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Sample records for noise equivalent count

  1. Optimization of noise-equivalent count rates in 3D PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, R.D.; Marsden, P.K.; Cronin, B.F.; Sutcliffe, J.L.; Maisey, M.N.

    1996-01-01

    We have used noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates to optimize count rate performance for 3D acquisition in PET in a wide range of situations, with particular reference to imaging of the torso. We have also compared NEC performance for 2D and 3D acquisition in order to establish the conditions under which 3D mode offers an improvement over 2D mode. Measurements were performed on four tissue-equivalent phantoms ranging in size from that of an infant's head (13 cm diameter) to that of an obese adult's chest 37 cm by 48 cm. Count rate data were acquired as a function of phantom size, activity in the field of view, lower energy discriminator level (LLD) and acquisition mode, and NEC rates were derived as a function of these variables. The LLD at which the highest NEC rate is obtained shows a dependence both on phantom size and on the activity in the field of view both for 2D and for 3D acquisition. The relative advantage of 3D mode over 2D mode, at the optimum LLD setting, is also strongly dependent both on activity in the field of view (FOV) and on the phantom size. The main limiting factors for 3D NEC rates are detector dead-time for small phantoms and random coincidences for large phantoms. The 3D NEC rate is more than twice as great as the 2D NEC rate when less than 60 MBq is present in the FOV for all phantoms except the largest, in which case a ratio of two is only achieved for activities less than 25 MBq. For the smallest phantom, 3D/2D NEC ratios of greater than 3.5 are obtained when the activity in the FOV falls below 10 MBq. (author)

  2. Noise equivalent count measurements in a neuro-PET scanner with retractable septa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.; Jones, T.; Spinks, T.J.; Gilardi, M.C.; Townsend, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the removal of interplane septa in a PET scanner that enables acquisition of all possible lines of response (3D mode) in an effort to maximize the available number of detected events. One problem with this method at high countrates, however, is a markedly increased deadtime and randoms rate, which has a deleterious effect on data quality. The noise-equivalent countrate (NEC) performance of a neuro-PET scanner has been determined with and without interplane septa on uniform cylindrical phantoms of differing radii and in human studies to assess the optimum countrate conditions that realize the maximum gain. In the brain, the effective gain in NEC performance for 3D ranges from >5 at low countrates to ∼3.3 at 200 kcps (equivalent to 37 kcps in 2D). The gains of the 3D method assessed by this analysis are significant, and are shown to be highly dependent on countrate and object dimensions

  3. Noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, C.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.; Katz, J.; Shacham, J.

    1982-01-01

    A small-signal model of a semiconductor laser is extended to include the effects of intrinsic noise by adding current and voltage noise sources. The current noise source represents the shot noise of carrier recombination, while the voltage noise source represents the random process of simulated emission. The usefulness of the noise equivalent circuit is demonstrated by calculating the modulation and noise characteristics of a current-driven diode as a function of bias current and frequency.

  4. Noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode

    OpenAIRE

    Harder, Christoph; Katz, Joseph; Margalit, S.; Shacham, J.; Yariv, A.

    1982-01-01

    The noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode is derived from the rate equations including Langevin noise sources. This equivalent circuit allows a straightforward calculation of the noise and modulation characteristics of a laser diode combined with electronic components. The intrinsic junction voltage noise spectrum and the light intensity fluctuation of a current driven laser diode are calculated as a function of bias current and frequency.

  5. ON THE USE OF SHOT NOISE FOR PHOTON COUNTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Lieu et al. have recently claimed that it is possible to substantially improve the sensitivity of radio-astronomical observations. In essence, their proposal is to make use of the intensity of the photon shot noise as a measure of the photon arrival rate. Lieu et al. provide a detailed quantum-mechanical calculation of a proposed measurement scheme that uses two detectors and conclude that this scheme avoids the sensitivity degradation that is associated with photon bunching. If correct, this result could have a profound impact on radio astronomy. Here I present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity attainable using shot-noise measurement schemes that use either one or two detectors, and demonstrate that neither scheme can avoid the photon bunching penalty. I perform both semiclassical and fully quantum calculations of the sensitivity, obtaining consistent results, and provide a formal proof of the equivalence of these two approaches. These direct calculations are furthermore shown to be consistent with an indirect argument based on a correlation method that establishes an independent limit to the sensitivity of shot-noise measurement schemes. Furthermore, these calculations are directly applicable to the regime of interest identified by Lieu et al. Collectively, these results conclusively demonstrate that the photon-bunching sensitivity penalty applies to shot-noise measurement schemes just as it does to ordinary photon counting, in contradiction to the fundamental claim made by Lieu et al. The source of this contradiction is traced to a logical fallacy in their argument

  6. A comparison of quantum limited dose and noise equivalent dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Isaias D.; Boyce, Sarah J.; Petrillo, Michael J.; Zhou, Kungang

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-limited-dose (QLD) and noise-equivalent-dose (NED) are performance metrics often used interchangeably. Although the metrics are related, they are not equivalent unless the treatment of electronic noise is carefully considered. These metrics are increasingly important to properly characterize the low-dose performance of flat panel detectors (FPDs). A system can be said to be quantum-limited when the Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) is proportional to the square-root of x-ray exposure. Recent experiments utilizing three methods to determine the quantum-limited dose range yielded inconsistent results. To investigate the deviation in results, generalized analytical equations are developed to model the image processing and analysis of each method. We test the generalized expression for both radiographic and fluoroscopic detectors. The resulting analysis shows that total noise content of the images processed by each method are inherently different based on their readout scheme. Finally, it will be shown that the NED is equivalent to the instrumentation-noise-equivalent-exposure (INEE) and furthermore that the NED is derived from the quantum-noise-only method of determining QLD. Future investigations will measure quantum-limited performance of radiographic panels with a modified readout scheme to allow for noise improvements similar to measurements performed with fluoroscopic detectors.

  7. The equivalent internal orientation and position noise for contour integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Alex S; Fu, Minnie; Farivar, Reza; Hess, Robert F

    2017-10-12

    Contour integration is the joining-up of local responses to parts of a contour into a continuous percept. In typical studies observers detect contours formed of discrete wavelets, presented against a background of random wavelets. This measures performance for detecting contours in the limiting external noise that background provides. Our novel task measures contour integration without requiring any background noise. This allowed us to perform noise-masking experiments using orientation and position noise. From these we measure the equivalent internal noise for contour integration. We found an orientation noise of 6° and position noise of 3 arcmin. Orientation noise was 2.6x higher in contour integration compared to an orientation discrimination control task. Comparing against a position discrimination task found position noise in contours to be 2.4x lower. This suggests contour integration involves intermediate processing that enhances the quality of element position representation at the expense of element orientation. Efficiency relative to the ideal observer was lower for the contour tasks (36% in orientation noise, 21% in position noise) compared to the controls (54% and 57%).

  8. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system's input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple "linear amplifier" model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer's detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system's internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity. Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF. We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies.

  9. Equivalence of truncated count mixture distributions and mixtures of truncated count distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhning, Dankmar; Kuhnert, Ronny

    2006-12-01

    This article is about modeling count data with zero truncation. A parametric count density family is considered. The truncated mixture of densities from this family is different from the mixture of truncated densities from the same family. Whereas the former model is more natural to formulate and to interpret, the latter model is theoretically easier to treat. It is shown that for any mixing distribution leading to a truncated mixture, a (usually different) mixing distribution can be found so that the associated mixture of truncated densities equals the truncated mixture, and vice versa. This implies that the likelihood surfaces for both situations agree, and in this sense both models are equivalent. Zero-truncated count data models are used frequently in the capture-recapture setting to estimate population size, and it can be shown that the two Horvitz-Thompson estimators, associated with the two models, agree. In particular, it is possible to achieve strong results for mixtures of truncated Poisson densities, including reliable, global construction of the unique NPMLE (nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator) of the mixing distribution, implying a unique estimator for the population size. The benefit of these results lies in the fact that it is valid to work with the mixture of truncated count densities, which is less appealing for the practitioner but theoretically easier. Mixtures of truncated count densities form a convex linear model, for which a developed theory exists, including global maximum likelihood theory as well as algorithmic approaches. Once the problem has been solved in this class, it might readily be transformed back to the original problem by means of an explicitly given mapping. Applications of these ideas are given, particularly in the case of the truncated Poisson family.

  10. Simulation-Based Prediction of Equivalent Continuous Noises during Construction Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Pei, Yun

    2016-08-12

    Quantitative prediction of construction noise is crucial to evaluate construction plans to help make decisions to address noise levels. Considering limitations of existing methods for measuring or predicting the construction noise and particularly the equivalent continuous noise level over a period of time, this paper presents a discrete-event simulation method for predicting the construction noise in terms of equivalent continuous level. The noise-calculating models regarding synchronization, propagation and equivalent continuous level are presented. The simulation framework for modeling the noise-affected factors and calculating the equivalent continuous noise by incorporating the noise-calculating models into simulation strategy is proposed. An application study is presented to demonstrate and justify the proposed simulation method in predicting the equivalent continuous noise during construction. The study contributes to provision of a simulation methodology to quantitatively predict the equivalent continuous noise of construction by considering the relevant uncertainties, dynamics and interactions.

  11. Noise Equivalent Power of Graphene-Superconductor-Based Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghda, B. Afkhami; Moftakharzadeh, A.; Hosseini, M.

    In this paper, the noise equivalent power (NEP) of optical sensors based on graphene-superconductor junctions in the voltage bias operation mode has been calculated. The effects of device parameters such as temperature, magnetic field and device resistance on the NEP of these detectors have been thoroughly investigated. By solving the related equations, graphene specific heat, thermal conductivity, electron-phonon interaction and responsivity of the detector have been obtained. Using the calculated parameters, the NEP of the device was obtained. The results show that at constant magnetic field the NEP will increase linearly by increasing device temperature. On the other hand, at constant temperature the behavior of NEP versus magnetic field is first increasing and then decreasing. Our calculations show that the optimal resistance of the device has a direct relation with respect to the device temperature, while in the investigated operating range the optimal resistance of device is almost independent of the magnetic field.

  12. A practical exposure-equivalent metric for instrumentation noise in x-ray imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadava, G K; Kuhls-Gilcrist, A T; Rudin, S; Patel, V K; Hoffmann, K R; Bednarek, D R

    2008-01-01

    The performance of high-sensitivity x-ray imagers may be limited by additive instrumentation noise rather than by quantum noise when operated at the low exposure rates used in fluoroscopic procedures. The equipment-invasive instrumentation noise measures (in terms of electrons) are generally difficult to make and are potentially not as helpful in clinical practice as would be a direct radiological representation of such noise that may be determined in the field. In this work, we define a clinically relevant representation for instrumentation noise in terms of noise-equivalent detector entrance exposure, termed the instrumentation noise-equivalent exposure (INEE), which can be determined through experimental measurements of noise-variance or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The INEE was measured for various detectors, thus demonstrating its usefulness in terms of providing information about the effective operating range of the various detectors. A simulation study is presented to demonstrate the robustness of this metric against post-processing, and its dependence on inherent detector blur. These studies suggest that the INEE may be a practical gauge to determine and compare the range of quantum-limited performance for clinical x-ray detectors of different design, with the implication that detector performance at exposures below the INEE will be instrumentation-noise limited rather than quantum-noise limited

  13. A practical exposure-equivalent metric for instrumentation noise in x-ray imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, G. K.; Kuhls-Gilcrist, A. T.; Rudin, S.; Patel, V. K.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Bednarek, D. R.

    2008-09-01

    The performance of high-sensitivity x-ray imagers may be limited by additive instrumentation noise rather than by quantum noise when operated at the low exposure rates used in fluoroscopic procedures. The equipment-invasive instrumentation noise measures (in terms of electrons) are generally difficult to make and are potentially not as helpful in clinical practice as would be a direct radiological representation of such noise that may be determined in the field. In this work, we define a clinically relevant representation for instrumentation noise in terms of noise-equivalent detector entrance exposure, termed the instrumentation noise-equivalent exposure (INEE), which can be determined through experimental measurements of noise-variance or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The INEE was measured for various detectors, thus demonstrating its usefulness in terms of providing information about the effective operating range of the various detectors. A simulation study is presented to demonstrate the robustness of this metric against post-processing, and its dependence on inherent detector blur. These studies suggest that the INEE may be a practical gauge to determine and compare the range of quantum-limited performance for clinical x-ray detectors of different design, with the implication that detector performance at exposures below the INEE will be instrumentation-noise limited rather than quantum-noise limited.

  14. A practical exposure-equivalent metric for instrumentation noise in x-ray imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, G K; Kuhls-Gilcrist, A T; Rudin, S; Patel, V K; Hoffmann, K R; Bednarek, D R [Toshiba Stroke Research Center, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2008-09-21

    The performance of high-sensitivity x-ray imagers may be limited by additive instrumentation noise rather than by quantum noise when operated at the low exposure rates used in fluoroscopic procedures. The equipment-invasive instrumentation noise measures (in terms of electrons) are generally difficult to make and are potentially not as helpful in clinical practice as would be a direct radiological representation of such noise that may be determined in the field. In this work, we define a clinically relevant representation for instrumentation noise in terms of noise-equivalent detector entrance exposure, termed the instrumentation noise-equivalent exposure (INEE), which can be determined through experimental measurements of noise-variance or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The INEE was measured for various detectors, thus demonstrating its usefulness in terms of providing information about the effective operating range of the various detectors. A simulation study is presented to demonstrate the robustness of this metric against post-processing, and its dependence on inherent detector blur. These studies suggest that the INEE may be a practical gauge to determine and compare the range of quantum-limited performance for clinical x-ray detectors of different design, with the implication that detector performance at exposures below the INEE will be instrumentation-noise limited rather than quantum-noise limited.

  15. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Tissue-equivalent torso phantom for calibration of transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, A.L.; Dean, P.N.; Fisher, J.C.; Sundbeck, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Several tissue-equivalent human-torso phantoms have been constructed for the calibration of counting systems used for in-vivo measurement of transuranic radionuclides. The phantoms contain a simulated human rib cage (in some cases, real bone) and removable model organs, and they include tissue-equivalent chest plates that can be placed over the torso to simulate people with a wide range of statures. The organs included are the lungs, liver, and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Polyurethane with varying concentrations of added calcium was used to simulate the linear photon-attenuation properties of various human tissues, including lean muscle, adipose-muscle mixtures, cartilage, and bone. Foamed polyurethane was used to simulate lung tissue. Organs have been loaded with highly pure 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 241 Am, and other radionuclides of interest. The validity of the phantom as a calibration standard has been checked in separate intercomparison studies using human subjects whose lungs contained a plutonium simulant. The resulting phantom calibration factors generally compared to within +-20% of the average calibration factors obtained for the human subjects

  17. Calibration procedure for focal plane array cameras and noise equivalent material loss for quantitative thermographic NDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinetti, S.; Maldague, X. [Univ. Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada). Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept.; Prystay, M. [National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, a complete procedure is proposed for the calibration of a focal plane array in quantitative infrared nondestructive testing (NDT). This procedure includes vignetting correction and gray level conversion into temperature. A noise analysis is also presented in the context of pulsed infrared thermography applied to NDT. In this analysis, the authors introduce a new parameter, the noise equivalent material loss (NEML). The NEML is a global figure of merit which allows the comparison of different experimental set-ups for infrared pulsed thermography. Theory, experimental validation of the proposed concepts, and comparison with a few infrared scanning thermal imagers are presented as well.

  18. Atomic Faraday filter with equivalent noise bandwidth less than 1 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentile, Mark A; Whiting, Daniel J; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Hughes, Ifan G

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate an atomic bandpass optical filter with an equivalent noise bandwidth less than 1 GHz using the D1 line in a cesium vapor. We use the ElecSus computer program to find optimal experimental parameters and find that, for important quantities, the cesium D1 line clearly outperforms other alkali metals on either D-lines. The filter simultaneously achieves a peak transmission of 77%, a passband of 310 MHz, and an equivalent noise bandwidth of 0.96 GHz, for a magnetic field of 45.3 G and a temperature of 68.0°C. Experimentally, the prediction from the model is verified. The experiment and theoretical predictions show excellent agreement.

  19. Fabrication of a tissue-equivalent torso phantom for intercalibration of in-vivo transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Dean, P.N.; Anderson, A.L.; Fisher, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent human-torso phantom has been constructed for calibration of the counting systems used for in-vivo measurement of transuranic nuclides. The phantom contains a human male rib cage, removable model organs, and includes tissue-equivalent chest plates that can be placed over the torso to simulate people with a wide range of statures. The organs included are lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, and tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes. Polyurethane with different concentrations of calcium carbonate was used to simulate the linear photon-attenuation properties of various human tissues--lean muscle, adipose-muscle mixtures, and cartilage. Foamed polyurethane with calcium carbonate simulates lung tissue. Transuranic isotopes can be incorporated uniformly in the phantom's lungs and other polyurethane-based organs by dissolution of the nitrate form in acetone with lanthanum nitrate carrier. Organs have now been labelled with highly pure 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and 241 Am for calibration measurements. This phantom is the first of three that will be used in a U.S. Department of Energy program of intercomparisons involving more than ten laboratories. The results of the intercomparison will allow participating laboratories to prepare sets of transmission curves that can be used to predict the performance of their counting systems for a wide range of subject builds and organ depositions. The intercomparison will also provide valuable information on the relative performance of a variety of detector systems and counting techniques

  20. A simplified, improved method for making amplifier equivalent noise charge measurements using a new generation digitizing oscilloscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, T.

    1990-10-01

    Historically a variety of methods have been used to measure the equivalent noise charge (ENC) of amplifier/shaper systems for high energy physics. Some of these methods require several pieces of special test equipment and a fair amount of effort. The advent of digitizing oscilloscopes with statistics capabilities makes it possible to perform certain types of noise measurements accurately with very little effort. This paper describes the noise measurement method of a time invariant amplifier/shaper and of a time variant correlated sampling system, using a Tektronix DSA602 Digitizing Signal Analyzer. 4 figs

  1. A practical exposure-equivalent metric for instrumentation noise in x-ray imaging systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, G K; Kuhls-Gilcrist, A T; Rudin, S; Patel, V K; Hoffmann, K R; Bednarek, D R

    2008-01-01

    The performance of high-sensitivity x-ray imagers may be limited by additive instrumentation noise rather than by quantum noise when operated at the low exposure rates used in fluoroscopic procedures. The equipment-invasive instrumentation noise measures (in terms of electrons) are generally difficult to make and are potentially not as helpful in clinical practice as would be a direct radiological representation of such noise that may be determined in the field. In this work, we define a clin...

  2. Power distribution and substrate noise coupling investigations on the behavioral level for photon counting imaging readout circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, Jan; Abdalla, Suliman; O'Nils, Mattias; Oelmann, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    In modern mixed-signal system design, there are increasing problems associated with noise coupling caused by switching digital parts to sensitive analog parts. As a consequence, there is a growing necessity to understand these problems. In order to avoid costly design iterations, noise coupling simulations should be initiated as early as possible in the design chain. The problems associated with on-chip noise coupling have been discovered in photon counting pixel detector readout systems, where the level of integration of analog and digital circuits is very high on a very small area, and it would appear that these problems will continue to increase for future system designs in this field. This paper deals with the functionality of utilizing behavioral level models for simulating noise coupling in these readout systems. The methods and models are described and simulation results are shown for a photon counting pixel detector readout system

  3. Assessment of noise in a digital image using the join-count statistic and the Moran test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehshih Chuang; Huang, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    It is assumed that data bits of a pixel in digital images can be divided into signal and noise bits. The signal bits occupy the most significant part of the pixel. The signal parts of each pixel are correlated while the noise parts are uncorrelated. Two statistical methods, the Moran test and the join-count statistic, are used to examine the noise parts. Images from computerized tomography, magnetic resonance and computed radiography are used for the evaluation of the noise bits. A residual image is formed by subtracting the original image from its smoothed version. The noise level in the residual image is then identical to that in the original image. Both statistical tests are then performed on the bit planes of the residual image. Results show that most digital images contain only 8-9 bits of correlated information. Both methods are easy to implement and fast to perform. (author)

  4. The volumes and transcript counts of single cells reveal concentration homeostasis and capture biological noise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempe, H.; Schwabe, A.; Crémazy, F.; Verschure, P.J.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional stochasticity can be measured by counting the number of mRNA molecules per cell. Cell-to-cell variability is best captured in terms of concentration rather than molecule counts, because reaction rates depend on concentrations. We combined single-molecule mRNA counting with

  5. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannequin, Pascal Paul

    2015-06-07

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images.Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable.The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  6. Estimation of equivalent dose and its uncertainty in the OSL SAR protocol when count numbers do not follow a Poisson distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluszcz, Andrzej; Adamiec, Grzegorz; Heer, Aleksandra J.

    2015-01-01

    The current work focuses on the estimation of equivalent dose and its uncertainty using the single aliquot regenerative protocol in optically stimulated luminescence measurements. The authors show that the count numbers recorded with the use of photomultiplier tubes are well described by negative binomial distributions, different ones for background counts and photon induced counts. This fact is then exploited in pseudo-random count number generation and simulations of D e determination assuming a saturating exponential growth. A least squares fitting procedure is applied using different types of weights to determine whether the obtained D e 's and their error estimates are unbiased and accurate. A weighting procedure is suggested that leads to almost unbiased D e estimates. It is also shown that the assumption of Poisson distribution in D e estimation may lead to severe underestimation of the D e error. - Highlights: • Detailed analysis of statistics of count numbers in luminescence readers. • Generation of realistically scattered pseudo-random numbers of counts in luminescence measurements. • A practical guide for stringent analysis of D e values and errors assessment.

  7. Very High Gain and Low Noise Near Infrared Single Photon Counting Detectors and Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Amplification Technologies Inc ("ATI") proposes to develop the enabling material and device technology for the design of ultra low noise, high gain and low...

  8. A modern mathematical method for filtering noise in low count experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat Moustafa E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the proposed work, a novel application of a numerical and functional analysis based on the discrete wavelet transform is discussed. The mathematics of improving signals and removing noises are described. Results obtained show that the method used in a variety of gamma spectra is superior to other techniques.

  9. Signal-Induced Noise Effects in a Photon Counting System for Stratospheric Ozone Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Signal-induced noise (SIN) is a common effect resulting when a photomultiplier tube (PMT) is saturated, for a brief moment, with a high intensity light pulse. After the laser pulse is sent into the atmosphere a very large light return, from either the near-field or a cloud, causes the PMT to momentarily saturate. The PMT is gated off at this time so no signal is seen at the anode. When the PMT gate is turned on, the far-field light return from the atmosphere is observed. This signal is distorted, however because of the addition of SIN to the received light signal causing a slower than expected decay of the atmospheric signal return. We have characterized SIN responses to varying parameters of the incident light on the PMT. These varied parameters included incident wavelength, PMT voltage, incident intensity, and tube type. We found that only the amplitude of the SIN was effected by varying PMT voltages and light intensities. The amplitude increased linearly as input light intensity increased. Different incident wavelengths at the same intensity did not effect the amplitude or the temporal behavior of the SIN response. Finally, different PMT tubes with similar physical structures exhibited similar SIN responses although with different amplitudes. The different amplitudes can be attributed to the different gains and operating voltages of each tube. These results suggest that SIN is caused by photocathode electron dynamics such as charge accumulation on internal PMT surfaces. These surfaces then emit the electrons slowly resulting in a long decay noise signal. With the SIN responses characterized we can now try to develop a method to reduce or eliminate SIN in DIAL systems.

  10. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  11. Boltzmann-distribution-equivalent for Lévy noise and how it leads to thermodynamically consistent epicatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Nonequilibrium systems commonly exhibit Lévy noise. This means that the distribution for the size of the Brownian fluctuations has a "fat" power-law tail. Large Brownian kicks are then more common as compared to the ordinary Gaussian distribution. We consider a two-state system, i.e., two wells and a barrier in between. The barrier is sufficiently high for a barrier crossing to be a rare event. When the noise is Lévy, we do not get a Boltzmann distribution between the two wells. Instead we get a situation where the distribution between the two wells also depends on the height of the barrier that is in between. Ordinarily, a catalyst, by lowering the barrier between two states, speeds up the relaxation to an equilibrium, but does not change the equilibrium distribution. In an environment with Lévy noise, on the other hand, we have the possibility of epicatalysis, i.e., a catalyst effectively altering the distribution between two states through the changing of the barrier height. After deriving formulas to quantitatively describe this effect, we discuss how this idea may apply in nuclear reactors and in the biochemistry of a living cell.

  12. Component analysis of a new solid state x-ray image intensifier (SSXII) using photon transfer and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2009-02-01

    The SSXII is a novel x-ray imager designed to improve upon the performance limitations of conventional dynamic radiographic/fluoroscopic imagers related to resolution, charge-trapping, frame-rate, and instrumentation-noise. The SSXII consists of a CsI:Tl phosphor coupled via a fiber-optic taper (FOT) to an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD). To facilitate investigational studies, initial designs enable interchangeability of such imaging components. Measurements of various component and configuration characteristics enable an optimization analysis with respect to overall detector performance. Photon transfer was used to characterize the EMCCD performance including ADC sensitivity, read-noise, full-well capacity and quantum efficiency. X-ray sensitivity was measured using RQA x-ray spectra. Imaging components were analyzed in terms of their MTF and transmission efficiency. The EMCCD was measured to have a very low effective read-noise of less than 1 electron rms at modest EMCCD gains, which is more than two orders-ofmagnitude less than flat panel (FPD) and CMOS-based detectors. The variable signal amplification from 1 to 2000 times enables selectable sensitivities ranging from 8.5 (168) to over 15k (300k) electrons per incident x-ray photon with (without) a 4:1 FOT; these sensitivities could be readily increased with further component optimization. MTF and DQE measurements indicate the SSXII performance is comparable to current state-of-the-art detectors at low spatial frequencies and far exceeds them at higher spatial frequencies. The instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) was measured to be less than 0.3 μR out to 10 cycles/mm, which is substantially better than FPDs. Component analysis suggests that these improvements can be substantially increased with further detector optimization.

  13. Harvesting entropy and quantifying the transition from noise to chaos in a photon-counting feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerstrom, Aaron Morgan; Murphy, Thomas Edward; Roy, Rajarshi

    2015-07-28

    Many physical processes, including the intensity fluctuations of a chaotic laser, the detection of single photons, and the Brownian motion of a microscopic particle in a fluid are unpredictable, at least on long timescales. This unpredictability can be due to a variety of physical mechanisms, but it is quantified by an entropy rate. This rate, which describes how quickly a system produces new and random information, is fundamentally important in statistical mechanics and practically important for random number generation. We experimentally study entropy generation and the emergence of deterministic chaotic dynamics from discrete noise in a system that applies feedback to a weak optical signal at the single-photon level. We show that the dynamics transition from shot noise to chaos as the photon rate increases and that the entropy rate can reflect either the deterministic or noisy aspects of the system depending on the sampling rate and resolution.

  14. An investigation of the trade-off between the count level and image quality in myocardial perfusion SPECT using simulated images: the effects of statistical noise and object variability on defect detectability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xin; Links, Jonathan M; Frey, Eric C

    2010-01-01

    Quantum noise as well as anatomic and uptake variability in patient populations limits observer performance on a defect detection task in myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). The goal of this study was to investigate the relative importance of these two effects by varying acquisition time, which determines the count level, and assessing the change in performance on a myocardial perfusion (MP) defect detection task using both mathematical and human observers. We generated ten sets of projections of a simulated patient population with count levels ranging from 1/128 to around 15 times a typical clinical count level to simulate different levels of quantum noise. For the simulated population we modeled variations in patient, heart and defect size, heart orientation and shape, defect location, organ uptake ratio, etc. The projection data were reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with no compensation or with attenuation, detector response and scatter compensation (ADS). The images were then post-filtered and reoriented to generate short-axis slices. A channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was applied to the short-axis images, and the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC) was computed. For each noise level and reconstruction method, we optimized the number of iterations and cutoff frequencies of the Butterworth filter to maximize the AUC. Using the images obtained with the optimal iteration and cutoff frequency and ADS compensation, we performed human observer studies for four count levels to validate the CHO results. Both CHO and human observer studies demonstrated that observer performance was dependent on the relative magnitude of the quantum noise and the patient variation. When the count level was high, the patient variation dominated, and the AUC increased very slowly with changes in the count level for the same level of anatomic variability. When the count level was low, however, quantum noise dominated, and changes in the count level

  15. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 μm active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  16. Effect of noise stress on count, progressive and non-progressive sperm motility, body and genital organ weights of adult male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Jalali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: It was decided to investigate the effect of noise pollution on the body weight, genital organ weights, and also on sperm parameters. Setting and Design: It is a prospective study designed in vitro. Materials and Methods: A total 20 adult male wistar rats were used in this study. All rats were divided into 2 equal groups (n = 10: (1 control group and (2 experimental group. Animals of the experimental group were exposed to noise for 50 days with an intensity of 90-120 db and frequency of 300 - 350 Hz for 12 hours daily. After 50 days, at first, body weights of all animals were recorded, and then they were killed. The right epididymides were removed and also, sperm concentration and motility were determined. Each organ was weighed separately on an electronic balance. Statistical Analysis Used: Data are reported as mean ± SD and percentage. The statistical significance of difference between the control and experimental groups was determined by the unpaired t-test. Results: The weights of the testes, epididymes, seminal vesicle, ventral prostate were found to be significantly decreased in rats exposed to noise pollution when compared with the weights of the same organs obtained from control group (P < 0.05. There was a statistical difference of P < 0.05 between the 2 groups in terms of sperm concentration. Conclusions: It is concluded that noise pollution has the bad effects on sperm concentration and motility; therefore, it is supposed that homes and places of working must be build far away of noisy of factories and other places with noise.

  17. Gyrokinetic equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I; Catto, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We compare two different derivations of the gyrokinetic equation: the Hamiltonian approach in Dubin D H E et al (1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3524) and the recursive methodology in Parra F I and Catto P J (2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 065014). We prove that both approaches yield the same result at least to second order in a Larmor radius over macroscopic length expansion. There are subtle differences in the definitions of some of the functions that need to be taken into account to prove the equivalence.

  18. Counting carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  19. Seal Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Database of seal counts from aerial photography. Counts by image, site, species, and date are stored in the database along with information on entanglements and...

  20. A counting pixel chip and sensor system for X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, P.; Hausmann, J.; Helmich, A.; Lindner, M.; Wermes, N. [Universitaet Bonn (Germany). Physikalisches Institut; Blanquart, L. [CNRS, Marseille (France). Centre de Physique des Particules

    1999-08-01

    Results obtained with a (photon) counting pixel imaging chip connected to a silicon pixel sensor using the bump and flip-chip technology are presented. The performance of the chip electronics is characterized by an average equivalent noise charge (ENC) below 135 e and a threshold spread of less than 35 e after individual threshold adjust, both measured with a sensor attached. First results on the imaging performance are also reported.

  1. Equivalent magnetic noise reduction at high frequency range due to polarized direction optimization in Terfenol-D/Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} magnetoelectric laminate sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Cong, E-mail: fangcong86@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Material and Device, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Ma, Jiashuai; Yao, Meng [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Material and Device, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Di, Wenning; Lin, Di; Xu, Haiqing; Wang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Material and Device, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Luo, Haosu, E-mail: hsluo@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Material and Device, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the responsivities and output voltage noise power spectral densities of magnetoelectric (ME) laminate sensors, consisting of length magnetized Terfenol-D alloys and transverse/width poled Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} (PMNT) crystals (i.e. L-T mode and L-W mode respectively), which are directly integrated with custom-build low noise charge amplifier circuits. Both the theoretical analyses and experimental results prove that the L-W mode sensor with the optimized polarized direction of the PMNT plate possesses lower magnetic detection limit at the interested high frequency range of 10 kHz≤f≤50 kHz. The equivalent magnetic noise (EMN) of the L-W mode sensor is 0.78 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 30 kHz, which is about 1.7 times lower than the 1.35 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} for conventional L-T mode sensor. Furthermore, an effective method of using operational amplifiers with low equivalent input noise voltage and employing ME laminate composites with high voltage coefficient to reduce the EMNs of the ME laminate sensors at high frequency range has been established. - Highlights: • We present fabrications and properties of the L-T and L-T mode ME composites. • The equivalent magnetic noise levels at high frequency are measured. • The equivalent magnetic noise of the L-W mode sensor is 0.78 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 30 kHz. • The dominated noise source can be confirmed from OPA at high frequency range.

  2. A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Duncan; Lawson, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear medicine computers now commonly offer resolution recovery and other software techniques which have been developed to improve image quality for images with low counts. These techniques potentially mean that these images can give equivalent clinical information to a full-count image. Reducing the number of counts in nuclear medicine images has the benefits of either allowing reduced activity to be administered or reducing acquisition times. However, because acquisition and processing parameters vary, each user should ideally evaluate the use of images with reduced counts within their own department, and this is best done by simulating reduced-count images from the original data. Reducing the counts in an image by division and rounding off to the nearest integer value, even if additional Poisson noise is added, is inadequate because it gives incorrect counting statistics. This technical note describes how, by applying Poisson resampling to the original raw data, simulated reduced-count images can be obtained while maintaining appropriate counting statistics. The authors have developed manufacturer independent software that can retrospectively generate simulated data with reduced counts from any acquired nuclear medicine image. (note)

  3. A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Duncan; Lawson, Richard S

    2015-05-07

    Nuclear medicine computers now commonly offer resolution recovery and other software techniques which have been developed to improve image quality for images with low counts. These techniques potentially mean that these images can give equivalent clinical information to a full-count image. Reducing the number of counts in nuclear medicine images has the benefits of either allowing reduced activity to be administered or reducing acquisition times. However, because acquisition and processing parameters vary, each user should ideally evaluate the use of images with reduced counts within their own department, and this is best done by simulating reduced-count images from the original data. Reducing the counts in an image by division and rounding off to the nearest integer value, even if additional Poisson noise is added, is inadequate because it gives incorrect counting statistics. This technical note describes how, by applying Poisson resampling to the original raw data, simulated reduced-count images can be obtained while maintaining appropriate counting statistics. The authors have developed manufacturer independent software that can retrospectively generate simulated data with reduced counts from any acquired nuclear medicine image.

  4. Multiplicity Counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  5. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G. (José M. G.), 1972-; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  6. Photon counting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuby, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is a review of the various photon counting systems, used in astronomy, at optical wavelengths. Technological differences between available devices are introduced according to the processes applied to these photoelectrons (multiplication and/or acceleration), and their impact targets (phosphors, photodetectors, resistive or conductive anodes...). Two detection processes are involved: threshold discrimination above noise for most types of devices, and analog measurement for systems using resistive and wedge-and-strip anodes. Devices currently used for astronomical observations are presented, and their performance characteristics. These devices are: photomultipliers, which are monopixel detectors, using multiplication with dynodes; images intensifiers cameras, most frequently read with CCDs; analog devices with resistive or wedge-and-strip anodes, behind microchannel plates (MCP); Digicons, using direct electronic bombardment; the MAMA detector, with coincidence anodes behind MCP; and then the PAPA detector using masks encoding readout. Dead time effects, which define the dynamic range are presented with some details. Finally, because of the improvement of low level readout noise devices (CCDs), the field of application of the photon counting techniques confines to the blue and the UV part of the spectrum, at low signal to noise ratios [fr

  7. Counting Penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  8. Noise analysis of a low noise charge sensitive preamplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Liu Songqiu; Xue Zhihua; Zhao Jie

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the traditional noise model, this paper makes a quantitative noise analysis of a self-made charge sensitive pre-amplifier and compares its result with that of Pspice simulation and practical measurements. Moreover, this paper figures out the practical formulas for the spectrum of output noise, the equivalent noise charge (ENC) and its slope respectively, thus facilitating the design and improvement of pre-amplifier. (authors)

  9. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  11. Counting Possibilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tomasetta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Williamson supports the thesis that every possible entity necessarily exists and so he needs to explain how a possible son of Wittgenstein’s, for example, exists in our world:he exists as a merely possible object (MPO, a pure locus of potential. Williamson presents a short argument for the existence of MPOs: how many knives can be made by fitting together two blades and two handles? Four: at the most two are concrete objects, the others being merely possible knives and merely possible objects. This paper defends the idea that one can avoid reference and ontological commitment to MPOs. My proposal is that MPOs can be dispensed with by using the notion of rules of knife-making. I first present a solution according to which we count lists of instructions - selected by the rules - describing physical combinations between components. This account, however, has its own difficulties and I eventually suggest that one can find a way out by admitting possible worlds, entities which are more commonly accepted - at least by philosophers - than MPOs. I maintain that, in answering Williamson’s questions, we count classes of physically possible worlds in which the same instance of a general rule is applied.

  12. Adjusted Count, Complete Count, and Straight Count: Does it Matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... research output and citation impact, respectively. This paper reports on the results generated from a case study of the LIS researchers' output using three methods of publications count, namely, adjusted count (Ac), complete count (Cc) and straight count (Sc). Using data extracted from the Library, Information Science and ...

  13. Politico-economic equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime...... and a state are equivalent to another such pair if both pairs give rise to the same allocation in politico-economic equilibrium. The equivalence conditions help to identify factors that render institutional change non-neutral and to construct politico-economic equilibria in new policy regimes. We exemplify...

  14. Photon-counting image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Teranishi, Nobukazu; Theuwissen, Albert; Stoppa, David; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    The field of photon-counting image sensors is advancing rapidly with the development of various solid-state image sensor technologies including single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs) and deep-sub-electron read noise CMOS image sensor pixels. This foundational platform technology will enable opportunities for new imaging modalities and instrumentation for science and industry, as well as new consumer applications. Papers discussing various photon-counting image sensor technologies and selected new applications are presented in this all-invited Special Issue.

  15. Noise performance of microwave humidity sounders over their lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Imke; Burgdorf, Martin; John, Viju O.; Mittaz, Jonathan; Buehler, Stefan A.

    2017-12-01

    The microwave humidity sounders Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSMT-2), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) to date have been providing data records for 25 years. So far, the data records lack uncertainty information essential for constructing consistent long time data series. In this study, we assess the quality of the recorded data with respect to the uncertainty caused by noise. We calculate the noise on the raw calibration counts from the deep space views (DSVs) of the instrument and the noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT) as a measure for the radiometer sensitivity. For this purpose, we use the Allan deviation that is not biased from an underlying varying mean of the data and that has been suggested only recently for application in atmospheric remote sensing. Moreover, we use the bias function related to the Allan deviation to infer the underlying spectrum of the noise. As examples, we investigate the noise spectrum in flight for some instruments. For the assessment of the noise evolution in time, we provide a descriptive and graphical overview of the calculated NEΔT over the life span of each instrument and channel. This overview can serve as an easily accessible information for users interested in the noise performance of a specific instrument, channel and time. Within the time evolution of the noise, we identify periods of instrumental degradation, which manifest themselves in an increasing NEΔT, and periods of erratic behaviour, which show sudden increases of NEΔT interrupting the overall smooth evolution of the noise. From this assessment and subsequent exclusion of the aforementioned periods, we present a chart showing available data records with NEΔT Fidelity and Uncertainty in Climate data records from Earth Observation (FIDUCEO).

  16. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  17. Count-rate analysis from clinical scans in PET with LSO detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonutti, F.; Cattaruzzi, E.; Cragnolini, E.; Floreani, M.; Foti, C.; Malisan, M. R.; Moretti, E.; Geatti, O.; Padovani, R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of optimising the acquisition parameters in positron emission tomography is to improve the quality of the diagnostic images. Optimisation can be done by maximising the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) that in turn depends on the coincidence rate. For each bed position the scanner records coincidences and singles rates. For each patient, the true, random and scattered coincidences as functions of the single count rate(s) are determined by fitting the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) 70 cm phantom count rate curves to measured clinical points. This enables analytical calculation of the personalised PNECR [pseudo NECR(s)] curve, linked to the NECR curve. For central bed positions, missing activity of ∼70% is estimated to get maximum PNECR (PNECR max ), but the improvement in terms of signal-to-noise ratio would be ∼15%. The correlation between patient weight and PNECR max is also estimated to determine the optimal scan duration of a single bed position as a function of patient weight at the same PNEC. Normalising the counts at PNECR max for the 70 kg patient, the bed duration for a 90 kg patient should be 230 s, which is ∼30% longer. Although the analysis indicates that the fast scanner electronics allow using higher administered activities, this would involve poor improvement in terms of NECR. Instead, attending to higher bed duration for heavier patients may be more useful. (authors)

  18. [Corrected count].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-27

    The data of the 1991 census indicated that the population count of Brazil fell short of a former estimate by 3 million people. The population reached 150 million people with an annual increase of 2%, while projections in the previous decade expected an increase of 2.48% to 153 million people. This reduction indicates more widespread use of family planning (FP) and control of fertility among families of lower social status as more information is being provided to them. However, the Ministry of Health ordered an investigation of foreign family planning organizations because it was suspected that women were forced to undergo tubal ligation during vaccination campaigns. A strange alliance of left wing politicians and the Roman Catholic Church alleges a conspiracy of international FP organizations receiving foreign funds. The FP strategies of Bemfam and Pro-Pater offer women who have little alternative the opportunity to undergo tubal ligation or to receive oral contraceptives to control fertility. The ongoing government program of distributing booklets on FP is feeble and is not backed up by an education campaign. Charges of foreign interference are leveled while the government hypocritically ignores the grave problem of 4 million abortions a year. The population is expected to continue to grow until the year 2040 and then to stabilize at a low growth rate of .4%. In 1980, the number of children per woman was 4.4 whereas the 1991 census figures indicate this has dropped to 3.5. The excess population is associated with poverty and a forsaken caste in the interior. The population actually has decreased in the interior and in cities with 15,000 people. The phenomenon of the drop of fertility associated with rural exodus is contrasted with cities and villages where the population is 20% less than expected.

  19. Count-to-count time interval distribution analysis in a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro Gomez, A.

    1973-01-01

    The most important kinetic parameters have been measured at the zero power fast reactor CORAL-I by means of the reactor noise analysis in the time domain, using measurements of the count-to-count time intervals. (Author) 69 refs

  20. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Share Clean Air Act Title IV - Noise Pollution The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments added a ... abatement 7642 Authorization of appropriations What is Noise Pollution? The traditional definition of noise is “unwanted or ...

  1. Noise performance of microwave humidity sounders over their lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hans

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microwave humidity sounders Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSMT-2, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS to date have been providing data records for 25 years. So far, the data records lack uncertainty information essential for constructing consistent long time data series. In this study, we assess the quality of the recorded data with respect to the uncertainty caused by noise. We calculate the noise on the raw calibration counts from the deep space views (DSVs of the instrument and the noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT as a measure for the radiometer sensitivity. For this purpose, we use the Allan deviation that is not biased from an underlying varying mean of the data and that has been suggested only recently for application in atmospheric remote sensing. Moreover, we use the bias function related to the Allan deviation to infer the underlying spectrum of the noise. As examples, we investigate the noise spectrum in flight for some instruments. For the assessment of the noise evolution in time, we provide a descriptive and graphical overview of the calculated NEΔT over the life span of each instrument and channel. This overview can serve as an easily accessible information for users interested in the noise performance of a specific instrument, channel and time. Within the time evolution of the noise, we identify periods of instrumental degradation, which manifest themselves in an increasing NEΔT, and periods of erratic behaviour, which show sudden increases of NEΔT interrupting the overall smooth evolution of the noise. From this assessment and subsequent exclusion of the aforementioned periods, we present a chart showing available data records with NEΔT  <  1 K. Due to overlapping life spans of the instruments, these reduced data records still cover without gaps the time since 1994 and may therefore serve as a first step for constructing long time

  2. Characterization of revenue equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, B.; Müller, R.; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, R.

    2009-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called revenue equivalence. We give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The characterization holds

  3. Characterization of Revenue Equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, Birgit; Müller, Rudolf; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called \\emph{revenue equivalence}. In this paper we give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The

  4. On the operator equivalents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenet, G.; Kibler, M.

    1978-06-01

    A closed polynomial formula for the qth component of the diagonal operator equivalent of order k is derived in terms of angular momentum operators. The interest in various fields of molecular and solid state physics of using such a formula in connection with symmetry adapted operator equivalents is outlined

  5. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalized...

  6. Ensemble Equivalence for Distinguishable Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernández-Peralta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Statistics of distinguishable particles has become relevant in systems of colloidal particles and in the context of applications of statistical mechanics to complex networks. In this paper, we present evidence that a commonly used expression for the partition function of a system of distinguishable particles leads to huge fluctuations of the number of particles in the grand canonical ensemble and, consequently, to nonequivalence of statistical ensembles. We will show that the alternative definition of the partition function including, naturally, Boltzmann’s correct counting factor for distinguishable particles solves the problem and restores ensemble equivalence. Finally, we also show that this choice for the partition function does not produce any inconsistency for a system of distinguishable localized particles, where the monoparticular partition function is not extensive.

  7. Set of counts by scintillations for atmospheric samplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appriou, D.; Doury, A.

    1962-01-01

    The author reports the development of a scintillation-based counting assembly with the following characteristics: a photo-multiplier with a wide photo-cathode, a thin plastic scintillator for the counting of beta + alpha (and possibility of mounting an alpha scintillator), a relatively small own motion with respect to activities to be counted, a weakly varying efficiency. The authors discuss the counting objective, present equipment tests (counter, proportional amplifier and pre-amplifier, input drawer). They describe the apparatus operation, discuss the selection of scintillators, report the study of the own movement (electron-based background noise, total background noise, background noise reduction), discuss counts (influence of the external source, sensitivity to alpha radiations, counting homogeneity, minimum detectable activity) and efficiencies

  8. Quantum Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, C W J

    2005-01-01

    Quantum Noise is advertised as a handbook, and this is indeed how it functions for me these days: it is a book that I keep within hand's reach, ready to be consulted on the proper use of quantum stochastic methods in the course of my research on quantum dots. I should point out that quantum optics, the target field for this book, is not my field by training. So I have much to learn, and find this handbook to be a reliable and helpful guide. Crispin Gardiner previously wrote the Handbook of Stochastic Methods (also published by Springer), which provides an overview of methods in classical statistical physics. Quantum Noise, written jointly with Peter Zoller, is the counterpart for quantum statistical physics, and indeed the two books rely on each other by frequent cross referencing. The fundamental problem addressed by Quantum Noise is how the quantum dynamics of an open system can be described statistically by treating the environment as a source of noise. This is a general problem in condensed matter physics (in particular in the context of Josephson junctions) and in quantum optics. The emphasis in this book in on the optical applications (for condensed matter applications one could consult Quantum Dissipative Systems by Ulrich Weiss, published by World Scientific). The optical applications centre around the interaction of light with atoms, where the atoms represent the open system and the light is the noisy environment. A complete description of the production and detection of non-classical states of radiation (such as squeezed states) can be obtained using one of the equivalent quantum stochastic formulations: the quantum Langevin equation for the field operators (in either the Ito or the Stratonovich form), the Master equation for the density matrix, or the stochastic Schroedinger equation for the wave functions. Each formulation is fully developed here (as one would expect from a handbook), with detailed instructions on how to go from one to the other. The

  9. Maximum entropy deconvolution of low count nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, D.M.

    1998-12-01

    Maximum entropy is applied to the problem of deconvolving nuclear medicine images, with special consideration for very low count data. The physics of the formation of scintigraphic images is described, illustrating the phenomena which degrade planar estimates of the tracer distribution. Various techniques which are used to restore these images are reviewed, outlining the relative merits of each. The development and theoretical justification of maximum entropy as an image processing technique is discussed. Maximum entropy is then applied to the problem of planar deconvolution, highlighting the question of the choice of error parameters for low count data. A novel iterative version of the algorithm is suggested which allows the errors to be estimated from the predicted Poisson mean values. This method is shown to produce the exact results predicted by combining Poisson statistics and a Bayesian interpretation of the maximum entropy approach. A facility for total count preservation has also been incorporated, leading to improved quantification. In order to evaluate this iterative maximum entropy technique, two comparable methods, Wiener filtering and a novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique, were implemented. The comparison of results obtained indicated that this maximum entropy approach may produce equivalent or better measures of image quality than the compared methods, depending upon the accuracy of the system model used. The novel Bayesian maximum likelihood expectation maximisation technique was shown to be preferable over many existing maximum a posteriori methods due to its simplicity of implementation. A single parameter is required to define the Bayesian prior, which suppresses noise in the solution and may reduce the processing time substantially. Finally, maximum entropy deconvolution was applied as a pre-processing step in single photon emission computed tomography reconstruction of low count data. Higher contrast results were

  10. Combustion noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  11. Community response to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  12. Topics in orbit equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Kechris, Alexander S

    2004-01-01

    This volume provides a self-contained introduction to some topics in orbit equivalence theory, a branch of ergodic theory. The first two chapters focus on hyperfiniteness and amenability. Included here are proofs of Dye's theorem that probability measure-preserving, ergodic actions of the integers are orbit equivalent and of the theorem of Connes-Feldman-Weiss identifying amenability and hyperfiniteness for non-singular equivalence relations. The presentation here is often influenced by descriptive set theory, and Borel and generic analogs of various results are discussed. The final chapter is a detailed account of Gaboriau's recent results on the theory of costs for equivalence relations and groups and its applications to proving rigidity theorems for actions of free groups.

  13. High level white noise generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Blalock, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application

  14. Noise Pollution and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise pollution is of particular importance due to the physical and psychological effects on humans. Noise is a stressor that affects the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Noise is also a threat to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Health risks from noise are correlated with road traffic. In other words, noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. Objectives This study aims to determine the effect of noise pollution (near roadways on health issues in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, equivalent sound pressure level were measured by sound level meters TES-1353 in 75 locations around 4 roadways, which had a high load of traffic in Ahvaz City during day time. During the study, 820 measurements were recorded at measuring stations, for 7 days per week with 1-hour interval between each measurement. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS software. Results According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were 76.28 ± 3.12 dB (Mean ± SD. According to sound measurements and the survey questionnaire, noise pollution is higher than EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency and Iran standard level. Based on result of this study the worst noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality during 2012. Conclusions According to the results of this study, with increasing load of traffic, there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans to control noise pollution and prevent its effects.

  15. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  16. Count it! fun with counting and comparing

    CERN Document Server

    First, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Make math fun with Count It! Fun photographs, colorful graphics, and simple text are used to teach young readers basic math concepts. From counting groups to comparing to estimating this book will help kids develop the skills they need. A simple activity at the end of the book encourages kids to put counting and comparing to use! Aligned to Common Core standards and correlated to state standards. Sandcastle is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  17. Single-electron thermal noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori; Fujiwara, Akira

    2014-07-11

    We report the observation of thermal noise in the motion of single electrons in an ultimately small dynamic random access memory (DRAM). The nanometer-scale transistors that compose the DRAM resolve the thermal noise in single-electron motion. A complete set of fundamental tests conducted on this single-electron thermal noise shows that the noise perfectly follows all the aspects predicted by statistical mechanics, which include the occupation probability, the law of equipartition, a detailed balance, and the law of kT/C. In addition, the counting statistics on the directional motion (i.e., the current) of the single-electron thermal noise indicate that the individual electron motion follows the Poisson process, as it does in shot noise.

  18. Investigation into the origin of the noise of surface electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huigen, E.; Peper, A.; Grimbergen, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    In the recording of biomedical signals, a significant noise component is introduced by the electrode. The magnitude of this noise is considerably higher than the equivalent thermal noise from the electrode impedance. As the noise in surface electrodes limits the resolution of biopotential

  19. Dose reduction potential with photon counting computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolan; Zamyatin, Alexander; Shi, Daxin

    2012-03-01

    Electronic noise becomes a major source of signal degradation in low-dose clinical computed tomography (CT). In current clinical scanners based on energy integrating x-ray detectors, electronic noise from the readout circuits adds a noise of constant variance, which is negligible at high counts but can be significant at low count levels. On the other hand, in a photon counting detector (PCD) with pulse height discrimination capability, electronic noise has little to no impact on the measured signal. PCDs are known for their abilities to provide useful spectral information. In this work, we investigate this dose reduction to improve low-dose single-energy CT. We perform low-dose single-energy CT simulations using both energy integrating and photon counting detectors, and compare results with both analytical and iterative reconstructions (IR). The results demonstrate the dose reduction potential of PCDs in conventional low-dose single-energy CT examinations, when spectral information is not required.

  20. A comparative analysis of OTF, NPS, and DQE in energy integrating and photon counting digital x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: One of the benefits of photon counting (PC) detectors over energy integrating (EI) detectors is the absence of many additive noise sources, such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that thresholding voltage gains to detect individual x rays actually generates an unexpected source of white noise in photon counters. Methods: To distinguish the two detector types, their point spread function (PSF) is interpreted differently. The PSF of the energy integrating detector is treated as a weighting function for counting x rays, while the PSF of the photon counting detector is interpreted as a probability. Although this model ignores some subtleties of real imaging systems, such as scatter and the energy-dependent amplification of secondary quanta in indirect-converting detectors, it is useful for demonstrating fundamental differences between the two detector types. From first principles, the optical transfer function (OTF) is calculated as the continuous Fourier transform of the PSF, the noise power spectra (NPS) is determined by the discrete space Fourier transform (DSFT) of the autocovariance of signal intensity, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is found from combined knowledge of the OTF and NPS. To illustrate the calculation of the transfer functions, the PSF is modeled as the convolution of a Gaussian with the product of rect functions. The Gaussian reflects the blurring of the x-ray converter, while the rect functions model the sampling of the detector. Results: The transfer functions are first calculated assuming outside noise sources such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise are negligible. It is demonstrated that while OTF is the same for two detector types possessing an equivalent PSF, a frequency-independent (i.e., ''white'') difference in their NPS exists such that NPS PC ≥NPS EI and hence DQE PC ≤DQE EI . The necessary and sufficient condition for equality is that the PSF

  1. Electronic noise of superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Kraus, H.; Gutsche, M.; Kemmather, B.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Moessbauer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal signal to noise ratio for detectors based on superconducting tunnel junctions is calculated and compared for the cases of a detector consisting of one single tunnel junction, as well as of series and of parallel connections of such tunnel junctions. The influence of 1 / f noise and its dependence on the dynamical resistance of tunnel junctions is discussed quantitatively. A single tunnel junction yields the minimum equivalent noise charge. Such a tunnel junction exhibits the best signal to noise ratio if the signal charge is independent of detector size. In case, signal charge increases with detector size, a parallel or a series connection of tunnel junctions would provide the optimum signal to noise ratio. The equivalent noise charge and the respective signal to noise ratio are deduced as functions of tunnel junction parameters such as tunneling time, quasiparticle lifetime, etc. (orig.)

  2. How Many Equivalent Resistances?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is straightforward to construct the set of equiv- alent resistance for circuits constructed from a bunch of four or five equal resistors. But as the bunch size increases it becomes difficult to find the order of the set of equivalent resistances. Even the computer programs runs out of mem- ory. Here we present an analytical result ...

  3. How Many Equivalent Resistances?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.prenhall.com/boylestad/. [3]. Antoni Amengual, The intriguing properties of the equivalent resistances of n equal resistors combined in series and in parallel, American Journal of Physics, Vol.68, No.2, pp.175–179, 2000. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/. 10.1119/1.19396. [4]. Neil J A Sloane (Ed.), The On-Line Encyclopedia ...

  4. Radioactive waste equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    The report reviews, for the Member States of the European Community, possible situations in which an equivalence concept for radioactive waste may be used, analyses the various factors involved, and suggests guidelines for the implementation of such a concept. Only safety and technical aspects are covered. Other aspects such as commercial ones are excluded. Situations where the need for an equivalence concept has been identified are processes where impurities are added as a consequence of the treatment and conditioning process, the substitution of wastes from similar waste streams due to the treatment process, and exchange of waste belonging to different waste categories. The analysis of factors involved and possible ways for equivalence evaluation, taking into account in particular the chemical, physical and radiological characteristics of the waste package, and the potential risks of the waste form, shows that no simple all-encompassing equivalence formula may be derived. Consequently, a step-by-step approach is suggested, which avoids complex evaluations in the case of simple exchanges

  5. The principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    Principle of equivalence was the fundamental guiding principle in the formulation of the general theory of relativity. What are its key elements? What are the empirical observations which establish it? What is its relevance to some new experiments? These questions are discussed in this article. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  6. Mass Equivalent Dyads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijk, V.; Bai, Shaoping; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In this paper it is shown how a general 2-DoF dyad can be designed mass equivalent to a general (1-DoF) link element. This is useful in the synthesis of balanced mechanisms, for instance to increase or reduce the number of DoFs of a balanced mechanism maintaining its balance. Also it can be used as

  7. Correspondences. Equivalence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.M.

    1978-03-01

    We comment on sections paragraph 3 'Correspondences' and paragraph 6 'Equivalence Relations' in chapter II of 'Elements de mathematique' by N. Bourbaki in order to simplify their comprehension. Paragraph 3 exposes the ideas of a graph, correspondence and map or of function, and their composition laws. We draw attention to the following points: 1) Adopting the convention of writting from left to right, the composition law for two correspondences (A,F,B), (U,G,V) of graphs F, G is written in full generality (A,F,B)o(U,G,V) = (A,FoG,V). It is not therefore assumed that the co-domain B of the first correspondence is identical to the domain U of the second (EII.13 D.7), (1970). 2) The axiom of choice consists of creating the Hilbert terms from the only relations admitting a graph. 3) The statement of the existence theorem of a function h such that f = goh, where f and g are two given maps having the same domain (of definition), is completed if h is more precisely an injection. Paragraph 6 considers the generalisation of equality: First, by 'the equivalence relation associated with a map f of a set E identical to (x is a member of the set E and y is a member of the set E and x:f = y:f). Consequently, every relation R(x,y) which is equivalent to this is an equivalence relation in E (symmetrical, transitive, reflexive); then R admits a graph included in E x E, etc. Secondly, by means of the Hilbert term of a relation R submitted to the equivalence. In this last case, if R(x,y) is separately collectivizing in x and y, theta(x) is not the class of objects equivalent to x for R (EII.47.9), (1970). The interest of bringing together these two subjects, apart from this logical order, resides also in the fact that the theorem mentioned in 3) can be expressed by means of the equivalence relations associated with the functions f and g. The solutions of the examples proposed reveal their simplicity [fr

  8. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee, E-mail: symolloi@uci.edu [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S. [DxRay Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A{sup 109}Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm{sup 2}) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The

  9. Reticulocyte Count Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to compensate, resulting in a high reticulocyte count. Hemolytic disease of the newborn : This condition causes increased RBC destruction, similar to hemolytic anemia described above. A low reticulocyte count with ...

  10. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 115 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 3 Loading... Loading... Transcript The ...

  11. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 118 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 3 Loading... Loading... Transcript The ...

  12. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 117 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to make your opinion count. Sign in 3 Loading... Loading... Transcript The ...

  13. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  14. A Noise Removal Algorithm of Color Image

    OpenAIRE

    WANG Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm of the color image noise removal algorithm is put forward based on the pixel operations. The idea of the algorithm is to read every pixel in a set order and determine whether the pixel level is consistent with the probability density function of impulse noise or not. If it is similar to noise pixel, the number of impulse noise in a certain mask is counted. If the number is less than the given threshold, the pixel is considered as possible noise. The pixel value is not unchanged. ...

  15. From equivalence to adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Borowczyk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to illustrate in which cases the translators use the adaptation when they are confronted with a term related to sociocultural aspects. We will discuss the notions of equivalence and adaptation and their limits in the translation. Some samples from Arte TV news and from the American film Shrek translated into Polish, German and French will be provided as a support for this article.

  16. Pinned equivalence relations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, Jindřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2011), s. 559-564 ISSN 1073-2780 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902; GA MŠk MEB060909; GA MŠk MEB051006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : equivalence relations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.743, year: 2011 http://intlpress.com/site/pub/pages/journals/items/mrl/content/vols/0018/0003/a015/index.html

  17. Noise Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  18. Radiation counting statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Jee, K. Y.; Park, K. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    This report is intended to describe the statistical methods necessary to design and conduct radiation counting experiments and evaluate the data from the experiments. The methods are described for the evaluation of the stability of a counting system and the estimation of the precision of counting data by application of probability distribution models. The methods for the determination of the uncertainty of the results calculated from the number of counts, as well as various statistical methods for the reduction of counting error are also described. 11 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  19. Radiation counting statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, M. Y.; Jee, K. Y.; Park, K. K.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, W. H.

    1999-08-01

    This report is intended to describe the statistical methods necessary to design and conduct radiation counting experiments and evaluate the data from the experiment. The methods are described for the evaluation of the stability of a counting system and the estimation of the precision of counting data by application of probability distribution models. The methods for the determination of the uncertainty of the results calculated from the number of counts, as well as various statistical methods for the reduction of counting error are also described. (Author). 11 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs

  20. Comments on TNT Equivalence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, P.W.

    1994-07-01

    The term ``TNT Equivalence`` is used throughout the explosives and related industries to compare the effects of the output of a given explosive to that of TNT. This is done for technical design reasons in scaling calculation such as for the prediction of blast waves, craters, and structural response, and is also used as a basis for government regulations controlling the shipping, handling and storage of explosive materials, as well as for the siting and design of explosive facilities. TNT equivalence is determined experimentally by several different types of tests, the most common of which include: plate dent, ballistic mortar, trauzl, sand crush, and air blast. All of these tests do not necessarily measure the same output property of the sample explosive. As examples of this, some tests depend simply upon the CJ pressure, some depend upon the PV work in the CJ zone and in the Taylor wave behind the CJ plane, some are functions of the total work which includes that from secondary combustion in the air mixing region of the fireball and are acutely effected by the shape of the pressure-time profile of the wave. Some of the tests incorporate systematic errors which are not readily apparent, and which have a profound effect upon skewing the resultant data. Further, some of the tests produce different TNT Equivalents for the same explosive which are a function of the conditions at which the test is run. This paper describes the various tests used, discusses the results of each test and makes detailed commentary on what the test is actually measuring, how the results may be interpreted, and if and how these results can be predicted by first principals based calculations. Extensive data bases are referred to throughout the paper and used in examples for each point in the commentaries.

  1. Environmental Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumberg, Martin

    Environmental noise may be defined as unwanted sound that is caused by emissions from traffic (roads, air traffic corridors, and railways), industrial sites and recreational infrastructures, which may cause both annoyance and damage to health. Noise in the environment or community seriously affects people, interfering with daily activities at school, work and home and during leisure time.

  2. Equivalences of coisotropic submanifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaetz, Florian; Zambon, Marco

    We study the role that Hamiltonian and symplectic diffeomorphisms play in the deformation problem of coisotropic submanifolds. We prove that the action by Hamiltonian diffeomorphisms corresponds to the gauge-action of the $L_\\infty$-algebra of Oh and Park. Moreover we introduce the notion of exte...... of extended gauge-equivalence and show that in the case of Oh and Park's $L_\\infty$-algebra one recovers the action of symplectic isotopies on coisotropic submanifolds. Finally, we consider the transversally integrable case in detail....

  3. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continuous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalize...... for multivariate systems to an ARMAV model. The covariance equivalent model structure is also considered when the number of channels are different from the number of degrees of freedom to be modelled. Finally, it is reviewed how to estimate an ARMAV model from sampled data....

  4. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalized...... for multi-variate systems to an ARMAV model. The covariance equivalent model structure is also considered when the number of channels are different from the number of degrees offreedom to be modelled. Finally, it is reviewed how to estimate an ARMAV model from sampled data....

  5. Health Physics counting room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    The Health Physics counting room, where the quantity of induced radioactivity in materials is determined. This information is used to evaluate possible radiation hazards from the material investigated.

  6. Investigating the impact of LSO on the count rate of wholebody PET tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, J.L.; Moisan, C.; Rogers, J.G.

    1996-05-01

    We investigated the impact of using detectors made of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) on the count rate performances of wholebody PET tomographs. To that end, we used a single computational model that predicts the prompt and random contributions to the total event rate in septaless PET tomographs. Dead time factors at all stages of a typical event acquisition stream are calculated from specified values of their respective processing clock cycle. We validated our approach by fitting the true, random and multiple count rates measured with the ECAT-953B and the EXACT HR PLUS scanners for a standard 20 x 20 cm cylindrical phantom. We then investigated the implications of using position encoding detectors made of LSO in the EXACT HR PLUS scanner geometry. The results in indicate that only replacing BGO by the faster LSO incurs no appreciable change in the maximum noise-equivalent-count (NEC) rate of the scanner. However, one could realistically increase the NEC by a factor 2.5 using a 4 nsec coincidence window width with the detector processing front-end operating on a 128 nsec clock cycle. Further reducing the coincidence window width to 600 psec and the front-end clock cycle to 64 nsec leads to an increase of the NEC by a factor 7.5. To sustain the operation of an HR Plus with these specifications, the saturation bandwidth of the data acquisition system would have to be increased to no more than 4.5 MHz. (authors)

  7. A count rate model for PET and its application to an LSO HR PLUS scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisan, C.; Rogers, J.G.; Douglas, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    We present a count rate model for PET. Considering a standard 20 x 20 cm phantom in the field-of-view of a cylindrical septaless tomograph, the model computes the acceptance to prompt and random events from simple geometric considerations. Dead time factors at all stages of a typical event acquisition architecture are calculated from specified processing clock cycles. Validations of the model's predictions against the measured performances of the ECAT-953B and the EXACT HR PLUS are presented. The model is then used to investigate the benefit of using detectors made of LSO in the EXACT HR PLUS scanner geometry. The results indicate that in replacing BGO by the faster LSO, one can count on an increase of the peak noise-equivalent-count rate by a factor 2.2. This gain will be achieved by using a 5 nsec coincidence window, buckets operating on 128 nsec clock cycle, and front-end data acquisition that can sustain a total rate of 2.9 MHz. (authors)

  8. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  9. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Tingting; Chang Guoping; Clark, John W Jr; Kohlmyer, Steve; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2011-01-01

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m -2 ) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD (registered) fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better

  10. Stuttering Equivalence for Parity Games

    OpenAIRE

    Cranen, Sjoerd; Keiren, Jeroen J. A.; Willemse, Tim A. C.

    2011-01-01

    We study the process theoretic notion of stuttering equivalence in the setting of parity games. We demonstrate that stuttering equivalent vertices have the same winner in the parity game. This means that solving a parity game can be accelerated by minimising the game graph with respect to stuttering equivalence. While, at the outset, it might not be clear that this strategy should pay off, our experiments using typical verification problems illustrate that stuttering equivalence speeds up sol...

  11. Platelet Count and Plateletcrit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    strated that neonates with late onset sepsis (bacteremia after 3 days of age) had a dramatic increase in MPV and. PDW18. We hypothesize that as the MPV and PDW increase and platelet count and PCT decrease in sick children, intui- tively, the ratio of MPV to PCT; MPV to Platelet count,. PDW to PCT, PDW to platelet ...

  12. T-cell count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... count URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003516.htm T-cell count To use the sharing features on this ... as hepatitis or mononucleosis Lower than normal T-cell levels may be due to: Acute viral infections Aging Cancer Immune system diseases, such as HIV/AIDS ...

  13. EcoCount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip P. Allen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Techniques that analyze biological remains from sediment sequences for environmental reconstructions are well established and widely used. Yet, identifying, counting, and recording biological evidence such as pollen grains remain a highly skilled, demanding, and time-consuming task. Standard procedure requires the classification and recording of between 300 and 500 pollen grains from each representative sample. Recording the data from a pollen count requires significant effort and focused resources from the palynologist. However, when an adaptation to the recording procedure is utilized, efficiency and time economy improve. We describe EcoCount, which represents a development in environmental data recording procedure. EcoCount is a voice activated fully customizable digital count sheet that allows the investigator to continuously interact with a field of view during the data recording. Continuous viewing allows the palynologist the opportunity to remain engaged with the essential task, identification, for longer, making pollen counting more efficient and economical. EcoCount is a versatile software package that can be used to record a variety of environmental evidence and can be installed onto different computer platforms, making the adoption by users and laboratories simple and inexpensive. The user-friendly format of EcoCount allows any novice to be competent and functional in a very short time.

  14. Imaging by photon counting with 256 x 256 pixel matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Tlustos, Lukas; Heijne, Erik H M; Llopart-Cudie, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Using 0.25 mum standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256 multiplied by 256 square 55mum pixels intended for X- ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise similar to 150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3 multiplied by 10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13- bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of similar to 300 mus could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to t...

  15. Neutron event counting circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, B.J.; Maitis, W.

    1986-01-01

    A circuit is described for counting particles emitted by a particle-emitting material. The circuit consists of: means responsive to emitted particles for generating sensed particle pulses; first counting means for counting the sensed particle pulses; means responsive to the sensed particle pulses for generating window pulses, the window pulse generating means being further operative to generate window pulse of predetermined maximum time duration in response to each sensed particle pulse which occurs during the interval of a previously generated window pulse; means for generating a second pulse in response to each sensed particle pulse occurring during the interval of a previously generated window pulse; and second counting means for counting the second pulses

  16. Applied carbohydrate counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lovely; Khandelwal, Deepak; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-09-01

    Carbohydrate counting or "carb counting" is a meal planning technique for persons with diabetes for managing blood glucose levels by tracking the grams of carbohydrate consumed at meals. With better patient education and awareness, carb counting has become an important step in diabetes management. People with all types of diabetes can be benefited with this approach via improved glycaemic control and quality of life. In the first part of this review basic principles of carbohydrate counting, its application in clinical practice and exchange lists pertaining primarily to South Asian populations have been discussed. Advanced carb counting involving equations which help in better understanding of insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio and insulin dose adjustment are also included in this review.

  17. New recommendations for dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    In its report 39, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), has defined four new quantities for the determination of dose equivalents from external sources: the ambient dose equivalent, the directional dose equivalent, the individual dose equivalent, penetrating and the individual dose equivalent, superficial. The rationale behind these concepts and their practical application are discussed. Reference is made to numerical values of these quantities which will be the subject of a coming publication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP. (Author)

  18. Drone noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Charles; Sirohi, Jayant; University of Texas at Austin Team

    2017-11-01

    A basic understanding of the noise produced by single and multirotor drones operating at static thrust conditions is presented. This work acts as an extension to previous efforts conducted at The University of Texas at Austin (Tinney et al. 2017, AHS Forum 73). Propeller diameters ranging from 8 inch to 12 inch are examined for configurations comprising an isolated rotor, a quadcopter configuration and a hexacopter configuration, and with a constant drone pitch of 2.25. An azimuthal array of half-inch microphones, placed between 2 and 3 hub-center diameters from the drone center, are used to assess the acoustic near-field. Thrust levels, acquired using a six degree-of-freedom load cell, are then used to correlate acoustic noise levels to aerodynamic performance for each drone configuration. The findings reveal a nearly logarithmic increase in noise with increasing thrust. However, for the same thrust condition, considerable noise reduction is achieved by increasing the number of propeller blades thereby reducing the blade passage frequency and both the thickness and loading noise sources that accompany it.

  19. Uncorrelated Noise in Turbulence Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    of atmospheric variability. The authors assume that the measured signal is a representation of a variable that is continuous on the scale of interest in the atmosphere. Uncorrelated noise affects the autovariance function (or, equivalently, the structure function) only between zero and the first lag, while its...... effect is smeared across the entire power spectrum. For this reason, quantities such as variance dissipation may be more conveniently estimated from the structure function than from the spectrum. The modeling results are confirmed by artificially modifying a test time series with Poisson noise...

  20. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find ...

  1. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 64K ...

  2. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  3. Allegheny County Traffic Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Traffic sensors at over 1,200 locations in Allegheny County collect vehicle counts for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Data included in the Health...

  4. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed ...

  5. Analog multivariate counting analyzers

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitin, A V; Armstrong, T P

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing rates of occurrence of various features of a signal is of great importance in numerous types of physical measurements. Such signal features can be defined as certain discrete coincidence events, e.g. crossings of a signal with a given threshold, or occurrence of extrema of a certain amplitude. We describe measuring rates of such events by means of analog multivariate counting analyzers. Given a continuous scalar or multicomponent (vector) input signal, an analog counting analyzer outputs a continuous signal with the instantaneous magnitude equal to the rate of occurrence of certain coincidence events. The analog nature of the proposed analyzers allows us to reformulate many problems of the traditional counting measurements, and cast them in a form which is readily addressed by methods of differential calculus rather than by algebraic or logical means of digital signal processing. Analog counting analyzers can be easily implemented in discrete or integrated electronic circuits, do not suffer fro...

  6. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Ditch the ads. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ... Sign in Share More Report Need to report the video? Sign in to report inappropriate content. Sign ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... out why Close Clean Hands Count Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Loading... Unsubscribe from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe ...

  8. Equivalence principle and gravitational redshift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensee, Michael A; Chu, Steven; Peters, Achim; Müller, Holger

    2011-04-15

    We investigate leading order deviations from general relativity that violate the Einstein equivalence principle in the gravitational standard model extension. We show that redshift experiments based on matter waves and clock comparisons are equivalent to one another. Consideration of torsion balance tests, along with matter-wave, microwave, optical, and Mössbauer clock tests, yields comprehensive limits on spin-independent Einstein equivalence principle-violating standard model extension terms at the 10(-6) level.

  9. Testing statistical hypotheses of equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Wellek, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Equivalence testing has grown significantly in importance over the last two decades, especially as its relevance to a variety of applications has become understood. Yet published work on the general methodology remains scattered in specialists' journals, and for the most part, it focuses on the relatively narrow topic of bioequivalence assessment.With a far broader perspective, Testing Statistical Hypotheses of Equivalence provides the first comprehensive treatment of statistical equivalence testing. The author addresses a spectrum of specific, two-sided equivalence testing problems, from the

  10. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-03-21

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  11. Counting bacteria on a microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongxin; Zhang, Hongpeng; Chon, Chan Hee; Chen, Shu; Pan, Xinxiang; Li, Dongqing

    2010-11-29

    This paper reports a lab-on-a-chip device that counts the number of bacteria flowing through a microchannel. The bacteria number counting is realized by a microfluidic differential Resistive Pulse Sensor (RPS). By using a single microfluidic channel with two detecting arm channels placed at the two ends of the sensing section, the microfluidic differential RPS can achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio. This method is applied to detect and count bacteria in aqueous solution. The detected RPS signals amplitude for Pseudomonas aeruginosa ranges from 0.05 V to 0.17 V and the signal-to-noise ratio is 5-17. The number rate of the bacteria flowing through the sensing gate per minute is a linear function of the sample concentration. Using this experimentally obtained correlation curve, the concentration of bacteria in the sample solution can be evaluated within several minutes by measuring the number rate of the bacteria flowing through the sensing gate of this microfluidic differential RPS chip. The method described in this paper is simple and automatic, and have wide applications in determining the bacteria and cell concentrations for microbiological and other biological applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Noise reduction in photon counting by exploiting spatial correlations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina Jr., J.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 044018. ISSN 2331-7019 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : parametric down-conversion * quantum imaging applications * coherence properties Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 4.808, year: 2016

  13. Unitary equivalence of quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Sandeep K.; Konrad, Thomas; Diósi, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We have found unitary equivalent classes in coined quantum walks. • A single parameter family of coin operators is sufficient to realize all simple one-dimensional quantum walks. • Electric quantum walks are unitarily equivalent to time dependent quantum walks. - Abstract: A simple coined quantum walk in one dimension can be characterized by a SU(2) operator with three parameters which represents the coin toss. However, different such coin toss operators lead to equivalent dynamics of the quantum walker. In this manuscript we present the unitary equivalence classes of quantum walks and show that all the nonequivalent quantum walks can be distinguished by a single parameter. Moreover, we argue that the electric quantum walks are equivalent to quantum walks with time dependent coin toss operator

  14. Alpha scintillation radon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Radon counting chambers which utilize the alpha-scintillation properties of silver activated zinc sulfide are simple to construct, have a high efficiency, and, with proper design, may be relatively insensitive to variations in the pressure or purity of the counter filling. Chambers which were constructed from glass, metal, or plastic in a wide variety of shapes and sizes were evaluated for the accuracy and the precision of the radon counting. The principles affecting the alpha-scintillation radon counting chamber design and an analytic system suitable for a large scale study of the 222 Rn and 226 Ra content of either air or other environmental samples are described. Particular note is taken of those factors which affect the accuracy and the precision of the method for monitoring radioactivity around uranium mines

  15. Principles of correlation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of the various applications which have been made of correlation techniques in the field of nuclear physics, in particular for absolute counting. Whereas in most cases the usual coincidence method will be preferable for its simplicity, correlation counting may be the only possible approach in such cases where the two radiations of the cascade cannot be well separated or when there is a longliving intermediate state. The measurement of half-lives and of count rates of spurious pulses is also briefly discussed. The various experimental situations lead to different ways the correlation method is best applied (covariance technique with one or with two detectors, application of correlation functions, etc.). Formulae are given for some simple model cases, neglecting dead-time corrections

  16. Noise study in laboratories with exhaust fans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, G.H.; Hashmi, R.; Shareef, A.

    2005-01-01

    Noise study has been carried out in 25 laboratories fitted with exhaust fans. We have studied A- Weighted equivalent sound pressure levels (dB(A) LAeJ and equivalent octave band sound pressure levels (dB L/sub eq/ in each of the laboratories surveyed. The data collected has been analyzed for Preferred Speech Interference Levels (PSIL). The results show that the interior noise levels in these laboratories vary from 59.6 to 72.2 dB(A) L/sub Aeq/, which are very high and much beyond the interior noise limits recommended for laboratories. Some ways and means to limit emission of high-level noise from exhaust fans are also discussed. (author)

  17. Computerized radioautographic grain counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKanna, J.A.; Casagrande, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, radiolabeling techniques have become fundamental assays in physiology and biochemistry experiments. They also have assumed increasingly important roles in morphologic studies. Characteristically, radioautographic analysis of structure has been qualitative rather than quantitative, however, microcomputers have opened the door to several methods for quantifying grain counts and density. The overall goal of this chapter is to describe grain counting using the Bioquant, an image analysis package based originally on the Apple II+, and now available for several popular microcomputers. The authors discuss their image analysis procedures by applying them to a study of development in the central nervous system

  18. Rainflow counting revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeker, H. [Deutsches Windenergie-Institut (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    As state of the art method the rainflow counting technique is presently applied everywhere in fatigue analysis. However, the author feels that the potential of the technique is not fully recognized in wind energy industries as it is used, most of the times, as a mere data reduction technique disregarding some of the inherent information of the rainflow counting results. The ideas described in the following aim at exploitation of this information and making it available for use in the design and verification process. (au)

  19. Mean and quasideterministic equivalence for linear stochastic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, F B; Ryan, D

    1989-03-01

    In linear, stochastic dynamics it is shown that the quasideterministic population size is equivalent to the mean population size. The quasideterministic dynamics are defined by the conditional infinitesimal mean of the process. The stochastic component of the dynamics includes both Gaussian and Poisson white noise, with amplitude coefficients proportional to the population size. Generalizations are given for nonautonomous coefficients and for distributed Poisson jump amplitudes. A counter example--an exactly integrable nonlinear jump model--shows that the equivalence result does not hold for nonlinear stochastic dynamics.

  20. System for the suppression of noise and of noise fluctuations: extraction of a net signal from another one containing frequencies of noise and discontinuous signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambaut, M.

    1989-01-01

    A patent is claimed for an invention relating to a system for the suppression of noise and noise fluctuations. The aim of the system is the detection of the signal contained in noise-and-discontinuous signal mixed frequencies. The invention is to be applied in radiation detection. The results of the measurements are reliable for short counting rates, as compared with the time constant of the background noise fluctuations, and for measurements performed in regions having the same background noise average. The diagram, the characteristics and the operation of the invention are described [fr

  1. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    realistic and complex three-dimensional bathymetry. This is achieved by using a parabolic equation [PE) propagation model and the reciprocity principle...explain the horizontal noise directionality observed in the Tonga Trench [Barclay, 2014], which was found not to be a 3D effect, but rather due to...modeled noise arriving on the axis of the canyon has significantly perturbed zero-crossings when compared to the equivalent Nx2D result. Theoretical

  2. Occupational Noise Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety and Health Topics / Occupational Noise Exposure Occupational Noise Exposure This page requires that javascript be enabled ... interprets the signal as sound. x What is noise? Noise and vibration are both fluctuations in the ...

  3. ERICA: an energy resolving photon counting readout ASIC for X-ray in-line cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Montero, J.-G.; Sarraj, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Moore, T.; Casanova, R.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Prats, X.; Kolstein, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present ERICA (Energy Resolving Inline X-ray Camera) a photon-counting readout ASIC, with 6 energy bins. The ASIC is composed of a matrix of 8 × 20 pixels controlled by a global digital controller and biased with 7 independent digital to analog converters (DACs) and a band-gap current reference. The pixel analog front-end includes a charge sensitive amplifier with 16 mV/ke- gain and dynamic range of 45 ke-. ERICA has programmable pulse width, an adjustable constant current feedback resistor, a linear test pulse generator, and six discriminators with 6-bit local threshold adjustment. The pixel digital back-end includes the digital controller, 8 counters of 8-bit depth, half-full buffer flag for any of the 8 counters, a 74-bit shadow/shift register, a 74-bit configuration latch, and charge sharing compensation processing to perform the energy classification and counting operations of every detected photon in 1 μ s. The pixel size is 330 μm × 330 μm and its average consumption is 150 μW. Implemented in TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, the ASIC pixel's equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 90 e- RMS connected to a 1 mm thickness matching CdTe detector biased at -300 V with a total leakage current of 20 nA.

  4. Noise induced phenomena in combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongliang

    Quantitative models of combustion usually consist of systems of deterministic differential equations. However, there are reasons to suspect that noise may have a significant influence. In this thesis, our primary objective is to study the effect of noise on measurable quantities in the combustion process. Our first study involves combustion in a homogeneous gas. With a one step reaction model, we analytically estimate the requirements under which noise is important to create significant differences. Our simulation shows that a bi-modality phenomenon appears when appropriate parameters are applied, which agrees with our analytical result. Our second study involves steady planar flames. We use a relatively complete chemical model of the H2/air reaction system, which contains all eight reactive species (H2, O2, H, O, OH, H2O, HO2, H2O2) and N2. Our mathematical model for this system is a reacting flow model. We derive noise terms related to transport processes by a method advocated by Landau & Lifshitz, and we also derive noise terms related to chemical reactions. We develop a code to simulate this system. The numerical implementation relies on a good Riemann solver, suitable initial and boundary conditions, and so on. We also implement a code on a continuation method, which not only can be used to study approximate properties of laminar flames under deterministic governing equations, but also eliminates the difficulty of providing a suitable initial condition for governing equations with noise. With numerical experiments, we find the difference of flame speed exist when the noise is turned on or off although it is small when compared with the influence of other parameters, for example, the equivalence ratio. It will be a starting point for further studies to include noise in combustion.

  5. Noise of Embedded High Aspect Ratio Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2011-01-01

    A family of high aspect ratio nozzles were designed to provide a parametric database of canonical embedded propulsion concepts. Nozzle throat geometries with aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were chosen, all with convergent nozzle areas. The transition from the typical round duct to the rectangular nozzle was designed very carefully to produce a flow at the nozzle exit that was uniform and free from swirl. Once the basic rectangular nozzles were designed, external features common to embedded propulsion systems were added: extended lower lip (a.k.a. bevel, aft deck), differing sidewalls, and chevrons. For the latter detailed Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were made to predict the thrust performance and to optimize parameters such as bevel length, and chevron penetration and azimuthal curvature. Seventeen of these nozzles were fabricated at a scale providing a 2.13 inch diameter equivalent area throat." ! The seventeen nozzles were tested for far-field noise and a few data were presented here on the effect of aspect ratio, bevel length, and chevron count and penetration. The sound field of the 2:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet was very nearly axisymmetric, but the 4:1 and 8:1 were not, the noise on their minor axes being louder than the major axes. Adding bevel length increased the noise of these nozzles, especially on their minor axes, both toward the long and short sides of the beveled nozzle. Chevrons were only added to the 2:1 rectangular jet. Adding 4 chevrons per wide side produced some decrease at aft angles, but increased the high frequency noise at right angles to the jet flow. This trend increased with increasing chevron penetration. Doubling the number of chevrons while maintaining their penetration decreased these effects. Empirical models of the parametric effect of these nozzles were constructed and quantify the trends stated above." Because it is the objective of the Supersonics Project that

  6. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 414 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 319 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 410,052 ...

  8. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to make your opinion count. Sign in 117 2 Don't like this video? Sign in to ... Duration: 4:50. Saskatchewan Health Authority - Saskatoon area 2,010,512 views 4:50 Handwashing Gangnam Style - ...

  9. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Ditch the ads. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 671 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  10. What Counts as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  11. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 396 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  12. What Counts as Prostitution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P. Green

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available What counts, or should count, as prostitution? In the criminal law today, prostitution is understood to involve the provision of sexual services in exchange for money or other benefits. But what exactly is a ‘sexual service’? And what exactly is the nature of the required ‘exchange’? The key to answering these questions is to recognize that how we choose to define prostitution will inevitably depend on why we believe one or more aspects of prostitution are wrong or harmful, or should be criminalized or otherwise deterred, in the first place. These judgements, in turn, will often depend on an assessment of the contested empirical evidence on which they rest. This article describes a variety of real-world contexts in which the ‘what counts as prostitution’ question has arisen, surveys a range of leading rationales for deterring prostitution, and demonstrates how the answer to the definition question depends on the answer to the normative question. The article concludes with some preliminary thoughts on how analogous questions about what should count as sexual conduct arise in the context of consensual offences such as adultery and incest, as well as non-consensual offences such as sexual assault.

  13. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 741 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 410,052 ...

  14. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

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  15. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 460 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  16. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 269 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  17. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 384 views 1:19 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  18. Detection and counting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, M.A.N. de

    1976-01-01

    Detection devices based on gaseous ionization are analysed, such as: electroscopes ionization chambers, proportional counters and Geiger-Mueller counters. Scintillation methods are also commented. A revision of the basic concepts in electronics is done and the main equipment for counting is detailed. In the study of gama spectrometry, scintillation and semiconductor detectors are analysed [pt

  19. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 824 views 1:36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 409,492 ...

  20. Calorie count - fast food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Calorie count - fast food URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/ ...

  1. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Ditch the ads. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 931 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 552 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  3. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  4. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swansen, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a high speed circuit for accurate neutron coincidence counting comprising: neutron detecting means for providing an above-threshold signal upon neutron detection; amplifying means inputted by the neutron detecting means for providing a pulse output having a pulse width of about 0.5 microseconds upon the input of each above threshold signal; digital processing means inputted by the pulse output of the amplifying means for generating a pulse responsive to each input pulse from the amplifying means and having a pulse width of about 50 nanoseconds effective for processing an expected neutron event rate of about 1 Mpps: pulse stretching means inputted by the digital processing means for producing a pulse having a pulse width of several milliseconds for each pulse received form the digital processing means; visual indicating means inputted by the pulse stretching means for producing a visual output for each pulse received from the digital processing means; and derandomizing means effective to receive the 50 ns neutron event pulses from the digital processing means for storage at a rate up to the neutron event rate of 1 Mpps and having first counter means for storing the input neutron event pulses

  5. Statistical data filtration in neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddingfield, D.H.; Menlove, H.O.

    1992-11-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of statistical data filtration to minimize the contribution of matrix materials in 200-ell drums to the nondestructive assay of plutonium. Those matrices were examined: polyethylene, concrete, aluminum, iron, cadmium, and lead. Statistical filtration of neutron coincidence data improved the low-end sensitivity of coincidence counters. Spurious data arising from electrical noise, matrix spallation, and geometric effects were smoothed in a predictable fashion by the statistical filter. The filter effectively lowers the minimum detectable mass limit that can be achieved for plutonium assay using passive neutron coincidence counting

  6. Yesterday's noise - today's signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdula, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Plant performance can be improved by noise analysis. This paper describes noise characteristics, imposed noise and response functions, a case history of cost benefits derived from application of noise analysis techniques, areas for application of noise analysis techniques with special reference to the Gentilly-1 nuclear generating station, and the validity of noise measurement results. (E.C.B.)

  7. Noise Abatement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  8. Statistical Methods for Unusual Count Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guthrie, Katherine A.; Gammill, Hilary S.; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    microchimerism data present challenges for statistical analysis, including a skewed distribution, excess zero values, and occasional large values. Methods for comparing microchimerism levels across groups while controlling for covariates are not well established. We compared statistical models for quantitative...... microchimerism values, applied to simulated data sets and 2 observed data sets, to make recommendations for analytic practice. Modeling the level of quantitative microchimerism as a rate via Poisson or negative binomial model with the rate of detection defined as a count of microchimerism genome equivalents per...... total cell equivalents tested utilizes all available data and facilitates a comparison of rates between groups. We found that both the marginalized zero-inflated Poisson model and the negative binomial model can provide unbiased and consistent estimates of the overall association of exposure or study...

  9. The right to count does not always count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The best prescription against illness is learning to read and to count. People who are unable to count have a harder time learning to read. People who have difficulty counting make poorer decisions, are less able to combine information and are less likely to have a strategy for life......The best prescription against illness is learning to read and to count. People who are unable to count have a harder time learning to read. People who have difficulty counting make poorer decisions, are less able to combine information and are less likely to have a strategy for life...

  10. Six billion and counting

    OpenAIRE

    Leisinger, Klaus M.; Schmitt, Karin M.; Pandya-Lorch, Rajul

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 global population surpassed 6 billion people, and this number rises by about 70-80 million people each year. "Six Billion and Counting" examines the consequences of continuing population growth for the world's resource systems and for national and global food security. Leisinger, Schmitt, and Pandya-Lorch offer here a sober analysis of a complex and alarming situation. They assess the progress the world has made in controlling population growth and point to the areas where future diff...

  11. Fragments of approximate counting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buss, S.R.; Kolodziejczyk, L. A.; Thapen, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 2 (2014), s. 496-525 ISSN 0022-4812 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : approximate counting * bounded arithmetic * ordering principle Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.541, year: 2014 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9287274&fileId=S0022481213000376

  12. Counting conformal correlators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Petr; Simmons-Duffin, David

    2018-02-01

    We introduce simple group-theoretic techniques for classifying conformallyinvariant tensor structures. With them, we classify tensor structures of general n-point functions of non-conserved operators, and n ≥ 4-point functions of general conserved currents, with or without permutation symmetries, and in any spacetime dimension d. Our techniques are useful for bootstrap applications. The rules we derive simultaneously count tensor structures for flat-space scattering amplitudes in d + 1 dimensions.

  13. Urban Noise Modelling in Boka Kotorska Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Nikolić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traffic is the most significant noise source in urban areas. The village of Kamenari in Boka Kotorska Bay is a site where, in a relatively small area, road traffic and sea (ferry traffic take place at the same time. Due to the specificity of the location, i.e. very rare synergy of sound effects of road and sea traffic in the urban area, as well as the expressed need for assessment of noise level in a simple and quick way, a research was conducted, using empirical methods and statistical analysis methods, which led to the creation of acoustic model for the assessment of equivalent noise level (Leq. The developed model for noise assessment in the Village of Kamenari in Boka Kotorska Bay quite realistically provides data on possible noise levels at the observed site, with very little deviations in relation to empirically obtained values.

  14. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua [Center for Quantum Information and Control, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Caves, Carlton M. [Center for Quantum Information and Control, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA and Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2014-12-04

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  15. Characterization of noise in different industrial workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Aldina; Lopes, Miguel; de Almeida, M. Fátima

    2017-11-01

    The damage caused by noise in workers' health is well known. The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work presented in 2005 a summary of main effects of workplace noise, defining the loss of hearing as the principal effect of noise exposure, however, it can also exacerbate stress and increase the risk of accidents. The problem to be addressed is this work is about noise analysis, performed under the PREVENIR program. The data was collected in industrial workplaces from 280 Portuguese industrial companies distributed by different sectors. The program was implemented between 2005 and 2011. The aim of this work is identify differences of intensity of noise exposure between these industrial sectors in different workplaces, using inference techniques. The existence of significance differences between average levels of Equivalent Sound Level (LAeq,TdB(A)) are verified using ANOVA.

  16. Studying the noise parameters of thin-film silicon resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belogurov, S.V.; Gostilo, V.V.; Yurov, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The results of studies on spectral density and energy noise equivalent of thin-film resistors on the base of amorphous silicon and KIM and KVM commercial high-ohmic resistors are presented. Dependence of the active part of impedance on frequency is shown to be the main source of redundant noise in resistors. Dependence of spectral density of noise voltage of current noises of silicon resistors on applied voltage is described by the formula S T =B V 2 /f 1.6 with the values B=(1.4-1.7)x10 -12 Hz 0.6 . As to noise parameters the silicon resistor is superior to commercial resistors

  17. Noise thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Brixy, H.; Kakuta, Tsunemi.

    1996-03-01

    The noise thermometry (NT) is a temperature measuring method by which the absolute temperature measurement can be performed with a very high accuracy and without any influence of ambient environments and of the thermal history of its NT sensor (electric resistor). Hence it is quite suitable for application as a standard thermometry to the in-situ temperature calibration of incore thermocouples. The KFA Juelich had played a pioneering role in the development of NT and applied the results successfully to the AVR for testing its feasibility. In this report, all about the NT including its principle, sensor elements and system configurations are presented together with the experiences in the AVR and the results of investigation to apply it to high temperature measurement. The NT can be adopted as a standard method for incore temperature measurement and in situ temperature calibration in the HTTR. (author). 85 refs

  18. Noise thermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Brixy, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1996-03-01

    The noise thermometry (NT) is a temperature measuring method by which the absolute temperature measurement can be performed with a very high accuracy and without any influence of ambient environments and of the thermal history of its NT sensor (electric resistor). Hence it is quite suitable for application as a standard thermometry to the in-situ temperature calibration of incore thermocouples. The KFA Juelich had played a pioneering role in the development of NT and applied the results successfully to the AVR for testing its feasibility. In this report, all about the NT including its principle, sensor elements and system configurations are presented together with the experiences in the AVR and the results of investigation to apply it to high temperature measurement. The NT can be adopted as a standard method for incore temperature measurement and in situ temperature calibration in the HTTR. (author). 85 refs.

  19. Matching of equivalent field regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Rengarajan, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    In aperture problems, integral equations for equivalent currents are often found by enforcing matching of equivalent fields. The enforcement is made in the aperture surface region adjoining the two volumes on each side of the aperture. In the case of an aperture in a planar perfectly conducting...... screen, having the same homogeneous medium on both sides and an impressed current on one aide, an alternative procedure is relevant. We make use of the fact that in the aperture the tangential component of the magnetic field due to the induced currents in the screen is zero. The use of such a procedure...... shows that equivalent currents can be found by a consideration of only one of the two volumes into which the aperture plane divides the space. Furthermore, from a consideration of an automatic matching at the aperture, additional information about tangential as well as normal field components...

  20. Equivalent linearization of nonlinear forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guang; Xue, Zhongqing

    1987-07-01

    A method used for equivalent linearization of the two orthogonal squeeze-film forces is extended here to the general case of n degrees of freedom and n components of nonlinear forces, and the expressions for equivalent linear coefficients are derived. Nonlinear forces can be linearized by the methods of Fourier expansion, active and reactive powers, or mean-square error. The n components of nonlinear forces can all be expressed formally as the sum of an average force, a linear spring force, and a linear damping force. This paper also gives a flow chart for calculating the steady-state responses of a nonlinear system with many degrees of freedom, using the method of equivalent linearization. The resulting saving in computation time is demonstrated by a numerical example of a flexible rotor-bearing system with a noncentralized squeeze-film damper.

  1. Shot-noise in resistive-diode mixers and the attenuator noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    The representation of a pumped exponential diode, operating as a mixer, by an equivalent lossy network, is reexamined. It is shown that the model is correct provided the network has ports for all sideband frequencies at which (real) power flow can occur between the diode and its embedding. The temperature of the equivalent network is eta/2 times the physical temperature of the diode. The model is valid only if the series resistance and nonlinear capacitance of the diode are negligible. Expressions are derived for the input and output noise temperature and the noise-temperature ratio of ideal mixers. Some common beliefs concerning noise-figure and noise-temperature ratio are shown to be incorrect.

  2. Noise analysis for CCD-based ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John J; Hodgkinson, Jane; Saffell, John R; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-09-20

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of the noise behavior of two CCD spectrometers in common use, an AvaSpec-3648 CCD UV spectrometer and an Ocean Optics S2000 Vis spectrometer. Light sources used include a deuterium UV/Vis lamp and UV and visible LEDs. Common noise phenomena include source fluctuation noise, photoresponse nonuniformity, dark current noise, fixed pattern noise, and read noise. These were identified and characterized by varying light source, spectrometer settings, or temperature. A number of noise-limiting techniques are proposed, demonstrating a best-case spectroscopic noise equivalent absorbance of 3.5×10(-4)  AU for the AvaSpec-3648 and 5.6×10(-4)  AU for the Ocean Optics S2000 over a 30 s integration period. These techniques can be used on other CCD spectrometers to optimize performance.

  3. Attainment of radiation equivalency principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmelev, A.N.; Apseh, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Problems connected with the prospects for long-term development of the nuclear energetics are discussed. Basic principles of the future large-scale nuclear energetics are listed, primary attention is the safety of radioactive waste management of nuclear energetics. The radiation equivalence principle means close of fuel cycle and management of nuclear materials transportation with low losses on spent fuel and waste processing. Two aspects are considered: radiation equivalence in global and local aspects. The necessity of looking for other strategies of fuel cycle management in full-scale nuclear energy on radioactive waste management is supported [ru

  4. Noise exposure limits for hyperbaric conditions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howie, R.; Gardiner, J. [University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). National Hyperbaric Centre; Watt, S. [University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Medicine

    1998-05-01

    The sound pressure level (SPL) defined in the UK Control of Noise at Work Regulations as action levels designed to reduce the risk of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) cannot be applied in hyperbaric conditions since the physics of sound and the physiology of sound perception are altered. This study aimed to find a method of assessment of noise levels in hyperbaric conditions which would allow an equivalent degree of hazard control to be applied at pressure in air or heliox. (author)

  5. Noise in restaurants: levels and mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Wai Ming; Chung, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (L(eq,1-h)) was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  6. Noise in restaurants: Levels and mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Ming To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (Leq,1-h was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  7. Comments on field equivalence principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1987-01-01

    It is pointed Out that often-used arguments based on a short-circuit concept in presentations of field equivalence principles are not correct. An alternative presentation based on the uniqueness theorem is given. It does not contradict the results obtained by using the short-circuit concept...

  8. On the Einstein equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Einstein equivalence principle, the cornerstone of our present day understanding of gravity, is used to explore a deeper connection between the deflection of starlight by a spinning object and the Lense-Thirring dragging of inertial frames. It is also noted that experiment has not established that the gravitomagnetic coupling to currents of particle rest-mass energy, to currents of electromagnetic energy, and to currents of all other types of energy are identical as predicted by the Einstein equivalence principle. The detailed analysis of how atomic physics experiments originated by Hughes and by Drever can constrain such possible violations of the Einstein equivalence principle is given. Atomic clocks are also important tools used to test local Lorentz invariance and hence one important aspect of Einstein equivalence principle. The sensitivity of atomic clocks to preferred-frame effects is studied here for the first time, and the behavior of the hydrogen-maser clocks of the Gravity Probe A experiment is analyzed to illustrate use of the techniques involved

  9. Evolution of water equivalent phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabutani, Toshimine; Ida, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    In radiation therapy, the dose absorbed by the target tissue needs to be extremely accurate. In order to obtain the target absorbed dose, radiation dose measurements are performed using a phantom instead of the patient's body, because the target absorbed dose cannot be directly measured. Although water is the best human muscle equivalent phantom, it is not useful for this purpose. Therefore, water equivalent solid phantoms are usually used for the measurements. We compared the following water equivalent solid phantoms for water: Tough water phantom, 457 Solid water phantom, RW-3, Mix-DP, polystyrene resin, polyethylene resin, and acrylic resin. The measurements obtained were ionization current in the phantoms as determined by ionization chamber, tissue-maximum ratio, transmission measurements in water with and without the phantoms, Hounsfield units of the phantoms for uniformity of inside phantoms as determined by computed tomography, and accuracy of the phantoms. Results showed the phantoms to be almost equivalent to water, except for the acrylic resin phantom. However, the phantoms had various characteristics that affected accuracy, and the phantoms underwent change with time. Measurement error was caused by the characteristics of the phantoms. Therefore, it is important to measure the calibration coefficient of phantoms for water, regardless of what is stated on paper. (author)

  10. Sampling frequency affects ActiGraph activity counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønd, Jan Christian; Arvidsson, Daniel

    -15 Hz escaped the bandpass filter when sampled at 40, 50, 70, 80 and 100 Hz, while this was not the case when sampled at 30, 60 and 90 Hz. During the ambulatory activities this artifact resultet in different activity count output from the ActiLife software with different sampling frequency....... The difference increased with increasing activity intensity, with up to 1000 counts per minute at fast running.Discussion & conclusions: Activity counts from vigorous physical activity is highly attenuated with the ActiLife software. High frequency movement and noise information escape the bandpass filter...... depending on the sampling frequency of data collection, adding unexplained variation in activity counts. Therefore, the choice of sampling frequency may be an additional source of error with large impact on phsyical activty research as many investigators are using the ActiGraph with the ActiLife software...

  11. Automation system for optical counting of nuclear tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Boulyga, S F; Lomonosova, E M; Zhuk, I V

    1999-01-01

    An automation system consisting of the microscope, video camera and Pentium PC with frame recorder was created. The system provides counting of nuclear tracks on the SSNTD surface with a resolution of 752 x 582 points, determination of the surface area and main axis of the track. The pattern recognition program was developed for operation in Windows 3.1 (or higher) ensuring a convenient interface with the user. In a comparison of the results on automatic track counting with the more accurate hand mode it was shown that the program enables the tracks to be detected even on images with a rather high noise level. It ensures a high accuracy of track counting being comparable with the accuracy of manual counting for densities of tracks in the range of up to 2 centre dot 10 sup 5 tracks/cm sup 2. The automatic system was applied in the experimental investigation of uranium and transuranium elements.

  12. Noise and Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Noise and Hearing Protection Noise and Hearing Protection Patient ... it is. How can I tell if a noise is dangerous? People differ in their sensitivity to ...

  13. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  14. Noise-Measuring Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test.......A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test....

  15. Quantum-noise randomized ciphers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Ranjith; Yuen, Horace P.; Kumar, Prem; Corndorf, Eric; Eguchi, Takami

    2006-01-01

    We review the notion of a classical random cipher and its advantages. We sharpen the usual description of random ciphers to a particular mathematical characterization suggested by the salient feature responsible for their increased security. We describe a concrete system known as αη and show that it is equivalent to a random cipher in which the required randomization is affected by coherent-state quantum noise. We describe the currently known security features of αη and similar systems, including lower bounds on the unicity distances against ciphertext-only and known-plaintext attacks. We show how αη used in conjunction with any standard stream cipher such as the Advanced Encryption Standard provides an additional, qualitatively different layer of security from physical encryption against known-plaintext attacks on the key. We refute some claims in the literature that αη is equivalent to a nonrandom stream cipher

  16. Low-noise audio amplifiers and preamplifier for use with intrinsic thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, G.C.; Sachs, R.D.; Stewart, F.L.

    1979-03-01

    Two simple, low-noise audio amplifiers and one low-noise preamplifier for use with intrinsic thermocouples were designed, built, and tested. The amplifiers and the preamplifier have different front end designs. One amplifier uses ultralow-noise operational amplifiers; the other amplifier uses a hybrid component. The preamplifier uses ultralow-noise discrete components. The amplifiers' equivalent noise inputs, at maximum gain, are 4.09 nV and 50 nV; the preamplifier's input is 4.05 μV. Their bandwidths are 15 600 Hz, 550 Hz, and 174 kHz, respectively. the amplifiers' equivalent noise inputs were measured from approx. 0 to 100 Hz, whereas the preamplifier's equivalent noise input was measured from approx. 0 to 174 kHz

  17. Summary of thermal, shot and flicker noise in detectors and readout circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Seller, P

    1999-01-01

    The techniques for calculating noise in electronic circuits are well known (P. Seller, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 408 (1998) 603). These have been used here to tabulate the output noise variance and the Equivalent input Noise Charge (ENC) for time-invariant filter circuits often used for reading out detector systems. This is followed by some comparisons of the performance of different filters.

  18. Evaluation of surface decarburization depth by magnetic Barkhausen noise technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupakov, O., E-mail: stupak@fzu.c [Institute of Physics of the AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Perevertov, O.; Tomas, I. [Institute of Physics of the AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Skrbek, B. [Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 46117 Liberec (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Industrially unfavorable process of steel surface decarburization was induced by annealing in air. Two methods of after-anneal surface treatment were used: an acid pickling and a sand blasting. The obtained decarburized layers were examined by optical microscope, wave dispersive spectrometer, and surface X-ray diffraction method. Magnetic Barkhausen noise technique was tested for applicability of non-destructive characterization of the decarburized layer depth. A newly introduced parameter, Barkhausen noise coercivity, was proposed for practical use due to its sensitivity to decarburization and stability to measurement conditions. Other magnetic parameters, e.g. number of Barkhausen noise counts, were found to be sensitive to the compressive residual stress caused by the sand blasting. - Research highlights: Barkhausen coercivity shows good stability and sensitivity to decarburization depth. Number of Barkhausen noise counts indicates compressive residual stress. Rms value of Barkhausen noise shows nonmonotonic dependence on decarburization depth.

  19. The Source Equivalence Acceleration Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everson, Matthew S.; Forget, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new acceleration method, the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method. • SEAM forms an equivalent coarse group problem for any spatial method. • Equivalence is also formed across different spatial methods and angular quadratures. • Testing is conducted using OpenMOC and performance is compared with CMFD. • Results show that SEAM is preferable for very expensive transport calculations. - Abstract: Fine-group whole-core reactor analysis remains one of the long sought goals of the reactor physics community. Such a detailed analysis is typically too computationally expensive to be realized on anything except the largest of supercomputers. Recondensation using the Discrete Generalized Multigroup (DGM) method, though, offers a relatively cheap alternative to solving the fine group transport problem. DGM, however, suffered from inconsistencies when applied to high-order spatial methods. While an exact spatial recondensation method was developed and provided full spatial consistency with the fine group problem, this approach substantially increased memory requirements for realistic problems. The method described in this paper, called the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method (SEAM), forms a coarse-group problem which preserves the fine-group problem even when using higher order spatial methods. SEAM allows recondensation to converge to the fine-group solution with minimal memory requirements and little additional overhead. This method also provides for consistency when using different spatial methods and angular quadratures between the coarse group and fine group problems. SEAM was implemented in OpenMOC, a 2D MOC code developed at MIT, and its performance tested against Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) acceleration on the C5G7 benchmark problem and on a 361 group version of the problem. For extremely expensive transport calculations, SEAM was able to outperform CMFD, resulting in speed-ups of 20–45 relative to the normal power

  20. Incorporating signal-dependent noise for hyperspectral target detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Christopher J.; Meola, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The majority of hyperspectral target detection algorithms are developed from statistical data models employing stationary background statistics or white Gaussian noise models. Stationary background models are inaccurate as a result of two separate physical processes. First, varying background classes often exist in the imagery that possess different clutter statistics. Many algorithms can account for this variability through the use of subspaces or clustering techniques. The second physical process, which is often ignored, is a signal-dependent sensor noise term. For photon counting sensors that are often used in hyperspectral imaging systems, sensor noise increases as the measured signal level increases as a result of Poisson random processes. This work investigates the impact of this sensor noise on target detection performance. A linear noise model is developed describing sensor noise variance as a linear function of signal level. The linear noise model is then incorporated for detection of targets using data collected at Wright Patterson Air Force Base.

  1. Equivalent statistics and data interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Recent reform efforts in psychological science have led to a plethora of choices for scientists to analyze their data. A scientist making an inference about their data must now decide whether to report a p value, summarize the data with a standardized effect size and its confidence interval, report a Bayes Factor, or use other model comparison methods. To make good choices among these options, it is necessary for researchers to understand the characteristics of the various statistics used by the different analysis frameworks. Toward that end, this paper makes two contributions. First, it shows that for the case of a two-sample t test with known sample sizes, many different summary statistics are mathematically equivalent in the sense that they are based on the very same information in the data set. When the sample sizes are known, the p value provides as much information about a data set as the confidence interval of Cohen's d or a JZS Bayes factor. Second, this equivalence means that different analysis methods differ only in their interpretation of the empirical data. At first glance, it might seem that mathematical equivalence of the statistics suggests that it does not matter much which statistic is reported, but the opposite is true because the appropriateness of a reported statistic is relative to the inference it promotes. Accordingly, scientists should choose an analysis method appropriate for their scientific investigation. A direct comparison of the different inferential frameworks provides some guidance for scientists to make good choices and improve scientific practice.

  2. On temporal correlations in high-resolution frequency counting

    OpenAIRE

    Dunker, Tim; Hauglin, Harald; Rønningen, Ole Petter

    2016-01-01

    We analyze noise properties of time series of frequency data from different counting modes of a Keysight 53230A frequency counter. We use a 10 MHz reference signal from a passive hydrogen maser connected via phase-stable Huber+Suhner Sucoflex 104 cables to the reference and input connectors of the counter. We find that the high resolution gap-free (CONT) frequency counting process imposes long-term correlations in the output data, resulting in a modified Allan deviation that is characteristic...

  3. Deaf Smith County noise analysis: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    An analysis of activities proposed for the three major phases of development of the proposed nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas, was conducted to quantify the noise levels and the effect of noise resulting from these activities. The report provides additional details of the predictive noise level modeling conducted for the site characterization, repository construction, and repository operation phases. Equivalent day/night sound levels are presented for each phase as sound level contours. Sound levels from onsite and offsite activities are addressed including traffic on access routes, and railroad construction and operation. A description of the predictive models, the analysis methodologies, the noise source inventories, the model outputs, and the evaluation criteria are included. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  4. AdipoCount: A New Software for Automatic Adipocyte Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhao Zhi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has spread worldwide and become a common health problem in modern society. One typical feature of obesity is the excessive accumulation of fat in adipocytes, which occurs through the following two physiological phenomena: hyperplasia (increase in quantity and hypertrophy (increase in size of adipocytes. In clinical and scientific research, the accurate quantification of the number and diameter of adipocytes is necessary for assessing obesity. In this study, we present a new automatic adipocyte counting system, AdipoCount, which is based on image processing algorithms. Comparing with other existing adipocyte counting tools, AdipoCount is more accurate and supports further manual correction. AdipoCount counts adipose cells by the following three-step process: (1 It detects the image edges, which are used to segment the membrane of adipose cells; (2 It uses a watershed-based algorithm to re-segment the missing dyed membrane; and (3 It applies a domain connectivity analysis to count the cells. The outputs of this system are the labels and the statistical data of all adipose cells in the image. The AdipoCount software is freely available for academic use at: http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/AdipoCount/.

  5. Equivalence relations of AF-algebra extensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we consider equivalence relations of *-algebra extensions and describe the relationship between the isomorphism equivalence and the unitary equivalence. We also show that a certain group homomorphism is the obstruction for these equivalence relations to be the same.

  6. Equivalence in bilingual lexicography: criticism and suggestions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A reminder of general problems in the formation of terminology, as illustrated by the German Äquivalence (Eng. equivalence) and äquivalent (Eng. equivalent), is followed by a critical discussion of the concept of equivalence in contrastive lexicology. It is shown that especially the concept of partial equivalence is ...

  7. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equivalence determination. 26.9 Section 26.9 Food... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence determination... document insufficient evidence of equivalence, lack of opportunity to assess equivalence or a determination...

  8. Wijsman Orlicz Asymptotically Ideal -Statistical Equivalent Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipan Hazarika

    2013-01-01

    in Wijsman sense and present some definitions which are the natural combination of the definition of asymptotic equivalence, statistical equivalent, -statistical equivalent sequences in Wijsman sense. Finally, we introduce the notion of Cesaro Orlicz asymptotically -equivalent sequences in Wijsman sense and establish their relationship with other classes.

  9. Noise exposure of truck drivers: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heever, D J; Roets, F J

    1996-06-01

    To investigate the extent of noise exposure to which truck drivers are subjected, a comparison was made of the noise levels in the cabs of two different brands of trucks. Both brands were manufactured with identical engines. The equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels, maximum sound pressure levels, and percentage noise dose were determined. This study sought to determine if truck drivers are exposed to excessive noise inside the cabs of these trucks. Furthermore, the most beneficial working environment in terms of the brand used was investigated. No significant differences regarding the individual noise exposure of the truck drivers were found (P > 0.05). Based on comparison of measured noise exposures to existing criteria, it was determined that the noise exposures of truck drivers are potentially hazardous to their hearing.

  10. Estimating and Separating Noise from AIA Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Michael S.; Ireland, Jack; Young, C. Alex; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2016-10-01

    All digital images are corrupted by noise and SDO AIA is no different. In most solar imaging, we have the luxury of high photon counts and low background contamination, which when combined with carful calibration, minimize much of the impact noise has on the measurement. Outside high-intensity regions, such as in coronal holes, the noise component can become significant and complicate feature recognition and segmentation. We create a practical estimate of noise in the high-resolution AIA images across the detector CCD in all seven EUV wavelengths. A mixture of Poisson and Gaussian noise is well suited in the digital imaging environment due to the statistical distributions of photons and the characteristics of the CCD. Using state-of-the-art noise estimation techniques, the publicly available solar images, and coronal loop simulations; we construct a maximum-a-posteriori assessment of the error in these images. The estimation and mitigation of noise not only provides a clearer view of large-scale solar structure in the solar corona, but also provides physical constraints on fleeting EUV features observed with AIA.

  11. Noise Modeling of SDO AIA Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, M. S.; Young, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    All digital images are corrupted by noise. In most solar imaging, we have the luxury of high photon counts and low background contamination, which when combined with carful calibration, minimize much of the impact noise has on the measurement. Outside high-intensity regions, such as in coronal holes, the noise component can become significant and complicate feature recognition and segmentation. We create a practical estimate of noise in the AIA images across the detector CCD. A Poisson-Gaussian model of noise is well suited in the digital imaging environment due to the statistical distributions of photons and the characteristics of the CCD. Using the dark and flat field calibration images, the level-1 AIA images, and readout noise measurements, we construct a maximum-a-posteriori estimation of the expected error in the AIA images. These estimations of noise not only provide a clearer view of solar features in AIA, but they are also relevant to error characterizations of other solar images.

  12. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  13. LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY COUNTING HANDBOOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Nuclear Instrumentation

    1966-10-01

    The Counting Handbook is a compilation of operational techniques and performance specifications on counting equipment in use at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Counting notes have been written from the viewpoint of the user rather than that of the designer or maintenance man. The only maintenance instructions that have been included are those that can easily be performed by the experimenter to assure that the equipment is operating properly.

  14. Let's Make Data Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budden, A. E.; Abrams, S.; Chodacki, J.; Cruse, P.; Fenner, M.; Jones, M. B.; Lowenberg, D.; Rueda, L.; Vieglais, D.

    2017-12-01

    The impact of research has traditionally been measured by citations to journal publications and used extensively for evaluation and assessment in academia, but this process misses the impact and reach of data and software as first-class scientific products. For traditional publications, Article-Level Metrics (ALM) capture the multitude of ways in which research is disseminated and used, such as references and citations within social media and other journal articles. Here we present on the extension of usage and citation metrics collection to include other artifacts of research, namely datasets. The Make Data Count (MDC) project will enable measuring the impact of research data in a manner similar to what is currently done with publications. Data-level metrics (DLM) are a multidimensional suite of indicators measuring the broad reach and use of data as legitimate research outputs. By making data metrics openly available for reuse in a number of different ways, the MDC project represents an important first step on the path towards the full integration of data metrics into the research data management ecosystem. By assuring researchers that their contributions to scholarly progress represented by data corpora are acknowledged, data level metrics provide a foundation for streamlining the advancement of knowledge by actively promoting desirable best practices regarding research data management, publication, and sharing.

  15. Making kids count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, W P

    1998-01-01

    Using data from the 1988 KIDS COUNT Data Book, compiled and published by The Annie E. Casey Foundation, the most recent state figures (1995) are compared with corresponding data from 1985 to assess the trends in child well-being in each state during the decade. The 10 key indicators used are taken from governmental data sources and reflect the best data available for each of the measures. Between 1985 and 1995, child well-being worsened across the country in five of the indicators, i.e., percent of low birthweight babies; rate of teen deaths by accident, homicide and suicide; teen birth rate; Juvenile Violent Crime Arrest Rate; and percent of families with children headed by a single parent. Areas of improvement include: infant mortality; child death rate; percent of teens who are high school dropouts; and percent of teens not attending school and/or not working. There was no change between 1985 and 1995 in the percent of children living in poverty. When the states are ranked by a composite of the 10 indicators of childhood well-being, a cluster of states in the South and Southwest are at or near the bottom of the rankings while the New England states and those in the upper plains are typically near the top. The states near the top have higher incomes and lower poverty rates than those near the bottom.

  16. Non-Markovian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulinski, A.

    1994-01-01

    The properties of non-Markovian noises with exponentially correlated memory are discussed. Considered are dichotomic noise, white shot noise, Gaussian white noise, and Gaussian colored noise. The stationary correlation functions of the non-Markovian versions of these noises are given by linear combinations of two or three exponential functions (colored noises) or of the δ function and exponential function (white noises). The non-Markovian white noises are well defined only when the kernel of the non-Markovian master equation contains a nonzero admixture of a Markovian term. Approximate equations governing the probability densities for processes driven by such non-Markovian noises are derived, including non-Markovian versions of the Fokker-Planck equation and the telegrapher's equation. As an example, it is shown how the non-Markovian nature changes the behavior of the driven linear process

  17. SUMS Counts-Related Projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Staging Instance for all SUMs Counts related projects including: Redeterminations/Limited Issue, Continuing Disability Resolution, CDR Performance Measures, Initial...

  18. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    1DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES ... challenges. Symptoms of short or long periods exposure to noise include auditory effects such auditory fatigue and hearing loss, and indirect n auditory effects such as speech interfere .... ASSESSMENT OF NOISE POLLUTION FROM SAWMILL ACTIVITIES IN ILORIN, NIGERIA.

  19. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This study examine. This study examined noise pollution pollution pollution from sawmillin from sawmillin using HD600 digital data l using HD600 digital data logging sound level me ogging sound level me designed to elicit noise related information. The res sawmills was 58.1 sawmills was 58.1-64.86 dB(A) while machine ...

  20. Derived equivalences for group rings

    CERN Document Server

    König, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    A self-contained introduction is given to J. Rickard's Morita theory for derived module categories and its recent applications in representation theory of finite groups. In particular, Broué's conjecture is discussed, giving a structural explanation for relations between the p-modular character table of a finite group and that of its "p-local structure". The book is addressed to researchers or graduate students and can serve as material for a seminar. It surveys the current state of the field, and it also provides a "user's guide" to derived equivalences and tilting complexes. Results and proofs are presented in the generality needed for group theoretic applications.

  1. Pulse-duration discrimination for increasing counting characteristic plateau and for improving counting rate stability of a scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    For greater stability of scintillation counters operation, discussed is the possibility for increasing the plateau and reducing its slope. Presented is the circuit for discrimination of the signal pulses from input pulses of a photomultiplier. The counting characteristics have been measured with the scintillation detectors being irradiated by different gamma sources ( 60 Co, 137 Cs, 241 Am) and without the source when the scintillation detector is shielded by a tungsten cylinder with a wall thickness of 23 mm. The comparison has revealed that discrimination in duration increase the plateau and reduces its slope. Proceeding from comparison of the noise characteristics, the relationship is found between the noise pulse number and gamma radiation energy. For better stability of the counting rate it is suggested to introduce into the scintillation counter the circuit for duration discrimination of the output pulses of a photomultiplier

  2. Spin-current noise from fluctuation relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jong Soo [Institut de Fisica Interdisciplinària i Sistemes Complexos IFISC (UIB-CSIC), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Sánchez, David; López, Rosa [Institut de Fisica Interdisciplinària i Sistemes Complexos IFISC (UIB-CSIC), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain and Departement de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-12-04

    We present fluctuation relations that connect spin-polarized current and noise in mesoscopic conductors. In linear response, these relations are equivalent to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates equilibrium current-current correlations to the linear conductance. More interestingly, in the weakly nonlinear regime of transport, these relations establish a connection between the leading-order rectification spin conductance, the spin noise susceptibility and the third cumulant of spin current fluctuations at equilibrium. Our results are valid even for systems in the presence of magnetic fields and coupled to ferromagnetic electrodes.

  3. Additive noise properties of active matrix flat-panel imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maolinbay, M; El-Mohri, Y; Antonuk, L E; Jee, K W; Nassif, S; Rong, X; Zhao, Q

    2000-08-01

    A detailed theoretical and empirical investigation of additive noise for indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) has been performed. Such imagers comprise a pixelated array, incorporating photodiodes and thin-film transistors (TFTs), and an associated electronic acquisition system. A theoretical model of additive noise, defined as the noise of an imaging system in the absence of radiation, has been developed. This model is based upon an equivalent-noise-circuit representation of an AMFPI. The model contains a number of uncorrelated noise components which have been designated as pixel noise, data line thermal noise, externally coupled noise, preamplifier noise and digitization noise. Pixel noise is further divided into the following components: TFT thermal noise, shot and 1/f noise associated with the TFT and photodiode leakage currents, and TFT transient noise. Measurements of various additive noise components were carried out on a prototype imaging system based on a 508 microm pitch, 26 x 26 cm2 array. Other measurements were performed in the absence of the array, involving discrete components connected to the preamplifier input. Overall, model predictions of total additive noise as well as of pixel, preamplifier, and data line thermal noise components were in agreement with results of their measured counterparts. For the imaging system examined, the model predicts that pixel noise is dominated by shot and 1/f noise components of the photodiode and TFT at frame times above approximately 1 s. As frame time decreases, pixel noise is increasingly dominated by TFT thermal noise. Under these conditions, the reasonable degree of agreement observed between measurements and model predictions provides strong evidence that the role of TFT thermal noise has been properly incorporated into the model. Finally, the role of the resistance and capacitance of array data lines in the model was investigated using discrete component circuits at the preamplifier

  4. Flicker-noise fluctuations in α-radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousik, G.S.; Gong, J.; Vanvliet, C.M.; Bosman, G.; Ellis, W.H.; Carroll, E.E.; Handel, P.H.

    1987-01-01

    Counting statistics of α particles from three sources, one containing 241 Am; one containing 239 Pu, 241 Am, and 244 Cu; and a source containing 148 Gd, were determined over periods of 1-4000 min. In particular, the two-sample variance or Allan variance was determined for many sample runs. According to a recent theorem, there is a unique relation between the particle-flux spectral noise density and the Allan variance. It was found that for small counting periods, the statistics were Poissonian, corresponding to shot noise of the particle flux. For long periods (> ≅ 200 min), the counting statistics were found to be non-Poissonian, indicating the presence of 1/f noise and (or) Lorentzian noise. The 1/f noise gave flicker floors of (0.5-0.7) x 10 -7 for 239 Pu, (1.0-1.3) x 10 -7 for 241 Am, and 3.0 x 10 -7 for 244 Cm. The Lorentzians were not reproducible in different runs and are probably associated with chemical oxidation-reduction rate processes in the source. The 1/f noise is likely inherent in the process of α-particle decay, indicating that the classical picture of alpha decay as a Poisson process is incomplete. Some forms of quantum 1/f noise associated with the tunnel-emission process are briefly discussed

  5. Computational Counting (Dagstuhl Seminar 18341)

    OpenAIRE

    Bezáková, Ivona; Goldberg, Leslie Ann; Jerrum, Mark R.

    2018-01-01

    This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17341 "Computational Counting". The seminar was held from 20th to 25th August 2017, at Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibnitz Center for Informatics. A total of 43 researchers from all over the world, with interests and expertise in different aspects of computational counting, actively participated in the meeting.

  6. Computational Counting (Dagstuhl Seminar 13031)

    OpenAIRE

    Bürgisser, Peter; Goldberg, Leslie Ann; Jerrum, Mark; Koiran, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Dagstuhl Seminar 13031 "Computational Counting" was held from 13th to 18th January 2013, at Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibnitz Center for Informatics. A total of 43 researchers from all over the world, with interests and expertise in different aspects of computational counting, actively participated in the meeting.

  7. 10481 Executive Summary -- Computational Counting

    OpenAIRE

    Bürgisser, Peter; Goldberg, Leslie Ann; Jerrum, Mark

    2011-01-01

    From November 28 to December 3 2010, the Dagstuhl seminar 10481 ``Computational Counting'' was held in Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibnitz Center for Informatics. 36 researchers from all over the world, with interests and expertise in different aspects of computational counting, actively participated in the meeting.

  8. The Noise Level Optimization for Induction Magnetometer of SEP System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Fang, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Surface Electromagnetic Penetration (SEP) System, subsidized by the SinoProbe Plan in China, is designed for 3D conductivity imaging in geophysical mineral exploration, underground water distribution exploration, oil and gas reservoir exploration. Both the Controlled Source Audio Magnetotellurics (CSAMT) method and Magnetotellurics (MT) method can be surveyed by SEP system. In this article, an optimization design is introduced, which can minimize the noise level of the induction magnetometer for SEP system magnetic field's acquisition. The induction magnetometer transfers the rate of the magnetic field's change to voltage signal by induction coil, and amplified it by Low Noise Amplifier The noise parts contributed to the magnetometer are: the coil's thermal noise, the equivalent input voltage and current noise of the pre-amplifier. The coil's thermal noise is decided by coil's DC resistance. The equivalent input voltage and current noise of the pre-amplifier depend on the amplifier's type and DC operation condition. The design here optimized the DC operation point of pre-amplifier, adjusted the DC current source, and realized the minimum of total noise level of magnetometer. The calculation and test results show that: the total noise is about 1pT/√Hz, the thermal noise of coils is 1.7nV/√Hz, the preamplifier equivalent input voltage and current noise is 3nV/ √Hz and 0.1pA/√Hz, the weight of the magnetometer is 4.5kg and meet the requirement of SEP system.

  9. Immature Multisensory Enhancement in Auditory and Visual Noise in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet C Downing

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Multisensory integration has seldom been examined in adolescents. Thus, performances on an audiovisual discrimination task were compared between 19 adolescents (M=15:00 SD=0:04 years, 20 primary school-aged children (M=11:04 years, SD=0:05 years and 22 young adults (M=26:02 years, SD=2:07 years in quiet and in auditory, visual and audiovisual noise conditions. Stimuli comprised domestic animal exemplars. Motor reaction times (MRTs and accuracy were recorded. Adolescents had equivalent false positive error rates but significantly lower false negative error rates than children. Children and adolescents had higher error rates than adults. MRTs differed significantly between all groups, being fastest for adults and slowest for children. Adults and children showed facilitation in all noise conditions, while adolescents showed equivalent, faster MRTs to visual and audiovisual than auditory targets in auditory noise. Coactivation was evident in all noise conditions for adults (probabilities of .05–.65 in quiet and auditory noise, .15–.65 in visual noise and .15–.25 in audiovisual noise but was limited to quiet and auditory noise conditions for children (probabilities of .05–.15 and adolescents (probabilities .05–.65 and .15–.45, respectively. The results indicate that adult-like levels of multisensory integration develop by adolescence in quiet conditions but remain immature in unisensory and audiovisual noise.

  10. Editorial: New operational dose equivalent quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The ICRU Report 39 entitled ''Determination of Dose Equivalents Resulting from External Radiation Sources'' is briefly discussed. Four new operational dose equivalent quantities have been recommended in ICRU 39. The 'ambient dose equivalent' and the 'directional dose equivalent' are applicable to environmental monitoring and the 'individual dose equivalent, penetrating' and the 'individual dose equivalent, superficial' are applicable to individual monitoring. The quantities should meet the needs of day-to-day operational practice, while being acceptable to those concerned with metrological precision, and at the same time be used to give effective control consistent with current perceptions of the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiations. (U.K.)

  11. Aviation noise effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  12. A Readout Chip for a 64 x 64 Pixel Matrix with 15-bit Single Photon Counting

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, M; Meddeler, G; Pernigotti, E; Snoeys, W

    1998-01-01

    A single Photon Counting pixel detector readout Chip (PCC) has been derived from previous work in the CERN RD19 collaboration for particle physics tracking devices, recently developed for high energy physics experiments. The readout chip is a 64 x 64 matrix of identical 170mm x 170mm cells. It is to be bump-bonded to an equally segmented 1 cm2 matrix of semiconductor sensors, e.g. Si or GaAs. Each readout cell comprises a preamplifier, a discriminator and a 15-bit counter. The input noise is 170 e- rms. At the lowest nominal threshold of 1 400 e- (5.1 keV in Si) the cells exhibit a threshold di stribution with a spread before adjustment of 350 e- rms. Each cell has a 5-bit register which allows masking, test-enable and 3-bit individual threshold adjust. After adjustment the threshold spread is reduced to 80 e- rms. Absolute calibration of the electrically measured equivalent charge can be done once the readout chip is bump-bonded to a detector.

  13. Galaxy number counts: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, N.; Shanks, T.; Fong, R.; Jones, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    Using the Prime Focus CCD Camera at the Isaac Newton Telescope we have determined the form of the B and R galaxy number-magnitude count relations in 12 independent fields for 21 m ccd m and 19 m ccd m 5. The average galaxy count relations lie in the middle of the wide range previously encompassed by photographic data. The field-to-field variation of the counts is small enough to define the faint (B m 5) galaxy count to ±10 per cent and this variation is consistent with that expected from galaxy clustering considerations. Our new data confirm that the B, and also the R, galaxy counts show evidence for strong galaxy luminosity evolution, and that the majority of the evolving galaxies are of moderately blue colour. (author)

  14. Hanford whole body counting manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, H.E.; Brim, C.P.; Rieksts, G.A.; Rhoads, M.C.

    1987-05-01

    This document, a reprint of the Whole Body Counting Manual, was compiled to train personnel, document operation procedures, and outline quality assurance procedures. The current manual contains information on: the location, availability, and scope of services of Hanford's whole body counting facilities; the administrative aspect of the whole body counting operation; Hanford's whole body counting facilities; the step-by-step procedure involved in the different types of in vivo measurements; the detectors, preamplifiers and amplifiers, and spectroscopy equipment; the quality assurance aspect of equipment calibration and recordkeeping; data processing, record storage, results verification, report preparation, count summaries, and unit cost accounting; and the topics of minimum detectable amount and measurement accuracy and precision. 12 refs., 13 tabs

  15. Annoyance, detection and recognition of wind turbine noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, Timothy; Bockstael, Annelies; De Weirt, Valentine; Botteldooren, Dick

    2013-07-01

    Annoyance, recognition and detection of noise from a single wind turbine were studied by means of a two-stage listening experiment with 50 participants with normal hearing abilities. In-situ recordings made at close distance from a 1.8-MW wind turbine operating at 22 rpm were mixed with road traffic noise, and processed to simulate indoor sound pressure levels at LAeq 40 dBA. In a first part, where people were unaware of the true purpose of the experiment, samples were played during a quiet leisure activity. Under these conditions, pure wind turbine noise gave very similar annoyance ratings as unmixed highway noise at the same equivalent level, while annoyance by local road traffic noise was significantly higher. In a second experiment, listeners were asked to identify the sample containing wind turbine noise in a paired comparison test. The detection limit of wind turbine noise in presence of highway noise was estimated to be as low as a signal-to-noise ratio of -23 dBA. When mixed with local road traffic, such a detection limit could not be determined. These findings support that noticing the sound could be an important aspect of wind turbine noise annoyance at the low equivalent levels typically observed indoors in practice. Participants that easily recognized wind-turbine(-like) sounds could detect wind turbine noise better when submersed in road traffic noise. Recognition of wind turbine sounds is also linked to higher annoyance. Awareness of the source is therefore a relevant aspect of wind turbine noise perception which is consistent with previous research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Feasibility of Noise Control in a Soft Drink Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouladi Dehaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background “Noise” can be defined as any unwanted sound. Soft drink plants, which produce the raw materials used in most carbonated beverage factories, are sources of noise. Objectives This study investigated the noise pollution present in a soft drink CO2 gas injection plant, in order to present noise control measures. Materials and Methods The instructions specified by the canadian center for occupational health and safety (CCOHS were followed during the noise study, and a sound level meter, CEL.450 calibrated with CEL-110.2 based on ISO-9612 methods, was used to record the sound pressure level (SPL at each grid point. SPL was determined in weighting scales A and C. and a noise survey map of equivalent SPLs was drawn for each part. Each part of the floor area of the soft drink factory where SPL exceeded 85 dBA was identified from the noise survey map to determine the causes of high levels of noise. In order to reduce noise level in each part, the absorption coefficient, transmission loss, and noise reduction rate were calculated in the proposed control area. Results According to the study results, noise levels in a CO2 plant’s house and control room ranged from 88 to 102 dB and 79 to 82 dB (A, respectively. In order to reduce the amount of emitted noise in the CO2 plant house and control room, a noise control plan was implemented in each part of the facility; it was met with effective results. Conclusions The findings of this investigation have clearly revealed that plant workers are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss. However, after the implementation of a noise control plan in each part of the facility, the noise dose received by workers has significantly decreased. The need to implement a noise conservation program was established.

  17. Electronic noise in CT detectors: Impact on image noise and artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Leng, Shuai; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Grant, Katharine; Flohr, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate in phantoms the differences in CT image noise and artifact level between two types of commercial CT detectors: one with distributed electronics (conventional) and one with integrated electronics intended to decrease system electronic noise. Cylindric water phantoms of 20, 30, and 40 cm in diameter were scanned using two CT scanners, one equipped with integrated detector electronics and one with distributed detector electronics. All other scanning parameters were identical. Scans were acquired at four tube potentials and 10 tube currents. Semianthropomorphic phantoms were scanned to mimic the shoulder and abdominal regions. Images of two patients were also selected to show the clinical values of the integrated detector. Reduction of image noise with the integrated detector depended on phantom size, tube potential, and tube current. Scans that had low detected signal had the greatest reductions in noise, up to 40% for a 30-cm phantom scanned using 80 kV. This noise reduction translated into up to 50% in dose reduction to achieve equivalent image noise. Streak artifacts through regions of high attenuation were reduced by up to 45% on scans obtained using the integrated detector. Patient images also showed superior image quality for the integrated detector. For the same applied radiation level, the use of integrated electronics in a CT detector showed a substantially reduced level of electronic noise, resulting in reductions in image noise and artifacts, compared with detectors having distributed electronics.

  18. Prevention of Noise Damage to Cochlear Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    difference We therefore conclude that it is more likely that female hormones are protecting against susceptibility as opposed to male hormones...of synapse counts among all experimental conditions, those in A as well as saline/vehicle and systemic 4 mg/Kg IEM-1460 (IEMs4mg). There is no... animals at the approximate level of the animals ’ ears. The variation of the noise level across the animals ’ ears and across time is ə dB

  19. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  20. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Cecilia Padilla Rodriguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner is present at a high level. This study sought to apply this theorem to the corporate sector, and to expand it to include other indicators of course effectiveness: satisfaction, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations. A large Mexican organisation participated in this research, with 146 learners, 30 teachers and 3 academic assistants. Three versions of an online course were designed, each emphasising a different type of interaction. Data were collected through surveys, exams, observations, activity logs, think aloud protocols and sales records. All course versions yielded high levels of effectiveness, in terms of satisfaction, learning and return on expectations. Yet, course design did not dictate the types of interactions in which students engaged within the courses. Findings suggest that the interaction equivalency theorem can be reformulated as follows: In corporate settings, an online course can be effective in terms of satisfaction, learning, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations, as long as (a at least one of three types of interaction (learner-content, learner-teacher or learner-learner features prominently in the design of the course, and (b course delivery is consistent with the chosen type of interaction. Focusing on only one type of interaction carries a high risk of confusion, disengagement or missed learning opportunities, which can be managed by incorporating other forms of interactions.

  1. 46 CFR 175.540 - Equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Management (ISM) Code (IMO Resolution A.741(18)) for the purpose of determining that an equivalent... Organization (IMO) “Code of Safety for High Speed Craft” as an equivalent to compliance with applicable...

  2. Equivalent damage of loads on pavements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Prozzi, JA

    2009-05-26

    Full Text Available This report describes a new methodology for the determination of Equivalent Damage Factors (EDFs) of vehicles with multiple axle and wheel configurations on pavements. The basic premise of this new procedure is that "equivalent pavement response...

  3. Applications of aero-acoustic analysis to wind turbine noise control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    Wind turbine noise generation mechanisms are essentially equivalent to the aero-acoustic mechanisms of other rotors, which have been studied in depth for many years. Basic sources for the wind turbine noise radiation process are defined, and their significance assessed. From the analysis, areas of potential improvement in wind turbine noise prediction are defined. Suggestions are made for approaches to wind turbine noise control which separate the noise problems at cut-in from those at rated power. Some of these offer the possibility of noise reduction without unfavourable effects on performance. (author)

  4. Helicopter Noise And Noise Abatement Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borivoj Galović

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The helicopter generated noise at and around the airports islower than the noise generated by aeroplanes, since their numberof operations, i. e. the number of takeoffs and landings ismuch lower than the takeoffs and landings of the aeroplanes.Out of some hundred operations a day, helicopters participatewith approximately 15%, but the very impact of noise is by nomeans negligible, since the number of helicopter flights aboveurban areas is constantly increasing.This paper attempts to analyse this phenomenon and thetype of helicopter generated noise, its negative impacts, to explainthe flight procedures and the operative procedures duringtakeoff, landing and overflight of helicopters in operations inthe vicinity and outside airports, as well as the methods of measuringand determining the limit of noise [eve~ and the resultingproblems.

  5. Traffic Noise Assessment at Residential Areas in Skudai, Johor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, F. S.; Darus, N.; Mashros, N.; Haron, Z.; Yahya, K.

    2018-03-01

    Vehicles passing by on roadways in residential areas may produce unpleasant traffic noise that affects the residents. This paper presents the traffic noise assessment of three selected residential areas located in Skudai, Johor. The objectives of this study are to evaluate traffic characteristics at selected residential areas, determine related noise indices, and assess impact of traffic noise. Traffic characteristics such as daily traffic volume and vehicle speed were evaluated using automatic traffic counter (ATC). Meanwhile, noise indices like equivalent continuous sound pressure level (LAeq), noise level exceeded 10% (L10) and 90% (L90) of measurement time were determined using sound level meter (SLM). Besides that, traffic noise index (TNI) and noise pollution level (LNP) were calculated based on the measured noise indices. The results showed an increase in noise level of 60 to 70 dBA maximum due to increase in traffic volume. There was also a significant change in noise level of more than 70 dBA even though average vehicle speed did not vary significantly. Nevertheless, LAeq, TNI, and LNP values for all sites during daytime were lower than the maximum recommended levels. Thus, residents in the three studied areas were not affected in terms of quality of life and health.

  6. Uncertainty in measurements by counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bich, Walter; Pennecchi, Francesca

    2012-02-01

    Counting is at the base of many high-level measurements, such as, for example, frequency measurements. In some instances the measurand itself is a number of events, such as spontaneous decays in activity measurements, or objects, such as colonies of bacteria in microbiology. Countings also play a fundamental role in everyday life. In any case, a counting is a measurement. A measurement result, according to its present definition, as given in the 'International Vocabulary of Metrology—Basic and general concepts and associated terms (VIM)', must include a specification concerning the estimated uncertainty. As concerns measurements by counting, this specification is not easy to encompass in the well-known framework of the 'Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement', known as GUM, in which there is no guidance on the topic. Furthermore, the issue of uncertainty in countings has received little or no attention in the literature, so that it is commonly accepted that this category of measurements constitutes an exception in which the concept of uncertainty is not applicable, or, alternatively, that results of measurements by counting have essentially no uncertainty. In this paper we propose a general model for measurements by counting which allows an uncertainty evaluation compliant with the general framework of the GUM.

  7. High Count Rate Single Photon Counting Detector Array, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An optical communications receiver requires efficient and high-rate photon-counting capability so that the information from every photon, received at the aperture,...

  8. Optimisation of centroiding algorithms for photon event counting imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhling, K.; Airey, R.W.; Morgan, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    Approaches to photon event counting imaging in which the output events of an image intensifier are located using a centroiding technique have long been plagued by fixed pattern noise in which a grid of dimensions similar to those of the CCD pixels is superimposed on the image. This is caused by a mismatch between the photon event shape and the centroiding algorithm. We have used hyperbolic cosine, Gaussian, Lorentzian, parabolic as well as 3-, 5-, and 7-point centre of gravity algorithms, and hybrids thereof, to assess means of minimising this fixed pattern noise. We show that fixed pattern noise generated by the widely used centre of gravity centroiding is due to intrinsic features of the algorithm. Our results confirm that the recently proposed use of Gaussian centroiding does indeed show a significant reduction of fixed pattern noise compared to centre of gravity centroiding (Michel et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 292 (1997) 611-620). However, the disadvantage of a Gaussian algorithm is a centroiding failure for small pulses, caused by a division by zero, which leads to a loss of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and to small amounts of residual fixed pattern noise. Using both real data from an image intensifier system employing a progressive scan camera, framegrabber and PC, and also synthetic data from Monte-Carlo simulations, we find that hybrid centroiding algorithms can reduce the fixed pattern noise without loss of resolution or loss of DQE. Imaging a test pattern to assess the features of the different algorithms shows that a hybrid of Gaussian and 3-point centre of gravity centroiding algorithms results in an optimum combination of low fixed pattern noise (lower than a simple Gaussian), high DQE, and high resolution. The Lorentzian algorithm gives the worst results in terms of high fixed pattern noise and low resolution, and the Gaussian and hyperbolic cosine algorithms have the lowest DQEs

  9. Noise characteristics of combustion augmented high speed jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, A. N.; Harrje, D. T.; Plett, E. G.; Summerfield, M.

    1973-01-01

    Noise generation by a subsonic flow discharging from a combustion chamber is examined with regard to the relative importance of combustion as a source of noise in such a flow system. Measurements of pressure fluctuations inside the combustor are compared with far-field noise measurements by direct cross-correlations. The cross-correlations and derived cross-spectral densities verify that much of the noise originates inside the combustor. A first-order fluid-mechanical perturbation model is used to predict exit plane velocity fluctuations due to internal pressure fluctuations. Far-field noise levels estimated on this basis are in good agreement with measured values. The overall noise level from the combustor/jet is found to be 10 to 20 dB higher than for an equivalent clean, cold jet at the same exit velocity.

  10. Count-to-count time interval distribution analysis in a fast reactor; Estudio de la distribucion de intervalos de tiempo entre detecciones consecutivas de neutrones en un reactor rapido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Navarro Gomez, A.

    1973-07-01

    The most important kinetic parameters have been measured at the zero power fast reactor CORAL-I by means of the reactor noise analysis in the time domain, using measurements of the count-to-count time intervals. (Author) 69 refs.

  11. Some spectral equivalences between Schroedinger operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, C; Hibberd, K E; Links, J

    2008-01-01

    Spectral equivalences of the quasi-exactly solvable sectors of two classes of Schroedinger operators are established, using Gaudin-type Bethe ansatz equations. In some instances the results can be extended leading to full isospectrality. In this manner we obtain equivalences between PT-symmetric problems and Hermitian problems. We also find equivalences between some classes of Hermitian operators

  12. Noise Radar Technology Basics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thayaparan, T; Wernik, C

    2006-01-01

    .... In this report, the basic theory of noise radar design is treated. The theory supports the use of noise waveforms for radar detection and imaging in such applications as covert military surveillance and reconnaissance...

  13. NASA Jet Noise Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The presentation highlights NASA's jet noise research for 2016. Jet-noise modeling efforts, jet-surface interactions results, acoustic characteristics of multi-stream jets, and N+2 Supersonic Aircraft system studies are presented.

  14. Test of the Equivalence Principle in an Einstein Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Irwin I.; Glashow, S.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M. L.; Cheimets, P. N.; Finkelstein, N.; Schneps, M.

    2005-01-01

    This Annual Report illustrates the work carried out during the last grant-year activity on the Test of the Equivalence Principle in an Einstein Elevator. The activity focused on the following main topics: (1) analysis and conceptual design of a detector configuration suitable for the flight tests; (2) development of techniques for extracting a small signal from data strings with colored and white noise; (3) design of the mechanism that spins and releases the instrument package inside the cryostat; and (4) experimental activity carried out by our non-US partners (a summary is shown in this report). The analysis and conceptual design of the flight-detector (point 1) was focused on studying the response of the differential accelerometer during free fall, in the presence of errors and precession dynamics, for various detector's configurations. The goal was to devise a detector configuration in which an Equivalence Principle violation (EPV) signal at the sensitivity threshold level can be successfully measured and resolved out of a much stronger dynamics-related noise and gravity gradient. A detailed analysis and comprehensive simulation effort led us to a detector's design that can accomplish that goal successfully.

  15. Toddlers' recognition of noise-vocoded speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Rochelle; Chatterjee, Monita

    2013-01-01

    Despite their remarkable clinical success, cochlear-implant listeners today still receive spectrally degraded information. Much research has examined normally hearing adult listeners' ability to interpret spectrally degraded signals, primarily using noise-vocoded speech to simulate cochlear implant processing. Far less research has explored infants' and toddlers' ability to interpret spectrally degraded signals, despite the fact that children in this age range are frequently implanted. This study examines 27-month-old typically developing toddlers' recognition of noise-vocoded speech in a language-guided looking study. Children saw two images on each trial and heard a voice instructing them to look at one item ("Find the cat!"). Full-spectrum sentences or their noise-vocoded versions were presented with varying numbers of spectral channels. Toddlers showed equivalent proportions of looking to the target object with full-speech and 24- or 8-channel noise-vocoded speech; they failed to look appropriately with 2-channel noise-vocoded speech and showed variable performance with 4-channel noise-vocoded speech. Despite accurate looking performance for speech with at least eight channels, children were slower to respond appropriately as the number of channels decreased. These results indicate that 2-yr-olds have developed the ability to interpret vocoded speech, even without practice, but that doing so requires additional processing. These findings have important implications for pediatric cochlear implantation.

  16. Proton-induced noise in digicons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. C.; Becher, J.; Fowler, W. B.; Flemming, K.

    1981-01-01

    The Space Telescope, which carries four Digicons, will pass several times per day through a low-altitude portion of the radiation belt called the South Atlantic Anomaly. This is expected to create interference in what is otherwise anticipated to be a noise-free device. Two essential components of the Digicon, the semiconductor diode array and the UV transmitting window, generate noise when subjected to medium-energy proton radiation, a primary component of the belt. These trapped protons, having energies ranging from 2 to 400 Mev and fluences at the Digicon up to 4,000 P+/sec-sq cm, pass through both the window and the diode array, depositing energy in each. In order to evaluate the effect of these protons, engineering test models of Digicon tubes to be flown on the High Resolution Spectrograph were irradiated with low-flux monoenergetic proton beams at the University of Maryland cyclotron. Electron-hole pairs produced by the protons passing through the diodes or the surrounding bulk caused a background count rate. This is the result of holes diffusing over a distance of many diode spacings, causing counts to be triggered simultaneously in the output circuits of several adjacent diodes. Pulse-height spectra of these proton-induced counts indicate that most of the bulk-related counts overlap the single photoelectron peak. A geometrical model will be presented of the charge collection characteristics of the diode array that accounts for most of the observed effects.

  17. Noise Reduction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, Tony

    There are two distinct kinds of noise - structural and color. Each requires a specific method of attack to minimize. The great challenge is to reduce the noise without reducing the faint and delicate detail in the image. My most-used and favorite noise suppression is found in Photoshop CS 5 Camera Raw. If I cannot get the desired results with the first choice, I will use Noise Ninja, which has certain advantages in some situations that we will cover.

  18. Fractal dimensions of spatial digital noise by scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Kazuro; Hamada, Nobuo; Sumita, Mitsugu; Ueda, Suguru

    1987-01-01

    The fractal dimensions of the spatial digital noise by scintillation camera were measured under the various conditions. It was found that fractal dimension decreases with increasing total counts, and that fractal dimension by the point source is larger than that by the collimated plane source. When a simple pattern is added to the spatial noise, the fractal dimension decreases and is separated into two components. (Auth.)

  19. Equation for Combustion Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical relationship derived for interactions between turbulent flame and combustion noise. Relationship is rigorous theoretical correlation of combustion noise and combustion process. Establishes foundation for acoustic measurements as tool for investigating structure of turbulent flames. Mathematical relationship is expected to aid researchers in field of noise generated by combustion.

  20. Introductory guide to noise

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferreira, T.M

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference between sound and noise varies from one human being to another. Noise, then, is simply unwanted sound and to understand how it can be combatted we must know more about its nature. A guide of acceptable levels of noise are investigated....

  1. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the...

  2. Make My Trip Count 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Make My Trip Count (MMTC) commuter survey, conducted in September and October 2015 by GBA, the Pittsburgh 2030 District, and 10 other regional transportation...

  3. Counting proofs in propositional logic

    OpenAIRE

    David, René; Zaionc, Marek

    2009-01-01

    International audience; We give a procedure for counting the number of different proofs of a formula in various sorts of propositional logic. This number is either an integer (that may be 0 if the formula is not provable) or infinite.

  4. Active noise control in a duct to cancel broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chun; Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Kuo, Sen M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents cancelling duct noises by using the active noise control (ANC) techniques. We use the single channel feed forward algorithm with feedback neutralization to realize ANC. Several kinds of ducts noises including tonal noises, sweep tonal signals, and white noise had investigated. Experimental results show that the proposed ANC system can cancel these noises in a PVC duct very well. The noise reduction of white noise can be up to 20 dB.

  5. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannous, C; Langlois, J

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems. (review)

  6. Behavioural equivalence for infinite systems - Partially decidable!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Kim; Nielsen, Mogens

    1996-01-01

    For finite-state systems non-interleaving equivalences are computationally at least as hard as interleaving equivalences. In this paper we show that when moving to infinite-state systems, this situation may change dramatically. We compare standard language equivalence for process description...... languages with two generalizations based on traditional approaches capturing non-interleaving behaviour, pomsets representing global causal dependency, and locality representing spatial distribution of events. We first study equivalences on Basic Parallel Processes, BPP, a process calculus equivalent...... to communication free Petri nets. For this simple process language our two notions of non-interleaving equivalences agree. More interestingly, we show that they are decidable, contrasting a result of Hirshfeld that standard interleaving language equivalence is undecidable. Our result is inspired by a recent result...

  7. Comparison of bacterial counts obtained from naturally contaminated foods by means of Stomacher and blender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, U; Sharpe, A N; Bergener, D M; Lachapelle, G; Milling, M; Spiring, F

    1987-01-01

    Four Regional Health Protection Branch laboratories each compared aerobic colony counts obtained after "stomaching" and blending, for a minimum of 10 samples in each of the seven food groups: dry pastas; chocolate and cocoa powders; frozen entrees (macaroni and cheese, chow mein, chop suey, fried rice, seafood casseroles, and Salisbury steak); nonfat dry milk; shrimp and crabmeats; spices; and breakfast sausages. Overall, counts obtained after using the Stomacher were equivalent to or higher than counts obtained after using the blender in 73% of the comparisons (alpha = 0.05). Where differences existed, counts obtained after using the Stomacher tended to be higher than counts obtained after using the blender from milk powder and lower from sausage. Aerobic colony counts from these foods are not unacceptably biased when obtained by Stomacher.

  8. Direct-reading dial for noise temperature and noise resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J.M.

    1967-01-01

    An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance.......An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance....

  9. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  10. A new microcalorimeter concept for photon counting X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.H.; Labov, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    We present an innovative approach for performing photon counting X-ray spectroscopy with cryogenic microcalorimeters. The detector concept takes advantage of the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant in ferroelectric materials. A dielectric calorimeter has many potential advantages over traditional resistive devices, particularly in the reduction of Johnson noise. This makes the energy resolution for photon counting spectroscopy limited only to the noise produced by the intrinsic temperature fluctuations of the device. The detector concept is presented and its predicted performance is compared with resistive calorimeters. Calculations have shown that practical instruments operating with an energy resolution less than 20 eV may be possible at 300 mK. (orig.)

  11. Noise suppression in duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Barfeh, M.A.G.

    2001-01-01

    In air-conditioning system the noise generated by supply fan is carried by conditioned air through the ductwork. The noise created in ductwork run may be transmission, regenerative and ductborne. Transmission noise is fan noise, regenerative noise is due to turbulence in flow and ductborne noise is the noise radiating from duct to surroundings. Some noise is attenuated in ducts also but if noise level is high then it needs to be attenuated. A simple mitre bend can attenuate-noise. This principle is extended to V and M-shape ducts with inside lining of fibreglass, which gave maximum attenuation of 77 dB and 62 dB respectively corresponding to 8 kHz frequency as compared to mitre, bend giving maximum 18 dB attenuation. Sound level meter measured sound levels with octave band filter and tests were conducted in anechoic room. A V-shape attenuator can be used at fan outlet and high frequency noise can be minimized greatly. (author)

  12. Active3 noise reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-01-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Active noise cancellation algorithms for impulsive noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Yu, Xun

    2013-04-01

    Impulsive noise is an important challenge for the practical implementation of active noise control (ANC) systems. The advantages and disadvantages of popular filtered- X least mean square (FXLMS) ANC algorithm and nonlinear filtered-X least mean M-estimate (FXLMM) algorithm are discussed in this paper. A new modified FXLMM algorithm is also proposed to achieve better performance in controlling impulsive noise. Computer simulations and experiments are carried out for all three algorithms and the results are presented and analyzed. The results show that the FXLMM and modified FXLMM algorithms are more robust in suppressing the adverse effect of sudden large amplitude impulses than FXLMS algorithm, and in particular, the proposed modified FXLMM algorithm can achieve better stability without sacrificing the performance of residual noise when encountering impulses.

  14. Flicker (1/f) noise in tunnel junction DC SQUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.H.; Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Martinis, J.M.; Pegrum, C.M.; Van Harlingen, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured the spectral density of the 1/f voltage noise in current-biased resistively shunted Josephson tunnel junctions and dc SQUIDs. A theory in which fluctuations in the temperature give rise to fluctuations in the critical current and hence in the voltage predicts the magnitude of the noise quite accurately for junctions with areas of about 2 x 10 4 μm 2 , but significantly overestimates the noise for junctions with areas of about 6 μm 2 . DC SQUIDs fabricated from these two types of junctions exhibit substantially more 1/f voltage noise than would be predicted from a model in which the noise arises from critical current fluctuations in the junctions. This result was confirmed by an experiment involving two different bias current and flux modulation schemes, which demonstrated that the predominant 1/f voltage noise arises not from critical current fluctuations, but from some unknown source that can be regarded as an apparent 1/f flux noise. Measurements on five different configurations of dc SQUIDs fabricated with thin-film tunnel junctions and with widely varying areas, inductances, and junction capacitances show that the spectral density of the 1/f equivalent flux noise is roughtly constant, within a factor of three of (10 -10 /f)phi 2 0 Hz -1 . It is emphasized that 1/f flux noise may not be the predominant source of 1/f noise in SQUIDS fabricated with other technologies

  15. Audible Noise Measurement and Analysis of the Main Power Apparatus in UHV GIS Substations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Nian Guang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of audible noise characteristics of the main power apparatus in UHV GIS substations provides essential statistics for the noise prediction and control. Noise pressure level, spectrum and attenuation characteristics of the main transformers and high voltage (HV reactors are measured and analyzed in this paper. The result shows that the main transformer and HV reactor have identical A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level. The medium- and low-frequency noises are the primary components in the spectral. More attention should be paid to the low-frequency bands in the noise control process. The noise of cooling fan has a large influence on that of the main transformer. Without the consideration of corona noise, the average A-weighted sound pressure level shows an overall decreasing trend with the increase of the propagation distance. Obvious interference phenomenon of the noises at 100 and 200Hz exists in the noise propagation process.

  16. SUBMILLIMETER NUMBER COUNTS FROM STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF BLAST MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patanchon, Guillaume; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    We describe the application of a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts from confusion-limited observations by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). Our method is based on a maximum likelihood fit to the pixel histogram, sometimes called 'P(D)', an approach which has been used before to probe faint counts, the difference being that here we advocate its use even for sources with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios. This method has an advantage over standard techniques of source extraction in providing an unbiased estimate of the counts from the bright end down to flux densities well below the confusion limit. We specifically analyze BLAST observations of a roughly 10 deg 2 map centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South field. We provide estimates of number counts at the three BLAST wavelengths 250, 350, and 500 μm; instead of counting sources in flux bins we estimate the counts at several flux density nodes connected with power laws. We observe a generally very steep slope for the counts of about -3.7 at 250 μm, and -4.5 at 350 and 500 μm, over the range ∼0.02-0.5 Jy, breaking to a shallower slope below about 0.015 Jy at all three wavelengths. We also describe how to estimate the uncertainties and correlations in this method so that the results can be used for model-fitting. This method should be well suited for analysis of data from the Herschel satellite.

  17. AN INVESTIGATION OF COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO URBAN TRAFFIC NOISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Mohammadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Traffic noise is a major environmental source of pollution in the whole planet, both in developed and in developing nations. The study being reported here has been carried out on one of the most busy and crowded streets in the downtown area of Kerman, located in south east of Iran, which have heavy traffic during the day. Total of 20 measuring points were selected along the main road and its 6 connecting streets. In this study the A-weighted continuous equivalent sound level values and statistical levels were manually measured at each site separately. The noise equivalent level varied between 66 to 79.5 dBA. The results of the study established the fact that noise levels are more than the acceptable limit of 60 dBA, which is the daytime governmentally prescribed noise limit for residential-commercial areas. This paper also describes the reaction of the environmental noise of the city of Kerman. A total of 250 questionnaires were processed. The results of the interview questionnaire revealed the following items; (I the main isolated noise source was traffic (50% and street noise (34%; (II 70% of the people classified the noise in his/her street as “very high”; (III 52% and 48% of the respondents answered that noise bother them more in morning and evening, respectively; (IV 86% and 86.8% of the subjects answered that traffic noise produce physicsl and psychological annoyance to them; (V the main outcomes of exposure to noise were: irritability (40.8%, insomnia (24%, difficulty in concentrating (16% and conservation disruption (16%.

  18. Advanced Noise Control Fan: A 20-Year Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The ANCF test bed is used for evaluating fan noise reduction concepts, developing noise measurement technologies, and providing a database for Aero-acoustic code development. Rig Capabilities: 4 foot 16 bladed rotor @ 2500 rpm, Auxiliary air delivery system (3 lbm/sec @ 6/12 psi), Variable configuration (rotor pitch angle, stator count/position, duct length), synthetic acoustic noise generation (tone/broadband). Measurement Capabilities: 112 channels dynamic data system, Unique rotating rake mode measuremen, Farfield (variable radius), Duct wall microphones, Stator vane microphones, Two component CTA w/ traversing, ESP for static pressures.

  19. Daily Snow Depth and SWE from GPS Signal-to-Noise Ratios, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of daily snow depths and snow-water equivalents (SWEs) estimated from GPS signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Snow depth is determined by...

  20. Hanford whole body counting manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1990-06-01

    This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs

  1. Equivalence in Bilingual Lexicography: Criticism and Suggestions*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Ernst Wiegand

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: A reminder of general problems in the formation of terminology, as illustrated by theGerman Äquivalence (Eng. equivalence and äquivalent (Eng. equivalent, is followed by a critical discussionof the concept of equivalence in contrastive lexicology. It is shown that especially the conceptof partial equivalence is contradictory in its different manifestations. Consequently attemptsare made to give a more precise indication of the concept of equivalence in the metalexicography,with regard to the domain of the nominal lexicon. The problems of especially the metalexicographicconcept of partial equivalence as well as that of divergence are fundamentally expounded.In conclusion the direction is indicated to find more appropriate metalexicographic versions of theconcept of equivalence.

    Keywords: EQUIVALENCE, LEXICOGRAPHIC EQUIVALENT, PARTIAL EQUIVALENCE,CONGRUENCE, DIVERGENCE, CONVERGENCE, POLYDIVERGENCE, SYNTAGM-EQUIVALENCE,ZERO EQUIVALENCE, CORRESPONDENCE

    Abstrakt: Äquivalenz in der zweisprachigen Lexikographie: Kritik und Vorschläge.Nachdem an allgemeine Probleme der Begriffsbildung am Beispiel von dt. Äquivalenzund dt. äquivalent erinnert wurde, wird zunächst auf Äquivalenzbegriffe in der kontrastiven Lexikologiekritisch eingegangen. Es wird gezeigt, dass insbesondere der Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenzin seinen verschiedenen Ausprägungen widersprüchlich ist. Sodann werden Präzisierungenzu den Äquivalenzbegriffen in der Metalexikographie versucht, die sich auf den Bereich der Nennlexikbeziehen. Insbesondere der metalexikographische Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenz sowie derder Divergenz werden grundsätzlich problematisiert. In welche Richtung man gehen kann, umangemessenere metalexikographische Fassungen des Äquivalenzbegriffs zu finden, wird abschließendangedeutet.

    Stichwörter: ÄQUIVALENZ, LEXIKOGRAPHISCHES ÄQUIVALENT, PARTIELLE ÄQUIVALENZ,KONGRUENZ, DIVERGENZ, KONVERGENZ, POLYDIVERGENZ

  2. Equivalences of real submanifolds in complex space.

    OpenAIRE

    ZAITSEV, DMITRI

    2001-01-01

    PUBLISHED We show that for any real-analytic submanifold M in CN there is a proper real-analytic subvariety V contained in M such that for any p ? M \\ V , any real-analytic submanifold M? in CN, and any p? ? M?, the germs of the submanifolds M and M? at p and p? respectively are formally equivalent if and only if they are biholomorphically equivalent. More general results for k-equivalences are also stated and proved.

  3. Equivalent Simplification Method of Micro-Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Cai Changchun; Cao Xiangqin

    2013-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the equivalent simplification method for the micro-grid system connection into distributed network. The equivalent simplification method proposed for interaction study between micro-grid and distributed network. Micro-grid network, composite load, gas turbine synchronous generation, wind generation are equivalent simplification and parallel connect into the point of common coupling. A micro-grid system is built and three phase and single phase grounded faults are per...

  4. The Complexity of Identifying Large Equivalence Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven; Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    1999-01-01

    We prove that at least 3k−4/k(2k−3)(n/2) – O(k)equivalence tests and no more than 2/k (n/2) + O(n) equivalence tests are needed in the worst case to identify the equivalence classes with at least k members in set of n elements. The upper bound is an improvement by a factor 2 compared to known res...

  5. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed

  6. Fabrication of a set of realistic torso phantoms for calibration of transuranic nuclide lung counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, A.L.; Sundbeck, C.W.; Alderson, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    A set of 16 tissue equivalent torso phantoms has been fabricated for use by major laboratories involved in counting transuranic nuclides in the lung. These phantoms, which have bone equivalent plastic rib cages, duplicate the performance of the DOE Realistic Phantom set. The new phantoms (and their successors) provide the user laboratories with a highly realistic calibration tool. Moreover, use of these phantoms will allow participating laboratories to intercompare calibration information, both on formal and informal bases. 3 refs., 2 figs

  7. A frequency-domain derivation of shot-noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A formula for shot-noise is derived in the frequency-domain. The derivation is complete and reasonably rigorous while being appropriate for undergraduate students; it models a sequence of random pulses using Fourier sine and cosine series, and requires some basic statistical concepts. The text here may serve as a pedagogic introduction to the spectral analysis of random processes and may prove useful to introduce students to the logic behind stochastic problems. The concepts of noise power spectral density and equivalent noise bandwidth are introduced.

  8. City & Rural KIDS COUNT Data Book. KIDS COUNT Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This publication provides the objective data needed to track and monitor the well-being of children in different types of American communities. It is part of the ongoing work of the Casey Foundation -- advanced primarily through our KIDS COUNT initiative -- designed to give policymakers data that can help them better understand how conditions of…

  9. Improving the sensitivity of velocity measurements in laser speckle contrast imaging using a noise correction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Lv, Wenzhi; Chen, Xiao; Lu, Jinling; Li, Pengcheng

    2017-11-15

    We demonstrate that noise is an important factor contributing to the decline of sensitivity and linear response range of velocity measurements for laser speckle contrast imaging. We propose to use a noise correction method to improve the sensitivity of velocity measurements. For a kind of camera in which the mean values of the dark noise have been subtracted and negative counts have been set to zero, we propose a method to estimate the true dark noise based on the maximum likelihood estimation, which expands the application scope of the noise correction method.

  10. Adaptive noise cancellation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, N.

    1999-01-01

    In this report we describe the concept of adaptive noise canceling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise of interference. The method uses 'primary' input containing the corrupted signal and a 'reference' input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise, the reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. When the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met then noise in the primary input can be essentially eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that the adaptive filter also acts as notch filter. Simulated results illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise canceling technique. (author)

  11. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Christopher

    levels that shows good agreement with 85% of the temporal data. Bed stresses associated with currents can produce propagating ambient noise by mobilizing sediments. The strength of the tidal currents in northern Admiralty Inlet produces bed stresses in excess of 20 Pa. Significant increases in noise levels at frequencies from 4-30 kHz, with more modest increases noted from 1-4 kHz, are attributed to mobilized sediments. Sediment-generated noise during strong currents masks background noise from other sources, including vessel traffic. Inversions of the acoustic spectra for equivalent grain sizes are consistent with qualitative observations of the seabed composition. Bed stress calculations using log layer, Reynolds stress, and inertial dissipation techniques generally agree well and are used to estimate the shear stresses at which noise levels increase for different grain sizes. Ambient noise levels in one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 1 kHz to 25 kHz are dominated by sediment-generated noise and can be accurately predicted using the near-bed current velocity above a critical threshold. When turbulence is advected over a pressure sensitive transducer, the turbulent pressure fluctuations can be measured as noise, though these pressure fluctuations are not propagating sound and should not be interpreted as ambient noise. Based on measurements in both Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound and the Chacao Channel, Chile, two models are developed for flow-noise. The first model combined measurements of mean current velocities and turbulence and agrees well with data from both sites. The second model uses scaling arguments to model the flow-noise based solely on the mean current velocity. This model agrees well with the data from the Chacao Channel but performs poorly in Admiralty Inlet, a difference attributed to differences turbulence production mechanisms. At both sites, the spectral slope of flow noise follows a f-3.2 dependence, suggesting partial cancellation of

  12. Software design of automatic counting system for nuclear track based on mathematical morphology algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yi; Mao Wanchong

    2010-01-01

    The parameter measurement of nuclear track occupies an important position in the field of nuclear technology. However, traditional artificial counting method has many limitations. In recent years, DSP and digital image processing technology have been applied in nuclear field more and more. For the sake of reducing errors of visual measurement in artificial counting method, an automatic counting system for nuclear track based on DM642 real-time image processing platform is introduced in this article, which is able to effectively remove interferences from the background and noise points, as well as automatically extract nuclear track-points by using mathematical morphology algorithm. (authors)

  13. A pulse stacking method of particle counting applied to position sensitive detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basilier, E.

    1976-03-01

    A position sensitive particle counting system is described. A cyclic readout imaging device serves as an intermediate information buffer. Pulses are allowed to stack in the imager at very high counting rates. Imager noise is completely discriminated to provide very wide dynamic range. The system has been applied to a detector using cascaded microchannel plates. Pulse height spread produced by the plates causes some loss of information. The loss is comparable to the input loss of the plates. The improvement in maximum counting rate is several hundred times over previous systems that do not permit pulse stacking. (Auth.)

  14. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  15. What can we learn from noise? - Mesoscopic nonequilibrium statistical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscopic systems - small electric circuits working in quantum regime - offer us a unique experimental stage to explorer quantum transport in a tunable and precise way. The purpose of this Review is to show how they can contribute to statistical physics. We introduce the significance of fluctuation, or equivalently noise, as noise measurement enables us to address the fundamental aspects of a physical system. The significance of the fluctuation theorem (FT) in statistical physics is noted. We explain what information can be deduced from the current noise measurement in mesoscopic systems. As an important application of the noise measurement to statistical physics, we describe our experimental work on the current and current noise in an electron interferometer, which is the first experimental test of FT in quantum regime. Our attempt will shed new light in the research field of mesoscopic quantum statistical physics.

  16. A CMOS low-noise instrumentation amplifier using chopper modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Bruun, Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a low-power, low-noise chopper stabilized CMOS instrumentation amplifier for biomedical applications. Low thermal noise is achieved by employing MOSTs biased in the weak/moderate inversion region, whereas chopper stabilization is utilized to shift 1/f-noise out of the signal...... band hereby ensuring overall low noise performance. The resulting equivalent input referred noise is approximately 7 nV/rootHz for a chopping frequency of 20 kHz. The amplifier operates from a modest supply voltage of 1.8 V, drawing 136 muA of current thus consuming 245 muW of power. The gain is 72.5 d...

  17. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  18. Noise in biological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L; Cox, Chris D; Allen, Michael S; McCollum, James M; Dar, Roy D; Karig, David K; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and review many of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Noise upon the Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity’s (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...

  20. Noise exposure assessment with task-based measurement in complex noise environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Yang, Qiu-ling; Zeng, Lin; Zhu, Liang-liang; Tao, Li-yuan; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Yi-ming

    2011-05-01

    Task-based measurement (TBM) is a method to assess the eight-hour A-weighted equivalent noise exposure level (L(Aeq.8h)) besides dosimeter. TBM can be better used in factories by non-professional workers and staffs. However, it is still not clear if TBM is equal or similar with dosimeter for L(Aeq.8h) measurement in general. This study considered the measurement with dosimeter as real personal noise exposure level (PNEL) and assessed the accuracy of TBM by comparing the consistencies of TBM and dosimeter in L(Aeq.8h) measurement. The study was conducted in one automobile firm among 387 workers who are exposed to unstable noise. Dosimeters and TBM were used to compare the two strategies and assess the degree of agreement and causes of disagreement. Worker's PNEL was measured via TBM for noise; the real PNEL was also recorded. The TBM for noise was computed with task/position noise levels measured via sound level meter and workers' exposure information collected via working diary forms (WDF) filled by participants themselves. Full-shift noise exposure measurement via personal noise dosimeters were taken as the real PNEL. General linear model (GLM) was built to analyze the accuracy of TBM for noise and the source of difference between TBM for noise and real PNEL. The L(Aeq.8h) with TBM were slightly higher than the real PNELs, except the electricians. Differences of the two values had statistical significance in stamping workers (P < 0.001), assembly workers (P = 0.015) and welding workers (P = 0.001). The correlation coefficient of L(Aeq.8h) with TBM and real PNELs was 0.841. Differences of the two results were mainly affected by real PNEL (F = 11.27, P = 0.001); and work groups (F = 3.11, P < 0.001) divided by jobs and workshops were also independent factors. PNEL of workers with fixed task/position ((86.53 ± 8.82) dB(A)) was higher than those without ((75.76 ± 9.92) dB(A)) (t = 8.84, P < 0.01). Whether workers had fixed task/position was another factor on the

  1. Flow equivalence and isotopy for subshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Mike; Carlsen, Toke Meier; Eilers, Søren

    2017-01-01

    We study basic properties of flow equivalence on one-dimensional compact metric spaces with a particular emphasis on isotopy in the group of (self-) flow equivalences on such a space. In particular, we show that such an orbit-preserving map is not always an isotopy, but that this always is the case...

  2. 21 CFR 26.6 - Equivalence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) The criteria to be used by the parties to assess equivalence are listed in appendix D of this subpart. Information pertaining to the criteria under European Community (EC) competence will be provided... draft programs for assessing the equivalence of the respective regulatory systems in terms of quality...

  3. Equivalent drawbead performance in deep drawing simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, Vincent T.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han

    1999-01-01

    Drawbeads are applied in the deep drawing process to improve the control of the material flow during the forming operation. In simulations of the deep drawing process these drawbeads can be replaced by an equivalent drawbead model. In this paper the usage of an equivalent drawbead model in the

  4. Equivalency Programmes (EPs) for Promoting Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Equivalency programmes (EPs) refers to alternative education programmes that are equivalent to the formal education system in terms of curriculum and certification, policy support mechanisms, mode of delivery, staff training, and other support activities such as monitoring, evaluation and assessment. The development of EPs is potentially an…

  5. 7 CFR 1032.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1032.54 Section 1032.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1032.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  6. 7 CFR 1124.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1124.54 Section 1124.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1124.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  7. 7 CFR 1000.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1000.54 Section 1000.54 Agriculture... Prices § 1000.54 Equivalent price. If for any reason a price or pricing constituent required for computing the prices described in § 1000.50 is not available, the market administrator shall use a price or...

  8. 7 CFR 1006.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1006.54 Section 1006.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1006.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  9. 7 CFR 1030.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1030.54 Section 1030.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1030.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. ...

  10. 7 CFR 1001.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1001.54 Section 1001.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1001.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  11. 7 CFR 1007.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1007.54 Section 1007.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1007.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  12. 7 CFR 1126.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1126.54 Section 1126.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1126.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  13. 7 CFR 1131.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1131.54 Section 1131.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1131.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  14. 7 CFR 1005.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1005.54 Section 1005.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1005.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  15. 7 CFR 1033.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1033.54 Section 1033.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1033.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  16. What is Metaphysical Equivalence? | Miller | Philosophical Papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theories are metaphysically equivalent just if there is no fact of the matter that could render one theory true and the other false. In this paper I argue that if we are judiciously to resolve disputes about whether theories are equivalent or not, we need to develop testable criteria that will give us epistemic access to the obtaining ...

  17. Mania and Behavioral Equivalents: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmey, Peter; Laud, Rinita B.; Cooper, Christopher L.; Matson, Johnny L.; Fodstad, Jill C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has failed to address the possibility of behavioral equivalents in people with ID and mania. The relationship between a measure of mania and possible behavioral equivalents was assessed in 693 adults, most with severe or profound ID, living in a large residential setting. The mania subscale of the DASH-II proved to be a…

  18. Sounds and Noises. A Position Paper on Noise Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Thomas L.

    This position paper focuses on noise pollution and the problems and solutions associated with this form of pollution. The paper is divided into the following five sections: Noise and the Ear, Noise Measurement, III Effects of Noise, Acoustics and Action, and Programs and Activities. The first section identifies noise and sound, the beginnings of…

  19. Noise and Health: How does noise affect us?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Noise annoyance is a primary indication that noise is a problem, and by itself noise annoyance means that the quality of life is adversely affected. Results from noise annoyance research are presented that make possible a detailed evaluation of noise exposures with respect to the annoyance induced.

  20. Kids Count Data Sheet, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    Data from the 50 United States are listed for 1997 from Kids Count in an effort to track state-by-state the status of children in the United States and to secure better futures for all children. Data include percent low birth weight babies; infant mortality rate; child death rate; rate of teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; teen birth…

  1. Verbal Counting in Bilingual Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donevska-Todorova, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Informal experiences in mathematics often include playful competitions among young children in counting numbers in as many as possible different languages. Can these enjoyable experiences result with excellence in the formal processes of education? This article discusses connections between mathematical achievements and natural languages within…

  2. Logistic regression for dichotomized counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisser, John S; Das, Kalyan; Benecha, Habtamu; Stamm, John W

    2016-12-01

    Sometimes there is interest in a dichotomized outcome indicating whether a count variable is positive or zero. Under this scenario, the application of ordinary logistic regression may result in efficiency loss, which is quantifiable under an assumed model for the counts. In such situations, a shared-parameter hurdle model is investigated for more efficient estimation of regression parameters relating to overall effects of covariates on the dichotomous outcome, while handling count data with many zeroes. One model part provides a logistic regression containing marginal log odds ratio effects of primary interest, while an ancillary model part describes the mean count of a Poisson or negative binomial process in terms of nuisance regression parameters. Asymptotic efficiency of the logistic model parameter estimators of the two-part models is evaluated with respect to ordinary logistic regression. Simulations are used to assess the properties of the models with respect to power and Type I error, the latter investigated under both misspecified and correctly specified models. The methods are applied to data from a randomized clinical trial of three toothpaste formulations to prevent incident dental caries in a large population of Scottish schoolchildren. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

    This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school dropouts; and (8)…

  4. South Carolina Kids Count, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, A. Baron

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 42 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  5. South Carolina Kids Count, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, A. Baron

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 41 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  6. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

  7. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school…

  8. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

  9. Vote Counting as Mathematical Proof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Pattinson, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    -based formalisation of voting protocols inside a theorem prover, we synthesise vote counting programs that are not only provably correct, but also produce independently verifiable certificates. These programs are generated from a (formal) proof that every initial set of ballots allows to decide the election winner...

  10. Counting a Culture of Mealworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Math is not the only topic that will be discussed when young children are asked to care for and count "mealworms," a type of insect larvae (just as caterpillars are the babies of butterflies, these larvae are babies of beetles). The following activity can take place over two months as the beetles undergo metamorphosis from larvae to adults. As the…

  11. Counting problems for number rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakenhoff, Johannes Franciscus

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we look at three counting problems connected to orders in number fields. First we study the probability that for a random polynomial f in Z[X] the ring Z[X]/f is the maximal order in Q[X]/f. Connected to this is the probability that a random polynomial has a squarefree

  12. Carbon fiber counting. [aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for characterizing the number and lengths of carbon fibers accidentally released by the burning of composite portions of civil aircraft structure in a jet fuel fire after an accident. Representative samplings of carbon fibers collected on transparent sticky film were counted from photographic enlargements with a computer aided technique which also provided fiber lengths.

  13. Liquid scintillation, counting, and compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, E.A.; Tolbert, B.M.; Sutula, C.L.

    1975-01-01

    The emissions of radioactive isotopes in both aqueous and organic samples can be measured by liquid scintillation counting in micellar systems. The micellar systems are made up of scintillation solvent, scintillation solute and a mixture of surfactants, preferably at least one of which is relatively oil-soluble water-insoluble and another which is relatively water-soluble oil-insoluble

  14. Phase space quark counting rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei-gin, C.; Lo, S.

    1980-01-01

    A simple quark counting rule based on phase space consideration suggested before is used to fit all 39 recent experimental data points on inclusive reactions. Parameter free relations are found to agree with experiments. Excellent detail fits are obtained for 11 inclusive reactions

  15. Low Count Anomaly Detection at Large Standoff Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, David Michael; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Kiff, Scott D.; Sidor, Daniel E.

    2010-02-01

    Searching for hidden illicit sources of gamma radiation in an urban environment is difficult. Background radiation profiles are variable and cluttered with transient acquisitions from naturally occurring radioactive materials and medical isotopes. Potentially threatening sources likely will be nearly hidden in this noise and encountered at high standoff distances and low threat count rates. We discuss an anomaly detection algorithm that characterizes low count sources as threatening or non-threatening and operates well in the presence of high benign source variability. We discuss the algorithm parameters needed to reliably find sources both close to the detector and far away from it. These parameters include the cutoff frequencies of background tracking filters and the integration time of the spectrometer. This work is part of the development of the Standoff Radiation Imaging System (SORIS) as part of DNDO's Standoff Radiation Detection System Advanced Technology Demonstration (SORDS-ATD) program.

  16. Full counting statistics of a single-molecule quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bing; Ding, G. H.; Lei, X. L.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the full counting statistics of a single quantum dot strongly coupled to a local phonon and weakly tunnel connected to two metallic electrodes. By employing the generalized nonequilibrium Green-function method and the Lang-Firsov transformation, we derive an explicit analytical formula for the cumulant generating function, which makes one able to identify distinctly the elastic and inelastic contributions to the current and zero-frequency shot noise. We find that at zero temperature, the inelastic effect causes upward steps in the current and downward jumps in the noise at the bias voltages corresponding to the opening of the inelastic channels, which are ascribed to the vibration-induced complex dependencies of electronic self-energies on the energy and bias voltage. More interestingly, the Fano factor exhibits oscillatory behavior with increasing bias voltage and its minimum value is observed to be smaller than one-half.

  17. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  18. Investigation into the Dependence of Noise Generated By Standing Cars on the Engine Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Gineika

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ambient noise harms a number of citizens in Europe. The major sources of environmental noise are that generated by cars in streets, parking lots, railway lines and airports as well as noise from local sources (fans, transformers. According to the methodology for noise measurement, engine testing has been carried out. The conducted analysis has been focused on engine capacity and the distance between vehicles and equipment. Equivalent, maximum and minimum sound levels at different frequencies have been measured accepting that errors may range up to 2 %. Maximum sound level has been reached using the engine of 2000 cm3 petrol capacity. At a half-meter distance, the equivalent sound level reaches 89 dB(A, whereas the noise level decreases moving away from the car. The obtained results of tested cars disclose that according to engine capacity, the majority of the investigated cars are technically faulty and therefore significantly exceed noise levels.Article in Lithuanian

  19. Numerical Algorithm For Digital Image Enhancement And Noise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We adopt the approach of Vogel and Oman, 1998 and introduce a Lagrange multiplier Ibiejugba, 1985, to obtain an appropriate discrete energy which we minimize, in order to minimize equivalently, the unwanted vibration (noise) associated with a digitally transmitted image. An iterative algorithm is developed for this ...

  20. The equivalency between logic Petri workflow nets and workflow nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yu, ShuXia; Du, YuYue

    2015-01-01

    Logic Petri nets (LPNs) can describe and analyze batch processing functions and passing value indeterminacy in cooperative systems. Logic Petri workflow nets (LPWNs) are proposed based on LPNs in this paper. Process mining is regarded as an important bridge between modeling and analysis of data mining and business process. Workflow nets (WF-nets) are the extension to Petri nets (PNs), and have successfully been used to process mining. Some shortcomings cannot be avoided in process mining, such as duplicate tasks, invisible tasks, and the noise of logs. The online shop in electronic commerce in this paper is modeled to prove the equivalence between LPWNs and WF-nets, and advantages of LPWNs are presented.

  1. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  2. Pixel-Cluster Counting Luminosity Measurement In ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)782710; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement of the delivered luminosity is a key component of the ATLAS physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A fundamental ingredient of the strategy to control the systematic uncertainties affecting the absolute luminosity has been to compare the measure- ments of several luminometers, most of which use more than one counting technique. The level of consistency across the various methods provides valuable cross-checks as well as an estimate of the detector-related systematic uncertainties. This poster describes the development of a luminosity algorithm based on pixel-cluster counting in the recently installed ATLAS inner b-layer (IBL), using data recorded during the 2015 pp run at the LHC. The noise and background contamination of the luminosity-associated cluster count is minimized by a multi-component fit to the measured cluster-size distribution in the forward pixel modules of the IBL. The linearity, long-term stability and statistical precision of the cluster- counting method a...

  3. Noise in miniature microphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen C; LoPresti, Janice L; Ring, Eugene M; Nepomuceno, Henry G; Beard, John J; Ballad, William J; Carlson, Elmer V

    2002-02-01

    The internal noise spectrum in miniature electret microphones of the type used in the manufacture of hearing aids is measured. An analogous circuit model of the microphone is empirically fit to the measured data and used to determine the important sources of noise within the microphone. The dominant noise source is found to depend on the frequency. Below 40 Hz and above 9 kHz, the dominant source is electrical noise from the amplifier circuit needed to buffer the electrical signal from the microphone diaphragm. Between approximately 40 Hz and 1 kHz, the dominant source is thermal noise originating in the acoustic flow resistance of the small hole pierced in the diaphragm to equalize barometric pressure. Between approximately 1 kHz and 9 kHz, the noise originates in the acoustic flow resistances of sound entering the microphone and propagating to the diaphragm. To further reduce the microphone internal noise in the audio band requires attacking these sources. A prototype microphone having reduced acoustical noise is measured and discussed.

  4. Effects of traffic noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlob, D.

    1986-02-01

    One of the main sources of noise is road traffic. In 1984 there were over 25 million cars, 1.2 million lorries, 1.3 million motor cycles and 1.6 million mopeds using our roads. Opinion polls showed that 21% of the population felt that they were affected by traffic noise as a nuisance factor. An outline of the effects of this noise on the affected population is given, illustrated by diagrams. Details about noise emissions (drive-past level) of the different types of vehicles in city traffic are stated and the effects of noise described. The author goes into the nuisance effect (noise is not a physical factor, but a psychosocial one), changes in behaviour (ways of speaking, reduction of stress on households in proportion to rising income and higher educational levels) and the consequences for health (the reaction of the body to noise is primarily a consequence of the psychosomatic organisation of ow bodies). In conclusion, the author deals with the subjective efficiency of noise protection measures. (HWJ).

  5. Mediality is Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    This PhD is concerned with the use of noise as a material within media arts practice, especially in ‘post-digital’ contexts such as glitch electronica, glitch art and uses of old media. It examines the relationship between informational culture and noise, exploring the ways in which the structuring...

  6. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...

  7. Noise from wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.; Jakobsen, J.

    1992-11-01

    Based on a previous project concerning the calculation of the amount of noise emanating from wind turbine arrays, this one examines the subject further by investigating whether there could be significant differences in the amount of noise made by individual wind turbines in an array, and whether the noise is transmitted in varying directions - so that when it is carried in the same direction as the wind blows it would appear to be louder. The aim was also to determine whether the previously used method of calculation lacked precision. It was found that differences in noise niveaux related to individual wind turbines were insignificant and that noise was not so loud when it was not borne in the direction of the wind. It was necessary to change the method of calculation as reckoning should include the influence of the terrain, wind velocity and distance. The measuring and calculation methods are exemplified and the resulting measurements are presented in detail. (AB)

  8. Noise from wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.; Larsen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Denmark has 3200 wind turbines with an installed maximum capacity of 418MW. The most important Danish research projects into wind turbine noise and the main results are listed. These date from 1983. Two comprehensive studies are currently in progress. The first is an analytical and empirical investigation of aerodynamic noise from wind turbine rotors and has so far dealt mainly with tip noise. The measurement method, using a hard board mounted microphone on the ground near the turbine, is described. Four different tip designs have been tested. Some examples of reference sound power level spectra for three of the designs are presented. During the past two years a computerbased data acquisition system has been used for real-time determination of sound power levels. The second study, which has just commenced, is on annoyance from wind turbine noise. It will include noise measurements, masking calculations and a social survey on the perceived nuisance. (UK)

  9. [Urban noise pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouard, C H

    2001-07-01

    Noise is responsible for cochlear and general damages. Hearing loss and tinnitus greatly depend on sound intensity and duration. Short-duration sound of sufficient intensity (gunshot or explosion) will not be described because they are not currently encountered in our normal urban environment. Sound levels of less than 75 d (A) are unlikely to cause permanent hearing loss, while sound levels of about 85 d (A) with exposures of 8 h per day will produce permanent hearing loss after many years. Popular and largely amplified music is today one of the most dangerous causes of noise induced hearing loss. The intensity of noises (airport, highway) responsible for stress and general consequences (cardiovascular) is generally lower. Individual noise sensibility depends on several factors. Strategies to prevent damage from sound exposure should include the use of individual hearing protection devices, education programs beginning with school-age children, consumer guidance, increased product noise labelling, and hearing conservation programs for occupational settings.

  10. A faceoff with hazardous noise: Noise exposure and hearing threshold shifts of indoor hockey officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karin L; Brazile, William J

    2017-02-01

    Noise exposure and hearing thresholds of indoor hockey officials of the Western States Hockey League were measured to assess the impact of hockey game noise on hearing sensitivity. Twenty-nine hockey officials who officiated the league in an arena in southeastern Wyoming in October, November, and December 2014 participated in the study. Personal noise dosimetry was conducted to determine if officials were exposed to an equivalent sound pressure level greater than 85 dBA. Hearing thresholds were measured before and after hockey games to determine if a 10 dB or greater temporary threshold shift in hearing occurred. Pure-tone audiometry was conducted in both ears at 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 Hz. All noise exposures were greater than 85 dBA, with a mean personal noise exposure level of 93 dBA (SD = 2.2), providing 17.7% (SD = 6.3) of the officials' daily noise dose according to the OSHA criteria. Hearing threshold shifts of 10 dB or greater were observed in 86.2% (25/29) of officials, with 36% (9/25) of those threshold shifts equaling 15 dB or greater. The largest proportion of hearing threshold shifts occurred at 4000 Hz, comprising 35.7% of right ear shifts and 31.8% of left ear shifts. The threshold shifts between the pre- and post-game audiometry were statistically significant in the left ear at 500 (p=.019), 2000 (p=.0009), 3000 (phockey officials are exposed to hazardous levels of noise, experience temporary hearing loss after officiating games, and a hearing conservation program is warranted. Further temporary threshold shift research has the potential to identify officials of other sporting events that are at an increased risk of noise-induced hearing loss.

  11. A very low noise, high accuracy, programmable voltage source for low frequency noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandurra, Graziella; Giusi, Gino; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-04-01

    In this paper an approach for designing a programmable, very low noise, high accuracy voltage source for biasing devices under test in low frequency noise measurements is proposed. The core of the system is a supercapacitor based two pole low pass filter used for filtering out the noise produced by a standard DA converter down to 100 mHz with an attenuation in excess of 40 dB. The high leakage current of the supercapacitors, however, introduces large DC errors that need to be compensated in order to obtain high accuracy as well as very low output noise. To this end, a proper circuit topology has been developed that allows to considerably reduce the effect of the supercapacitor leakage current on the DC response of the system while maintaining a very low level of output noise. With a proper design an output noise as low as the equivalent input voltage noise of the OP27 operational amplifier, used as the output buffer of the system, can be obtained with DC accuracies better that 0.05% up to the maximum output of 8 V. The expected performances of the proposed voltage source have been confirmed both by means of SPICE simulations and by means of measurements on actual prototypes. Turn on and stabilization times for the system are of the order of a few hundred seconds. These times are fully compatible with noise measurements down to 100 mHz, since measurement times of the order of several tens of minutes are required in any case in order to reduce the statistical error in the measured spectra down to an acceptable level.

  12. Comparison of classical statistical methods and artificial neural network in traffic noise prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedic, Vladimir; Despotovic, Danijela; Cvetanovic, Slobodan; Despotovic, Milan; Babic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Traffic is the main source of noise in urban environments and significantly affects human mental and physical health and labor productivity. Therefore it is very important to model the noise produced by various vehicles. Techniques for traffic noise prediction are mainly based on regression analysis, which generally is not good enough to describe the trends of noise. In this paper the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the prediction of traffic noise is presented. As input variables of the neural network, the proposed structure of the traffic flow and the average speed of the traffic flow are chosen. The output variable of the network is the equivalent noise level in the given time period L eq . Based on these parameters, the network is modeled, trained and tested through a comparative analysis of the calculated values and measured levels of traffic noise using the originally developed user friendly software package. It is shown that the artificial neural networks can be a useful tool for the prediction of noise with sufficient accuracy. In addition, the measured values were also used to calculate equivalent noise level by means of classical methods, and comparative analysis is given. The results clearly show that ANN approach is superior in traffic noise level prediction to any other statistical method. - Highlights: • We proposed an ANN model for prediction of traffic noise. • We developed originally designed user friendly software package. • The results are compared with classical statistical methods. • The results are much better predictive capabilities of ANN model

  13. Studies on the Neutron Radiation Damage Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOU De-hui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish a unified standard of the evaluation of different sources of radiation damage, the neutron radiation damage equivalent standard source was determined both at home and abroad, and a lot of equivalence research work was done for making weapons anti neutron radiation performance examination and acceptance basis. The theoretical research progress was combed according to the relationship between the displacement damage function and the radiation source spectra ,and the experimental research progress was combed from the basic experimental methods, the controlling trend of effect parameters and field parameters. The experiment method to reduce the uncertainty was discussed, and present the research directions of radiation damage equivalence.

  14. Simultaneity as an Invariant Equivalence Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamone-Capria, Marco

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the concept of simultaneity in classical and relativistic physics as construed in terms of group-invariant equivalence relations. A full examination of Newton, Galilei and Poincaré invariant equivalence relations in ℝ4 is presented, which provides alternative proofs, additions and occasionally corrections of results in the literature, including Malament's theorem and some of its variants. It is argued that the interpretation of simultaneity as an invariant equivalence relation, although interesting for its own sake, does not cut in the debate concerning the conventionality of simultaneity in special relativity.

  15. Is there a Sex Difference in Accelerometer Counts During Walking in Older Adults?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Domelen, Dane R; Caserotti, Paolo; Brychta, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Accelerometers have emerged as a useful tool for measuring free-living physical activity in epidemiological studies. Validity of activity estimates depends on the assumption that measurements are equivalent for males and females while performing activities of the same intensity. The primary purpose...... of this study was to compare accelerometer count values in males and females undergoing a standardized 6-min walk test....

  16. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  17. Temporal trends in sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Hagai; Jørgensen, Niels; Martino-Andrade, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    , method of measuring SC and semen volume, exclusion criteria and indicators of completeness of covariate data]. The slopes of SC and TSC were estimated as functions of sample collection year using both simple linear regression and weighted meta-regression models and the latter were adjusted for pre......-determined covariates and modification by fertility and geographic group. Assumptions were examined using multiple sensitivity analyses and nonlinear models. OUTCOMES: SC declined significantly between 1973 and 2011 (slope in unadjusted simple regression models -0.70 million/ml/year; 95% CI: -0.72 to -0.69; P ...BACKGROUND: Reported declines in sperm counts remain controversial today and recent trends are unknown. A definitive meta-analysis is critical given the predictive value of sperm count for fertility, morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: To provide a systematic review and meta-regression...

  18. Reference counting for reversible languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2014-01-01

    Modern programming languages and operating systems use heap memory that allows allocation and deallocation of memory to be decoupled, so they don't follow a stack discipline. Axelsen and Glück have presented a reversible heap manager where allocation and deallocation are each other's logical...... inverses: Freeing a block of memory is done by running the allocation procedure backwards. Axelsen and Glück use this heap manager to sketch implementation of a simple reversible functional language where pattern matching a constructor is the inverse of construction, so pattern-matching implies...... a pointer decreases the reference count. We show reversible implementations of operations on nodes with reference counts. We then show these operations can be used when implementing a reversible functional language RCFUN to the reversible imperative language Janus....

  19. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online.

  20. Compressed Counting Meets Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (sparse signal recovery) has been a popular and important research topic in recent years. By observing that natural signals are often nonnegative, we propose a new framework for nonnegative signal recovery using Compressed Counting (CC). CC is a technique built on maximally-skewed p-stable random projections originally developed for data stream computations. Our recovery procedure is computationally very efficient in that it requires only one linear scan of the coordinates....

  1. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Language: English (US) Español ( ... when hazardous noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog ...

  2. [HYGIENIC ASSESSMENT OF NOISE FACTOR OF THE LARGE CITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubirko, M L; Stepkin, Yu I; Seredenko, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of the negative impact of traffic noise on the health and living conditions of the population in conditions of the large city. Every day on the streets there are appeared more and more different modes of transport, and to date almost all transportation network has reached his traffic performance. The increase in traffic noise certainly has an impact on the human body. The most common and intense noise is caused by the traffic of urban automobile and electric transport. This is explained by the existence of the heavy traffic (2-3 thousand crews/h) on almost all main roads in historically emerged parts of the city. In addition, sources of external noise in the city can be a railway running in residential zone, access roads, industrial enterprises, located in close proximity to residential areas and on the borders of residential zones, planes of military and civil aviation. For the evaluation of the different noises sound levels were measured with the use of sound level meters. The most common parameter for the assessment ofthe noise generatedfrom motor vehicles on residential areas and usedfor the noise characteristics of the traffic flows, is the equivalent sound level/A EQ dB. This parameter is used in the majority of normative-technical documentation as hygienic noise standard. With the aim of the assessment of noise exposure there were selected 122 control points at intersections of roads of different traffic performance where there were made instrumental measurements the equivalent sound level, followed by its comparison with permissible levels.

  3. Monitoring Milk Somatic Cell Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Şteţca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of somatic cells in milk is a widely disputed issue in milk production sector. The somatic cell counts in raw milk are a marker for the specific cow diseases such as mastitis or swollen udder. The high level of somatic cells causes physical and chemical changes to milk composition and nutritional value, and as well to milk products. Also, the mastitic milk is not proper for human consumption due to its contribution to spreading of certain diseases and food poisoning. According to these effects, EU Regulations established the maximum threshold of admitted somatic cells in raw milk to 400000 cells / mL starting with 2014. The purpose of this study was carried out in order to examine the raw milk samples provided from small farms, industrial type farms and milk processing units. There are several ways to count somatic cells in milk but the reference accepted method is the microscopic method described by the SR EN ISO 13366-1/2008. Generally samples registered values in accordance with the admissible limit. By periodical monitoring of the somatic cell count, certain technological process issues are being avoided and consumer’s health ensured.

  4. A novel interference fringes software counting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanzhao; Chen, Benyong; Wu, Xiaowei; Li, Dacheng

    2005-02-01

    Conventional interference fringes counting methods often process two sinusoidal interference signals with a phase difference of π/2 to realize fringe-counting. But when the signals fluctuate in half a period of the signal, the conventional fringe-counting method sometimes produces direction-distinguishing mistakes, then resulting in counting errors. To address the problem, this paper presents a novel interference fringes counting method that uses software to distinguish the forward or backward direction of interference fringe and to count. This fringe-counting method can accurately distinguish the moving direction induced by the fluctuation of interference fringes, so it has the advantages of exact counting, intelligence and reliability. An experimental setup based on a Michelson interferometer is constructed to demonstrate the utility of this fringe-counting method for displacement measurement, and experimental results with a range of 1036mm is presented.

  5. Noise generation mechanisms in claw pole alternators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversman, W.; Burns, S.; Pekarek, S.; Bai, Hua; Tichenor, J.

    2005-05-01

    Noise of claw pole alternators, generated electromagnetically and structurally radiated, has been the subject of an extensive research program. The goal has been to identify and reduce noise radiation mechanisms in claw pole (Lundell) alternators used in automotive applications. Two approaches have been followed. In the first, electromagnetic sources of noise have been investigated by lumped parameter and magnetically equivalent circuit modeling and simulation, and by related experimentation. This is the subject of separate papers. The second, concurrent study reported here has investigated machine and mount responses to an electromagnetically generated torque ripple. Modeling and experimentation has led to the conclusion that there exists a high correlation between electromagnetic sources, torque ripple, and radiated noise. Experimentation also has led to the conclusion that noise characteristics of a given machine are substantially altered by modification of the mounting configuration. The work reported here involves modeling, simulation, and experiment to isolate machine dynamic characteristics and mounting geometries which contribute to strong coupling between torque ripple and machine/mount dynamic response. A low-order model of the alternator which includes shaft flexibility, gyroscopic effects, shaft bearing asymmetry, mounting lug geometry, and mounting structure dynamics has been created. The model provides a rapid simulation of dynamic response in the form of a transfer function between torque ripple and mounting forces. Generic studies of a simplified mounting structure coupled to the machine model are presented here. Acoustic testing of several machine configurations on a production mount has been carried out to investigate 36th order noise in three phase machines and 72nd order noise in six-phase machines. Electromagnetic modeling and dynamic response simulations suggest that the six-phase machine is inherently quieter. This is supported by

  6. Handbook Of Noise And Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This book is about noise and vibration. The first chapter has explanations of noise such as basic of sound, influence of noise, assessment of noise, measurement of prevention of noise and technology, case of noise measurement and soundproof. The second chapter describes vibration with outline, theory of vibration, interpretation of vibration, measurement for reduction of vibration, case of design of protection against vibration. It deals with related regulation and method of measurement.

  7. Equivalent resistors of polyhedral resistive structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steenwijk, FJ

    The equivalent resistors of regular polyhedral resistive structures between any two of the vertices are calculated in terms of the characteristic properties of the structures. Some special cases are considered. (C) 1998 American Association of Physics Teachers.

  8. The gauge principle vs. the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, S.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Within the context of field theory, it is argued that the role of the equivalence principle may be replaced by the principle of gauge invariance to provide a logical framework for theories of gravitation

  9. The effective theory of Borel equivalence relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokina, E.B.; Friedman, S.-D.; Törnquist, Asger Dag

    2010-01-01

    effectively Borel sets of reals, neither of which contains the range of the other under any effectively Borel function; the proof of this result applies Barwise compactness to a deep theorem of Harrington (see [5,16]) establishing for any recursive ordinal α the existence of Π singletons whose α...... equality on ω is above equality on P (ω), the power set of ω, and any Borel equivalence relation strictly above equality on the reals is above equality modulo finite on P (ω). In this article we examine the effective content of these and related results by studying effectively Borel equivalence relations...... under effectively Borel reducibility. The resulting structure is complex, even for equivalence relations with finitely many equivalence classes. However use of Kleene's O as a parameter is sufficient to restore the picture from the noneffective setting. A key lemma is that of the existence of two...

  10. Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, M

    2000-07-01

    Where do equivalence relations come from? One possible answer is that they arise directly from the reinforcement contingency. That is to say, a reinforcement contingency produces two types of outcome: (a) 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, or n-term units of analysis that are known, respectively, as operant reinforcement, simple discrimination, conditional discrimination, second-order conditional discrimination, and so on; and (b) equivalence relations that consist of ordered pairs of all positive elements that participate in the contingency. This conception of the origin of equivalence relations leads to a number of new and verifiable ways of conceptualizing equivalence relations and, more generally, the stimulus control of operant behavior. The theory is also capable of experimental disproof.

  11. Equivalence Principle, Higgs Boson and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Francaviglia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss here possible tests for Palatini f(R-theories together with their implications for different formulations of the Equivalence Principle. We shall show that Palatini f(R-theories obey the Weak Equivalence Principle and violate the Strong Equivalence Principle. The violations of the Strong Equivalence Principle vanish in vacuum (and purely electromagnetic solutions as well as on short time scales with respect to the age of the universe. However, we suggest that a framework based on Palatini f(R-theories is more general than standard General Relativity (GR and it sheds light on the interpretation of data and results in a way which is more model independent than standard GR itself.

  12. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  13. Dose equivalent rate calculation tool for FBFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porte, R.; Lengele, C.; Favier, Th.; Duval, A.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the results obtained by a software designed to compute dose equivalent rate for the critical workstations of the FBFC plant in Romans, France, which will have to deal with an uranium more heavily loaded with U 232 . The uranium spectrum and the ageing time can be varied in order to visualize the evolution of the dose equivalent rate in different locations with respect to the ageing time

  14. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  15. Towards a theory of bias and equivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Vijver, Fons J.R. van de

    1998-01-01

    "Bias refers to the presence of nuisance factors in cross-cultural research. Three types of bias are distinguished, depending on whether the nuisance factor is located at the level of the construct (construct bias), the measurement instrument as a whole (method bias) or the items (item bias or differential item functioning). Equivalence refers to the measurement level characteristics that apply to cross-cultural score comparisons; three types of equivalence are defined: construct (identity of...

  16. The equivalence principle and spatial curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugdale, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    An examination is made of the connection between the equivalence principle of general relativity and the non-Euclidean properties of space. The arguments commonly advanced to suggest a necessary connection between these two features of general relativity are reviewed and critically discussed. It is shown that although gravitational time dilation is an immediate consequence of the equivalence principle the corresponding effects on space are not such immediate or logically necessary consequences of this principle. (author)

  17. Approximate unitary equivalence of normaloid type operators

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Sen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore approximate unitary equivalence of normaloid operators and classify several normaloid type operators including transaloid operators, polynomial-normaloid operators and von Neumann operators up to approximate unitary equivalence. As an application, we explore approximation of transaloid operators with closed numerical ranges. Among other things, it is proved that those transaloid operators with closed numerical ranges are norm dense in the class of transaloid operators.

  18. Neuron dynamics in the presence of 1/f noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Cameron; Babul, Arif; de Sousa, Rogério

    2011-05-01

    Interest in understanding the interplay between noise and the response of a nonlinear device cuts across disciplinary boundaries. It is as relevant for unmasking the dynamics of neurons in noisy environments as it is for designing reliable nanoscale logic circuit elements and sensors. Most studies of noise in nonlinear devices are limited to either time-correlated noise with a Lorentzian spectrum (of which the white noise is a limiting case) or just white noise. We use analytical theory and numerical simulations to study the impact of the more ubiquitous "natural" noise with a 1/f frequency spectrum. Specifically, we study the impact of the 1/f noise on a leaky integrate and fire model of a neuron. The impact of noise is considered on two quantities of interest to neuron function: The spike count Fano factor and the speed of neuron response to a small steplike stimulus. For the perfect (nonleaky) integrate and fire model, we show that the Fano factor can be expressed as an integral over noise spectrum weighted by a (low-pass) filter function given by F(t,f)=sinc(2)(πft). This result elucidates the connection between low-frequency noise and disorder in neuron dynamics. Under 1/f noise, spike dynamics lacks a characteristic correlation time, inducing the leaky and nonleaky models, to exhibit nonergodic behavior and the Fano factor, increasing logarithmically as a function of time. We compare our results to experimental data of single neurons in vivo [Teich, Heneghan, Lowen, Ozaki, and Kaplan, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14, 529 (1997)] and show how the 1/f noise model provides much better agreement than the usual approximations based on Lorentzian noise. The low-frequency noise, however, complicates the case for an information-coding scheme based on interspike intervals by introducing variability in the neuron response time. On a positive note, the neuron response time to a step stimulus is, remarkably, nearly optimal in the presence of 1/f noise. An explanation of this

  19. Noise exposure during ambulance flights and repatriation operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, Thomas E; Zimmer, Bernd; Conrad, Gerson; Jansing, Paul; Hardt, Aline

    2010-01-01

    Although ambulance flights are routine work and thousands of employees work in repatriation organizations, there is no data on noise exposure which may be used for preventive advice. We investigated the noise exposure of crews working in ambulance flight organizations for international patient repatriation to get the data for specific guidelines concerning noise protection. Noise levels inside Learjet 35A, the aircraft type which is most often used for repatriation operations, were collected from locations where flight crews typically spend their time. A sound level meter class 1 meeting the DIN IEC 651 requirements was used for noise measurements, but several factors during the real flight situations caused a measurement error of ~3%. Therefore, the results fulfill the specifications for class 2. The data was collected during several real repatriation operations and was combined with the flight data (hours per day) regarding the personnel to evaluate the occupationally encountered equivalent noise level according to DIN 45645-2. The measured noise levels were safely just below the 85 dB(A) threshold and should not induce permanent threshold shifts, provided that additional high noise exposure by non-occupational or private activities was avoided. As the levels of the noise produced by the engines outside the cabin are significantly above the 85 dB(A) threshold, the doors of the aircraft must be kept closed while the engines are running, and any activity performed outside the aircraft - or with the doors opened while the engines are running - must be done with adequate noise protection. The new EU noise directive (2003/10/EG) states that protective equipment must be made available to the aircrew to protect their hearing, though its use is not mandatory.

  20. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  1. Alien Noise Cancellation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Full FEXT Cancellation. Expectation Maximization based Algorithms. Partial Cancellation. Optimal Choice of what to Cancel and what not to! Alien Noise Cancellation. Efficient Crosstalk channel estimation. In addition:

  2. Airframe noise prediction evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kingo J.; Donelson, Michael J.; Huang, Shumei C.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of current airframe noise prediction methods using available airframe noise measurements from tests of a narrow body transport (DC-9) and a wide body transport (DC-10) in addition to scale model test data. General features of the airframe noise from these aircraft and models are outlined. The results of the assessment of two airframe prediction methods, Fink's and Munson's methods, against flight test data of these aircraft and scale model wind tunnel test data are presented. These methods were extensively evaluated against measured data from several configurations including clean, slat deployed, landing gear-deployed, flap deployed, and landing configurations of both DC-9 and DC-10. They were also assessed against a limited number of configurations of scale models. The evaluation was conducted in terms of overall sound pressure level (OASPL), tone corrected perceived noise level (PNLT), and one-third-octave band sound pressure level (SPL).

  3. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  4. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  5. Deep Count: Fruit Counting Based on Deep Simulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnemoonfar, Maryam; Sheppard, Clay

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed significant advancement in computer vision research based on deep learning. Success of these tasks largely depends on the availability of a large amount of training samples. Labeling the training samples is an expensive process. In this paper, we present a simulated deep convolutional neural network for yield estimation. Knowing the exact number of fruits, flowers, and trees helps farmers to make better decisions on cultivation practices, plant disease prevention, and the size of harvest labor force. The current practice of yield estimation based on the manual counting of fruits or flowers by workers is a very time consuming and expensive process and it is not practical for big fields. Automatic yield estimation based on robotic agriculture provides a viable solution in this regard. Our network is trained entirely on synthetic data and tested on real data. To capture features on multiple scales, we used a modified version of the Inception-ResNet architecture. Our algorithm counts efficiently even if fruits are under shadow, occluded by foliage, branches, or if there is some degree of overlap amongst fruits. Experimental results show a 91% average test accuracy on real images and 93% on synthetic images. PMID:28425947

  6. Noise performance of phase-insensitive multicasting in multi-stage parametric mixers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Christopher K; Tong, Zhi; Myslivets, Evgeny; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Adleman, James R; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Jacobs, Everett W; Radic, Stojan

    2013-01-14

    Noise properties of large-count spectral multicasting in a phase-insensitive parametric mixer were investigated. Scalable multicasting was achieved using two-tone continuous-wave seeded mixers capable of generating more than 20 frequency non-degenerate copies. The mixer was constructed using a multistage architecture to simultaneously manage high Figure-of-Merit frequency generation and suppress noise generation. The performance was characterized by measuring the conversion efficiency and noise figure of all signal copies. Minimum noise figure of 8.09dB was measured. Experimental findings confirm that noise of the multicasted signal does not grow linearly with copy count and that it can be suppressed below this limit.

  7. Approximations to camera sensor noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaodan; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2013-02-01

    Noise is present in all image sensor data. Poisson distribution is said to model the stochastic nature of the photon arrival process, while it is common to approximate readout/thermal noise by additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN). Other sources of signal-dependent noise such as Fano and quantization also contribute to the overall noise profile. Question remains, however, about how best to model the combined sensor noise. Though additive Gaussian noise with signal-dependent noise variance (SD-AWGN) and Poisson corruption are two widely used models to approximate the actual sensor noise distribution, the justification given to these types of models are based on limited evidence. The goal of this paper is to provide a more comprehensive characterization of random noise. We concluded by presenting concrete evidence that Poisson model is a better approximation to real camera model than SD-AWGN. We suggest further modification to Poisson that may improve the noise model.

  8. Noise Abatement Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    A former NASA employee who discovered a kind of plastic that soaked up energy, dampened vibrations, and was a good noise abatement material, founded a company to market noise deadening adhesives, sheets, panels and enclosures. Known as SMART products, they are 75-80% lighter than ordinary soundproofing material and have demonstrated a high degree of effectiveness. The company, Varian Associates, makes enclosures for high voltage terminals and other electronic system components, and easily transportable audiometric test booths.

  9. Active noise control primer

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Scott D

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control - the reduction of noise by generating an acoustic signal that actively interferes with the noise - has become an active area of basic research and engineering applications. The aim of this book is to present all of the basic knowledge one needs for assessing how useful active noise control will be for a given problem and then to provide some guidance for designing, setting up, and tuning an active noise-control system. Written for students who have no prior knowledge of acoustics, signal processing, or noise control but who do have a reasonable grasp of basic physics and mathematics, the book is short and descriptive. It leaves for more advanced texts or research monographs all mathematical details and proofs concerning vibrations, signal processing and the like. The book can thus be used in independent study, in a classroom with laboratories, or in conjunction with a kit for experiment or demonstration. Topics covered include: basic acoustics; human perception and sound; sound intensity...

  10. Predictive Model Assessment for Count Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czado, Claudia; Gneiting, Tilmann; Held, Leonhard

    2007-01-01

    .... In case studies, we critique count regression models for patent data, and assess the predictive performance of Bayesian age-period-cohort models for larynx cancer counts in Germany. Key words: Calibration...

  11. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Pup Count Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains counts of Steller sea lion pups on rookeries in Alaska made between 1961 and 2015. Pup counts are conducted in late June-July. Pups are...

  12. Noise behaviour of semiinsulating GaAs particle detectors at various temperatures before and after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenbusch, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Chu, Z.; Krais, R.; Kubicki, T.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Pandoulas, D.; Rente, C.; Syben, O.; Toporowski, M.; Wittmer, B.; Xiao, W.J. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.

    1998-02-01

    We investigated the noise behaviour of surface barrier detectors (double sided Schottky contact) made of semiinsulating GaAs. Two types of measurements were performed: equivalent noise charge (ENC) and noise power density spectra in a frequency range from 10 Hz to 500 kHz. The shape of the density spectra are a powerful tool to examine the physical origin of the noise, before irradiation it is dominated by generation-recombination processes caused by deep levels. Temperature dependent noise measurements reveal the deep level parameters like activation energy and cross section, which are also extracted by analyzing the time transients of the charge pulse from {alpha}-particles. After irradiation with protons, neutrons and pions the influence of the deep levels being originally responsible for the noise is found to decrease and a reduction of the noise over the entire frequency range with increasing fluence is observed. (orig.). 21 refs.

  13. Study of noise in offices with window-type room air-conditioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, G.H.; Hashmi, R.; Shareef, A.

    2005-01-01

    A Study of Noise has been carried out in 17 private offices, with window-type room air-conditioners, to assess noise levels in these offices. A-Weighted equivalent sound-pressure levels (dB(A) LAeq) and equivalent octave-band sound-pressure levels (dB Leq) were measured in each office, and Preferred Speech Interference Levels (PSIL) evaluated. The results show that the interior noise-levels in these offices vary from 59.6 to 72.2 dB(A) LAeq. which are very high and much above the interior noise limits, recommended for offices by some individual workers. Some ways and means to limit its emission of high level of noise from the air conditioners are also discussed. (author)

  14. A new IEA document for the measurement of noise immission from wind turbines at receptor locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljunggren, Sten

    1999-01-01

    A new IEA guide on acoustic noise was recently completed by an international expert group. In this guide, several practical and reliable methods for determining wind turbine noise immission at receptor locations are presented: three methods for equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels and one method for A-weighted percentiles. In the most ambitious method for equivalent sound levels, the noise is measured together with the wind speed at two locations: one at the microphone and the other at the turbine site. With this approach, the turbine levels can be corrected for background sound and the immission level can be determined at a certain target speed. Special importance is attached to the problem of correcting for background noise and to techniques for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, six methods are described which can be used in difficult situations

  15. Equivalence of Szegedy's and coined quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2017-09-01

    Szegedy's quantum walk is a quantization of a classical random walk or Markov chain, where the walk occurs on the edges of the bipartite double cover of the original graph. To search, one can simply quantize a Markov chain with absorbing vertices. Recently, Santos proposed two alternative search algorithms that instead utilize the sign-flip oracle in Grover's algorithm rather than absorbing vertices. In this paper, we show that these two algorithms are exactly equivalent to two algorithms involving coined quantum walks, which are walks on the vertices of the original graph with an internal degree of freedom. The first scheme is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with one walk step per query of Grover's oracle, and the second is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with two walk steps per query of Grover's oracle. These equivalences lie outside the previously known equivalence of Szegedy's quantum walk with absorbing vertices and the coined quantum walk with the negative identity operator as the coin for marked vertices, whose precise relationships we also investigate.

  16. DC KIDS COUNT e-Databook Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    DC Action for Children, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report presents indicators that are included in DC Action for Children's 2012 KIDS COUNT e-databook, their definitions and sources and the rationale for their selection. The indicators for DC KIDS COUNT represent a mix of traditional KIDS COUNT indicators of child well-being, such as the number of children living in poverty, and indicators of…

  17. Hearing in young adults. Part II: The effects of recreational noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Vinck, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Great concern arises from recreational noise exposure, which might lead to noise-induced hearing loss in young adults. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of recreational noise exposure on hearing function in young adults. A questionnaire concerning recreational noise exposures and an audiological test battery were completed by 163 subjects (aged 18-30 years). Based on the duration of exposure and self-estimated loudness of various leisure-time activities, the weekly and lifetime equivalent noise exposure were calculated. Subjects were categorized in groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure based on these values. Hearing was evaluated using audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Mean differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no significant differences in hearing thresholds, TEOAE amplitudes, and DPOAE amplitudes between groups with low, intermediate, or high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, one-third of our subjects exceeded the weekly equivalent noise exposure for all activities of 75 dBA. Further, the highest equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated for the activities visiting nightclubs or pubs, attending concerts or festivals, and playing in a band or orchestra. Moreover, temporary tinnitus after recreational noise exposure was found in 86% of our subjects. There were no significant differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, a long-term assessment of young adults' hearing in relation to recreational noise exposure is needed.

  18. Hearing in young adults. Part II: The effects of recreational noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Vinck, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Great concern arises from recreational noise exposure, which might lead to noise-induced hearing loss in young adults. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of recreational noise exposure on hearing function in young adults. A questionnaire concerning recreational noise exposures and an audiological test battery were completed by 163 subjects (aged 18-30 years). Based on the duration of exposure and self-estimated loudness of various leisure-time activities, the weekly and lifetime equivalent noise exposure were calculated. Subjects were categorized in groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure based on these values. Hearing was evaluated using audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Mean differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no significant differences in hearing thresholds, TEOAE amplitudes, and DPOAE amplitudes between groups with low, intermediate, or high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, one-third of our subjects exceeded the weekly equivalent noise exposure for all activities of 75 dBA. Further, the highest equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated for the activities visiting nightclubs or pubs, attending concerts or festivals, and playing in a band or orchestra. Moreover, temporary tinnitus after recreational noise exposure was found in 86% of our subjects. There were no significant differences in hearing between groups with low, intermediate, and high recreational noise exposure. Nevertheless, a long-term assessment of young adults’ hearing in relation to recreational noise exposure is needed. PMID:26356366

  19. Airborne dust particle counting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S G; Prasad, B D

    2006-03-01

    The paper briefly describes an electro-optical system for counting of dust particles, which is based on the scattering phenomena. Utilizing the scattering of light by various size particles present in the environment, various particle counting techniques have been developed in order to measure the scattered intensity of light. Light scatters in all directions but much more in the so-called near forward direction 17( composite function) off axis, at 163( composite function) from the light source in the visible range. On the basis of two techniques, the right angle and forward angle scattering, opto-mechanical systems have been developed which measure scattered intensity and particulate matter. The forward scattering Nephelometer is more sensitive and therefore is more suitable for pollution monitoring than the right angle scattering Nephelometer. Whereas the right angle scattering Nephelometer has the utility in extremely low concentration in ppb level owing to the excellent light trap efficiency in comparison to forward scattering Nephelometer. In this paper measurement techniques and measurement results associated with design and development of a real time particle analyser are also discussed.

  20. Noise sensitivity and sleep disturbance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laszlo, H.E.; Janssen, S.A.; Babisch, W.; Hansell, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that noise induced health effects are strongly related to non-acoustical factors such as noise sensitivity. It is a stable personality trait and it can be conceptualised as a causal pathway confounder and/or effect modifier between noise and health. Furthermore noise sensitivity

  1. Photon counting detector for the personal radiography inspection system "SIBSCAN"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Leonov, V. V.; Oleynikov, V. P.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray detectors operating in the energy integrating mode are successfully used in many different applications. Nevertheless the direct photon counting detectors, having the superior parameters in comparison with the integrating ones, are rarely used yet. One of the reasons for this is the low value of the electrical signal generated by a detected photon. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based scintillation counters have a high detection efficiency, high electronic gain and compact dimensions. This makes them a very attractive candidate to replace routinely used detectors in many fields. More than 10 years ago the digital scanning radiography system based on multistrip ionization chamber (MIC) was suggested at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The detector demonstrates excellent radiation resistance and parameter stability after 5 year operations and an imaging of up to 1000 persons per day. Currently, the installations operate at several Russian airports and at subway stations in some cities. At the present time we design a new detector operating in the photon counting mode, having superior parameters than the gas one, based on scintillator - SiPM assemblies. This detector has close to zero noise, higher quantum efficiency and a count rate capability of more than 5 MHz per channel (20% losses), which leads to better image quality and improved detection capability. The suggested detector technology could be expanded to medical applications.

  2. Counting efficiencies by liquid scintillation counting. Single isomeric transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    1995-09-01

    In this work we present liquid scintillation counting efficiency tables for several radionuclides with single isomeric transitions, in which electron conversion and gamma emission processes are competitive. We study the radionuclides: ''58m CO, ''77mSE, ''79mBR, ''87mSR,''89mY,''93mNB,''103mRh, ''107mAG, ''109mAG, ''113mIn, ''131mXe; ''133mXe,''135mBa, ''167mEr, for two different scintillators, Ultima-Gold and Insta-Gel. We consider volumes of 10 and 15 mL for Ultima gold, and 15 mL for Insta-Gel

  3. Counting efficiencies by liquid scintillation counting. Single isomeric transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    1995-01-01

    In this work we present liquid scintillation counting efficiency tables for several radionuclides with single isomeric transitions, in which electron conversion and gamma emission processes are competitive. We study the radionuclides: 58mCo, 77mSe, 79mBr, 87mSr, S9mY, 93mNb, 103mRh, 107mAg, 109mAg, 113mIn, 131mXe, I33mXe, 135raBa, 137mBa, 167raEr, for two different scintillators, Ultima-Gold and Insta-Gel. We consider volumes of 10 and 15 mL for Ultima Gold, and 15 mL for Insta-Gel. (Author) 18 refs

  4. How much do women count if they not counted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Taddia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The condition of women throughout the world is marked by countless injustices and violations of the most fundamental rights established by the Universal Declaration of human rights and every culture is potentially prone to commit discrimination against women in various forms. Women are worse fed, more exposed to physical violence, more exposed to diseases and less educated; they have less access to, or are excluded from, vocational training paths; they are the most vulnerable among prisoners of conscience, refugees and immigrants and the least considered within ethnic minorities; from their very childhood, women are humiliated, undernourished, sold, raped and killed; their work is generally less paid compared to men’s work and in some countries they are victims of forced marriages. Such condition is the result of old traditions that implicit gender-differentiated education has long promoted through cultural models based on theories, practices and policies marked by discrimination and structured differentially for men and women. Within these cultural models, the basic educational institutions have played and still play a major role in perpetuating such traditions. Nevertheless, if we want to overcome inequalities and provide women with empowerment, we have to start right from the educational institutions and in particular from school, through the adoption of an intercultural approach to education: an approach based on active pedagogy and on methods of analysis, exchange and enhancement typical of socio-educational animation. The intercultural approach to education is attentive to promote the realisation of each individual and the dignity and right of everyone to express himself/herself in his/her own way. Such an approach will give women the opportunity to become actual agents of collective change and to get the strength and wellbeing necessary to count and be counted as human beings entitled to freedom and equality, and to have access to all

  5. Water equivalence of polymer gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellakumar, P.; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the water equivalence and radiation transport properties of polymer gel dosimeters over the wide range of photon and electron energies 14 different types of polymer gels were considered. Their water equivalence was evaluated in terms of effective atomic number (Z eff ), electron density (ρ e ), photon mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), photon mass energy absorption coefficient (μ en /ρ) and total stopping power (S/ρ) tot of electrons using the XCOM and the ESTAR database. The study showed that the effective atomic number of polymer gels were very close ( en /ρ for all polymer gels were in close agreement ( tot of electrons in polymer gel dosimeters were within 1% agreement with that of water. From the study we conclude that at lower energy (<80keV) the polymer gel dosimeters cannot be considered water equivalent and study has to be carried out before using the polymer gel for clinical application

  6. Quantum mechanics and the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, P C W

    2004-01-01

    A quantum particle moving in a gravitational field may penetrate the classically forbidden region of the gravitational potential. This raises the question of whether the time of flight of a quantum particle in a gravitational field might deviate systematically from that of a classical particle due to tunnelling delay, representing a violation of the weak equivalence principle. I investigate this using a model quantum clock to measure the time of flight of a quantum particle in a uniform gravitational field, and show that a violation of the equivalence principle does not occur when the measurement is made far from the turning point of the classical trajectory. The results are then confirmed using the so-called dwell time definition of quantum tunnelling. I conclude with some remarks about the strong equivalence principle in quantum mechanics

  7. Equivalence and Discretisation in Bio-PEPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpin, Vashti; Hillston, Jane

    Bio-PEPA is a process algebra for modelling biological systems. An important aspect of Bio-PEPA is the ability it provides to discretise concentrations resulting in a smaller, more manageable state space. The discretisation is based on a step size which determines the size of each discrete level and also the maximum number of levels. This paper considers the relationship between two discretisations of the same Bio-PEPA model that differ only in the step size and hence the maximum number of levels, by using the idea of equivalence from concurrency and process algebra. We present a novel behavioural semantic equivalence, compression bisimulation, that equates two discretisations of the same model and we show that this equivalence is a congruence with respect to the synchronisation operator.

  8. Noise in the operating room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasfeldt-Hansen, Dorthe; Lærkner, Eva Ann; Birkelund, Regner

    2010-01-01

    Because noise is a general stressor, noise in the OR should be avoided whenever possible. This article presents the results of a review of the research literature on the topic of noise in the OR. A systematic literature search was conducted. Eighteen relevant articles were identified...... and categorized as follows: noise levels, noise sources, staff performances, and patient’s perception of noise. Each study was assessed according to the strength of the evidence and the quality of the study. Noise levels in the OR in general exceed recommended levels, and the noise sources are related...... to equipment and staff behavior. The main effect of noise on staff performances is related to impaired communication, resulting in a negative effect on patient safety. The literature on patients’ perception of noise is both limited and inconsistent, and more research on this topic is needed....

  9. A compact cryostat and a simple photon-counting unit for a microcomputer-controlled thermoluminescence measuring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, M.; Shibata, K.; Ikeda, T.

    1991-01-01

    An inexpensive, home-made, thermoluminescence measuring system is described which is composed of a compact cryostat, simple photon-counting unit and computing unit. The cryostat with a temperature control unit had a good temperature stability of ± 0.2 K in the temperature range 80-300 K. The photon-counting system could detect light over a wide range of intensities from 10 to 3 x 10 7 photons per second with low noise and high reliability. (author)

  10. Annoyance from Road Traffic, Trains, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina S. Ragettli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of studies assessing the exposure-response relationship between transportation noise and annoyance in North America. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of noise annoyance induced by road traffic, trains and airplanes in relation to distance to transportation noise sources, and to total environmental noise levels in Montreal, Canada; annoyance was assessed as noise-induced disturbance. A telephone-based survey among 4336 persons aged >18 years was conducted. Exposure to total environmental noise (A-weighted outdoor noise levels—LAeq24h and day-evening-night equivalent noise levels—Lden for each study participant was determined using a statistical noise model (land use regression—LUR that is based on actual outdoor noise measurements. The proportion of the population annoyed by road traffic, airplane and train noise was 20.1%, 13.0% and 6.1%, respectively. As the distance to major roads, railways and the Montreal International Airport increased, the percentage of people disturbed and highly disturbed due to the corresponding traffic noise significantly decreased. When applying the statistical noise model we found a relationship between noise levels and disturbance from road traffic and total environmental noise, with Prevalence Proportion Ratios (PPR for highly disturbed people of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07–1.13 and 1.04 (1.02–1.06 per 1 dB(A Lden, respectively. Our study provides the first comprehensive information on the relationship between transportation noise levels and disturbance in a Canadian city. LUR models are still in development and further studies on transportation noise induced annoyance are consequently needed, especially for sources other than road traffic.

  11. Strong suppression of shot noise in a feedback-controlled single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Timo; Strasberg, Philipp; Bayer, Johannes C.; Rugeramigabo, Eddy P.; Brandes, Tobias; Haug, Rolf J.

    2017-03-01

    Feedback control of quantum mechanical systems is rapidly attracting attention not only due to fundamental questions about quantum measurements, but also because of its novel applications in many fields in physics. Quantum control has been studied intensively in quantum optics but progress has recently been made in the control of solid-state qubits as well. In quantum transport only a few active and passive feedback experiments have been realized on the level of single electrons, although theoretical proposals exist. Here we demonstrate the suppression of shot noise in a single-electron transistor using an exclusively electronic closed-loop feedback to monitor and adjust the counting statistics. With increasing feedback response we observe a stronger suppression and faster freezing of charge current fluctuations. Our technique is analogous to the generation of squeezed light with in-loop photodetection as used in quantum optics. Sub-Poisson single-electron sources will pave the way for high-precision measurements in quantum transport similar to optical or optomechanical equivalents.

  12. A Logical Characterisation of Static Equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Pedersen, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The work of Abadi and Fournet introduces the notion of a frame to describe the knowledge of the environment of a cryptographic protocol. Frames are lists of terms; two frames are indistinguishable under the notion of static equivalence if they satisfy the same equations on terms. We present a first......-order logic for frames with quantification over environment knowledge which, under certain general conditions, characterizes static equivalence and is amenable to construction of characteristic formulae. The logic can be used to reason about environment knowledge and can be adapted to a particular application...

  13. Topological equivalence of nonlinear autonomous dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Huynh Phan; Tran Van Nhung

    1995-12-01

    We show in this paper that the autonomous nonlinear dynamical system Σ(A,B,F): x' = Ax+Bu+F(x) is topologically equivalent to the linear dynamical system Σ(A,B,O): x' = Ax+Bu if the projection of A on the complement in R n of the controllable vectorial subspace is hyperbolic and if lipschitz constant of F is sufficiently small ( * ) and F(x) = 0 when parallel x parallel is sufficiently large ( ** ). In particular, if Σ(A,B,O) is controllable, it is topologically equivalent to Σ(A,B,F) when it is only that F satisfy ( ** ). (author). 18 refs

  14. Measurements of the personal dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Badita, E.; Oane, M.; Mitru, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the results of measurements related to the personal dose equivalent in the rooms adjacent to NILPRP 7 MeV linear accelerator, by means of the secondary standard chamber T34035 Hp(10). The chamber was calibrated by PTB at S- 137 Cs (E av = 661.6 keV, T 1/2 11050 days) and has N H = 3.17x10 6 Sv/C calibration factor for the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), at a depth of 10 mm in climatic reference conditions. The measurements were made for the two operation mode of the 7 MeV linac: electrons and bremsstrahlung

  15. Equivalent circuit analysis of terahertz metamaterial filters

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xueqian

    2011-01-01

    An equivalent circuit model for the analysis and design of terahertz (THz) metamaterial filters is presented. The proposed model, derived based on LMC equivalent circuits, takes into account the detailed geometrical parameters and the presence of a dielectric substrate with the existing analytic expressions for self-inductance, mutual inductance, and capacitance. The model is in good agreement with the experimental measurements and full-wave simulations. Exploiting the circuit model has made it possible to predict accurately the resonance frequency of the proposed structures and thus, quick and accurate process of designing THz device from artificial metamaterials is offered. ©2011 Chinese Optics Letters.

  16. Fiscal adjustments in Europe and Ricardian equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. DE BONIS

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the ‘Ricardian’ equivalence hypothesis, consumption is dependent on permanent disposable income and current deficits are equivalent to future tax payments. This hypothesis is tested on 14 European countries in the 1990s. The relationships between private sector savings and general government deficit, and the GDP growth rate and the unemployment rate are determined. The results show the change in consumers' behaviour with respect to government deficit, and that expectations of an increase in future wealth are no longer associated with a decrease in deficit.

  17. Resistive Switching Assisted by Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, G. A.; Fierens, P. I.; Grosz, D. F.

    2013-01-01

    We extend results by Stotland and Di Ventra on the phenomenon of resistive switching aided by noise. We further the analysis of the mechanism underlying the beneficial role of noise and study the EPIR (Electrical Pulse Induced Resistance) ratio dependence with noise power. In the case of internal noise we find an optimal range where the EPIR ratio is both maximized and independent of the preceding resistive state. However, when external noise is considered no beneficial effect is observed.

  18. Spatial traffic noise pollution assessment – A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Monazzam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Spatial assessment of traffic noise pollution intensity will provide urban planners with approximate estimation of citizens exposure to impermissible sound levels. They could identify critical noise pollution areas wherein noise barriers should be embedded. The present study aims at using the Geographic Information System (GIS to assess spatial changes in traffic noise pollution in Tehran, the capital of Iran, and the largest city in the Middle East. Material and Methods: For this purpose, while measuring equivalent sound levels at different time periods of a day and different days of a week in District 14 of Tehran, wherein there are highways and busy streets, the geographic coordination of the measurement points was recorded at the stations. The obtained results indicated that the equivalent sound level did not show a statistically significant difference between weekdays, and morning, afternoon and evening hours as well as time intervals of 10 min, 15 min and 30 min. Then, 91 stations were selected in the target area and equivalent sound level was measured for each station on 3 occasions of the morning (7:00–9:00 a.m., afternoon (12.00–3:00 p.m. and evening (5:00–8:00 p.m. on Saturdays to Wednesdays. Results: As the results suggest, the maximum equivalent sound level (Leq was reported from Basij Highway, which is a very important connecting thoroughfare in the district, and was equal to 84.2 dB(A, while the minimum equivalent sound level (Leq, measured in the Fajr Hospital, was equal to 59.9 dB(A. Conclusions: The average equivalent sound level was higher than the national standard limit at all stations. The use of sound walls in Highways Basij and Mahallati as well as widening the Streets 17th Shahrivar, Pirouzi and Khavaran, benchmarked on a map, were recommended as the most effective mitigation measures. Additionally, the research findings confirm the outstanding applicability of the Geographic Information System in

  19. Spatial traffic noise pollution assessment - A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Karimi, Elham; Abbaspour, Majid; Nassiri, Parvin; Taghavi, Lobat

    2015-01-01

    Spatial assessment of traffic noise pollution intensity will provide urban planners with approximate estimation of citizens exposure to impermissible sound levels. They could identify critical noise pollution areas wherein noise barriers should be embedded. The present study aims at using the Geographic Information System (GIS) to assess spatial changes in traffic noise pollution in Tehran, the capital of Iran, and the largest city in the Middle East. For this purpose, while measuring equivalent sound levels at different time periods of a day and different days of a week in District 14 of Tehran, wherein there are highways and busy streets, the geographic coordination of the measurement points was recorded at the stations. The obtained results indicated that the equivalent sound level did not show a statistically significant difference between weekdays, and morning, afternoon and evening hours as well as time intervals of 10 min, 15 min and 30 min. Then, 91 stations were selected in the target area and equivalent sound level was measured for each station on 3 occasions of the morning (7:00-9:00 a.m.), afternoon (12.00-3:00 p.m.) and evening (5:00-8:00 p.m.) on Saturdays to Wednesdays. As the results suggest, the maximum equivalent sound level (Leq) was reported from Basij Highway, which is a very important connecting thoroughfare in the district, and was equal to 84.2 dB(A), while the minimum equivalent sound level (Leq), measured in the Fajr Hospital, was equal to 59.9 dB(A). The average equivalent sound level was higher than the national standard limit at all stations. The use of sound walls in Highways Basij and Mahallati as well as widening the Streets 17th Shahrivar, Pirouzi and Khavaran, benchmarked on a map, were recommended as the most effective mitigation measures. Additionally, the research findings confirm the outstanding applicability of the Geographic Information System in handling noise pollution data towards depicting noise pollution intensity caused

  20. Chaos and related nonlinear noise phenomena in Josephson tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miracky, R.F.

    1984-07-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of Josephson tunnel junctions shunted by a resistance with substantial self-inductance have been thoroughly investigated. The current-voltage characteristics of these devices exhibit stable regions of negative differential resistance. Very large increases in the low-frequency voltage noise with equivalent noise temperatures of 10 6 K or more, observed in the vicinity of these regions, arise from switching, or hopping, between subharmonic modes. Moderate increases in the noise, with temperatures of about 10 3 K, arise from chaotic behavior. Analog and digital simulations indicate that under somewhat rarer circumstances the same junction system can sustain a purely deterministic hopping between two unstable subharmonic modes, accompanied by excess low-frequency noise. Unlike the noise-induced case, this chaotic process occurs over a much narrower range in bias current and is destroyed by the addition of thermal noise. The differential equation describing the junction system can be reduced to a one-dimensional mapping in the vicinity of one of the unstable modes. A general analytical calculation of switching processes for a class of mappings yields the frequency dependence of the noise spectrum in terms of the parameters of the mapping. Finally, the concepts of noise-induced hopping near bifurcation thresholds are applied to the problem of the three-photon Josephson parametric amplifier. Analog simulations indicate that the noise rise observed in experimental devices arises from occasional hopping between a mode at the pump frequency ω/sub p/ and a mode at the half harmonic ω/sub p//2. The hopping is induced by thermal noise associated with the shunt resistance. 71 references

  1. Multiplicative noise removal using variable splitting and constrained optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioucas-Dias, José M; Figueiredo, Mário A T

    2010-07-01

    Multiplicative noise (also known as speckle noise) models are central to the study of coherent imaging systems, such as synthetic aperture radar and sonar, and ultrasound and laser imaging. These models introduce two additional layers of difficulties with respect to the standard Gaussian additive noise scenario: (1) the noise is multiplied by (rather than added to) the original image; (2) the noise is not Gaussian, with Rayleigh and Gamma being commonly used densities. These two features of multiplicative noise models preclude the direct application of most state-of-the-art algorithms, which are designed for solving unconstrained optimization problems where the objective has two terms: a quadratic data term (log-likelihood), reflecting the additive and Gaussian nature of the noise, plus a convex (possibly nonsmooth) regularizer (e.g., a total variation or wavelet-based regularizer/prior). In this paper, we address these difficulties by: (1) converting the multiplicative model into an additive one by taking logarithms, as proposed by some other authors; (2) using variable splitting to obtain an equivalent constrained problem; and (3) dealing with this optimization problem using the augmented Lagrangian framework. A set of experiments shows that the proposed method, which we name MIDAL (multiplicative image denoising by augmented Lagrangian), yields state-of-the-art results both in terms of speed and denoising performance.

  2. Comparison of Annoyance from Railway Noise and Railway Vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ögren, Mikael; Gidlöf-Gunnarsson, Anita; Smith, Michael; Gustavsson, Sara; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2017-07-19

    The aim of this study is to compare vibration exposure to noise exposure from railway traffic in terms of equal annoyance, i.e., to determine when a certain noise level is equally annoying as a corresponding vibration velocity. Based on questionnaire data from the Train Vibration and Noise Effects (TVANE) research project from residential areas exposed to railway noise and vibration, the dose response relationship for annoyance was estimated. By comparing the relationships between exposure and annoyance for areas both with and without significant vibration exposure, the noise levels and vibration velocities that had an equal probability of causing annoyance was determined using logistic regression. The comparison gives a continuous mapping between vibration velocity in the ground and a corresponding noise level at the facade that are equally annoying. For equivalent noise level at the facade compared to maximum weighted vibration velocity in the ground the probability of annoyance is approximately 20% for 59 dB or 0.48 mm/s, and about 40% for 63 dB or 0.98 mm/s.

  3. Assessment of rural soundscapes with high-speed train noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pyoung Jik; Hong, Joo Young; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, rural soundscapes with high-speed train noise were assessed through laboratory experiments. A total of ten sites with varying landscape metrics were chosen for audio-visual recording. The acoustical characteristics of the high-speed train noise were analyzed using various noise level indices. Landscape metrics such as the percentage of natural features (NF) and Shannon's diversity index (SHDI) were adopted to evaluate the landscape features of the ten sites. Laboratory experiments were then performed with 20 well-trained listeners to investigate the perception of high-speed train noise in rural areas. The experiments consisted of three parts: 1) visual-only condition, 2) audio-only condition, and 3) combined audio-visual condition. The results showed that subjects' preference for visual images was significantly related to NF, the number of land types, and the A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq). In addition, the visual images significantly influenced the noise annoyance, and LAeq and NF were the dominant factors affecting the annoyance from high-speed train noise in the combined audio-visual condition. In addition, Zwicker's loudness (N) was highly correlated with the annoyance from high-speed train noise in both the audio-only and audio-visual conditions. © 2013.

  4. Engineering out the noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankaskas, Kurt; Fischer, Raymond; Spence, Jesse; Komrower, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    The US Navy, through an Office of Naval Research (ONR) lead effort on Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL), is investigating methods and techniques to mitigate hearing loss for the crews and warfighters. Hearing protection is a viable and increasingly popular method of reducing hearing exposure for many ship crew members; however, it has limitations on comfort and low frequency effectiveness. Furthermore, Personal Hearing Protection (PHP) is often used improperly. Proper vessel planning, programmatic changes and advances in noise control engineering can also have significant impacts by inherently reducing noise exposure through ship design and use of noise control treatments. These impacts go beyond hearing loss mitigation since they can improve quality of life onboard vessels and provide enhanced warfighter performance. Such approaches also can be made to work in the lower frequency range where hearing protection is not as effective. This paper describes non-hearing protection methods being implemented to mitigate and control noise within the US Navy and US Marine Corps. These approaches reflect the latest changes to Mil-Std 1474E, Appendix F. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Airport noise and teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, L.D.; Layde, P.M.; Erickson, J.D.

    1979-07-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to high-noise levels near major airports may cause increased incidence of birth defects in the offspring of parents residing near these airports. Using data gathered in Metropolitan Atlanta during 1970 to 1972, we compared the rates of seventeen categories of defects in high- and low-noise census tracts. No significant differences were observed. However, when we subdivided the category of central nervous system defects into several subcategories of specific defects, we noted a significantly increased incidence of spina bifida without hydrocephalus in the high-noise areas. Because of the small number of cases associated with this finding we did a matched case-control study using all cases of central nervous system defects born during the years 1968 to 1976. No significantly increased risk for residents in the high-noise areas was noted in this study. It is our opinion that noise or other factors associated with residence near airports are unlikely to be important environmental teratogens.

  6. Noise and sleep on board vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlend Sunde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research indicates that exposure to noise during sleep can cause sleep disturbance. Seamen on board vessels are frequently exposed to noise also during sleep periods, and studies have reported sleep disturbance in this occupational group. However, studies of noise and sleep in maritime settings are few. This study′s aim was to examine the associations between noise exposure during sleep, and sleep variables derived from actigraphy among seamen on board vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN. Data were collected on board 21 RNoN vessels, where navy seamen participated by wearing an actiwatch (actigraph, and by completing a questionnaire comprising information on gender, age, coffee drinking, nicotine use, use of medication, and workload. Noise dose meters were used to assess noise exposure inside the seamen′s cabin during sleep. Eighty-three sleep periods from 68 seamen were included in the statistical analysis. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the association between noise exposure and the sleep variables percentage mobility during sleep and sleep efficiency, respectively. Noise exposure variables, coffee drinking status, nicotine use status, and sleeping hours explained 24.9% of the total variance in percentage mobility during sleep, and noise exposure variables explained 12.0% of the total variance in sleep efficiency. Equivalent noise level and number of noise events per hour were both associated with increased percentage mobility during sleep, and the number of noise events was associated with decreased sleep efficiency.

  7. Noise and sleep on board vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, Erlend; Bratveit, Magne; Pallesen, Stale; Moen, Bente Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Previous research indicates that exposure to noise during sleep can cause sleep disturbance. Seamen on board vessels are frequently exposed to noise also during sleep periods, and studies have reported sleep disturbance in this occupational group. However, studies of noise and sleep in maritime settings are few. This study's aim was to examine the associations between noise exposure during sleep, and sleep variables derived from actigraphy among seamen on board vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN). Data were collected on board 21 RNoN vessels, where navy seamen participated by wearing an actiwatch (actigraph), and by completing a questionnaire comprising information on gender, age, coffee drinking, nicotine use, use of medication, and workload. Noise dose meters were used to assess noise exposure inside the seamen's cabin during sleep. Eighty-three sleep periods from 68 seamen were included in the statistical analysis. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the association between noise exposure and the sleep variables percentage mobility during sleep and sleep efficiency, respectively. Noise exposure variables, coffee drinking status, nicotine use status, and sleeping hours explained 24.9% of the total variance in percentage mobility during sleep, and noise exposure variables explained 12.0% of the total variance in sleep efficiency. Equivalent noise level and number of noise events per hour were both associated with increased percentage mobility during sleep, and the number of noise events was associated with decreased sleep efficiency.

  8. Noise level in neonatal incubators: A comparative study of three models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Zacarías, F; Beira Jiménez, J L; Bustillo Velázquez-Gaztelu, P J; Hernández Molina, R; Lubián López, Simón

    2018-04-01

    Preterm infants usually have to spend a long time in an incubator, excessive noise in which can have adverse physiological and psychological effects on neonates. In fact, incubator noise levels typically range from 45 to 70 dB but differences in this respect depend largely on the noise measuring method used. The primary aim of this work was to assess the extent to which noise in an incubator comes from its own fan and how efficiently the incubator can isolate external noise. Three different incubator models were characterized for acoustic performance by measuring their internal noise levels in an anechoic chamber, and also for noise isolation efficiency by using a pink noise source in combination with an internal and an external microphone that were connected to an SVAN958 noise analyzer. The incubators studied produced continuous equivalent noise levels of 53.5-58 dB and reduced external noise by 5.2-10.4 dB. A preterm infant in an incubator is exposed to noise levels clearly exceeding international recommendations even though such levels usually comply with the limit set in the standard IEC60601-2-19: 2009 (60 dBA) under normal conditions of use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Discrete calculus methods for counting

    CERN Document Server

    Mariconda, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to combinatorics, finite calculus, formal series, recurrences, and approximations of sums. Readers will find not only coverage of the basic elements of the subjects but also deep insights into a range of less common topics rarely considered within a single book, such as counting with occupancy constraints, a clear distinction between algebraic and analytical properties of formal power series, an introduction to discrete dynamical systems with a thorough description of Sarkovskii’s theorem, symbolic calculus, and a complete description of the Euler-Maclaurin formulas and their applications. Although several books touch on one or more of these aspects, precious few cover all of them. The authors, both pure mathematicians, have attempted to develop methods that will allow the student to formulate a given problem in a precise mathematical framework. The aim is to equip readers with a sound strategy for classifying and solving problems by pursuing a mathematically rigorous yet ...

  10. Counting paths with Schur transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, Pablo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kemp, Garreth [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Véliz-Osorio, Alvaro, E-mail: aveliz@gmail.com [Mandelstam Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we explore the structure of the branching graph of the unitary group using Schur transitions. We find that these transitions suggest a new combinatorial expression for counting paths in the branching graph. This formula, which is valid for any rank of the unitary group, reproduces known asymptotic results. We proceed to establish the general validity of this expression by a formal proof. The form of this equation strongly hints towards a quantum generalization. Thus, we introduce a notion of quantum relative dimension and subject it to the appropriate consistency tests. This new quantity finds its natural environment in the context of RCFTs and fractional statistics; where the already established notion of quantum dimension has proven to be of great physical importance.

  11. High School Equivalency Testing in Arizona. Forum: Responding to Changes in High School Equivalency Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the state of Arizona has used the General Educational Development (GED) Test to award the Arizona High School Equivalency (HSE) Diploma, as the GED Test was the only test available, recognized and accepted in the United States as the measure by which adults could demonstrate the educational attainment equivalent to high school…

  12. Joyce’s Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Attridge

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available James Joyce uses both lexical and nonlexical onomatopoeia extensively in _Ulysses_; this essay examines some of the ways in which he employs the latter in order to convey noises of many kinds. Nonlexical onomatopoeia is particularly suited to the evocation of noise, though it can only do so in conjunction with shared literary and linguistic conventions. Several of the characters in _Ulysses_ show an interest in the representation of noise in language, but there are many more examples where there is no evidence of mental processes at work. The reader’s pleasure in Joyce’s nonlexical onomatopoeia is very seldom the result of vivid imitation; it is, as these examples testify, Joyce’s play with the workings of the device (and frequently its failure to imitate the nonlinguistic world that provides enjoyment and some insight into the relation between language and sound.

  13. Noise and Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Adel Ghahraman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus from the Latin word tinnire meaning ringing is the perception of sound within the human ear in the absence of corresponding external sound. The most common cause is noise induced hearing loss. Tinnitus may be induced by an acoustic trauma or a permanent noise in the workplace. In case that Tinnitus is induced by acoustic trauma the site of lesion is commonly the base of the cochlea. Tinnitus in the senile population is mostly accompanying presbycusis. Although the incidence of permanent tinnitus following noise exposure is high, little is published about this issue. In the current article we are aimed at studying the prevalence of tinnitus in Minoo and other manufactures.

  14. Beyond Language Equivalence on Visibly Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    We study (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds for a number of studied p...

  15. Equivalence Scales for the Former West Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlier, E.

    1997-01-01

    Equivalence scales provide answers to questions like how much a household with four children needs to spend compared to a household with two children or how much a childless couple needs to spend compared to a single person household to attain the same welfare level. These are important questions

  16. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical equivalence assessment of three brands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assay for content of active ingredients is a critical test of drug quality; failure to meet up the standard for content of active ingredients will result to sub therapeutic quantities. Three brands (A, B and C) of carbamazepine were assayed to determine their chemical equivalence as well as their anticonvulsant activities. This was ...

  18. Procedures for Determining the Equivalence of Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunivant, Noel

    Eight different methods are reviewed for determining whether two or more tests are equivalent measures. These methods vary in restrictiveness from the Wilks-Votaw test of compound symmetry (which requires that all means, variances, and covariances are equal), to Joreskog's theory of congeneric tests (which requires only that the tests are measures…

  19. Confluence Modulo Equivalence in Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Kirkeby, Maja Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Previous results on confluence for Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, are generalized to take into account user-defined state equivalence relations. This allows a much larger class of programs to enjoy the advantages of confluence, which include various optimization techniques and simplified...

  20. Four equivalent lot-sizing models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. van den Heuvel (Wilco); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWe study the following lot-sizing models that recently appeared in the literature: a lot-sizing model with a remanufacturing option, a lot-sizing model with production time windows, and a lot-sizing model with cumulative capacities. We show the equivalence of these models with a

  1. Equivalence relations of AF-algebra extensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 120; Issue 2. Equivalence Relations of -Algebra Extensions. Changguo Wei. Volume 120 Issue 2 April 2010 ... Author Affiliations. Changguo Wei1. School of Mathematical Sciences, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266071, People's Republic of China ...

  2. Visual Equivalence and Amodal Completion in Cuttlefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Rong; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Modern cephalopods are notably the most intelligent invertebrates and this is accompanied by keen vision. Despite extensive studies investigating the visual systems of cephalopods, little is known about their visual perception and object recognition. In the present study, we investigated the visual processing of the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis , including visual equivalence and amodal completion. Cuttlefish were trained to discriminate images of shrimp and fish using the operant conditioning paradigm. After cuttlefish reached the learning criteria, a series of discrimination tasks were conducted. In the visual equivalence experiment, several transformed versions of the training images, such as images reduced in size, images reduced in contrast, sketches of the images, the contours of the images, and silhouettes of the images, were used. In the amodal completion experiment, partially occluded views of the original images were used. The results showed that cuttlefish were able to treat the training images of reduced size and sketches as the visual equivalence. Cuttlefish were also capable of recognizing partially occluded versions of the training image. Furthermore, individual differences in performance suggest that some cuttlefish may be able to recognize objects when visual information was partly removed. These findings support the hypothesis that the visual perception of cuttlefish involves both visual equivalence and amodal completion. The results from this research also provide insights into the visual processing mechanisms used by cephalopods.

  3. Estimation of Toxicity Equivalent Concentration (TEQ) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimation of Toxicity Equivalent Concentration (TEQ) of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils from Idu Ekpeye playground and University of Port ... Effective soil remediation and detoxification method like Dispersion by chemical reaction technology should be deployed to clean-up sites to avoid soil toxicity ...

  4. On the Leitmann equivalent problem approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.O.O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to show how Leitmann’s equivalent problem approach ties in with the classical notions of the Calculus of Variations, and how it can be exploited to give a rapid and elegant approach to Weierstrass’ theory of sufficient conditions. Both fixed and free endpoint conditions

  5. Bilingual Dictionaries and Communicative Equivalence for a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This implies that a bilingual dictionary becomes a poly functional instrument, presenting more information than just translation equivalents. ... With the emphasis on the user perspective, metalexicographical criteria are used to investigate problems regarding the access structure and the addressing procedures in Afrikaans ...

  6. Possibility and necessity measures and integral equivalence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, T.; Mesiar, Radko; Li, J.; Stupňanová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 1 (2017), s. 62-72 ISSN 0888-613X Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Integral equivalence * Necessity measure * Possibility measure * Survival function * Universal integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0477092.pdf

  7. Contextual dependencies in a stimulus equivalence paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibbets, P.; Maes, J.H.R.; Vossen, J.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments with human subjects assessed contextual dependencies in a stimulus equivalence paradigm. Subjects learned to form two sets of stimuli in a matching-to-sample training procedure. Each set was presented against one of two different background colours, the contextual cues. At test, the

  8. [The equivalence and interchangeability of medical articles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, V S

    2013-11-01

    The information concerning the interchangeability of medical articles is highly valuable because it makes it possible to correlate most precisely medical articles with medical technologies and medical care standards and to optimize budget costs under public purchasing. The proposed procedure of determination of interchangeability is based on criteria of equivalence of prescriptions, functional technical and technological characteristics and effectiveness of functioning of medical articles.

  9. Infinitesimal bi-Lipschitz Equivalence of Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Gaffney, Terence

    2016-01-01

    We introduce two different notions of infinitesimal bi-Lipschitz equivalence for functions, one related to bi-Lipschitz triviality of families of functions, one related to homeomorphisms which are bi-Lipschitz on the fibers of the functions in the family. We show that the first is not a generic condition, and that the second is.

  10. An Equivalent Circuit for Landau Damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1976-01-01

    An equivalent circuit simulating the effect of Landau damping in a stable plasma‐loaded parallel‐plate capacitor is presented. The circuit contains a double infinity of LC components. The transition from stable to unstable plasmas is simulated by the introduction of active elements into the circuit....

  11. On Behavioral Equivalence of Rational Representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, Harry L.; Willems, JC; Hara, S; Ohta, Y; Fujioka, H

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the equivalence of representations of behaviors of linear differential systems In general. the behavior of a given linear differential system has many different representations. In this paper we restrict ourselves to kernel representations and image representations Two kernel

  12. Regional Equivalence Scales for Convenience Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Tedford, John R.; Capps, Oral, Jr.; Havlicek, Joseph, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Estimates of regional adult equivalence scales for convenience foods were obtained using the model developed by Buse and Salathe and using data from the 1977-78 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey. Wide dispa rities exist in scale values among regions, controlling for other factors, suggesting that age-sex composition of households have differential impacts on convenience food expenditures.

  13. Equivalent drawbead model in finite element simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carleer, Bart D.; Carleer, B.D.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Huetink, Han; Lee, J.K.; Kinzel, G.L.; Wagoner, R.

    1996-01-01

    In 3D simulations of the deep drawing process the drawbead geometries are seldom included. Therefore equivalent drawbeads are used. In order to investigate the drawbead behaviour a 2D plane strain finite element model was used. For verification of this model experiments were performed. The analyses

  14. Fuel Cell Equivalent Electric Circuit Parameter Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    In this work a simple model for a fuel cell is investigated for diagnostic purpose. The fuel cell is characterized, with respect to the electrical impedance of the fuel cell at non-faulty conditions and under variations in load current. Based on this the equivalent electrical circuit parameters can...

  15. Weak equivalence classes of complex vector bundles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van

    LXXVII, č. 1 (2008), s. 23-30 ISSN 0862-9544 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : chern classes * complex Grassmannians weak equivalence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  16. Equivalence domination in graphs | Arumugam | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Click on the link to view the abstract. Keywords: Equivalence domination, total domination, P3-forming set. Quaestiones Mathematicae 36(2013), 331-340. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/16073606.2013.779959 · AJOL African ...

  17. Pharmaceutical Equivalence of Some Commercial Samples of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tablets were subjected to various compendial tests including identification, weight uniformity, uniformity of content, content of active ingredient and uniformity of diameter. Additional tests used as a basis for the assessment of the pharmaceutical equivalence of the products include hardness, disintegration time and ...

  18. Superstring field theory equivalence: Ramond sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroyter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We prove that the finite gauge transformation of the Ramond sector of the modified cubic superstring field theory is ill-defined due to collisions of picture changing operators. Despite this problem we study to what extent could a bijective classical correspondence between this theory and the (presumably consistent) non-polynomial theory exist. We find that the classical equivalence between these two theories can almost be extended to the Ramond sector: We construct mappings between the string fields (NS and Ramond, including Chan-Paton factors and the various GSO sectors) of the two theories that send solutions to solutions in a way that respects the linearized gauge symmetries in both sides and keeps the action of the solutions invariant. The perturbative spectrum around equivalent solutions is also isomorphic. The problem with the cubic theory implies that the correspondence of the linearized gauge symmetries cannot be extended to a correspondence of the finite gauge symmetries. Hence, our equivalence is only formal, since it relates a consistent theory to an inconsistent one. Nonetheless, we believe that the fact that the equivalence formally works suggests that a consistent modification of the cubic theory exists. We construct a theory that can be considered as a first step towards a consistent RNS cubic theory.

  19. Free Fall and the Equivalence Principle Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Free fall is commonly discussed as an example of the equivalence principle, in the context of a homogeneous gravitational field, which is a reasonable approximation for small test masses falling moderate distances. Newton's law of gravity provides a generalisation to larger distances, and also brings in an inhomogeneity in the gravitational field.…

  20. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Dezhong [School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu City, 610054, Sichuan Province (China); He Bin [The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  1. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dezhong; He, Bin

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  2. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De wael, Annelies, E-mail: annelies.dewael@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); De Backer, Annick [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Van Aert, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. - Highlights: • A hybrid method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images is introduced. • Image simulations are incorporated into a statistical framework in a reliable manner. • Limits of the existing methods for atom-counting are far exceeded. • Reliable counting results from an experimental low dose image are obtained. • Progress towards reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials is made.

  3. Maximum noise abatement trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldin, S.; Speyer, J.

    1972-01-01

    Minimum noise annoyance trajectories for developing STOL operation procedures are obtained by modulating five control variables in two dimensions. The performance index is formulated such that it explicitly assigns the same relative importance to thrust as it does to distances between discrete listeners and the aircraft. However, using a steepest descent optimization program, results indicate that it is preferable to keep the thrusters at their maximum value to minimize the integrated annoyance rather than to reduce thrust which would lower the instantaneous annoyance. Thrust decreases below its bound only when the instantaneous noise at a listener is limited.

  4. Noise Source Location Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed O’Keefe

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method to determine locations of noise sources that minimize modal coupling in complex acoustic volumes. Using the acoustic source scattering capabilities of the boundary element method, predictions are made of mode shape and pressure levels due to various source locations. Combining knowledge of the pressure field with a multivariable function minimization technique, the source location generating minimum pressure levels can be determined. The analysis also allows for an objective comparison of “best/worst” locations. The technique was implemented on a personal computer for the U.S. Space Station, predicting 5–10 dB noise reduction using optimum source locations.

  5. Equivalencies, Identities, Symmetric Differences, and Congruencies in Orthomodular Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megill, Norman D.; Pavičić, Mladen

    2003-12-01

    It is shown that operations of equivalence cannot serve for building algebras which would induce orthomodular lattices as the operations of implication can. Several properties of equivalence operations have been investigated. Distributivity of equivalence terms and several other 3 variable expressions involving equivalence terms have been proved to hold in any orthomodular lattice. Symmetric differences have been shown to reduce to complements of equivalence terms. Some congruence relations related to equivalence operations and symmetric differences have been considered.

  6. Neuro System Structure for Vehicle Recognition and Count in Floating Bridge Specific Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Beroš

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research of the sophisticated vehiclerecognition and count system based on the application of theneural network. The basic elements of neural network andadaptive logic network for object recognition are discussed. Theadaptive logic network solution ability based on simple digitalcircuits as crucial in real-time applications is pointed out. Thesimulation based on the use of reduced high level noise pictureand a tree 2. 7. software have shown excellent results. The consideredand simulated adaptive neural network based systemwith its good recognition and convergence is a useful real-timesolution for vehicle recognition and count in the floating bridgesevere conditions.

  7. Personal noise exposure assessment from small firearms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardous, Chucri A.; Murphy, William J.; Willson, Robert D.

    2003-04-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conducted noise exposure evaluations of law-enforcement personnel during firearms training at indoor and outdoor firing ranges. A representative cross section of weapons used by officers was measured. Shooters participated in live-fire exercise at an indoor firing range using three different weapons: a Beretta .400 caliber pistol, a Remington 12-gauge shotgun, and an M4 .223-caliber assault rifle. Indoor and outdoor measurements were obtained for the Smith and Wesson .357 pistol and Colt .450 and 9-mm pistols, the Glock .400 pistol, and the Heckler and Koch and Colt AR15 .223 rifles. Impulses were measured using a Bruel and Kjaer 4136 1/4-in. microphone and TASCAM digital audio tape recorder. Relevant impulse noise metrics were calculated. Peak levels ranged from 155 to 168 dB SPL. A-weighted equivalent levels ranged from 124 to 128 dBA. The contributions of the secondary weapon firings were approximately 1 to 9 dBA. Other parameters such as A/B durations, number and mixture of impulses, spectral content, energy, kurtosis, temporal spacing, and hearing protectors' effectiveness were examined. Comparisons of applicable damage risk criteria are presented. Further studies are needed to establish an occupational impulse noise damage risk criterion.

  8. Comparison of fluorescence microscopy and solid-phase cytometry methods for counting bacteria in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T.; Hamilton, Martin A.; Willse, Alan R.; McFeters, Gordon A.

    2004-01-01

    Total direct counts of bacterial abundance are central in assessing the biomass and bacteriological quality of water in ecological and industrial applications. Several factors have been identified that contribute to the variability in bacterial abundance counts when using fluorescent microscopy, the most significant of which is retaining an adequate number of cells per filter to ensure an acceptable level of statistical confidence in the resulting data. Previous studies that have assessed the components of total-direct-count methods that contribute to this variance have attempted to maintain a bacterial cell abundance value per filter of approximately 106 cells filter-1. In this study we have established the lower limit for the number of bacterial cells per filter at which the statistical reliability of the abundance estimate is no longer acceptable. Our results indicate that when the numbers of bacterial cells per filter were progressively reduced below 105, the microscopic methods increasingly overestimated the true bacterial abundance (range, 15.0 to 99.3%). The solid-phase cytometer only slightly overestimated the true bacterial abundances and was more consistent over the same range of bacterial abundances per filter (range, 8.9 to 12.5%). The solid-phase cytometer method for conducting total direct counts of bacteria was less biased and performed significantly better than any of the microscope methods. It was also found that microscopic count data from counting 5 fields on three separate filters were statistically equivalent to data from counting 20 fields on a single filter.

  9. Maximizing noise energy for noise-masking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules Étienne, Cédric; Arleo, Angelo; Allard, Rémy

    2017-08-01

    Noise-masking experiments are widely used to investigate visual functions. To be useful, noise generally needs to be strong enough to noticeably impair performance, but under some conditions, noise does not impair performance even when its contrast approaches the maximal displayable limit of 100 %. To extend the usefulness of noise-masking paradigms over a wider range of conditions, the present study developed a noise with great masking strength. There are two typical ways of increasing masking strength without exceeding the limited contrast range: use binary noise instead of Gaussian noise or filter out frequencies that are not relevant to the task (i.e., which can be removed without affecting performance). The present study combined these two approaches to further increase masking strength. We show that binarizing the noise after the filtering process substantially increases the energy at frequencies within the pass-band of the filter given equated total contrast ranges. A validation experiment showed that similar performances were obtained using binarized-filtered noise and filtered noise (given equated noise energy at the frequencies within the pass-band) suggesting that the binarization operation, which substantially reduced the contrast range, had no significant impact on performance. We conclude that binarized-filtered noise (and more generally, truncated-filtered noise) can substantially increase the energy of the noise at frequencies within the pass-band. Thus, given a limited contrast range, binarized-filtered noise can display higher energy levels than Gaussian noise and thereby widen the range of conditions over which noise-masking paradigms can be useful.

  10. Aeroacoustics: Jet noise, combustion and core engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, I. R.

    1976-01-01

    The papers in this volume deal essentially with the question whether the amplification of noise is due to the jet noise phenomenon or perhaps an interaction of airframe and core engine noise. In the area of jet noise suppression, various promising suppressor concepts are examined. The swirling flow jet noise suppressor is shown to provide significant noise reduction with minimal thrust losses. Progress in the aircraft engine core noise problem is reflected by seven research-type papers. Two possible mechanisms are seen to be responsible for core noise. One is the direct noise radiated from the turbulent combustion in the primary combuster and transmitted through the turbine, passing out the nozzle into the far field. The other mechanism is the noise that is emitted from hot spots being convected through the turbine. Which of these mechanisms (or perhaps both mechanisms) is responsible for core noise, and what are the coupling mechanisms of core engine noise and jet noise are the questions confronting researchers.

  11. Neuroanatomical substrate of noise sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliuchko, Marina; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja

    2018-01-01

    Recent functional studies suggest that noise sensitivity, a trait describing attitudes towards noise and predicting noise annoyance, is associated with altered processing in the central auditory system. In the present work, we examined whether noise sensitivity could be related to the structural...... and hippocampus was measured as well. According to our findings, noise sensitivity is associated with the grey matter volume in the selected structures. Among those, we propose and discuss particular areas, previously linked to auditory perceptual, emotional and interoceptive processing, in which larger grey...... matter volume seems to be related to higher noise sensitivity....

  12. Noise Abatement Tradeoff Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    The intent of this study is to obtain information on small high-speed engines so that their effect on the urban environment may be assessed, and if necessary, programs devised to reduce the noise and other emissions from vehicles using these "highly ...

  13. Spin Hall noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamra, A.; Witek, F.P.; Meyer, S.; Huebl, H.; Geprägs, S.; Gross, R.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Goennenwein, S.T.B.

    2014-01-01

    We measure the low-frequency thermal fluctuations of pure spin current in a platinum film deposited on yttrium iron garnet via the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE)-mediated voltage noise as a function of the angle ? between the magnetization and the transport direction. The results are consistent

  14. When noise becomes voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veerasawmy, Rune; McCarthy, John

    2014-01-01

    space in competition with their rivals. The more noise and movement they make, the more screen real estate they gain. BannerBattle therefore enabled us to explore the emergence of imitative and at times inventive behavior in enriched crowd experience, by augmenting and supporting spectator performance...

  15. Wind turbine noise diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richarz, W.; Richarz, H.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation proposed a self-consistent model for broad-band noise emitted from modern wind turbines. The simple source model was consistent with the physics of sound generation and considered the unique features of wind turbines. Although the acoustics of wind turbines are similar to those of conventional propellers, the dimensions of wind turbines pose unique challenges in diagnosing noise emission. The general features of the sound field were deduced. Source motion and source directivity appear to be responsible for amplitude variations. The amplitude modulation is likely to make wind-turbine noise more audible, and may be partly responsible for annoyance that has been reported in the literature. Acoustic array data suggests that broad-band noise is emitted predominantly during the downward sweep of each rotor blade. Source motion and source directivity account for the observed pattern. Rotor-tower interaction effects are of lesser importance. Predicted amplitude modulation ranges from 1 dB to 6dB. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Design And Calibration Of A Two-Channel Low Noise Heterodyne Receiver At 10.6 Microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. A.; Richards, R. K.; Hutchinson, D. P.

    1988-11-01

    A dual channel, low noise heterodyne receiver has been constructed for Thomson scattering from alpha particles in a burning plasma experiment. A real time calibration method has been devised which references the integrated system noise to a blackbody source. Two wideband (>1GHz) HgCdTe photovoltaic mixers yield a double sideband system noise equivalent power of less than 1.5 x 10-20 W/Hz.

  17. Pollen counts in the television media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberson, J E; Murray, L W; Frenz, D A

    1997-01-01

    Allergists routinely supply pollen counts to television stations to assist allergy sufferers and to publicize their medical practices. This investigation examined how widely pollen counts are used in television news programming. The authors telephoned the news director or a meteorologist at 121 broadcast television stations in the nation's 30 largest Designated Market Areas (DMAs). They were asked if pollen counts were included or would be included in news programming during the 1995 pollen season. At least one television station in 28 DMAs included pollen counts in news programming. All five stations in the Washington, DC, DMA aired pollen counts; however, no stations in the Pittsburgh or Milwaukee DMAs carried pollen information. Approximately 49 million television households have access to pollen counts through a broadcast television station. Because these data appear important to television stations and to the public, the authors outline four measures to assure the reliability and meaningfulness of pollen information.

  18. Combined Active Noise Control and noise reduction in Hearing Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Serizel, Romain; Moonen, Marc; Wouters, Jan; Jensen, Søren,

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a combined active noise control and noise reduction scheme for hearing aids to tackle secondary path effects and effects of signal leakage through the fitting. While such leakage contributions and the secondary accoustic path from the reciever to the tympanic membrane are usually not taken into account in standard noise reduction systems, they appear to have a non-negligible impact on the final signal quality. Integrating an active noise control sys...

  19. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand landing-gear noise sources, we have been examining a simplified configuration that still maintains some of the salient features of landing-gear flow fields. In particular, tandem cylinders have been studied because they model a variety of component level interactions. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders spatially separated in the streamwise direction by 3.7 diameters. Experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have provided steady surface pressures, detailed off-surface measurements of the flow field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), hot-wire measurements in the wake of the rear cylinder, unsteady surface pressure data, and the radiated noise. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 166 105 based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent shedding process and simulate the effects of a high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The current calculations further explore the influence of the grid resolution and spanwise extent on the flow and associated radiated noise. Extensive comparisons with the experimental data are used to assess the ability of the computations to simulate the details of the flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuations on the upstream cylinder, caused by vortex shedding, are smaller than those generated on the downstream cylinder by wake interaction. Consequently, the downstream cylinder dominates the noise radiation, producing an overall directivity pattern that is similar to that of an isolated cylinder. Only calculations based on the full length of the model span were able to

  20. Limitations of direct electron counting in soft X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, J. A.; Harris, T. J.; Mathieson, E.

    1994-07-01

    Recent developments in electron counting detectors have shown that these types of detectors offer the potential to provide significant improvement in the energy resolution for soft X-rays. To evaluate the performance of any electron counting detector, however, requires an accurate knowledge of parameters such as electron mobility, characteristic electron energy, mean electron lifetime against capture to gas impurities, signal-to-noise ratio and resolving time of the associated electronics. In our previous paper [T.J. Harris, E. Mathieson, J.A. Mir and G.C. Smith, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 299 (1990) 195] we reported experimental values of these parameters using A-CH 4 (10%), A-CH 4 (50%) and A-CO 2 (20%) at atmospheric pressure. Although examples of the "best" electron counting spectra at 1.49 and 5.89 keV were included in that paper, no attempt was made to show the various trade-offs which were needed for optimization. The purpose of this paper is to show the performance of the present direct electron counting system under different signal-to-noise ratios and drift fields. The useful X-ray energy and drift field range of the present electron counting system have been established. Through an understanding of loss processes, modifications have been suggested to improve its performance in any future investigations. Electron counting at atmospheric pressure can also prove to be a powerful tool to provide accurate measurements of basic ionization parameters such as the Fano factor and the average energy required to create an ion-pair ( W) in counter gases for X-rays (0.2-10.0 keV) through a knowledge of electron counting efficiencies only.

  1. Leveraging multiple datasets for deep leaf counting

    OpenAIRE

    Dobrescu, Andrei; Giuffrida, Mario Valerio; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A

    2017-01-01

    The number of leaves a plant has is one of the key traits (phenotypes) describing its development and growth. Here, we propose an automated, deep learning based approach for counting leaves in model rosette plants. While state-of-the-art results on leaf counting with deep learning methods have recently been reported, they obtain the count as a result of leaf segmentation and thus require per-leaf (instance) segmentation to train the models (a rather strong annotation). Instead, our method tre...

  2. Ultra-low noise miniaturized neural amplifier with hardware averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweiri, Yazan M; Eggers, Thomas; McCallum, Grant; Durand, Dominique M

    2015-08-01

    Peripheral nerves carry neural signals that could be used to control hybrid bionic systems. Cuff electrodes provide a robust and stable interface but the recorded signal amplitude is small (noise of less than 1 μVrms for a useful signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) contacts alone generate thermal noise of at least 0.5 μVrms therefore the amplifier should add as little noise as possible. Since mainstream neural amplifiers have a baseline noise of 2 μVrms or higher, novel designs are required. Here we apply the concept of hardware averaging to nerve recordings obtained with cuff electrodes. An optimization procedure is developed to minimize noise and power simultaneously. The novel design was based on existing neural amplifiers (Intan Technologies, LLC) and is validated with signals obtained from the FINE in chronic dog experiments. We showed that hardware averaging leads to a reduction in the total recording noise by a factor of 1/√N or less depending on the source resistance. Chronic recording of physiological activity with FINE using the presented design showed significant improvement on the recorded baseline noise with at least two parallel operation transconductance amplifiers leading to a 46.1% reduction at N = 8. The functionality of these recordings was quantified by the SNR improvement and shown to be significant for N = 3 or more. The present design was shown to be capable of generating noise when connected to a FINE placed on the sciatic nerve of an awake animal. An algorithm was introduced to find the value of N that can minimize both the power consumption and the noise in order to design a miniaturized ultralow-noise neural amplifier. These results demonstrate the efficacy of hardware averaging on noise improvement for neural recording with cuff electrodes, and can accommodate the presence of high source impedances that are associated with the miniaturized contacts and the high channel count in electrode arrays. This

  3. Ultra-low noise miniaturized neural amplifier with hardware averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweiri, Yazan M.; Eggers, Thomas; McCallum, Grant; Durand, Dominique M.

    2015-08-01

    the high channel count in electrode arrays. This technique can be adopted for other applications where miniaturized and implantable multichannel acquisition systems with ultra-low noise and low power are required.

  4. Development of Airport Noise Mapping using Matlab Software (Case Study: Adi Soemarmo Airport - Boyolali, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andarani, Pertiwi; Setiyo Huboyo, Haryono; Setyanti, Diny; Budiawan, Wiwik

    2018-02-01

    Noise is considered as one of the main environmental impact of Adi Soemarmo International Airport (ASIA), the second largest airport in Central Java Province, Indonesia. In order to manage the noise of airport, airport noise mapping is necessary. However, a model that requires simple input but still reliable was not available in ASIA. Therefore, the objective of this study are to develop model using Matlab software, to verify its reliability by measuring actual noise exposure, and to analyze the area of noise levels‥ The model was developed based on interpolation or extrapolation of identified Noise-Power-Distance (NPD) data. In accordance with Indonesian Government Ordinance No.40/2012, the noise metric used is WECPNL (Weighted Equivalent Continuous Perceived Noise Level). Based on this model simulation, there are residence area in the region of noise level II (1.912 km2) and III (1.16 km2) and 18 school buildings in the area of noise levels I, II, and III. These land-uses are actually prohibited unless noise insulation is equipped. The model using Matlab in the case of Adi Soemarmo International Airport is valid based on comparison of the field measurement (6 sampling points). However, it is important to validate the model again once the case study (the airport) is changed.

  5. Circuit models and experimental noise measurements of micropipette amplifiers for extracellular neural recordings from live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang Hao; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Vai, Mang I; Klug, Achim; Lei, Tim C

    2014-01-01

    Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  6. Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  7. The Traffic Noise Index: A Method of Controlling Noise Nuisance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, F. J.; Scholes, W. E.

    This building research survey is an analysis of the social nuisance caused by urban motor ways and their noise. The Traffic Noise Index is used to indicate traffic noises and their effects on architectural designs and planning, while suggesting the need for more and better window insulation and acoustical barriers. Overall concern is for--(1)…

  8. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard; Poulsen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two test subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises we...

  9. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, F.R.; Poulsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  10. Rating environmental noise on the basis of noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Borst, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    A system that rates noise on the basis of noise maps has been developed which is based on empirical exposure-response relationships, so that effects in the community will be lower if the system gives a better rating. It is consistent with noise metrics and effect endpoint chosen in the EU, i.e., it

  11. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people

  12. Noise sensitivity and reactions to noise and other environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Vos, H.

    2003-01-01

    This article integrates findings from the literature and new results regarding noise sensitivity. The new results are based on analyses of 28 combined datasets (N=23 038), and separate analyses of a large aircraft noise study (N=10939). Three topics regarding noise sensitivity are discussed, namely,

  13. Planck 2015 results: XXIV. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    . These various calibrations imply constraints on the present-day amplitude of matter fluctuations in varying degrees of tension with those from the Planck analysis of primary fluctuations in the CMB; for the lowest estimated values of (1-b) the tension is mild, only a little over one standard deviation, while......We present cluster counts and corresponding cosmological constraints from the Planck full mission data set. Our catalogue consists of 439 clusters detected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal down to a signal-to-noise ratio of 6, and is more than a factor of 2 larger than the 2013 Planck...... cluster cosmology sample. The counts are consistent with those from 2013 and yield compatible constraints under the same modelling assumptions. Taking advantage of the larger catalogue, we extend our analysis to the two-dimensional distribution in redshift and signal-to-noise. We use mass estimates from...

  14. Testing the Equivalence of Regular Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Almeida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The minimal deterministic finite automaton is generally used to determine regular languages equality. Antimirov and Mosses proposed a rewrite system for deciding regular expressions equivalence of which Almeida et al. presented an improved variant. Hopcroft and Karp proposed an almost linear algorithm for testing the equivalence of two deterministic finite automata that avoids minimisation. In this paper we improve the best-case running time, present an extension of this algorithm to non-deterministic finite automata, and establish a relationship between this algorithm and the one proposed in Almeida et al. We also present some experimental comparative results. All these algorithms are closely related with the recent coalgebraic approach to automata proposed by Rutten.

  15. Thevenin Equivalent Method for Dynamic Contingency Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jakob Glarbo; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A method that exploits Thevenin equivalent representation for obtaining post-contingency steady-state nodal voltages is integrated with a method of detecting post-contingency aperiodic small-signal instability. The task of integrating stability assessment with contingency assessment is challenged...... by the cases of unstable post-contingency conditions. For unstable postcontingency conditions there exists no credible steady-state which can be used for basis of a stability assessment. This paper demonstrates how Thevenin Equivalent methods can be applied in algebraic representation of such bifurcation...... points which may be used in assessment of post-contingency aperiodic small-signal stability. The assessment method is introduced with a numeric example....

  16. On equivalent resistance of electrical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    While the standard (introductory physics) way of computing the equivalent resistance of nontrivial electrical circuits is based on Kirchhoff's rules, there is a mathematically and conceptually simpler approach, called the method of nodal potentials, whose basic variables are the values of the electric potential at the circuit's nodes. In this paper, we review the method of nodal potentials and illustrate it using the Wheatstone bridge as an example. We then derive a closed-form expression for the equivalent resistance of a generic circuit, which we apply to a few sample circuits. The result unveils a curious interplay between electrical circuits, matrix algebra, and graph theory and its applications to computer science. The paper is written at a level accessible by undergraduate students who are familiar with matrix arithmetic. Additional proofs and technical details are provided in appendices.

  17. Exposure to impulse noise at an explosives company: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Aleksandra; Malinowska-Borowska, Jolanta

    2018-02-15

    Impulse noise encountered in workplaces is a threat to hearing. The aim of this study was to assess the occupational exposure to impulse noise produced by detonation of dynamite on the premises of an explosives company. Test points were located on the blast test area (inside and outside the bunker) and in work buildings across the site. Noise propagation measurement was performed during 130 blast tests at nine measurement points. At every point, at least 10 separate measurements of A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (L A eq ), maximum A-weighted sound pressure level (L A max ) and C-weighted peak sound pressure level (L C peak ) were made. Noise recorded in the blast test area exceeded occupational exposure limits (OELs). Noise levels measured in buildings did not exceed OELs. Results of the survey showed that for 62% of respondents, impulse noise causes difficulties in performing work. The most commonly reported symptoms include headaches, nervousness and irritability.

  18. Numerical method for solving stochastic differential equations with Poissonian white shot noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changho; Lee, Eok Kyun; Hänggi, Peter; Talkner, Peter

    2007-07-01

    We propose a numerical integration scheme to solve stochastic differential equations driven by Poissonian white shot noise. Our formula, which is based on an integral equation, which is equivalent to the stochastic differential equation, utilizes a discrete time approximation with fixed integration time step. We show that our integration formula approaches the Euler formula if the Poissonian noise approaches the Gaussian white noise. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are examined by studying the dynamics of an overdamped particle driven by Poissonian white shot noise in a spatially periodic potential. We find that the accuracy of the proposed algorithm only weakly depends on the parameters characterizing the Poissonian white shot noise; this holds true even if the limit of Gaussian white noise is approached.

  19. Derived equivalences induced by good silting complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Breaz, Simion; Modoi, George Ciprian

    2017-01-01

    Consider a (possibly big) silting object $U$ in a derived category over a (dg-)algebra $A$. Under some fairly general appropriate hypotheses, we show that it induces derived equivalences between the derived category over $A$ and a localization of the derived category of dg-endomorphism algebra $B$ of $U$. If, in addition, $U$ is small then this localization is the whole derived category over $B$.

  20. Visual Equivalence and Amodal Completion in Cuttlefish

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, I-Rong; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Modern cephalopods are notably the most intelligent invertebrates and this is accompanied by keen vision. Despite extensive studies investigating the visual systems of cephalopods, little is known about their visual perception and object recognition. In the present study, we investigated the visual processing of the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis, including visual equivalence and amodal completion. Cuttlefish were trained to discriminate images of shrimp and fish using the operant conditioning pa...