filter, first-order difference, and temporal features such as number of turning points, maximum absolute amplitude, zerocrossings, and autocorrelation features. The representation dictionary is learned based on the type of noise identified in the previous stage. The proposed framework is evaluated using noise-free and noisy ECG signals. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly reduce computational load as compared with conventional dictionary learning-based ECG denoising approaches. Further, comparative results show that the method outperforms existing methods in automatically removing noises such as baseline wanders, power-line interference, muscle artefacts and their combinations without distorting the morphological content of local waves of ECG signal.

  18. Subspace-Based Noise Reduction for Speech Signals via Diagonal and Triangular Matrix Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2007-01-01

    We survey the definitions and use of rank-revealing matrix decompositions in single-channel noise reduction algorithms for speech signals. Our algorithms are based on the rank-reduction paradigm and, in particular, signal subspace techniques. The focus is on practical working algorithms, using both...... with working Matlab code and applications in speech processing....

  19. BER analysis for MPAM signal constellations in the presence of fading and ADC quantization noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizvi, U.H.; Janssen, G.J.M.; Weber, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, closed-form expressions for the bit error rate of M-ary pulse amplitude modulated signal constellations as a function of the analog-to-digital converter word length, the signal-to-noise ratio and the fading distribution, are derived. These results allow for a rapid and accurate

  20. Spectral characteristics of seismic noise using data of Kazakhstan monitoring stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlova, N.N.; Komarov, I.I.

    2006-01-01

    Spectral specifications of seismic noise research for PS23-Makanchi, Karatau, Akbulak, AS057-Borovoye and new three-component station AS059-Aktyubinsk was done. Spectral noise density models were obtained for day and night time and spectral density values variation. Noise close to low-level universal noise model is peculiar for all stations, which provides their high efficiency while seismic monitoring. Noise parameters dependence on seismic receivers installation conditions was investigated separately. Based on three stations (Makanchi, Borovoye, and Aktyubinsk), spectral density change features are shown after borehole equipment installation. (author)

  1. Noise and signal processing in a microstrip detector with a time variant readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattaneo, P.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper treats the noise and signal processing by a time variant filter in a microstrip detector. In particular, the noise sources in the detector-electronics chain and the signal losses that cause a substantial decrease of the original signal are thoroughly analyzed. This work has been motivated by the analysis of the data of the microstrip detectors designed for the ALEPH minivertex detector. Hence, even if the discussion will be kept as general as possible, concrete examples will be presented referring to the specific ALEPH design. (orig.)

  2. Effect of signal noise on the learning capability of an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, J.J.; Reynoso, R.; Calvet, H. Carrillo

    2009-01-01

    Digital Pulse Shape Analysis (DPSA) by artificial neural networks (ANN) is becoming an important tool to extract relevant information from digitized signals in different areas. In this paper, we present a systematic evidence of how the concomitant noise that distorts the signals or patterns to be identified by an ANN set limits to its learning capability. Also, we present evidence that explains overtraining as a competition between the relevant pattern features, on the one side, against the signal noise, on the other side, as the main cause defining the shape of the error surface in weight space and, consequently, determining the steepest descent path that controls the ANN adaptation process.

  3. Electrocardiogram (ECG Signal Modeling and Noise Reduction Using Hopfield Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bagheri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Electrocardiogram (ECG signal is one of the diagnosing approaches to detect heart disease. In this study the Hopfield Neural Network (HNN is applied and proposed for ECG signal modeling and noise reduction. The Hopfield Neural Network (HNN is a recurrent neural network that stores the information in a dynamic stable pattern. This algorithm retrieves a pattern stored in memory in response to the presentation of an incomplete or noisy version of that pattern. Computer simulation results show that this method can successfully model the ECG signal and remove high-frequency noise.

  4. Improved stochastic resonance algorithm for enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio of high-performance liquid chromatographic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Shaofei; Xiang Bingren; Deng Haishan; Xiang Suyun; Lu Jun

    2007-01-01

    Based on the theory of stochastic resonance, an improved stochastic resonance algorithm with a new criterion for optimizing system parameters to enhance signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of HPLC/UV chromatographic signal for trace analysis was presented in this study. Compared with the conventional criterion in stochastic resonance, the proposed one can ensure satisfactory SNR as well as good peak shape of chromatographic peak in output signal. Application of the criterion to experimental weak signals of HPLC/UV was investigated and the results showed an excellent quantitative relationship between different concentrations and responses

  5. Full-Scale Turbofan Engine Noise-Source Separation Using a Four-Signal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Arechiga, Rene O.

    2016-01-01

    Contributions from the combustor to the overall propulsion noise of civilian transport aircraft are starting to become important due to turbofan design trends and expected advances in mitigation of other noise sources. During on-ground, static-engine acoustic tests, combustor noise is generally sub-dominant to other engine noise sources because of the absence of in-flight effects. Consequently, noise-source separation techniques are needed to extract combustor-noise information from the total noise signature in order to further progress. A novel four-signal source-separation method is applied to data from a static, full-scale engine test and compared to previous methods. The new method is, in a sense, a combination of two- and three-signal techniques and represents an attempt to alleviate some of the weaknesses of each of those approaches. This work is supported by the NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, Aircraft Noise Reduction Subproject and the NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program.

  6. Towards Noise Tomography and Passive Monitoring Using Distributed Acoustic Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paitz, P.; Fichtner, A.

    2017-12-01

    Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) has the potential to revolutionize the field of seismic data acquisition. Thanks to their cost-effectiveness, fiber-optic cables may have the capability of complementing conventional geophones and seismometers by filling a niche of applications utilizing large amounts of data. Therefore, DAS may serve as an additional tool to investigate the internal structure of the Earth and its changes over time; on scales ranging from hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs to the entire globe. An additional potential may be in the existence of large fibre networks deployed already for telecommunication purposes. These networks that already exist today could serve as distributed seismic antennas. We investigate theoretically how ambient noise tomography may be used with DAS data. For this we extend the theory of seismic interferometry to the measurement of strain. With numerical, 2D finite-difference examples we investigate the impact of source and receiver effects. We study the effect of heterogeneous source distributions and the cable orientation by assessing similarities and differences to the Green's function. We also compare the obtained interferometric waveforms from strain interferometry to displacement interferometric wave fields obtained with existing methods. Intermediate results show that the obtained interferometric waveforms can be connected to the Green's Functions and provide consistent information about the propagation medium. These simulations will be extended to reservoir scale subsurface structures. Future work will include the application of the theory to real-data examples. The presented research depicts the early stage of a combination of theoretical investigations, numerical simulations and real-world data applications. We will therefore evaluate the potentials and shortcomings of DAS in reservoir monitoring and seismology at the current state, with a long-term vision of global seismic tomography utilizing DAS data from

  7. Effects of traffic noise on tree frog stress levels, immunity, and color signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troïanowski, Mathieu; Mondy, Nathalie; Dumet, Adeline; Arcanjo, Caroline; Lengagne, Thierry

    2017-10-01

    During the last decade, many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of noise pollution on acoustic communication. Surprisingly, although it is known that noise exposure strongly influences health in humans, studies on wildlife remain scarce. In order to gain insight into the consequences of traffic noise exposure, we experimentally manipulated traffic noise exposure as well as the endocrine status of animals to investigate physiological and phenotypic consequences of noise pollution in an anuran species. We showed that noise exposure increased stress hormone level and induced an immunosuppressive effect. In addition, both traffic noise exposure and stress hormone application negatively impacted H. arborea vocal sac coloration. Moreover, our results suggest profound changes in sexual selection processes because the best quality males with initial attractive vocal sac coloration were the most impacted by noise. Hence, our study suggests that the recent increases in anthropogenic noise worldwide might affect a broader range of animal species than previously thought, because of alteration of visual signals and immunity. Generalizing these results to other taxa is crucial for the conservation of biodiversity in an increasingly noisy world. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. The curious case of HD 41248. A pair of static signals buried behind red noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Tuomi, M., E-mail: jjenkins@das.uchile.cl [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino el Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago, Casilla 36-D (Chile)

    2014-10-20

    Gaining a better understanding of the effects of stellar-induced radial velocity noise is critical for the future of exoplanet studies since the discovery of the lowest-mass planets using this method will require us to go below the intrinsic stellar noise limit. An interesting test case in this respect is that of the southern solar analog HD 41248. The radial velocity time series of this star has been proposed to contain either a pair of signals with periods of around 18 and 25 days, which could be due to a pair of resonant super-Earths, or a single and varying 25 day signal that could arise due to a complex interplay between differential rotation and modulated activity. In this work, we build up more evidence for the former scenario, showing that the signals are still clearly significant, even after more than 10 yr of observations, and they likely do not change in period, amplitude, or phase as a function of time, the hallmarks of static Doppler signals. We show that over the last two observing seasons, this star was more intrinsically active and the noise reddened, highlighting why better noise models are needed to find the lowest amplitude signals, in particular, models that consider noise correlations. This analysis shows that there is still sufficient evidence for the existence of two super-Earths on the edge of, or locked into, a 7:5 mean motion resonance orbiting HD 41248.

  9. Modeling signal-to-noise ratio of otoacoustic emissions in workers exposed to different industrial noise levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Nassiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise is considered as the most common cause of harmful physical effects in the workplace. A sound that is generated from within the inner ear is known as an otoacoustic emission (OAE. Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs assess evoked emission and hearing capacity. The aim of this study was to assess the signal-to-noise ratio in different frequencies and at different times of the shift work in workers exposed to various levels of noise. It was also aimed to provide a statistical model for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of OAEs in different frequencies based on the two variables of sound pressure level (SPL and exposure time. Materials and Methods: This case–control study was conducted on 45 workers during autumn 2014. The workers were divided into three groups based on the level of noise exposure. The SNR was measured in frequencies of 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz in both ears, and in three different time intervals during the shift work. According to the inclusion criterion, SNR of 6 dB or greater was included in the study. The analysis was performed using repeated measurements of analysis of variance, spearman correlation coefficient, and paired samples t-test. Results: The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the three exposed groups in terms of the mean values of SNR (P > 0.05. Only in signal pressure levels of 88 dBA with an interval time of 10:30–11:00 AM, there was a statistically significant difference between the right and left ears with the mean SNR values of 3000 frequency (P = 0.038. The SPL had a significant effect on the SNR in both the right and left ears (P = 0.023, P = 0.041. The effect of the duration of measurement on the SNR was statistically significant in both the right and left ears (P = 0.027, P < 0.001. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrated that after noise exposure during the shift, SNR of OAEs reduced from the

  10. False alarm reduction in BSN-based cardiac monitoring using signal quality and activity type information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanantong, Tanatorn; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit; Thiemjarus, Surapa

    2015-02-09

    False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs), the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs) can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring.

  11. False Alarm Reduction in BSN-Based Cardiac Monitoring Using Signal Quality and Activity Type Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanatorn Tanantong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs, the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring.

  12. Experimental Comparison of Signal Subspace Based Noise Reduction Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Søren Kirk; Hansen, Per Christian; Hansen, Steffen Duus

    1999-01-01

    The signal subspace approach for non-parametric speech enhancement is considered. Several algorithms have been proposed in the literature but only partly analyzed. Here, the different algorithms are compared, and the emphasis is put onto the limiting factors and practical behavior of the estimators...

  13. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in mass and ion kinetic energy spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenton, A.G.; Beynon, J.H.; Morgan, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio in mass and ion kinetic energy spectrometers is limited by noise generated from the presence of scattered ions and neutrals. Methods of eliminating this are illustrated with reference to the ZAB-2F instrument manufactured by VG-Micromass Ltd. It is estimated that after the modifications the instrument is capable, on a routine basis, of measuring peaks corresponding to the arrival of ions at a rate of the order of 1 ion s -1 . (Auth.)

  14. MEMS microphone innovations towards high signal to noise ratios (Conference Presentation) (Plenary Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehé, Alfons

    2017-06-01

    After decades of research and more than ten years of successful production in very high volumes Silicon MEMS microphones are mature and unbeatable in form factor and robustness. Audio applications such as video, noise cancellation and speech recognition are key differentiators in smart phones. Microphones with low self-noise enable those functions. Backplate-free microphones enter the signal to noise ratios above 70dB(A). This talk will describe state of the art MEMS technology of Infineon Technologies. An outlook on future technologies such as the comb sensor microphone will be given.

  15. Modeling speech intelligibility based on the signal-to-noise envelope power ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren

    of modulation frequency selectivity in the auditory processing of sound with a decision metric for intelligibility that is based on the signal-to-noise envelope power ratio (SNRenv). The proposed speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) is demonstrated to account for the effects of stationary...... through three commercially available mobile phones. The model successfully accounts for the performance across the phones in conditions with a stationary speech-shaped background noise, whereas deviations were observed in conditions with “Traffic” and “Pub” noise. Overall, the results of this thesis...

  16. Speech Denoising in White Noise Based on Signal Subspace Low-rank Plus Sparse Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yuan Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new subspace speech enhancement method using low-rank and sparse decomposition is presented. In the proposed method, we firstly structure the corrupted data as a Toeplitz matrix and estimate its effective rank for the underlying human speech signal. Then the low-rank and sparse decomposition is performed with the guidance of speech rank value to remove the noise. Extensive experiments have been carried out in white Gaussian noise condition, and experimental results show the proposed method performs better than conventional speech enhancement methods, in terms of yielding less residual noise and lower speech distortion.

  17. Signal and noise analysis in TRION-Time-Resolved Integrative Optical Fast Neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartsky, D; Feldman, G; Mor, I; Goldberg, M B; Bar, D; Dangendorf, V

    2009-01-01

    TRION is a sub-mm spatial resolution fast neutron imaging detector, which employs an integrative optical time-of-flight technique. The detector was developed for fast neutron resonance radiography, a method capable of detecting a broad range of conventional and improvised explosives. In this study we have analyzed in detail, using Monte-Carlo calculations and experimentally determined parameters, all the processes that influence the signal and noise in the TRION detector. In contrast to event-counting detectors where the signal-to-noise ratio is dependent only on the number of detected events (quantum noise), in an energy-integrating detector additional factors, such as the fluctuations in imparted energy, number of photoelectrons, system gain and other factors will contribute to the noise. The excess noise factor (over the quantum noise) due to these processes was 4.3, 2.7, 2.1, 1.9 and 1.9 for incident neutron energies of 2, 4, 7.5, 10 and 14 MeV, respectively. It is shown that, even under ideal light collection conditions, a fast neutron detection system operating in an integrative mode cannot be quantum-noise-limited due to the relatively large variance in the imparted proton energy and the resulting scintillation light distributions.

  18. Fractional Gaussian noise-enhanced information capacity of a nonlinear neuron model with binary signal input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng-Yin; Kang, Yan-Mei; Chen, Xi; Chen, Guanrong

    2018-05-01

    This paper reveals the effect of fractional Gaussian noise with Hurst exponent H ∈(1 /2 ,1 ) on the information capacity of a general nonlinear neuron model with binary signal input. The fGn and its corresponding fractional Brownian motion exhibit long-range, strong-dependent increments. It extends standard Brownian motion to many types of fractional processes found in nature, such as the synaptic noise. In the paper, for the subthreshold binary signal, sufficient conditions are given based on the "forbidden interval" theorem to guarantee the occurrence of stochastic resonance, while for the suprathreshold binary signal, the simulated results show that additive fGn with Hurst exponent H ∈(1 /2 ,1 ) could increase the mutual information or bits count. The investigation indicated that the synaptic noise with the characters of long-range dependence and self-similarity might be the driving factor for the efficient encoding and decoding of the nervous system.

  19. Effects of signal salience and noise on performance and stress in an abbreviated vigil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, William Stokely

    Vigilance or sustained attention tasks traditionally require observers to detect predetermined signals that occur unpredictably over periods of 30 min to several hours (Warm, 1984). These tasks are taxing and have been useful in revealing the effects of stress agents, such as infectious disease and drugs, on human performance (Alluisi, 1969; Damos & Parker, 1994; Warm, 1993). However, their long duration has been an inconvenience. Recently, Temple and his associates (Temple et al., 2000) developed an abbreviated 12-min vigilance task that duplicates many of the findings with longer duration vigils. The present study was designed to explore further the similarity of the abbreviated task to long-duration vigils by investigating the effects of signal salience and jet-aircraft engine noise on performance, operator stress, and coping strategies. Forty-eight observers (24 males and 24 females) were assigned at random to each of four conditions resulting from the factorial combination of signal salience (high and low contrast signals) and background noise (quiet and jet-aircraft noise). As is the case with long-duration vigils (Warm, 1993), signal detection in the abbreviated task was poorer for low salience than for high salience signals. In addition, stress scores, as indexed by the Dundee Stress State Questionnaire (Matthews, Joiner, Gilliland, Campbell, & Falconer, 1999), were elevated in the low as compared to the high salience condition. Unlike longer vigils, however, (Becker, Warm, Dember, & Hancock, 1996), signal detection in the abbreviated task was superior in the presence of aircraft noise than in quiet. Noise also attenuated the stress of the vigil, a result that is counter to previous findings regarding the effects of noise in a variety of other scenarios (Clark, 1984). Examination of observers' coping responses, as assessed by the Coping Inventory for Task Situations (Matthews & Campbell, 1998), indicated that problem-focused coping was the overwhelming

  20. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  1. Signal to noise ratio enhancement for Eddy Current testing of steam generator tubes in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgel, B.

    1985-01-01

    Noise reduction is a compulsory task when we try to recognize and characterize flaws. The signals we deal with come from Eddy Current testings of steam generator steel tubes. We point out the need for a spectral invariant in digital spectral analysis of 2 components signals. We make clear the pros and cons of classical passband filtering and suggest the use of a new noise cancellation method first discussed by Moriwaki and Tlusty. We generalize this tricky technique and prove it is a very special case of the well-known Wiener filter. In that sense the M-T method is shown to be optimal. 6 refs

  2. Detection and Processing Techniques of FECG Signal for Fetal Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan MA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fetal electrocardiogram (FECG signal contains potentially precise information that could assist clinicians in making more appropriate and timely decisions during labor. The ultimate reason for the interest in FECG signal analysis is in clinical diagnosis and biomedical applications. The extraction and detection of the FECG signal from composite abdominal signals with powerful and advance methodologies are becoming very important requirements in fetal monitoring. The purpose of this review paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and developed algorithms on FECG signal detection and analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the FECG signal and its nature for fetal monitoring. A comparative study has been carried out to show the performance and accuracy of various methods of FECG signal analysis for fetal monitoring. Finally, this paper further focused some of the hardware implementations using electrical signals for monitoring the fetal heart rate. This paper opens up a passage for researchers, physicians, and end users to advocate an excellent understanding of FECG signal and its analysis procedures for fetal heart rate monitoring system.

  3. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Gyuseong.

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was ∼400 MHz and the noise charge ∼1000 electrons at a 1 μsec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of ∼0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB

  4. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyuseong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was ~400 MHz and the noise charge ~1000 electrons at a 1 μsec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of ~0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB.

  5. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyuseong.

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was {approximately}400 MHz and the noise charge {approximately}1000 electrons at a 1 {mu}sec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of {approximately}0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB.

  6. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  7. Signal-noise separation based on self-similarity testing in 1D-timeseries data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Philippe A.

    2015-08-01

    The continuous improvement of the resolution delivered by modern instrumentation is a cost-intensive part of any new space- or ground-based observatory. Typically, scientists later reduce the resolution of the obtained raw-data, for example in the spatial, spectral, or temporal domain, in order to suppress the effects of noise in the measurements. In practice, only simple methods are used that just smear out the noise, instead of trying to remove it, so that the noise can nomore be seen. In high-precision 1D-timeseries data, this usually results in an unwanted quality-loss and corruption of power spectra at selected frequency ranges. Novel methods exist that are based on non-local averaging, which would conserve much of the initial resolution, but these methods are so far focusing on 2D or 3D data. We present here a method specialized for 1D-timeseries, e.g. as obtained by magnetic field measurements from the recently launched MMS satellites. To identify the noise, we use a self-similarity testing and non-local averaging method in order to separate different types of noise and signals, like the instrument noise, non-correlated fluctuations in the signal from heliospheric sources, and correlated fluctuations such as harmonic waves or shock fronts. In power spectra of test data, we are able to restore significant parts of a previously know signal from a noisy measurement. This method also works for high frequencies, where the background noise may have a larger contribution to the spectral power than the signal itself. We offer an easy-to-use software tools set, which enables scientists to use this novel technique on their own noisy data. This allows to use the maximum possible capacity of the instrumental hardware and helps to enhance the quality of the obtained scientific results.

  8. A Bayesian test for periodic signals in red noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, S.

    2010-02-01

    Many astrophysical sources, especially compact accreting sources, show strong, random brightness fluctuations with broad power spectra in addition to periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) that have narrower spectra. The random nature of the dominant source of variance greatly complicates the process of searching for possible weak periodic signals. We have addressed this problem using the tools of Bayesian statistics; in particular, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to approximate the posterior distribution of model parameters, and posterior predictive model checking to assess model fits and search for periodogram outliers that may represent periodic signals. The methods developed are applied to two example data sets, both long XMM-Newton observations of highly variable Seyfert 1 galaxies: RE J1034 + 396 and Mrk 766. In both cases, a bend (or break) in the power spectrum is evident. In the case of RE J1034 + 396, the previously reported QPO is found but with somewhat weaker statistical significance than reported in previous analyses. The difference is due partly to the improved continuum modelling, better treatment of nuisance parameters and partly to different data selection methods.

  9. Evaluation of signal processing for boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.L.; Ledwidge, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the co-ordinated research programme on the detection of sodium boiling some further analysis has been performed on the data from the test loop in Karlsruhe and some preliminary analysis of the data from the BOR 60 experiment. The work on the Karlsruhe data is concerned with the search for a reliable method by which the quality of signal processing strategies may be compared. The results show that the three novel methods previously reported are all markedly superior to the mean square method which is used as a benchmark. The three novel methods are nth order differentiation in the frequency domain, the mean square prediction based on nth order conditional expectation and the nth order probability density function. A preliminary analysis on the data from the BOR 60 reactor shows that 4th order differentiation is adequate for the detection of signals derived from a pressure transducer and that the map of spurious trip probability (S) and the probability of missing an event (M) is consistent with the theoretical model proposed herein, and the suggested procedures for evaluating the quality of detection strategies. (author). 15 figs, 1 tab

  10. An adaptive segment method for smoothing lidar signal based on noise estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuzhao; Luo, Pingping

    2014-10-01

    An adaptive segmentation smoothing method (ASSM) is introduced in the paper to smooth the signal and suppress the noise. In the ASSM, the noise is defined as the 3σ of the background signal. An integer number N is defined for finding the changing positions in the signal curve. If the difference of adjacent two points is greater than 3Nσ, the position is recorded as an end point of the smoothing segment. All the end points detected as above are recorded and the curves between them will be smoothed separately. In the traditional method, the end points of the smoothing windows in the signals are fixed. The ASSM creates changing end points in different signals and the smoothing windows could be set adaptively. The windows are always set as the half of the segmentations and then the average smoothing method will be applied in the segmentations. The Iterative process is required for reducing the end-point aberration effect in the average smoothing method and two or three times are enough. In ASSM, the signals are smoothed in the spacial area nor frequent area, that means the frequent disturbance will be avoided. A lidar echo was simulated in the experimental work. The echo was supposed to be created by a space-born lidar (e.g. CALIOP). And white Gaussian noise was added to the echo to act as the random noise resulted from environment and the detector. The novel method, ASSM, was applied to the noisy echo to filter the noise. In the test, N was set to 3 and the Iteration time is two. The results show that, the signal could be smoothed adaptively by the ASSM, but the N and the Iteration time might be optimized when the ASSM is applied in a different lidar.

  11. Signal de-noising methods for fault diagnosis and troubleshooting at CANDU{sup ®} stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasimi, Elnara; Gabbar, Hossam A., E-mail: hossam.gabbar@uoit.ca

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Fault modelling using a Fault Semantic Network (FSN). • Intelligent filtering techniques for signal de-noise in NPP. • Signal feature extraction is applied as integrated with FSN. • Increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). - Abstract: Over the past several years a number of domestic CANDU{sup ®} stations have experienced issues with neutron detection systems that challenged safety and operation. Intelligent troubleshooting methodology is required to aid in making risk-informed decisions related to design and operational activities, which can aid current stations and be used for the future generation of CANDU{sup ®} designs. Fault modelling approach using Fault Semantic Network (FSN) with risk estimation is proposed for this purpose. One major challenge in troubleshooting is the determination of accurate data. It is typical to have missing, incomplete or corrupted data points in large process data sets from dynamically changing systems. Therefore, it is expected that quality of obtained data will have a direct impact on the system's ability to recognize developing trends in the process upset situations. In order to enable fault detection process, intelligent filtering techniques are required to de-noise process data and extract valuable signal features in the presence of background noise. In this study, the impact of applying an optimized and intelligent filtering of process signals prior to data analysis is discussed. This is particularly important for neutronic signals in order to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) which suffers the most during start-ups and low power operation. This work is complimentary to the previously published studies on FSN-based fault modelling in CANDU stations. The main objective of this work is to explore the potential research methods using a specific case study and, based on the results and outcomes from this work, to note the possible future improvements and innovation areas.

  12. A method for discrimination of noise and EMG signal regions recorded during rhythmic behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Rex; Wall, Christine E

    2016-12-08

    Analyses of muscular activity during rhythmic behaviors provide critical data for biomechanical studies. Electrical potentials measured from muscles using electromyography (EMG) require discrimination of noise regions as the first step in analysis. An experienced analyst can accurately identify the onset and offset of EMG but this process takes hours to analyze a short (10-15s) record of rhythmic EMG bursts. Existing computational techniques reduce this time but have limitations. These include a universal threshold for delimiting noise regions (i.e., a single signal value for identifying the EMG signal onset and offset), pre-processing using wide time intervals that dampen sensitivity for EMG signal characteristics, poor performance when a low frequency component (e.g., DC offset) is present, and high computational complexity leading to lack of time efficiency. We present a new statistical method and MATLAB script (EMG-Extractor) that includes an adaptive algorithm to discriminate noise regions from EMG that avoids these limitations and allows for multi-channel datasets to be processed. We evaluate the EMG-Extractor with EMG data on mammalian jaw-adductor muscles during mastication, a rhythmic behavior typified by low amplitude onsets/offsets and complex signal pattern. The EMG-Extractor consistently and accurately distinguishes noise from EMG in a manner similar to that of an experienced analyst. It outputs the raw EMG signal region in a form ready for further analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On signal design by the R sub 0 criterion for non-white Gaussian noise channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the R sub 0 criterion for modulation system design is investigated for channels with non-white Gaussian noise. A signal space representation of the waveform channel is developed, and the cut-off rate R sub 0 for vector channels with additive nonwhite Gaussian noise and unquantized demodulation is derived. When the signal unput to the channel is a continuous random vector, maximization of R sub 0 with constrained average signal energy leads to a water-filling interpretation of optimal energy distribution in signal space. The necessary condition for a finite signal set to maximize R sub 0 with constrained energy and an equally likely probability assignment of signal vectors is presented, and an algorithm is outlined for numerically computing the optimum signal set. A necessary condition on a constrained energy, finite signal set is found which maximizes a Taylor series approximation of R sub 0. This signal set is compared with the finite signal set which has the water-filling average energy distribution.

  14. Results of the Simulator smart against synthetic signals using a model of reduced order of BWR with additive and multiplicative noise; Resultados del simulador smart frente a senales sinteticas utilizando un modelo de orden reducido de BWR con ruido aditivo y multiplicativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Montesino, M. E.; Pena, J.; Escriva, A.; Melara, J.

    2011-07-01

    Results of SMART-simulator front of synthetic signals with models of reduced order of BWR with additive and multiplicative noise Under the SMART project, which aims to monitor the signals Cofrentes nuclear plant, we have developed a signal generator of synthetics BWR that will allow together real signals of plant the validation of the monitor.

  15. Signal and Noise Delineation for Prompt-Gamma Detection during Hadrontherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, M.-P.W.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Garcia-Ortega, P.; Sala, P.-R.

    2013-06-01

    Proton and carbon therapies of a human brain were simulated using FLUKA, with particular emphasis on treatment monitoring using the prompt gamma method where activities of the source proton/carbon in the patient's body are to be extracted from the positional profile of exit photons. Tissue heterogeneity ranging from hydrogen to zinc was represented in a VIP-Man anthropomorphic voxel phantom. Each photon exiting the head was scored with ancestry attributes such as the particle type of its parent, the originating collision type and site. These data, not accessible via physical detectors, were analysed to characterise the escaping photons, delineating signal from noise according to the gamma origin and scatter history. Combinations of energy, geometry, time and angle filters, aided by ray-tracing, were studied for the optimal compromise between a sufficiently featured exit profile and a statistically adequate count. These will be put in context with ongoing research in the field; our perspective for the prompt gamma method will be discussed in detail. (authors)

  16. Real Time Phase Noise Meter Based on a Digital Signal Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrisani, Leopoldo; D'Arco, Mauro; Greenhall, Charles A.; Schiano Lo Morille, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    A digital signal-processing meter for phase noise measurement on sinusoidal signals is dealt with. It enlists a special hardware architecture, made up of a core digital signal processor connected to a data acquisition board, and takes advantage of a quadrature demodulation-based measurement scheme, already proposed by the authors. Thanks to an efficient measurement process and an optimized implementation of its fundamental stages, the proposed meter succeeds in exploiting all hardware resources in such an effective way as to gain high performance and real-time operation. For input frequencies up to some hundreds of kilohertz, the meter is capable both of updating phase noise power spectrum while seamlessly capturing the analyzed signal into its memory, and granting as good frequency resolution as few units of hertz.

  17. Signal Amplification Technique (SAT): an approach for improving resolution and reducing image noise in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Plummer, D.; Carson, R.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial resolution improvements in computed tomography (CT) have been limited by the large and unique error propagation properties of this technique. The desire to provide maximum image resolution has resulted in the use of reconstruction filter functions designed to produce tomographic images with resolution as close as possible to the intrinsic detector resolution. Thus, many CT systems produce images with excessive noise with the system resolution determined by the detector resolution rather than the reconstruction algorithm. CT is a rigorous mathematical technique which applies an increasing amplification to increasing spatial frequencies in the measured data. This mathematical approach to spatial frequency amplification cannot distinguish between signal and noise and therefore both are amplified equally. We report here a method in which tomographic resolution is improved by using very small detectors to selectively amplify the signal and not noise. Thus, this approach is referred to as the signal amplification technique (SAT). SAT can provide dramatic improvements in image resolution without increases in statistical noise or dose because increases in the cutoff frequency of the reconstruction algorithm are not required to improve image resolution. Alternatively, in cases where image counts are low, such as in rapid dynamic or receptor studies, statistical noise can be reduced by lowering the cutoff frequency while still maintaining the best possible image resolution. A possible system design for a positron CT system with SAT is described

  18. Signal Processing Methods Monitor Cranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Dr. Norden Huang, of Goddard Space Flight Center, invented a set of algorithms (called the Hilbert-Huang Transform, or HHT) for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary signals that developed into a user-friendly signal processing technology for analyzing time-varying processes. At an auction managed by Ocean Tomo Federal Services LLC, licenses of 10 U.S. patents and 1 domestic patent application related to HHT were sold to DynaDx Corporation, of Mountain View, California. DynaDx is now using the licensed NASA technology for medical diagnosis and prediction of brain blood flow-related problems, such as stroke, dementia, and traumatic brain injury.

  19. Review of neutron and associated process variables noise monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    33 methods involving the use of neutron noise and that of intimately related primary system variables are described. Emphasis is on the applicability of a method to current needs of commercial power plants. Practical suggestions are given on how plants might make better use of this still-developing technology via those methods which have been well-proven. 22 refs.

  20. Coolant flow monitoring in a PWR core using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Lj.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the neutron and temperature noise field have been performed in the 1350 MW PWR nuclear power plant. Evaluation in the low frequency range, where both feedback effects and different thermohydraulics phenomena are dominant, succeeded in measuring the coolant velocity. This is important for determination and localization of essential deviations and possible anomalies. (author)

  1. Stochastic resonance in a gain-noise model of a single-mode laser driven by pump noise and quantum noise with cross-correlation between real and imaginary parts under direct signal modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li-Mei; Cao Li; Wu Da-Jin

    2007-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in a gain-noise model of a single-mode laser driven by a coloured pump noise and a quantum noise with cross-correlation between real and imaginary parts under a direct signal modulation. By using a linear approximation method, we find that the SR appears during the variation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)separately with the pump noise self-correlation time τ, the noise correlation coefficient between the real part and the imaginary part of the quantum noise λq, the attenuation coefficient γ and the deterministic steady-state intensity I0.In addition, it is found that the SR can be characterized not only by the dependence of SNR on the noise variables of τand λq, but also by the dependence of SNR on the laser system variables of γ and I0. Thus our investigation extends the characteristic quantity of SR proposed before.

  2. Signal Processing for MoC brake rattle noise of moving vehicles using prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Cheol; Kwak, Yun Sang; Park, Jun Hong [Dept. of Mechanical Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To verify the possibility of generating rattling noise from a motor on caliper brake system, a test was conducted using a caliper excited with vibrations similar to that in a vehicle running on actual roads; this test was conducted using a quiet shaker installed in an anechoic room. After several hours of external excitation, the test assembly was loosened, and the frequency of rattling noise generation increased. A microphone was used to record the generated noise. The measured signals were analyzed by conventional spectrum analysis. Since the noise is generated as an impact response, the advantages of employing Prony analysis was discussed, and the results were compared to those obtained using conventional fast Fourier transforms. The accuracy of Prony analysis was through endurance tests on different brake systems.

  3. Determination of noise sources and space-dependent reactor transfer functions from measured output signals only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; van Dam, H.; Kleiss, E.B.J.; van Uitert, G.C.; Veldhuis, D.

    1982-01-01

    The measured cross power spectral densities of the signals from three neutron detectors and the displacement of the control rod of the 2 MW research reactor HOR at Delft have been used to determine the space-dependent reactor transfer function, the transfer function of the automatic reactor control system and the noise sources influencing the measured signals. From a block diagram of the reactor with control system and noise sources expressions were derived for the measured cross power spectral densities, which were adjusted to satisfy the requirements following from the adopted model. Then for each frequency point the required transfer functions and noise sources could be derived. The results are in agreement with those of autoregressive modelling of the reactor control feed-back loop. A method has been developed to determine the non-linear characteristics of the automatic reactor control system by analysing the non-gaussian probability density function of the power fluctuations.

  4. Determination of noise sources and space-dependent reactor transfer functions from measured output signals only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The measured cross power spectral densities of the signals from three neutron detectors and the displacement of the control rod of the 2 MW research reactor HOR at Delft have been used to determine the space-dependent reactor transfer function, the transfer function of the automatic reactor control system and the noise sources influencing the measured signals. From a block diagram of the reactor with control system and noise sources expressions were derived for the measured cross power spectral densities, which were adjusted to satisfy the requirements following from the adopted model. Then for each frequency point the required transfer functions and noise sources could be derived. The results are in agreement with those of autoregressive modelling of the reactor control feed-back loop. A method has been developed to determine the non-linear characteristics of the automatic reactor control system by analysing the non-gaussian probability density function of the power fluctuations. (author)

  5. Comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Boyd, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging. We first calculate the signal-to-noise ratio of each process in terms of its controllable experimental conditions. We show that a key distinction is that a thermal ghost image always resides on top of a large background; the fluctuations in this background constitutes an intrinsic noise source for thermal ghost imaging. In contrast, there is a negligible intrinsic background to a quantum ghost image. However, for practical reasons involving achievable illumination levels, acquisition times for thermal ghost images are often much shorter than those for quantum ghost images. We provide quantitative predictions for the conditions under which each process provides superior performance. Our conclusion is that each process can provide useful functionality, although under complementary conditions.

  6. Violin mode amplitude glitch monitor for the presence of excess noise on the monolithic silica suspensions of GEO 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorazu, B; Strain, K A; Heng, I S; Kumar, R, E-mail: b.sorazu@physics.gla.ac.u [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, University Avenue, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-07

    Non-Gaussian features of data from gravitational wave detectors are of interest as unpredictable 'glitches' limit the sensitivity of searches for many kinds of signal. We consider events due to non-random excitations of the test masses and their suspension fibres. These events could, for example, be related to acoustic emissions in the fibres due to the presence and propagation of cracks or another type of structural perturbation, and they would generate excess noise above the Gaussian background, which matches the level expected due to thermal noise. We look for excess noise in the fundamental violin modes of the monolithic silica suspension fibres of GEO 600. We describe the algorithm used to monitor the violin mode amplitude for glitches, present our results and consider how these may be applied to advanced detectors. The conclusion of our analysis is that no excess noise above what was considered to be thermal noise was observed for several days of h(t) data analysed at the frequency of the selected violin modes.

  7. Violin mode amplitude glitch monitor for the presence of excess noise on the monolithic silica suspensions of GEO 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorazu, B; Strain, K A; Heng, I S; Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    Non-Gaussian features of data from gravitational wave detectors are of interest as unpredictable 'glitches' limit the sensitivity of searches for many kinds of signal. We consider events due to non-random excitations of the test masses and their suspension fibres. These events could, for example, be related to acoustic emissions in the fibres due to the presence and propagation of cracks or another type of structural perturbation, and they would generate excess noise above the Gaussian background, which matches the level expected due to thermal noise. We look for excess noise in the fundamental violin modes of the monolithic silica suspension fibres of GEO 600. We describe the algorithm used to monitor the violin mode amplitude for glitches, present our results and consider how these may be applied to advanced detectors. The conclusion of our analysis is that no excess noise above what was considered to be thermal noise was observed for several days of h(t) data analysed at the frequency of the selected violin modes.

  8. Violin mode amplitude glitch monitor for the presence of excess noise on the monolithic silica suspensions of GEO 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorazu, B.; Strain, K. A.; Heng, I. S.; Kumar, R.

    2010-08-01

    Non-Gaussian features of data from gravitational wave detectors are of interest as unpredictable 'glitches' limit the sensitivity of searches for many kinds of signal. We consider events due to non-random excitations of the test masses and their suspension fibres. These events could, for example, be related to acoustic emissions in the fibres due to the presence and propagation of cracks or another type of structural perturbation, and they would generate excess noise above the Gaussian background, which matches the level expected due to thermal noise. We look for excess noise in the fundamental violin modes of the monolithic silica suspension fibres of GEO 600. We describe the algorithm used to monitor the violin mode amplitude for glitches, present our results and consider how these may be applied to advanced detectors. The conclusion of our analysis is that no excess noise above what was considered to be thermal noise was observed for several days of h(t) data analysed at the frequency of the selected violin modes.

  9. A comparative study of chaotic and white noise signals in digital watermarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooney, Aidan; Keating, John G.; Pitas, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    Digital watermarking is an ever increasing and important discipline, especially in the modern electronically-driven world. Watermarking aims to embed a piece of information into digital documents which their owner can use to prove that the document is theirs, at a later stage. In this paper, performance analysis of watermarking schemes is performed on white noise sequences and chaotic sequences for the purpose of watermark generation. Pseudorandom sequences are compared with chaotic sequences generated from the chaotic skew tent map. In particular, analysis is performed on highpass signals generated from both these watermark generation schemes, along with analysis on lowpass watermarks and white noise watermarks. This analysis focuses on the watermarked images after they have been subjected to common image distortion attacks. It is shown that signals generated from highpass chaotic signals have superior performance than highpass noise signals, in the presence of such attacks. It is also shown that watermarks generated from lowpass chaotic signals have superior performance over the other signal types analysed

  10. Signal-to-noise ratio analysis and evaluation of the Hadamard imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, D. J.; Katzberg, S. J.; Spiers, R. B., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio performance of the Hadamard imaging technique is analyzed and an experimental evaluation of a laboratory Hadamard imager is presented. A comparison between the performances of Hadamard and conventional imaging techniques shows that the Hadamard technique is superior only when the imaging objective lens is required to have an effective F (focus) number of about 2 or slower.

  11. Using hyperentanglement to enhance resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and measurement time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James F.

    2017-03-01

    A hyperentanglement-based atmospheric imaging/detection system involving only a signal and an ancilla photon will be considered for optical and infrared frequencies. Only the signal photon will propagate in the atmosphere and its loss will be classical. The ancilla photon will remain within the sensor experiencing low loss. Closed form expressions for the wave function, normalization, density operator, reduced density operator, symmetrized logarithmic derivative, quantum Fisher information, quantum Cramer-Rao lower bound, coincidence probabilities, probability of detection, probability of false alarm, probability of error after M measurements, signal-to-noise ratio, quantum Chernoff bound, time-on-target expressions related to probability of error, and resolution will be provided. The effect of noise in every mode will be included as well as loss. The system will provide the basic design for an imaging/detection system functioning at optical or infrared frequencies that offers better than classical angular and range resolution. Optimization for enhanced resolution will be included. The signal-to-noise ratio will be increased by a factor equal to the number of modes employed during the hyperentanglement process. Likewise, the measurement time can be reduced by the same factor. The hyperentanglement generator will typically make use of entanglement in polarization, energy-time, orbital angular momentum and so on. Mathematical results will be provided describing the system's performance as a function of loss mechanisms and noise.

  12. Signal-to-Noise ratio and design complexity based on Unified Loss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taguchi's quality loss function for larger-the-better performance characteristics uses a reciprocal transformation to compute quality loss. This paper suggests that reciprocal transformation unnecessarily complicates and may distort results. Examples of this distortion include the signal-to-noise ratio based on mean squared ...

  13. Analysis of Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the Laser Doppler Velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars

    1973-01-01

    The signal-to-shot-noise ratio of the photocurrent of a laser Doppler anemometer is calculated as a function of the parameters which describe the system. It is found that the S/N is generally a growing function of receiver area, that few large particles are better than many small ones, and that g...

  14. Characterization of transient noise in Advanced LIGO relevant to gravitational wave signal GW150914

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adamo, M.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterji, S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.A.; DeRosa, R. T.; Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Franco, S; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, V. Germain Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzlez, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    On 14 September 2015, a gravitational wave signal from a coalescing black hole binary system was observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors. This paper describes the transient noise backgrounds used to determine the significance of the event (designated GW150914) and presents the results of

  15. The influence of the cathodic process on the interpretation of electrochemical noise signals arising from pitting corrosion of stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapper, Helmuth Sarmiento [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Helmuth.sarmiento-klapper@bam.de; Goellner, Joachim [Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, P.O. Box 4120, Magdeburg (Germany); Heyn, Andreas [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, P.O. Box 4120, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The use of electrochemical noise (EN) measurements for the investigation and monitoring of corrosion has allowed many interesting advances in the corrosion science in recent years. A special advantage of EN measurements includes the possibility to detect and study the early stages of localized corrosion. Nevertheless, the understanding of the electrochemical information included in the EN signal is actually very limited. The role of the cathodic process on the EN signals remains uncertain and has not been sufficiently investigated to date. Thus, an accurate understanding of the influence of the cathodic process on the EN signal is still lacking. On the basis of different kinetics of the oxygen reduction it was established that the anodic amplitude of transients arising from pitting corrosion on stainless steel can be decreased by the corresponding electron consumption of the cathodic process. Therefore, the stronger the electron consumption, the weaker the anodic amplitude of the EN signal becomes. EN signals arising from pitting corrosion on stainless steel can be measured because the cathodic process is inhibited by the passive layer. This was confirmed by means of EN measurements under cathodic polarisation. Since the cathodic process plays a decisive role on the form of transients arising from pitting corrosion, its influence must be considered in the evaluation and interpretation of the EN signals.

  16. An Application of Reassigned Time-Frequency Representations for Seismic Noise/Signal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S. M.; Langston, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic data recorded by surface arrays are often strongly contaminated by unwanted noise. This background noise makes the detection of small magnitude events difficult. An automatic method for seismic noise/signal decomposition is presented based upon an enhanced time-frequency representation. Synchrosqueezing is a time-frequency reassignment method aimed at sharpening a time-frequency picture. Noise can be distinguished from the signal and suppressed more easily in this reassigned domain. The threshold level is estimated using a general cross validation approach that does not rely on any prior knowledge about the noise level. Efficiency of thresholding has been improved by adding a pre-processing step based on higher order statistics and a post-processing step based on adaptive hard-thresholding. In doing so, both accuracy and speed of the denoising have been improved compared to our previous algorithms (Mousavi and Langston, 2016a, 2016b; Mousavi et al., 2016). The proposed algorithm can either kill the noise (either white or colored) and keep the signal or kill the signal and keep the noise. Hence, It can be used in either normal denoising applications or in ambient noise studies. Application of the proposed method on synthetic and real seismic data shows the effectiveness of the method for denoising/designaling of local microseismic, and ocean bottom seismic data. References: Mousavi, S.M., C. A. Langston., and S. P. Horton (2016), Automatic Microseismic Denoising and Onset Detection Using the Synchrosqueezed-Continuous Wavelet Transform. Geophysics. 81, V341-V355, doi: 10.1190/GEO2015-0598.1. Mousavi, S.M., and C. A. Langston (2016a), Hybrid Seismic Denoising Using Higher-Order Statistics and Improved Wavelet Block Thresholding. Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 106, doi: 10.1785/0120150345. Mousavi, S.M., and C.A. Langston (2016b), Adaptive noise estimation and suppression for improving microseismic event detection, Journal of Applied Geophysics., doi: http

  17. Model-based temperature noise monitoring methods for LMFBR core anomaly detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaoki, Tetsuo; Sonoda, Yukio; Sato, Masuo; Takahashi, Ryoichi.

    1994-01-01

    Temperature noise, measured by thermocouples mounted at each core fuel subassembly, is considered to be the most useful signal for detecting and locating local cooling anomalies in an LMFBR core. However, the core outlet temperature noise contains background noise due to fluctuations in the operating parameters including reactor power. It is therefore necessary to reduce this background noise for highly sensitive anomaly detection by subtracting predictable components from the measured signal. In the present study, both a physical model and an autoregressive model were applied to noise data measured in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The results indicate that the autoregressive model has a higher precision than the physical model in background noise prediction. Based on these results, an 'autoregressive model modification method' is proposed, in which a temporary autoregressive model is generated by interpolation or extrapolation of reference models identified under a small number of different operating conditions. The generated autoregressive model has shown sufficient precision over a wide range of reactor power in applications to artificial noise data produced by an LMFBR noise simulator even when the coolant flow rate was changed to keep a constant power-to-flow ratio. (author)

  18. Benchmarking the Algorithms to Detect Seasonal Signals Under Different Noise Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, A.; Bogusz, J.; Bos, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) position time series contain seasonal signals. Among the others, annual and semi-annual are the most powerful. Widely, these oscillations are modelled as curves with constant amplitudes, using the Weighted Least-Squares (WLS) algorithm. However, in reality, the seasonal signatures vary over time, as their geophysical causes are not constant. Different algorithms have been already used to cover this time-variability, as Wavelet Decomposition (WD), Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA), Chebyshev Polynomial (CP) or Kalman Filter (KF). In this research, we employed 376 globally distributed GPS stations which time series contributed to the newest International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2014). We show that for c.a. 20% of stations the amplitudes of seasonal signal varies over time of more than 1.0 mm. Then, we compare the WD, SSA, CP and KF algorithms for a set of synthetic time series to quantify them under different noise conditions. We show that when variations of seasonal signals are ignored, the power-law character is biased towards flicker noise. The most reliable estimates of the variations were found to be given by SSA and KF. These methods also perform the best for other noise levels while WD, and to a lesser extend also CP, have trouble in separating the seasonal signal from the noise which leads to an underestimation in the spectral index of power-law noise of around 0.1. For real ITRF2014 GPS data we discovered, that SSA and KF are capable to model 49-84% and 77-90% of the variance of the true varying seasonal signals, respectively.

  19. An Enhanced Empirical Wavelet Transform for Features Extraction from Wind Turbine Condition Monitoring Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Shi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction from nonlinear and non-stationary (NNS wind turbine (WT condition monitoring (CM signals is challenging. Previously, much effort has been spent to develop advanced signal processing techniques for dealing with CM signals of this kind. The Empirical Wavelet Transform (EWT is one of the achievements attributed to these efforts. The EWT takes advantage of Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD in dealing with NNS signals but is superior to the EMD in mode decomposition and robustness against noise. However, the conventional EWT meets difficulty in properly segmenting the frequency spectrum of the signal, especially when lacking pre-knowledge of the signal. The inappropriate segmentation of the signal spectrum will inevitably lower the accuracy of the EWT result and thus raise the difficulty of WT CM. To address this issue, an enhanced EWT is proposed in this paper by developing a feasible and efficient spectrum segmentation method. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been verified by using the bearing and gearbox CM data that are open to the public for the purpose of research. The experiment has shown that, after adopting the proposed method, it becomes much easier and more reliable to segment the frequency spectrum of the signal. Moreover, benefitting from the correct segmentation of the signal spectrum, the fault-related features of the CM signals are presented more explicitly in the time-frequency map of the enhanced EWT, despite the considerable noise contained in the signal and the shortage of pre-knowledge about the machine being investigated.

  20. Stochastic amplification and signaling in enzymatic futile cycles through noise-induced bistability with oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilov, Michael; Plyasunov, Sergey; Arkin, Adam P.

    2005-02-01

    Stochastic effects in biomolecular systems have now been recognized as a major physiologically and evolutionarily important factor in the development and function of many living organisms. Nevertheless, they are often thought of as providing only moderate refinements to the behaviors otherwise predicted by the classical deterministic system description. In this work we show by using both analytical and numerical investigation that at least in one ubiquitous class of (bio)chemical-reaction mechanisms, enzymatic futile cycles, the external noise may induce a bistable oscillatory (dynamic switching) behavior that is both quantitatively and qualitatively different from what is predicted or possible deterministically. We further demonstrate that the noise required to produce these distinct properties can itself be caused by a set of auxiliary chemical reactions, making it feasible for biological systems of sufficient complexity to generate such behavior internally. This new stochastic dynamics then serves to confer additional functional modalities on the enzymatic futile cycle mechanism that include stochastic amplification and signaling, the characteristics of which could be controlled by both the type and parameters of the driving noise. Hence, such noise-induced phenomena may, among other roles, potentially offer a novel type of control mechanism in pathways that contain these cycles and the like units. In particular, observations of endogenous or externally driven noise-induced dynamics in regulatory networks may thus provide additional insight into their topology, structure, and kinetics. network motif | signal transduction | chemical reaction | synthetic biology | systems biology

  1. Noise-assisted data processing with empirical mode decomposition in biomedical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Alexandros; Constantinou, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology is described in order to investigate the performance of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) in biomedical signals, and especially in the case of electrocardiogram (ECG). Synthetic ECG signals corrupted with white Gaussian noise are employed and time series of various lengths are processed with EMD in order to extract the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). A statistical significance test is implemented for the identification of IMFs with high-level noise components and their exclusion from denoising procedures. Simulation campaign results reveal that a decrease of processing time is accomplished with the introduction of preprocessing stage, prior to the application of EMD in biomedical time series. Furthermore, the variation in the number of IMFs according to the type of the preprocessing stage is studied as a function of SNR and time-series length. The application of the methodology in MIT-BIH ECG records is also presented in order to verify the findings in real ECG signals.

  2. Symbol signal-to-noise ratio loss in square-wave subcarrier downconversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Y.; Statman, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the simulated results of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss in the process of a square-wave subcarrier down conversion. In a previous article, the SNR degradation was evaluated at the output of the down converter based on the signal and noise power change. Unlike in the previous article, the SNR loss is defined here as the difference between the actual and theoretical symbol SNR's for the same symbol-error rate at the output of the symbol matched filter. The results show that an average SNR loss of 0.3 dB can be achieved with tenth-order infinite impulse response (IIR) filters. This loss is a 0.2-dB increase over the SNR degradation in the previous analysis where neither the signal distortion nor the symbol detector was considered.

  3. Noise Suppression in ECG Signals through Efficient One-Step Wavelet Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Castillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates the application of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT for wandering and noise suppression in electrocardiographic (ECG signals. A novel one-step implementation is presented, which allows improving the overall denoising process. In addition an exhaustive study is carried out, defining threshold limits and thresholding rules for optimal wavelet denoising using this presented technique. The system has been tested using synthetic ECG signals, which allow accurately measuring the effect of the proposed processing. Moreover, results from real abdominal ECG signals acquired from pregnant women are presented in order to validate the presented approach.

  4. Web monitoring of industrial signals using embedded systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Augusto Romero-Molano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the design of software and hardware for a system of web monitoring of industrial signals. This prototype provides a web interface which can observe in real time the status of four industrial-type signal on-off. MSP432 microcontroller is used for sampling and transmitting monitored signals to a Raspberry PI which receives by a UART link the MSP432 monitored data and presents them immediately in the front-end web application. The prototype design was verified with a pneumatic application that consists of four single-acting cylinders and it was observed an efficient synchronization between the occurrence of the triggering event or change in status of any of the monitored cylinder and web publishing.

  5. FPGA implementation of ICA algorithm for blind signal separation and adaptive noise canceling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Min; Park, Hyung-Min; Kim, Taesu; Choi, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Soo-Young

    2003-01-01

    An field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of independent component analysis (ICA) algorithm is reported for blind signal separation (BSS) and adaptive noise canceling (ANC) in real time. In order to provide enormous computing power for ICA-based algorithms with multipath reverberation, a special digital processor is designed and implemented in FPGA. The chip design fully utilizes modular concept and several chips may be put together for complex applications with a large number of noise sources. Experimental results with a fabricated test board are reported for ANC only, BSS only, and simultaneous ANC/BSS, which demonstrates successful speech enhancement in real environments in real time.

  6. Low-Noise CMOS Circuits for On-Chip Signal Processing in Focal-Plane Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    The performance of focal-plane arrays can be significantly enhanced through the use of on-chip signal processing. Novel, in-pixel, on-focal-plane, analog signal-processing circuits for high-performance imaging are presented in this thesis. The presence of a high background-radiation is a major impediment for infrared focal-plane array design. An in-pixel, background-suppression scheme, using dynamic analog current memory circuit, is described. The scheme also suppresses spatial noise that results from response non-uniformities of photo-detectors, leading to background limited infrared detector readout performance. Two new, low-power, compact, current memory circuits, optimized for operation at ultra-low current levels required in infrared-detection, are presented. The first one is a self-cascading current memory that increases the output impedance, and the second one is a novel, switch feed-through reducing current memory, implemented using error-current feedback. This circuit can operate with a residual absolute -error of less than 0.1%. The storage-time of the memory is long enough to also find applications in neural network circuits. In addition, a voltage-mode, accurate, low-offset, low-power, high-uniformity, random-access sample-and-hold cell, implemented using a CCD with feedback, is also presented for use in background-suppression and neural network applications. A new, low noise, ultra-low level signal readout technique, implemented by individually counting photo-electrons within the detection pixel, is presented. The output of each unit-cell is a digital word corresponding to the intensity of the photon flux, and the readout is noise free. This technique requires the use of unit-cell amplifiers that feature ultra-high-gain, low-power, self-biasing capability and noise in sub-electron levels. Both single-input and differential-input implementations of such amplifiers are investigated. A noise analysis technique is presented for analyzing sampled

  7. Measurements of noise immission from wind turbines at receptor locations: Use of a vertical microphone board to improve the signal-to-noise ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegeant, Olivier

    1999-01-01

    The growing interest in wind energy has increased the need of accuracy in wind turbine noise immission measurements and thus, the need of new measurement techniques. This paper shows that mounting the microphone on a vertical board improves the signal-to-noise ratio over the whole frequency range compared to the free microphone technique. Indeed, the wind turbine is perceived two times noisier by the microphone due to the signal reflection by the board while, in addition, the wind noise is reduced. Furthermore, the board shielding effect allows the measurements to be carried out in the presence of reflecting surfaces such as building facades

  8. Dynamic characteristics of background seismic noise according to records of nuclear monitoring seismic stations in Kazakstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyashova, N.N.; Sinyova, Z.I.; Komarov, I.I.; Mikhailova, N.N.

    1998-01-01

    The seismic stations of Kazakstan, included into nuclear monitoring network (see fig.1) are equipped with broad hand seismometers; seismic data are recorded in digital format. All this allows to investigate spectral and time characteristics of seismic background noise in very large frequency diapason (more than 3-5 orders), for all three components of oscillation vector. The spectral density of background seismic noise for vertical and both horizontal components (fig.2) was calculated for all of the observation points. The regular features of structure of noise spectra, inherent for all of the studied observation points, as well as some features, specific for studied places were found. The curves of spectral noise density were compared with global noise model, determined by the data of Global Seismological Network (GSN)

  9. Corrosion monitoring in a straw-fired power plant using an electrochemical noise probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm; Bjerrum, Niels; Petrushina, Irina

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical Noise Measurements have been carried out in situ in a straw-fired power plant using an experimental probe constructed from alumina and AlSl 347 steel. Based on a framework of controlled laboratory experiments it has been found that electrochemical noise has the unique ability...... to provide in-situ monitoring of intergranular corrosion in progress. The probe had a lifetime of two months. It was shown that down-time corrosion in the boiler was negligible. Electrochemical noise data indicated that metal temperatures around 590 degrees C should be avoided as the intergranular corrosion...

  10. Digital Generation of Noise-Signals with Arbitrary Constant or Time-Varying Spectra (A noise generation software package and its application)

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Artificial creation of arbitrary noise signals is used in accelerator physics to reproduce a measured perturbation spectrum for simulations but also to generate real-time shaped noise spectra for controlled emittance blow-up giving tailored properties to the final bunch shape. It is demonstrated here how one can produce numerically what is, for all practical purposes, an unlimited quantity of non-periodic noise data having any predefined spectral density. This spectral density may be constant or varying with time. The noise output never repeats and has excellent statistical properties, important for very long-term applications. It is difficult to obtain such flexibility and spectral cleanliness using analogue techniques. This algorithm was applied both in computer simulations of bunch behaviour in the presence of RF noise in the PS, SPS and LHC and also to generate real-time noise, tracking the synchrotron frequency change during the energy ramp of the SPS and producing controlled longitudinal emittance blow-...

  11. Defining Biological Networks for Noise Buffering and Signaling Sensitivity Using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable information processing in cells requires high sensitivity to changes in the input signal but low sensitivity to random fluctuations in the transmitted signal. There are often many alternative biological circuits qualifying for this biological function. Distinguishing theses biological models and finding the most suitable one are essential, as such model ranking, by experimental evidence, will help to judge the support of the working hypotheses forming each model. Here, we employ the approximate Bayesian computation (ABC method based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC to search for biological circuits that can maintain signaling sensitivity while minimizing noise propagation, focusing on cases where the noise is characterized by rapid fluctuations. By systematically analyzing three-component circuits, we rank these biological circuits and identify three-basic-biological-motif buffering noise while maintaining sensitivity to long-term changes in input signals. We discuss in detail a particular implementation in control of nutrient homeostasis in yeast. The principal component analysis of the posterior provides insight into the nature of the reaction between nodes.

  12. Spectral data de-noising using semi-classical signal analysis: application to localized MRS

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2016-09-05

    In this paper, we propose a new post-processing technique called semi-classical signal analysis (SCSA) for MRS data de-noising. Similar to Fourier transformation, SCSA decomposes the input real positive MR spectrum into a set of linear combinations of squared eigenfunctions equivalently represented by localized functions with shape derived from the potential function of the Schrodinger operator. In this manner, the MRS spectral peaks represented as a sum of these \\'shaped like\\' functions are efficiently separated from noise and accurately analyzed. The performance of the method is tested by analyzing simulated and real MRS data. The results obtained demonstrate that the SCSA method is highly efficient in localized MRS data de-noising and allows for an accurate data quantification.

  13. Spectral data de-noising using semi-classical signal analysis: application to localized MRS

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Zhang, Jiayu; Achten, Eric; Serrai, Hacene

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new post-processing technique called semi-classical signal analysis (SCSA) for MRS data de-noising. Similar to Fourier transformation, SCSA decomposes the input real positive MR spectrum into a set of linear combinations of squared eigenfunctions equivalently represented by localized functions with shape derived from the potential function of the Schrodinger operator. In this manner, the MRS spectral peaks represented as a sum of these 'shaped like' functions are efficiently separated from noise and accurately analyzed. The performance of the method is tested by analyzing simulated and real MRS data. The results obtained demonstrate that the SCSA method is highly efficient in localized MRS data de-noising and allows for an accurate data quantification.

  14. Channel noise enhances signal detectability in a model of acoustic neuron through the stochastic resonance paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberti, M; Paffi, A; Maggio, F; De Angelis, A; Apollonio, F; d'Inzeo, G

    2009-01-01

    A number of experimental investigations have evidenced the extraordinary sensitivity of neuronal cells to weak input stimulations, including electromagnetic (EM) fields. Moreover, it has been shown that biological noise, due to random channels gating, acts as a tuning factor in neuronal processing, according to the stochastic resonant (SR) paradigm. In this work the attention is focused on noise arising from the stochastic gating of ionic channels in a model of Ranvier node of acoustic fibers. The small number of channels gives rise to a high noise level, which is able to cause a spike train generation even in the absence of stimulations. A SR behavior has been observed in the model for the detection of sinusoidal signals at frequencies typical of the speech.

  15. Measuring multielectron beam imaging fidelity with a signal-to-noise ratio analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Maseeh; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Quoi, Kathy; Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad

    2016-07-01

    Java Monte Carlo Simulator for Secondary Electrons (JMONSEL) simulations are used to generate expected imaging responses of chosen test cases of patterns and defects with the ability to vary parameters for beam energy, spot size, pixel size, and/or defect material and form factor. The patterns are representative of the design rules for an aggressively scaled FinFET-type design. With these simulated images and resulting shot noise, a signal-to-noise framework is developed, which relates to defect detection probabilities. Additionally, with this infrastructure, the effect of detection chain noise and frequency-dependent system response can be made, allowing for targeting of best recipe parameters for multielectron beam inspection validation experiments. Ultimately, these results should lead to insights into how such parameters will impact tool design, including necessary doses for defect detection and estimations of scanning speeds for achieving high throughput for high-volume manufacturing.

  16. Noise removal in extended depth of field microscope images through nonlinear signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahreddine, Ramzi N; Cormack, Robert H; Cogswell, Carol J

    2013-04-01

    Extended depth of field (EDF) microscopy, achieved through computational optics, allows for real-time 3D imaging of live cell dynamics. EDF is achieved through a combination of point spread function engineering and digital image processing. A linear Wiener filter has been conventionally used to deconvolve the image, but it suffers from high frequency noise amplification and processing artifacts. A nonlinear processing scheme is proposed which extends the depth of field while minimizing background noise. The nonlinear filter is generated via a training algorithm and an iterative optimizer. Biological microscope images processed with the nonlinear filter show a significant improvement in image quality and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional linear filter.

  17. Bayesian Inference for Signal-Based Seismic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional seismic monitoring systems rely on discrete detections produced by station processing software, discarding significant information present in the original recorded signal. SIG-VISA (Signal-based Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis) is a system for global seismic monitoring through Bayesian inference on seismic signals. By modeling signals directly, our forward model is able to incorporate a rich representation of the physics underlying the signal generation process, including source mechanisms, wave propagation, and station response. This allows inference in the model to recover the qualitative behavior of recent geophysical methods including waveform matching and double-differencing, all as part of a unified Bayesian monitoring system that simultaneously detects and locates events from a global network of stations. We demonstrate recent progress in scaling up SIG-VISA to efficiently process the data stream of global signals recorded by the International Monitoring System (IMS), including comparisons against existing processing methods that show increased sensitivity from our signal-based model and in particular the ability to locate events (including aftershock sequences that can tax analyst processing) precisely from waveform correlation effects. We also provide a Bayesian analysis of an alleged low-magnitude event near the DPRK test site in May 2010 [1] [2], investigating whether such an event could plausibly be detected through automated processing in a signal-based monitoring system. [1] Zhang, Miao and Wen, Lianxing. "Seismological Evidence for a Low-Yield Nuclear Test on 12 May 2010 in North Korea". Seismological Research Letters, January/February 2015. [2] Richards, Paul. "A Seismic Event in North Korea on 12 May 2010". CTBTO SnT 2015 oral presentation, video at https://video-archive.ctbto.org/index.php/kmc/preview/partner_id/103/uiconf_id/4421629/entry_id/0_ymmtpps0/delivery/http

  18. Effect of daily noise exposure monitoring on annual rates of hearing loss in industrial workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Peter M; Galusha, Deron; Kirsche, Sharon R; Cullen, Mark R; Slade, Martin D; Dixon-Ernst, Christine

    2011-06-01

    Occupational noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is prevalent, yet evidence on the effectiveness of preventive interventions is lacking. The effectiveness of a new technology allowing workers to monitor daily at-ear noise exposure was analysed. Workers in the hearing conservation program of an aluminium smelter were recruited because of accelerated rates of hearing loss. The intervention consisted of daily monitoring of at-ear noise exposure and regular feedback on exposures from supervisors. The annual rate of change in high frequency hearing average at 2, 3 and 4 KHz before intervention (2000-2004) and 4 years after intervention (2006-2009) was determined. Annual rates of loss were compared between 78 intervention subjects and 234 controls in other company smelters matched for age, gender and high frequency hearing threshold level in 2005. Individuals monitoring daily noise exposure experienced on average no further worsening of high frequency hearing (average rate of hearing change at 2, 3 and 4 KHz = -0.5 dB/year). Matched controls also showed decelerating hearing loss, the difference in rates between the two groups being significant (p hearing loss showed a similar trend but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.06). Monitoring daily occupational noise exposure inside hearing protection with ongoing administrative feedback apparently reduces the risk of occupational NIHL in industrial workers. Longer follow-up of these workers will help determine the significance of the intervention effect. Intervention studies for the prevention of NIHL need to include appropriate control groups.

  19. Passive monitoring of a sea dike during a tidal cycle using sea waves as a seismic noise source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Anaëlle; Feuvre, Mathieu Le; Cote, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    Over the past decade, ambient seismic noise has been used successfully to monitor various geological objects with high accuracy. Recently, it has been shown that surface seismic waves propagating within a sea dike body can be retrieved from the cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise generated by sea waves. We use sea wave impacts to monitor the response of a sea dike during a tidal cycle using empirical Green's functions. These are obtained either by cross-correlation or deconvolution, from signals recorded by sensors installed linearly on the crest of a dike. Our analysis is based on delay and spectral amplitude measurements performed on reconstructed surface waves propagating along the array. We show that localized variations of velocity and attenuation are correlated with changes in water level as a probable consequence of water infiltration inside the structure. Sea dike monitoring is of critical importance for safety and economic reasons, as internal erosion is generally only detected at late stages by visual observations. The method proposed here may provide a solution for detecting structural weaknesses, monitoring progressive internal erosion, and delineating areas of interest for further geotechnical studies, in view to understanding the erosion mechanisms involved.

  20. The effect of hearing aid signal-processing schemes on acceptable noise levels: perception and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Stangl, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test determines the maximum noise level that an individual is willing to accept while listening to speech. The first objective of the present study was to systematically investigate the effect of wide dynamic range compression processing (WDRC), and its combined effect with digital noise reduction (DNR) and directional processing (DIR), on ANL. Because ANL represents the lowest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that a listener is willing to accept, the second objective was to examine whether the hearing aid output SNR could predict aided ANL across different combinations of hearing aid signal-processing schemes. Twenty-five adults with sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. ANL was measured monaurally in two unaided and seven aided conditions, in which the status of the hearing aid processing schemes (enabled or disabled) and the location of noise (front or rear) were manipulated. The hearing aid output SNR was measured for each listener in each condition using a phase-inversion technique. The aided ANL was predicted by unaided ANL and hearing aid output SNR, under the assumption that the lowest acceptable SNR at the listener's eardrum is a constant across different ANL test conditions. Study results revealed that, on average, WDRC increased (worsened) ANL by 1.5 dB, while DNR and DIR decreased (improved) ANL by 1.1 and 2.8 dB, respectively. Because the effects of WDRC and DNR on ANL were opposite in direction but similar in magnitude, the ANL of linear/DNR-off was not significantly different from that of WDRC/DNR-on. The results further indicated that the pattern of ANL change across different aided conditions was consistent with the pattern of hearing aid output SNR change created by processing schemes. Compared with linear processing, WDRC creates a noisier sound image and makes listeners less willing to accept noise. However, this negative effect on noise acceptance can be offset by DNR, regardless of microphone mode

  1. Accuracy of signal-to-noise ratio measurement method for magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Akio; Miyai, Akira; Maeda, Fumie; Fukutake, Hiroyuki; Kikumoto, Rikiya

    2003-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a magnetic resonance image is a common measure of imager performance. However, evaluations for the calculation of the SNR use various methods. A problem with measuring SNR is caused by the distortion of noise statistics in commonly used magnitude images. In this study, measurement accuracy was compared among four methods of evaluating SNR according to the size and position of regions of interest (ROIs). The results indicated that the method that used the difference between two images showed the best agreement with the theoretical value. In the method that used a single image, the SNR calculated by using a small size of ROI showed better agreement with the theoretical value because of noise bias and image artifacts. However, in the method that used the difference between two images, a large size of ROI was better in reducing statistical errors. In the same way, the methods that used air noise and air signal were better when applied to a large ROI. In addition, the image subtraction process used to calculate pixel-by-pixel differences in images may reach zero on a minus pixel value when using an image processor with the MRI system and apparatuses associated with it. A revised equation is presented for this case. It is important to understand the characteristics of each method and to choose a suitable method carefully according to the purpose of the study. (author)

  2. Modeling random telegraph signal noise in CMOS image sensor under low light based on binomial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu; Wang Guangyi; Lu Xinmiao; Hu Yongcai; Xu Jiangtao

    2016-01-01

    The random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower MOSFET is the principle component of the noise in the CMOS image sensor under low light. In this paper, the physical and statistical model of the random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower based on the binomial distribution is set up. The number of electrons captured or released by the oxide traps in the unit time is described as the random variables which obey the binomial distribution. As a result, the output states and the corresponding probabilities of the first and the second samples of the correlated double sampling circuit are acquired. The standard deviation of the output states after the correlated double sampling circuit can be obtained accordingly. In the simulation section, one hundred thousand samples of the source follower MOSFET have been simulated, and the simulation results show that the proposed model has the similar statistical characteristics with the existing models under the effect of the channel length and the density of the oxide trap. Moreover, the noise histogram of the proposed model has been evaluated at different environmental temperatures. (paper)

  3. Nonlinear Bayesian Estimation of BOLD Signal under Non-Gaussian Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fahim Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal has been a subject of study for over a decade in the neuroimaging community. Inspired from fluid dynamics, the hemodynamic model provides a plausible yet convincing interpretation of the BOLD signal by amalgamating effects of dynamic physiological changes in blood oxygenation, cerebral blood flow and volume. The nonautonomous, nonlinear set of differential equations of the hemodynamic model constitutes the process model while the weighted nonlinear sum of the physiological variables forms the measurement model. Plagued by various noise sources, the time series fMRI measurement data is mostly assumed to be affected by additive Gaussian noise. Though more feasible, the assumption may cause the designed filter to perform poorly if made to work under non-Gaussian environment. In this paper, we present a data assimilation scheme that assumes additive non-Gaussian noise, namely, the e-mixture noise, affecting the measurements. The proposed filter MAGSF and the celebrated EKF are put to test by performing joint optimal Bayesian filtering to estimate both the states and parameters governing the hemodynamic model under non-Gaussian environment. Analyses using both the synthetic and real data reveal superior performance of the MAGSF as compared to EKF.

  4. Stochastic resonance and stability for a stochastic metapopulation system subjected to non-Gaussian noise and multiplicative periodic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang-Kang, Wang; Xian-Bin, Liu; Yu, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the stability and stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon induced by the multiplicative periodic signal for a metapopulation system driven by the additive Gaussian noise, multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and noise correlation time is investigated. By using the fast descent method, unified colored noise approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld’s SR theory, the analytical expressions of the stationary probability distribution function and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are derived in the adiabatic limit. Via numerical calculations, each effect of the addictive noise intensity, the multiplicative noise intensity and the correlation time upon the steady state probability distribution function and the SNR is discussed, respectively. It is shown that multiplicative, additive noises and the departure parameter from the Gaussian noise can all destroy the stability of the population system. However, the noise correlation time can consolidate the stability of the system. On the other hand, the correlation time always plays an important role in motivating the SR and enhancing the SNR. Under different parameter conditions of the system, the multiplicative, additive noises and the departure parameter can not only excite SR phenomenon, but also restrain the SR phenomenon, which demonstrates the complexity of different noises upon the nonlinear system. (paper)

  5. Signal discrimination of ULF electromagnetic data with using singular spectrum analysis – an attempt to detect train noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saito

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic phenomena associated with crustal activities have been reported in a wide frequency range (DC-HF. In particular, ULF electromagnetic phenomena are the most promising among them because of the deeper skin depth. However, ULF geoelctromagnetic data are a superposition of signals of different origins. They originated from interactions between the geomagnetic field and the solar wind, leak current by a DC-driven train (train noise, precipitation, and so on. In general, the intensity of electromagnetic signals associated with crustal activity is smaller than the above variations. Therefore, in order to detect a smaller signal, signal discrimination such as noise reduction or identification of noises is very important. In this paper, the singular spectrum analysis (SSA has been performed to detect the DC-driven train noise in geoelectric potential difference data. The aim of this paper is to develop an effective algorithm for the DC-driven train noise detection.

  6. Signal-to-noise ratio of FT-IR CO gas spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, J.; Clausen, Sønnik

    1999-01-01

    in emission and transmission spectrometry, an investigation of the SNR in CO gas spectra as a function of spectral resolution has been carried out. We present a method to (1) determine experimentally the SNR at constant throughput, (2) determine the SNR on the basis of measured noise levels and Hitran......The minimum amount of a gaseous compound which can be detected and quantified with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers depends on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the measured gas spectra. In order to use low-resolution FT-IR spectrometers to measure combustion gases like CO and CO2...... simulated signals, and (3) determine the SNR of CO from high to low spectral resolutions related to the molecular linewidth and vibrational-rotational lines spacing. In addition, SNR values representing different spectral resolutions but scaled to equal measurement times were compared. It was found...

  7. Speed of response, pile-up and signal to noise ratio in liquid ionization calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, J.

    1989-11-01

    Although liquid ionization calorimeters have been mostly used up to now with slow readout, their signals have a fast rise time. However, it is not easy to get this fast component of the pulse out of the calorimeter. For this purpose a new connection scheme of the electrodes, the electrostatic transformer, is presented and discussed. This technique reduces the detector capacitance while keeping the number of channels at an acceptable level. Also it allows the use of transmission lines to bring signals from the electrodes to the preamplifiers which could be located in an accessible area. With room temperature liquids the length of these cables can be short, keeping the added noise at a reasonable level. Contributions to the error on the energy measurement from pile up and electronics noise are studied in detail. Even on this issue, room temperature liquids (TMP/TMS) are found to be competitive with cold liquid argon at the expense of a moderately higher gap voltage

  8. The signal-to-noise analysis of the Little-Hopfield model revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolle, D; Blanco, J Busquets; Verbeiren, T

    2004-01-01

    Using the generating functional analysis an exact recursion relation is derived for the time evolution of the effective local field of the fully connected Little-Hopfield model. It is shown that, by leaving out the feedback correlations arising from earlier times in this effective dynamics, one precisely finds the recursion relations usually employed in the signal-to-noise approach. The consequences of this approximation as well as the physics behind it are discussed. In particular, it is pointed out why it is hard to notice the effects, especially for model parameters corresponding to retrieval. Numerical simulations confirm these findings. The signal-to-noise analysis is then extended to include all correlations, making it a full theory for dynamics at the level of the generating functional analysis. The results are applied to the frequently employed extremely diluted (a)symmetric architectures and to sequence processing networks

  9. The effects of noise-bandwidth, noise-fringe duration, and temporal signal location on the binaural masking-level difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Ifat; Henning, G Bruce

    2012-07-01

    The effects of forward and backward noise fringes on binaural signal detectability were investigated. Masked thresholds for a 12-ms, 250-Hz, sinusoidal signal masked by Gaussian noise, centered at 250 Hz, with bandwidths from 3 to 201 Hz, were obtained in N(0)S(0) and N(0)S(π) configurations. The signal was (a) temporally centered in a 12-ms noise burst (no fringe), (b) presented at the start of a 600-ms noise burst (backward fringe), or (c) temporally centered in a 600-ms noise burst (forward-plus-backward fringe). For noise bandwidths between 3 and 75 Hz, detection in N(0)S(0) improved with the addition of a backward fringe, improving further with an additional forward fringe; there was little improvement in N(0)S(π). The binaural masking-level difference (BMLD) increased from 0 to 8 dB with a forward-plus-backward fringe as noise bandwidths increased to 100 Hz, increasing slightly to 10 dB at 201 Hz. This two-stage increase was less pronounced with a backward fringe. With no fringe, the BMLD was about 10-14 dB at all bandwidths. Performance appears to result from the interaction of across-time and across-frequency listening strategies and the possible effects of gain reduction and suppression, which combine in complex ways. Current binaural models are, as yet, unable to account fully for these effects.

  10. An improved method based on wavelet coefficient correlation to filter noise in Doppler ultrasound blood flow signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Renzhi; Zu, Yunxiao; Shao, Lin

    2018-04-01

    The blood echo signal maintained through Medical ultrasound Doppler devices would always include vascular wall pulsation signal .The traditional method to de-noise wall signal is using high-pass filter, which will also remove the lowfrequency part of the blood flow signal. Some scholars put forward a method based on region selective reduction, which at first estimates of the wall pulsation signals and then removes the wall signal from the mixed signal. Apparently, this method uses the correlation between wavelet coefficients to distinguish blood signal from wall signal, but in fact it is a kind of wavelet threshold de-noising method, whose effect is not so much ideal. In order to maintain a better effect, this paper proposes an improved method based on wavelet coefficient correlation to separate blood signal and wall signal, and simulates the algorithm by computer to verify its validity.

  11. Investigation of a glottal related harmonics-to-noise ratio and spectral tilt as indicators of glottal noise in synthesized and human voice signals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Peter J

    2008-03-01

    The harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR) of the voiced speech signal has implicitly been used to infer information regarding the turbulent noise level at the glottis. However, two problems exist for inferring glottal noise attributes from the HNR of the speech wave form: (i) the measure is fundamental frequency (f0) dependent for equal levels of glottal noise, and (ii) any deviation from signal periodicity affects the ratio, not just turbulent noise. An alternative harmonics-to-noise ratio formulation [glottal related HNR (GHNR\\')] is proposed to overcome the former problem. In GHNR\\' a mean over the spectral range of interest of the HNRs at specific harmonic\\/between-harmonic frequencies (expressed in linear scale) is calculated. For the latter issue [(ii)] two spectral tilt measures are shown, using synthesis data, to be sensitive to glottal noise while at the same time being comparatively insensitive to other glottal aperiodicities. The theoretical development predicts that the spectral tilt measures reduce as noise levels increase. A conventional HNR estimator, GHNR\\' and two spectral tilt measures are applied to a data set of 13 pathological and 12 normal voice samples. One of the tilt measures and GHNR\\' are shown to provide statistically significant differentiating power over a conventional HNR estimator.

  12. Detection of coherent beam-beam modes with digitized beam position monitor signals

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G.; White, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    A system for bunch-by-bunch detection of transverse proton and antiproton coherent oscillations in the Fermilab Tevatron collider is described. It is based on the signal from a single beam-position monitor located in a region of the ring with large amplitude functions. The signal is digitized over a large number of turns and Fourier-analyzed offline with a dedicated algorithm. To enhance the signal, band-limited noise is applied to the beam for about 1 s. This excitation does not adversely affect the circulating beams even at high luminosities. The device has a response time of a few seconds, a frequency resolution of $1.6\\times 10^{-5}$ in fractional tune, and it is sensitive to oscillation amplitudes of 60 nm. It complements Schottky detectors as a diagnostic tool for tunes, tune spreads, and beam-beam effects. Measurements of coherent mode spectra are presented and compared with models of beam-beam oscillations.

  13. SIG-VISA: Signal-based Vertically Integrated Seismic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D.; Mayeda, K. M.; Myers, S. C.; Russell, S.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional seismic monitoring systems rely on discrete detections produced by station processing software; however, while such detections may constitute a useful summary of station activity, they discard large amounts of information present in the original recorded signal. We present SIG-VISA (Signal-based Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis), a system for seismic monitoring through Bayesian inference on seismic signals. By directly modeling the recorded signal, our approach incorporates additional information unavailable to detection-based methods, enabling higher sensitivity and more accurate localization using techniques such as waveform matching. SIG-VISA's Bayesian forward model of seismic signal envelopes includes physically-derived models of travel times and source characteristics as well as Gaussian process (kriging) statistical models of signal properties that combine interpolation of historical data with extrapolation of learned physical trends. Applying Bayesian inference, we evaluate the model on earthquakes as well as the 2009 DPRK test event, demonstrating a waveform matching effect as part of the probabilistic inference, along with results on event localization and sensitivity. In particular, we demonstrate increased sensitivity from signal-based modeling, in which the SIGVISA signal model finds statistical evidence for arrivals even at stations for which the IMS station processing failed to register any detection.

  14. Enhancement of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Sonic Logging Waveforms by Seismic Interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2012-04-01

    Sonic logs are essential tools for reliably identifying interval velocities which, in turn, are used in many seismic processes. One problem that arises, while logging, is irregularities due to washout zones along the borehole surfaces that scatters the transmitted energy and hence weakens the signal recorded at the receivers. To alleviate this problem, I have extended the theory of super-virtual refraction interferometry to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sonic waveforms. Tests on synthetic and real data show noticeable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancements of refracted P-wave arrivals in the sonic waveforms. The theory of super-virtual interferometric stacking is composed of two redatuming steps followed by a stacking procedure. The first redatuming procedure is of correlation type, where traces are correlated together to get virtual traces with the sources datumed to the refractor. The second datuming step is of convolution type, where traces are convolved together to dedatum the sources back to their original positions. The stacking procedure following each step enhances the signal to noise ratio of the refracted P-wave first arrivals. Datuming with correlation and convolution of traces introduces severe artifacts denoted as correlation artifacts in super-virtual data. To overcome this problem, I replace the datuming with correlation step by datuming with deconvolution. Although the former datuming method is more robust, the latter one reduces the artifacts significantly. Moreover, deconvolution can be a noise amplifier which is why a regularization term is utilized, rendering the datuming with deconvolution more stable. Tests of datuming with deconvolution instead of correlation with synthetic and real data examples show significant reduction of these artifacts. This is especially true when compared with the conventional way of applying the super-virtual refraction interferometry method.

  15. Numerical modelling of the pump-to-signal relative intensity noise ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An accurate numerical model to investigate the pump-to-signal relative intensity noise (RIN) transfer in two-pump fibre optical parametric amplifiers (2-P FOPAs) for low modulation frequencies is presented. Compared to other models in the field, this model takes into account the fibre loss, pump depletion as well as the gain ...

  16. Structural health monitoring an advanced signal processing perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuefeng; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the latest advances and trends in advanced signal processing (such as wavelet theory, time-frequency analysis, empirical mode decomposition, compressive sensing and sparse representation, and stochastic resonance) for structural health monitoring (SHM). Its primary focus is on the utilization of advanced signal processing techniques to help monitor the health status of critical structures and machines encountered in our daily lives: wind turbines, gas turbines, machine tools, etc. As such, it offers a key reference guide for researchers, graduate students, and industry professionals who work in the field of SHM.

  17. Effect of uncompensated SPN detector cables on neutron noise signals measured in VVER-440 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, S. E-mail: kisss@sunserv.kfki.hu; Lipcsei, S. E-mail: lipcsei@sunserv.kfki.hu; Hazi, G. E-mail: gah@sunserv.kfki.hu

    2003-03-01

    The Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) noise measurements of an operating VVER-440 nuclear reactor are described and characterised. Signal characteristics may be radically influenced by the geometrical properties of the detector and the cable, and by the measuring arrangement. Simulator is used as a means of studying the structure of those phase spectra that show propagating perturbations measured on uncompensated SPN detectors. The paper presents measurements with detectors of very different sizes (i.e. 20 cm length SPNDs and the 200 cm length compensation cables), where the ratios of the global and local component differ significantly for the different detector sizes. This phenomenon is used up for signal compensation.

  18. Subspace-Based Noise Reduction for Speech Signals via Diagonal and Triangular Matrix Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    We survey the definitions and use of rank-revealing matrix decompositions in single-channel noise reduction algorithms for speech signals. Our algorithms are based on the rank-reduction paradigm and, in particular, signal subspace techniques. The focus is on practical working algorithms, using both...... diagonal (eigenvalue and singular value) decompositions and rank-revealing triangular decompositions (ULV, URV, VSV, ULLV and ULLIV). In addition we show how the subspace-based algorithms can be evaluated and compared by means of simple FIR filter interpretations. The algorithms are illustrated...... with working Matlab code and applications in speech processing....

  19. Status of Database for Electrochemical Noise Based Corrosion Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    Underground storage tanks made of mild steel are used to contain radioactive waste generated by plutonium production at the Hanford Site. Corrosion of the walls of these tanks is a major issue. Corrosion-related failure of waste tank walls could lead to the leakage of radioactive contaminants to the soil and groundwater. It is essential to monitor corrosion conditions of the tank walls to determine tank integrity and ensure safe waste storage until retrieval and final waste disposal can be accomplished. Corrosion monitoring/control is currently provided at the Hanford Site through a waste chemistry sampling and analysis program. In this process, tank waste is sampled, analyzed and compared to a selection of laboratory exposures of coupons in simulated waste. Tank wall corrosion is inferred by matching measured tank chemistries to the results of the laboratory simulant testing. This method is expensive, time consuming, and does not yield real-time data. A project to improve the Hanford Site's corrosion monitoring strategy was started in 1995

  20. Reducing Brain Signal Noise in the Prediction of Economic Choices: A Case Study in Neuroeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raanju R. Sundararajan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the noise of brain signals, neuroeconomic experiments typically aggregate data from hundreds of trials collected from a few individuals. This contrasts with the principle of simple and controlled designs in experimental and behavioral economics. We use a frequency domain variant of the stationary subspace analysis (SSA technique, denoted as DSSA, to filter out the noise (nonstationary sources in EEG brain signals. The nonstationary sources in the brain signal are associated with variations in the mental state that are unrelated to the experimental task. DSSA is a powerful tool for reducing the number of trials needed from each participant in neuroeconomic experiments and also for improving the prediction performance of an economic choice task. For a single trial, when DSSA is used as a noise reduction technique, the prediction model in a food snack choice experiment has an increase in overall accuracy by around 10% and in sensitivity and specificity by around 20% and in AUC by around 30%, respectively.

  1. Signal-to-noise ratio measurement in parallel MRI with subtraction mapping and consecutive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hiroshi; Miyati, Tosiaki; Ogura, Akio; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Machida, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Kouzou; Kitou, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    When measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of an image the used parallel magnetic resonance imaging, it was confirmed that there was a problem in the application of past SNR measurement. With the method of measuring the noise from the background signal, SNR with parallel imaging was higher than that without parallel imaging. In the subtraction method (NEMA standard), which sets a wide region of interest, the white noise was not evaluated correctly although SNR was close to the theoretical value. We proposed two techniques because SNR in parallel imaging was not uniform according to inhomogeneity of the coil sensitivity distribution and geometry factor. Using the first method (subtraction mapping), two images were scanned with identical parameters. The SNR in each pixel divided the running mean (7 by 7 pixels in neighborhood) by standard deviation/√2 in the same region of interest. Using the second (consecutive) method, more than fifty consecutive scans of the uniform phantom were obtained with identical scan parameters. Then the SNR was calculated from the ratio of mean signal intensity to the standard deviation in each pixel on a series of images. Moreover, geometry factors were calculated from SNRs with and without parallel imaging. The SNR and geometry factor using parallel imaging in the subtraction mapping method agreed with those of the consecutive method. Both methods make it possible to obtain a more detailed determination of SNR in parallel imaging and to calculate the geometry factor. (author)

  2. High-frequency signal and noise estimates of CSR GRACE RL04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Jennifer A.; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Tapley, Byron D.

    2012-12-01

    A sliding window technique is used to create daily-sampled Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) solutions with the same background processing as the official CSR RL04 monthly series. By estimating over shorter time spans, more frequent solutions are made using uncorrelated data, allowing for higher frequency resolution in addition to daily sampling. Using these data sets, high-frequency GRACE errors are computed using two different techniques: assuming the GRACE high-frequency signal in a quiet area of the ocean is the true error, and computing the variance of differences between multiple high-frequency GRACE series from different centers. While the signal-to-noise ratios prove to be sufficiently high for confidence at annual and lower frequencies, at frequencies above 3 cycles/year the signal-to-noise ratios in the large hydrological basins looked at here are near 1.0. Comparisons with the GLDAS hydrological model and high frequency GRACE series developed at other centers confirm CSR GRACE RL04's poor ability to accurately and reliably measure hydrological signal above 3-9 cycles/year, due to the low power of the large-scale hydrological signal typical at those frequencies compared to the GRACE errors.

  3. Correlation techniques for the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in measurements with stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, V R; Reddy, T G; Reddy, P Y; Reddy, K R

    2003-01-01

    An AC modulation technique is described to convert stochastic signal variations into an amplitude variation and its retrieval through Fourier analysis. It is shown that this AC detection of signals of stochastic processes when processed through auto- and cross-correlation techniques improve the signal-to-noise ratio; the correlation techniques serve a similar purpose of frequency and phase filtering as that of phase-sensitive detection. A few model calculations applied to nuclear spectroscopy measurements such as Angular Correlations, Mossbauer spectroscopy and Pulse Height Analysis reveal considerable improvement in the sensitivity of signal detection. Experimental implementation of the technique is presented in terms of amplitude variations of harmonics representing the derivatives of normal spectra. Improved detection sensitivity to spectral variations is shown to be significant. These correlation techniques are general and can be made applicable to all the fields of particle counting where measurements ar...

  4. Semi-automated identification of artefact and noise signals in MEG sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettich, E.

    2006-09-01

    Magnetic encephalography (MEG) is a noninvasive method of measuring cerebral activity. It is based on the registration of magnetic fields that are induced by synaptic ion currents as the brain processes information. These magnetic fields are of a very small magnitude, ranging from a few femto Tesla (1 fT = 10 15 T) to several thousand fT (1 pT). This is equivalent to a ten thousandth to a billionth of the Earth's magnetic field. When applied with a time resolution in the range of milliseconds this technique permits research on time-critical neurophysiological processes. A meaningful analysis of MEG data presupposes that signals have been measured at low noise levels. This in turn requires magnetic shielding, normally in the form of a shielded cabin, and low-noise detectors. Data input from high-noise channels impairs the result of the measurement, possibly rendering it useless. To prevent this it is necessary to identify high-noise channels and remove them from the measurement data. At Juelich Research Center, like at most MEG laboratories, this is done by visual inspection. However, being dependent on the individual observer, this method does not yield objective results. Furthermore, visual inspection presupposes a high degree of experience and is time-consuming. This situation could be significantly improved by automated identification of high-noise channels. The purpose of the present study was to develop an algorithm that analyses measurement signals in a given time and frequency interval on the basis of statistical traits. Using a suitably designed user interface this permits searching MEG data for high-noise channel data below or above statistical threshold values on the basis of predetermined decision criteria. The identified high-noise channels are then output in a selection list, and the measurement data and results of the statistical analysis are displayed. This information enables the user to make changes and decide which high-noise channels to extract

  5. Statistical Angles on the Lattice QCD Signal-to-Noise Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagman, Michael L.

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) encodes the strong interactions that bind quarks and gluons into nucleons and that bind nucleons into nuclei. Predictive control of QCD would allow nuclear structure and reactions as well as properties of supernovae and neutron stars to be theoretically studied from first principles. Lattice QCD (LQCD) can represent generic QCD predictions in terms of well-defined path integrals, but the sign and signal-to-noise problems have obstructed LQCD calculations of large nuclei and nuclear matter in practice. This thesis presents a statistical study of LQCD correlation functions, with a particular focus on characterizing the structure of the noise associated with quantum fluctuations. The signal-to-noise problem in baryon correlation functions is demonstrated to arise from a sign problem associated with Monte Carlo sampling of complex correlation functions. Properties of circular statistics are used to understand the emergence of a large time noise region where standard energy measurements are unreliable. Power-law tails associated with stable distributions and Levy flights are found to play a central role in the time evolution of baryon correlation functions. Building on these observations, a new statistical analysis technique called phase reweighting is introduced that allow energy levels to be extracted from large-time correlation functions with time-independent signal-to-noise ratios. Phase reweighting effectively includes dynamical refinement of source magnitudes but introduces a bias associated with the phase. This bias can be removed by performing an extrapolation, but at the expense of re-introducing a signal-to-noise problem. Lattice QCD calculations of the ρ+ and nucleon masses and of the ΞΞ(1S0) binding energy show consistency between standard results obtained using smaller-time correlation functions and phase-reweighted results using large-time correlation functions inaccessible to standard statistical analysis

  6. Using a noise monitoring station in a small quarry located in an urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichers, Michiel; Iramina, Wilson Siguemasa; de Eston, Sérgio Médici; Ayres da Silva, Anna Luiza Marques

    2017-12-22

    Mining plays an important role in Brazilian exports. On the other hand, large urban centers like São Paulo, with approximately 21 million inhabitants, also demand an increasing domestic consumption of natural resources, such as construction aggregate. There are many quarries located in the surroundings of urban centers in Brazil, competing with the growth of urbanized areas. Such proximity leads to a series of conflicts involving quarries and surrounding communities, where the increase in noise levels is highlighted. Operations in quarries, in general, are intermittent. Noisier equipment, such as drilling rigs and primary crushers, operates only a few hours during the day, while other operations, such as screening and secondary and tertiary crushing, are more constant. This paper presents a study carried out in a quarry located near São Paulo, where in addition to conventional short term noise measurements at surrounding receptors, one noise monitoring station was installed, allowing to identify the noisiest moments during the quarry operating time. Through data transmitted by wireless technology, it was possible to follow the noise variations emitted from mining activities in real time and observe the noisiest events that were recorded for events that exceeded the established standards. A mobile application associated to this monitoring station facilitated the quarry's manager and employees to access immediately the monitoring information. Therefore, by using this system, it was possible to evaluate the effectiveness of noise reduction measures already taken and indicate what steps still need to be held.

  7. Signal and image processing for monitoring and testing at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgel, B.; Garreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    The quality of monitoring and non destructive testing devices in plants and utilities today greatly depends on the efficient processing of signal and image data. In this context, signal or image processing techniques, such as adaptive filtering or detection or 3D reconstruction, are required whenever manufacturing nonconformances or faulty operation have to be recognized and identified. This paper reviews the issues of industrial image and signal processing, by briefly considering the relevant studies and projects under way at EDF. (authors). 1 fig., 11 refs

  8. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Terzic

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7 are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network.

  9. Monitoring ship noise to assess the impact of coastal developments on marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Pirotta, Enrico; Barton, Tim R; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-01-15

    The potential impacts of underwater noise on marine mammals are widely recognised, but uncertainty over variability in baseline noise levels often constrains efforts to manage these impacts. This paper characterises natural and anthropogenic contributors to underwater noise at two sites in the Moray Firth Special Area of Conservation, an important marine mammal habitat that may be exposed to increased shipping activity from proposed offshore energy developments. We aimed to establish a pre-development baseline, and to develop ship noise monitoring methods using Automatic Identification System (AIS) and time-lapse video to record trends in noise levels and shipping activity. Our results detail the noise levels currently experienced by a locally protected bottlenose dolphin population, explore the relationship between broadband sound exposure levels and the indicators proposed in response to the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive, and provide a ship noise assessment toolkit which can be applied in other coastal marine environments. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitoring of electric-cardio signals based on DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yi-xin; Sun, Hui-nan; Lv, Shuang

    2008-10-01

    Monitoring of electric-cardio signals is the most direct method of discovering heart diseases. This article presents an electric-cardio signal acquisition and processing system based on DSP. According to the features of electric-cardio signals, the proposed system uses the AgCl electrode as electric-cardio signals sensor, and acquires analog signals with AD620 as the prepositional amplifier, and the digital system equipped is with TMS320LF2407A DSP. The design of digital filter and the analysis of heart rate variation are realized by programming in the DSP. Finally the ECG is obtained with P and T waves along with obvious QRS multi-wave characteristics. The system has low power dissipation, low cost and high precision, which meets the requirements for medical instruments.

  11. Integration and enhancement of low-level signals from air-pollution monitoring sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowd, G F; Dubois, L; Monkman, J L

    1975-09-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated how signal enhancement techniques would be advantageous in the low-level analysis of air pollutants. We have further shown what type of signal-to-noise gain may be expected from an off-the-shelf, inexpensive run-of-the-mill mercury monitor. As long as an evoked response time constant is introduced into the measuring system, noise of a random nature may be reduced to such an extent that trace signals, buried deep in the electrical background, may be reliably measured. If we couple this type of analysis to a multi-parameter mercury analyzer, contributing factors may be evaluated. This will result in a more efficient system application. We have also reported a manner in which evoked response time is related to instrument onset time. However, there are other methods for obtaining an evoked response. Of note is the use of wavelength in the enhancement of spectrophotometric signals. In additional work now being carried out in our laboratory, there are indications that it is possible to relate this type of processing to SO/sub 2/ analyzing systems using conductometry. (auth)

  12. Using white noise to gate organic transistors for dynamic monitoring of cultured cell layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Leleux, Pierre; Hama, Adel; Ramuz, Marc; Huerta, Miriam; Malliaras, George G; Owens, Roisin M

    2015-06-26

    Impedance sensing of biological systems allows for monitoring of cell and tissue properties, including cell-substrate attachment, layer confluence, and the "tightness" of an epithelial tissue. These properties are critical for electrical detection of tissue health and viability in applications such as toxicological screening. Organic transistors based on conducting polymers offer a promising route to efficiently transduce ionic currents to attain high quality impedance spectra, but collection of complete impedance spectra can be time consuming (minutes). By applying uniform white noise at the gate of an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), and measuring the resulting current noise, we are able to dynamically monitor the impedance and thus integrity of cultured epithelial monolayers. We show that noise sourcing can be used to track rapid monolayer disruption due to compounds which interfere with dynamic polymerization events crucial for maintaining cytoskeletal integrity, and to resolve sub-second alterations to the monolayer integrity.

  13. Analysis of cutting force signals by wavelet packet transform for surface roughness monitoring in CNC turning

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Plaza, E.; Núñez López, P. J.

    2018-01-01

    On-line monitoring of surface finish in machining processes has proven to be a substantial advancement over traditional post-process quality control techniques by reducing inspection times and costs and by avoiding the manufacture of defective products. This study applied techniques for processing cutting force signals based on the wavelet packet transform (WPT) method for the monitoring of surface finish in computer numerical control (CNC) turning operations. The behaviour of 40 mother wavelets was analysed using three techniques: global packet analysis (G-WPT), and the application of two packet reduction criteria: maximum energy (E-WPT) and maximum entropy (SE-WPT). The optimum signal decomposition level (Lj) was determined to eliminate noise and to obtain information correlated to surface finish. The results obtained with the G-WPT method provided an in-depth analysis of cutting force signals, and frequency ranges and signal characteristics were correlated to surface finish with excellent results in the accuracy and reliability of the predictive models. The radial and tangential cutting force components at low frequency provided most of the information for the monitoring of surface finish. The E-WPT and SE-WPT packet reduction criteria substantially reduced signal processing time, but at the expense of discarding packets with relevant information, which impoverished the results. The G-WPT method was observed to be an ideal procedure for processing cutting force signals applied to the real-time monitoring of surface finish, and was estimated to be highly accurate and reliable at a low analytical-computational cost.

  14. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  15. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Imaging Research Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3440 S. Dearborn Street, E1-116, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  16. Enhancing scatterometry CD signal-to-noise ratio for 1x logic and memory challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Derrick; Krishnan, Shankar; Wei, Lanhua; Shchegrov, Andrei V.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing transition from 2D to 3D structures in logic and memory has led to an increased adoption of scatterometry CD (SCD) for inline metrology. However, shrinking device dimensions in logic and high aspect ratios in memory represent primary challenges for SCD and require a significant breakthrough in improving signal-to-noise performance. We present a report on the new generation of SCD technology, enabled by a new laser-driven plasma source. The developed light source provides several key advantages over conventional arc lamps typically used in SCD applications. The plasma color temperature of the laser driven source is considerably higher than available with arc lamps resulting in >5X increase in radiance in the visible and >10X increase in radiance in the DUV when compared to sources on previous generation SCD tools while maintaining or improving source intensity noise. This high radiance across such a broad spectrum allows for the use of a single light source from 190-1700nm. When combined with other optical design changes, the higher source radiance enables reduction of measurement box size of our spectroscopic ellipsometer from 45×45um box to 25×25um box without compromising signal to noise ratio. The benefits for 1×nm SCD metrology of the additional photons across the DUV to IR spectrum have been found to be greater than the increase in source signal to noise ratio would suggest. Better light penetration in Si and poly-Si has resulted in improved sensitivity and correlation breaking for critical parameters in 1xnm FinFET and HAR flash memory structures.

  17. A nontoxic, photostable and high signal-to-noise ratio mitochondrial probe with mitochondrial membrane potential and viscosity detectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanan; Qi, Jianguo; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Xiaomin; Niu, Linqiang; Yan, Zhijie; Wang, Jianhong

    2018-01-01

    Herein, we reported a yellow emission probe 1-methyl-4-(6-morpholino-1, 3-dioxo-1H-benzo[de]isoquinolin-2(3H)-yl) pyridin-1-ium iodide which could specifically stain mitochondria in living immortalized and normal cells. In comparison to the common mitochondria tracker (Mitotracker Deep Red, MTDR), this probe was nontoxic, photostable and ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, which could real-time monitor mitochondria for a long time. Moreover, this probe also showed high sensitivity towards mitochondrial membrane potential and intramitochondrial viscosity change. Consequently, this probe was used for imaging mitochondria, detecting changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and intramitochondrial viscosity in physiological and pathological processes.

  18. Acquiring L2 Sentence Comprehension: A Longitudinal Study of Word Monitoring in Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Georgina; Gullberg, Marianne; Hellwig, Frauke; Mitterer, Holger; Indefrey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the development of second language online auditory processing with ab initio German learners of Dutch. We assessed the influence of different levels of background noise and different levels of semantic and syntactic target word predictability on word-monitoring latencies. There was evidence of syntactic, but not…

  19. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of swept-source optical coherence tomography by oversampling in k-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagib, Karim; Mezgebo, Biniyam; Thakur, Rahul; Fernando, Namal; Kordi, Behzad; Sherif, Sherif

    2018-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography systems suffer from noise that could reduce ability to interpret reconstructed images correctly. We describe a method to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) using oversampling in k-space. Due to this oversampling, information redundancy would be introduced in the measured interferogram that could be used to reduce white noise in the reconstructed A-scan. We applied our novel scaled nonuniform discrete Fourier transform to oversampled SS-OCT interferograms to reconstruct images of a salamander egg. The peak-signal-to-noise (PSNR) between the reconstructed images using interferograms sampled at 250MS/s andz50MS/s demonstrate that this oversampling increased the signal-to-noise ratio by 25.22 dB.

  20. A Dynamical System Exhibits High Signal-to-noise Ratio Gain by Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makra, Peter; Gingl, Zoltan

    2003-05-01

    On the basis of mixed-signal simulations, we demonstrate that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains much greater than unity can be obtained in the double-well potential through stochastic resonance (SR) with a symmetric periodic pulse train as deterministic and Gaussian white noise as random excitation. We also show that significant SNR improvement is possible in this system even for a sub-threshold sinusoid input if, instead of the commonly used narrow-band SNR, we apply an equally simple but much more realistic wide-band SNR definition. Using the latter result as an argument, we draw attention to the fact that the choice of the measure to reflect signal quality is critical with regard to the extent of signal improvement observed, and urge reconsideration of the practice prevalent in SR studies that most often the narrow-band SNR is used to characterise SR. Finally, we pose some questions concerning the possibilities of applying SNR improvement in practical set-ups.

  1. Filtering Performance Comparison of Kernel and Wavelet Filters for Reactivity Signal Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Ghu; Shin, Ho Cheol; Lee, Yong Kwan; You, Skin

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor power deviation from the critical state is a parameter of specific interest defined by the reactivity measuring neutron population. Reactivity is an extremely important quantity used to define many of the reactor startup physics parameters. The time dependent reactivity is normally determined by solving the using inverse neutron kinetics equation. The reactivity computer is a device to provide an on-line solution of the inverse kinetics equation. The measurement signal of the neutron density is normally noise corrupted and the control rods movement typically gives reactivity variation with edge signals like saw teeth. Those edge regions should be precisely preserved since the measured signal is used to estimate the reactivity wroth which is a crucial parameter to assure the safety of the nuclear reactors. In this paper, three kind of edge preserving noise filters are proposed and their performance is demonstrated using stepwise signals. The tested filters are based on the unilateral, bilateral kernel and wavelet filters which are known to be effective in edge preservation. The bilateral filter shows a remarkable improvement compared with unilateral kernel and wavelet filters

  2. Optical Performance Monitoring and Signal Optimization in Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Nordal

    2006-01-01

    The thesis studies performance monitoring for the next generation optical networks. The focus is on all-optical networks with bit-rates of 10 Gb/s or above. Next generation all-optical networks offer large challenges as the optical transmitted distance increases and the occurrence of electrical-optical......-electrical regeneration points decreases. This thesis evaluates the impact of signal degrading effects that are becoming of increasing concern in all-optical high-speed networks due to all-optical switching and higher bit-rates. Especially group-velocity-dispersion (GVD) and a number of nonlinear effects will require...... enhanced attention to avoid signal degradations. The requirements for optical performance monitoring features are discussed, and the thesis evaluates the advantages and necessity of increasing the level of performance monitoring parameters in the physical layer. In particular, methods for optical...

  3. Gear wear monitoring by modulation signal bispectrum based on motor current signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiliang; Gu, Fengshou; Mansaf, Haram; Wang, Tie; Ball, Andrew D.

    2017-09-01

    Gears are important mechanical components for power transmissions. Tooth wear is one of the most common failure modes, which can present throughout a gear's lifetime. It is significant to accurately monitor gear wear progression in order to take timely predictive maintenances. Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is an effective and non-intrusive approach which is able to monitor faults from both electrical and mechanical systems. However, little research has been reported in monitoring the gear wear and estimating its severity based on MCSA. This paper presents a novel gear wear monitoring method through a modulation signal bispectrum based motor current signal analysis (MSB-MCSA). For a steady gear transmission, it is inevitable to exist load and speed oscillations due to various errors including wears. These oscillations can induce small modulations in the current signals of the driving motor. MSB is particularly effective in characterising such small modulation signals. Based on these understandings, the monitoring process was implemented based on the current signals from a run-to-failure test of an industrial two stages helical gearbox under a moderate accelerated fatigue process. At the initial operation of the test, MSB analysis results showed that the peak values at the bifrequencies of gear rotations and the power supply can be effective monitoring features for identifying faulty gears and wear severity as they exhibit agreeable changes with gear loads. A monotonically increasing trend established by these features allows a clear indication of the gear wear progression. The dismantle inspection at 477 h of operation, made when one of the monitored features is about 123% higher than its baseline, has found that there are severe scuffing wear marks on a number of tooth surfaces on the driving gear, showing that the gear endures a gradual wear process during its long test operation. Therefore, it is affirmed that the MSB-MSCA approach proposed is reliable

  4. Noise Reduction of Steel Cord Conveyor Belt Defect Electromagnetic Signal by Combined Use of Improved Wavelet and EMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wei Ma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the noise of a defect electromagnetic signal of the steel cord conveyor belt used in coal mines, a new signal noise reduction method by combined use of the improved threshold wavelet and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD is proposed. Firstly, the denoising method based on the improved threshold wavelet is applied to reduce the noise of a defect electromagnetic signal obtained by an electromagnetic testing system. Then, the EMD is used to decompose the denoised signal and then the effective Intrinsic Mode Function (IMF is extracted by the dominant eigenvalue strategy. Finally, the signal reconstruction is carried out by utilizing the obtained IMF. In order to verify the proposed noise reduction method, the experiments are carried out in two cases including the defective joint and steel wire rope break. The experimental results show that the proposed method in this paper obtains the higher Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR for the defect electromagnetic signal noise reduction of steel cord conveyor belts.

  5. Skalabilitas Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR pada Pengkodean Video dengan Derau Gaussian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Purwadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In video transmission, there is a possibility of packet lost an d a large load variation on the bandwidth. These are the source of network congestion, which can interfere the communication data rate. This study discusses a system to overcome the congestion with Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR scalability-based approach, for the video sequence encoding method into two layers, which is a solution to decrease encoding mode for each packet and channel coding rate. The goal is to minimize any distortion from the source to the destination. The coding system used is a video coding standards that is MPEG-2 or H.263 with SNR scalability. The algorithm used for motion compensation, temporal redundancy and spatial redundancy is the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT and quantization. The transmission error is simulated by adding Gaussian noise (error on motion vectors. From the simulation results, the SNR and Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR in the noisy video frames decline with averages of 3dB and 4dB respectively.

  6. Noise Reduction of MEMS Gyroscope Based on Direct Modeling for an Angular Rate Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xue

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel approach for processing the outputs signal of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS gyroscopes was presented to reduce the bias drift and noise. The principle for the noise reduction was presented, and an optimal Kalman filter (KF was designed by a steady-state filter gain obtained from the analysis of KF observability. In particular, the true angular rate signal was directly modeled to obtain an optimal estimate and make a self-compensation for the gyroscope without needing other sensor’s information, whether in static or dynamic condition. A linear fit equation that describes the relationship between the KF bandwidth and modeling parameter of true angular rate was derived from the analysis of KF frequency response. The test results indicated that the MEMS gyroscope having an ARW noise of 4.87°/h0.5 and a bias instability of 44.41°/h were reduced to 0.4°/h0.5 and 4.13°/h by the KF under a given bandwidth (10 Hz, respectively. The 1σ estimated error was reduced from 1.9°/s to 0.14°/s and 1.7°/s to 0.5°/s in the constant rate test and swing rate test, respectively. It also showed that the filtered angular rate signal could well reflect the dynamic characteristic of the input rate signal in dynamic conditions. The presented algorithm is proved to be effective at improving the measurement precision of the MEMS gyroscope.

  7. Effects of signal modulation and coloured cross-correlation of coloured noises on the diffusion of a harmonic oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li; Zhang Liang-Ying; Cao Li

    2009-01-01

    The diffusion in a harmonic oscillator driven by coloured noises ζ(t) and η(t) with coloured cross-correlation in which one of the noises is modulated by a biased periodic signal is investigated. The exact expression of diffusion coefficient d as a function of noise parameter, signal parameter, and oscillator frequency is derived. The findings in this paper are as follows. 1) The curves of d versus noise intensity D and d versus noises cross-correlation time τ_3 exist as two different phases. The transition between the two phases arises from the change of the cross-correlation coefficient λ of the two Orustein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) noises. 2) Changing the value of τ3, the curves of d versus Q, the intensity of colored noise that is modulated by the signal, can transform from a phase having a minimum to a monotonic phase. 3)Changing the value of signal amplitude A, d versus Q curves can transform from a phase having a minimum to a monotonic phase. The above-mentioned results demonstrate that a like noise-induced transition appears in the model.

  8. Effects of signal modulation and coloured cross-correlation of coloured noises on the diffusion of a harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Liu; Li, Cao; Liang-Ying, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The diffusion in a harmonic oscillator driven by coloured noises ζ(t) and η(t) with coloured cross-correlation in which one of the noises is modulated by a biased periodic signal is investigated. The exact expression of diffusion coefficient d as a function of noise parameter, signal parameter, and oscillator frequency is derived. The findings in this paper are as follows. 1) The curves of d versus noise intensity D and d versus noises cross-correlation time τ 3 exist as two different phases. The transition between the two phases arises from the change of the cross-correlation coefficient λ of the two Ornstein–Uhlenbeck (O-U) noises. 2) Changing the value of τ 3 , the curves of d versus Q, the intensity of colored noise that is modulated by the signal, can transform from a phase having a minimum to a monotonic phase. 3) Changing the value of signal amplitude A, d versus Q curves can transform from a phase having a minimum to a monotonic phase. The above-mentioned results demonstrate that a like noise-induced transition appears in the model. (general)

  9. Separation of random telegraph sSignals from 1/f noise in MOSFETs under constant and switched bias conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolhatkar, J.S.; Vandamme, L.K.J.; Salm, Cora; Wallinga, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The low-frequency noise power spectrum of small dimension MOSFETs is dominated by Lorentzians arising from random telegraph signals (RTS). The low-frequency noise is observed to decrease when the devices are periodically switched 'off'. The technique of determining the statistical lifetimes and

  10. Investigation of signal models and methods for evaluating structures of processing telecommunication information exchange systems under acoustic noise conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropotov, Y. A.; Belov, A. A.; Proskuryakov, A. Y.; Kolpakov, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    The paper considers models and methods for estimating signals during the transmission of information messages in telecommunication systems of audio exchange. One-dimensional probability distribution functions that can be used to isolate useful signals, and acoustic noise interference are presented. An approach to the estimation of the correlation and spectral functions of the parameters of acoustic signals is proposed, based on the parametric representation of acoustic signals and the components of the noise components. The paper suggests an approach to improving the efficiency of interference cancellation and highlighting the necessary information when processing signals from telecommunications systems. In this case, the suppression of acoustic noise is based on the methods of adaptive filtering and adaptive compensation. The work also describes the models of echo signals and the structure of subscriber devices in operational command telecommunications systems.

  11. Performance Analysis of the Effect of Pulsed-Noise Interference on WLAN Signals Transmitted Over a Nakagami Fading Channel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsoumanis, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    ...) coding with soft decision decoding (SDD) and maximum- likelihood detection improves performance as compared to uncoded signals, In addition, the combination of maximum-likelihood detection and error connection coding renders pulsed-noise...

  12. Adaptive filtration of speech signals in the presence of correlated noise with random variation of probabilistic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    M. O. Partala; S. Ya. Zhuk

    2007-01-01

    On the base of mixed Markoff process in discrete time optimal and quasioptimal algorithms is designed for adaptive filtration of speech signals in the presence of correlated noise with random variation of probabilistic characteristics.

  13. Correlated cone noise decreases rod signal contributions to the post-receptoral pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathibelagal, Amithavikram R; Feigl, Beatrix; Zele, Andrew J

    2018-04-01

    This study investigated how invisible extrinsic temporal white noise that correlates with the activity of one of the three [magnocellular (MC), parvocellular (PC), or koniocellular (KC)] post-receptoral pathways alters mesopic rod signaling. A four-primary photostimulator provided independent control of the rod and three cone photoreceptor excitations. The rod contributions to the three post-receptoral pathways were estimated by perceptually matching a 20% contrast rod pulse by independently varying the LMS (MC pathway), +L-M (PC pathway), and S-cone (KC pathway) excitations. We show that extrinsic cone noise caused a predominant decrease in the overall magnitude and ratio of the rod contributions to each pathway. Thus, the relative cone activity in the post-receptoral pathways determines the relative mesopic rod inputs to each pathway.

  14. Signal-to-noise ratio application to seismic marker analysis and fracture detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui-Qun; Gui, Zhi-Xian

    2014-03-01

    Seismic data with high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) are useful in reservoir exploration. To obtain high SNR seismic data, significant effort is required to achieve noise attenuation in seismic data processing, which is costly in materials, and human and financial resources. We introduce a method for improving the SNR of seismic data. The SNR is calculated by using the frequency domain method. Furthermore, we optimize and discuss the critical parameters and calculation procedure. We applied the proposed method on real data and found that the SNR is high in the seismic marker and low in the fracture zone. Consequently, this can be used to extract detailed information about fracture zones that are inferred by structural analysis but not observed in conventional seismic data.

  15. Detection of oscillatory components in noise signals and its application to fast detection of sodium boiling in LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.

    1975-09-01

    In general, the surveillance of technical plants is performed by observating the mean value of measured signals. In this method not all information included in these signals is used. On the other hand - for example in a reactor - disturbances are possible which generate small oscillatory components in the measured signals. In general, these oscillatory components do not influence the mean value of the signals and consequently do not activate the conventional control system; however they can be found by analysis of the signal's noise component. For the detection of these oscillatory signals the observation of the frequency spectra of the noise signals is particularly advantageous because they produce peaks at the oscillation frequencies. In this paper a new detection system for the fast detection of suddenly appearing peaks in the frequency spectra of noise signals is presented. The prototype of a compact detection unit was developed which continuously computes the power spectral density (PSD) of noise signals and simultaneously supervises the PSD for peaks in the relevant frequency range. The detection method is not affected by the frequency dependance of the PSD and is applicable to any noise signal. General criteria were developed to enable the determination of the optimal detection system and its sensitivity. The upper limits of false alarm rate and detection time were taken into account. The detection criteria are applicable to all noise signals with approximately normally distributed amplitudes. Theoretical results were confirmed in a number of experiments; special experimental and theoretical parameter studies were done for the optimal detection of sodium boiling in LMFBR's. Computations based on these results showed that local and integral sodium boiling can be detected in a wide core range of SNR 300 by observing fluctuations of the neutron flux. In this connection it is important to point out that no additional core instrumentation is necessary because the

  16. The tradeoff between signal detection and recognition rules auditory sensitivity under variable background noise conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Marco

    2015-12-07

    Animal acoustic communication commonly takes place under masked conditions. For instance, sound signals relevant for mating and survival are very often masked by background noise, which makes their detection and recognition by organisms difficult. Ambient noise (AN) varies in level and shape among different habitats, but also remarkable variations in time and space occurs within the same habitat. Variable AN conditions mask hearing thresholds of the receiver in complex and unpredictable ways, thereby causing distortions in sound perception. When communication takes place in a noisy environment, a highly sensitive system might confer no advantage to the receiver compared to a less sensitive one. The effects of noise masking on auditory thresholds and hearing-related functions are well known, and the potential role of AN in the evolution of the species' auditory sensitivity has been recognized by few authors. The mechanism of the underlying selection process has never been explored, however. Here I present a simple fitness model that seeks for the best sensitivity of a hearing system performing the detection and recognition of the sound under variable AN conditions. The model predicts higher sensitivity (i.e. lower hearing thresholds) as best strategy for species living in quiet habitats and lower sensitivity (i.e. higher hearing thresholds) as best strategy for those living in noisy habitats provided the cost of incorrect recognition is not low. The tradeoff between detection and recognition of acoustic signals appears to be a key factor determining the best level of hearing sensitivity of a species when acoustic communication is corrupted by noise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. LIMPIC: a computational method for the separation of protein MALDI-TOF-MS signals from noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Nicola Marta

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry protein profiling is a promising tool for biomarker discovery in clinical proteomics. However, the development of a reliable approach for the separation of protein signals from noise is required. In this paper, LIMPIC, a computational method for the detection of protein peaks from linear-mode MALDI-TOF data is proposed. LIMPIC is based on novel techniques for background noise reduction and baseline removal. Peak detection is performed considering the presence of a non-homogeneous noise level in the mass spectrum. A comparison of the peaks collected from multiple spectra is used to classify them on the basis of a detection rate parameter, and hence to separate the protein signals from other disturbances. Results LIMPIC preprocessing proves to be superior than other classical preprocessing techniques, allowing for a reliable decomposition of the background noise and the baseline drift from the MALDI-TOF mass spectra. It provides lower coefficient of variation associated with the peak intensity, improving the reliability of the information that can be extracted from single spectra. Our results show that LIMPIC peak-picking is effective even in low protein concentration regimes. The analytical comparison with commercial and freeware peak-picking algorithms demonstrates its superior performances in terms of sensitivity and specificity, both on in-vitro purified protein samples and human plasma samples. Conclusion The quantitative information on the peak intensity extracted with LIMPIC could be used for the recognition of significant protein profiles by means of advanced statistic tools: LIMPIC might be valuable in the perspective of biomarker discovery.

  18. Novel textile systems for the continuous monitoring of vital signals: design and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Isabel G; Martins, Frederico; Dias, Rúben; Oliveira, Cristina; Machado da Silva, José

    2015-08-01

    In this article we present a smart textile system for the continuous monitoring of cardiorespiratory signals, produced and integrated with an industrial embroidery unit. The design of a T-shirt system, having embedded textile sensors and interconnects and custom designed circuit for data collection and Bluetooth transmission is presented. The performance of skin-contact textile electrodes, having distinctive electrical characteristics and surface morphologies, was characterized by measurements of signal to noise ratio, under dry and moisture conditions. The influence of the electrodes size and the wear resistance were addressed. Results of an electrocardiogram acquisition with a subject wearing the T-shirt and display on a smartphone are also shown. The presented smart textile systems exhibit good performance and versatility for custom demand production.

  19. Acoustic monitoring of rotating machine by advanced signal processing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The acoustic data remotely measured by hand held type microphones are investigated for monitoring and diagnosing the rotational machine integrity in nuclear power plants. The plant operator's patrol monitoring is one of the important activities for condition monitoring. However, remotely measured sound has some difficulties to be considered for precise diagnosis or quantitative judgment of rotating machine anomaly, since the measurement sensitivity is different in each measurement, and also, the sensitivity deteriorates in comparison with an attached type sensor. Hence, in the present study, several advanced signal processing methods are examined and compared in order to find optimum anomaly monitoring technology from the viewpoints of both sensitivity and robustness of performance. The dimension of pre-processed signal feature patterns are reduced into two-dimensional space for the visualization by using the standard principal component analysis (PCA) or the kernel based PCA. Then, the normal state is classified by using probabilistic neural network (PNN) or support vector data description (SVDD). By using the mockup test facility of rotating machine, it is shown that the appropriate combination of the above algorithms gives sensitive and robust anomaly monitoring performance. (author)

  20. Average bit error probability of binary coherent signaling over generalized fading channels subject to additive generalized gaussian noise

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2012-06-01

    This letter considers the average bit error probability of binary coherent signaling over flat fading channels subject to additive generalized Gaussian noise. More specifically, a generic closed form expression in terms of the Fox\\'s H function is offered for the extended generalized-K fading case. Simplifications for some special fading distributions such as generalized-K fading and Nakagami-m fading and special additive noise distributions such as Gaussian and Laplacian noise are then presented. Finally, the mathematical formalism is illustrated by some numerical examples verified by computer based simulations for a variety of fading and additive noise parameters. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. Exact Symbol Error Probability of Square M-QAM Signaling over Generalized Fading Channels subject to Additive Generalized Gaussian Noise

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2013-07-01

    This paper considers the average symbol error probability of square Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) coherent signaling over flat fading channels subject to additive generalized Gaussian noise. More specifically, a generic closedform expression in terms of the Fox H function and the bivariate Fox H function is offered for the extended generalized-K fading case. Simplifications for some special fading distributions such as generalized-K fading, Nakagami-m fading, and Rayleigh fading and special additive noise distributions such as Gaussian and Laplacian noise are then presented. Finally, the mathematical formalism is illustrated by some numerical examples verified by computer based simulations for a variety of fading and additive noise parameters.

  2. Seismic signal and noise on Europa and how to use it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panning, M. P.; Stähler, S. C.; Bills, B. G.; Castillo, J.; Huang, H. H.; Husker, A. L.; Kedar, S.; Lorenz, R. D.; Pike, W. T.; Schmerr, N. C.; Tsai, V. C.; Vance, S.

    2017-12-01

    Seismology is one of our best tools for detailing interior structure of planetary bodies, and a seismometer is included in the baseline and threshold mission design for a potential Europa lander mission. Guiding mission design and planning for adequate science return, though, requires modeling of both the anticipated signal and noise. Assuming ice seismicity on Europa behaves according to statistical properties observed in Earth catalogs and scaling cumulative seismic moment release to the moon, we simulate long seismic records and estimate background noise and peak signal amplitudes (Panning et al., 2017). This suggests a sensitive instrument comparable to many broadband terrestrial instruments or the SP instrument from the InSight mission to Mars will be able to record signals, while high frequency geophones are likely inadequate. We extend this analysis to also begin incorporation of spatial and temporal variation due to the tidal cycle, which can help inform landing site selection. We also begin exploration of how chaotic terrane at the bottom of the ice shell and inter-ice heterogeneities (i.e. internal melt structures) may affect predicted seismic observations using 2D numerical seismic simulations. We also show some of the key seismic observations to determine interior properties of Europa (Stähler et al., 2017). M. P. Panning, S. C. Stähler, H.-H. Huang, S. D. Vance, S. Kedar, V. C. Tsai, W. T. Pike, R. D. Lorenz, "Expected seismicity and the seismic noise environment of Europa," J. Geophys. Res., in revision, 2017. S. C. Stähler, M. P. Panning, S. D. Vance, R. D. Lorenz, M. van Driel, T. Nissen-Meyer, S. Kedar, "Seismic wave propagation in icy ocean worlds," J. Geophys. Res., in revision, 2017.

  3. Stimulation of the Locus Ceruleus Modulates Signal-to-Noise Ratio in the Olfactory Bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manella, Laura C; Petersen, Nicholas; Linster, Christiane

    2017-11-29

    Norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to influence sensory, and specifically olfactory processing at the behavioral and physiological levels, potentially by regulating signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). The present study is the first to look at NE modulation of olfactory bulb (OB) in regards to S/N in vivo We show, in male rats, that locus ceruleus stimulation and pharmacological infusions of NE into the OB modulate both spontaneous and odor-evoked neural responses. NE in the OB generated a non-monotonic dose-response relationship, suppressing mitral cell activity at high and low, but not intermediate, NE levels. We propose that NE enhances odor responses not through direct potentiation of the afferent signal per se, but rather by reducing the intrinsic noise of the system. This has important implications for the ways in which an animal interacts with its olfactory environment, particularly as the animal shifts from a relaxed to an alert behavioral state. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sensory perception can be modulated by behavioral states such as hunger, fear, stress, or a change in environmental context. Behavioral state often affects neural processing via the release of circulating neurochemicals such as hormones or neuromodulators. We here show that the neuromodulator norepinephrine modulates olfactory bulb spontaneous activity and odor responses so as to generate an increased signal-to-noise ratio at the output of the olfactory bulb. Our results help interpret and improve existing ideas for neural network mechanisms underlying behaviorally observed improvements in near-threshold odor detection and discrimination. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3711605-11$15.00/0.

  4. MIMO Radar Transceiver Design for High Signal-to-Interference-Plus-Noise Ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Lipor, John

    2013-05-12

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar employs orthogonal or partially correlated transmit signals to achieve performance benefits over its phased-array counterpart. It has been shown that MIMO radar can achieve greater spatial resolution, improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and target localization, and greater clutter resolution using space-time adaptive processing (STAP). This thesis explores various methods to improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) via transmit and receive beamforming. In MIMO radar settings, it is often desirable to transmit power only to a given location or set of locations defined by a beampattern. Current methods involve a two- step process of designing the transmit covariance matrix R via iterative solutions and then using R to generate waveforms that fulfill practical constraints such as having a constant-envelope or drawing from a finite alphabet. In this document, a closed- form method to design R is proposed that utilizes the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) coefficients and Toeplitz matrices. The resulting covariance matrix fulfills the practical constraints such as positive semidefiniteness and the uniform elemental power constraint and provides performance similar to that of iterative methods, which require a much greater computation time. Next, a transmit architecture is presented 
that exploits the orthogonality of frequencies at discrete DFT values to transmit a sum of orthogonal signals from each antenna. The resulting waveforms provide a lower mean-square error than current methods at a much lower computational cost, and a simulated detection scenario demonstrates the performance advantages achieved. It is also desirable to receive signal power only from a given set of directions defined by a beampattern. In a later chapter of this document, the problem of receive beampattern matching is formulated and three solutions to this problem are demonstrated. We show that partitioning the received data vector

  5. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable.Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients.The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz −1 cm −1 ). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in

  6. Indirect estimation of signal-dependent noise with nonadaptive heterogeneous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, Lucio; Foi, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    We consider the estimation of signal-dependent noise from a single image. Unlike conventional algorithms that build a scatterplot of local mean-variance pairs from either small or adaptively selected homogeneous data samples, our proposed approach relies on arbitrarily large patches of heterogeneous data extracted at random from the image. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach through an extensive theoretical analysis based on mixture of Gaussian distributions. A prototype algorithm is also developed in order to validate the approach on simulated data as well as on real camera raw images.

  7. Signal processing methods for in-situ creep specimen monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guers, Manton J.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2018-04-01

    Previous work investigated using guided waves for monitoring creep deformation during accelerated life testing. The basic objective was to relate observed changes in the time-of-flight to changes in the environmental temperature and specimen gage length. The work presented in this paper investigated several signal processing strategies for possible application in the in-situ monitoring system. Signal processing methods for both group velocity (wave-packet envelope) and phase velocity (peak tracking) time-of-flight were considered. Although the Analytic Envelope found via the Hilbert transform is commonly applied for group velocity measurements, erratic behavior in the indicated time-of-flight was observed when this technique was applied to the in-situ data. The peak tracking strategies tested had generally linear trends, and tracking local minima in the raw waveform ultimately showed the most consistent results.

  8. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick T.; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C.; Mauget, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20th century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal. PMID:25898351

  9. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick T; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C; Mauget, Steven A

    2015-04-21

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20(th) century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal.

  10. Sub-Nyquist signal-reconstruction-free operational modal analysis and damage detection in the presence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkoktsi, Kyriaki; Giaralis, Agathoklis; TauSiesakul, Bamrung

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by a need to reduce energy consumption in wireless sensors for vibration-based structural health monitoring (SHM) associated with data acquisition and transmission, this paper puts forth a novel approach for undertaking operational modal analysis (OMA) and damage localization relying on compressed vibrations measurements sampled at rates well below the Nyquist rate. Specifically, non-uniform deterministic sub-Nyquist multi-coset sampling of response acceleration signals in white noise excited linear structures is considered in conjunction with a power spectrum blind sampling/estimation technique which retrieves/samples the power spectral density matrix from arrays of sensors directly from the sub-Nyquist measurements (i.e., in the compressed domain) without signal reconstruction in the time-domain and without posing any signal sparsity conditions. The frequency domain decomposition algorithm is then applied to the power spectral density matrix to extract natural frequencies and mode shapes as a standard OMA step. Further, the modal strain energy index (MSEI) is considered for damage localization based on the mode shapes extracted directly from the compressed measurements. The effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed approach is numerically assessed by considering simulated vibration data pertaining to a white-noise excited simply supported beam in healthy and in 3 damaged states, contaminated with Gaussian white noise. Good accuracy is achieved in estimating mode shapes (quantified in terms of the modal assurance criterion) and natural frequencies from an array of 15 multi-coset devices sampling at a 70% slower than the Nyquist frequency rate for SNRs as low as 10db. Damage localization of equal level/quality is also achieved by the MSEI applied to mode shapes derived from noisy sub-Nyquist (70% compression) and Nyquist measurements for all damaged states considered. Overall, the furnished numerical results demonstrate that the herein considered sub

  11. Analytical models of probability distribution and excess noise factor of solid state photomultiplier signals with crosstalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradov, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM), also called Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPM), are based on Geiger mode avalanche breakdown that is limited by a strong negative feedback. An SSPM can detect and resolve single photons due to the high gain and ultra-low excess noise of avalanche multiplication in this mode. Crosstalk and afterpulsing processes associated with the high gain introduce specific excess noise and deteriorate the photon number resolution of the SSPM. The probabilistic features of these processes are widely studied because of its significance for the SSPM design, characterization, optimization and application, but the process modeling is mostly based on Monte Carlo simulations and numerical methods. In this study, crosstalk is considered to be a branching Poisson process, and analytical models of probability distribution and excess noise factor (ENF) of SSPM signals based on the Borel distribution as an advance on the geometric distribution models are presented and discussed. The models are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental probability distributions for dark counts and a few photon spectrums in a wide range of fired pixels number as well as with observed super-linear behavior of crosstalk ENF.

  12. Intrinsic low pass filtering improves signal-to-noise ratio in critical-point flexure biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Ankit; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2014-01-01

    A flexure biosensor consists of a suspended beam and a fixed bottom electrode. The adsorption of the target biomolecules on the beam changes its stiffness and results in change of beam's deflection. It is now well established that the sensitivity of sensor is maximized close to the pull-in instability point, where effective stiffness of the beam vanishes. The question: “Do the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit-of-detection (LOD) also improve close to the instability point?”, however remains unanswered. In this article, we systematically analyze the noise response to evaluate SNR and establish LOD of critical-point flexure sensors. We find that a flexure sensor acts like an effective low pass filter close to the instability point due to its relatively small resonance frequency, and rejects high frequency noise, leading to improved SNR and LOD. We believe that our conclusions should establish the uniqueness and the technological relevance of critical-point biosensors.

  13. Speech perception at positive signal-to-noise ratios using adaptive adjustment of time compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, Anne; Brand, Thomas; Lemke, Ulrike; Nitzschner, Stefan; Kollmeier, Birger; Holube, Inga

    2015-11-01

    Positive signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) characterize listening situations most relevant for hearing-impaired listeners in daily life and should therefore be considered when evaluating hearing aid algorithms. For this, a speech-in-noise test was developed and evaluated, in which the background noise is presented at fixed positive SNRs and the speech rate (i.e., the time compression of the speech material) is adaptively adjusted. In total, 29 younger and 12 older normal-hearing, as well as 24 older hearing-impaired listeners took part in repeated measurements. Younger normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired listeners conducted one of two adaptive methods which differed in adaptive procedure and step size. Analysis of the measurements with regard to list length and estimation strategy for thresholds resulted in a practical method measuring the time compression for 50% recognition. This method uses time-compression adjustment and step sizes according to Versfeld and Dreschler [(2002). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 401-408], with sentence scoring, lists of 30 sentences, and a maximum likelihood method for threshold estimation. Evaluation of the procedure showed that older participants obtained higher test-retest reliability compared to younger participants. Depending on the group of listeners, one or two lists are required for training prior to data collection.

  14. A complex symbol signal-to-noise ratio estimator and its performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Y.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents an algorithm for estimating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of signals that contain data on a downconverted suppressed carrier or the first harmonic of a square-wave subcarrier. This algorithm can be used to determine the performance of the full-spectrum combiner for the Galileo S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) mission by measuring the input and output symbol SNR. A performance analysis of the algorithm shows that the estimator can estimate the complex symbol SNR using 10,000 symbols at a true symbol SNR of -5 dB with a mean of -4.9985 dB and a standard deviation of 0.2454 dB, and these analytical results are checked by simulations of 100 runs with a mean of -5.06 dB and a standard deviation of 0.2506 dB.

  15. Signal Processing Device (SPD) for networked radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmapurikar, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Sawhney, A.; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    A networked radiation and parameter monitoring system with three tier architecture is being developed. Signal Processing Device (SPD) is a second level sub-system node in the network. SPD is an embedded system which has multiple input channels and output communication interfaces. It acquires and processes data from first level parametric sensor devices, and sends to third level devices in response to request commands received from host. It also performs scheduled diagnostic operations and passes on the information to host. It supports inputs in the form of differential digital signals and analog voltage signals. SPD communicates with higher level devices over RS232/RS422/USB channels. The system has been designed with main requirements of minimal power consumption and harsh environment in radioactive plants. This paper discusses the hardware and software design details of SPD. (author)

  16. Ultra low power signal oriented approach for wireless health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinkovic, Stevan; Popovici, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there is growing pressure on the medical sector to reduce costs while maintaining or even improving the quality of care. A potential solution to this problem is real time and/or remote patient monitoring by using mobile devices. To achieve this, medical sensors with wireless communication, computational and energy harvesting capabilities are networked on, or in, the human body forming what is commonly called a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN). We present the implementation of a novel Wake Up Receiver (WUR) in the context of standardised wireless protocols, in a signal-oriented WBAN environment and present a novel protocol intended for wireless health monitoring (WhMAC). WhMAC is a TDMA-based protocol with very low power consumption. It utilises WBAN-specific features and a novel ultra low power wake up receiver technology, to achieve flexible and at the same time very low power wireless data transfer of physiological signals. As the main application is in the medical domain, or personal health monitoring, the protocol caters for different types of medical sensors. We define four sensor modes, in which the sensors can transmit data, depending on the sensor type and emergency level. A full power dissipation model is provided for the protocol, with individual hardware and application parameters. Finally, an example application shows the reduction in the power consumption for different data monitoring scenarios.

  17. Evaluating signal-to-noise ratios, loudness, and related measures as indicators of airborne sound insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H K; Bradley, J S

    2009-09-01

    Subjective ratings of the audibility, annoyance, and loudness of music and speech sounds transmitted through 20 different simulated walls were used to identify better single number ratings of airborne sound insulation. The first part of this research considered standard measures such as the sound transmission class the weighted sound reduction index (R(w)) and variations of these measures [H. K. Park and J. S. Bradley, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 208-219 (2009)]. This paper considers a number of other measures including signal-to-noise ratios related to the intelligibility of speech and measures related to the loudness of sounds. An exploration of the importance of the included frequencies showed that the optimum ranges of included frequencies were different for speech and music sounds. Measures related to speech intelligibility were useful indicators of responses to speech sounds but were not as successful for music sounds. A-weighted level differences, signal-to-noise ratios and an A-weighted sound transmission loss measure were good predictors of responses when the included frequencies were optimized for each type of sound. The addition of new spectrum adaptation terms to R(w) values were found to be the most practical approach for achieving more accurate predictions of subjective ratings of transmitted speech and music sounds.

  18. Speed of response, pile-up, and signal to noise ratio in liquid ionization calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, J.

    1989-06-01

    Although liquid ionization calorimeters have been mostly used up to now with slow readout, their signals have a fast rise time. However, it is not easy to get this fast component of the pulse out of the calorimeter. For this purpose a new connection scheme of the electrodes, the ''electrostatic transformer,'' is presented. This technique reduces the detector capacitance while keeping the number of channels at an acceptable level. Also it allows the use of transmission lines to bring signals from the electrodes to the preamplifiers which could be located in an accessible area. With room temperature liquids the length of these cables can be short, keeping the added noise at a reasonable level. Contributions to the error on the energy measurement from pile up and electronics noise are studied in detail. Even on this issue, room temperature liquids (TMP/TMS) are found to be competitive with cold liquid argon at the expense of a moderately higher gap voltage. 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  19. The impact of signal-to-noise ratio on contextual cueing in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingying; Merrill, Edward C

    2015-04-01

    Contextual cueing refers to a form of implicit spatial learning where participants incidentally learn to associate a target location with its repeated spatial context. Successful contextual learning produces an efficient visual search through familiar environments. Despite the fact that children exhibit the basic ability of implicit spatial learning, their general effectiveness in this form of learning can be compromised by other development-dependent factors. Learning to extract useful information (signal) in the presence of various amounts of irrelevant or distracting information (noise) characterizes one of the most important changes that occur with cognitive development. This research investigated whether signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) affects contextual cueing differently in children and adults. S/N was operationally defined as the ratio of repeated versus new displays encountered over time. Three ratio conditions were created: high (100%), medium (67%), and low (33%) conditions. Results suggested no difference in the acquisition of contextual learning effects in the high and medium conditions across three age groups (6- to 8-year-olds, 10- to 12-year-olds, and young adults). However, a significant developmental difference emerged in the low S/N condition. As predicted, adults exhibited significant contextual cueing effects, whereas older children showed marginally significant contextual cueing and younger children did not show cueing effects. Group differences in the ability to exhibit implicit contextual learning under low S/N conditions and the implications of this difference are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Free Energy Adjusted Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (FEA-PSNR) for Image Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Zhai, Guangtao

    2017-12-01

    Peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), the de facto universal image quality metric has been widely criticized as having poor correlation with human subjective quality ratings. In this paper, it will be illustrated that the low performance of PSNR as an image quality metric is partially due to its inability of differentiating image contents. And it is revealed that the deviation between subjective score and PSNR for each type of distortions can be systematically captured by perceptual complexity of the target image. The free energy modelling technique is then introduced to simulate the human cognitive process and measure perceptual complexity of an image. Then it is shown that performance of PSNR can be effectively improved using a linear score mapping process considering image free energy and distortion type. The proposed free energy adjusted peak signal to noise ratio (FEA-PSNR) does not change computational steps the of ordinary PSNR and therefore it inherits the merits of being simple, derivable and physically meaningful. So FEA-PSNR can be easily integrated into existing PSNR based image processing systems to achieve more visually plausible results. And the proposed analysis approach can be extended to other types of image quality metrics for enhanced performance.

  1. Particle image velocimetry correlation signal-to-noise ratio metrics and measurement uncertainty quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Zhenyu; Charonko, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-01-01

    In particle image velocimetry (PIV) the measurement signal is contained in the recorded intensity of the particle image pattern superimposed on a variety of noise sources. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) strength governs the resulting PIV cross correlation and ultimately the accuracy and uncertainty of the resulting PIV measurement. Hence we posit that correlation SNR metrics calculated from the correlation plane can be used to quantify the quality of the correlation and the resulting uncertainty of an individual measurement. In this paper we extend the original work by Charonko and Vlachos and present a framework for evaluating the correlation SNR using a set of different metrics, which in turn are used to develop models for uncertainty estimation. Several corrections have been applied in this work. The SNR metrics and corresponding models presented herein are expanded to be applicable to both standard and filtered correlations by applying a subtraction of the minimum correlation value to remove the effect of the background image noise. In addition, the notion of a ‘valid’ measurement is redefined with respect to the correlation peak width in order to be consistent with uncertainty quantification principles and distinct from an ‘outlier’ measurement. Finally the type and significance of the error distribution function is investigated. These advancements lead to more robust and reliable uncertainty estimation models compared with the original work by Charonko and Vlachos. The models are tested against both synthetic benchmark data as well as experimental measurements. In this work, U 68.5 uncertainties are estimated at the 68.5% confidence level while U 95 uncertainties are estimated at 95% confidence level. For all cases the resulting calculated coverage factors approximate the expected theoretical confidence intervals, thus demonstrating the applicability of these new models for estimation of uncertainty for individual PIV measurements. (paper)

  2. Particle image velocimetry correlation signal-to-noise ratio metrics and measurement uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhenyu; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2014-11-01

    In particle image velocimetry (PIV) the measurement signal is contained in the recorded intensity of the particle image pattern superimposed on a variety of noise sources. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) strength governs the resulting PIV cross correlation and ultimately the accuracy and uncertainty of the resulting PIV measurement. Hence we posit that correlation SNR metrics calculated from the correlation plane can be used to quantify the quality of the correlation and the resulting uncertainty of an individual measurement. In this paper we extend the original work by Charonko and Vlachos and present a framework for evaluating the correlation SNR using a set of different metrics, which in turn are used to develop models for uncertainty estimation. Several corrections have been applied in this work. The SNR metrics and corresponding models presented herein are expanded to be applicable to both standard and filtered correlations by applying a subtraction of the minimum correlation value to remove the effect of the background image noise. In addition, the notion of a ‘valid’ measurement is redefined with respect to the correlation peak width in order to be consistent with uncertainty quantification principles and distinct from an ‘outlier’ measurement. Finally the type and significance of the error distribution function is investigated. These advancements lead to more robust and reliable uncertainty estimation models compared with the original work by Charonko and Vlachos. The models are tested against both synthetic benchmark data as well as experimental measurements. In this work, {{U}68.5} uncertainties are estimated at the 68.5% confidence level while {{U}95} uncertainties are estimated at 95% confidence level. For all cases the resulting calculated coverage factors approximate the expected theoretical confidence intervals, thus demonstrating the applicability of these new models for estimation of uncertainty for individual PIV measurements.

  3. Corrosion monitoring of the AA2024 alloy in NaCl solutions by electrochemical noise measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aballe, A.; Bethencourt, M.; Botana, F.J.; Marcos, M.; Rodriguez-Chacon, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The behaviour of the AA2024 alloy against corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution has been monitored. In this environment the alloy can be easily damaged under small anodic polarizations. Linear Polarization, electrochemical impedance, spectroscopy and electrochemical noise measurement have been used as experimental techniques. Data from ENM have been analyzed using statistical parameters and Chaos Theory. The results here obtained suggest that ENM is particularly useful to monitored systems that can be modified using other electrochemical techniques. (Author) 11 refs

  4. Gating in time domain as a tool for improving the signal-to-noise ratio of beam transfer function measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, U; Caspers, Fritz

    1992-01-01

    For the measurement of Beam Transfer Functions the signal-to-noise ratio is of great importance. In order to get a reasonable quality of the measured data one may apply averaging and smoothing. In the following another technique called time gating to improve the quality of the measurement will be described. By this technique the measurement data are Fourier transformed and then modified in time domain. Tune gating suppresses signal contributions that are correlated to a time interval when no interesting information is expected. Afterivards an inverse Fourier transform leads to data in frequency domain with an improved signal to noise ratio.

  5. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Foroughi Abari, Farzad; Mann, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both...... leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift...... has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2....

  6. Acceptance noise level: effects of the speech signal, babble, and listener language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lu-Feng; Azcona, Gabrielly; Buten, Lupe

    2015-04-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) measure has gained much research/clinical interest in recent years. The present study examined how the characteristics of the speech signal and the babble used in the measure may affect the ANL in listeners with different native languages. Fifteen English monolingual, 16 Russian-English bilingual, and 24 Spanish-English bilingual listeners participated. The ANL was obtained in eight conditions varying in the language of the signal (English and Spanish), language of the babble (English and Spanish), and number of talkers in the babble (4 and 12). Test conditions were randomized across listeners. The ANL for each condition was based on a minimum of two trials. Russian-English bilinguals yielded higher ANLs than other listeners; the intergroup difference of 4-5 dB was statistically and clinically significant. Spanish signals yielded significantly higher ANLs than English signals, but this difference of 0.5 dB was clinically negligible. The language and composition of the babble had a significant effect on Russian-English bilinguals, who yielded higher ANLs with the Spanish than English 12-talker babble. The above findings do not fully support the notion that the ANL is language- and population-independent. Clinicians should be aware of possible effects on ANL measures due to listeners' linguistic/cultural background.

  7. Ultrasensitive, passive and wearable sensors for monitoring human muscle motion and physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Feng; Yi, Changrui; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xuming; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Flexible sensors have attracted more and more attention as a fundamental part of anthropomorphic robot research, medical diagnosis and physical health monitoring. Here, we constructed an ultrasensitive and passive flexible sensor with the advantages of low cost, lightness and wearability, electric safety and reliability. The fundamental mechanism of the sensor is based on triboelectric effect inducing electrostatic charges on the surfaces between two different materials. Just like a plate capacitor, current will be generated while the distance or size of the parallel capacitors changes caused by the small mechanical disturbance upon it and therefore the output current/voltage will be produced. Typically, the passive sensor unambiguously monitors muscle motions including hand motion from stretch-clench-stretch, mouth motion from open-bite-open, blink and respiration. Moreover, this sensor records the details of the consecutive phases in a cardiac cycle of the apex cardiogram, and identify the peaks including percussion wave, tidal wave and diastolic wave of the radial pulse wave. To record subtle human physiological signals including radial pulsilogram and apex cardiogram with excellent signal/noise ratio, stability and reproducibility, the sensor shows great potential in the applications of medical diagnosis and daily health monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Techniques and software tools for estimating ultrasonic signal-to-noise ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; McKillip, Matthew; Engle, Brady J.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    2016-02-01

    At Iowa State University's Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (ISU CNDE), the use of models to simulate ultrasonic inspections has played a key role in R&D efforts for over 30 years. To this end a series of wave propagation models, flaw response models, and microstructural backscatter models have been developed to address inspection problems of interest. One use of the combined models is the estimation of signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) in circumstances where backscatter from the microstructure (grain noise) acts to mask sonic echoes from internal defects. Such S/N models have been used in the past to address questions of inspection optimization and reliability. Under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center at ISU, an effort was recently initiated to improve existing research-grade software by adding graphical user interface (GUI) to become user friendly tools for the rapid estimation of S/N for ultrasonic inspections of metals. The software combines: (1) a Python-based GUI for specifying an inspection scenario and displaying results; and (2) a Fortran-based engine for computing defect signal and backscattered grain noise characteristics. The latter makes use of several models including: the Multi-Gaussian Beam Model for computing sonic fields radiated by commercial transducers; the Thompson-Gray Model for the response from an internal defect; the Independent Scatterer Model for backscattered grain noise; and the Stanke-Kino Unified Model for attenuation. The initial emphasis was on reformulating the research-grade code into a suitable modular form, adding the graphical user interface and performing computations rapidly and robustly. Thus the initial inspection problem being addressed is relatively simple. A normal-incidence pulse/echo immersion inspection is simulated for a curved metal component having a non-uniform microstructure, specifically an equiaxed, untextured microstructure in which the average

  9. Discrimination of acoustic communication signals by grasshoppers (Chorthippus biguttulus): temporal resolution, temporal integration, and the impact of intrinsic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronacher, Bernhard; Wohlgemuth, Sandra; Vogel, Astrid; Krahe, Rüdiger

    2008-08-01

    A characteristic feature of hearing systems is their ability to resolve both fast and subtle amplitude modulations of acoustic signals. This applies also to grasshoppers, which for mate identification rely mainly on the characteristic temporal patterns of their communication signals. Usually the signals arriving at a receiver are contaminated by various kinds of noise. In addition to extrinsic noise, intrinsic noise caused by stochastic processes within the nervous system contributes to making signal recognition a difficult task. The authors asked to what degree intrinsic noise affects temporal resolution and, particularly, the discrimination of similar acoustic signals. This study aims at exploring the neuronal basis for sexual selection, which depends on exploiting subtle differences between basically similar signals. Applying a metric, by which the similarities of spike trains can be assessed, the authors investigated how well the communication signals of different individuals of the same species could be discriminated and correctly classified based on the responses of auditory neurons. This spike train metric yields clues to the optimal temporal resolution with which spike trains should be evaluated. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  10. Novel Oversampling Technique for Improving Signal-to-Quantization Noise Ratio on Accelerometer-Based Smart Jerk Sensors in CNC Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose J; Romero-Troncoso, Rene J; Osornio-Rios, Roque A; Cabal-Yepez, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Jerk monitoring, defined as the first derivative of acceleration, has become a major issue in computerized numeric controlled (CNC) machines. Several works highlight the necessity of measuring jerk in a reliable way for improving production processes. Nowadays, the computation of jerk is done by finite differences of the acceleration signal, computed at the Nyquist rate, which leads to low signal-to-quantization noise ratio (SQNR) during the estimation. The novelty of this work is the development of a smart sensor for jerk monitoring from a standard accelerometer, which has improved SQNR. The proposal is based on oversampling techniques that give a better estimation of jerk than that produced by a Nyquist-rate differentiator. Simulations and experimental results are presented to show the overall methodology performance.

  11. Evaluation of mobile smartphones app as a screening tool for environmental noise monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, Titus S; Folorunsho, David O; Dahilo, Enoch A; Gbujie, Ibeneche O; Nwegbu, Maxwell M; Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G

    2016-01-01

    Noise is a global occupational and environmental health hazard with considerable social and physiological impact and, therefore, there is a need for regular measurements to boost monitoring and regulations of environmental noise levels in our communities. This necessitates a readily available, inexpensive, and easy to use noise measuring device. We aimed to test the sensitivity and validity of mobile "smart" phones for this purpose. This was a comparative analysis of a cross sectional study done between January 2014 and February 2015. Noise levels were measured simultaneously at different locations within Abuja Nigeria at day and night hours in real time environments. A sound level meter (SLM) (Extech407730 Digital Soundmeter, serial no.: 2310135, calibration no: 91037) and three smartphones (Samsung Galaxy note3, Nokia S, and Techno Phantom Z running on Android "Apps" Androidboy1) were used. Statistical calculations were done with Pearson correlation, T-test and Consistency within American National Standards Institute acceptable standard errors. Noise level readings for both daytime and night with the SLM and the mobile phones showed equivalent values. All noise level meters measured were <100dB. The daytime readings were nearly identical in six locations and the maximum difference in values between the SLM and Smartphone instruments was 3db, noted in two locations. Readings in dBA showed strong correlation (r = 0.9) within acceptable error limits for Type 2 SLM devices and no significant difference in the values (p = 0.12 & 0.58) for both day and night. Sensitivity of the instrument yielded 92.9%. The androidboy1 "app" performance in this study showed a good correlation and comparative high sensitivity to the Standard SLM (type 2 SLM device). However there is the need for further studies.

  12. A Plan to Develop and Demonstrate Electrochemical Noise Based Corrosion Monitoring Systems in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document describes changes that need to be made to the site's authorization basis and technical concerns that need to be resolved before proceduralized use of Electrochemical Noise based corrosion monitoring systems is fully possible at the Hanford Site

  13. Relationship of signal-to-noise ratio with acquisition parameters in MRI for a given contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittoun, J.; Leroy-Willig, A.; Idy, I.; Halimi, P.; Syrota, A.; Desgrez, A.; Saint-Jalmes, H.

    1987-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is certainly the most important characteristic of medical images, since the spatial resolution and the visualization of contrast are dependent on its value. On the other hand, modifying an acquisition variable in magnetic resonance imaging, in order to improve spatial resolution for example, may induce a SNR loss and finally alter the image quality. We have studied a theoretical relation between SNR and 2DFT method acquisition variables with the exception of parameters such as TR, TE and TI; these parameters are determined by the desired contrast in order to confirm a diagnosis. According to this relation SNR is proportional to each dimension of the slice, and to the square root of the number of averaged signals; it is inversely proportional to the number of frequency points and to the square root of the number of phase points. This relation was experimentally verified with phantoms and on an MR system at 1.5 T. It was then plotted as a multiple-entry graph on which operators at the console can read the number of averaged signals necessary to compensate SNR loss induced by a modification of other parameters [fr

  14. A Novel Partial Discharge Ultra-High Frequency Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Single-Channel Blind Source Separation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Wei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To effectively de-noise the Gaussian white noise and periodic narrow-band interference in the background noise of partial discharge ultra-high frequency (PD UHF signals in field tests, a novel de-noising method, based on a single-channel blind source separation algorithm, is proposed. Compared with traditional methods, the proposed method can effectively de-noise the noise interference, and the distortion of the de-noising PD signal is smaller. Firstly, the PD UHF signal is time-frequency analyzed by S-transform to obtain the number of source signals. Then, the single-channel detected PD signal is converted into multi-channel signals by singular value decomposition (SVD, and background noise is separated from multi-channel PD UHF signals by the joint approximate diagonalization of eigen-matrix method. At last, the source PD signal is estimated and recovered by the l1-norm minimization method. The proposed de-noising method was applied on the simulation test and field test detected signals, and the de-noising performance of the different methods was compared. The simulation and field test results demonstrate the effectiveness and correctness of the proposed method.

  15. Representation of acoustic signals in the eighth nerve of the Tokay gecko. II. Masking of pure tones with noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams-Dodd, F; Capranica, R R

    1996-10-01

    Acoustic signals are generally encoded in the peripheral auditory system of vertebrates by a duality scheme. For frequency components that fall within the excitatory tuning curve, individual eighth nerve fibers can encode the effective spectral energy by a spike-rate code, while simultaneously preserving the signal waveform periodicity of lower frequency components by phase-locked spike-train discharges. To explore how robust this duality of representation may be in the presence of noise, we recorded the responses of auditory fibers in the eighth nerve of the Tokay gecko to tonal stimuli when masking noise was added simultaneously. We found that their spike-rate functions reached plateau levels fairly rapidly in the presence of noise, so the ability to signal the presence of a tone by a concomitant change in firing rate was quickly lost. On the other hand, their synchronization functions maintained a high degree of phase-locked firings to the tone even in the presence of high-intensity masking noise, thus enabling a robust detection of the tonal signal. Critical ratios (CR) and critical bandwidths showed that in the frequency range where units are able to phaselock to the tonal periodicity, the CR bands were relatively narrow and the bandwidths were independent of noise level. However, to higher frequency tones where phaselocking fails and only spike-rate codes apply, the CR bands were much wider and depended upon noise level, so that their ability to filter tones out of a noisy background degraded with increasing noise levels. The greater robustness of phase-locked temporal encoding contrasted with spike-rate coding verifies a important advantage in using lower frequency signals for communication in noisy environments.

  16. Signal-to-noise based local decorrelation compensation for speckle interferometry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molimard, Jerome; Cordero, Raul; Vautrin, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Speckle-based interferometric techniques allow assessing the whole-field deformation induced on a specimen due to the application of load. These high sensitivity optical techniques yield fringe images generated by subtracting speckle patterns captured while the specimen undergoes deformation. The quality of the fringes, and in turn the accuracy of the deformation measurements, strongly depends on the speckle correlation. Specimen rigid body motion leads to speckle decorrelation that, in general, cannot be effectively counteracted by applying a global translation to the involved speckle patterns. In this paper, we propose a recorrelation procedure based on the application of locally evaluated translations. The proposed procedure implies dividing the field into several regions, applying a local translation, and calculating, in every region, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Since the latter is a correlation indicator (the noise increases with the decorrelation) we argue that the proper translation is that which maximizes the locally evaluated SNR. The search of the proper local translations is, of course, an interactive process that can be facilitated by using a SNR optimization algorithm. The performance of the proposed recorrelation procedure was tested on two examples. First, the SNR optimization algorithm was applied to fringe images obtained by subtracting simulated speckle patterns. Next, it was applied to fringe images obtained by using a shearography optical setup from a specimen subjected to mechanical deformation. Our results show that the proposed SNR optimization method can significantly improve the reliability of measurements performed by using speckle-based techniques

  17. From noise to signal - a new approach to LHCb muon optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchuk, A P

    2010-01-01

    One has to exploit the LHCb muon detector at the lowest possible gas gain and operational voltage in order to minimize the charge accumulated during 10 years of the LHCb experiment keeping the aging effects as low as possible. The detector lifetime prolongation 1.5-2 times can be achieved following the optimization of the LHCb muon system proposed in this note. An optimization of the LHCb muon system assumes: minimization of the electronics thresholds and detector gas gain, a choice of the working point near the knee of the efficiency plateau at high enough efficiency at stabilization the signal-to-noise ratio during long-term data taking runs by gas gain stabilization. An efficiency of each chamber tuned once by a time alignment remains constant at the constant gas gain. Cluster size, cross-talks, multi-hits become constant and minimal at constant and minimal gas gain. It is shown in the note how to reconstruct the noise distribution in each chamber already installed in the pit and to measure precisely offse...

  18. Separation of pulsar signals from noise using supervised machine learning algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethapudi, S.; Desai, S.

    2018-04-01

    We evaluate the performance of four different machine learning (ML) algorithms: an Artificial Neural Network Multi-Layer Perceptron (ANN MLP), Adaboost, Gradient Boosting Classifier (GBC), and XGBoost, for the separation of pulsars from radio frequency interference (RFI) and other sources of noise, using a dataset obtained from the post-processing of a pulsar search pipeline. This dataset was previously used for the cross-validation of the SPINN-based machine learning engine, obtained from the reprocessing of the HTRU-S survey data (Morello et al., 2014). We have used the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique (SMOTE) to deal with high-class imbalance in the dataset. We report a variety of quality scores from all four of these algorithms on both the non-SMOTE and SMOTE datasets. For all the above ML methods, we report high accuracy and G-mean for both the non-SMOTE and SMOTE cases. We study the feature importances using Adaboost, GBC, and XGBoost and also from the minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance approach to report algorithm-agnostic feature ranking. From these methods, we find that the signal to noise of the folded profile to be the best feature. We find that all the ML algorithms report FPRs about an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding FPRs obtained in Morello et al. (2014), for the same recall value.

  19. Periodic rotation noise induced by the crosstalk between two beat-frequency signals in multi-oscillator ring laser gyros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Guangfeng; Wang, Zhiguo; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Periodic rotation noise in the outputs of multi-oscillator ring laser gyros (MRLGs) is investigated in this paper for the first time. It is proved theoretically and experimentally that noise is induced by the crosstalk between two beat-frequency signals, which are combined from the left and right circularly polarized counter-propagating beams in MRLGs. Theoretical analysis and experimental results also indicate that the fundamental frequency of this noise is equal to the frequency difference between the two beat-frequency signals and the amplitude of the fundamental component is proportional to the crosstalk ratio between the two beat-frequency signals. Further, the amplitude of the nth-order component is proportional to the nth power of the crosstalk ratio. (paper)

  20. Macromolecular 3D SEM reconstruction strategies: Signal to noise ratio and resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, J.D.; Wepf, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy generates quantitative volumetric structural data from SEM images of macromolecules. This technique provides a quick and easy way to define the quaternary structure and handedness of protein complexes. Here, we apply a variety of preparation and imaging methods to filamentous actin in order to explore the relationship between resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, structural preservation and dataset size. This information can be used to define successful imaging strategies for different applications. - Highlights: • F-actin SEM datasets were collected using 8 different preparation/ imaging techniques. • Datasets were reconstructed by back projection and compared/analyzed • 3DSEM actin reconstructions can be produced with <100 views of the asymmetric unit. • Negatively stained macromolecules can be reconstructed by 3DSEM to ∼3 nm resolution

  1. Hearing aid processing of loud speech and noise signals: Consequences for loudness perception and listening comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Erik

    2007-01-01

    sounds, has found that both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners prefer loud sounds to be closer to the most comfortable loudness-level, than suggested by common non-linear fitting rules. During this project, two listening experiments were carried out. In the first experiment, hearing aid users......Hearing aid processing of loud speech and noise signals: Consequences for loudness perception and listening comfort. Sound processing in hearing aids is determined by the fitting rule. The fitting rule describes how the hearing aid should amplify speech and sounds in the surroundings......, such that they become audible again for the hearing impaired person. The general goal is to place all sounds within the hearing aid users’ audible range, such that speech intelligibility and listening comfort become as good as possible. Amplification strategies in hearing aids are in many cases based on empirical...

  2. Combining of Direct Search and Signal-to-Noise Ratio for economic dispatch optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Whei-Min; Gow, Hong-Jey; Tsai, Ming-Tang

    2011-01-01

    This paper integrated the ideas of Direct Search and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) to develop a Novel Direct Search (NDS) method for solving the non-convex economic dispatch problems. NDS consists of three stages: Direct Search (DS), Global SNR (GSNR) and Marginal Compensation (MC) stages. DS provides a basic solution. GSNR searches the point with optimization strategy. MC fulfills the power balance requirement. With NDS, the infinite solution space becomes finite. Furthermore, a same optimum solution can be repeatedly reached. Effectiveness of NDS is demonstrated with three examples and the solutions were compared with previously published results. Test results show that the proposed method is simple, robust, and more effective than many other previously developed algorithms.

  3. Shuttle bit rate synchronizer. [signal to noise ratios and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, D. C.; Fultz, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A shuttle bit rate synchronizer brassboard unit was designed, fabricated, and tested, which meets or exceeds the contractual specifications. The bit rate synchronizer operates at signal-to-noise ratios (in a bit rate bandwidth) down to -5 dB while exhibiting less than 0.6 dB bit error rate degradation. The mean acquisition time was measured to be less than 2 seconds. The synchronizer is designed around a digital data transition tracking loop whose phase and data detectors are integrate-and-dump filters matched to the Manchester encoded bits specified. It meets the reliability (no adjustments or tweaking) and versatility (multiple bit rates) of the shuttle S-band communication system through an implementation which is all digital after the initial stage of analog AGC and A/D conversion.

  4. Attitude determination for small satellites using GPS signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Daniel

    An embedded system for GPS-based attitude determination (AD) using signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements was developed for CubeSat applications. The design serves as an evaluation testbed for conducting ground based experiments using various computational methods and antenna types to determine the optimum AD accuracy. Raw GPS data is also stored to non-volatile memory for downloading and post analysis. Two low-power microcontrollers are used for processing and to display information on a graphic screen for real-time performance evaluations. A new parallel inter-processor communication protocol was developed that is faster and uses less power than existing standard protocols. A shorted annular patch (SAP) antenna was fabricated for the initial ground-based AD experiments with the testbed. Static AD estimations with RMS errors in the range of 2.5° to 4.8° were achieved over a range of off-zenith attitudes.

  5. Signal-to-noise analysis of a birefringent spectral zooming imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaotong; Wu, Haiying; Qi, Chun

    2018-05-01

    Study of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a novel spectral zooming imaging spectrometer (SZIS) based on two identical Wollaston prisms is conducted. According to the theory of radiometry and Fourier transform spectroscopy, we deduce the theoretical equations of SNR of SZIS in spectral domain with consideration of the incident wavelength and the adjustable spectral resolution. An example calculation of SNR of SZIS is performed over 400-1000 nm. The calculation results indicate that SNR with different spectral resolutions of SZIS can be optionally selected by changing the spacing between the two identical Wollaston prisms. This will provide theoretical basis for the design, development and engineering of the developed imaging spectrometer for broad spectrum and SNR requirements.

  6. Novel Flexible Wearable Sensor Materials and Signal Processing for Vital Sign and Human Activity Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servati, Amir; Zou, Liang; Wang, Z Jane; Ko, Frank; Servati, Peyman

    2017-07-13

    Advances in flexible electronic materials and smart textile, along with broad availability of smart phones, cloud and wireless systems have empowered the wearable technologies for significant impact on future of digital and personalized healthcare as well as consumer electronics. However, challenges related to lack of accuracy, reliability, high power consumption, rigid or bulky form factor and difficulty in interpretation of data have limited their wide-scale application in these potential areas. As an important solution to these challenges, we present latest advances in novel flexible electronic materials and sensors that enable comfortable and conformable body interaction and potential for invisible integration within daily apparel. Advances in novel flexible materials and sensors are described for wearable monitoring of human vital signs including, body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate, muscle movements and activity. We then present advances in signal processing focusing on motion and noise artifact removal, data mining and aspects of sensor fusion relevant to future clinical applications of wearable technology.

  7. Noise and signal properties in PSF-based fully 3D PET image reconstruction: an experimental evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, S; Alessio, A M; Kinahan, P E

    2010-01-01

    The addition of accurate system modeling in PET image reconstruction results in images with distinct noise texture and characteristics. In particular, the incorporation of point spread functions (PSF) into the system model has been shown to visually reduce image noise, but the noise properties have not been thoroughly studied. This work offers a systematic evaluation of noise and signal properties in different combinations of reconstruction methods and parameters. We evaluate two fully 3D PET reconstruction algorithms: (1) OSEM with exact scanner line of response modeled (OSEM+LOR), (2) OSEM with line of response and a measured point spread function incorporated (OSEM+LOR+PSF), in combination with the effects of four post-reconstruction filtering parameters and 1-10 iterations, representing a range of clinically acceptable settings. We used a modified NEMA image quality (IQ) phantom, which was filled with 68 Ge and consisted of six hot spheres of different sizes with a target/background ratio of 4:1. The phantom was scanned 50 times in 3D mode on a clinical system to provide independent noise realizations. Data were reconstructed with OSEM+LOR and OSEM+LOR+PSF using different reconstruction parameters, and our implementations of the algorithms match the vendor's product algorithms. With access to multiple realizations, background noise characteristics were quantified with four metrics. Image roughness and the standard deviation image measured the pixel-to-pixel variation; background variability and ensemble noise quantified the region-to-region variation. Image roughness is the image noise perceived when viewing an individual image. At matched iterations, the addition of PSF leads to images with less noise defined as image roughness (reduced by 35% for unfiltered data) and as the standard deviation image, while it has no effect on background variability or ensemble noise. In terms of signal to noise performance, PSF-based reconstruction has a 7% improvement in

  8. Attention-dependent modulation of cortical taste circuits revealed by Granger causality with signal-dependent noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Luo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We show, for the first time, that in cortical areas, for example the insular, orbitofrontal, and lateral prefrontal cortex, there is signal-dependent noise in the fMRI blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD time series, with the variance of the noise increasing approximately linearly with the square of the signal. Classical Granger causal models are based on autoregressive models with time invariant covariance structure, and thus do not take this signal-dependent noise into account. To address this limitation, here we describe a Granger causal model with signal-dependent noise, and a novel, likelihood ratio test for causal inferences. We apply this approach to the data from an fMRI study to investigate the source of the top-down attentional control of taste intensity and taste pleasantness processing. The Granger causality with signal-dependent noise analysis reveals effects not identified by classical Granger causal analysis. In particular, there is a top-down effect from the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the insular taste cortex during attention to intensity but not to pleasantness, and there is a top-down effect from the anterior and posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness but not to intensity. In addition, there is stronger forward effective connectivity from the insular taste cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness than during attention to intensity. These findings indicate the importance of explicitly modeling signal-dependent noise in functional neuroimaging, and reveal some of the processes involved in a biased activation theory of selective attention.

  9. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  10. Data-driven gating in PET: Influence of respiratory signal noise on motion resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büther, Florian; Ernst, Iris; Frohwein, Lynn Johann; Pouw, Joost; Schäfers, Klaus Peter; Stegger, Lars

    2018-05-21

    Data-driven gating (DDG) approaches for positron emission tomography (PET) are interesting alternatives to conventional hardware-based gating methods. In DDG, the measured PET data themselves are utilized to calculate a respiratory signal, that is, subsequently used for gating purposes. The success of gating is then highly dependent on the statistical quality of the PET data. In this study, we investigate how this quality determines signal noise and thus motion resolution in clinical PET scans using a center-of-mass-based (COM) DDG approach, specifically with regard to motion management of target structures in future radiotherapy planning applications. PET list mode datasets acquired in one bed position of 19 different radiotherapy patients undergoing pretreatment [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT or [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI were included into this retrospective study. All scans were performed over a region with organs (myocardium, kidneys) or tumor lesions of high tracer uptake and under free breathing. Aside from the original list mode data, datasets with progressively decreasing PET statistics were generated. From these, COM DDG signals were derived for subsequent amplitude-based gating of the original list mode file. The apparent respiratory shift d from end-expiration to end-inspiration was determined from the gated images and expressed as a function of signal-to-noise ratio SNR of the determined gating signals. This relation was tested against additional 25 [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI list mode datasets where high-precision MR navigator-like respiratory signals were available as reference signal for respiratory gating of PET data, and data from a dedicated thorax phantom scan. All original 19 high-quality list mode datasets demonstrated the same behavior in terms of motion resolution when reducing the amount of list mode events for DDG signal generation. Ratios and directions of respiratory shifts between end-respiratory gates and the respective nongated image were constant over all

  11. High-frequency Audiometry Hearing on Monitoring of Individuals Exposed to Occupational Noise: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonioli, Cleonice Aparecida Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The literature reports on high-frequency audiometry as one of the exams used on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to high sound pressure in their work environment, due to the method́s greater sensitivity in early identification of hearing loss caused by noise. The frequencies that compose the exam are generally between 9 KHz and 20KHz, depending on the equipment. Objective This study aims to perform a retrospective and secondary systematic revision of publications on high-frequency audiometry on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to occupational noise. Data Synthesis This systematic revision followed the methodology proposed in the Cochrane Handbook, focusing on the question: “Is High-frequency Audiometry more sensitive than Conventional Audiometry in the screening of early hearing loss individuals exposed to occupational noise?” The search was based on PubMed data, Base, Web of Science (Capes, Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS, and in the references cited in identified and selected articles. The search resulted in 6059 articles in total. Of these, only six studies were compatible with the criteria proposed in this study. Conclusion The performed meta-analysis does not definitively answer the study's proposed question. It indicates that the 16 KHz high frequency audiometry (HFA frequency is sensitive in early identification of hearing loss in the control group (medium difference (MD = 8.33, as well as the 4 KHz frequency (CA, this one being a little less expressive (MD = 5.72. Thus, others studies are necessary to confirm the HFA importance for the early screening of hearing loss on individuals exposed to noise at the workplace.

  12. High-frequency Audiometry Hearing on Monitoring of Individuals Exposed to Occupational Noise: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonioli, Cleonice Aparecida Silva; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa Maria; Benaglia, Tatiana Aparecida Silva

    2016-07-01

    The literature reports on high-frequency audiometry as one of the exams used on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to high sound pressure in their work environment, due to the method́s greater sensitivity in early identification of hearing loss caused by noise. The frequencies that compose the exam are generally between 9 KHz and 20KHz, depending on the equipment. This study aims to perform a retrospective and secondary systematic revision of publications on high-frequency audiometry on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to occupational noise. This systematic revision followed the methodology proposed in the Cochrane Handbook, focusing on the question: "Is High-frequency Audiometry more sensitive than Conventional Audiometry in the screening of early hearing loss individuals exposed to occupational noise?" The search was based on PubMed data, Base, Web of Science (Capes), Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS), and in the references cited in identified and selected articles. The search resulted in 6059 articles in total. Of these, only six studies were compatible with the criteria proposed in this study. The performed meta-analysis does not definitively answer the study's proposed question. It indicates that the 16 KHz high frequency audiometry (HFA) frequency is sensitive in early identification of hearing loss in the control group (medium difference (MD = 8.33)), as well as the 4 KHz frequency (CA), this one being a little less expressive (MD = 5.72). Thus, others studies are necessary to confirm the HFA importance for the early screening of hearing loss on individuals exposed to noise at the workplace.

  13. An electromagnetic signals monitoring and analysis wireless platform employing personal digital assistants and pattern analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninos, K.; Georgiadis, P.; Cavouras, D.; Nomicos, C.

    2010-05-01

    This study presents the design and development of a mobile wireless platform to be used for monitoring and analysis of seismic events and related electromagnetic (EM) signals, employing Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs). A prototype custom-developed application was deployed on a 3G enabled PDA that could connect to the FTP server of the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens and receive and display EM signals at 4 receiver frequencies (3 KHz (E-W, N-S), 10 KHz (E-W, N-S), 41 MHz and 46 MHz). Signals may originate from any one of the 16 field-stations located around the Greek territory. Employing continuous recordings of EM signals gathered from January 2003 till December 2007, a Support Vector Machines (SVM)-based classification system was designed to distinguish EM precursor signals within noisy background. EM-signals corresponding to recordings preceding major seismic events (Ms≥5R) were segmented, by an experienced scientist, and five features (mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis, and a wavelet based feature), derived from the EM-signals were calculated. These features were used to train the SVM-based classification scheme. The performance of the system was evaluated by the exhaustive search and leave-one-out methods giving 87.2% overall classification accuracy, in correctly identifying EM precursor signals within noisy background employing all calculated features. Due to the insufficient processing power of the PDAs, this task was performed on a typical desktop computer. This optimal trained context of the SVM classifier was then integrated in the PDA based application rendering the platform capable to discriminate between EM precursor signals and noise. System's efficiency was evaluated by an expert who reviewed 1/ multiple EM-signals, up to 18 days prior to corresponding past seismic events, and 2/ the possible EM-activity of a specific region employing the trained SVM classifier. Additionally, the proposed architecture can form a

  14. Signal-to-noise ratio of bilateral nonimaging transcranial Doppler recordings of the middle cerebral artery is not affected by age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsogridakis, Emmanuel; Dineen, Nicky E; Brodie, Fiona G; Robinson, Thompson G; Panerai, Ronney B

    2011-04-01

    Differences between transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) recordings of symmetrical vessels can show true physiologic differences, but can also be caused by measurement error and other sources of noise. The aim of this project was to assess the influence of noise on estimates of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA), and of age, sex and breathing manoeuvres on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was monitored in 30 young (60 years) during baseline conditions, breath-holding and hyperventilation. Noise was defined as the difference between beat-to-beat values of the two mean CBF velocity (CBFV) signals. Magnitude squared coherence estimates of noise vs. ABP and ABP vs. CBFV were obtained and averaged. A similar approach was adopted for the CBFV step response. The effect of age and breathing manoeuvre on the SNR was assessed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), whilst the effect of sex was investigated using a Student's t test. No significant differences were observed in SNR (baseline 6.07 ± 3.07 dB and 7.33 ± 3.84 dB, breath-hold: 13.53 ± 3.93 dB and 14.64 ± 4.52 dB, and hyperventilation: 14.69 ± 4.04 dB and 14.84 ± 4.05 dB) estimates between young and old groups, respectively. The use of breathing manoeuvres significantly improved the SNR (p < 10(-4)) without a significant difference between manoeuvres. Sex does not appear to have an effect on SNR (p = 0.365). Coherence estimates were not influenced by the SNR, but significant differences were found in the amplitude of the CBFV step response. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Regularized non-stationary morphological reconstruction algorithm for weak signal detection in microseismic monitoring: methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weilin; Wang, Runqiu; Chen, Yangkang

    2018-05-01

    Microseismic signal is typically weak compared with the strong background noise. In order to effectively detect the weak signal in microseismic data, we propose a mathematical morphology based approach. We decompose the initial data into several morphological multiscale components. For detection of weak signal, a non-stationary weighting operator is proposed and introduced into the process of reconstruction of data by morphological multiscale components. The non-stationary weighting operator can be obtained by solving an inversion problem. The regularized non-stationary method can be understood as a non-stationary matching filtering method, where the matching filter has the same size as the data to be filtered. In this paper, we provide detailed algorithmic descriptions and analysis. The detailed algorithm framework, parameter selection and computational issue for the regularized non-stationary morphological reconstruction (RNMR) method are presented. We validate the presented method through a comprehensive analysis through different data examples. We first test the proposed technique using a synthetic data set. Then the proposed technique is applied to a field project, where the signals induced from hydraulic fracturing are recorded by 12 three-component geophones in a monitoring well. The result demonstrates that the RNMR can improve the detectability of the weak microseismic signals. Using the processed data, the short-term-average over long-term average picking algorithm and Geiger's method are applied to obtain new locations of microseismic events. In addition, we show that the proposed RNMR method can be used not only in microseismic data but also in reflection seismic data to detect the weak signal. We also discussed the extension of RNMR from 1-D to 2-D or a higher dimensional version.

  16. Neutron Signal and Noise Separation of the {sup 6}Li-ZnS(Ag) scintillator (BC702) Using Flash ADC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S. G.; Kye, Y. U. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. N. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M. W. [Dongnam Inst. of radiological and Medical Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This study will apply to nuclear data experiments and improve the quality of nuclear data measured at PNF. We also briefly discuss the future plan to apply our research to different kinds of neutron detectors. The parameters to separate the neutron signals and noises of the {sup 6}Li.ZnS(Ag) scintillator are determined through the upper processes. Three kinds of noise are determined by the parameters as shown in figure.5. The signals at the green (pedestal), red (gamma flash), and blue (gamma flash with big signal area) region are subtracted from the total amount of the counted signals. These algorithms will be applied to next neutron TOF experiments. Two additional neutron detectors will be introduced for neutron TOF experiment. These will measure the neutron flux to get the normalization factor. We will also conduct signal and noise separation of these neutron detectors. Neutron total cross-sections have been measured by using the time-of-flight (TOF) method at Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). A {sup 6}Li.ZnS(Ag) scintillator BC702 from Bicron (Newbury, OH) with a diameter of 127 mm and a thickness of 6.35 mm mounted on an EMI-93090 photomultiplier was used as a detector for the neutron TOF spectrum measurement. This detector is sensitive to thermal and epithermal neutrons and insensitive to gamma radiation. However, it is required to more accurately separate neutron signal and noise. In the present work, we studied neutron signal and noise separation of the BC702 scintillator to measure the accurate neutron TOF data.

  17. A SIGNAL ENHANCED PORTABLE RAMAN PROBE FOR ANESTHETIC GAS MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schlüter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous Raman scattering technique is an excellent tool for a quantitative analysis of multi-species gas mixtures. It is a noninvasive optical method for species identification and gas phase concentration measurement of all Raman active molecules, since the intensity of the species specific Raman signal is linearly dependent on the concentration. Applying a continuous wave (CW laser it typically takes a few seconds to capture a gas phase Raman spectrum at room temperature. Nevertheless in contrast to these advantages the weak Raman signal intensity is a major drawback. Thus, it is still challenging to detect gas phase Raman spectra in alow-pressure regime with a temporal resolution of only a few 100 ms. In this work a fully functional gas phase Raman system for measurements in the low-pressure regime (p ≥ 980 hPa (absolute is presented. It overcomes the drawback of a weak Raman signal by using a multipass cavity. A description of the sensor setup and of the multipass arrangement will be presented. Moreover the complete functionality of the sensor system will be demonstrated by measurements at an anesthesia simulator under clinical relevant conditions and in comparison to a conventional gas monitor.

  18. Noise reduction in Lidar signal using correlation-based EMD combined with soft thresholding and roughness penalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jianhua; Zhu, Lingyan; Li, Hongxu; Xu, Fan; Liu, Binggang; Yang, Zhenbo

    2018-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is widely used to analyze the non-linear and non-stationary signals for noise reduction. In this study, a novel EMD-based denoising method, referred to as EMD with soft thresholding and roughness penalty (EMD-STRP), is proposed for the Lidar signal denoising. With the proposed method, the relevant and irrelevant intrinsic mode functions are first distinguished via a correlation coefficient. Then, the soft thresholding technique is applied to the irrelevant modes, and the roughness penalty technique is applied to the relevant modes to extract as much information as possible. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using three typical signals contaminated by white Gaussian noise. The denoising performance was then compared to the denoising capabilities of other techniques, such as correlation-based EMD partial reconstruction, correlation-based EMD hard thresholding, and wavelet transform. The use of EMD-STRP on the measured Lidar signal resulted in the noise being efficiently suppressed, with an improved signal to noise ratio of 22.25 dB and an extended detection range of 11 km.

  19. Shot-noise-limited monitoring and phase locking of the motion of a single trapped ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushev, P; Hétet, G; Slodička, L; Rotter, D; Wilson, M A; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Eschner, J; Blatt, R

    2013-03-29

    We perform a high-resolution real-time readout of the motion of a single trapped and laser-cooled Ba+ ion. By using an interferometric setup, we demonstrate a shot-noise-limited measurement of thermal oscillations with a resolution of 4 times the standard quantum limit. We apply the real-time monitoring for phase control of the ion motion through a feedback loop, suppressing the photon recoil-induced phase diffusion. Because of the spectral narrowing in the phase-locked mode, the coherent ion oscillation is measured with a resolution of about 0.3 times the standard quantum limit.

  20. Lifting Transit Signals from the Kepler Noise Floor. I. Discovery of a Warm Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, Michelle; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Hoffman, Kelsey

    2018-01-01

    Light curves from the 4-year Kepler exoplanet hunting mission have been searched for transits by NASA’s Kepler team and others, but there are still important discoveries to be made. We have searched the light curves of 400 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) to find transit signals down to signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) ∼ 6, which is under the limit of S/N ∼ 7.1 that has been commonly adopted as a strict threshold to distinguish between a transit candidate and false alarm. We detect four new and convincing planet candidates ranging in radius from near-Mercury-size to slightly larger than Neptune. We highlight the discovery of KOI-408.05 (period = 637 days; radius = 4.9 R ⊕ incident flux = 0.6 S ⊕), a planet candidate within its host star’s Habitable Zone. We dub this planet a “warm Neptune,” a likely volatile-rich world that deserves closer inspection. KOI-408.05 joins 21 other confirmed and candidate planets in the current Kepler sample with semimajor axes a > 1.4 au. These discoveries are significant as a demonstration that the S/N threshold for detection used by the Kepler project is open to debate.

  1. Research and Development Program in Reactor Diagnostics and Monitoring with Neutron Noise Methods. Stage 8. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Demaziere, C.; Arzhanov, V.

    2003-01-01

    This report constitutes Stage 8 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. A brief proposal for the continuation of this program in stage 9 is also given at the end of the report. The program executed in Stage 8 consists of three parts and the work performed in each part is summarized below. In Stage 7, an anomaly localisation algorithm was presented and applied to the Forsmark-1 channel instability event. This investigation was carried out with a set of static data that were typical of a generic BWR model, since no data except the Local Power Range Monitors (LPRMs) time signals recorded during the instability event were made accessible to us at that time. In the present Stage, these static data were obtained from Vattenfall Fuel AB, who used the SIMULATE-3 code. The first Section of this report is thus devoted to this anomaly localisation but this time with a relevant set of data, both regarding the static core conditions and regarding the LPRMs time signals. The noise source pointed out by the localisation algorithm was once again found to be very close to an unseated fuel assembly discovered during the fuel outage following the instability event. The localisation procedure relies in fact on the prior calculation of the reactor transfer function, carried out via the neutron noise simulator first presented in Stage 6 and later improved in Stage 7. The neutron noise simulator was also improved in this Stage. More precisely, a 2-D 2- group static core simulator was developed in order to calculate the static flux and the associated eigenvalue with a spatial discretization scheme compatible with the one in use in the neutron noise simulator, i.e. finite differences. It has generally been assumed that the Decay Ratio (DR), a parameter characterizing the stability of BWRs, is a space-independent parameter of the reactor, i.e. it is independent of which LPRM is used in the core to

  2. Fractal properties of background noise and target signal enhancement using CSEM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Alfonso; Everett, Mark E.; Pierce, Carl; Nguyen, Cam

    2003-09-01

    Controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) spatial profiles and 2-D conductivity maps were obtained on the Brazos Valley, TX floodplain to study the fractal statistics of geological signals and effects of man-made conductive targets using Geonics EM34, EM31 and EM63. Using target-free areas, a consistent power-law power spectrum (|A(k)| ~ k ^-β) for the profiles was found with β values typical of fractional Brownian motion (fBm). This means that the spatial variation of conductivity does not correspond to Gaussian statistics, where there are spatial correlations at different scales. The presence of targets tends to flatten the power-law power spectrum (PS) at small wavenumbers. Detection and localization of targets can be achieved using short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The presence of targets is enhanced because the signal energy is spread to higher wavenumbers (small scale numbers) in the positions occupied by the targets. In the case of poor spatial sampling or small amount of data, the information available from the power spectrum is not enough to separate spatial correlations from target signatures. Advantages are gained by using the spatial correlations of the fBm in order to reject the background response, and to enhance the signals from highly conductive targets. This approach was tested for the EM31 using a pre-processing step that combines apparent conductivity readings from two perpendicular transmitter-receiver orientations at each station. The response obtained using time-domain CSEM is influence to a lesser degree by geological noise and the target response can be processed to recover target features. The homotopy method is proposed to solve the inverse problem using a set of possible target models and a dynamic library of responses used to optimize the starting model.

  3. Effects of the physiological parameters on the signal-to-noise ratio of single myoelectric channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YT

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important measure of the performance of a myoelectric (ME control system for powered artificial limbs is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR at the output of ME channel. However, few studies illustrated the neuron-muscular interactive effects on the SNR at ME control channel output. In order to obtain a comprehensive understanding on the relationship between the physiology of individual motor unit and the ME control performance, this study investigates the effects of physiological factors on the SNR of single ME channel by an analytical and simulation approach, where the SNR is defined as the ratio of the mean squared value estimation at the channel output and the variance of the estimation. Methods Mathematical models are formulated based on three fundamental elements: a motoneuron firing mechanism, motor unit action potential (MUAP module, and signal processor. Myoelectric signals of a motor unit are synthesized with different physiological parameters, and the corresponding SNR of single ME channel is numerically calculated. Effects of physiological multi factors on the SNR are investigated, including properties of the motoneuron, MUAP waveform, recruitment order, and firing pattern, etc. Results The results of the mathematical model, supported by simulation, indicate that the SNR of a single ME channel is associated with the voluntary contraction level. We showed that a model-based approach can provide insight into the key factors and bioprocess in ME control. The results of this modelling work can be potentially used in the improvement of ME control performance and for the training of amputees with powered prostheses. Conclusion The SNR of single ME channel is a force, neuronal and muscular property dependent parameter. The theoretical model provides possible guidance to enhance the SNR of ME channel by controlling physiological variables or conscious contraction level.

  4. Ambient seismic noise monitoring of a clay landslide: Toward failure prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainsant, Guénolé; Larose, Eric; Brönnimann, Cornelia; Jongmans, Denis; Michoud, Clément; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2012-03-01

    Given that clay-rich landslides may become mobilized, leading to rapid mass movements (earthflows and debris flows), they pose critical problems in risk management worldwide. The most widely proposed mechanism leading to such flow-like movements is the increase in water pore pressure in the sliding mass, generating partial or complete liquefaction. This solid-to-liquid transition results in a dramatic reduction of mechanical rigidity in the liquefied zones, which could be detected by monitoring shear wave velocity variations. With this purpose in mind, the ambient seismic noise correlation technique has been applied to measure the variation in the seismic surface wave velocity in the Pont Bourquin landslide (Swiss Alps). This small but active composite earthslide-earthflow was equipped with continuously recording seismic sensors during spring and summer 2010. An earthslide of a few thousand cubic meters was triggered in mid-August 2010, after a rainy period. This article shows that the seismic velocity of the sliding material, measured from daily noise correlograms, decreased continuously and rapidly for several days prior to the catastrophic event. From a spectral analysis of the velocity decrease, it was possible to determine the location of the change at the base of the sliding layer. These results demonstrate that ambient seismic noise can be used to detect rigidity variations before failure and could potentially be used to predict landslides.

  5. GPS Signal Offset Detection and Noise Strength Estimation in a Parallel Kalman Filter Algorithm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanek, Barry

    1999-01-01

    .... The variance of the noise process is estimated and provided to the second algorithm, a parallel Kalman filter structure, which then adapts to changes in the real-world measurement noise strength...

  6. Study of core support barrel vibration monitoring using ex-core neutron noise analysis and fuzzy logic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, Robby; Song, Seon Ho; Kang, Hyun Gook

    2015-01-01

    The application of neutron noise analysis (NNA) to the ex-core neutron detector signal for monitoring the vibration characteristics of a reactor core support barrel (CSB) was investigated. Ex-core flux data were generated by using a nonanalog Monte Carlo neutron transport method in a simulated CSB model where the implicit capture and Russian roulette technique were utilized. First and third order beam and shell modes of CSB vibration were modeled based on parallel processing simulation. A NNA module was developed to analyze the ex-core flux data based on its time variation, normalized power spectral density, normalized cross-power spectral density, coherence, and phase differences. The data were then analyzed with a fuzzy logic module to determine the vibration characteristics. The ex-core neutron signal fluctuation was directly proportional to the CSB's vibration observed at 8Hz and15Hzin the beam mode vibration, and at 8Hz in the shell mode vibration. The coherence result between flux pairs was unity at the vibration peak frequencies. A distinct pattern of phase differences was observed for each of the vibration models. The developed fuzzy logic module demonstrated successful recognition of the vibration frequencies, modes, orders, directions, and phase differences within 0.4 ms for the beam and shell mode vibrations.

  7. Monitoring Instrument Performance in Regional Broadband Seismic Network Using Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, F.; Lyu, S.; Lin, J.

    2017-12-01

    In the past ten years, the number of seismic stations has increased significantly, and regional seismic networks with advanced technology have been gradually developed all over the world. The resulting broadband data help to improve the seismological research. It is important to monitor the performance of broadband instruments in a new network in a long period of time to ensure the accuracy of seismic records. Here, we propose a method that uses ambient noise data in the period range 5-25 s to monitor instrument performance and check data quality in situ. The method is based on an analysis of amplitude and phase index parameters calculated from pairwise cross-correlations of three stations, which provides multiple references for reliable error estimates. Index parameters calculated daily during a two-year observation period are evaluated to identify stations with instrument response errors in near real time. During data processing, initial instrument responses are used in place of available instrument responses to simulate instrument response errors, which are then used to verify our results. We also examine feasibility of the tailing noise using data from stations selected from USArray in different locations and analyze the possible instrumental errors resulting in time-shifts used to verify the method. Additionally, we show an application that effects of instrument response errors that experience pole-zeros variations on monitoring temporal variations in crustal properties appear statistically significant velocity perturbation larger than the standard deviation. The results indicate that monitoring seismic instrument performance helps eliminate data pollution before analysis begins.

  8. Investigations on the relationship between power spectrum and signal-to-noise ratio of frequency-swept pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhuhong; Fan Diayuan

    1993-01-01

    The criterion for obtaining compressed chirp pulses with high signal-to-noise ratio is the shape of the power spectrum, a chirp pulse of Gaussian shaped power spectrum without modulation is needed in CPA system to get the clean compressed pulses. 4 refs., 2 figs

  9. Influence of Signal-to-Noise Ratio and Point Spread Function on Limits of Super-Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.Q.; Vliet, L.J. van; Schutte, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a method to predict the limit of possible resolution enhancement given a sequence of low resolution images. Three important parameters influence the outcome of this limit: the total Point Spread Function (PSF), the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and the number of input images.

  10. Influence of signal-to-noise ratio and point spread function on limits of super-resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.Q.; Van Vliet, L.; Schutte, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a method to predict the limit of possible resolution enhancement given a sequence of lowresolution images. Three important parameters influence the outcome of this limit: the total Point Spread Function (PSF), the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and the number of input images.

  11. Nonlinearity and Phase Noise Tolerant 75-110 GHz Signal over Fiber System Using Phase Modulation Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    We report on the transmission of 8 Gb/s 0 dB PAPR 16QAM-OFDM W-band (75-110 GHz) signals over 22.8km SMF without phase noise compensation by using a phase modulator in the optical heterodyne up-convertor....

  12. Parallel Array Bistable Stochastic Resonance System with Independent Input and Its Signal-to-Noise Ratio Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-01-01

    with independent components and averaged output; second, we give a deduction of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR for this system to show the performance. Our examples show the enhancement of the system and how different parameters influence the performance of the proposed parallel array.

  13. MOSFET LF noise under Large Signal Excitation: Measurement, Modelling and Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Regarding LF noise in MOSFETs, it is noted that the MOSFET is a surface channel device. Both n and p-channel devices exhibit similar low frequency (LF) noise behaviour that can be explained by a carrier number fluctuation model (section 3.5). LF noise in MOSFETs is predominantly caused by Random

  14. Optimizing the De-Noise Neural Network Model for GPS Time-Series Monitoring of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosbeh R. Kaloop

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Global Positioning System (GPS is recently used widely in structures and other applications. Notwithstanding, the GPS accuracy still suffers from the errors afflicting the measurements, particularly the short-period displacement of structural components. Previously, the multi filter method is utilized to remove the displacement errors. This paper aims at using a novel application for the neural network prediction models to improve the GPS monitoring time series data. Four prediction models for the learning algorithms are applied and used with neural network solutions: back-propagation, Cascade-forward back-propagation, adaptive filter and extended Kalman filter, to estimate which model can be recommended. The noise simulation and bridge’s short-period GPS of the monitoring displacement component of one Hz sampling frequency are used to validate the four models and the previous method. The results show that the Adaptive neural networks filter is suggested for de-noising the observations, specifically for the GPS displacement components of structures. Also, this model is expected to have significant influence on the design of structures in the low frequency responses and measurements’ contents.

  15. Synchronisation and desynchronisation of self-modulation oscillations in a ring chip laser under the action of a periodic signal and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudetskiy, V Yu; Lariontsev, E G; Chekina, S N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of pump noise on the synchronisation of selfmodulation oscillations in a solid-state ring laser with periodic pump modulation is studied numerically and experimentally. It is found that, in contrast to desynchronisation that usually occurs under action of noise in the case of 1/1 synchronisation of self-oscillations by a periodic signal, the effect of noise on 1/2 synchronisation may be positive, namely, at a sufficiently low intensity, pump noise is favourable for synchronisation of self-oscillations, for narrowing of their spectrum, and for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. (lasers)

  16. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aileen

    The term infrasound describes atmospheric sound waves with frequencies below 20 Hz, while acoustics are classified within the audible range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasound and acoustic monitoring in the scientific community is hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and a limited number of studies on regional and short-range noise and source characterization. The JASON Report (2005) suggests the infrasound community focus on more broad-frequency, observational studies within a tactical distance of 10 km. In keeping with that recommendation, this paper presents a study of regional and short-range atmospheric acoustic and infrasonic noise characterization, at a desert site in West Texas, covering a broad frequency range of 0.2 to 100 Hz. To spatially sample the band, a large number of infrasound gauges was needed. A laboratory instrument analysis is presented of the set of low-cost infrasound sensors used in this study, manufactured by Inter-Mountain Laboratories (IML). Analysis includes spectra, transfer functions and coherences to assess the stability and range of the gauges, and complements additional instrument testing by Sandia National Laboratories. The IMLs documented here have been found reliably coherent from 0.1 to 7 Hz without instrument correction. Corrections were built using corresponding time series from the commercially available and more expensive Chaparral infrasound gauge, so that the corrected IML outputs were able to closely mimic the Chaparral output. Arrays of gauges are needed for atmospheric sound signal processing. Our West Texas experiment consisted of a 1.5 km aperture, 23-gauge infrasound/acoustic array of IMLs, with a compact, 12 m diameter grid-array of rented IMLs at the center. To optimize signal recording, signal-to-noise ratio needs to be quantified with respect to both frequency band and coherence length. The higher-frequency grid array consisted of 25 microphones arranged in a five by five pattern with 3 meter spacing, without

  17. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in ultrasound-modulated optical tomography by a lock-in amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lili; Wu, Jingping; Lin, Guimin; Hu, Liangjun; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    With high spatial resolution of ultrasonic location and high sensitivity of optical detection, ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) is a promising noninvasive biological tissue imaging technology. In biological tissue, the ultrasound-modulated light signals are very weak and are overwhelmed by the strong unmodulated light signals. It is a difficulty and key to efficiently pick out the weak modulated light from strong unmodulated light in UOT. Under the effect of an ultrasonic field, the scattering light intensity presents a periodic variation as the ultrasonic frequency changes. So the modulated light signals would be escape from the high unmodulated light signals, when the modulated light signals and the ultrasonic signal are processed cross correlation operation by a lock-in amplifier and without a chopper. Experimental results indicated that the signal-to-noise ratio of UOT is significantly improved by a lock-in amplifier, and the higher the repetition frequency of pulsed ultrasonic wave, the better the signal-to-noise ratio of UOT.

  18. Prescription-event monitoring: developments in signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Germano

    2007-01-01

    Prescription-event monitoring (PEM) is a non-interventional intensive method for post-marketing drug safety monitoring of newly licensed medicines. PEM studies are cohort studies where exposure is obtained from a centralised service and outcomes from simple questionnaires completed by general practitioners. Follow-up forms are sent for selected events. Because PEM captures all events and not only the suspected adverse drug reactions, PEM cohorts potentially differ in respect to the distribution of number of events per person depending on the nature of the drug under study. This variance can be related either with the condition for which the drug is prescribed (e.g. a condition causing high morbidity will have, in average, a higher number of events per person compared with a condition with lower morbidity) or with the drug effect itself. This paper describes an exploratory investigation of the distortion caused by product-related variations of the number of events to the interpretation of the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) values ("the higher the PRR, the greater the strength of the signal") computed using drug-cohort data. We studied this effect by assessing the agreement between the PRR based on events (event of interest vs all other events) and PRR based on cases (cases with the event of interest vs cases with any other events). PRR were calculated for all combinations reported to ten selected drugs against a comparator of 81 other drugs. Three of the ten drugs had a cohort with an apparent higher proportion of patients with lower number of events. The PRRs based on events were systematically higher than the PRR based on cases for the combinations reported to these three drugs. Additionally, when applying the threshold criteria for signal screening (n > or =3, PRR > or =1.5 and Chi-squared > or =4), the binary agreement was generally high but apparently lower for these three drugs. In conclusion, the distribution of events per patient in drug cohorts shall be

  19. A de-noising algorithm based on wavelet threshold-exponential adaptive window width-fitting for ground electrical source airborne transient electromagnetic signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yanju; Li, Dongsheng; Yu, Mingmei; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The ground electrical source airborne transient electromagnetic system (GREATEM) on an unmanned aircraft enjoys considerable prospecting depth, lateral resolution and detection efficiency, etc. In recent years it has become an important technical means of rapid resources exploration. However, GREATEM data are extremely vulnerable to stationary white noise and non-stationary electromagnetic noise (sferics noise, aircraft engine noise and other human electromagnetic noises). These noises will cause degradation of the imaging quality for data interpretation. Based on the characteristics of the GREATEM data and major noises, we propose a de-noising algorithm utilizing wavelet threshold method and exponential adaptive window width-fitting. Firstly, the white noise is filtered in the measured data using the wavelet threshold method. Then, the data are segmented using data window whose step length is even logarithmic intervals. The data polluted by electromagnetic noise are identified within each window based on the discriminating principle of energy detection, and the attenuation characteristics of the data slope are extracted. Eventually, an exponential fitting algorithm is adopted to fit the attenuation curve of each window, and the data polluted by non-stationary electromagnetic noise are replaced with their fitting results. Thus the non-stationary electromagnetic noise can be effectively removed. The proposed algorithm is verified by the synthetic and real GREATEM signals. The results show that in GREATEM signal, stationary white noise and non-stationary electromagnetic noise can be effectively filtered using the wavelet threshold-exponential adaptive window width-fitting algorithm, which enhances the imaging quality.

  20. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation in digital computer simulation of lowpass and bandpass systems with applications to analog and digital communications, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, W. H.; Turner, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are developed to estimate power gain, delay, signal-to-noise ratio, and mean square error in digital computer simulations of lowpass and bandpass systems. The techniques are applied to analog and digital communications. The signal-to-noise ratio estimates are shown to be maximum likelihood estimates in additive white Gaussian noise. The methods are seen to be especially useful for digital communication systems where the mapping from the signal-to-noise ratio to the error probability can be obtained. Simulation results show the techniques developed to be accurate and quite versatile in evaluating the performance of many systems through digital computer simulation.

  1. Speckle noise reduction technique for Lidar echo signal based on self-adaptive pulse-matching independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhu, Daiyin; Tu, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Speckle noise has always been a particularly tricky problem in improving the ranging capability and accuracy of Lidar system especially in harsh environment. Currently, effective speckle de-noising techniques are extremely scarce and should be further developed. In this study, a speckle noise reduction technique has been proposed based on independent component analysis (ICA). Since normally few changes happen in the shape of laser pulse itself, the authors employed the laser source as a reference pulse and executed the ICA decomposition to find the optimal matching position. In order to achieve the self-adaptability of algorithm, local Mean Square Error (MSE) has been defined as an appropriate criterion for investigating the iteration results. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that the self-adaptive pulse-matching ICA (PM-ICA) method could effectively decrease the speckle noise and recover the useful Lidar echo signal component with high quality. Especially, the proposed method achieves 4 dB more improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than a traditional homomorphic wavelet method.

  2. Development of capacitive beam position, beam current and Schottky-signal monitors for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, Felix

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis novel techniques based on capacitive pickups for the determination of the beam current, the beam position and the Schottky-signal in storage rings have been developed. Beam current measurements at the heavy ion storage ring TSR with a capacitive pickup have been found in very good agreement with the theory. Using this device the accurate measurement of beam currents at the TSR far below 1 μA is now possible. This method will also be used at the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at which beam currents in the range of 1 nA-1 μA are expected. For the first time, position measurements with a resonant amplifier system for capacitive pickups have been examined at the TSR for later use of this technique in the CSR. With this method an increased signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved using a parallel inductance. A comparison with measurements using the rest gas beam profile monitor has shown very good agreement even at very low intensities. Experiments with the cryo-capable electronics for the CSR beam position monitors have shown an achievable quality factor of Q=500, resulting in the prospect of precise position measurements at the CSR even at very low beam currents. The CSR Schottky-Pickup will also be equipped with a resonant amplifier system with a comparable quality factor. An estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio suggests a detection limit of a few protons. (orig.)

  3. Optimal signal constellation design for ultra-high-speed optical transport in the presence of nonlinear phase noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2014-12-29

    In this paper, we first describe an optimal signal constellation design algorithm suitable for the coherent optical channels dominated by the linear phase noise. Then, we modify this algorithm to be suitable for the nonlinear phase noise dominated channels. In optimization procedure, the proposed algorithm uses the cumulative log-likelihood function instead of the Euclidian distance. Further, an LDPC coded modulation scheme is proposed to be used in combination with signal constellations obtained by proposed algorithm. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the LDPC-coded modulation schemes employing the new constellation sets, obtained by our new signal constellation design algorithm, outperform corresponding QAM constellations significantly in terms of transmission distance and have better nonlinearity tolerance.

  4. Signal-to-Noise Enhancement of a Nanospring Redox-Based Sensor by Lock-in Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Bakharev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A significant improvement of the response characteristics of a redox chemical gas sensor (chemiresistor constructed with a single ZnO coated silica nanospring has been achieved with the technique of lock-in signal amplification. The comparison of DC and analog lock-in amplifier (LIA AC measurements of the electrical sensor response to toluene vapor, at the ppm level, has been conducted. When operated in the DC detection mode, the sensor exhibits a relatively high sensitivity to the analyte vapor, as well as a low detection limit at the 10 ppm level. However, at 10 ppm the signal-to-noise ratio is 5 dB, which is less than desirable. When operated in the analog LIA mode, the signal-to-noise ratio at 10 ppm increases by 30 dB and extends the detection limit to the ppb range.

  5. An all digital phase locked loop for synchronization of a sinusoidal signal embedded in white Gaussian noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C. P.; Gupta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    An all digital phase locked loop which tracks the phase of the incoming sinusoidal signal once per carrier cycle is proposed. The different elements and their functions and the phase lock operation are explained in detail. The nonlinear difference equations which govern the operation of the digital loop when the incoming signal is embedded in white Gaussian noise are derived, and a suitable model is specified. The performance of the digital loop is considered for the synchronization of a sinusoidal signal. For this, the noise term is suitably modelled which allows specification of the output probabilities for the two level quantizer in the loop at any given phase error. The loop filter considered increases the probability of proper phase correction. The phase error states in modulo two-pi forms a finite state Markov chain which enables the calculation of steady state probabilities, RMS phase error, transient response and mean time for cycle skipping.

  6. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling, E-mail: linling@tju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin, People' s Republic of China, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Detecting Techniques and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Qiao, Xiaoyan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Shanxi University, Shanxi (China); Wang, Mengjun [School of Information Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Weibo [Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  7. Signal-noise ratio of MR spectroscopy in the central gland of prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Yanjun; Wang Xiaoying; Li Feiyu; Jiang Xuexiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the MRS of the prostate central gland, and study its relationship with the pathology of the lesions. Methods: Eighteen patients who underwent transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were enrolled in this study. They were divided into three groups according to the pathological findings: 7 cases of glandular-BPH (GBPH), 7 cases of stromal-BPH (SBPH) and 5 cases of incidentally detected prostate carcinoma (IDPC). The voxels in the central glands with SNR ≥5 and SNR < 5 were counted, and the relationship between the percentage of voxel with SNR < 5 and pathology was analyzed. Results: In the 18 cases, the total number of voxels measured in the regions of interest was 3632, and the voxels with SNR≥5 and SNR < 5 were 1579 (the percentage is 43%) and 1873, respectively. The percentage of voxels with SNR < 5 in SBPH group (67.6 ± 21.8)% was statistically higher than that in GBPH (37.1±14.5)% and IDPC (39.9±18.8)%. The difference between the group of GBPH and IDPC was not statistically significant. Conclusion: More than half of the voxels in the central gland could not be reliably analyzed in the prostate MRS examination because of its low SNR, especially in the case of SBPH. (authors)

  8. Statistical process control: separating signal from noise in emergency department operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Laura; Barrueto, Fermin

    2015-05-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) is a visually appealing and statistically rigorous methodology very suitable to the analysis of emergency department (ED) operations. We demonstrate that the control chart is the primary tool of SPC; it is constructed by plotting data measuring the key quality indicators of operational processes in rationally ordered subgroups such as units of time. Control limits are calculated using formulas reflecting the variation in the data points from one another and from the mean. SPC allows managers to determine whether operational processes are controlled and predictable. We review why the moving range chart is most appropriate for use in the complex ED milieu, how to apply SPC to ED operations, and how to determine when performance improvement is needed. SPC is an excellent tool for operational analysis and quality improvement for these reasons: 1) control charts make large data sets intuitively coherent by integrating statistical and visual descriptions; 2) SPC provides analysis of process stability and capability rather than simple comparison with a benchmark; 3) SPC allows distinction between special cause variation (signal), indicating an unstable process requiring action, and common cause variation (noise), reflecting a stable process; and 4) SPC keeps the focus of quality improvement on process rather than individual performance. Because data have no meaning apart from their context, and every process generates information that can be used to improve it, we contend that SPC should be seriously considered for driving quality improvement in emergency medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Large signal-to-noise ratio quantification in MLE for ARARMAX models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yiqun; Tang, Xiafei

    2014-06-01

    It has been shown that closed-loop linear system identification by indirect method can be generally transferred to open-loop ARARMAX (AutoRegressive AutoRegressive Moving Average with eXogenous input) estimation. For such models, the gradient-related optimisation with large enough signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can avoid the potential local convergence in maximum likelihood estimation. To ease the application of this condition, the threshold SNR needs to be quantified. In this paper, we build the amplitude coefficient which is an equivalence to the SNR and prove the finiteness of the threshold amplitude coefficient within the stability region. The quantification of threshold is achieved by the minimisation of an elaborately designed multi-variable cost function which unifies all the restrictions on the amplitude coefficient. The corresponding algorithm based on two sets of physically realisable system input-output data details the minimisation and also points out how to use the gradient-related method to estimate ARARMAX parameters when local minimum is present as the SNR is small. Then, the algorithm is tested on a theoretical AutoRegressive Moving Average with eXogenous input model for the derivation of the threshold and a gas turbine engine real system for model identification, respectively. Finally, the graphical validation of threshold on a two-dimensional plot is discussed.

  10. Application of Adaptive Noise Cancellation for Anti-Vibration in Yield Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the process of grain harvest, yield monitor system acquires real-time spatial distribution information of crop yield to provide important basis of decision-making for subsequent assignments of precision agriculture. The measurement accuracy has been seriously affected by Combine working vibration. Based on an innovative test platform of wheat combine harvester for yield monitor, well simulate the working vibration at the field situation; impact-based grain flow sensor with the structure of dual-parallel-beams as test terminals and using the NI (National Instrument data acquisition card to acquire signals; grain impacted frequency as fundamental frequency to process harmonic extraction, and for extracted signals, applied the improved LMS adaptive algorithm to interference cancellation, aim to eliminate interference cased by working vibration. The comparative experiment show that the maximum relative error less than 2 % under the proposed method and proved that the proposed algorithm in this paper is effective.

  11. Efficient algorithm for baseline wander and powerline noise removal from ECG signals based on discrete Fourier series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaz, Mohamed; Benzid, Redha

    2018-03-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals are often contaminated with artefacts and noises which can lead to incorrect diagnosis when they are visually inspected by cardiologists. In this paper, the well-known discrete Fourier series (DFS) is re-explored and an efficient DFS-based method is proposed to reduce contribution of both baseline wander (BW) and powerline interference (PLI) noises in ECG records. In the first step, the determination of the exact number of low frequency harmonics contributing in BW is achieved. Next, the baseline drift is estimated by the sum of all associated Fourier sinusoids components. Then, the baseline shift is discarded efficiently by a subtraction of its approximated version from the original biased ECG signal. Concerning the PLI, the subtraction of the contributing harmonics calculated in the same manner reduces efficiently such type of noise. In addition of visual quality results, the proposed algorithm shows superior performance in terms of higher signal-to-noise ratio and smaller mean square error when faced to the DCT-based algorithm.

  12. Automated pattern recognition system for noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sides, W.H. Jr.; Piety, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    A pattern recognition system was developed at ORNL for on-line monitoring of noise signals from sensors in a nuclear power plant. The system continuousy measures the power spectral density (PSD) values of the signals and the statistical characteristics of the PSDs in unattended operation. Through statistical comparison of current with past PSDs (pattern recognition), the system detects changes in the noise signals. Because the noise signals contain information about the current operational condition of the plant, a change in these signals could indicate a change, either normal or abnormal, in the operational condition

  13. Developmental Mechanisms Underlying Improved Contrast Thresholds for Discriminations of Orientation Signals Embedded in Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Taek eJeon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We combined an external noise paradigm with an efficient procedure for obtaining contrast thresholds (Lesmes et al., 2006 in order to model developmental changes during childhood. Specifically, we measured the contrast thresholds of 5-, 7-, 9-year-olds and adults (n = 20/age in a two alternative forced-choice orientation discrimination task over a wide range of external noise levels and at three levels of accuracy. Overall, as age increased, contrast thresholds decreased over the entire range of external noise levels tested. The decrease was greatest between 5 and 7 years of age. The reduction in threshold after age 5 was greater in the high than the low external noise region, a pattern implying greater tolerance to the irrelevant background noise as children became older. To model the mechanisms underlying these developmental changes in terms of internal noise components, we adapted the original perceptual template model (Lu and Dosher, 1998 and normalized the magnitude of performance changes against the performance of 5-year-olds. The resulting model provided an excellent fit (r2 = 0.985 to the contrast thresholds at multiple levels of accuracy (60, 75, and 90% across a wide range of external noise levels. The improvements in contrast thresholds with age were best modelled by a combination of reductions in internal additive noise, reductions in internal multiplicative noise, and improvements in excluding external noise by template retuning. In line with the data, the improvement was greatest between 5 and 7 years of age, accompanied by a 39% reduction in additive noise, 71% reduction in multiplicative noise, and 45% improvement in external noise exclusion. The modelled improvements likely reflect developmental changes at the cortical level, rather than changes in front-end structural properties (Kiorpes et al., 2003.

  14. MONITORING HIGH-FREQUENCY OCEAN SIGNALS USING LOW-COST GNSS/IMU BUOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-L. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In oceans there are different ocean signals covering the multi-frequencies including tsunami, meteotsunami, storm surge, as sea level change, and currents. These signals have the direct and significant impact on the economy and life of human-beings. Therefore, measuring ocean signals accurately becomes more and more important and necessary. Nowadays, there are many techniques and methods commonly used for monitoring oceans, but each has its limitation. For example, tide gauges only measure sea level relative to benchmarks and are disturbed unevenly, and satellite altimeter measurements are not continuous and inaccurate near coastal oceans. In addition, high-frequency ocean signals such as tsunami and meteotsunami cannot be sufficiently detected by 6-minutes tide gauge measurements or 10-day sampled altimetry data. Moreover, traditional accelerometer buoy is heavy, expensive and the low-frequency noise caused by the instrument is unavoidable. In this study, a small, low-cost and self-assembly autonomous Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU that independently collects continuous acceleration and angular velocity data is mounted on a GNSS buoy to provide the positions and tilts of the moving buoy. The main idea is to integrate the Differential GNSS (DGNSS or Precise Point Positioning (PPP solutions with IMU data, and then evaluate the performance by comparing with in situ tide gauges. The validation experiments conducted in the NCKU Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory showed that GNSS and IMU both can detect the simulated regular wave frequency and height, and the field experiments in the Anping Harbor, Tainan, Taiwan showed that the low-cost GNSS buoy has an excellent ability to observe significant wave heights in amplitude and frequency.

  15. A New Digital Signal Processing Method for Spectrum Interference Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrisani, L.; Capriglione, D.; Ferrigno, L.; Miele, G.

    2011-01-01

    Frequency spectrum is a limited shared resource, nowadays interested by an ever growing number of different applications. Generally, the companies providing such services pay to the governments the right of using a limited portion of the spectrum, consequently they would be assured that the licensed radio spectrum resource is not interested by significant external interferences. At the same time, they have to guarantee that their devices make an efficient use of the spectrum and meet the electromagnetic compatibility regulations. Therefore the competent authorities are called to control the access to the spectrum adopting suitable management and monitoring policies, as well as the manufacturers have to periodically verify the correct working of their apparatuses. Several measurement solutions are present on the market. They generally refer to real-time spectrum analyzers and measurement receivers. Both of them are characterized by good metrological accuracies but show costs, dimensions and weights that make no possible a use "on the field". The paper presents a first step in realizing a digital signal processing based measurement instrument able to suitably accomplish for the above mentioned needs. In particular the attention has been given to the DSP based measurement section of the instrument. To these aims an innovative measurement method for spectrum monitoring and management is proposed in this paper. It performs an efficient sequential analysis based on a sample by sample digital processing. Three main issues are in particular pursued: (i) measurement performance comparable to that exhibited by other methods proposed in literature; (ii) fast measurement time, (iii) easy implementation on cost-effective measurement hardware.

  16. Detection Performance of Signals in Dependent Noise From a Gaussian Mixture Uncertainty Class

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerlach, K

    1998-01-01

    ... (correlated) multivariate noise from a Gaussian mixture uncertainty class. This uncertainty class is defined using upper and lower bounding functions on the univariate Gaussian mixing distribution function...

  17. Passive monitoring using traffic noise recordings - case study on the Steinachtal Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvermoser, Johannes; Stähler, Simon; Hadziioannou, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Civil structures age continuously. The early recognition of potentially critical damages is an important economical issue, but also one of public safety. Continuous tracking of small changes in the medium by using passive methods would offer an extension to established active non-destructive testing procedures at relatively low cost. Here we present a case study of structural monitoring using continuous recordings of traffic noise on a 200 meter long reinforced concrete highway bridge in Germany. Over two months of continuos geophone records are used in the frequency range of 2-8 Hz. Using passive image interferometry, evaluation of hourly cross-correlations between recordings at pairs of receivers yield velocity variations in the range of -1.5% to +2.1%. We were able to correlate our outcomes with temperature measurements of the same two month period. The measured velocity changes scale with the temperature variations with on average a dv/v of 0.064% per degree Celsius. This value is in accordance with other studies of concrete response to temperature, confirming that we are able to observe subtle changes with physical origin. It is shown that traffic noise is temporally homogenenous enough to fulfill the requirements of passive image interferometry.

  18. Research and Development Program in Reactor Diagnostics and Monitoring with Neutron Noise Methods, Stage 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, Imre; Nam, Tran Hoai; Dykin, Victor; Jonsson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    This report constitutes Stage 18 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. The objective of the research program is to contribute to the strategic research goal of competence and research capacity by building up competence within the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology, regarding reactor physics, reactor dynamics and noise diagnostics. The purpose is also to contribute to the research goal of giving a basis for SSM's supervision by developing methods for identification and localization of perturbations in reactor cores. Results up to Stage 17 were reported in SKI and SSM reports, as listed in the report's summary

  19. Simulation of range imaging-based estimation of respiratory lung motion. Influence of noise, signal dimensionality and sampling patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, M; Werner, R; Blendowski, M; Ortmüller, J; Handels, H

    2014-01-01

    A major problem associated with the irradiation of thoracic and abdominal tumors is respiratory motion. In clinical practice, motion compensation approaches are frequently steered by low-dimensional breathing signals (e.g., spirometry) and patient-specific correspondence models, which are used to estimate the sought internal motion given a signal measurement. Recently, the use of multidimensional signals derived from range images of the moving skin surface has been proposed to better account for complex motion patterns. In this work, a simulation study is carried out to investigate the motion estimation accuracy of such multidimensional signals and the influence of noise, the signal dimensionality, and different sampling patterns (points, lines, regions). A diffeomorphic correspondence modeling framework is employed to relate multidimensional breathing signals derived from simulated range images to internal motion patterns represented by diffeomorphic non-linear transformations. Furthermore, an automatic approach for the selection of optimal signal combinations/patterns within this framework is presented. This simulation study focuses on lung motion estimation and is based on 28 4D CT data sets. The results show that the use of multidimensional signals instead of one-dimensional signals significantly improves the motion estimation accuracy, which is, however, highly affected by noise. Only small differences exist between different multidimensional sampling patterns (lines and regions). Automatically determined optimal combinations of points and lines do not lead to accuracy improvements compared to results obtained by using all points or lines. Our results show the potential of multidimensional breathing signals derived from range images for the model-based estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy.

  20. Fourth year progress report on the co-ordinated research programme on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, O.P.; Prabhakar, R.; Reddy, C.P.; Vyjayanthi, R.K.; Srinivasan, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the BOR 60 reactor in the USSR. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. A proposal for in-service boiling monitoring by acoustic means is described. (author). 4 refs, 11 figs, 5 tabs

  1. Third year progress report on the co-ordinated research programme on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, O.P.; Prabhakar, R.; Reddy, C.P.; Vyjayanthi, R.K.; Srinivasan, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the BOR 60 reactor in the USSR. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. A proposal for in-service boiling monitoring by acoustic means is described. (author). 1 ref., 13 figs, 4 tabs

  2. High signal to noise ratio THz spectroscopy with ASOPS and signal processing schemes for mapping and controlling molecular and bulk relaxation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjiloucas, S; Walker, G C; Bowen, J W; Becerra, V M; Zafiropoulos, A; Galvao, R K H

    2009-01-01

    Asynchronous Optical Sampling has the potential to improve signal to noise ratio in THz transient sperctrometry. The design of an inexpensive control scheme for synchronising two femtosecond pulse frequency comb generators at an offset frequency of 20 kHz is discussed. The suitability of a range of signal processing schemes adopted from the Systems Identification and Control Theory community for further processing recorded THz transients in the time and frequency domain are outlined. Finally, possibilities for femtosecond pulse shaping using genetic algorithms are mentioned.

  3. High signal to noise ratio THz spectroscopy with ASOPS and signal processing schemes for mapping and controlling molecular and bulk relaxation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjiloucas, S; Walker, G C; Bowen, J W; Becerra, V M [Cybernetics, School of Systems Engineering, University of Reading, RG6 6AY (United Kingdom); Zafiropoulos, A [Biosystems Engineering Department, School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, 411 10, Larissa (Greece); Galvao, R K H, E-mail: s.hadjiloucas@reading.ac.u [Divisao de Engenharia Eletronica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, 12228-900 Brazil (Brazil)

    2009-08-01

    Asynchronous Optical Sampling has the potential to improve signal to noise ratio in THz transient sperctrometry. The design of an inexpensive control scheme for synchronising two femtosecond pulse frequency comb generators at an offset frequency of 20 kHz is discussed. The suitability of a range of signal processing schemes adopted from the Systems Identification and Control Theory community for further processing recorded THz transients in the time and frequency domain are outlined. Finally, possibilities for femtosecond pulse shaping using genetic algorithms are mentioned.

  4. Direct Signal-to-Noise Quality Comparison between an Electronic and Conventional Stethoscope aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Ebert, Doug; Bauer, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of heart, lung, and bowel sounds is routinely performed with the use of a stethoscope to help detect a broad range of medical conditions. Stethoscope acquired information is even more valuable in a resource limited environments such as the International Space Station (ISS) where additional testing is not available. The high ambient noise level aboard the ISS poses a specific challenge to auscultation by stethoscope. An electronic stethoscope's ambient noise-reduction, greater sound amplification, recording capabilities, and sound visualization software may be an advantage to a conventional stethoscope in this environment. Methods: A single operator rated signal-to-noise quality from a conventional stethoscope (Littman 2218BE) and an electronic stethoscope (Litmann 3200). Borborygmi, pulmonic, and cardiac sound quality was ranked with both stethoscopes. Signal-to-noise rankings were preformed on a 1 to 10 subjective scale with 1 being inaudible, 6 the expected quality in an emergency department, 8 the expected quality in a clinic, and 10 the clearest possible quality. Testing took place in the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM), Unity (Node 2), Destiny (US Lab), Tranquility (Node 3), and the Cupola of the International Space Station. All examinations were conducted at a single point in time. Results: The electronic stethoscope's performance ranked higher than the conventional stethoscope for each body sound in all modules tested. The electronic stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 7 and 10 in all modules tested. In comparison, the traditional stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 4 and 7. The signal to noise ratio of borborygmi showed the biggest difference between stethoscopes. In the modules tested, the auscultation of borborygmi was rated between 5 and 7 by the conventional stethoscope and consistently 10 by the electronic stethoscope. Discussion: This stethoscope comparison was limited to a single operator. However, we

  5. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  6. Limits of visual communication: the effect of signal-to-noise ratio on the intelligibility of American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, M; Sperling, G; Riedl, T; Vanderbeek, A

    1987-12-01

    To determine the limits of human observers' ability to identify visually presented American Sign Language (ASL), the contrast s and the amount of additive noise n in dynamic ASL images were varied independently. Contrast was tested over a 4:1 range; the rms signal-to-noise ratios (s/n) investigated were s/n = 1/4, 1/2, 1, and infinity (which is used to designate the original, uncontaminated images). Fourteen deaf subjects were tested with an intelligibility test composed of 85 isolated ASL signs, each 2-3 sec in length. For these ASL signs (64 x 96 pixels, 30 frames/sec), subjects' performance asymptotes between s/n = 0.5 and 1.0; further increases in s/n do not improve intelligibility. Intelligibility was found to depend only on s/n and not on contrast. A formulation in terms of logistic functions was proposed to derive intelligibility of ASL signs from s/n, sign familiarity, and sign difficulty. Familiarity (ignorance) is represented by additive signal-correlated noise; it represents the likelihood of a subject's knowing a particular ASL sign, and it adds to s/n. Difficulty is represented by a multiplicative difficulty coefficient; it represents the perceptual vulnerability of an ASL sign to noise and it adds to log(s/n).

  7. Shot-Noise-Limited Dual-Beam Detector for Atmospheric Trace-Gas Monitoring with Near-Infrared Diode Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durry, Georges; Pouchet, Ivan; Amarouche, Nadir; Danguy, Théodore; Megie, Gerard

    2000-10-01

    A dual-beam detector is used to measure atmospheric trace species by differential absorption spectroscopy with commercial near-infrared InGaAs laser diodes. It is implemented on the Spectrom tre Diodes Laser Accordables, a balloonborne tunable diode laser spectrometer devoted to the in situ monitoring of CH 4 and H 2 O. The dual-beam detector is made of simple analogical subtractor circuits combined with InGaAs photodiodes. The detection strategy consists in taking the balanced analogical difference between the reference and the sample signals detected at the input and the output of an open optical multipass cell to apply the full dynamic range of the measurements (16 digits) to the weak molecular absorption information. The obtained sensitivity approaches the shot-noise limit. With a 56-m optical cell, the detection limit obtained when the spectra is recorded within 8 ms is 10 4 (expressed in absorbance units). The design and performances of both a simple substractor and an upgraded feedback substractor circuit are discussed with regard to atmospheric in situ CH 4 absorption spectra measured in the 1.653- m region. Mixing ratios are obtained from the absorption spectra by application of a nonlinear least-squares fit to the full molecular line shape in conjunction with in situ P and T measurements.

  8. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Z.; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions

  9. Noise analysis of grating-based x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with angular signal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiz, Wali; Gao Kun; Wu Zhao; Wei Chen-Xi; Zan Gui-Bin; Tian Yang-Chao; Bao Yuan; Zhu Pei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is one of the novel techniques, and has potential to enhance image quality and provide the details of inner structures nondestructively. In this work, we investigate quantitatively signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging (GBPCI) system by employing angular signal radiography (ASR). Moreover, photon statistics and mechanical error that is a major source of noise are investigated in detail. Results show the dependence of SNR on the system parameters and the effects on the extracted absorption, refraction and scattering images. Our conclusions can be used to optimize the system design for upcoming practical applications in the areas such as material science and biomedical imaging. (paper)

  10. Real-time photonic sampling with improved signal-to-noise and distortion ratio using polarization-dependent modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dong; Zhang, Zhiyao; Liu, Yong; Li, Xiaojun; Jiang, Wei; Tan, Qinggui

    2018-04-01

    A real-time photonic sampling structure with effective nonlinearity suppression and excellent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance is proposed. The key points of this scheme are the polarization-dependent modulators (P-DMZMs) and the sagnac loop structure. Thanks to the polarization sensitive characteristic of P-DMZMs, the differences between transfer functions of the fundamental signal and the distortion become visible. Meanwhile, the selection of specific biases in P-DMZMs is helpful to achieve a preferable linearized performance with a low noise level for real-time photonic sampling. Compared with the quadrature-biased scheme, the proposed scheme is capable of valid nonlinearity suppression and is able to provide a better SNR performance even in a large frequency range. The proposed scheme is proved to be effective and easily implemented for real time photonic applications.

  11. Improving Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Susceptibility Weighted Imaging: A Novel Multicomponent Non-Local Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Borrelli

    Full Text Available In susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI, the high resolution required to obtain a proper contrast generation leads to a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. The application of a denoising filter to produce images with higher SNR and still preserve small structures from excessive blurring is therefore extremely desirable. However, as the distributions of magnitude and phase noise may introduce biases during image restoration, the application of a denoising filter is non-trivial. Taking advantage of the potential multispectral nature of MR images, a multicomponent approach using a Non-Local Means (MNLM denoising filter may perform better than a component-by-component image restoration method. Here we present a new MNLM-based method (Multicomponent-Imaginary-Real-SWI, hereafter MIR-SWI to produce SWI images with high SNR and improved conspicuity. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons of MIR-SWI with the original SWI scheme and previously proposed SWI restoring pipelines showed that MIR-SWI fared consistently better than the other approaches. Noise removal with MIR-SWI also provided improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR and vessel conspicuity at higher factors of phase mask multiplications than the one suggested in the literature for SWI vessel imaging. We conclude that a proper handling of noise in the complex MR dataset may lead to improved image quality for SWI data.

  12. Signal discrimination of ULF electromagnetic data with using singular spectrum analysis – an attempt to detect train noise

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, S.; Kaida, D.; Hattori, K.; Febriani, F.; Yoshino, C.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena associated with crustal activities have been reported in a wide frequency range (DC-HF). In particular, ULF electromagnetic phenomena are the most promising among them because of the deeper skin depth. However, ULF geoelctromagnetic data are a superposition of signals of different origins. They originated from interactions between the geomagnetic field and the solar wind, leak current by a DC-driven train (train noise), precipitation, and so on. In general, the inten...

  13. Signal-to-noise characterization of time-gated intensifiers used for wide-field time-domain FLIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinty, J; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Talbot, C B; Dunsby, C; Neil, M A A; French, P M W [Photonics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Kellett, P A; Hares, J D, E-mail: james.mcginty@imperial.ac.u [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Isis Building, Howbery Park, Wallingford, OX10 8BA (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-07

    Time-gated imaging using gated optical intensifiers provides a means to realize high speed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for the study of fast events and for high throughput imaging. We present a signal-to-noise characterization of CCD-coupled micro-channel plate gated intensifiers used with this technique and determine the optimal acquisition parameters (intensifier gain voltage, CCD integration time and frame averaging) for measuring mono-exponential fluorescence lifetimes in the shortest image acquisition time for a given signal flux. We explore the use of unequal CCD integration times for different gate delays and show that this can improve the lifetime accuracy for a given total acquisition time.

  14. Structural monitoring of a highway bridge using passive noise recordings from street traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvermoser, Johannes; Hadziioannou, Céline; Stähler, Simon C

    2015-12-01

    Structural damage on bridges presents a hazard to public safety and can lead to fatalities. This article contributes to the development of an alternative monitoring system for civil structures, based on passive measurements of seismic elastic waves. Cross-correlations of traffic noise recorded at geophone receiver pairs were found to be sufficiently stable for comparison and sensitive to velocity changes in the medium. As such velocity variations could be caused by damage, their detection would be valuable in structural health monitoring systems. A method, originally introduced for seismological applications and named Passive Image Interferometry, was used to quantify small velocity fluctuations in the medium and thereby observe structural changes. Evaluation of more than 2 months of continuous geophone recordings at a reinforced concrete bridge yielded velocity variations Δv/v in the range of -1.5% to +2.1%. The observed fluctuations correlate with associated temperature time series with a striking resemblance which is remarkable for two completely independent data sets. Using a linear regression approach, a relationship between temperature and velocity variations of on average 0.064% °C(-1) can be identified. This value corresponds well to other studies on concrete structures.

  15. Asynchronous monitoring of the quality of multilevel optical PAM signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuzdak, J.

    2017-08-01

    In the paper, there is analyzed the signal quality assessment method based on delay tap asynchronous sampling, both for binary and multilevel PAM signals. The obtained multilevel phase diagrams are far more complicated than binary ones. The phase diagrams are affected by the signal distortions but it is difficult to relate reliably the phase diagram form to the distortion type and its influence on the signal quality.

  16. A Data-Driven Noise Reduction Method and Its Application for the Enhancement of Stress Wave Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lin Feng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD has been recently used to recover a signal from observed noisy data. Typically this is performed by partial reconstruction or thresholding operation. In this paper we describe an efficient noise reduction method. EEMD is used to decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs. The time intervals between two adjacent zero-crossings within the IMF, called instantaneous half period (IHP, are used as a criterion to detect and classify the noise oscillations. The undesirable waveforms with a larger IHP are set to zero. Furthermore, the optimum threshold in this approach can be derived from the signal itself using the consecutive mean square error (CMSE. The method is fully data driven, and it requires no prior knowledge of the target signals. This method can be verified with the simulative program by using Matlab. The denoising results are proper. In comparison with other EEMD based methods, it is concluded that the means adopted in this paper is suitable to preprocess the stress wave signals in the wood nondestructive testing.

  17. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and their trade-offs with resolution in axial-shear strain elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Krouskop, Thomas A; Ophir, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    In axial-shear strain elastography, the local axial-shear strain resulting from the application of quasi-static axial compression to an inhomogeneous material is imaged. In this paper, we investigated the image quality of the axial-shear strain estimates in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR asse ) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR asse ) using simulations and experiments. Specifically, we investigated the influence of the system parameters (beamwidth, transducer element pitch and bandwidth), signal processing parameters (correlation window length and axial window shift) and mechanical parameters (Young's modulus contrast, applied axial strain) on the SNR asse and CNR asse . The results of the study show that the CNR asse (SNR asse ) is maximum for axial-shear strain values in the range of 0.005-0.03. For the inclusion/background modulus contrast range considered in this study ( asse (SNR asse ) is maximum for applied axial compressive strain values in the range of 0.005%-0.03%. This suggests that the RF data acquired during axial elastography can be used to obtain axial-shear strain elastograms, since this range is typically used in axial elastography as well. The CNR asse (SNR asse ) remains almost constant with an increase in the beamwidth while it increases as the pitch increases. As expected, the axial shift had only a weak influence on the CNR asse (SNR asse ) of the axial-shear strain estimates. We observed that the differential estimates of the axial-shear strain involve a trade-off between the CNR asse (SNR asse ) and the spatial resolution only with respect to pitch and not with respect to signal processing parameters. Simulation studies were performed to confirm such an observation. The results demonstrate a trade-off between CNR asse and the resolution with respect to pitch

  18. On the Application of the Raspberry Pi as an Advanced Acoustic Sensor Network for Noise Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Emilio Noriega-Linares

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Smart Cities and the monitoring of environmental parameters is an area of research that has attracted scientific attention during the last decade. These environmental parameters are well-known as important factors in their affection towards people. Massive monitoring of this kind of parameters in cities is an expensive and complex task. Recent technologies of low-cost computing and low-power devices have opened researchers to a wide and more accessible research field, developing monitoring devices for deploying Wireless Sensor Networks. Gathering information from them, improved urban plans could be carried out and the information could help citizens. In this work, the prototyping of a low-cost acoustic sensor based on the Raspberry Pi platform for its use in the analysis of the sound field is described. The device is also connected to the cloud to share results in real time. The computation resources of the Raspberry Pi allow treating high quality audio for calculating acoustic parameters. A pilot test was carried out with the installation of two acoustic devices in the refurbishment works of a neighbourhood. In this deployment, the evaluation of these devices through long-term measurements was carried out, obtaining several acoustic parameters in real time for its broadcasting and study. This test has shown the Raspberry Pi as a powerful and affordable computing core of a low-cost device, but also the pilot test has served as a query tool for the inhabitants of the neighbourhood to be more aware about the noise in their own place of residence.

  19. Investigations of certain problems in reactor noise diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Joakim.

    1997-06-01

    A number of problems in reactor noise diagnostics have been investigated within the framework of the present thesis. The papers presented cover three relatively different areas, namely neutron noise induced by small vibrations of a strong absorber, the decomposition of noise in BWRs with application to stability monitoring, and fluctuation analysis of soft x-ray signals from fusion plasmas. 18 refs, 6 figs

  20. Investigations of certain problems in reactor noise diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Joakim

    1997-06-01

    A number of problems in reactor noise diagnostics have been investigated within the framework of the present thesis. The papers presented cover three relatively different areas, namely neutron noise induced by small vibrations of a strong absorber, the decomposition of noise in BWRs with application to stability monitoring, and fluctuation analysis of soft x-ray signals from fusion plasmas. 18 refs, 6 figs.

  1. Methods for surveillance of noise signals from nuclear power plants using auto power spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streich, M.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of methods for noise diagnostics applied in the nuclear power plant 'Bruno Leuschner' for surveillance of primary circuit is given. Considering a special example concept of surveillance of standard deviations is explained. (author)

  2. Research and Development Program in Reactor Diagnostics and Monitoring with Neutron Noise Methods, Stage 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazsit, Imre; Dykin, Victor; Jonsson, Anders; Demaziere, Christophe (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This report gives an account of the work performed by the Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, in the frame of a research contract with the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), contract No. SSM 2009/2093. The present report is based on work performed by Imre Pazsit, Victor Dykin, Anders Jonsson and Christophe Demaziere, with Imre Pazsit being the project leader. This report describes the results obtained during Stage 16 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. The long-term goals are elaborated in more detail in e.g. the Final Reports of Stage 1 and 2 (SKI Report 95:14 and 96:50, Pazsit et al. 1995, 1996). Results up to Stage 15 were reported in (Pazsit et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003a, 2003b; Demaziere et al, 2004; Sunde et al, 2006; Pazsit et al. 2008, 2009). A brief proposal for the continuation of this program in Stage 17 is also given at the end of the report. The program executed in Stage 16 consists of four parts as follows: - An overview of the present status of experience with BWR stability; - An investigation of the significance of the properties of the noise source for BWR instability; - Study of the dynamics of molten salt systems: construction of the adjoint and calculating the space dependent noise induced by propagating perturbations in the fuel; - A specific study of some novel methods of analysis of non-linear and non-stationary processes

  3. Research and Development Program in Reactor Diagnostics and Monitoring with Neutron Noise Methods, Stage 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, Imre; Dykin, Victor; Jonsson, Anders; Demaziere, Christophe

    2010-12-01

    This report gives an account of the work performed by the Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, in the frame of a research contract with the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), contract No. SSM 2009/2093. The present report is based on work performed by Imre Pazsit, Victor Dykin, Anders Jonsson and Christophe Demaziere, with Imre Pazsit being the project leader. This report describes the results obtained during Stage 16 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. The long-term goals are elaborated in more detail in e.g. the Final Reports of Stage 1 and 2 (SKI Report 95:14 and 96:50, Pazsit et al. 1995, 1996). Results up to Stage 15 were reported in (Pazsit et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003a, 2003b; Demaziere et al, 2004; Sunde et al, 2006; Pazsit et al. 2008, 2009). A brief proposal for the continuation of this program in Stage 17 is also given at the end of the report. The program executed in Stage 16 consists of four parts as follows: - An overview of the present status of experience with BWR stability; - An investigation of the significance of the properties of the noise source for BWR instability; - Study of the dynamics of molten salt systems: construction of the adjoint and calculating the space dependent noise induced by propagating perturbations in the fuel; - A specific study of some novel methods of analysis of non-linear and non-stationary processes

  4. Comparison of Langevin and Markov channel noise models for neuronal signal generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, B; Laughlin, S B; Niven, J E

    2010-01-01

    The stochastic opening and closing of voltage-gated ion channels produce noise in neurons. The effect of this noise on the neuronal performance has been modeled using either an approximate or Langevin model based on stochastic differential equations or an exact model based on a Markov process model of channel gating. Yet whether the Langevin model accurately reproduces the channel noise produced by the Markov model remains unclear. Here we present a comparison between Langevin and Markov models of channel noise in neurons using single compartment Hodgkin-Huxley models containing either Na+ and K+, or only K+ voltage-gated ion channels. The performance of the Langevin and Markov models was quantified over a range of stimulus statistics, membrane areas, and channel numbers. We find that in comparison to the Markov model, the Langevin model underestimates the noise contributed by voltage-gated ion channels, overestimating information rates for both spiking and nonspiking membranes. Even with increasing numbers of channels, the difference between the two models persists. This suggests that the Langevin model may not be suitable for accurately simulating channel noise in neurons, even in simulations with large numbers of ion channels.

  5. Turning Noise into Signal: Utilizing Impressed Pipeline Currents for EM Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindau, Tobias; Becken, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP) systems are extensively used for the protection of central Europe's dense network of oil-, gas- and water pipelines against destruction by electrochemical corrosion. While ICCP systems usually provide protection by injecting a DC current into the pipeline, mandatory pipeline integrity surveys demand a periodical switching of the current. Consequently, the resulting time varying pipe currents induce secondary electric- and magnetic fields in the surrounding earth. While these fields are usually considered to be unwanted cultural noise in electromagnetic exploration, this work aims at utilizing the fields generated by the ICCP system for determining the electrical resistivity of the subsurface. The fundamental period of the switching cycles typically amounts to 15 seconds in Germany and thereby roughly corresponds to periods used in controlled source EM applications (CSEM). For detailed studies we chose an approximately 30km long pipeline segment near Herford, Germany as a test site. The segment is located close to the southern margin of the Lower Saxony Basin (LSB) and part of a larger gas pipeline composed of multiple segments. The current injected into the pipeline segment originates in a rectified 50Hz AC signal which is periodically switched on and off. In contrast to the usual dipole sources used in CSEM surveys, the current distribution along the pipeline is unknown and expected to be non-uniform due to coating defects that cause current to leak into the surrounding soil. However, an accurate current distribution is needed to model the fields generated by the pipeline source. We measured the magnetic fields at several locations above the pipeline and used Biot-Savarts-Law to estimate the currents decay function. The resulting frequency dependent current distribution shows a current decay away from the injection point as well as a frequency dependent phase shift which is increasing with distance from the injection

  6. Improving signal-to-noise in the direct imaging of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with MLOCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Yang, Bin; Canovas, Hector; de Boer, Jozua; Casassus, Simon; Ménard, François; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Liu, Michael C.; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new algorithm designed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of point and extended source detections around bright stars in direct imaging data.One of our innovations is that we insert simulated point sources into the science images, which we then try to recover with maximum S/N. This improves the S/N of real point sources elsewhere in the field. The algorithm, based on the locally optimized combination of images (LOCI) method, is called Matched LOCI or MLOCI. We show with Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) data on HD 135344 B and Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) data on several stars that the new algorithm can improve the S/N of point source detections by 30-400% over past methods. We also find no increase in false detections rates. No prior knowledge of candidate companion locations is required to use MLOCI. On the other hand, while non-blind applications may yield linear combinations of science images that seem to increase the S/N of true sources by a factor >2, they can also yield false detections at high rates. This is a potential pitfall when trying to confirm marginal detections or to redetect point sources found in previous epochs. These findings are relevant to any method where the coefficients of the linear combination are considered tunable, e.g., LOCI and principal component analysis (PCA). Thus we recommend that false detection rates be analyzed when using these techniques. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  7. Low signal-to-noise FDEM in-phase data: Practical potential for magnetic susceptibility modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delefortrie, Samuël; Hanssens, Daan; De Smedt, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the use of land-based frequency-domain electromagnetics (FDEM) for magnetic susceptibility modelling. FDEM data comprises both out-of-phase and in-phase components, which can be related to the electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of the subsurface. Though applying the FDEM method to obtain information on the subsurface conductivity is well established in various domains (e.g. through the low induction number approximation of subsurface apparent conductivity), the potential for susceptibility mapping is often overlooked. Especially given a subsurface with a low magnetite and maghemite content (e.g. most sedimentary environments), it is generally assumed that susceptibility is negligible. Nonetheless, the heterogeneity of the near surface and the impact of anthropogenic disturbances on the soil can cause sufficient variation in susceptibility for it to be detectable in a repeatable way. Unfortunately, it can be challenging to study the potential for susceptibility mapping due to systematic errors, an often poor low signal-to-noise ratio, and the intricacy of correlating in-phase responses with subsurface susceptibility and conductivity. Alongside use of an accurate forward model - accounting for out-of-phase/in-phase coupling - any attempt at relating the in-phase response with subsurface susceptibility requires overcoming instrument-specific limitations that burden the real-world application of FDEM susceptibility mapping. Firstly, the often erratic and drift-sensitive nature of in-phase responses calls for relative data levelling. In addition, a correction for absolute levelling offsets may be equally necessary: ancillary (subsurface) susceptibility data can be used to assess the importance of absolute in-phase calibration though hereby accurate in-situ data is required. To allow assessing the (importance of) in-phase calibration alongside the potential of FDEM data for susceptibility modelling, we consider an experimental

  8. Noise is the new signal: Moving beyond zeroth-order geomorphology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerolmack, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    The last several decades have witnessed a rapid growth in our understanding of landscape evolution, led by the development of geomorphic transport laws - time- and space-averaged equations relating mass flux to some physical process(es). In statistical mechanics this approach is called mean field theory (MFT), in which complex many-body interactions are replaced with an external field that represents the average effect of those interactions. Because MFT neglects all fluctuations around the mean, it has been described as a zeroth-order fluctuation model. The mean field approach to geomorphology has enabled the development of landscape evolution models, and led to a fundamental understanding of many landform patterns. Recent research, however, has highlighted two limitations of MFT: (1) The integral (averaging) time and space scales in geomorphic systems are sometimes poorly defined and often quite large, placing the mean field approximation on uncertain footing, and; (2) In systems exhibiting fractal behavior, an integral scale does not exist - e.g., properties like mass flux are scale-dependent. In both cases, fluctuations in sediment transport are non-negligible over the scales of interest. In this talk I will synthesize recent experimental and theoretical work that confronts these limitations. Discrete element models of fluid and grain interactions show promise for elucidating transport mechanics and pattern-forming instabilities, but require detailed knowledge of micro-scale processes and are computationally expensive. An alternative approach is to begin with a reasonable MFT, and then add higher-order terms that capture the statistical dynamics of fluctuations. In either case, moving beyond zeroth-order geomorphology requires a careful examination of the origins and structure of transport “noise”. I will attempt to show how studying the signal in noise can both reveal interesting new physics, and also help to formalize the applicability of geomorphic

  9. Robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter noise reduction of ultrasonic signals using multiple sub-spectrum phase coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongzhang, R.; Xiao, B.; Lardner, T.; Gachagan, A. [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Li, M. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    This paper presents a robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter reduction in ultrasonic A-scan waveforms. The performance of conventional spectral-temporal techniques like Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) is highly dependent on the parameter selection, especially when the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low. Although spatial beamforming offers noise reduction with less sensitivity to parameter variation, phased array techniques are not always available. The proposed algorithm first selects an ascending series of frequency bands. A signal is reconstructed for each selected band in which a defect is present when all frequency components are in uniform sign. Combining all reconstructed signals through averaging gives a probability profile of potential defect position. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, Full Matrix Capture is applied on the austenitic steel and high nickel alloy (HNA) samples with 5MHz transducer arrays. When processing A-scan signals with unrefined parameters, the proposed algorithm enhances SNR by 20dB for both samples and consequently, defects are more visible in B-scan images created from the large amount of A-scan traces. Importantly, the proposed algorithm is considered robust, while SSP is shown to fail on the austenitic steel data and achieves less SNR enhancement on the HNA data.

  10. Evaluation and comparison of contrast to noise ratio and signal to noise ratio according to change of reconstruction on breast PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Jae [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eul Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Inje Paik University Hospital Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Park, Hoon Hee; Son, Jin Hyun; Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, The Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to measure contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) according to change of reconstruction from region of interest (ROI) in breast positron emission tomography- computed tomography (PET-CT), and to analyze the CNR and SNR statically. We examined images of breast PET-CT of 100 patients in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Each patient's image of breast PET-CT were calculated by using Image J. Differences of CNR and SNR among four reconstruction algorithms were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p<0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, CNR and SNR according to reconstruction images, 95% confidence according to CNR and SNR of reconstruction and difference in a mean of CNR and SNR. SNR results, with the quality of distributions in the order of PSF{sub T}OF, Iterative and Iterative-TOF, FBP-TOF. CNR, with the quality of distributions in the order of PSF{sub T}OF, Iterative and Iterative-TOF, FBP-TOF. CNR and SNR of PET-CT reconstruction methods of the breast would be useful to evaluate breast diseases.

  11. Changes in signal-to-noise ratios and contrast-to-noise ratios of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas on ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yulri; Choi, Dongil; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jongmee; Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To verify changes in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) on ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic T1-weighted MR imaging. Materials and methods: Fifty-two patients with 61 hypervascular HCCs underwent ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and then hepatic resection. Hypervascular HCCs were identified when definite enhancement was noted during the arterial dominant phase of three-phase MDCT. Dynamic MR Images with T1-weighted fast multiplanar spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequence (TR200/TE4.2) were obtained before and 20 s, and 1, 3, 5, and 10 min, after bolus injection of ferucarbotran. We estimated the signal intensities of tumors and livers, and calculated the SNRs and CNRs of the tumors. Results: On ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic MR imaging, SNR measurements showed a fluctuating pattern, namely, an increase in SNR followed by a decrease and a subsequent increase (or a decrease in SNR followed by a increase and a subsequent decrease) in 50 (82.0%) of 61 tumors, a single-peak SNR pattern (highest SNR on 20 s, 1, 3, or 5 min delayed images followed by a decrease) in seven (11.5%), and a decrease in SNR followed by an increase in four (6.6%). Maximum absolute CNRs with positive value were noted on 10 min delayed images in 41 (67.2%) tumors, and maximum absolute CNRs with negative value were observed on 20 s delayed images in 12 (19.7%) and on 1 min delayed images in eight (13.1%). Conclusion: Despite showing various SNR and CNR changes, the majority of hypervascular HCCs demonstrated a fluctuating SNR pattern on ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic MR imaging and a highest CNR on 10 min delayed image, which differed from the classic enhancement pattern on multiphasic CT

  12. Assessing denoising strategies to increase signal to noise ratio in spinal cord and in brain cortical and subcortical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, L.; Moraschi, M.; Summers, P.; Favilla, S.; Mascali, D.; Cedola, A.; Porro, C. A.; Giove, F.; Fratini, M.

    2018-02-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) based on Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast has become one of the most powerful tools in neuroscience research. On the other hand, fMRI approaches have seen limited use in the study of spinal cord and subcortical brain regions (such as the brainstem and portions of the diencephalon). Indeed obtaining good BOLD signal in these areas still represents a technical and scientific challenge, due to poor control of physiological noise and to a limited overall quality of the functional series. A solution can be found in the combination of optimized experimental procedures at acquisition stage, and well-adapted artifact mitigation procedures in the data processing. In this framework, we studied two different data processing strategies to reduce physiological noise in cortical and subcortical brain regions and in the spinal cord, based on the aCompCor and RETROICOR denoising tools respectively. The study, performed in healthy subjects, was carried out using an ad hoc isometric motor task. We observed an increased signal to noise ratio in the denoised functional time series in the spinal cord and in the subcortical brain region.

  13. Monte Carlo analysis of megavoltage x-ray interaction-induced signal and noise in detectors for container inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinwoo; Park, Jiwoong; Kim, Junwoo; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chang Hwy [Korea Research Institute of Ships and Ocean Engineering, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In a scanner system, a scintillation crystal is the first stage in the cascaded imaging chain transferring x-ray interaction information in cargo to be investigated to the final user who investigates x-ray images. On the other hand, the signal and noise is irreversibly transferred through the cascaded imaging chain. Therefore, the imaging performance of the first stage scintillator mainly governs the ultimate imaging performance of the system. In MV imaging, it is generally accepted that high-density scintillators, because of their sufficient optical yield, and low optical self-absorption and scattering coefficients. We chose the CdWO{sub 4} as the scintillation material. CdWO{sub 4} has a high density (7.9 g/cm{sup 3}), high atomic number (64), resistance to radiation, high optical yield, and low optical self-absorption. For the given MV spectrum, the improvement of QE from a detector with a thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm is 27% whereas the improvement from 30 mm to 50 mm is only 7%. On the other hand, the Swank noise is almost independent of the detector thickness. Consequently, the improvement of DQE from a detector with a thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm is 46% whereas the improvement from 30 mm to 50 mm is only 11%. In conclusion, the detector thickness of 30 mm would be the best for x-ray interaction-induced signal and noise performance as well as cost.

  14. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  15. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  16. A low noise photoelectric signal acquisition system applying in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qilin; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Xinghua; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Binquan; Hu, Zhaohui

    2017-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope serves as a new generation of strong support for the development of high-tech weapons, it solves the core problem that limits the development of the long-playing seamless navigation and positioning. In the NMR gyroscope, the output signal with atomic precession frequency is detected by the probe light, the final crucial photoelectric signal of the probe light directly decides the quality of the gyro signal. But the output signal has high sensitivity, resolution and measurement accuracy for the photoelectric detection system. In order to detect the measured signal better, this paper proposed a weak photoelectric signal rapid acquisition system, which has high SNR and the frequency of responded signal is up to 100 KHz to let the weak output signal with high frequency of the NMR gyroscope can be detected better.

  17. Bootstrap Signal-to-Noise Confidence Intervals: An Objective Method for Subject Exclusion and Quality Control in ERP Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nathan A.; Gannon, Matthew A.; Long, Stephanie M.; Young, Madeleine E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of event-related potential (ERP) data includes several steps to ensure that ERPs meet an appropriate level of signal quality. One such step, subject exclusion, rejects subject data if ERP waveforms fail to meet an appropriate level of signal quality. Subject exclusion is an important quality control step in the ERP analysis pipeline as it ensures that statistical inference is based only upon those subjects exhibiting clear evoked brain responses. This critical quality control step is most often performed simply through visual inspection of subject-level ERPs by investigators. Such an approach is qualitative, subjective, and susceptible to investigator bias, as there are no standards as to what constitutes an ERP of sufficient signal quality. Here, we describe a standardized and objective method for quantifying waveform quality in individual subjects and establishing criteria for subject exclusion. The approach uses bootstrap resampling of ERP waveforms (from a pool of all available trials) to compute a signal-to-noise ratio confidence interval (SNR-CI) for individual subject waveforms. The lower bound of this SNR-CI (SNRLB) yields an effective and objective measure of signal quality as it ensures that ERP waveforms statistically exceed a desired signal-to-noise criterion. SNRLB provides a quantifiable metric of individual subject ERP quality and eliminates the need for subjective evaluation of waveform quality by the investigator. We detail the SNR-CI methodology, establish the efficacy of employing this approach with Monte Carlo simulations, and demonstrate its utility in practice when applied to ERP datasets. PMID:26903849

  18. Ketamine-Induced Changes in the Signal and Noise of Rule Representation in Working Memory by Lateral Prefrontal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liya; Skoblenick, Kevin; Seamans, Jeremy K; Everling, Stefan

    2015-08-19

    Working memory dysfunction is an especially debilitating symptom in schizophrenia. The NMDA antagonist ketamine has been successfully used to model working memory deficits in both rodents and nonhuman primates, but how it affects the strength and the consistency of working memory representations remains unclear. Here we recorded single-neuron activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex of macaque monkeys before and after the administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine in a rule-based working memory task. The rule was instructed with a color cue before each delay period and dictated the correct prosaccadic or antisaccadic response to a peripheral stimulus appearing after the delay. We found that acute ketamine injections both weakened the rule signal across all delay periods and amplified the trial-to-trial variance in neural activities (i.e., noise), both within individual neurons and at the ensemble level, resulting in impaired performance. In the minority of postinjection trials when the animals responded correctly, the preservation of the signal strength during the delay periods was predictive of their subsequent success. Our findings suggest that NMDA receptor function may be critical for establishing the optimal signal-to-noise ratio in information representation by ensembles of prefrontal cortex neurons. In schizophrenia patients, working memory deficit is highly debilitating and currently without any efficacious treatment. An improved understanding of the pathophysiology of this symptom may provide critical information to treatment development. The NMDA antagonist ketamine, when injected at a subanesthetic dose, produces working memory deficit and other schizophrenia-like symptoms in humans and other animals. Here we investigated the effects of ketamine on the representation of abstract rules by prefrontal neurons, while macaque monkeys held the rules in working memory before responding accordingly. We found that ketamine weakened the signal-to-noise

  19. Removing the Influence of Shimmer in the Calculation of Harmonics-To-Noise Ratios Using Ensemble-Averages in Voice Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Ferrer; Eduardo González; María E. Hernández-Díaz; Diana Torres; Anesto del Toro

    2009-01-01

    Harmonics-to-noise ratios (HNRs) are affected by general aperiodicity in voiced speech signals. To specifically reflect a signal-to-additive-noise ratio, the measurement should be insensitive to other periodicity perturbations, like jitter, shimmer, and waveform variability. The ensemble averaging technique is a time-domain method which has been gradually refined in terms of its sensitivity to jitter and waveform variability and required number of pulses. In this paper, shimmer is introduced ...

  20. Second year progress report on the co-ordinated research programme on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, O.P.; Harish, R.; Prabhakar, R.; Reddy, C.P.; Srinivasan, G.S.; Vyjayanthi, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with the second stage of investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the KNS I loop at KfK Karlsruhe and first results of analysis of data from a series of boiling experiments carried out in the BOR 60 reactor in the USSR. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. A proposal for in-service boiling monitoring by acoustic means is briefly described. (author). 9 refs, 22 figs, 19 tabs

  1. Novel active signal compression in low-noise analog readout at future X-ray FEL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghisoni, M.; Comotti, D.; Gaioni, L.; Lodola, L.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the design of a low-noise front-end implementing a novel active signal compression technique. This feature can be exploited in the design of analog readout channels for application to the next generation free electron laser (FEL) experiments. The readout architecture includes the low-noise charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with dynamic signal compression, a time variant shaper used to process the signal at the preamplifier output and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The channel will be operated in such a way to cope with the high frame rate (exceeding 1 MHz) foreseen for future XFEL machines. The choice of a 65 nm CMOS technology has been made in order to include all the building blocks in the target pixel pitch of 100 μm. This work has been carried out in the frame of the PixFEL Project funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy.

  2. Software development of the mechanical vibration monitoring system of the CNA I reactor internals by neutron noise technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzeis, Luis M.; Calvo, Maria D.

    2009-01-01

    The neutron noise analysis technique is an important predictive maintenance tool for early detection of failures such as sensor malfunctions and incipient mechanical problems located in the reactor internals. This technique was applied successfully in Argentina since 1987. The FER-GAEN group dependent of the CNEA developed the measuring system to detect anomalies as early as possible. The magnitude of interest in this analysis is the fluctuating component of the neutron flux known as 'neutron noise'. In order to improve and facilitate the analysis, a new software code was developed for the data acquisition of the neutron noise signals and neutron spectra estimation in the frequency domain. The RMS values related with the internals vibrations are calculated from these spectra and are chronologically displayed, in order to detect any anomalous vibration or incipient detector malfunction as early as possible. (author)

  3. Signal processing for solar array monitoring, fault detection, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Henry; Spanias, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Although the solar energy industry has experienced rapid growth recently, high-level management of photovoltaic (PV) arrays has remained an open problem. As sensing and monitoring technology continues to improve, there is an opportunity to deploy sensors in PV arrays in order to improve their management. In this book, we examine the potential role of sensing and monitoring technology in a PV context, focusing on the areas of fault detection, topology optimization, and performance evaluation/data visualization. First, several types of commonly occurring PV array faults are considered and detection algorithms are described. Next, the potential for dynamic optimization of an array's topology is discussed, with a focus on mitigation of fault conditions and optimization of power output under non-fault conditions. Finally, monitoring system design considerations such as type and accuracy of measurements, sampling rate, and communication protocols are considered. It is our hope that the benefits of monitoring presen...

  4. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  5. Electromagnetic noise studies in a silicon strip detector, used as part of a luminosity monitor at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødegaard, Trygve; Tafjord, Harald; Buran, Torleiv

    1995-02-01

    As part of the luminosity monitor, SAT, in the DELPHI [1] experiment at CERN's Large Electron Positron collider, a tracking detector constructed from silicon strip detector elements was installed in front of an electromagnetic calorimeter. The luminosity was measured by counting the number of Bhabha events at the interaction point of the electron and the positron beans. The tracking detector reconstructs from the interaction point and the calorimeter measures the corresponding particles' energies. The SAT Tracker [2] consists of 504 silicon strip detectors. The strips are DC-coupled to CMOS VLSI-chips, baptized Balder [3,4]. The chip performs amplification, zero-suppression, digitalisation, and multiplexing. The requirements of good space resolution and high efficiency put strong requirements on noise control. A short description of the geometry and the relevant circuit layout is given. We describe the efforts made to minimise the electromagnetic noise in the detector and present some numbers of the noise level using various techniques.

  6. Tests of variable-band multilayers designed for investigating optimal signal-to-noise vs artifact signal ratios in Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography (DDSA) imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyers, D.; Ho, A.; Li, Q.; Piestrup, M.; Rice, M.; Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, various design techniques were applied to investigate the feasibility of controlling the bandwidth and bandshape profiles of tungsten/boron-carbon (W/B 4 C) and tungsten/silicon (W/Si) multilayers for optimizing their performance in synchrotron radiation based angiographical imaging systems at 33 keV. Varied parameters included alternative spacing geometries, material thickness ratios, and numbers of layer pairs. Planar optics with nominal design reflectivities of 30%--94% and bandwidths ranging from 0.6%--10% were designed at the Stanford Radiation Laboratory, fabricated by the Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company, and characterized on Beam Line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, in this paper we report selected results of these tests and review the possible use of the multilayers for determining optimal signal to noise vs. artifact signal ratios in practical Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography systems

  7. Non-linear signal response functions and their effects on the statistical and noise cancellation properties of isotope ratio measurements by multi-collector plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, W.

    2013-01-01

    A nebulizer-centric response function model of the analytical inductively coupled argon plasma ion source was used to investigate the statistical frequency distributions and noise reduction factors of simultaneously measured flicker noise limited isotope ion signals and their ratios. The response function model was extended by assuming i) a single gaussian distributed random noise source (nebulizer gas pressure fluctuations) and ii) the isotope ion signal response is a parabolic function of the nebulizer gas pressure. Model calculations of ion signal and signal ratio histograms were obtained by applying the statistical method of translation to the non-linear response function model of the plasma. Histograms of Ni, Cu, Pr, Tl and Pb isotope ion signals measured using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer were, without exception, negative skew. Histograms of the corresponding isotope ratios of Ni, Cu, Tl and Pb were either positive or negative skew. There was a complete agreement between the measured and model calculated histogram skew properties. The nebulizer-centric response function model was also used to investigate the effect of non-linear response functions on the effectiveness of noise cancellation by signal division. An alternative noise correction procedure suitable for parabolic signal response functions was derived and applied to measurements of isotope ratios of Cu, Ni, Pb and Tl. The largest noise reduction factors were always obtained when the non-linearity of the response functions was taken into account by the isotope ratio calculation. Possible applications of the nebulizer-centric response function model to other types of analytical instrumentation, large amplitude signal noise sources (e.g., lasers, pumped nebulizers) and analytical error in isotope ratio measurements by multi-collector plasma mass spectrometry are discussed. - Highlights: ► Isotope ion signal noise is modelled as a parabolic transform of a gaussian variable. ► Flicker

  8. A note on errors and signal to noise ratio of binary cross-correlation measurements of system impulse response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.D.

    1964-02-01

    The sources of error in the measurement of system impulse response using test signals of a discrete interval binary nature are considered. Methods of correcting for the errors due to theoretical imperfections are given and the variance of the estimate of the system impulse response due to random noise is determined. Several topics related to the main topic are considered e.g. determination of a theoretical model from experimental results. General conclusions about the magnitude of the errors due to the theoretical imperfections are made. (author)

  9. Signal-to-noise contribution of principal component loads in reconstructed near-infrared Raman tissue spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbergen, M C M; van Swol, C F P; Kendall, C; Verdaasdonk, R M; Stone, N; Bosch, J L H R

    2010-01-01

    The overall quality of Raman spectra in the near-infrared region, where biological samples are often studied, has benefited from various improvements to optical instrumentation over the past decade. However, obtaining ample spectral quality for analysis is still challenging due to device requirements and short integration times required for (in vivo) clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy. Multivariate analytical methods, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), are routinely applied to Raman spectral datasets to develop classification models. Data compression is necessary prior to discriminant analysis to prevent or decrease the degree of over-fitting. The logical threshold for the selection of principal components (PCs) to be used in discriminant analysis is likely to be at a point before the PCs begin to introduce equivalent signal and noise and, hence, include no additional value. Assessment of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at a certain peak or over a specific spectral region will depend on the sample measured. Therefore, the mean SNR over the whole spectral region (SNR(msr)) is determined in the original spectrum as well as for spectra reconstructed from an increasing number of principal components. This paper introduces a method of assessing the influence of signal and noise from individual PC loads and indicates a method of selection of PCs for LDA. To evaluate this method, two data sets with different SNRs were used. The sets were obtained with the same Raman system and the same measurement parameters on bladder tissue collected during white light cystoscopy (set A) and fluorescence-guided cystoscopy (set B). This method shows that the mean SNR over the spectral range in the original Raman spectra of these two data sets is related to the signal and noise contribution of principal component loads. The difference in mean SNR over the spectral range can also be appreciated since fewer principal components can

  10. Asymmetry between ON and OFF α ganglion cells of mouse retina: integration of signal and noise from synaptic inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Michael A

    2017-11-15

    Bipolar and amacrine cells presynaptic to the ON sustained α cell of mouse retina provide currents with a higher signal-to-noise power ratio (SNR) than those presynaptic to the OFF sustained α cell. Yet the ON cell loses proportionately more SNR from synaptic inputs to spike output than the OFF cell does. The higher SNR of ON bipolar cells at the beginning of the ON pathway compensates for losses incurred by the ON ganglion cell, and improves the processing of positive contrasts. ON and OFF pathways in the retina include functional pairs of neurons that, at first glance, appear to have symmetrically similar responses to brightening and darkening, respectively. Upon careful examination, however, functional pairs exhibit asymmetries in receptive field size and response kinetics. Until now, descriptions of how light-adapted retinal circuitry maintains a preponderance of signal over the noise have not distinguished between ON and OFF pathways. Here I present evidence of marked asymmetries between members of a functional pair of sustained α ganglion cells in the mouse retina. The ON cell exhibited a proportionately greater loss of signal-to-noise power ratio (SNR) from its presynaptic arrays to its postsynaptic currents. Thus the ON cell combines signal and noise from its presynaptic arrays of bipolar and amacrine cells less efficiently than the OFF cell does. Yet the inefficiency of the ON cell is compensated by its presynaptic arrays providing a higher SNR than the arrays presynaptic to the OFF cell, apparently to improve visual processing of positive contrasts. Dynamic clamp experiments were performed that introduced synaptic conductances into ON and OFF cells. When the amacrine-modulated conductance was removed, the ON cell's spike train exhibited an increase in SNR. The OFF cell, however, showed the opposite effect of removing amacrine input, which was a decrease in SNR. Thus ON and OFF cells have different modes of synaptic integration with direct effects on

  11. A note on errors and signal to noise ratio of binary cross-correlation measurements of system impulse response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, J D [Dynamics Group, Control and Instrumentation Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-02-15

    The sources of error in the measurement of system impulse response using test signals of a discrete interval binary nature are considered. Methods of correcting for the errors due to theoretical imperfections are given and the variance of the estimate of the system impulse response due to random noise is determined. Several topics related to the main topic are considered e.g. determination of a theoretical model from experimental results. General conclusions about the magnitude of the errors due to the theoretical imperfections are made. (author)

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio and detective quantum efficiency determination by and alternative use of photographic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgudzhiev, Z.; Koleva, D.

    1986-01-01

    A known theoretical model of an alternative use of silver-halogenid pnotographic emulsions in which the number of the granulas forming the photographic image is used as a detector output instead of the microdensiometric blackening density is applied to some real photographic emulsions. It is found that by this use the Signal-to-Noise ratio of the photographic detector can be increased to about 5 times while its detective quantum efficiency can reach about 20%, being close to that of some photomultipliers

  13. Regional improvement of signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in dual-screen CR chest imaging - a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinming; Shaw, Chris C.

    2001-01-01

    The improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in dual-screen computed radiography (CR) has been investigated for various regions in images of an anthropomorphic chest phantom. With the dual-screen CR technique, two image plates are placed in a cassette and exposed together during imaging. The exposed plates are separately scanned to form a front image and a back image, which are then registered and superimposed to form a composite image with improved SNRs and CNRs. The improvement can be optimized by applying specifically selected weighting factors during superimposition. In this study, dual-screen CR images of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were acquired and formed with four different combinations of standard resolution (ST) and high-resolution (HR) screens: ST-ST, ST-HR, HR-ST, and HR-HR. SNRs and their improvements were measured and compared over twelve representative regions-of-interest (ROIs) in these images. A 19.1%-45.7% increase of the SNR was observed, depending on the ROI and screen combination used. The optimal weighting factors were found to vary by only 4.5%-12.4%. Largest improvement was found in the lung field for all screen combinations. Improvement of CNRs was investigated over two ROIs in the lung field using the rib bones as the contrast objects and a 29.2%-43.9% improvement of the CNR was observed. Among the four screen combinations, ST-ST resulted in the most SNR and CNR improvement, followed in order by HR-ST, HR-HR, and ST-HR. The HR-ST combination yielded the lowest spatial variation of the optimal weighting factors with improved SNRs and CNRs close to those of the ST-ST combination

  14. [Evaluation of signal noise ratio on analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma using DWI with multi-b values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiule; Xing, Wei; Chen, Jie; Dai, Yongming; Sun, Jun; Li, Dengfa

    2014-01-21

    To explore the influence of signal noise ratio (SNR) on analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) using DWI with multi-b values. The images of 17 cases with CCRCC were analyzed, including 17 masses and 9 pure cysts. The signal intensity of the cysts and masses was measured separately on DWI for each b value. The minimal SNR, as the threshold, was recorded when the signal curve manifest as the single exponential line. The SNR of the CCRCC was calculated on DWI for each b value, and compared with the threshold by independent Two-sample t Test. The signal decreased on DWI with increased b factors for both pure cysts and CCRCC. The threshold is 1.29 ± 0.17, and the signal intensity of the cysts on DWI with multi-b values shown as a single exponential line when b ≤ 800 s/mm(2). For the CCRCC, the SNR is similar to the threshold when b = 1 000 s/mm(2) (t = 0.40, P = 0.69), and is lower when b = 1 200 s/mm(2) (t = -2.38, P = 0.03). The SNR should be sufficient for quantitative analysis of DWI, and the maximal b value is 1000 s/mm(2) for CCRCC.

  15. Wearable System for Acquisition and Monitoring of Biological Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, D. J.; Andino, N. B.; Ponce, S. D.; Roberti, MA; López, y. N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a modular, wearable system for acquisition and wireless transmission of biological signals. Configurable slaves for different signals (such as ECG, EMG, inertial sensors, and temperature) based in the ADS1294 Medical Analog Front End are connected to a Master, based in the CC3200 microcontroller, both from Texas Instruments. The slaves are configurable according to the specific application, providing versatility to the wearable system. The battery consumption is reduced, through a couple of Li-ion batteries and the circuit has also a battery charger. A custom made box was designed and fabricated in a 3D printer, preserving the requirements of low cost, low weight and safety recommendations.

  16. Maintaining quantum coherence in the presence of noise through state monitoring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Konrad, T

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available in the presence of classical dephasing and amplitude noise, by simulating such measurements on a two-level system undergoing Rabi oscillations. Finite estimation fidelity is found to persist indefinitely after the decoherence times set by the noise fields...

  17. Model based monitoring of urban traffic noise : Field test results for road side and shielded sides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Lutgendorf, D.; Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Urban traffic noise can be a major issue for people and (local) governments. On a local scale the use of measurements is increasing, especially when measures or changes to the local infrastructure are proposed. However, measuring (only) urban traffic noise is a challenging task. By using a model

  18. The effect of signal to noise ratio on accuracy of temperature measurements for Brillouin lidar in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kun; Niu, Qunjie; Wu, Xiangkui; Xu, Jiaqi; Peng, Li; Zhou, Bo

    2017-09-01

    A lidar system with Fabry-Pérot etalon and an intensified charge coupled device can be used to obtain the scattering spectrum of the ocean and retrieve oceanic temperature profiles. However, the spectrum would be polluted by noise and result in a measurement error. To analyze the effect of signal to noise ratio (SNR) on the accuracy of measurements for Brillouin lidar in water, the theory model and characteristics of SNR are researched. The noise spectrums with different SNR are repetitiously measured based on simulation and experiment. The results show that accuracy is related to SNR, and considering the balance of time consumption and quality, the average of five measurements is adapted for real remote sensing under the pulse laser conditions of wavelength 532 nm, pulse energy 650 mJ, repetition rate 10 Hz, pulse width 8 ns and linewidth 0.003 cm-1 (90 MHz). Measuring with the Brillouin linewidth has a better accuracy at a lower temperature (15 °C), based on the classical retrieval model we adopt. The experimental results show that the temperature error is 0.71 °C and 0.06 °C based on shift and linewidth respectively when the image SNR is at the range of 3.2 dB-3.9 dB.

  19. An innovative non-intrusive driver assistance system for vital signal monitoring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Y. & Yu, X.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an in-vehicle nonintrusive biopotential measurement system for driver health monitoring and fatigue detection. Previous research has found that the physiological signals including eye features, electrocardiography (ECG), electroencephalography (EEG) and their secondary

  20. Traffic data for local emissions monitoring at a signalized intersection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bigazzi, A.; Lint, J.W.C. van; Klunder, G.; Stelwagen, U.; Ligterink, N.E.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assist planning efforts for air pollution-responsive dynamic traffic management (DTM) systems, this research assesses the accuracy of local emissions monitoring based on traffic data and models. The study quantifies the benefits of increased data resolution for short-term emissions

  1. A CMOS power-efficient low-noise current-mode front-end amplifier for neural signal recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung-Yu; Chen, Wei-Ming; Kuo, Liang-Ting

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a new current-mode front-end amplifier (CMFEA) for neural signal recording systems is proposed. In the proposed CMFEA, a current-mode preamplifier with an active feedback loop operated at very low frequency is designed as the first gain stage to bypass any dc offset current generated by the electrode-tissue interface and to achieve a low high-pass cutoff frequency below 0.5 Hz. No reset signal or ultra-large pseudo resistor is required. The current-mode preamplifier has low dc operation current to enhance low-noise performance and decrease power consumption. A programmable current gain stage is adopted to provide adjustable gain for adaptive signal scaling. A following current-mode filter is designed to adjust the low-pass cutoff frequency for different neural signals. The proposed CMFEA is designed and fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS technology and the area of the core circuit is 0.076 mm(2). The measured high-pass cutoff frequency is as low as 0.3 Hz and the low-pass cutoff frequency is adjustable from 1 kHz to 10 kHz. The measured maximum current gain is 55.9 dB. The measured input-referred current noise density is 153 fA /√Hz , and the power consumption is 13 μW at 1-V power supply. The fabricated CMFEA has been successfully applied to the animal test for recording the seizure ECoG of Long-Evan rats.

  2. Compressive sensing for sparse time-frequency representation of nonstationary signals in the presence of impulsive noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orović, Irena; Stanković, Srdjan; Amin, Moeness

    2013-05-01

    A modified robust two-dimensional compressive sensing algorithm for reconstruction of sparse time-frequency representation (TFR) is proposed. The ambiguity function domain is assumed to be the domain of observations. The two-dimensional Fourier bases are used to linearly relate the observations to the sparse TFR, in lieu of the Wigner distribution. We assume that a set of available samples in the ambiguity domain is heavily corrupted by an impulsive type of noise. Consequently, the problem of sparse TFR reconstruction cannot be tackled using standard compressive sensing optimization algorithms. We introduce a two-dimensional L-statistics based modification into the transform domain representation. It provides suitable initial conditions that will produce efficient convergence of the reconstruction algorithm. This approach applies sorting and weighting operations to discard an expected amount of samples corrupted by noise. The remaining samples serve as observations used in sparse reconstruction of the time-frequency signal representation. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated on numerical examples that comprise both cases of monocomponent and multicomponent signals.

  3. Novel processing of Barkhausen noise signal for assessment of residual stress in surface ground components exhibiting poor magnetic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashista, M.; Paul, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Barkhausen Noise Analysis (BNA) technique has been utilised to assess surface integrity of steels. But the BNA technique is not very successful in evaluating surface integrity of ground steels that exhibit poor micro-magnetic response. A new approach has been proposed for the processing of BN signal and two newly proposed parameters, namely 'count' and 'event', have been shown to correlate linearly with the residual stress upon grinding, with judicious choice of user defined 'threshold', even when the micro-magnetic response of the work material is poor. In the present study, residual stress induced upon conventional plunge surface grinding of hardened bearing steel has been investigated along with unhardened bearing steel for benchmarking. Moreover, similar correlation has been established, when primarily compressive stress is induced upon high speed grinding using cBN wheel with moderately deep cut suppressing the micro-magnetic response from the ground medium carbon steel as the work material. - Highlights: → The problem of work materials exhibiting poor BN response and poor Barkhausen Noise response is identified. → A novel signal processing strategy is introduced to address the issue of poor micro-magnetic response of some ferromagnetic material. → Potential of newly introduced BN parameters has been studied. → These two BN parameters exhibited linear correlation with residual stress for work material with poor micro-magnetic response.

  4. Low concentration of a Gd-chelate increases the signal-to-noise ratio in fast pulsing BEST experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Nathalie; Bellot, Gaëtan; Wang, Jing; Déméné, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    Despite numerous developments in the past few years that aim to increase the sensitivity of NMR multidimensional experiments, NMR spectroscopy still suffers from intrinsic low sensitivity. In this report, we show that the combination of two developments in the field, the Band-selective Excitation Short-Transient (BEST) experiment [Schanda et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 128 (2006) 9042] and the addition of the nonionic paramagnetic gadolinium chelate gadodiamide into NMR samples, enhances the signal-to-noise ratio. This effect is shown here for four different proteins, three globular and one unfolded, of molecular weights ranging from 6.5 kDa to 40 kDa, using 2D BEST HSQC and 3D BEST triple resonance sequences. Moreover, we show that the increase in signal-to-noise ratio provided by the gadodiamide is higher for peak resonances with lower than average intensity in BEST experiments. It is interesting to note that these residues are on average the weakest ones in those experiments. In this case, the gadodiamide-mediated increase can reach a value of 60% for low and 30% for high molecular weight proteins respectively. An investigation into the origin of this “paramagnetic gain” in BEST experiments is presented.

  5. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  6. Effect of low-xenon and krypton supplementation on signal/noise of regional CT-based ventilation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Deokiee; Beck, Kenneth C; Simon, Brett A; Shikata, Hidenori; Saba, Osama I; Hoffman, Eric A

    2007-04-01

    Xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT) is used to estimate regional ventilation by measuring regional attenuation changes over multiple breaths while rebreathing a constant Xe concentration ([Xe]). Xe-CT has potential human applications, although anesthetic properties limit [Xe] to krypton (Kr) combination, on time constant (TC) determination. Six anesthetized sheep were scanned prone and supine using multidetector row CT. Lungs were imaged by respiratory gating during washin of a 30%, 40%, 55% Xe, and a 30% Xe/30% Kr mixture. Using Kr avoids unwanted effects of Xe. Mean TCs, coefficients of variation (CV), and half confidence intervals (CI)/mean served as indexes of sensitivity to noise. Mean supine and prone TCs of three [Xe] values were not significantly different. Average CVs of TCs increased from 57% (55% Xe), 58% (40% Xe), and 73% (30% Xe) (P < 0.05: paired t-tests; 30% Xe vs. higher [Xe]). Monte Carlo simulation indicated a CV based on inherent image noise was 8% for 55% Xe and 17% for 30% Xe (P < 0.05). Adding 30% Kr to 30% Xe gave a washin signal equivalent to 40% Xe. Half CI/mean using the 30% Xe/30% Kr mixture was not significantly different from 55 and 40% Xe. Although average TCs were not affected by changes in [Xe], the higher CV and half CI/mean suggested reduced signal-to-noise ratio at the 30% [Xe]. The 30% Xe/30% Kr mixture was comparable to that of 40% Xe, providing an important agent for CT-based assessment of regional ventilation in humans.

  7. Optimization of number and signal to noise ratio radiographs for defects 3D reconstruction in industrial control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruandet, J.-P.

    2001-01-01

    Among numerous techniques for non-destructive evaluation (NOE), X-rays systems are well suited to inspect inner objects. Acquiring several radiographs of inspected objects under different points of view enables to recover a three dimensional structural information. In this NOE application, a tomographic testing is considered. This work deals with two tomographic testing optimizations in order to improve the characterization of defects that may occur into metallic welds. The first one consists in the optimization of the acquisition strategy. Because tomographic testing is made on-line, the total duration for image acquisition is fixed, limiting the number of available views. Hence, for a given acquisition duration, it is possible either to acquire a very limited number of radiographs with a good signal to noise ratio in each single acquisition or a larger number of radiographs with a limited signal to noise ratio. The second one consists in optimizing the 3D reconstruction algorithms from a limited number of cone-beam projections. To manage the lack of data, we first used algebraic reconstruction algorithms such as ART or regularized ICM. In terms of acquisition strategy optimization, an increase of the number of projections was proved to be valuable. Taking into account specific prior knowledge such as support constraint or physical noise model in attenuation images also improved reconstruction quality. Then, a new regularized region based reconstruction approach was developed. Defects to reconstruct are binary (lack of material in a homogeneous object). As a consequence, they are entirely described by their shapes. Because the number of defects to recover is unknown and is totally arbitrary, a level set formulation allowing handling topological changes was used. Results obtained with a regularized level-set reconstruction algorithm are optimistic in the proposed context. (author) [fr

  8. Experimental Demonstration of Nonlinearity and Phase Noise Tolerant 16-QAM OFDM W-Band (75–110 GHz) Signal Over Fiber System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2014-01-01

    We propose a nonlinearity and phase noise tolerant orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) W-band signal over fiber system based on phase modulation and photonic heterodyne up-conversion techniques. By heterodyne mixing the phase-modulated optical OFDM signal with a free-running laser i...

  9. Parametric roll resonance monitoring using signal-based detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Falkenberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Extreme roll motion of ships can be caused by several phenomena, one of which is parametric roll resonance. Several incidents occurred unexpectedly around the millennium and caused vast fiscal losses on large container vessels. The phenomenon is now well understood and some consider parametric roll...... algorithms in real conditions, and to evaluate the frequency of parametric roll events on the selected vessels. Detection performance is scrutinised through the validation of the detected events using owners’ standard methods, and supported by available wave radar data. Further, a bivariate statistical...... analysis of the outcome of the signal-based detectors is performed to assess the real life false alarm probability. It is shown that detection robustness and very low false warning rates are obtained. The study concludes that small parametric roll events are occurring, and that the proposed signal...

  10. Low-complexity R-peak detection in ECG signals : a preliminary step towards ambulatory fetal monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijakkers, M.J.; Rabotti, C.; Bennebroek, M.; Meerbergen, van J.; Mischi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive fetal health monitoring during pregnancy has become increasingly important. Recent advances in signal processing technology have enabled fetal monitoring during pregnancy, using abdominal ECG recordings. Ubiquitous ambulatory monitoring for continuous fetal health measurement is however

  11. Experimental study on engine gas-path component fault monitoring using exhaust gas electrostatic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jianzhong; Zuo, Hongfu; Liu, Pengpeng; Wen, Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the recent development in engine gas-path components health monitoring using electrostatic sensors in combination with signal-processing techniques. Two ground-based engine electrostatic monitoring experiments are reported and the exhaust gas electrostatic monitoring signal-based fault-detection method is proposed. It is found that the water washing, oil leakage and combustor linear cracking result in an increase in the activity level of the electrostatic monitoring signal, which can be detected by the electrostatic monitoring system. For on-line health monitoring of the gas-path components, a baseline model-based fault-detection method is proposed and the multivariate state estimation technique is used to establish the baseline model for the electrostatic monitoring signal. The method is applied to a data set from a turbo-shaft engine electrostatic monitoring experiment. The results of the case study show that the system with the developed method is capable of detecting the gas-path component fault in an on-line fashion. (paper)

  12. The LSC glitch group: monitoring noise transients during the fifth LIGO science run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, L; Katsavounidis, E [LIGO-Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cadonati, L [University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Caride, S; Christensen, N; Ely, G; Isogai, T [Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States); Caudill, S; Gonzalez, G; Gouaty, R; Kissel, J [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Chatterji, S; Goggin, L [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dalrymple, J; Credico, A Di [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Desai, S [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Garofoli, J; Gray, C [LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Gretarsson, A [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, AZ 86301 (United States); Hoak, D [LIGO Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States)], E-mail: desai@gravity.psu.edu (and others)

    2008-09-21

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) glitch group is part of the LIGO detector characterization effort. It consists of data analysts and detector experts who, during and after science runs, collaborate for a better understanding of noise transients in the detectors. Goals of the glitch group during the fifth LIGO science run (S5) included (1) offline assessment of the detector data quality, with focus on noise transients, (2) veto recommendations for astrophysical analysis and (3) feedback to the commissioning team on anomalies seen in gravitational wave and auxiliary data channels. Other activities included the study of auto-correlation of triggers from burst searches, stationarity of the detector noise and veto studies. The group identified causes for several noise transients that triggered false alarms in the gravitational wave searches; the times of such transients were identified and vetoed from the data generating the LSC astrophysical results.

  13. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR. Development of microstrip sensors and signal transmission lines for a low-mass, low-noise system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singla, Minni

    2014-01-01

    construction of the silicon microstrip sensors. For the evaluation of the performance of the silicon microstrip sensors in the harsh radiation environment during experimental operation, a radiation damage model has been included. It reproduces the behavior of the irradiated CBM prototype sensors. In addition to the static characteristics, the interstrip parameters relevant to understand strip isolation and cross-talk issues have been extracted. The transient simulations have been performed to estimate the charge collection performance of the irradiated sensors. The signal transmission in the readout cables has been evaluated with the finite element simulation tool RAPHAEL. Based on the performance of the front-end electronics used for early prototyping in the CBM experiment, capacitive and resistive noise contributions from the silicon microstrip sensors and multi-line readout cables have been extracted. To validate the aforementioned simulations, numerous tests have been performed both on the multi-line readout cables and silicon microstrip sensors. Characterizations of multi-line readout cables and silicon microstrip sensors in laboratory conditions have been found to agree reasonably well with the simulations. Considering the expected radiation environment the behavior of silicon microstrip sensors have been studied especially in terms of noise and charge collection efficiency. scan of the silicon microstrip sensors using 241 Am is presented. In order to test a first system of detector stations including the data acquisition system, slow control and online monitoring software and for track reconstruction, in-beam tests have been performed at the COSY synchrotron of the Research Center Juelich, Germany. Further, different design parameters have been suggested to improve the sensor and readout cable design on the basis of the simulations and the measurements. Many of these parameters have been implemented in the new prototypes under production. These new prototypes were

  14. Emergence of a signal from background noise in the "memory of water" experiments: how to explain it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Francis

    2012-01-01

    After more than 20 years, the case of the "memory of water" still has not been resolved satisfactorily. After the affair with the journal Nature, Benveniste extended his results on high dilutions to an "electromagnetic biology" and then to a "digital biology," where electromagnetic signals supposed to be emitted from biologically active solutions were said to be stored on magnetic memories. Although the results obtained by Benveniste and coworkers were obvious, the difficulties in reproducibility by other teams created doubt of the reality of the alleged phenomenon. In a first step, we analyzed a set of experiments obtained by Benveniste's team in the 1990s. We quantified the relationship between "expected" effects (ie, labels of the tested samples) and apparatus outcomes, and we defined the experimental conditions to observe significant correlations. We concluded that the results of these experiments were related to experimenter-dependent correlations, which did not support the initial "memory of water" hypothesis. The fact that a signal emerged from background noise, however, remained puzzling. Therefore, in a second step, we described Benveniste's experiments according to the relational interpretation of quantum physics of C. Rovelli. In this interpretation, the state of a system is observer-dependent and the collapse of the wave function appears only in the states relative to a given observer. This interpretation allowed us to elaborate a model describing Benveniste's experiments in which the emergence of a signal from background noise was described by the entanglement of the experimenter with the observed system. In conclusion, the pursuit of the experimental "proof" to support the "memory of water" hypothesis has prevented other interpretations. Although our hypothesis does not definitely dismiss the possibility of "memory of water," the experimenter-dependent entanglement could be an attractive alternative interpretation of Benveniste's experiments

  15. Development of a central PC-based system for reactor signal monitoring and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, A.; Ansari, S.A.; Baig, A.R.

    1996-05-01

    A personal computer based system was developed for on-line monitoring, signal processing and display of important parameters of the Pakistan Reactor-1. The system was designed for assistance to both reactor operator and users. It performs three main functions. The first is the centralized radiation monitoring in and around the reactor building. The computer acquires signals from radiation monitoring channels and continuously displays them on distributed monitors. Trend monitoring and alarm generation is also done. In case of any abnormal condition the radiation level data is automatically stored in computer memory for detailed off-line analysis. In the second part the computer does the performance testing of nuclear instrumentation channels by signal statistical analysis and generates alarm in case the channel standard deviation error exceeds the permissible error. Mean values of important nuclear signals are also displayed on distributed monitors as a part of reactor safety parameters display system. The third function is on-line computation of reactor physics parameters of the core which are important from operational and safety point-of-view. The signals from radiation protection system and nuclear instrumentation channels in the reactor were interfaced with the computer for this purpose. The development work was done under an IAEA research contract as a part of coordinated research programme. (author) 12 figs

  16. Development of a central PC-based system for reactor signal monitoring and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, A.; Ansari, S.A.; Rauf Baig, A.

    1998-01-01

    A personal computer based system was developed for on-line monitoring, signal processing and display of important reactor parameters of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1. The system was designed for assistance to both reactor operator and users. It performs three main functions. The first is the centralized radiation monitoring in and around the reactor building. The computer acquires signals from radiation monitoring channels and continuously displays them on distributed monitors. Trend monitoring and alarm generation is also done. In case of any abnormal condition the radiation level data is automatically stored in computer memory for detailed off-line analysis. In the second part the computer does the performance testing of nuclear instrumentation channels by signal statistical analysis, and generates alarm in case the channel standard deviation error exceeds the permissible error. Mean values of important nuclear signals are also displayed on distributed monitors as a part of reactor safety parameters display system. The third function is on-line computation of reactor physics parameters of the core which are important from operational and safety points-of-view. The signals from radiation protection system and nuclear instrumentation channels in the reactor were interfaced with the computer for this purpose. The development work was done under an IAEA research contract as a part of coordinated research programme. (author)

  17. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement on SEM images using a cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay filters and weighted least squares error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, M A; Sim, K S; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2015-05-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing using weighted least squares error filter is enhanced for scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. A diversity of sample images is captured and the performance is found to be better when compared with the moving average and the standard median filters, with respect to eliminating noise. This technique can be implemented efficiently on real-time SEM images, with all mandatory data for processing obtained from a single image. Noise in images, and particularly in SEM images, are undesirable. A new noise reduction technique, based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay and weighted least squares error method, is developed. We apply the combined technique to single image signal-to-noise ratio estimation and noise reduction for SEM imaging system. This autocorrelation-based technique requires image details to be correlated over a few pixels, whereas the noise is assumed to be uncorrelated from pixel to pixel. The noise component is derived from the difference between the image autocorrelation at zero offset, and the estimation of the corresponding original autocorrelation. In the few test cases involving different images, the efficiency of the developed noise reduction filter is proved to be significantly better than those obtained from the other methods. Noise can be reduced efficiently with appropriate choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Influence of fuel vibration on PWR neutron noise associated with core barrel motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; March-Leuba, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ex-core neutron detector noise has been utilized to monitor core support barrel (CSB) vibrations. In order to observe long-term changes, noise signals at Sequoyah-1 were monitored continuously during the whole first fuel cycle and part of the second cycle. Results suggest that neutron noise measurements performed infrequently may not provide adequate surveillance of the CSB because it may be difficult to separate noise amplitude changes due solely to CSB motion from changes caused by fuel motion and burnup

  19. Optimum Boundaries of Signal-to-Noise Ratio for Adaptive Code Modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-14

    possible ACM modes. This will decrease the searching time by half when compared to the mode search using a linear searching ( sequential ) method. The... simultaneously on with same 10 dB transmit power gain and parameters………………………………………………………………65 Fig. B-12. PSD when signal is transmitted from vector network...dB transmit power gain. Observe in Fig. B-11 that the peak height of the summed signal PSD increases when the second USRP 2932 is simultaneously

  20. Achieving high signal-to-noise performance for a velocity-map imaging experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, E.H.; Cavanagh, S.J.; Gibson, S.T.; Lewis, B.R.; Dedman, C.J.; Picker, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Since the publication of the pioneering paper on velocity-map imaging in 1997, by Eppink and Parker [A.T.J.B. Eppink, D.H. Parker, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68 (1997) 3477], numerous groups have applied this method in a variety of ways and to various targets. However, despite this interest, little attention has been given to the inherent difficulties and problems associated with this method. In implementing a velocity-map imaging system for photoelectron spectroscopy for the photo-detachment of anion radicals, we have developed a coaxial velocity-map imaging spectrometer. Examined are the advantages and disadvantages of such a system, in particular the sources of noise and the methods used to reduce it